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Sample records for 2-d detector array

  1. Antenna coupled detectors for 2D staring focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritz, Michael A.; Kolasa, Borys; Lail, Brian; Burkholder, Robert; Chen, Leonard

    2013-06-01

    Millimeter-wave (mmW)/sub-mmW/THz region of the electro-magnetic spectrum enables imaging thru clothing and other obscurants such as fog, clouds, smoke, sand, and dust. Therefore considerable interest exists in developing low cost millimeter-wave imaging (MMWI) systems. Previous MMWI systems have evolved from crude mechanically scanned, single element receiver systems into very complex multiple receiver camera systems. Initial systems required many expensive mmW integrated-circuit low-noise amplifiers. In order to reduce the cost and complexity of the existing systems, attempts have been made to develop new mmW imaging sensors employing direct detection arrays. In this paper, we report on Raytheon's recent development of a unique focal plane array technology, which operates broadly from the mmW through the sub-mmW/THz region. Raytheon's innovative nano-antenna based detector enables low cost production of 2D staring mmW focal plane arrays (mmW FPA), which not only have equivalent sensitivity and performance to existing MMWI systems, but require no mechanical scanning.

  2. Performance assessment of a 2D array of plastic scintillation detectors for IMRT quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2013-07-01

    The purposes of this work are to assess the performance of a 2D plastic scintillation detectors array prototype for quality assurance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to determine its sensitivity and specificity to positioning errors of one multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf and one MLC leaf bank by applying the principles of signal detection theory. Ten treatment plans (step-and-shoot delivery) and one volumetric modulated arc therapy plan were measured and compared to calculations from two treatment-planning systems (TPSs) and to radiochromic films. The averages gamma passing rates per beam found for the step-and-shoot plans were 95.8% for the criteria (3%, 2 mm), 97.8% for the criteria (4%, 2 mm), and 98.1% for the criteria (3%, 3 mm) when measurements were compared to TPS calculations. The receiver operating characteristic curves for the one leaf errors and one leaf bank errors were determined from simulations (theoretical upper limits) and measurements. This work concludes that arrays of plastic scintillation detectors could be used for IMRT quality assurance in clinics. The use of signal detection theory could improve the quality of dosimetric verifications in radiation therapy by providing optimal discrimination criteria for the detection of different classes of errors.

  3. A 2-D Array of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) Far-IR Thermal Detectors for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakew, Brook

    2009-01-01

    A 2-D array of superconducting Magnesium Diboride(MgB2) far IR thermal detectors has been fabricated. Such an array is intended to be at the focal plane of future generation thermal imaging far-IR instruments that will investigate the outer planets and their icy moons. Fabrication and processing of the pixels of the array as well as noise characterization of architectured MgB2 thin films will be presented. Challenges and solutions for improving the performance of the array will be discussed.

  4. Performance characteristics of the new detector array for the SANS2d instrument on the ISIS spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, D.; Heenan, R.; McPhail, D.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N.; Rogers, S.; Schooneveld, E.; Spill, E.; Terry, A.

    2014-12-01

    The performance of the new position sensitive neutron detector arrays of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) instrument SANS2d is described. The SANS2d instrument is one of the seven instruments currently available for users on the second target station (TS2) of the ISIS spallation neutron source. Since the instrument became operational in 2009 it has used two one metre square multi-wire proportional detectors (MWPC). However, these detectors suffer from a low count rate capability, are easily damaged by excess beam and are then expensive to repair. The new detector arrays each consist of 120 individual position sensitive detector tubes, filled with 15 bar of 3He. Each of the tubes is one metre long and has a diameter of 8mm giving a detector array with an overall area of one square metre. Two such arrays have been built and installed in the SANS2d vacuum tank where they are currently taking user data. For SANS measurements operation of the detector within a vacuum is essential in order to reduce air scattering. A novel, fully engineered approach has been utilised to ensure that the high voltage connections and preamps are located inside the SANS2d vacuum tank at atmospheric pressure, within air tubes and air boxes respectively. The signal processing electronics and data acquisition system are located remotely in a counting house outside of the blockhouse. This allows easy access for maintenance purposes, without the need to remove the detectors from the vacuum tank. The design will be described in detail. A position resolution of 8mm FWHM or less has been measured along the length of the tubes. The initial measurements taken from a standard sample indicate that whilst the detector arrays themselves only represent a moderate improvement in overall detection efficiency (~ 20%), compared to the previous detector, the count rate capability is increased by a factor of 100. A significant advantage of the new array is the ability to change a single tube in situ

  5. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500

    SciTech Connect

    Stelljes, T. S. Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Poppe, B.; Harmeyer, A.; Reuter, J.; Harder, D.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. Methods: The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm{sup 2} measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array’s readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor k{sub NR} for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array’s central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. Results: The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1

  6. WE-AB-BRB-04: A Novel Monolithic Silicon 2D Detector Array for Use in Stereotactic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gargett, M; Petasecca, M; Alnaghy, S; Rosenfeld, A; Oborn, B; Metcalfe, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the capability of a novel 2D monolithic silicon detector array in measuring stereotactic photon fields. Methods: The silicon array detector used in this work, named Magic Plate-512 (MP512), is a thin monolithic silicon wafer (52 × 52 × 0.47 mm{sup 3}) with 512 ion-implanted diodes (0.5 × 0.5 mm{sup 2}). Adjacent pixels are spaced evenly with 2 mm pitch, covering a maximum detection area 46 mm wide. Its fast, FPGA based read-out system is synchronised with the linac to allow readout of all pixels pulse-by-pulse. A clinical SABR lung plan (consisting of 9 single segment beams, 6MV) was measured with the array at 1.5 cm depth in a solid water phantom (100 cm SSD). The typical field size was in the range of 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} to 4 × 4 cm{sup 2}. Each beam was delivered at perpendicular incidence to the detector plane so as to avoid the need for angular dependence corrections. The fields were measured under the same conditions using Gafchromic EBT3 film for comparison. The film was scanned at 72 dpi resolution, with the red channel data used for analysis. Results: Average gamma passing rates of (92.3 ± 1.8) % for 2%/2mm criteria, and (86.6 ± 2.3) % for 1%/2mm criteria were achieved for MP512, using EBT3 film as the reference distribution. The detector array was able to accurately measure the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM), to within (0.77 ± 0.01) mm accuracy when compared to film. The penumbral widths (80%-20%) were measured to within (0.30 ± 0.01) mm accuracy to film. Conclusion: The MP512 is a feasible option for measurement of stereotactic photon fields, with its high density of detection points making it useful for small field applications. The prototype array has demonstrated merit; in the future the development of a larger array detection area would be beneficial for clinical applications.

  7. Update on the Fabrication and Performance of 2-D Arrays of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) Thermal Detectors for Outer-Planets Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakew, Brook; Aslam, S.

    2011-01-01

    Detectors with better performance than the current thermopile detectors that operate at room temperature will be needed at the focal plane of far-infrared instruments on future planetary exploration missions. We will present an update on recent results from the 2-D array of MgB2 thermal detectors being currently developed at NASA Goddard. Noise and sensitivity results will be presented and compared to thermal detectors currently in use on planetary missions.

  8. Comparison of dose accuracy between 2D array detectors and Epid for IMRT of nasopharynx cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altiparmak, Duygu; Coban, Yasin; Merih, Adil; Avci, Gulhan Guler; Yigitoglu, Ibrahim

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to perform the dosimetric controls of nasopharynx cancer patient's intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans that generated by treatment planing system (TPS) with using two different equipments and also to make comparison in terms of their reliability and practicability. This study has been performed at Radiation Oncology Department, Medicine Faculty in Gaziosmanpasa University by using the VARIAN CLINAC DHX linear accelerator which is operated in the range of 6 MV. Selected 10 nasopharynx patients planned in TPS (Eclipce V13.0) and approved for treatment by medical physicists and radiation oncologists. These plans recalculated on EPID and mapcheck which are 2D dosimetric equipments to obtain dose maps. To compare these two dosimetric equipments gamma analysis method has been preferred. Achieved data is presented and discussed.

  9. MagicPlate-512: A 2D silicon detector array for quality assurance of stereotactic motion adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Petasecca, M. Newall, M. K.; Aldosari, A. H.; Fuduli, I.; Espinoza, A. A.; Porumb, C. S.; Guatelli, S.; Metcalfe, P.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Booth, J. T.; Colvill, E.; Duncan, M.; Cammarano, D.; Carolan, M.; Oborn, B.; Perevertaylo, V.; Keall, P. J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Spatial and temporal resolutions are two of the most important features for quality assurance instrumentation of motion adaptive radiotherapy modalities. The goal of this work is to characterize the performance of the 2D high spatial resolution monolithic silicon diode array named “MagicPlate-512” for quality assurance of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) combined with a dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking technique for motion compensation. Methods: MagicPlate-512 is used in combination with the movable platform HexaMotion and a research version of radiofrequency tracking system Calypso driving MLC tracking software. The authors reconstruct 2D dose distributions of small field square beams in three modalities: in static conditions, mimicking the temporal movement pattern of a lung tumor and tracking the moving target while the MLC compensates almost instantaneously for the tumor displacement. Use of Calypso in combination with MagicPlate-512 requires a proper radiofrequency interference shielding. Impact of the shielding on dosimetry has been simulated by GEANT4 and verified experimentally. Temporal and spatial resolutions of the dosimetry system allow also for accurate verification of segments of complex stereotactic radiotherapy plans with identification of the instant and location where a certain dose is delivered. This feature allows for retrospective temporal reconstruction of the delivery process and easy identification of error in the tracking or the multileaf collimator driving systems. A sliding MLC wedge combined with the lung motion pattern has been measured. The ability of the MagicPlate-512 (MP512) in 2D dose mapping in all three modes of operation was benchmarked by EBT3 film. Results: Full width at half maximum and penumbra of the moving and stationary dose profiles measured by EBT3 film and MagicPlate-512 confirm that motion has a significant impact on the dose distribution. Motion

  10. State of the art of AIM LWIR and VLWIR MCT 2D focal plane detector arrays for higher operating temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figgemeier, H.; Hanna, S.; Eich, D.; Mahlein, K.-M.; Fick, W.; Schirmacher, W.; Thöt, R.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper AIM presents its latest results on both n-on-p and p-on-n low dark current planar MCT photodiode technology LWIR and VLWIR two-dimensional focal plane detector arrays with a cut-off wavelength >11μm at 80K and a 640x512 pixel format at a 20μm pitch. Thermal dark currents significantly reduced as compared to `Tennant's Rule 07' at a yet good detection efficiency >60% as well as results from NETD and photo response performance characterization are presented. The demonstrated detector performance paces the way for a new generation of higher operating temperature LWIR MCT FPAs with a <30mK NETD up to a 110K detector operating temperature and with good operability.

  11. SU-E-T-644: Evaluation of Angular Dependence Correction for 2D Array Detector Using for Quality Assurance of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Karthikeyan, N; Ganesh, K M; Vikraman, S; Shariff, MH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector in quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT). Methods: Total ten patients comprising of different sites were planned for VMAT and taken for the study. Each plan was exposed on Matrix Evolution 2D array detector with Omnipro IMRT software based on the following three different methods using 6MV photon beams from Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. First method, VMAT plan was delivered on Matrix Evolution detector as it gantry mounted with dedicated holder with build-up of 2.3cm. Second, the VMAT plan was delivered with the static gantry angle on to the table mounted setup. Third, the VMAT plan was delivered with actual gantry angle on Matrix Evolution detector fixed in Multicube phantom with gantry angle sensor and angular dependence correction were applied to quantify the plan quality. For all these methods, the corresponding QA plans were generated in TPS and the dose verification was done for both point and 2D fluence analysis with pass criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement. Results: The measured point dose variation for the first method was observed as 1.58±0.6% of mean and SD with TPS calculated. For second and third method, the mean and standard deviation(SD) was observed as 1.67±0.7% and 1.85±0.8% respectively. The 2D fluence analysis of measured and TPS calculated has the mean and SD of 97.9±1.1%, 97.88±1.2% and 97.55±1.3% for first, second and third methods respectively. The calculated two-tailed Pvalue for point dose and 2D fluence analysis shows the insignificance with values of 0.9316 and 0.9015 respectively, among the different methods of QA. Conclusion: The qualitative evaluation of angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector shows its competency in accuracy of quality assurance measurement of composite dose distribution of volumetric modulated arc therapy.

  12. MCT-Based LWIR and VLWIR 2D Focal Plane Detector Arrays for Low Dark Current Applications at AIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S.; Eich, D.; Mahlein, K.-M.; Fick, W.; Schirmacher, W.; Thöt, R.; Wendler, J.; Figgemeier, H.

    2016-09-01

    We present our latest results on n-on- p as well as on p-on- n low dark current planar mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) photodiode technology long wavelength infrared (LWIR) and very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) two-dimensional focal plane arrays (FPAs) with quantum efficiency (QE) cut-off wavelength >11 μm at 80 K and a 512 × 640 pixel format FPA at 20 μm pitch stitched from two 512 × 320 pixel photodiode arrays. Significantly reduced dark currents as compared with Tennant's "Rule 07" are demonstrated in both polarities while retaining good detection efficiency ≥60% for operating temperatures between 30 K and 100 K. This allows for the same dark current performance at 20 K higher operating temperature than with previous AIM INFRAROT-MODULE GmbH (AIM) technology. For p-on- n LWIR MCT FPAs, broadband photoresponse nonuniformity of only about 1.2% is achieved at 55 K with low defective pixel numbers. For an n-on- p VLWIR MCT FPA with 13.6 μm cut-off at 55 K, excellent photoresponse nonuniformity of about 3.1% is achieved at moderate defective pixel numbers. This advancement in detector technology paves the way for outstanding signal-to-noise ratio performance infrared detection, enabling cutting-edge next-generation LWIR/VLWIR detectors for space instruments and devices with higher operating temperature and low size, weight, and power for field applications.

  13. areaDetector: Software for 2-D Detectors in EPICS

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, M.

    2011-09-23

    areaDetector is a new EPICS module designed to support 2-D detectors. It is modular C++ code that greatly simplifies the task of writing support for a new detector. It also supports plugins, which receive detector data from the driver and process it in some way. Existing plugins perform Region-Of-Interest extraction and analysis, file saving (in netCDF, HDF, TIFF and JPEG formats), color conversion, and export to EPICS records for image display in clients like ImageJ and IDL. Drivers have now been written for many of the detectors commonly used at synchrotron beamlines, including CCDs, pixel array and amorphous silicon detectors, and online image plates.

  14. A new water-equivalent 2D plastic scintillation detectors array for the dosimetry of megavoltage energy photon beams in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, Mathieu; Beaulieu, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to present a new 2D plastic scintillation detectors array (2D-PSDA) designed for the dosimetry of megavoltage (MV) energy photon beams in radiation therapy and to characterize its basic performance. Methods: We developed a 2D detector array consisting of 781 plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) inserted into a plane of a water-equivalent phantom. The PSDs were distributed on a 26 x 26 cm{sup 2} grid, with an interdetector spacing of 10 mm, except for two perpendicular lines centered on the detection plane, where the spacing was 5 mm. Each PSD was made of a 1 mm diameter by 3 mm long cylindrical polystyrene scintillating fiber coupled to a clear nonscintillating plastic optical fiber. All of the light signals emitted by the PSDs were read simultaneously with an optical system at a rate of one measurement per second. We characterized the performance of the optical system, the angular dependency of the device, and the perturbation of dose distributions caused by the hundreds of PSDs inserted into the phantom. We also evaluated the capacity of the system to monitor complex multileaf collimator (MLC) sequences such as those encountered in step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. We compared our results with calculations performed by a treatment planning system and with measurements taken with a 2D ionization chamber array and with a radiochromic film. Results: The detector array that we developed allowed us to measure doses with an average precision of better than 1% for cumulated doses equal to or greater than 6.3 cGy. Our results showed that the dose distributions produced by the 6-MV photon beam are not perturbed (within {+-}1.1%) by the presence of the hundreds of PSDs located into the phantom. The results also showed that the variations in the beam incidences have little effect on the dose response of the device. For all incidences tested, the passing rates of the gamma tests between the 2D-PSDA and

  15. SU-E-T-639: A Study On the Response of 2D Array Detector for VMAT Delivery for a Period of Two Years

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Syam; George, Anu

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the 2D array for radiation response for a period of 2 years. Methods: 45 VMAT plans already treated and quality assured before 2 years, 1.5 years and 1 year were selected for the study. Quality assurances of the plans were done using 2D array combined with Octavius phantom. Verification plans were recalculated without changing any parameters in Eclipse 10.0 TPS using the AAA algorithm. Response of 2D array to the plans treated before 2 years, 1.5 years and 1 year where evaluated. The results were analyzed using the Gamma analysis method with the standard gamma passing criteria of 3mm distance to agreement (DTA) and 3% dose difference (DD). Results: All the plans evaluated passed the gamma analysis with a percentage greater than 95, except for three cases. Higher gamma passing criteria where observed for all the analyzed plans, when analysis done before 2 years, 1.5 years and 1 year. The standard deviation of ± 1.38, ± 1.40,± 0.97 where observed between the plans when verification plans did before 2 years, 1.5 years and 1 year respectively. Same set of plans shows a standard deviation of ± 0.70, ± 1.36, and ± 1.18, when analysis done recently. A significance difference in response of the array when analysis done recently for the verification plans treated and quality assured before 2 years.This indicates a slightly reduced response of 2D array towards radiation response as the array gets older. Conclusion: It is found that 2D array shows a reduced response against radiation detection over a period of years. An onsite calibration of the instrument is recommended before the measurements. A dose correction factor can be applied if necessary to the results if the radiation response and efficiency of the array is very poor.

  16. SU-E-T-82: A Study On Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) Dosimetry Using 2D Seven29 Ion Chamber Array Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Syam; Aparna

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric properties of Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) using PTW Seven29 ion chamber array Methods: PTW Seven29 ion chamber array and Solid Water phantoms for different depths were used for the study. The study was carried out in Varian Clinac ix with photon energies, 6MV & 15MV. Primarily the solid water phantoms with the 2D array were scanned using a CT scanner (GE Optima 580) at different depths. These scanned images were used for EDW planning in an Eclipse treatment planning system (version 10). Planning was done for different wedge angles and for different depths for 6MV & 15MV. A dose of 100 CGy was delivered in each cases. For each delivery, calculated the Monitoring Unit (MU) required. Same set-up was created before delivering the plans in Varian Clinac-ix. For each clinically relevant depth and for different wedge angles, the same MU was delivered as calculated. Different wedged dose distributions where reconstructed from the measured 2D array data using the in-house developed excel program. Results: It is observed that the shoulder like region in the profile which reduces as depth increases. For the same depth and energy, the percentage difference between planned and measured dose is lesser than 3%. For smaller wedge angles, the percentage difference is found to be greater than 3% for the largest wedge angle. Standard deviation between measured doses at shoulder region for planned and measured profiles is 0.08 and 0.02 respectively. Standard deviations between planned and measured wedge factors for different depths (2.5cm, 5cm, 10cm, and 15cm) are (0.0021, 0.0007, 0.0050, 0.0001) for 6MV and (0.0024, 0.0191, 0.0013, 0.0005) for 15MV respectively. Conclusion: The 2D Seven29 ion chamber array is a good tool for the Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) dosimetry.

  17. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  18. Solid state neutron detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, J.G.; Ruddy, F.H.; Brandt, C.D.; Dulloo, A.R.; Lott, R.G.; Sirianni, E.; Wilson, R.O.

    1999-08-17

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors. 7 figs.

  19. HEXAGONAL ARRAY STRUCTURE FOR 2D NDE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewierz, J.; Ramadas, S. N.; Gachagan, A.; O'Leary, R. L.

    2010-02-22

    This paper describes a combination of simulation and experimentation to evaluate the advantages offered by utilizing a hexagonal shaped array element in a 2D NDE array structure. The active material is a 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composite structure incorporating triangular shaped pillars--each hexagonal array element comprising six triangular pillars. A combination of PZFlex, COMSOL and Matlab has been used to simulate the behavior of this device microstructure, for operation around 2.25 MHz, with unimodal behavior and low levels of mechanical cross-coupling predicted. Furthermore, the application of hexagonal array elements enables the array aperture to increase by approximately 30%, compared to a conventional orthogonal array matrix and hence will provide enhanced volumetric coverage and SNR. Prototype array configurations demonstrate good corroboration of the theoretically predicted mechanical cross-coupling between adjacent array elements (approx23 dB).

  20. Advanced UV Detectors and Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankove, Jacques I.; Torvik, John

    1998-01-01

    Gallium Nitride (GaN) with its wide energy bandgap of 3.4 eV holds excellent promise for solar blind UV detectors. We have successfully designed, fabricated and tested GaN p-i-n detectors and detector arrays. The detectors have a peak responsivity of 0.14A/W at 363 nm (3.42 eV) at room temperature. This corresponds to an internal quantum efficiency of 56%. The responsivity decreases by several orders of magnitude to 0.008 A/W at 400 nm (3.10 eV) giving the excellent visible rejection ratio needed for solar-blind applications.

  1. Detector Arrays For Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Paper describes status of program for developing integrated infrared detectors for astronomy. Program covers variety of detectors, including extrinsic silicon, extrinsic germanium, and indium antimonide devices with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Paper notes for arrays to reach background noise limit in cryogenic telescope, continued reductions in readout noise and dark current needed.

  2. Massively Parallel MRI Detector Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Originally proposed as a method to increase sensitivity by extending the locally high-sensitivity of small surface coil elements to larger areas, the term parallel imaging now includes the use of array coils to perform image encoding. This methodology has impacted clinical imaging to the point where many examinations are performed with an array comprising multiple smaller surface coil elements as the detector of the MR signal. This article reviews the theoretical and experimental basis for the trend towards higher channel counts relying on insights gained from modeling and experimental studies as well as the theoretical analysis of the so-called “ultimate” SNR and g-factor. We also review the methods for optimally combining array data and changes in RF methodology needed to construct massively parallel MRI detector arrays and show some examples of state-of-the-art for highly accelerated imaging with the resulting highly parallel arrays. PMID:23453758

  3. Optical diffraction by ordered 2D arrays of silica microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, A. A.; Shavdina, O.; Tishchenko, A. V.; Veillas, C.; Verrier, I.; Dellea, O.; Jourlin, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The article presents experimental and theoretical studies of angular dependent diffraction properties of 2D monolayer arrays of silica microspheres. High-quality large area defect-free monolayers of 1 μm diameter silica microspheres were deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique under an accurate optical control. Measured angular dependencies of zeroth and one of the first order diffraction efficiencies produced by deposited samples were simulated by the rigorous Generalized Source Method taking into account particle size dispersion and lattice nonideality.

  4. A method to enhance 2D ion chamber array patient specific quality assurance for IMRT.

    PubMed

    Diaz Moreno, Rogelio Manuel; Venencia, Daniel; Garrigo, Edgardo; Pipman, Yakov

    2016-11-21

    Gamma index comparison has been established as a method for patient specific quality assurance in IMRT. Detector arrays can replace radiographic film systems to record 2D dose distributions and fulfill quality assurance requirements. These electronic devices present spatial resolution disadvantages with respect to films. This handicap can be partially overcome with a multiple acquisition sequence of adjacent 2D dose distributions. The detector spatial response influence can also be taken into account through the convolution of the calculated dose with the detector spatial response. A methodology that employs both approaches could allow for enhancements of the quality assurance procedure. 35 beams from different step and shoot IMRT plans were delivered on a phantom. 2D dose distributions were recorded with a PTW-729 ion chamber array for individual beams, following the multiple acquisition methodology. 2D dose distributions were also recorded on radiographic films. Measured dose distributions with films and with the PTW-729 array were processed with the software RITv5.2 for Gamma index comparison with calculated doses. Calculated dose was also convolved with the ion chamber 2D response and the Gamma index comparisons with the 2D dose distribution measured with the PTW-729 array was repeated. 3.7 ± 2.7% of points surpassed the accepted Gamma index when using radiographic films compared with calculated dose, with a minimum of 0.67 and a maximum of 13.27. With the PTW-729 multiple acquisition methodology compared with calculated dose, 4.1 ± 1.3% of points surpassed the accepted Gamma index, with a minimum of 1.44 and a maximum of 11.26. With the PTW- multiple acquisition methodology compared with convolved calculated dose, 2.7 ± 1.3% of points surpassed the accepted Gamma index, with a minimum of 0.42 and a maximum of 5.75. The results obtained in this work suggest that the comparison of merged adjacent dose distributions with convolved calculated dose

  5. Characterization of nonlinear ultrasound fields of 2D therapeutic arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yuldashev, Petr V.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Farr, Navid; Partanen, Ari; Bailey, Michael R.; Khokhlova, Vera

    2015-01-01

    A current trend in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) technologies is to use 2D focused phased arrays that enable electronic steering of the focus, beamforming to avoid overheating of obstacles (such as ribs), and better focusing through inhomogeneities of soft tissue using time reversal methods. In many HIFU applications, the acoustic intensity in situ can reach thousands of W/cm2 leading to nonlinear propagation effects. At high power outputs, shock fronts develop in the focal region and significantly alter the bioeffects induced. Clinical applications of HIFU are relatively new and challenges remain for ensuring their safety and efficacy. A key component of these challenges is the lack of standard procedures for characterizing nonlinear HIFU fields under operating conditions. Methods that combine low-amplitude pressure measurements and nonlinear modeling of the pressure field have been proposed for axially symmetric single element transducers but have not yet been validated for the much more complex 3D fields generated by therapeutic arrays. Here, the method was tested for a clinical HIFU source comprising a 256-element transducer array. A numerical algorithm based on the Westervelt equation was used to enable 3D full-diffraction nonlinear modeling. With the acoustic holography method, the magnitude and phase of the acoustic field were measured at a low power output and used to determine the pattern of vibrations at the surface of the array. This pattern was then scaled to simulate a range of intensity levels near the elements up to 10 W/cm2. The accuracy of modeling was validated by comparison with direct measurements of the focal waveforms using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Simulation results and measurements show that shock fronts with amplitudes up to 100 MPa were present in focal waveforms at clinically relevant outputs, indicating the importance of strong nonlinear effects in ultrasound fields generated by HIFU arrays. PMID:26203345

  6. Characterization of nonlinear ultrasound fields of 2D therapeutic arrays.

    PubMed

    Yuldashev, Petr V; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Farr, Navid; Partanen, Ari; Bailey, Michael R; Khokhlova, Vera

    2012-10-07

    A current trend in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) technologies is to use 2D focused phased arrays that enable electronic steering of the focus, beamforming to avoid overheating of obstacles (such as ribs), and better focusing through inhomogeneities of soft tissue using time reversal methods. In many HIFU applications, the acoustic intensity in situ can reach thousands of W/cm(2) leading to nonlinear propagation effects. At high power outputs, shock fronts develop in the focal region and significantly alter the bioeffects induced. Clinical applications of HIFU are relatively new and challenges remain for ensuring their safety and efficacy. A key component of these challenges is the lack of standard procedures for characterizing nonlinear HIFU fields under operating conditions. Methods that combine low-amplitude pressure measurements and nonlinear modeling of the pressure field have been proposed for axially symmetric single element transducers but have not yet been validated for the much more complex 3D fields generated by therapeutic arrays. Here, the method was tested for a clinical HIFU source comprising a 256-element transducer array. A numerical algorithm based on the Westervelt equation was used to enable 3D full-diffraction nonlinear modeling. With the acoustic holography method, the magnitude and phase of the acoustic field were measured at a low power output and used to determine the pattern of vibrations at the surface of the array. This pattern was then scaled to simulate a range of intensity levels near the elements up to 10 W/cm(2). The accuracy of modeling was validated by comparison with direct measurements of the focal waveforms using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Simulation results and measurements show that shock fronts with amplitudes up to 100 MPa were present in focal waveforms at clinically relevant outputs, indicating the importance of strong nonlinear effects in ultrasound fields generated by HIFU arrays.

  7. Stressed detector arrays for airborne astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Beeman, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Geis, N.; Poglitsch, A.; Rumitz, M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of stressed Ge:Ga detector arrays for far-infrared astronomy from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) is discussed. Researchers successfully constructed and used a three channel detector array on five flights from the KAO, and have conducted laboratory tests of a two-dimensional, 25 elements (5x5) detector array. Each element of the three element array performs as well as the researchers' best single channel detector, as do the tested elements of the 25 channel system. Some of the exciting new science possible with far-infrared detector arrays is also discussed.

  8. Stressed and unstressed Ge:Ga detector arrays for airborne astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Beeman, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Geis, N.; Poglitsch, A.; Rumitz, M.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and operation of 2D arrays of both unstressed and stressed Ge:Ga photoconductive detectors for far-IR astronomy from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory is presented. The 25 element (5 x 5) arrays are designed for a new cryogenically cooled spectrometer. The 2D spatial array described has the advantage of absolute registry between pixels in a map.

  9. Self-leveling 2D DPN probe arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaheim, Jason R.; Val, Vadim; Solheim, Ed; Bussan, John; Fragala, J.; Nelson, Mike

    2010-02-01

    Dip Pen Nanolithography® (DPN®) is a direct write scanning probe-based technique which operates under ambient conditions, making it suitable to deposit a wide range of biological and inorganic materials. Precision nanoscale deposition is a fundamental requirement to advance nanoscale technology in commercial applications, and tailoring chemical composition and surface structure on the sub-100 nm scale benefits researchers in areas ranging from cell adhesion to cell-signaling and biomimetic membranes. These capabilities naturally suggest a "Desktop Nanofab" concept - a turnkey system that allows a non-expert user to rapidly create high resolution, scalable nanostructures drawing upon well-characterized ink and substrate pairings. In turn, this system is fundamentally supported by a portfolio of MEMS devices tailored for microfluidic ink delivery, directed placement of nanoscale materials, and cm2 tip arrays for high-throughput nanofabrication. Massively parallel two-dimensional nanopatterning is now commercially available via NanoInk's 2D nano PrintArray™, making DPN a high-throughput (>3×107 μm2 per hour), flexible and versatile method for precision nanoscale pattern formation. However, cm2 arrays of nanoscopic tips introduce the nontrivial problem of getting them all evenly touching the surface to ensure homogeneous deposition; this requires extremely precise leveling of the array. Herein, we describe how we have made the process simple by way of a selfleveling gimbal attachment, coupled with semi-automated software leveling routines which bring the cm^2 chip to within 0.002 degrees of co-planarity. This excellent co-planarity yields highly homogeneous features across a square centimeter, with <6% feature size standard deviation. We have engineered the devices to be easy to use, wire-free, and fully integrated with both of our patterning tools: the DPN 5000, and the NLP 2000.

  10. Arrays of Bolometric Detectors for Submillimeter Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Moseley, S. H.; Freund, M.; Allen, C.; Harper, A.; Loewenstein, R.; Dowell, C. D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large format two dimensional arrays of bolometric detectors are required for many millimeter and submillimeter applications. We describe the development and testing of such arrays and the plans for using them in both a ground-based and airborne instrument.

  11. Detectors based on silicon photomultiplier arrays for medical imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Llosa, G.; Barrio, J.; Cabello, J.; Lacasta, C.; Oliver, J. F.; Stankova, V.; Solaz, C.

    2011-07-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have experienced a fast development and are now employed in different research fields. The availability of 2D arrays that provide information of the interaction position in the detector has had a high interest for medical imaging. Continuous crystals combined with segmented photodetectors can provide higher efficiency than pixellated crystals and very high spatial resolution. The IRIS group at IFIC is working on the development of detector heads based on continuous crystals coupled to SiPM arrays for different applications, including a small animal PET scanner in collaboration with the Univ. of Pisa and INFN Pisa, and a Compton telescope for dose monitoring in hadron therapy. (authors)

  12. Si:As BIB detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bharat, R.; Petroff, M. D.; Speer, J. J.; Stapelbroek, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    Highlights of the results obtained on arsenic-doped silicon blocked impurity band (BIB) detectors and arrays since the invention of the BIB concept a few years ago are presented. After a brief introduction and a description of the BIB concept, data will be given on single detector performance. Then different arrays that were fabricated will be described and test data presented.

  13. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  14. Infrared array detectors. [for astronomical observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Arrays of detectors sensitive to infrared radiation will enable astronomical observations to be made with shorter observing times than with discrete detectors and with good relative spatial accuracy. Systems using such arrays are being developed for astronomy in several regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. An example of an infrared system is given here consisting of a 32x32 element bismuth doped silicon charge injection device array that has been used in an astronomical camera.

  15. Low-frequency phased-array 2D fluorescence localization in breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Chen, Yu; Chance, Britton; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    A method for rapid, non-invasive 2D fluorescence localization of breast cancer using low frequency phased array near-infrared technique is presented in this article. In our study, we have developed a dual-channel fluorescence detection system to locate breast cancer. This system consists two pair of in-phase and out-of-phase light emitting diodes (LEDs) as the light sources and Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) as the detector. Two null planes generated by cancellation of diffusion photon density waves (DPDW) will indicate the 2D position of breast cancer with exogenous contrast agents. The fluorescent contrast agent used in this study is Indocyanine Green (ICG) and the minimum amount of ICG detected by our system is 0.5 μM. With the 2 cm separation of sources and detector, the maximum depth our system can detect is 10 mm. The whole system is in compact size and portable. Phantom experiments show that the system can provide real time detection and localization of small hidden absorbing-fluorescent objects inside the highly scattering medium with high accuracy of +/-3 mm. The potential application is that it is low-cost and can be used for breast cancer localization as operation aid and self-examination.

  16. Thermopile Detector Arrays for Space Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, M. C.; Kenyon, M.; Krueger, T. R.; McCann, T. A.; Chacon, R.; Jones, E. W.; Dickie, M. R.; Schofield, J. T.; McCleese, D. J.; Gaalema, S.

    2004-01-01

    Thermopile detectors are widely used in uncooled applications where small numbers of detectors are required, particularly in low-cost commercial applications or applications requiring accurate radiometry. Arrays of thermopile detectors, however, have not been developed to the extent of uncooled bolometer and pyroelectric/ferroelectric arrays. Efforts at JPL seek to remedy this deficiency by developing high performance thin-film thermopile detectors in both linear and two-dimensional formats. The linear thermopile arrays are produced by bulk micromachining and wire bonded to separate CMOS readout electronic chips. Such arrays are currently being fabricated for the Mars Climate Sounder instrument, scheduled for launch in 2005. Progress is also described towards realizing a two-dimensional thermopile array built over CMOS readout circuitry in the substrate.

  17. Dosimetric characterization of a 2D polycrystalline CVD diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, A.; Cupparo, I.; Baldi, A.; Scaringella, M.; Pasquini, A.; Pallotta, S.; Talamonti, C.; Bruzzi, M.

    2017-03-01

    A bidimensional pixelated dosimeter composed of two polycrystalline Chemical Vapour Deposited diamond films, 2.5 × 2.5 cm2 each placed aside, has been manufactured so as to obtain a detector with a 2 mm pitch over a total active area of 5.0 × 2.5 cm2. We performed the dosimetric characterization of the detector with an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator using a 6 MV photon beam. Uniformity maps, rise and fall times, signal repeatability, dependence on dose rate, linearity with dose and sensitivity show that the device is suitable for dosimetric evaluations in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) treatments. Then, a first quantitative evaluation of the dose distribution in a lung VMAT treatment plan has been carried out, by comparing data from our device with Treatment Planning Sistem values by means of a Γ test, with promising results.

  18. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  19. Fast 2D DOA Estimation Algorithm by an Array Manifold Matching Method with Parallel Linear Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lisheng; Liu, Sheng; Li, Dong; Jiang, Qingping; Cao, Hailin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of two-dimensional (2D) direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation with parallel linear arrays is addressed. Two array manifold matching (AMM) approaches, in this work, are developed for the incoherent and coherent signals, respectively. The proposed AMM methods estimate the azimuth angle only with the assumption that the elevation angles are known or estimated. The proposed methods are time efficient since they do not require eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) or peak searching. In addition, the complexity analysis shows the proposed AMM approaches have lower computational complexity than many current state-of-the-art algorithms. The estimated azimuth angles produced by the AMM approaches are automatically paired with the elevation angles. More importantly, for estimating the azimuth angles of coherent signals, the aperture loss issue is avoided since a decorrelation procedure is not required for the proposed AMM method. Numerical studies demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches. PMID:26907301

  20. Controlling avalanche criticality in 2D nano arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zohar, Y. C.; Yochelis, S.; Dahmen, K. A.; Jung, G.; Paltiel, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Many physical systems respond to slowly changing external force through avalanches spanning broad range of sizes. Some systems crackle even without apparent external force, such as bursts of neuronal activity or charge transfer avalanches in 2D molecular layers. Advanced development of theoretical models describing disorder-induced critical phenomena calls for experiments probing the dynamics upon tuneable disorder. Here we show that isomeric structural transitions in 2D organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) exhibit critical dynamics with experimentally tuneable disorder. The system consists of field effect transistor coupled through SAM to illuminated semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). Charges photoinduced in NCs are transferred through SAM to the transistor surface and modulate its conductivity. Avalanches of isomeric structural transitions are revealed by measuring the current noise I(t) of the transistor. Accumulated surface traps charges reduce dipole moments of the molecules, decrease their coupling, and thus decrease the critical disorder of the SAM enabling its tuning during experiments. PMID:23677142

  1. Controlling avalanche criticality in 2D nano arrays.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Y C; Yochelis, S; Dahmen, K A; Jung, G; Paltiel, Y

    2013-01-01

    Many physical systems respond to slowly changing external force through avalanches spanning broad range of sizes. Some systems crackle even without apparent external force, such as bursts of neuronal activity or charge transfer avalanches in 2D molecular layers. Advanced development of theoretical models describing disorder-induced critical phenomena calls for experiments probing the dynamics upon tuneable disorder. Here we show that isomeric structural transitions in 2D organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) exhibit critical dynamics with experimentally tuneable disorder. The system consists of field effect transistor coupled through SAM to illuminated semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). Charges photoinduced in NCs are transferred through SAM to the transistor surface and modulate its conductivity. Avalanches of isomeric structural transitions are revealed by measuring the current noise I(t) of the transistor. Accumulated surface traps charges reduce dipole moments of the molecules, decrease their coupling, and thus decrease the critical disorder of the SAM enabling its tuning during experiments.

  2. Synchronization of semiconductor laser arrays with 2D Bragg structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshev, V. R.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    A model of a planar semiconductor multi-channel laser is developed. In this model two-dimensional (2D) Bragg mirror structures are used for synchronizing radiation of multiple laser channels. Coupling of longitudinal and transverse waves can be mentioned as the distinguishing feature of these structures. Synchronization of 20 laser channels is demonstrated with a semi-classical approach based on Maxwell-Bloch equations.

  3. Volumetric elasticity imaging with a 2-D CMUT array.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Ted G; Hall, Timothy J; Panda, Satchi; Richards, Michael S; Barbone, Paul E; Jiang, Jingfeng; Resnick, Jeff; Barnes, Steve

    2010-06-01

    This article reports the use of a two-dimensional (2-D) capacitive micro-machined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) to acquire radio-frequency (RF) echo data from relatively large volumes of a simple ultrasound phantom to compare three-dimensional (3-D) elasticity imaging methods. Typical 2-D motion tracking for elasticity image formation was compared with three different methods of 3-D motion tracking, with sum-squared difference (SSD) used as the similarity measure. Differences among the algorithms were the degree to which they tracked elevational motion: not at all (2-D search), planar search, combination of multiple planes and plane independent guided search. The cross-correlation between the predeformation and motion-compensated postdeformation RF echo fields was used to quantify motion tracking accuracy. The lesion contrast-to-noise ratio was used to quantify image quality. Tracking accuracy and strain image quality generally improved with increased tracking sophistication. When used as input for a 3-D modulus reconstruction, high quality 3-D displacement estimates yielded accurate and low noise modulus reconstruction.

  4. Volumetric Elasticity Imaging with a 2D CMUT Array

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Ted G.; Hall, Timothy J.; Panda, Satchi; Richards, Michael S.; Barbone, Paul E.; Jiang, Jingfeng; Resnick, Jeff; Barnes, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the use of a two-dimensional (2D) capacitive micro-machined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) to acquire radio frequency (RF) echo data from relatively large volumes of a simple ultrasound phantom to compare 3D elasticity imaging methods. Typical 2D motion tracking for elasticity image formation was compared to three different methods of 3D motion tracking, with sum-squared difference (SSD) used as the similarity measure. Differences among the algorithms were the degree to which they tracked elevational motion: not at all (2D search), planar search, combination of multiple planes, and plane independent guided search. The cross correlation between the pre-deformation and motion-compensated post-deformation RF echo fields was used to quantify motion tracking accuracy. The lesion contrast-to-noise ratio was used to quantify image quality. Tracking accuracy and strain image quality generally improved with increased tracking sophistication. When used as input for a 3D modulus reconstruction, high quality 3D displacement estimates yielded accurate and low noise modulus reconstruction. PMID:20510188

  5. Low background IR detector and detector array evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Jared, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Stafford, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A technology program has been underway at Ames since 1978 to develop and evaluate detectors and integrated detector arrays for low-background astronomical applications. The approach is to evaluate existing (less than 24 micron) array technology under low-background conditions, with the aim of adapting and optimizing existing devices. For longer wavelengths, where the technology is much less mature, development is sponsored and devices are evaluated, in both discrete and array formats, for eventual applications. The status of this program has been reported previously. We rely on industrial and university sources for the detectors. Typically, after a brief functionality check in the supplier's laboratory, we work with the device at Ames to characterize its low-background performance. In the case of promising arrays or detectors, we conduct ground-based telescope testing to face the problems associated with real applications. A list of devices tested at Ames is given. In the array category, accumulation-mode charge-injection-devices (AMCIDs) appear repeatedly; this reflects our recent experience with the 2 x 64 and 16 x 16 arrays. Results from the 1 x 16 CID and InSb CCD have been reported. The status of our tests of the discrete Ge:x detectors from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are described below. Tests of a 1 x 2 switched sample photoconductor array are just beginning. A 32-channel CMOS multiplexer has been tested at 10 K. Low-temperature silicon MOSFETs and germanium JFETs have also been tested, primarily at Ball Aerospace. This paper describes results to date on three elements of this program: AMCID array, discrete Ge:Ga detectors, and Ge JFET preamplifiers.

  6. Monolithic short wave infrared (SWIR) detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A monolithic self-scanned linear detector array was developed for remote sensing in the 1.1- 2.4-micron spectral region. A high-density IRCCD test chip was fabricated to verify new design approaches required for the detector array. The driving factors in the Schottky barrier IRCCD (Pdsub2Si) process development are the attainment of detector yield, uniformity, adequate quantum efficiency, and lowest possible dark current consistent with radiometric accuracy. A dual-band module was designed that consists of two linear detector arrays. The sensor architecture places the floating diffusion output structure in the middle of the chip, away from the butt edges. A focal plane package was conceptualized and includes a polycrystalline silicon substrate carrying a two-layer, thick-film interconnecting conductor pattern and five epoxy-mounted modules. A polycrystalline silicon cover encloses the modules and bond wires, and serves as a radiation and EMI shield, thermal conductor, and contamination seal.

  7. Modeling Charge Collection in Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor); Pickel, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    A detector array charge collection model has been developed for use as an engineering tool to aid in the design of optical sensor missions for operation in the space radiation environment. This model is an enhancement of the prototype array charge collection model that was developed for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) program. The primary enhancements were accounting for drift-assisted diffusion by Monte Carlo modeling techniques and implementing the modeling approaches in a windows-based code. The modeling is concerned with integrated charge collection within discrete pixels in the focal plane array (FPA), with high fidelity spatial resolution. It is applicable to all detector geometries including monolithc charge coupled devices (CCDs), Active Pixel Sensors (APS) and hybrid FPA geometries based on a detector array bump-bonded to a readout integrated circuit (ROIC).

  8. Neutron detector characterization for SCINTIA array

    SciTech Connect

    Matei, C.; Hambsch, F. J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2011-07-01

    SCINTIA is a new detector array of organic scintillators under development at the Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM). The present design of SCINTIA includes NE213, p-terphenyl and Li glass neutron detectors positioned in a spherical configuration around the target. The properties of a novel p-terphenyl neutron detector to be used with SCINTIA have been investigated using photon sources and neutrons from a time tagged {sup 252}Cf(sf) source. The results show that the p-terphenyl crystal has better energy resolution, increased proton light output and neutron efficiency when compared to a similar size NE213 equivalent neutron detector. (authors)

  9. Array Detectors for Plasma Spectrochemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-04

    Applied Spectroscopy , (1987), 41, 1114. (2) R.B. Bilhorn, P.M. Epperson, J.V. Sweedler, M.B. Denton, Applied Spectroscopy , (1987), 41, 1125. 19. Abstract (continued) ,7different detector element based on the actual photon flux falling on each element during a specific measurement; binning, allowing the combination of charge stored in multiple elements while on the detector; and frame transfer, allowinq computer summation of multiple exposures of a single analysis.tA/,: -. • -’- ,, ,- - Readout modes such as random access

  10. SU-E-T-758: To Determine the Source Dwell Positions of HDR Brachytherapy Using 2D 729 Ion Chamber Array

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Syam; Sitha

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Determination of source dwell positions of HDR brachytherapy using 2D 729 ion chamber array Methods: Nucletron microselectron HDR and PTW 2D array were used for the study. Different dwell positions were assigned in the HDR machine. Rigid interstitial needles and vaginal applicator were positioned on the 2D array. The 2D array was exposed for this programmed dwell positions. The positional accuracy of the source was analyzed after the irradiation of the 2D array. This was repeated for different dwell positions. Different test plans were transferred from the Oncentra planning system and irradiated with the same applicator position on the 2D array. The results were analyzed using the in house developed excel program. Results: Assigned dwell positions versus corresponding detector response were analyzed. The results show very good agreement with the film measurements. No significant variation found between the planned and measured dwell positions. Average dose response with 2D array between the planned and nearby dwell positions was found to be 0.0804 Gy for vaginal cylinder applicator and 0.1234 Gy for interstitial rigid needles. Standard deviation between the doses for all the measured dwell positions for interstitial rigid needle for 1 cm spaced positions were found to be 0.33 and 0.37 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. For intracavitory vaginal applicator this was found to be 0.21 for 1 cm spaced dwell positions and 0.06 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. Intracavitory test plans reproduced on the 2D array with the same applicator positions shows the ideal dose distribution with the TPS planned. Conclusion: 2D array is a good tool for determining the dwell position of HDR brachytherapy. With the in-house developed program in excel it is easy and accurate. The traditional way with film analysis can be replaced by this method, as the films will be more costly.

  11. 2D Transducer Array for High-Speed 3D Imaging System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    low voltage differential signaling ( LVDS ) interface and a peripheral component interconnect (PCI) bus. The maximum numbers of transmission and...32-channel analog to digital converter (ADC) was attached to the developed transducer array. LVDS 2D Array Front End D a t a A c q u i s i t i o

  12. Ultrafast dynamics of metal plasmons induced by 2D semiconductor excitons in hybrid nanostructure arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Wang, Kai; ...

    2016-11-17

    With the advanced progress achieved in the field of nanotechnology, localized surface plasmons resonances (LSPRs) are actively considered to improve the efficiency of metal-based photocatalysis, photodetection, and photovoltaics. Here, we report on the exchange of energy and electric charges in a hybrid composed of a two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (2D-WS2) monolayer and an array of aluminum (Al) nanodisks. Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy results indicate that within ~830 fs after photoexcitation of the 2D-WS2 semiconductor, energy transfer from the 2D-WS2 excitons excites the plasmons of the Al array. Then, upon the radiative and/or nonradiative damping of these excited plasmons, energy and/or electron transfermore » back to the 2D-WS2 semiconductor takes place as indicated by an increase in the reflected probe at the 2D exciton transition energies at later time-delays. This simultaneous exchange of energy and charges between the metal and the 2D-WS2 semiconductor resulted in an extension of the average lifetime of the 2D-excitons from ~15 to ~58 ps in absence and presence of the Al array, respectively. Furthermore, the indirectly excited plasmons were found to live as long as the 2D-WS2 excitons exist. Furthermore, the demonstrated ability to generate exciton-plasmons coupling in a hybrid nanostructure may open new opportunities for optoelectronic applications such as plasmonic-based photodetection and photocatalysis.« less

  13. Fabrication and magnetic behaviour of 2D ordered Fe/SiO2 nanodots array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Zhong, W.; Qiu, L. J.; Lü, L. Y.; Du, Y. W.

    2006-06-01

    We have demonstrated a simple and universal morphology-controlled growth of 2D ordered Fe/SiO2 magnetic nanodots array, which was based on 2D colloidal monolayer template composed of polystyrene (PS) spheres and one-step sol-gel spin-coating technique. The Fe/SiO2 nanodots have a well-ordered structure arranged in a hexagonal pattern. The dots have the shape of quasi-pyramidal tetrahedron, which reside in the interstitial region between three PS spheres and the substrate. Magnetic measurements reveal that the nanodots array exhibits the in-plane easy magnetization direction. Compared with the unpatterned Fe/SiO2 thin film, the dots array has lower saturated field, higher remanence and coercivity. The present method is applicable to 2D ordered nanodots array of other magnetic materials.

  14. Imaging Using Energy Discriminating Radiation Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, Paul D.; Clajus, Martin; Tuemer, Tuemay O.; Visser, Gerard; Cajipe, Victoria

    2003-08-26

    Industrial X-ray radiography is often done using a broad band energy source and always a broad band energy detector. There exist several major advantages in the use of narrow band sources and or detectors, one of which is the separation of scattered radiation from primary radiation. ARDEC has developed a large detector array system in which every detector element acts like a multi-channel analyzer. A radiographic image is created from the number of photons detected in each detector element, rather than from the total energy absorbed in the elements. For high energies, 25 KeV to 4 MeV, used in radiography, energy discriminating detectors have been limited to less than 20,000 photons per second per detector element. This rate is much too slow for practical radiography. Our detector system processes over two million events per second per detector pixel, making radiographic imaging practical. This paper expounds on the advantages of the ARDEC radiographic imaging process.

  15. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery of electron beams using a 2D ion chamber array.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, S A; Das, K J Maria; Raj, D Gowtham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics; such as beam output, symmetry and flatness between gated and non-gated electron beams. Dosimetric verification of gated delivery was carried for all electron beams available on Varian CL 2100CD medical linear accelerator. Measurements were conducted for three dose rates (100 MU/min, 300 MU/min and 600 MU/min) and two respiratory motions (breathing period of 4s and 8s). Real-time position management (RPM) system was used for the gated deliveries. Flatness and symmetry values were measured using Imatrixx 2D ion chamber array device and the beam output was measured using plane parallel ion chamber. These detector systems were placed over QUASAR motion platform which was programmed to simulate the respiratory motion of target. The dosimetric characteristics of gated deliveries were compared with non-gated deliveries. The flatness and symmetry of all the evaluated electron energies did not differ by more than 0.7 % with respect to corresponding non-gated deliveries. The beam output variation of gated electron beam was less than 0.6 % for all electron energies except for 16 MeV (1.4 %). Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that Varian CL2100 CD is well suitable for gated delivery of non-dynamic electron beams.

  16. Inspection design using 2D phased array, TFM and cueMAP software

    SciTech Connect

    McGilp, Ailidh; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Lardner, Tim; Mackersie, John; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-02-18

    A simulation suite, cueMAP, has been developed to facilitate the design of inspection processes and sparse 2D array configurations. At the core of cueMAP is a Total Focusing Method (TFM) imaging algorithm that enables computer assisted design of ultrasonic inspection scenarios, including the design of bespoke array configurations to match the inspection criteria. This in-house developed TFM code allows for interactive evaluation of image quality indicators of ultrasonic imaging performance when utilizing a 2D phased array working in FMC/TFM mode. The cueMAP software uses a series of TFM images to build a map of resolution, contrast and sensitivity of imaging performance of a simulated reflector, swept across the inspection volume. The software takes into account probe properties, wedge or water standoff, and effects of specimen curvature. In the validation process of this new software package, two 2D arrays have been evaluated on 304n stainless steel samples, typical of the primary circuit in nuclear plants. Thick section samples have been inspected using a 1MHz 2D matrix array. Due to the processing efficiency of the software, the data collected from these array configurations has been used to investigate the influence sub-aperture operation on inspection performance.

  17. Inspection design using 2D phased array, TFM and cueMAP software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGilp, Ailidh; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Lardner, Tim; Mackersie, John; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-02-01

    A simulation suite, cueMAP, has been developed to facilitate the design of inspection processes and sparse 2D array configurations. At the core of cueMAP is a Total Focusing Method (TFM) imaging algorithm that enables computer assisted design of ultrasonic inspection scenarios, including the design of bespoke array configurations to match the inspection criteria. This in-house developed TFM code allows for interactive evaluation of image quality indicators of ultrasonic imaging performance when utilizing a 2D phased array working in FMC/TFM mode. The cueMAP software uses a series of TFM images to build a map of resolution, contrast and sensitivity of imaging performance of a simulated reflector, swept across the inspection volume. The software takes into account probe properties, wedge or water standoff, and effects of specimen curvature. In the validation process of this new software package, two 2D arrays have been evaluated on 304n stainless steel samples, typical of the primary circuit in nuclear plants. Thick section samples have been inspected using a 1MHz 2D matrix array. Due to the processing efficiency of the software, the data collected from these array configurations has been used to investigate the influence sub-aperture operation on inspection performance.

  18. Designing of sparse 2D arrays for Lamb wave imaging using coarray concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-03-01

    2D ultrasonic arrays have considerable application potential in Lamb wave based SHM systems, since they enable equivocal damage imaging and even in some cases wave-mode selection. Recently, it has been shown that the 2D arrays can be used in SHM applications in a synthetic focusing (SF) mode, which is much more effective than the classical phase array mode commonly used in NDT. The SF mode assumes a single element excitation of subsequent transmitters and off-line processing the acquired data. In the simplest implementation of the technique, only single multiplexed input and output channels are required, which results in significant hardware simplification. Application of the SF mode for 2D arrays creates additional degrees of freedom during the design of the array topology, which complicates the array design process, however, it enables sparse array designs with performance similar to that of the fully populated dense arrays. In this paper we present the coarray concept to facilitate synthesis process of an array's aperture used in the multistatic synthetic focusing approach in Lamb waves-based imaging systems. In the coherent imaging, performed in the transmit/receive mode, the sum coarray is a morphological convolution of the transmit/receive sub-arrays. It can be calculated as the set of sums of the individual sub-arrays' elements locations. The coarray framework will be presented here using a an example of a star-shaped array. The approach will be discussed in terms of beampatterns of the resulting imaging systems. Both simulated and experimental results will be included.

  19. Development of 2-D Array of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) for Far-IR Investigations of the Outer Planets and Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakew, Brook

    2009-09-01

    A 2-D array of superconducting Magnesium Diboride(MgB2) far -IR thermal detectors has been fabricated. Such an array is intended to be at the focal plane of future generation thermal imaging far-IR instruments that will investigate the outer planets and their icy moons. Fabrication and processing of the pixels of the array as well as noise characterization of architectured MgB2 thin films will be presented. Challenges and solutions for improving the performance of the array will be discussed.

  20. Laser fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A I; Kiyan, R; Chichkov, B N

    2010-09-27

    A novel method for fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays is proposed. This technique is based on laser-induced transfer of molten metal nanodroplets from thin metal films. Metal nanoparticles are produced by solidification of these nanodroplets. The size of the transferred nanoparticles can be controllably changed in the range from 180 nm to 1500 nm. Several examples of complex 2D and 3D microstructures generated form gold nanoparticles are demonstrated.

  1. Characterization and use of a 2D-array of ion chambers for brachytherapy dosimetric quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Yewondwossen, Mammo

    2012-10-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array MatriXX Evolution is one of the 2D ionization chamber arrays developed by IBA Dosimetry (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) for megavoltage real-time absolute 2D dosimetry and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate the performance of ion chamber array for submegavoltage range brachytherapy beam dose verification and quality assurance (QA) and (2) use the end-to-end dosimetric evaluation that mimics a patient treatment procedure and confirm the primary source strength calibration agrees in both the treatment planning system (TPS) and treatment delivery console computers. The dose linearity and energy dependence of the 2D ion chamber array was studied using kilovoltage X-ray beams (100, 180 and 300 kVp). The detector calibration factor was determined using 300 kVp X-ray beams so that we can use the same calibration factor for dosimetric verification of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The phantom used for this measurement consists of multiple catheters, the IBA MatriXX detector, and water-equivalent slab of RW3 to provide full scattering conditions. The treatment planning system (TPS) (Oncentra brachy version 3.3, Nucletron BV, Veenendaal, the Netherlands) dose distribution was calculated on the computed tomography (CT) scan of this phantom. The measured and TPS calculated distributions were compared in IBA Dosimetry OmniPro-I'mRT software. The quality of agreement was quantified by the gamma ({gamma}) index (with 3% delta dose and distance criterion of 2 mm) for 9 sets of plans. Using a dedicated phantom capable of receiving 5 brachytherapy intralumenal catheters a QA procedure was developed for end-to-end dosimetric evaluation for routine QA checks. The 2D ion chamber array dose dependence was found to be linear for 100-300 kVp and the detector response (k{sub user}) showed strong energy dependence for 100-300 kVp energy range. For the Ir-192 brachytherapy

  2. Wideband 2-D Array Design Optimization With Fabrication Constraints for 3-D US Imaging.

    PubMed

    Roux, Emmanuel; Ramalli, Alessandro; Liebgott, Herve; Cachard, Christian; Robini, Marc C; Tortoli, Piero

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) 2-D arrays are of increasing interest due to their electronic steering capability to investigate 3-D regions without requiring any probe movement. These arrays are typically populated by thousands of elements that, ideally, should be individually driven by the companion scanner. Since this is not convenient, the so-called microbeamforming methods, yielding a prebeamforming stage performed in the probe handle by suitable custom integrated circuits, have so far been implemented in a few commercial high-end scanners. A possible approach to implement relatively cheap and efficient 3-D US imaging systems is using 2-D sparse arrays in which a limited number of elements can be coupled to an equal number of independent transmit/receive channels. In order to obtain US beams with adequate characteristics all over the investigated volume, the layout of such arrays must be carefully designed. This paper provides guidelines to design, by using simulated annealing optimization, 2-D sparse arrays capable of fitting specific applications or fabrication/implementation constraints. In particular, an original energy function based on multidepth 3-D analysis of the beam pattern is also exploited. A tutorial example is given, addressed to find the N e elements that should be activated in a 2-D fully populated array to yield efficient acoustic radiating performance over the entire volume. The proposed method is applied to a 32 ×32 array centered at 3 MHz to select the 128, 192, and 256 elements that provide the best acoustic performance. It is shown that the 256-element optimized array yields sidelobe levels even lower (by 5.7 dB) than that of the reference 716-element circular and (by 10.3 dB) than that of the reference 1024-element array.

  3. The Ultrasonic Measurement of Crystallographic Orientation for Imaging Anisotropic Components with 2d Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, C. J. L.; Dunhill, A. K.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    Single crystal components are used widely in the gas-turbine industry. However, these components are elastically anisotropic which causes difficulties when performing NDE inspections with ultrasound. Recently an ultrasonic algorithm for a 2D array has been corrected to perform the reliable volumetric inspection of single crystals. For the algorithm to be implemented the crystallographic orientation of the components must be known. This paper, therefore, develops and reviews crystallographic orientation methods using 2D ultrasonic arrays. The methods under examination are based on the anisotropic propagation of surface and bulk waves and an image-based orientation method is also considered.

  4. 3-D Deep Penetration Photoacoustic Imaging with a 2-D CMUT Array.

    PubMed

    Ma, Te-Jen; Kothapalli, Sri Rajasekhar; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Oralkan, Omer; Kamaya, Aya; Wygant, Ira O; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2010-10-11

    In this work, we demonstrate 3-D photoacoustic imaging of optically absorbing targets embedded as deep as 5 cm inside a highly scattering background medium using a 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array with a center frequency of 5.5 MHz. 3-D volumetric images and 2-D maximum intensity projection images are presented to show the objects imaged at different depths. Due to the close proximity of the CMUT to the integrated frontend circuits, the CMUT array imaging system has a low noise floor. This makes the CMUT a promising technology for deep tissue photoacoustic imaging.

  5. Designing of sparse 2D arrays for Lamb wave imaging using coarray concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ambroziński, Łukasz Stepinski, Tadeusz Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-03-31

    2D ultrasonic arrays have considerable application potential in Lamb wave based SHM systems, since they enable equivocal damage imaging and even in some cases wave-mode selection. Recently, it has been shown that the 2D arrays can be used in SHM applications in a synthetic focusing (SF) mode, which is much more effective than the classical phase array mode commonly used in NDT. The SF mode assumes a single element excitation of subsequent transmitters and off-line processing the acquired data. In the simplest implementation of the technique, only single multiplexed input and output channels are required, which results in significant hardware simplification. Application of the SF mode for 2D arrays creates additional degrees of freedom during the design of the array topology, which complicates the array design process, however, it enables sparse array designs with performance similar to that of the fully populated dense arrays. In this paper we present the coarray concept to facilitate synthesis process of an array’s aperture used in the multistatic synthetic focusing approach in Lamb waves-based imaging systems. In the coherent imaging, performed in the transmit/receive mode, the sum coarray is a morphological convolution of the transmit/receive sub-arrays. It can be calculated as the set of sums of the individual sub-arrays’ elements locations. The coarray framework will be presented here using a an example of a star-shaped array. The approach will be discussed in terms of beampatterns of the resulting imaging systems. Both simulated and experimental results will be included.

  6. 2D Traveling Wave Array Employing a Trapezoidal Dielectric Wedge for Beam Steering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas K.; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranada, Felix A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation addresses the progress made so far in the development of an antenna array with reconfigurable transmission line feeds connecting each element in series. In particular, 2D traveling wave array employing trapezoidal Dielectric Wedge for Beam Steering will be discussed. The presentation includes current status of the effort and suggested future work. The work is being done as part of the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship (NSTRF).

  7. Dynamic photorefractive self-amplified angular-multiplex 2-D optical beam-array generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaomin; Yeh, Pochi; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1993-01-01

    A real-time 2-D angular-multiplex beam-array holographic storage and reconstruction technique using electrically-addressed spatial light modulators(E-SLM's) and photorefractive crystals is described. Using a liquid crystal television (LCTV) spatial light modulator (SLM) for beam steering and lithium niobate photorefractive crystal for holographic recording, experimental results of generating large and complicated arrays of laser beams with high diffraction efficiency and good uniformity are presented.

  8. Ultrafast dynamics of metal plasmons induced by 2D semiconductor excitons in hybrid nanostructure arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Wang, Kai; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lin, Ming -Wei; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Xiao, Kai; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-11-17

    With the advanced progress achieved in the field of nanotechnology, localized surface plasmons resonances (LSPRs) are actively considered to improve the efficiency of metal-based photocatalysis, photodetection, and photovoltaics. Here, we report on the exchange of energy and electric charges in a hybrid composed of a two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (2D-WS2) monolayer and an array of aluminum (Al) nanodisks. Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy results indicate that within ~830 fs after photoexcitation of the 2D-WS2 semiconductor, energy transfer from the 2D-WS2 excitons excites the plasmons of the Al array. Then, upon the radiative and/or nonradiative damping of these excited plasmons, energy and/or electron transfer back to the 2D-WS2 semiconductor takes place as indicated by an increase in the reflected probe at the 2D exciton transition energies at later time-delays. This simultaneous exchange of energy and charges between the metal and the 2D-WS2 semiconductor resulted in an extension of the average lifetime of the 2D-excitons from ~15 to ~58 ps in absence and presence of the Al array, respectively. Furthermore, the indirectly excited plasmons were found to live as long as the 2D-WS2 excitons exist. Furthermore, the demonstrated ability to generate exciton-plasmons coupling in a hybrid nanostructure may open new opportunities for optoelectronic applications such as plasmonic-based photodetection and photocatalysis.

  9. SU-E-T-65: Characterization of a 2D Array for QA and Pretreatment Plan Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Anvari, A; Aghamiri, S; Mahdavi, S; Alaei, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The OCTAVIUS detector729 is a 2D array of 729 air vented cubic plane parallel ion chambers used for pretreatment verification and QA. In this study we investigated dosimetric characteristics of this system for clinical photon beam dosimetry. Methods: Detector performance evaluation included determination of the location of the effective point of measurement (EPM), sensitivity, linearity, and reproducibility of detector response, as well as output factor, dose rate, and source to surface distance (SSD) dependence. Finally, assessment of wedge modulated fields was carried out. All the evaluations were performed five times for low and high photon energies. For reference measurements, a 0.6 cc ionization chamber was used. Data analysis and comparison of the OCTAVIUS detector with reference ion chamber data was performed using the VeriSoft patient plan verification software. Results: The reproducibility and stability of the measurements are excellent, the detector showed same signal with a maximum deviation of less than 0.5% in short and long term. Results of sensitivity test showed same signal with a maximum deviation of approximately 0.1%. As the detector 729 response is linear with dose and dose rate, it can be used for the measurement at regions of high dose gradient effectively. The detector agrees with the ionization chamber measurement to within 1% for SSD range of 75 to 125 cm. Also, its measured wedge modulated profiles matched very well with ion chamber dose profiles acquired in a water tank. Conclusions: As the response of the detector 729 is linear with dose and dose rate, it can be used for the measurements in the areas of dose gradients effectively. Based on the measurements and comparisons performed, this system is a reliable and accurate dosimeter for QA and pretreatment plan verification in radiotherapy.

  10. High power, high efficiency, 2D laser diode arrays for pumping solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, A.; McShea, J.C.; Bogdan, A.R.; Petheram, J.C.; Rosen, A.

    1987-11-01

    This document reports the current performance of 2D laser diode arrays operating at 770 nm and 808 nm for pumping promethium and neodymium solid state lasers, respectively. Typical power densities are in excess of 2kw/cm/sup 2/ with overall efficiencies greater than 30%.

  11. Adaptive Detector Arrays for Optical Communications Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Srinivasan, M.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of an optimal adaptive array receiver for ground-based optical communications is described and its performance investigated. Kolmogorov phase screen simulations are used to model the sample functions of the focal-plane signal distribution due to turbulence and to generate realistic spatial distributions of the received optical field. This novel array detector concept reduces interference from background radiation by effectively assigning higher confidence levels at each instant of time to those detector elements that contain significant signal energy and suppressing those that do not. A simpler suboptimum structure that replaces the continuous weighting function of the optimal receiver by a hard decision on the selection of the signal detector elements also is described and evaluated. Approximations and bounds to the error probability are derived and compared with the exact calculations and receiver simulation results. It is shown that, for photon-counting receivers observing Poisson-distributed signals, performance improvements of approximately 5 dB can be obtained over conventional single-detector photon-counting receivers, when operating in high background environments.

  12. SQUID Multiplexers for Cryogenic Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Kent; Beall, James; Deiker, Steve; Doriese, Randy; Duncan, William; Hilton, Gene; Moseley, S. Harvey; Reintsema, Carl; Stahle, Caroline; Ullom, Joel; Vale, Leila

    2004-01-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of cryogenic detectors with a manageable number of readout channels. We are developing time-division SQUID multiplexers based on Nb trilayer SQUIDs to read arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors. Our first-generation, 8-channel SQUID multiplexer was used in FIBRE, a one-dimensional TES array for submillimeter astronomy. Our second-generation 32-pixel multiplexer, based on an improved architecture, has been developed for instruments including Constellation-X, SCUBA-2, and solar x-ray astronomy missions. SCUBA-2, which is being developed for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, will have more than 10,000 pixels. We are now developing a third-generation architecture based on superconducting hot-electron switches. The use of SQUID multiplexers in instruments operating at above 2 K will also be discussed.

  13. Mirror effects and optical meta-surfaces in 2d atomic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Wild, Dominik; Lukin, Mikhail; Yelin, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Strong optical response of natural and artificial (meta-) materials typically relies on the fact that the lattice constant that separates their constituent particles (atoms or electromagnetic resonators, respectively) is much smaller than the optical wavelength. Here we consider a single layer of a 2d atom array with a lattice constant on the order of an optical wavelength, which can be thought of as a highly dilute 2d metamaterial (meta-surface). Our theoretical analysis shows how strong scattering of resonant incoming light off the array can be controlled by choosing its lattice constant, e.g. allowing the array to operate as a perfect mirror or a retro-reflector for most incident angles of the incoming light. We discuss the prospects for quantum metasurfaces, i.e. the ability to shape the output quantum state of light by controlling the atomic states, and the possible generality of our results as a universal wave phenomena.

  14. High-resistance liquid-crystal lens array for rotatable 2D/3D autostereoscopic display.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Cheng; Jen, Tai-Hsiang; Ting, Chih-Hung; Huang, Yi-Pai

    2014-02-10

    A 2D/3D switchable and rotatable autostereoscopic display using a high-resistance liquid-crystal (Hi-R LC) lens array is investigated in this paper. Using high-resistance layers in an LC cell, a gradient electric-field distribution can be formed, which can provide a better lens-like shape of the refractive-index distribution. The advantages of the Hi-R LC lens array are its 2D/3D switchability, rotatability (in the horizontal and vertical directions), low driving voltage (~2 volts) and fast response (~0.6 second). In addition, the Hi-R LC lens array requires only a very simple fabrication process.

  15. Preliminary work of real-time ultrasound imaging system for 2-D array transducer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has emerged as a non-invasive imaging modality that can provide anatomical structure information in real time. To enable the experimental analysis of new 2-D array ultrasound beamforming methods, a pre-beamformed parallel raw data acquisition system was developed for 3-D data capture of 2D array transducer. The transducer interconnection adopted the row-column addressing (RCA) scheme, where the columns and rows were active in sequential for transmit and receive events, respectively. The DAQ system captured the raw data in parallel and the digitized data were fed through the field programmable gate array (FPGA) to implement the pre-beamforming. Finally, 3-D images were reconstructed through the devised platform in real-time.

  16. A 1-MHz 2-D CMUT array for HIFU thermal ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Park, Kwan Kyu; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Firouzi, Kamyar; Choe, Jung Woo; Watkins, Ronald D.; Oguz, Huseyin Kagan; Kupnik, Mario; Pauly, Kim Butts; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre

    2017-03-01

    We developed a fully-populated 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. The 2-D CMUT array, which consists of 20 × 20 square CMUT elements with an element-to-element pitch of 1 mm, was designed and fabricated using the thick-buried-oxide (BOX) fabrication process. It was then assembled on a custom interface board that can provide various array configurations depending on the desired applications. In this study, the interface board groups the CMUT array elements into eight channels, based on the phase delay from the element to the targeted focal point at a 20-mm distance from the array surface, which corresponds to an F-number of 1. An 8-channel phase generating system supplies continuous waves with eight different phases to the eight channels of the CMUT array through bias-tees and amplifiers. This array aperture, grouped into eight channels, gives a focusing gain of 6.09 according to field simulation using Field II. Assuming a peak-to-peak pressure of 1 MPa at the surface of the array, our custom temperature simulator predicts successful tissue ablation at the focus. During the measurements, each channel was tuned with a series inductor for an operational frequency of 1 MHz. With a CMUT DC bias of 100 V and a 1-MHz AC input voltage of 55 V, we achieved peak-to-peak output pressures of 173.9 kPa and 568.7 kPa at the array surface and at the focus, respectively. The focusing gain calculated from this measurement is 3.27, which is lower than the simulated gain of 6.09 because of the mutual radiation impedance among the CMUT cells. Further optimization of the operating condition of this array and design improvements for reducing the effect of mutual radiation impedance are currently on-going.

  17. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  18. 2D wavelet-analysis-based calibration technique for flat-panel imaging detectors: application in cone beam volume CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    1999-05-01

    The application of the newly developed flat panel x-ray imaging detector in cone beam volume CT has attracted increasing interest recently. Due to an imperfect solid state array manufacturing process, however, defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image unavoidably exist in all kinds of flat panel x-ray imaging detectors, which will cause severe streak and ring artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image and severely degrade image quality. A calibration technique, in which the artifacts resulting from the defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image can be reduced significantly, is presented in this paper. The detection of defective elements is distinctively based upon two-dimensional (2D) wavelet analysis. Because of its inherent localizability in recognizing singularities or discontinuities, wavelet analysis possesses the capability of detecting defective elements over a rather large x-ray exposure range, e.g., 20% to approximately 60% of the dynamic range of the detector used. Three-dimensional (3D) images of a low-contrast CT phantom have been reconstructed from projection images acquired by a flat panel x-ray imaging detector with and without calibration process applied. The artifacts caused individually by defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image have been separated and investigated in detail, and the correlation with each other have also been exposed explicitly. The investigation is enforced by quantitative analysis of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the image uniformity of the cone beam reconstruction image. It has been demonstrated that the ring and streak artifacts resulting from the imperfect performance of a flat panel x-ray imaging detector can be reduced dramatically, and then the image qualities of a cone beam reconstruction image, such as contrast resolution and image uniformity are improved significantly. Furthermore, with little modification, the calibration technique presented here is also applicable

  19. Theory and operation of 2-D array piezoelectric micromachined ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Dausch, David E; Castellucci, John B; Chou, Derrick R; von Ramm, Olaf T

    2008-11-01

    Piezoelectric micromachined ultrasound transducers (pMUTs) are a new approach for the construction of 2-D arrays for forward-looking 3-D intravascular (IVUS) and intracardiac (ICE) imaging. Two-dimensional pMUT test arrays containing 25 elements (5 x 5 arrays) were bulk micromachined in silicon substrates. The devices consisted of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film membranes formed by deep reactive ion etching of the silicon substrate. Element widths ranged from 50 to 200 microm with pitch from 100 to 300 mum. Acoustic transmit properties were measured in de-ionized water with a calibrated hydrophone placed at a range of 20 mm. Measured transmit frequencies for the pMUT elements ranged from 4 to 13 MHz, and mode of vibration differed for the various element sizes. Element capacitance varied from 30 to over 400 pF depending on element size and PZT thickness. Smaller element sizes generally produced higher acoustic transmit output as well as higher frequency than larger elements. Thicker PZT layers also produced higher transmit output per unit electric field applied. Due to flexure mode operation above the PZT coercive voltage, transmit output increased nonlinearly with increased drive voltage. The pMUT arrays were attached directly to the Duke University T5 Phased Array Scanner to produce real-time pulse-echo B-mode images with the 2-D pMUT arrays.

  20. A mathematical model incorporating the effects of detector width in 2D PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, B. A.

    2000-02-01

    For decades, the Radon transform has been used as an approximate model for two-dimensional (2D) positron emission tomography (PET). Since this model assumes that detector tubes are represented by lines (hence have no area), PET reconstruction algorithms need to be modified to account for the nonzero width of detectors. To date, these modifications have been obtained by computational methods, so fail to exhibit any inherent mathematical structure of the PET transform which takes emission intensity to detector tube means. This paper contains a precise mathematical representation of this PET transform and exploits this representation to propose a new method for reconstructing PET images. This representation is achieved by expressing the probability that an emission at a point is detected in a detector tube, in terms of the Green function and Poisson kernel for Laplace's equation on the unit disc. This new PET transform involves four weighted line integrals of the emission intensity function, instead of the single unweighted line integral defining the 2D Radon transform. Despite the complexity of this model, a reconstruction method is obtained by using classical orthogonal series representations of the emission intensity and detection means in terms of circular harmonics, Bessel functions and Chebyshev polynomials.

  1. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, A.; Agulles-Pedrós, L.

    2016-07-01

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the 99mTc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  2. Application of conformal map theory for design of 2-D ultrasonic array structure for NDT imaging application: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, Sivaram N; Jackson, Joseph C; Dziewierz, Jerzy; O'Leary, Richard; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasonic phased arrays are becoming increasingly popular in nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Sparse array element configurations are required to fully exploit the potential benefits of 2-D phased arrays. This paper applies the conformal mapping technique as a means of designing sparse 2-D array layouts for NDE applications. Modeling using both Huygens' field prediction theory and 2-D fast Fourier transformation is employed to study the resulting new structure. A conformal power map was used that, for fixed beam width, was shown in simulations to have a greater contrast than rectangular or random arrays. A prototype aperiodic 2-D array configuration for direct contact operation in steel, with operational frequency ~3 MHz, was designed using the array design principle described in this paper. Experimental results demonstrate a working sparse-array transducer capable of performing volumetric imaging.

  3. A post-beamforming 2-D pseudoinverse filter for coarsely sampled ultrasound arrays.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yayun; Ebbini, Emad S

    2009-09-01

    Beamforming artifacts due to coarse discretization of imaging apertures represent a significant barrier against the use of array probes in high-frequency applications. Nyquist sampling of array apertures dictates center-to-center spacing of lambda/2 for elimination of grating lobes in the array pattern. However, this requirement is hard to achieve using current transducer technologies, even at the lower end of high-frequency ultrasonic imaging (in the range 25-35 MHz). In this paper, we present a new design approach for 2-D regularized pseudoinverse (PIO) filters suitable for restoring imaging contrast in systems employing coarsely sampled arrays. The approach is based on a discretized 2-D imaging model for linear arrays assuming scattering from a Cartesian grid in the imaging field of view (FOV). We show that the discretized imaging operator can be represented with a block Toeplitz matrix with the blocks themselves being Toeplitz. With sufficiently large grid size in the axial and lateral directions, it is possible to replace this Toeplitz-block block Toeplitz (TBBT) operator with its circulant-block block circulant (CBBC) equivalent. This leads to a computationally efficient implementation of the regularized pseudoinverse filtering approach using the 2-D fast Fourier transform (FFT). The derivation of the filtering equation is shown in detail and the regularization procedure is fully described. Using FIELD, we present simulation data to show the 2-D point-spread functions (PSFs) for imaging systems employing linear arrays with fine and coarse sampling of the imaging aperture. PSFs are also computed for a coarsely sampled array with different levels of regularization to demonstrate the tradeoff between contrast and spatial resolution. These results demonstrate the well-behaved nature of the PSF with the variation in a single regularization parameter. Specifically, the 6 dB axial and lateral dimensions of the PSF increase gradually with increasing value of the

  4. A 2-D diode array and analysis software for verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy delivery.

    PubMed

    Jursinic, Paul A; Nelms, Ben E

    2003-05-01

    An analysis is made of a two-dimensional array of diodes that can be used for measuring dose generated in a plane by a radiation beam. This measuring device is the MapCHECK Model 1175 (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL). This device has 445 N-type diodes in a 22 x 22 cm2 2-D array with variable spacing. The entire array of diodes is easily calibrated to allow for measurements in absolute dose. For IMRT quality assurance, each beam is measured individually with the beam central axis oriented perpendicular to the plane of diodes. Software is available to do the analytical comparison of measurements versus dose distributions calculated by a treatment planning system. Comparison criteria of percent difference and distance-to-agreement are defined by the operator. Data are presented that show the diode array has linear response when beam fluence changes by over 300-fold, which is typical of the level of modulation in intensity modulated radiation therapy, IMRT, beams. A linear dependence is also shown for a 100-fold change in monitors units delivered. Methods for how this device can be used in the clinic for quality assurance of IMRT fields are described. Measurements of typical IMRT beams that are modulated by compensators and MLCs are presented with comparisons to treatment planning system dose calculations. A time analysis is done for typical IMRT quality assurance measurements. The setup, calibration, and analysis time for the 2-D diode array are on the order of 20 min, depending on numbers of fields. This is significantly less time than required to do similar analysis with radiographic film. The 2-D diode array is ideal for per-plan quality assurance after an IMRT system is fully commissioned.

  5. Interference effects in reticon photodiode array detectors.

    PubMed

    Mount, G H; Sanders, R W; Brault, J W

    1992-03-01

    A detector system incorporating the Reticon RL1024S photodiode array has been constructed at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory as part of a double spectrograph to be used to study the Earth's atmosphere from ground-based and aircraft-based platforms. To determine accurately the abundances of atmospheric trace gases, this new system must be able to measure spectral absorptions as small as 0.02%. The detector, manufactured by EG&G Reticon, exhibits superior signal-to-noise characteristics at the light levels characteristic of scattered skylights, but interference in the passivating layer (a thin layer of SiO(2) that is deposited during the manufacture to protect the silicon active area from water vapor) causes major problems in achieving the required precision. The mechanism of the problems and the solution we have implemented are described in detail.

  6. PMN-PT single crystal for endoscopic ultrasound 2D array application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuhang; Liang, Huageng; Zhu, Benpeng; Zhou, Dan; Yang, Xiaofei

    2017-03-01

    Based on lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single crystal, a 24 × 24 row-column addressing endoscopic two-dimensional array has been successfully fabricated using novel flanged electrodes and "semi-kerf" technologies. Each row/column array element was measured to have an electromechanical coupling coefficient of 0.81, a center frequency of 5MHz, and a fractional bandwidth of approximately 88% at -6 dB. Of particular significance was that the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate element exhibits much higher sensitivity compared with lead zirconate titanate-based 2D arrays with similar operational frequency and element area. According to the Field II simulated results, although the obtained beamwidth at -6 dB was a little inferior to that of the fully sampled 24 × 24 two-dimensional array, it is believed that the beamwidth can be improved by appropriately increasing the element number. These results demonstrated that the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single-crystal 2D array is a promising candidate for real-time three-dimensional endoscopic ultrasound imaging.

  7. Modeling and simulation of ultrasound fields generated by 2D phased array transducers for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Matrone, G; Quaglia, F; Magenes, G

    2010-01-01

    Modern ultrasound imaging instrumentation for clinical applications allows real-time volumetric scanning of the patients' body. 4D imaging has been made possible thanks to the development of new echographic probes which consist in 2D phased arrays of piezoelectric transducers. In these new devices it is the system electronics which properly drives the matrix elements and focuses the beam in order to obtain a sequence of volumetric images. This paper introduces an ultrasound field simulator based on the Spatial Impulse Response method which is being properly developed to analyze the characteristics of the ultrasound field generated by a 2D phased array of transducers. Thanks to its high configurability by the user, it will represent a very useful tool for electronics designers in developing 4D ultrasound imaging systems components.

  8. Fundamental performance assessment of 2-D myocardial elastography in a phased-array configuration.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianwen; Lee, Wei-Ning; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2009-10-01

    Two-dimensional myocardial elastography, an RF-based, speckle-tracking technique, uses 1-D cross-correlation and recorrelation methods in a 2-D search, and can estimate and image the 2-D transmural motion and deformation of the myocardium so as to characterize the cardiac function. Based on a 3-D finite-element (FE) canine left-ventricular model, a theoretical framework was previously developed by our group to evaluate the estimation quality of 2-D myocardial elastography using a linear array. In this paper, an ultrasound simulation program, Field II, was used to generate the RF signals of a model of the heart in a phased-array configuration and under 3-D motion conditions; thus simulating a standard echocardiography exam. The estimation method of 2-D myocardial elastography was adapted for use with such a configuration. All elastographic displacements and strains were found to be in good agreement with the FE solutions, as indicated by the mean absolute error (MAE) between the two. The classified first and second principal strains approximated the radial and circumferential strains, respectively, in the phased-array configuration. The results at different sonographic signal-to-noise ratios (SNR(s)) showed that the MAEs of the axial, lateral, radial, and circumferential strains remained relatively constant when the SNR(s) was equal to or higher than 20 dB. The MAEs of the strain estimation were not significantly affected when the acoustic attenuation was included in the simulations. A significantly reduced number of scatterers could be used to speed up the simulation, without sacrificing the estimation quality.The proposed framework can further be used to assess the estimation quality, explore the theoretical limitation and investigate the effects of various parameters in 2-D myocardial elastography under more realistic conditions.

  9. Microphone array based novel infant deafness detector.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Chinmayee; Thiyagarajan, S; Kalyansundar, Archana

    2010-01-01

    This work focuses on an infant deafness detector unit, using the concept of microphone array. This instrument is based on the principle of evoked acoustic emissions (OAEs). The key feature of the microphone array is its ability to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reproducibility of the OAE responses. These further significantly contribute to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the overall system. Low level sound pressure values are recorded by the sensitive microphones in microphone array unit and processed using TI's DSP6416. The sound stimulus transmitted to human ear is generated and controlled by the 6416 DSP (Digital signal processor). Hardware circuit details and the algorithm used in signal processing are discussed in this paper. Standard averaging technique is used in the implemented algorithm. The final result speaks about the hearing capacity of a patient. The proof that the usage of microphone arrays leads to better SNR values than using a single microphone in an OAE probe, is successfully carried out in this work.

  10. Comparison of different sets of array configurations for multichannel 2D ERT acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorana, R.; Capizzi, P.; D'Alessandro, A.; Luzio, D.

    2017-02-01

    Traditional electrode arrays such Wenner-Schlumberger or dipole-dipole are still widely used thanks to their well-known properties but the array configurations are generally not optimized for multi-channel resistivity measures. Synthetic datasets relating to four different arrays, dipole-dipole (DD), pole-dipole (PD), Wenner-Schlumberger (WS) and a modified version of multiple gradient (MG), have been made for a systematic comparison between 2D resistivity models and their inverted images. Different sets of array configurations generated from simple combinations of geometric parameters (potential dipole lengths and dipole separation factors) were tested with synthetic and field data sets, even considering the influence of errors and the acquisition velocity. The purpose is to establish array configurations capable to provide reliable results but, at the same time, not involving excessive survey costs, even linked to the acquiring time and therefore to the number of current dipoles used. For DD, PD and WS arrays a progression of different datasets were considered increasing the number of current dipoles trying to get about the same amount of measures. A multi-coverage MG array configuration is proposed by increasing the lateral coverage and so the number of current dipoles. Noise simulating errors both on the electrode positions and on the electric potential was added. The array configurations have been tested on field data acquired in the landfill site of Bellolampo (Palermo, Italy), to detect and locate the leachate plumes and to identify the HDPE bottom of the landfill. The inversion results were compared using a quantitative analysis of data misfit, relative model resolution and model misfit. The results show that the trends of the first two parameters are linked on the array configuration and that a cumulative analysis of these parameters can help to choose the best array configuration in order to obtain a good resolution and reliability of a survey, according

  11. De-Li-DAQ-2D - a new data acquisition system for position-sensitive neutron detectors with delay-line readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchanovskiy, F. V.; Murashkevich, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    Software for a data acquisition system of modern one- and two-dimensional position-sensitive detectors with delay-line readout, which includes a software interface to a new electronic module De-Li-DAQ-2D with a USB interface, is presented. The new system after successful tests on the stand and on several spectrometers of the IBR-2 reactor has been integrated into the software complex SONIX+ [1]. The De-Li- DAQ-2D module [2] contains an 8-channel time-code converter (TDC-GPX) with a time resolution of 80 ps, field programmable gate array (FPGA), 1 Gbyte histogram memory and high-speed interface with a fiber-optic communication line. A real count rate is no less than 106 events/s. The De-Li-DAQ-2D module is implemented in the NIM standard. The De-Li-DAQ-2D module can operate in two modes: histogram mode and list mode.

  12. Densely Packed 2-D Matrix-Addressable Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadallah, Abdel-Sattar; Michalzik, Rainer

    2013-03-01

    We report on design, manufacturing, and characterization of densely packed top-emitting 16 × 16 elements wire-bonded matrix-addressable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) arrays, which may find future applications such as non-mechanical particle movement with optical multi-tweezers, confocal microscopy or free-space communications with beam steering capability. The factors that control the packing density such as layer structure, mask design, and VCSEL processing are investigated, aiming to minimize the pitch between VCSELs in the array. Both wet-etched and dry-etched arrays are presented and discussed. The single transverse mode VCSELs in the two-dimensional (2-D) matrix-addressable architecture have threshold currents which vary from 0.5 to 1.6 mA and maximum output powers between 2.4 and 4 mW. A simple analysis of the parasitic ohmic resistances is made.

  13. Electromagnetic modeling and resonant detectors and arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, K. K.; Sun, J.; DeCuir, E. A.; Olver, K. A.; Wijewarnasuriya, P.

    2015-05-01

    We recently developed a finite element three-dimensional electromagnetic model for quantum efficiency (QE) computation. It is applicable to any arbitrary detector geometry and materials. Using this model, we can accurately account for the open literature experimental results that we have investigated, which include those from GaAs solar cells, GaSb type-II superlattices, and GaAs quantum wells. We applied the model to design a photon trap to increase detector QE. By accumulating and storing incident light in the resonator-QWIP structure, we observed experimental QE as high as 71%. This improvement shows that we are now able to fully determine the optical properties of QWIPs. For example, we can design QWIPs to detect at certain wavelengths with certain bandwidths. To illustrate this capability, we designed QWIPs with its QE spectrum matching well with the transmission spectrum of a medium. We subsequently produced several focal plane arrays according to these designs with 640 × 512 and 1 K × 1 K formats. In this paper, we will compare the modeled QE and the experimental results obtained from single detectors as well as FPAs.

  14. 2D and 3D ordered arrays of Co magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Prida, V. M.; Vega, V.; Rosa, W. O.; Caballero-Flores, R.; Iglesias, L.; Hernando, B.

    2015-06-01

    Cobalt nanowire arrays spatially distributed in 2D and 3D arrangements have been performed by pulsed electrodeposition into the pores of planar and cylindrical nanoporous anodic alumina membranes, respectively. Morphological characterization points out the good filling factor reached by electroplated Co nanowires in both kinds of alumina membranes exhibiting hexagonally self-ordered porous structures. Co nanowires grown in both kinds of alumina templates exhibit the same crystalline phases. DC magnetometry and First Order Reversal Curve (FORC) analysis were carried out in order to determine the overall magnetic behavior for both nanowire array geometries. It is found that when the Co nanowires of two kinds of arrays are perpendicularly magnetized, both hysteresis loops are identical, suggesting that neither the intrinsic magnetic behavior of the nanowires nor the collective one depend on the arrays geometry. FORC analysis performed along the radial direction of the Co nanowire arrays embedded in the cylindrical alumina template reveals that the contribution of each nanowire to the magnetization reversal process involves its specific orientation with respect to the applied field direction. Furthermore, the comparison between the magnetic properties for both kinds of Co nanowire arrays allows discussing about the effect of the cylindrical geometry of the template on the magnetostatic interaction among nanowires.

  15. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Choi, S. K.; Coughlin, K. P.; Crowley, K. T.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Duff, S. M.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; van Engelen, A.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Hasselfield, M.; Hills, F.; Hilton, G. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hloẑek, R.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Huffenberger, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Koopman, B. J.; Kosowsky, A. B.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Munson, C.; Nati, F.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Page, L. A.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Simon, S. M.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Thornton, R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies—imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution—will enable precision cosmological constraints and also a wide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the Advanced ACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the Advanced ACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  16. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, S.W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies-imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution-will enable precision cosmological constraints and also awide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the AdvancedACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the AdvancedACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  17. SU-E-P-35: Real-Time Patient Transit Dose Verification of Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy by a 2D Ionization Chamber Array

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the real-time dose verification method in volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with a 2D array ion chamber array. Methods: The 2D ion chamber array was fixed on the panel of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Source-detector distance (SDD)was 140cm. 8mm RW3 solid water was added to the detector panel to achieve maximum readings.The patient plans for esophageal, prostate and liver cancers were selected to deliver on the cylindrical Cheese phantom 5 times in order to validate the reproducibility of doses. Real-time patient transit dose measurements were performed at each fraction. Dose distributions wereevaluated using gamma index criteria of 3mm DTA and 3% dose difference referred to the firsttime Result. Results: The gamma index pass rate in the Cheese phantom were about 98%; The gamma index pass rate for esophageal, liver and prostate cancer patient were about 92%,94%, and 92%, respectively; Gamma pass rate for all single fraction were more than 90%. Conclusion: The 2D array is capable of monitoring the real time transit doses during VMAT delivery. It is helpful to improve the treatment accuracy.

  18. Development of 2D imaging of SXR plasma radiation by means of GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Jabłoński, S.; Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Poźniak, K.; Kasprowicz, G.; Zabołotny, W.; Wojeński, A.; Byszuk, A.; Burza, M.; Juszczyk, B.; Zienkiewicz, P.

    2014-11-01

    Presented 2D gaseous detector system has been developed and designed to provide energy resolved fast dynamic plasma radiation imaging in the soft X-Ray region with 0.1 kHz exposure frequency for online, made in real time, data acquisition (DAQ) mode. The detection structure is based on triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) amplification structure followed by the pixel readout electrode. The efficiency of detecting unit was adjusted for the radiation energy region of tungsten in high-temperature plasma, the main candidate for the plasma facing material for future thermonuclear reactors. Here we present preliminary laboratory results and detector parameters obtained for the developed system. The operational characteristics and conditions of the detector were designed to work in the X-Ray range of 2-17 keV. The detector linearity was checked using the fluorescence lines of different elements and was found to be sufficient for good photon energy reconstruction. Images of two sources through various screens were performed with an X-Ray laboratory source and 55Fe source showing a good imaging capability. Finally offline stream-handling data acquisition mode has been developed for the detecting system with timing down to the ADC sampling frequency rate (~13 ns), up to 2.5 MHz of exposure frequency, which could pave the way to invaluable physics information about plasma dynamics due to very good time resolving ability. Here we present results of studied spatial resolution and imaging properties of the detector for conditions of laboratory moderate counting rates and high gain.

  19. Nanohole-array-based device for 2D snapshot multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Najiminaini, Mohamadreza; Vasefi, Fartash; Kaminska, Bozena; Carson, Jeffrey J L

    2013-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional (2D) snapshot multispectral imager that utilizes the optical transmission characteristics of nanohole arrays (NHAs) in a gold film to resolve a mixture of input colors into multiple spectral bands. The multispectral device consists of blocks of NHAs, wherein each NHA has a unique periodicity that results in transmission resonances and minima in the visible and near-infrared regions. The multispectral device was illuminated over a wide spectral range, and the transmission was spectrally unmixed using a least-squares estimation algorithm. A NHA-based multispectral imaging system was built and tested in both reflection and transmission modes. The NHA-based multispectral imager was capable of extracting 2D multispectral images representative of four independent bands within the spectral range of 662 nm to 832 nm for a variety of targets. The multispectral device can potentially be integrated into a variety of imaging sensor systems.

  20. Self-organized 2D periodic arrays of nanostructures in silicon by nanosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Barada K; Sun, Keye; Rothenbach, Christian; Gupta, Mool C

    2011-06-01

    We report a phenomenon of spontaneous formation of self-organized 2D periodic arrays of nanostructures (protrusions) by directly exposing a silicon surface to multiple nanosecond laser pulses. These self-organized 2D periodic nanostructures are produced toward the edge as an annular region around the circular laser spot. The heights of these nanostructures are around 500 nm with tip diameter ~100 nm. The period of the nanostructures is about 1064 nm, the wavelength of the incident radiation. In the central region of the laser spot, nanostructures are destroyed because of the higher laser intensity (due to the Gaussian shape of the laser beam) and accumulation of large number of laser pulses. Optical diffraction from these nanostructures indicates a threefold symmetry, which is in accordance with the observed morphological symmetries of these nanostructures.

  1. Complete Acoustic Stop-Bands in 2-D Periodic Arrays of Liquid Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, M. S.; Halevi, P.

    1996-03-01

    Periodic binary systems can give rise to complete acoustic band--gaps (i.e. stop--bands) within which sound and vibrations are forbidden. We compute the band structure for 2D periodic arrays of long water cylinders surrounded by mercury. We have neglected the wall (latex) material needed to hold the liquid, assuming that it is sufficiently light and thin. Complete acoustic stop--bands are found for both square and hexagonal lattices. We emphasize that such a simple 2D inhomogeneous system of liquids exhibits the widest stop--bands ever reported for elastic as well as for dielectric composites. We find gap/midgap ratios as high as ~ 1. For mercury cylinders surrounded by water the gaps obtained are much smaller.

  2. Spatially Resolved Synthetic Spectra from 2D Simulations of Stainless Steel Wire Array Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Chong, Y. K.; Dasgupta, A.; Davis, J.

    2009-01-21

    A 2D radiation MHD model has been developed to investigate stainless steel wire array implosion experiments on the Z and refurbished Z machines. This model incorporates within the Mach2 MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE kinetics and ray trace based radiation transport. Such a method is necessary in order to account for opacity effects in conjunction with ionization kinetics of K-shell emitting plasmas. Here the model is used to investigate multi-dimensional effects of stainless steel wire implosions. In particular, we are developing techniques to produce non-LTE, axially and/or radially resolved synthetic spectra based upon snapshots of our 2D simulations. Comparisons between experimental spectra and these synthetic spectra will allow us to better determine the state of the experimental pinches.

  3. Multiwavelength infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Inventor); Olsen, Gregory H. (Inventor); Kim, Dong-Su (Inventor); Lange, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A multiwavelength focal plane array infrared detector is included on a common substrate having formed on its top face a plurality of In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As (x.ltoreq.0.53) absorption layers, between each pair of which a plurality of InAs.sub.y P.sub.1-y (y<1) buffer layers are formed having substantially increasing lattice parameters, respectively, relative to said substrate, for preventing lattice mismatch dislocations from propagating through successive ones of the absorption layers of decreasing bandgap relative to said substrate, whereby a plurality of detectors for detecting different wavelengths of light for a given pixel are provided by removing material above given areas of successive ones of the absorption layers, which areas are doped to form a pn junction with the surrounding unexposed portions of associated absorption layers, respectively, with metal contacts being formed on a portion of each of the exposed areas, and on the bottom of the substrate for facilitating electrical connections thereto.

  4. Fabrication of Pop-up Detector Arrays on Si Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Mary J.; Allen, Christine A.; Gordon, Scott A.; Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Mott, David B.; Stahle, Caroline K.; Wang, Liqin L.

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity is a basic requirement for a new generation of thermal detectors. To meet the requirement, close-packed, two-dimensional silicon detector arrays have been developed in NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The goal of the task is to fabricate detector arrays configured with thermal detectors such as infrared bolometers and x-ray calorimeters to use in space fliGht missions. This paper focuses on the fabrication and the mechanical testing of detector arrays in a 0.2 mm pixel size, the smallest pop-up detectors being developed so far. These array structures, nicknamed "PUDS" for "Pop-Up Detectors", are fabricated on I pm thick, single-crystal, silicon membranes. Their designs have been refined so we can utilize the flexibility of thin silicon films by actually folding the silicon membranes to 90 degrees in order to obtain close-packed two-dimensional arrays. The PUD elements consist of a detector platform and two legs for mechanical support while also serving as electrical and thermal paths. Torsion bars and cantilevers connecting the detector platform to the legs provide additional flexures for strain relief. Using micro-electromechanical structure (MEMS) fabrication techniques, including photolithography, anisotropic chemical etching, reactive-ion etching, and laser dicing, we have fabricated PLTD detector arrays of fourteen designs with a variation of four parameters including cantilever length, torsion bar length and width, and leg length. Folding tests were conducted to test mechanical stress distribution for the array structures. We obtained folding yields and selected optimum design parameters to reach minimal stress levels. Computer simulation was also employed to verify mechanical behaviors of PUDs in the folding process. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was utilized to examine the flatness of detectors and the alignment of detector pixels in arrays. The fabrication of thermistors and heaters on the pop-up detectors is under way

  5. The Impact of Array Detectors on Raman Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Stephen C.; Pommier, Carolyn J. S.; Denton, M. Bonner

    2007-01-01

    The impact of array detectors in the field of Raman spectroscopy and all low-light-level spectroscopic techniques is examined. The high sensitivity of array detectors has allowed Raman spectroscopy to be used to detect compounds at part per million concentrations and to perform Raman analyses at advantageous wavelengths.

  6. Detector arrays for low-background space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The status of development and characterization tests of integrated infrared detector array technology for astronomy applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Laboratory test results and successful astronomy imagery have established the usefulness of integrated arrays in low-background astronomy applications.

  7. Detector arrays for low-background space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The status of development and characterization tests of integrated infrared detector array technology for astronomy applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Laboratary test results and successful astronomy imagery have established the usefulness of integrated arrays in low-background astronomy applications.

  8. Position sensitivity of MAMA detectors. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. S.; Slater, D. S.; Timothy, J. G.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1988-01-01

    The results of laboratory and telescopic measurements of the position sensitivity of a visible MAMA detector utilizing a 'coarse-fine' array are presented. The photometric accuracy of this detector was determined under point source illumination. It was found that computed centroid positions are accurate across the entire array to within 0.04 pixels.

  9. Modulation transfer function of a trapezoidal pixel array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Guo, Rongli; Ni, Jinping; Dong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is the tool most commonly used for quantifying the performance of an electro-optical imaging system. Recently, trapezoid-shaped pixels were designed and used in a retina-like sensor in place of rectangular-shaped pixels. The MTF of a detector with a trapezoidal pixel array is determined according to its definition. Additionally, the MTFs of detectors with differently shaped pixels, but the same pixel areas, are compared. The results show that the MTF values of the trapezoidal pixel array detector are obviously larger than those of rectangular and triangular pixel array detectors at the same frequencies.

  10. Rotationally symmetric triangulation sensor with integrated object imaging using only one 2D detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Johannes; Lei, Wang; Becker, Jonathan; Jun, Gao; Ott, Peter

    2006-04-01

    In this paper a distance measurement sensor is introduced, equipped with two integrated optical systems, the first one for rotationally symmetric triangulation and the second one for imaging the object while using only one 2D detector for both purposes. Rotationally symmetric triangulation, introduced in [1], eliminates some disadvantages of classical triangulation sensors, especially at steps or strong curvatures of the object, wherefore the measurement result depends not any longer on the angular orientation of the sensor. This is achieved by imaging the scattered light from an illuminated object point to a centered and sharp ring on a low cost area detector. The diameter of the ring is proportional to the distance of the object. The optical system consists of two off axis aspheric reflecting surfaces. This system allows for integrating a second optical system in order to capture images of the object at the same 2D detector. A mock-up was realized for the first time which consists of the reflecting optics for triangulation manufactured by diamond turning. A commercially available appropriate small lens system for imaging was mechanically integrated in the reflecting optics. Alternatively, some designs of retrofocus lens system for larger field of views were investigated. The optical designs allow overlying the image of the object and the ring for distance measurement in the same plane. In this plane a CCD detector is mounted, centered to the optical axis for both channels. A fast algorithm for the evaluation of the ring is implemented. The characteristics, i.e. the ring diameter versus object distance shows very linear behavior. For illumination of the object point for distance measurement, the beam of a red laser diode system is reflected by a wavelength bandpath filter on the axis of the optical system in. Additionally, the surface of the object is illuminated by LED's in the green spectrum. The LED's are located on the outside rim of the reflecting optics. The

  11. 2D array of cold-electron nanobolometers with double polarised cross-dipole antennas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A novel concept of the two-dimensional (2D) array of cold-electron nanobolometers (CEB) with double polarised cross-dipole antennas is proposed for ultrasensitive multimode measurements. This concept provides a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure both components of an RF signal and to avoid complicated combinations of two schemes for each polarisation. The optimal concept of the CEB includes a superconductor-insulator-normal tunnel junction and an SN Andreev contact, which provides better performance. This concept allows for better matching with the junction gate field-effect transistor (JFET) readout, suppresses charging noise related to the Coulomb blockade due to the small area of tunnel junctions and decreases the volume of a normal absorber for further improvement of the noise performance. The reliability of a 2D array is considerably increased due to the parallel and series connections of many CEBs. Estimations of the CEB noise with JFET readout give an opportunity to realise a noise equivalent power (NEP) that is less than photon noise, specifically, NEP = 4 10−19 W/Hz1/2 at 7 THz for an optical power load of 0.02 fW. PMID:22512950

  12. Large 2D-arrays of size-controllable silver nanoparticles prepared by hybrid deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieu Thuy Ung, Thi; Hoa Nguyen, Thi; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2016-09-01

    Two main results are presented in this paper. (i) Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with uniform size-distribution and controllability in the range of 20-50 nm were synthesized by seeding and growing at ambient conditions. The single-crystal Ag nano-seeds were created by reduction of AgNO3 in presence of citrate surfactant at 70 °C. Then, importantly, the fresh AgCl precursor was used in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone to adjust the reaction rate with ascorbic acid to generate Ag for growing on the surface of single-crystal Ag nano-seeds. The AgNPs size could be well-controlled by varying the amount of Ag nano-seeds while keeping the AgCl precursor concentration to be constant. (ii) The large 2D-arrays with homogeneous and dense monolayers of AgNPs were prepared on ITO substrates by hybrid method, in which the key technological point is the surface functionalization of AgNPs using mixed alkanethiols (dodecanethiol:octadecanethiol = 6:1). We have used the fabricated 2D-arrays from the 50 nm AgNPs as a surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate to take the Raman scattering spectra of rhodamine B (RhB), glucose and viral pathogen (H5N1) at very low concentrations of 10-10 M, 10-12 M and 4 ng μl-1, respectively.

  13. A 16 x 16 element extrinsic silicon detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Two bismuth-doped silicon accumulation-mode charge-injection device (AMCID) infrared detector arrays are studied. The geometry and composition of the arrays, and a description of the cold and warm electronics components of the system are described. Instructions for setting up and operating the array system, plus results of a functional test, are included.

  14. The Design and Analysis of Split Row-Column Addressing Array for 2-D Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Jia, Yanping; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-01-01

    For 3-D ultrasound imaging, the row-column addressing (RCA) with 2N connections for an N × N 2-D array makes the fabrication and interconnection simpler than the fully addressing with N2 connections. However, RCA degrades the image quality because of defocusing in signal channel direction in the transmit event. To solve this problem, a split row-column addressing scheme (SRCA) is proposed in this paper. Rather than connecting all the elements in the signal channel direction together, this scheme divides the elements in the signal channel direction into several disconnected blocks, thus enables focusing beam access in both signal channel and switch channel directions. Selecting an appropriate split scheme is the key for SRCA to maintaining a reasonable tradeoff between the image quality and the number of connections. Various split schemes for a 32 × 32 array are fully investigated with point spread function (PSF) analysis and imaging simulation. The result shows the split scheme with five blocks (4, 6, 12, 6, and 4 elements of each block) can provide similar image quality to fully addressing. The splitting schemes for different array sizes from 16 × 16 to 96 × 96 are also discussed. PMID:27690029

  15. The Design and Analysis of Split Row-Column Addressing Array for 2-D Transducer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Jia, Yanping; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-09-27

    For 3-D ultrasound imaging, the row-column addressing (RCA) with 2N connections for an N × N 2-D array makes the fabrication and interconnection simpler than the fully addressing with N² connections. However, RCA degrades the image quality because of defocusing in signal channel direction in the transmit event. To solve this problem, a split row-column addressing scheme (SRCA) is proposed in this paper. Rather than connecting all the elements in the signal channel direction together, this scheme divides the elements in the signal channel direction into several disconnected blocks, thus enables focusing beam access in both signal channel and switch channel directions. Selecting an appropriate split scheme is the key for SRCA to maintaining a reasonable tradeoff between the image quality and the number of connections. Various split schemes for a 32 × 32 array are fully investigated with point spread function (PSF) analysis and imaging simulation. The result shows the split scheme with five blocks (4, 6, 12, 6, and 4 elements of each block) can provide similar image quality to fully addressing. The splitting schemes for different array sizes from 16 × 16 to 96 × 96 are also discussed.

  16. Results from the Puebla extensive air shower detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, H.; Martinez, O.; Moreno, E.; Cotzomi, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Saavedrac, O.

    2003-07-01

    We describe the design and operation of the first stage of the EAS-UAP extensive air shower array, as a detector of very high energy cosmic rays ( Eo > 10 14eV). The array is located at the Campus of Puebla University and consists of 18 liquid scintillator detectors, with an active surface of 1 m2 each and a detector spacing of 20 m in a square grid. In this report we discuss the stability and the calibration of the detector array, as derived from the 10 detectors in operation in the first stage. The main characteristics of the array allow us also to use it as an educational and training facility. First distributions of the arrival direction and the lateral shower srpead are also given.

  17. Beamforming of Ultrasound Signals from 1-D and 2-D Arrays under Challenging Imaging Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovljevic, Marko

    Beamforming of ultrasound signals in the presence of clutter, or partial aperture blockage by an acoustic obstacle can lead to reduced visibility of the structures of interest and diminished diagnostic value of the resulting image. We propose new beamforming methods to recover the quality of ultrasound images under such challenging conditions. Of special interest are the signals from large apertures, which are more susceptible to partial blockage, and from commercial matrix arrays that suffer from low sensitivity due to inherent design/hardware limitations. A coherence-based beamforming method designed for suppressing the in vivo clutter, namely Short-lag Spatial Coherence (SLSC) Imaging, is first implemented on a 1-D array to enhance visualization of liver vasculature in 17 human subjects. The SLSC images show statistically significant improvements in vessel contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio over the matched B-mode images. The concept of SLSC imaging is then extended to matrix arrays, and the first in vivo demonstration of volumetric SLSC imaging on a clinical ultrasound system is presented. The effective suppression of clutter via volumetric SLSC imaging indicates it could potentially compensate for the low sensitivity associated with most commercial matrix arrays. The rest of the dissertation assesses image degradation due to elements blocked by ribs in a transthoracic scan. A method to detect the blocked elements is demonstrated using simulated, ex vivo, and in vivo data from the fully-sampled 2-D apertures. The results show that turning off the blocked elements both reduces the near-field clutter and improves visibility of anechoic/hypoechoic targets. Most importantly, the ex vivo data from large synthetic apertures indicates that the adaptive weighing of the non-blocked elements can recover the loss of focus quality due to periodic rib structure, allowing large apertures to realize their full resolution potential in transthoracic ultrasound.

  18. Continuous-wave terahertz digital holographic tomography with a pyroelectric array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Wang, Dayong; Zhou, Xun; Rong, Lu; Li, Zeyu; Li, Lei; Min, Wan; Huang, Haochong; Wang, Yunxin

    2016-05-01

    Terahertz computed tomography makes use of the penetrability of terahertz radiation and obtains three-dimensional (3-D) object projection data. Continuous-wave terahertz digital holographic tomography with a pyroelectric array detector is presented. Compared with scanning terahertz computed tomography, a pyroelectric array detector can obtain a large quantity of projection data in a short time. To obtain a 3-D image, in-line digital holograms of the object are recorded from various directions and reconstructed to obtain two-dimensional (2-D) projection data; then 2-D cross-sectional images and 3-D images of the internal structure of the object are obtained by the filtered back projection algorithm. The presented system can rapidly reconstruct the 3-D object and reveals the internal 3-D structure of the object. A 3-D reconstruction of a polyethylene straw is presented with a 6% error in retrieved diameter.

  19. Simulating ultrasound fields for 2D phased-array probes design optimization.

    PubMed

    Matrone, Giulia; Quaglia, Fabio; Magenes, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, ultrasound diagnostic imaging is one of the non-invasive techniques mostly used in the clinical practice. Recent advances in this field have brought to the development of small and portable systems. New bidimensional probes consisting of 2D phased arrays, allow to obtain real-time 3D representations of moving organs and blood vessels anatomy. Being the complexity of such 4D ultrasound imaging systems significantly increased, new challenges concerning electronics integration arise for designers. In this paper a software simulator is described, which has been developed in order to model ultrasound wave generation, pressure field distribution and echoes reception, with the aim to become a useful tool for optimizing the probe design. The paper mainly focuses on linear ultrasound field modeling; preliminary results on non-linear interactions with contrast agents are also here introduced.

  20. Holographic method for site-resolved detection of a 2D array of ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Daniel Kai; Deissler, Benjamin; Limmer, Wolfgang; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel approach to site-resolved detection of a 2D gas of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A near-resonant laser beam is coherently scattered by the atomic array, and after passing a lens its interference pattern is holographically recorded by superimposing it with a reference laser beam on a CCD chip. Fourier transformation of the recorded intensity pattern reconstructs the atomic distribution in the lattice with single-site resolution. The holographic detection method requires only about two hundred scattered photons per atom in order to achieve a high reconstruction fidelity of 99.9 %. Therefore, additional cooling during detection might not be necessary even for light atomic elements such as lithium. Furthermore, first investigations suggest that small aberrations of the lens can be post-corrected in imaging processing.

  1. Computationally Efficient 2D DOA Estimation with Uniform Rectangular Array in Low-Grazing Angle

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Junpeng; Hu, Guoping; Zhang, Xiaofei; Sun, Fenggang; Xiao, Yu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computationally efficient spatial differencing matrix set (SDMS) method for two-dimensional direction of arrival (2D DOA) estimation with uniform rectangular arrays (URAs) in a low-grazing angle (LGA) condition. By rearranging the auto-correlation and cross-correlation matrices in turn among different subarrays, the SDMS method can estimate the two parameters independently with one-dimensional (1D) subspace-based estimation techniques, where we only perform difference for auto-correlation matrices and the cross-correlation matrices are kept completely. Then, the pair-matching of two parameters is achieved by extracting the diagonal elements of URA. Thus, the proposed method can decrease the computational complexity, suppress the effect of additive noise and also have little information loss. Simulation results show that, in LGA, compared to other methods, the proposed methods can achieve performance improvement in the white or colored noise conditions. PMID:28245634

  2. Quantum simulation of 2D topological physics in a 1D array of optical cavities.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi-Wang; Zhou, Xingxiang; Li, Chuan-Feng; Xu, Jin-Shi; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhou, Zheng-Wei

    2015-07-06

    Orbital angular momentum of light is a fundamental optical degree of freedom characterized by unlimited number of available angular momentum states. Although this unique property has proved invaluable in diverse recent studies ranging from optical communication to quantum information, it has not been considered useful or even relevant for simulating nontrivial physics problems such as topological phenomena. Contrary to this misconception, we demonstrate the incredible value of orbital angular momentum of light for quantum simulation by showing theoretically how it allows to study a variety of important 2D topological physics in a 1D array of optical cavities. This application for orbital angular momentum of light not only reduces required physical resources but also increases feasible scale of simulation, and thus makes it possible to investigate important topics such as edge-state transport and topological phase transition in a small simulator ready for immediate experimental exploration.

  3. Synthesis of nanovoid Bi(2)WO(6) 2D ordered arrays as photoanodes for photoelectrochemical water splitting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwu; Bahnemann, Detlef

    2013-02-01

    Herein we report a facile and economic method to prepare nanovoid Bi(2)WO(6) 2D ordered arrays employing a simple self-assembly procedure. The electrochemical properties and performance of the 2D nanoarray as a photoanode for water splitting are investigated and compared with a conventional photoanode of similar thickness. The 2D array photoanode shows a much higher photocurrent density and photon-to-H(2) conversion efficiency even with a small content of the Bi(2)WO(6) material. The enhancement is further studied and explained on the basis of the superiority of light scattering and photogenerated hole diffusion within the 2D array structure. This work provides a facile method to improve the efficiency of solar energy conversion systems by minimizing the charge-carrier diffusion length and reducing the light reflection, as well as reducing the amount of the semiconductor material (often costly and/or rare) present in the photoanode.

  4. Wafer-bonded 2-D CMUT arrays incorporating through-wafer trench-isolated interconnects with a supporting frame.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xuefeng; Wygant, Ira O; Lin, Der-Song; Kupnik, Mario; Oralkan, Omer; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on wafer-bonded, fully populated 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays. To date, no successful through-wafer via fabrication technique has been demonstrated that is compatible with the wafer-bonding method of making CMUT arrays. As an alternative to through-wafer vias, trench isolation with a supporting frame is incorporated into the 2-D arrays to provide through-wafer electrical connections. The CMUT arrays are built on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer, and all electrical connections to the array elements are brought to the back side of the wafer through the highly conductive silicon substrate. Neighboring array elements are separated by trenches on both the device layer and the bulk silicon. A mesh frame structure, providing mechanical support, is embedded between silicon pillars, which electrically connect to individual elements. We successfully fabricated a 16 x 16-element 2-D CMUT array using wafer bonding with a yield of 100%. Across the array, the pulse-echo amplitude distribution is uniform (rho = 6.6% of the mean amplitude). In one design, we measured a center frequency of 7.6 MHz, a peak-to-peak output pressure of 2.9 MPa at the transducer surface, and a 3-dB fractional bandwidth of 95%. Volumetric ultrasound imaging was demonstrated by chip-to-chip bonding one of the fabricated 2-D arrays to a custom-designed integrated circuit (IC). This study shows that through-wafer trench-isolation with a supporting frame is a viable solution for providing electrical interconnects to CMUT elements and that 2-D arrays fabricated using waferbonding deliver good performance.

  5. On-line quality assurance of rotational radiotherapy treatment delivery by means of a 2D ion chamber array and the Octavius phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, Ann van; Clermont, Christian; Devillers, Magali; Iori, Mauro; Huyskens, Dominique P.

    2007-10-15

    For routine pretreatment verification of innovative treatment techniques such as (intensity modulated) dynamic arc therapy and helical TomoTherapy, an on-line and reliable method would be highly desirable. The present solution proposed by TomoTherapy, Inc. (Madison, WI) relies on film dosimetry in combination with up to two simultaneous ion chamber point dose measurements. A new method is proposed using a 2D ion chamber array (Seven29, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) inserted in a dedicated octagonal phantom, called Octavius. The octagonal shape allows easy positioning for measurements in multiple planes. The directional dependence of the response of the detector was primarily investigated on a dual energy (6 and 18 MV) Clinac 21EX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) as no fixed angle incidences can be calculated in the Hi-Art TPS of TomoTherapy. The array was irradiated from different gantry angles and with different arc deliveries, and the dose distributions at the level of the detector were calculated with the AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm) photon dose calculation algorithm implemented in Eclipse (Varian). For validation on the 6 MV TomoTherapy unit, rotational treatments were generated, and dose distributions were calculated with the Hi-Art TPS. Multiple cylindrical ion chamber measurements were used to cross-check the dose calculation and dose delivery in Octavius in the absence of the 2D array. To compensate for the directional dependence of the 2D array, additional prototypes of Octavius were manufactured with built-in cylindrically symmetric compensation cavities. When using the Octavius phantom with a 2 cm compensation cavity, measurements with an accuracy comparable to that of single ion chambers can be achieved. The complete Octavius solution for quality assurance of rotational treatments consists of: The 2D array, two octagonal phantoms (with and without compensation layer), an insert for nine cylindrical ion chambers, and a set of inserts of

  6. PbS-PbSe IR detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, John R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A silicon wafer is provided which does not employ individually bonded leads between the IR sensitive elements and the input stages of multiplexers. The wafer is first coated with lead selenide in a first detector array area and is thereafter coated with lead sulfide within a second detector array area. The described steps result in the direct chemical deposition of lead selenide and lead sulfide upon the silicon wafer to eliminate individual wire bonding, bumping, flip chipping, planar interconnecting methods of connecting detector array elements to silicon chip circuitry, e.g., multiplexers, to enable easy fabrication of very long arrays. The electrode structure employed, produces an increase in the electrical field gradient between the electrodes for a given volume of detector material, relative to conventional electrode configurations.

  7. A self contained Linux based data acquisition system for 2D detectors with delay line readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltran, D.; Toledo, J.; Klora, A. C.; Ramos-Lerate, I.; Martínez, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a fast and self-contained data acquisition system for 2D gas-filled detectors with delay line readout. It allows the realization of time resolved experiments in the millisecond scale. The acquisition system comprises of an industrial PC running Linux, a commercial time-to-digital converter and an in-house developed histogramming PCI card. The PC provides a mass storage for images and a graphical user interface for system monitoring and control. The histogramming card builds images with a maximum count rate of 5 MHz limited by the time-to-digital converter. Histograms are transferred to the PC at 85 MB/s. This card also includes a time frame generator, a calibration channel unit and eight digital outputs for experiment control. The control software was developed for easy integration into a beamline, including scans. The system is fully operational at the Spanish beamline BM16 at the ESRF in France, the neutron beamlines Adam and Eva at the ILL in France, the Max Plank Institute in Stuttgart in Germany, the University of Copenhagen in Denmark and at the future ALBA synchrotron in Spain. Some representative collected images from synchrotron and neutron beamlines are presented.

  8. Multichannel reconfigurable measurement system for hot plasma diagnostics based on GEM-2D detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojenski, A. J.; Kasprowicz, G.; Pozniak, K. T.; Byszuk, A.; Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Jablonski, S.; Juszczyk, B.; Zienkiewicz, P.

    2015-12-01

    In the future magnetically confined fusion research reactors (e.g. ITER tokamak), precise determination of the level of the soft X-ray radiation of plasma with temperature above 30 keV (around 350 mln K) will be very important in plasma parameters optimization. This paper presents the first version of a designed spectrography measurement system. The system is already installed at JET tokamak. Based on the experience gained from the project, the new generation of hardware for spectrography measurements, was designed and also described in the paper. The GEM detector readout structure was changed to 2D in order to perform measurements of i.e. laser generated plasma. The hardware structure of the system was redesigned in order to provide large number of high speed input channels. Finally, this paper also covers the issue of new control software, necessary to set-up a complete system of certain complexity and perform data acquisition. The main goal of the project was to develop a new version of the system, which includes upgraded structure and data transmission infrastructure (i.e. handling large number of measurement channels, high sampling rate).

  9. Particle Identification in the NIMROD-ISiS Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Wuenschel, S.; Hagel, K.; May, L. W.; Wada, R.; Yennello, S. J.

    2009-03-10

    Interest in the influence of the neutron-to-proton (N/Z) ratio on multifragmenting nuclei has demanded an improvement in the capabilities of multi-detector arrays as well as the companion analysis methods. The particle identification method used in the NIMROD-ISiS 4{pi} array is described. Performance of the detectors and the analysis method are presented for the reaction of {sup 86}Kr+{sup 64}Ni at 35 MeV/u.

  10. Scientific Applications and Promise of Cryogenic Detector Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, Samuel Harvey

    2009-12-01

    During the past year, the first results from a new generation of instruments based on kilopixel-scale arrays of cryogenic detectors have been released. I will review the history of low temperature detector arrays which has enabled this development, the science which has driven this rapid progress, describe the instruments now in operation and their initial scientific results, and speculate on the developments we may see in the next decade.

  11. Development of an iterative reconstruction method to overcome 2D detector low resolution limitations in MLC leaf position error detection for 3D dose verification in IMRT.

    PubMed

    Visser, R; Godart, J; Wauben, D J L; Langendijk, J A; Van't Veld, A A; Korevaar, E W

    2016-05-21

    The objective of this study was to introduce a new iterative method to reconstruct multi leaf collimator (MLC) positions based on low resolution ionization detector array measurements and to evaluate its error detection performance. The iterative reconstruction method consists of a fluence model, a detector model and an optimizer. Expected detector response was calculated using a radiotherapy treatment plan in combination with the fluence model and detector model. MLC leaf positions were reconstructed by minimizing differences between expected and measured detector response. The iterative reconstruction method was evaluated for an Elekta SLi with 10.0 mm MLC leafs in combination with the COMPASS system and the MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry) detector with a spacing of 7.62 mm. The detector was positioned in such a way that each leaf pair of the MLC was aligned with one row of ionization chambers. Known leaf displacements were introduced in various field geometries ranging from  -10.0 mm to 10.0 mm. Error detection performance was tested for MLC leaf position dependency relative to the detector position, gantry angle dependency, monitor unit dependency, and for ten clinical intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment beams. For one clinical head and neck IMRT treatment beam, influence of the iterative reconstruction method on existing 3D dose reconstruction artifacts was evaluated. The described iterative reconstruction method was capable of individual MLC leaf position reconstruction with millimeter accuracy, independent of the relative detector position within the range of clinically applied MU's for IMRT. Dose reconstruction artifacts in a clinical IMRT treatment beam were considerably reduced as compared to the current dose verification procedure. The iterative reconstruction method allows high accuracy 3D dose verification by including actual MLC leaf positions reconstructed from low resolution 2D measurements.

  12. Development of an iterative reconstruction method to overcome 2D detector low resolution limitations in MLC leaf position error detection for 3D dose verification in IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, R.; Godart, J.; Wauben, D. J. L.; Langendijk, J. A.; van't Veld, A. A.; Korevaar, E. W.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce a new iterative method to reconstruct multi leaf collimator (MLC) positions based on low resolution ionization detector array measurements and to evaluate its error detection performance. The iterative reconstruction method consists of a fluence model, a detector model and an optimizer. Expected detector response was calculated using a radiotherapy treatment plan in combination with the fluence model and detector model. MLC leaf positions were reconstructed by minimizing differences between expected and measured detector response. The iterative reconstruction method was evaluated for an Elekta SLi with 10.0 mm MLC leafs in combination with the COMPASS system and the MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry) detector with a spacing of 7.62 mm. The detector was positioned in such a way that each leaf pair of the MLC was aligned with one row of ionization chambers. Known leaf displacements were introduced in various field geometries ranging from  -10.0 mm to 10.0 mm. Error detection performance was tested for MLC leaf position dependency relative to the detector position, gantry angle dependency, monitor unit dependency, and for ten clinical intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment beams. For one clinical head and neck IMRT treatment beam, influence of the iterative reconstruction method on existing 3D dose reconstruction artifacts was evaluated. The described iterative reconstruction method was capable of individual MLC leaf position reconstruction with millimeter accuracy, independent of the relative detector position within the range of clinically applied MU’s for IMRT. Dose reconstruction artifacts in a clinical IMRT treatment beam were considerably reduced as compared to the current dose verification procedure. The iterative reconstruction method allows high accuracy 3D dose verification by including actual MLC leaf positions reconstructed from low resolution 2D measurements.

  13. Gamma-spectrometry with Compton suppressed detectors arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Schueck, C.; Hannachi, F.; Chapman, R.; Lisle, J.C.; Mo, J.N.; Paul, E.; Love, D.J.G.; Nolan, P.J.; Nelson, A.H.; Walker, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent results of experiments performed with two different Compton-suppressed detectors arrays in Daresbury and Berkeley (/sup 163,164/Yb and /sup 154/Er, respectively), are presented together with a brief description of the national French array presently under construction in Strasbourg. 25 refs., 15 figs.

  14. Quality assurance of asymmetric jaw alignment using 2D diode array

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Mo; Yeung, Ivan W. T.; Moseley, Douglas J.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: A method using a 2D diode array is proposed to measure the junction gap (or overlap) and dose with high precision for routine quality assurance of the asymmetric jaw alignment.Methods: The central axis (CAX) of the radiation field was determined with a 15 × 15 cm{sup 2} photon field at four cardinal collimator angles so that the junction gap (or overlap) can be measured with respect to the CAX. Two abutting fields having a field size of 15 cm (length along the axis parallel to the junction) × 7.5 cm (width along the axis perpendicular to the junction) were used to irradiate the 2D diode array (MapCHECK2) with 100 MU delivered at the photon energy of 6 MV. The collimator was slightly rotated at 15° with respect to the beam central axis to increase the number of diodes effective on the measurement of junction gap. The junction gap and dose measured in high spatial resolution were compared to the conventional methods using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and radiochromic film, respectively. In addition, the reproducibility and sensitivity of the proposed method to the measurements of junction gap and dose were investigated.Results: The junction gap (or overlap) and dose measured by MapCHECK2 agreed well to those measured by the conventional methods of EPID and film (the differences ranged from −0.01 to 0 cm and from −1.34% to 0.6% for the gap and dose, respectively). No variation in the repeat measurements of the junction gap was found whereas the measurements of junction dose were found to vary in quite a small range over the days of measurement (0.21%–0.35%). While the sensitivity of the measured junction gap to the actual junction gap applied was the ideal value of 1 cm/cm as expected, the sensitivity of the junction dose to the actual junction gap increased as the junction gap (or overlap) decreased (maximum sensitivity: 201.7%/cm).Conclusions: The initial results suggest that the method is applicable for a comprehensive quality

  15. Rubicon - a New Diode Array Detector System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Kaler, T.; Rudolph, R.; Tug, H.

    A photon-counting system with a 512-channel parallel output digital image tube is presented. Electronics developed separately for each detector channel as well as data aquisition are optimized for low power consumption and high counting rates. This detector, characterized by wide dynamic range, very low noise and high photometric accuracy, is especially suitable for spectrophotometry and calibrations.

  16. Low-background detector arrays for infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Estrada, J. A.; Goebel, J. H.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Mckibbin, D. D.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Weber, T. T.

    1989-01-01

    The status of a program which develops and characterizes integrated infrared (IR) detector array technology for space astronomical applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, coupled to silicon readout electronics. Low-background laboratory test results include measurements of responsivity, noise, dark current, temporal response, and the effects of gamma-radiation. In addition, successful astronomical imagery has been obtained on some arrays from this program. These two aspects of the development combine to demonstrate the strong potential for integrated array technology for IR space astronomy.

  17. A Study of Lane Differentiation Using An Array of Detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    McKigney E. A.; Gholkar, R. V.; Vega, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    The authors discuss a method for locating a radioactive source in the context of determining which lane a source is in on a roadway. This method is appropriate for use over a large range of source velocities, and could provide an advance alarm prior to a vehicle passing a portal monitor. This is a novel method which uses data from the entire array simultaneously to locate the source, rather than relying on only one or two sensors. A description of the underlying method will be given, along with results from five and six detector arrays. The five detector array was used mainly for static tests. The six detector array was used for dynamic tests, including slow movement of a source in a vehicle.

  18. Quantum information experiments with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Kevin; Bohnet, Justin; Sawyer, Brian; Britton, Joseph; Wall, Michael; Foss-Feig, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria; Bollinger, John

    2016-05-01

    We summarize recent experimental work with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped 9 Be+ ions stored in a Penning trap. Penning traps utilize static magnetic and electric fields to confine ions, and enable the trapping and laser cooling of ion crystals larger than typically possible in RF ion traps. We work with single-plane ion crystals where the ions form a triangular lattice through minimization of their Coulomb potential energy. The crystals rotate, and we present numerical studies that determine optimal operating parameters for producing low temperature, stable 2-dimensional crystals with Doppler laser cooling and a rotating wall potential. Our qubit is the electron spin-flip transition in the ground state of 9 Be+ and is sensitive to magnetic field fluctuations. Through mitigation of part-per-billion, vibration-induced magnetic field fluctuations we demonstrate T2 coherence times longer than 50 ms. We engineer long-range Ising interactions with spin-dependent optical dipole forces, and summarize recent measurements that characterize the entanglement generated through single-axis twisting. Supported by: JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PHY-1521080, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  19. Self-alignment of silver nanoparticles in highly ordered 2D arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-León, Ericka; Íñiguez-Palomares, Ramón; Urrutia-Bañuelos, Efraín; Herrera-Urbina, Ronaldo; Tánori, Judith; Maldonado, Amir

    2015-03-01

    We have synthesized silver nanoparticles in the non-polar phase of non-aqueous microemulsions. The nanocrystals have been grown by reducing silver ions in the microemulsion cylindrical micelles formed by the reducing agent (ethylene glycol). By a careful deposit of the microemulsion phase on a substrate, the micelles align in a hexagonal geometry, thus forming a 2D array of parallel strings of individual silver nanoparticles on the substrate. The microemulsions are the ternary system of anionic surfactant, non-polar solvent (isooctane), and solvent polar (ethylene glycol); the size of synthesized nanoparticles is about 7 nm and they are monodisperse. The study of the microstructure was realized by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution technique transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and Fourier processing using the software Digital Micrograph for the determination of the crystalline structure of the HR-TEM images of the nanocrystals; chemical composition was determined using the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Addition technique polarizing light microscopy allowed the observation of the hexagonal phase of the system. This method of synthesis and self-alignment could be useful for the preparation of patterned materials at the nanometer scale.

  20. A preliminary evaluation work on a 3D ultrasound imaging system for 2D array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiaoli; Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Li, Chunyu; Song, Junjie; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a preliminary evaluation work on a pre-designed 3-D ultrasound imaging system. The system mainly consists of four parts, a 7.5MHz, 24×24 2-D array transducer, the transmit/receive circuit, power supply, data acquisition and real-time imaging module. The row-column addressing scheme is adopted for the transducer fabrication, which greatly reduces the number of active channels . The element area of the transducer is 4.6mm by 4.6mm. Four kinds of tests were carried out to evaluate the imaging performance, including the penetration depth range, axial and lateral resolution, positioning accuracy and 3-D imaging frame rate. Several strong reflection metal objects , fixed in a water tank, were selected for the purpose of imaging due to a low signal-to-noise ratio of the transducer. The distance between the transducer and the tested objects , the thickness of aluminum, and the seam width of the aluminum sheet were measured by a calibrated micrometer to evaluate the penetration depth, the axial and lateral resolution, respectively. The experiment al results showed that the imaging penetration depth range was from 1.0cm to 6.2cm, the axial and lateral resolution were 0.32mm and 1.37mm respectively, the imaging speed was up to 27 frames per second and the positioning accuracy was 9.2%.

  1. Self-alignment of silver nanoparticles in highly ordered 2D arrays.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-León, Ericka; Íñiguez-Palomares, Ramón; Urrutia-Bañuelos, Efraín; Herrera-Urbina, Ronaldo; Tánori, Judith; Maldonado, Amir

    2015-01-01

    We have synthesized silver nanoparticles in the non-polar phase of non-aqueous microemulsions. The nanocrystals have been grown by reducing silver ions in the microemulsion cylindrical micelles formed by the reducing agent (ethylene glycol). By a careful deposit of the microemulsion phase on a substrate, the micelles align in a hexagonal geometry, thus forming a 2D array of parallel strings of individual silver nanoparticles on the substrate. The microemulsions are the ternary system of anionic surfactant, non-polar solvent (isooctane), and solvent polar (ethylene glycol); the size of synthesized nanoparticles is about 7 nm and they are monodisperse. The study of the microstructure was realized by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution technique transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and Fourier processing using the software Digital Micrograph for the determination of the crystalline structure of the HR-TEM images of the nanocrystals; chemical composition was determined using the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Addition technique polarizing light microscopy allowed the observation of the hexagonal phase of the system. This method of synthesis and self-alignment could be useful for the preparation of patterned materials at the nanometer scale.

  2. LWIR detector arrays based on nipi superlattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Elliott, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed that nipi superlattice structures in InSb or InAs can be grown with modern techniques to achieve tunable and stable LWIR detectors with high performance. Key device and material considerations for the application of such nipi superlattices to LWIR detectors are examined. It is shown that practical absorption coefficients (of about 100/cm) can be achieved with high doping concentrations (of about 10 to the 19th/cu cm) achievable in these materials. In particular, recent delta doping techniques being developed in molecular beam epitaxy offer promise of higher doping concentrations, improved uniformity, and greater flexibility in tailoring the structures for optimum detector performance.

  3. Quasi 3D dosimetry (EPID, conventional 2D/3D detector matrices)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient specific pretreatment measurement for IMRT and VMAT QA should preferably give information with a high resolution in 3D. The ability to distinguish complex treatment plans, i.e. treatment plans with a difference between measured and calculated dose distributions that exceeds a specified tolerance, puts high demands on the dosimetry system used for the pretreatment measurements and the results of the measurement evaluation needs a clinical interpretation. There are a number of commercial dosimetry systems designed for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. 2D arrays such as MapCHECK® (Sun Nuclear), MatriXXEvolution (IBA Dosimetry) and OCTAVIOUS® 1500 (PTW), 3D phantoms such as OCTAVIUS® 4D (PTW), ArcCHECK® (Sun Nuclear) and Delta4 (ScandiDos) and software for EPID dosimetry and 3D reconstruction of the dose in the patient geometry such as EPIDoseTM (Sun Nuclear) and Dosimetry CheckTM (Math Resolutions) are available. None of those dosimetry systems can measure the 3D dose distribution with a high resolution (full 3D dose distribution). Those systems can be called quasi 3D dosimetry systems. To be able to estimate the delivered dose in full 3D the user is dependent on a calculation algorithm in the software of the dosimetry system. All the vendors of the dosimetry systems mentioned above provide calculation algorithms to reconstruct a full 3D dose in the patient geometry. This enables analyzes of the difference between measured and calculated dose distributions in DVHs of the structures of clinical interest which facilitates the clinical interpretation and is a promising tool to be used for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. However, independent validation studies on the accuracy of those algorithms are scarce. Pretreatment IMRT QA using the quasi 3D dosimetry systems mentioned above rely on both measurement uncertainty and accuracy of calculation algorithms. In this article, these quasi 3D dosimetry systems and their use in patient specific pretreatment IMRT

  4. Bolometeric detector arrays for CMB polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, C. L.; Bock, J. J.; Day, P.; Goldin, A.; Golwala, S.; Holmes, W.; Irwin, K.; Kenyon, M.; Lange, A. E.; LeDuc, H. G.; Rossinot, P.; Sterb, J.; Vayonakis, A.; Wang, G.; Yun, M.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the development of antenna coupled bolometers for CMB polarization experiments. The necessary components of a bolometric CMB polarimeter - a beam forming element, a band defining filter, and detectors - are all fabricated on a silicon chip with photolithography.

  5. Surface detector array for the Pierre Auger observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, H.; Garipov, G. K.; Khrenov, B. A.; Martínez, O.; Moreno, E.; Villaseñor, L.; Zepeda, A.

    2001-05-01

    The Pierre Auger international collaboration will install two observatories, one in the southern hemisphere and other in the northern hemisphere. Each observatory will consist of two different subsystem: a surface detector array of about 1600 water Cherenkov detectors (WCD) and a set of fluorescence eyes to measure the longitudinal development of air showers. The large area covered by the surface detectors requires efficient calibration and monitoring methods that can be implemented remotely. We present several complementary methods to calibrate and monitor the performance of the individual surface detector stations. We also present some results of the studies made with a full size prototype tank in Puebla, Mexico and in Malargue, Argentina. .

  6. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-07

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  7. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  8. Compact optical true time delay beamformer for a 2D phased array antenna using tunable dispersive elements.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xingwei; Zhang, Fangzheng; Pan, Shilong

    2016-09-01

    A hardware-compressive optical true time delay architecture for 2D beam steering in a planar phased array antenna is proposed using fiber-Bragg-grating-based tunable dispersive elements (TDEs). For an M×N array, the proposed system utilizes N TDEs and M wavelength-fixed optical carriers to control the time delays. Both azimuth and elevation beam steering are realized by programming the settings of the TDEs. An experiment is carried out to demonstrate the delay controlling in a 2×2 array, which is fed by a wideband pulsed signal. Radiation patterns calculated from the experimentally measured waveforms at the four antennas match well with the theoretical results.

  9. Hydrates in the California Borderlands: 2D CSEM inversion results from towed and seafloor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannberg, P. K.; Constable, S.; Key, K.

    2013-12-01

    Methane hydrate, an ice-like solid clathrate of methane and water, forms in shallow continental slope sediments, and is both a potential energy source and geologic hazard. Traditionally, methane hydrate presence is inferred from a seismically detected bathymetry tracking velocity inversion, known as the bottom-simulating reflector (BSR). However the BSR is an indicator of free gas at the base of the hydrate stability zone, and not an indicator of hydrate. As such, seismic methods are limited in their capacity to identify and quantify hydrate presence and concentration. Controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) methods are sensitive to, and are able to directly detect, the presence of electrically resistive methane hydrate and free gas. Additionally, because shallow resistors can mimic deeper resistors in seafloor instruments, understanding the shallow sediment structure can inform deeper crustal modeling. We conducted two CSEM surveys in the San Nicolas Basin, located 150km west of San Diego where a BSR was identified from legacy seismics. Both surveys were conducted using a deep-towed EM transmitter followed by 4 towed 3-axis electric field receivers spaced every 200 m from 400-1000 m behind the transmitter. Either a half-hertz or quarter-hertz modified square wave was transmitted on a 200 ampere, 100 m dipole that was flown between 50 and 100m above the seafloor. The short transmitter-receiver offset allows resolution of shallow structure (less than 1km below seafloor), while the longer transmitter-seafloor receiver resolves deeper structure. Between the two surveys, 27 seafloor receivers were deployed and ~150km of lines were towed, including 5 transects of the basin coincident with legacy seismic lines, and a short-offset repeatability study. Initial 1D modeling showed the presence of a resistor coincident with the BSR. Further 2D inversions using the MARE2DEM inversion program were run for the towed array. These inversions show a 4 ohm-m resistor in the central

  10. Substorm development as observed by Interball UV imager and 2-D magnetic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyatsky, W.; Cogger, L. L.; Jackel, B.; Hamza, A. M.; Hughes, W. J.; Murr, D.; Rasmussen, O.

    2001-10-01

    Results of the study of two substorms from Interball auroral UV measurements and two-dimensional patterns of equivalent ionospheric currents derived from the MACCS/CANOPUS and Greenland magnetometer arrays are presented. Substorm development in 2-D equivalent ionospheric current patterns may be described in terms of the formation of two vortices in the equivalent currents: a morning vortex related to downward field-aligned current and an evening vortex related to upward field-aligned current. Poleward propagation of the magnetic disturbances during substorm expansive phase was found to be associated mainly with a poleward displacement of the morning vortex, whereas the evening vortex remained approximately at the same position. As a result, the initial quasi-azimuthal separation of the vortices was replaced by their quasi-meridional separation at substorm maximum. Interball UV images during this period showed the formation of a bright auroral border at the poleward edge of substorm auroral bulge. The auroral UV images showed also that the auroral distribution in the region between the polar border and the main auroral oval tends to have a form of bubbles or petals growing from a bright protuberant region on the equatorward boundary of the auroral oval. However, the resolution of the UV imager was not sufficient for the reliable separation of such the structures, therefore, this result should be considered as preliminary. Overlapping of the auroral UV images onto equivalent current patterns shows that the bright substorm surge was well collocated with the evening vortex whereas the poleward auroral border did not coincide with any evident feature in equivalent ionospheric currents and was located several degrees equatorward of the morning current vortex center related to downward field-aligned current. The ground-based magnetic array allowing us to obtain instantaneous patterns of equivalent ionospheric currents gives a possibility to propose a new index for

  11. Variable FOV optical illumination system with constant aspect ratio for 2-D array lasers diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasa, J.; de la Fuente, M. C.; Ibañez, C.

    2008-09-01

    In this contribution we present a compact system to create an illumination distribution with a constant aspect ratio 3:4 and FOV from 0.4 to 1 degree. Besides, the system must delivery 40 W from 170 individual laser diodes placed in a regular 2-D array distribution of 10 x 20 mm. The main problem that must be solved is the high asymmetry of the individual sources; emission divergence's ratio 3:73 (0.3 vs. 7.4 degree) combined with the flux holes due to the laser's heat drain. In one axis (divergence of 0.3º) the best design strategy approach is a Galileo telescope but in the other axis a collimator configuration is the best solution. To manage both solutions at the same time is the aim of this contribution. Unfortunately for the Galileo strategy, source dimensions are too large so aspheric surfaces are needed, and the collimator configuration requires an EFL that must change from 573 to 1432 mm. The presented solution uses a set of three fixed anamorphic lenses, two of them pure cylinders, combined with a wheel of anamorphic lenses that have the function to change the FOV of the system. The most important contribution of the design is to obtain a constant final ratio 3:4 from an initial ratio of 3:73 with no losses of energy. The proposed solution produces an illumination pattern with peaks and valleys lower than 40%. This pattern distribution might be unacceptable for a standard illumination solution. However, the actual FOV is used to illuminate far away targets thus air turbulence is enough to homogenize the distribution on the target.

  12. Photon counting detector array algorithms for deep space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Meera; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Farr, William H.; Wong, Andre

    2016-03-01

    For deep-space optical communications systems utilizing an uplink optical beacon, a single-photon-counting detector array on the flight terminal can be used to simultaneously perform uplink tracking and communications as well as accurate downlink pointing at photon-starved (pW=m2) power levels. In this paper, we discuss concepts and algorithms for uplink signal acquisition, tracking, and parameter estimation using a photon-counting camera. Statistical models of detector output data and signal processing algorithms are presented, incorporating realistic effects such as Earth background and detector/readout blocking. Analysis and simulation results are validated against measured laboratory data using state-of-the-art commercial photon-counting detector arrays, demonstrating sub-microradian tracking errors under channel conditions representative of deep space optical links.

  13. Integrated Miniature Arrays of Optical Biomolecule Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute; Lin, Ying; Le, Thanh

    2009-01-01

    Integrated miniature planar arrays of optical sensors for detecting specific biochemicals in extremely small quantities have been proposed. An array of this type would have an area of about 1 cm2. Each element of the array would include an optical microresonator that would have a high value of the resonance quality factor (Q . 107). The surface of each microresonator would be derivatized to make it bind molecules of a species of interest, and such binding would introduce a measurable change in the optical properties of the microresonator. Because each microresonator could be derivatized for detection of a specific biochemical different from those of the other microresonators, it would be possible to detect multiple specific biochemicals by simultaneous or sequential interrogation of all the elements in the array. Moreover, the derivatization would make it unnecessary to prepare samples by chemical tagging. Such interrogation would be effected by means of a grid of row and column polymer-based optical waveguides that would be integral parts of a chip on which the array would be fabricated. The row and column polymer-based optical waveguides would intersect at the elements of the array (see figure). At each intersection, the row and column waveguides would be optically coupled to one of the microresonators. The polymer-based waveguides would be connected via optical fibers to external light sources and photodetectors. One set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the row waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the sources to the resonators; the other set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the column waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the microresonators to the photodetectors. Each microresonator could be addressed individually by row and column for measurement of its optical transmission. Optionally, the chip could be fabricated so that each microresonator would lie inside a microwell, into which a microscopic liquid sample could be dispensed.

  14. SRAM As An Array Of Energetic-Ion Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Blaes, Brent R.; Lieneweg, Udo; Nixon, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    Static random-access memory (SRAM) designed for use as array of energetic-ion detectors. Exploits well-known tendency of incident energetic ions to cause bit flips in cells of electronic memories. Design of ion-detector SRAM involves modifications of standard SRAM design to increase sensitivity to ions. Device fabricated by use of conventional complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) processes. Potential uses include gas densimetry, position sensing, and measurement of cosmic-ray spectrum.

  15. Uncooled Infrared Detector Arrays With Electrostatically Levitated Sensing Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-28

    detectors"" vout operating at room temperature . Their resistance changes V2 Ni l following a temperature rise from the absorption of incident radiation...advantages of this approach are: Although in recent times, uncooled microbolometer 1) The detector temperature is not disturbed by thermal arrays have seen...levels by performing the deposition at an elevated temperature . The technology developed here was applied to a new class of acoustic transducer, a

  16. Status of the Neutral Current Detector Array at SNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Adam

    2003-05-01

    The third phase of data taking at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is currently scheduled to begin in the autumn of 2003 with the installation of the Neutral Current Detectors (NCD). The NCDs, an array of ^3He proportional counters, will make an independent measurement of the flux of ^8B solar neutrinos at SNO. The latest results in experimental neutrino physics have given the SNO collaboration the opportunity to maximize the physics capabilities of SNO by deploying just half of the initially proposed NCD array. In order to minimize backgrounds, only the best counters with the lowest intrinsic radioactivity have been selected for deployment into the SNO detector.

  17. Detector array evaluation and figures of merit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dereniak, Eustace L.

    1990-01-01

    The commonly used methods to evaluate the performance of a two-dimensional focal-plane array using charge transfer devices are reviewed. Two figures of merit that attempt to combine quantum efficiency, read noise and dark-current generation into a single parameter are discussed. The figures of merit are suggested as possible alternatives to the D asterisk.

  18. Two dimensional assisted liquid chromatography - a chemometric approach to improve accuracy and precision of quantitation in liquid chromatography using 2D separation, dual detectors, and multivariate curve resolution.

    PubMed

    Cook, Daniel W; Rutan, Sarah C; Stoll, Dwight R; Carr, Peter W

    2015-02-15

    Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC) is rapidly evolving as the preferred method for the analysis of complex biological samples owing to its much greater resolving power compared to conventional one-dimensional (1D-LC). While its enhanced resolving power makes this method appealing, it has been shown that the precision of quantitation in LC×LC is generally not as good as that obtained with 1D-LC. The poorer quantitative performance of LC×LC is due to several factors including but not limited to the undersampling of the first dimension and the dilution of analytes during transit from the first dimension ((1)D) column to the second dimension ((2)D) column, and the larger relative background signals. A new strategy, 2D assisted liquid chromatography (2DALC), is presented here. 2DALC makes use of a diode array detector placed at the end of each column, producing both multivariate (1)D and two-dimensional (2D) chromatograms. The increased resolution of the analytes provided by the addition of a second dimension of separation enables the determination of analyte absorbance spectra from the (2)D detector signal that are relatively pure and can be used to initiate the treatment of data from the first dimension detector using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). In this way, the approach leverages the strengths of both separation methods in a single analysis: the (2)D detector data is used to provide relatively pure analyte spectra to the MCR-ALS algorithm, and the final quantitative results are obtained from the resolved (1)D chromatograms, which has a much higher sampling rate and lower background signal than obtained in conventional single detector LC×LC, to obtain accurate and precise quantitative results. It is shown that 2DALC is superior to both single detector selective or comprehensive LC×LC and 1D-LC for quantitation of compounds that appear as severely overlapped peaks in the (1)D chromatogram - this is

  19. Application of X-Y Separable 2-D Array Beamforming for Increased Frame Rate and Energy Efficiency in Handheld Devices

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Kevin; Fuller, Michael I.; Hossack, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional arrays present significant beamforming computational challenges because of their high channel count and data rate. These challenges are even more stringent when incorporating a 2-D transducer array into a battery-powered hand-held device, placing significant demands on power efficiency. Previous work in sonar and ultrasound indicates that 2-D array beamforming can be decomposed into two separable line-array beamforming operations. This has been used in conjunction with frequency-domain phase-based focusing to achieve fast volume imaging. In this paper, we analyze the imaging and computational performance of approximate near-field separable beamforming for high-quality delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming and for a low-cost, phaserotation-only beamforming method known as direct-sampled in-phase quadrature (DSIQ) beamforming. We show that when high-quality time-delay interpolation is used, separable DAS focusing introduces no noticeable imaging degradation under practical conditions. Similar results for DSIQ focusing are observed. In addition, a slight modification to the DSIQ focusing method greatly increases imaging contrast, making it comparable to that of DAS, despite having a wider main lobe and higher side lobes resulting from the limitations of phase-only time-delay interpolation. Compared with non-separable 2-D imaging, up to a 20-fold increase in frame rate is possible with the separable method. When implemented on a smart-phone-oriented processor to focus data from a 60 × 60 channel array using a 40 × 40 aperture, the frame rate per C-mode volume slice increases from 16 to 255 Hz for DAS, and from 11 to 193 Hz for DSIQ. Energy usage per frame is similarly reduced from 75 to 4.8 mJ/ frame for DAS, and from 107 to 6.3 mJ/frame for DSIQ. We also show that the separable method outperforms 2-D FFT-based focusing by a factor of 1.64 at these data sizes. This data indicates that with the optimal design choices, separable 2-D beamforming can

  20. Application of X-Y separable 2-D array beamforming for increased frame rate and energy efficiency in handheld devices.

    PubMed

    Owen, Kevin; Fuller, Michael; Hossack, John

    2012-07-01

    Two-dimensional arrays present significant beamforming computational challenges because of their high channel count and data rate. These challenges are even more stringent when incorporating a 2-D transducer array into a battery-powered hand-held device, placing significant demands on power efficiency. Previous work in sonar and ultrasound indicates that 2-D array beamforming can be decomposed into two separable line-array beamforming operations. This has been used in conjunction with frequency-domain phase-based focusing to achieve fast volume imaging. In this paper, we analyze the imaging and computational performance of approximate near-field separable beamforming for high-quality delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming and for a low-cost, phase-rotation-only beamforming method known as direct-sampled in-phase quadrature (DSIQ) beamforming. We show that when high-quality time-delay interpolation is used, separable DAS focusing introduces no noticeable imaging degradation under practical conditions. Similar results for DSIQ focusing are observed. In addition, a slight modification to the DSIQ focusing method greatly increases imaging contrast, making it comparable to that of DAS, despite having a wider main lobe and higher side lobes resulting from the limitations of phase-only time-delay interpolation. Compared with non-separable 2-D imaging, up to a 20-fold increase in frame rate is possible with the separable method. When implemented on a smart-phone-oriented processor to focus data from a 60 x 60 channel array using a 40 x 40 aperture, the frame rate per C-mode volume slice increases from 16 to 255 Hz for DAS, and from 11 to 193 Hz for DSIQ. Energy usage per frame is similarly reduced from 75 to 4.8 mJ/ frame for DAS, and from 107 to 6.3 mJ/frame for DSIQ. We also show that the separable method outperforms 2-D FFT-based focusing by a factor of 1.64 at these data sizes. This data indicates that with the optimal design choices, separable 2-D beamforming can

  1. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidgunst, C.; Ritter, D.; Lang, E.

    2007-09-15

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology.

  2. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Schmidgunst, C; Ritter, D; Lang, E

    2007-09-01

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems, (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology.

  3. Si:Bi switched photoconducttor infrared detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eakin, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A multiplexed infrared detector array is described. The small demonstration prototype consisted of two cryogenically cooled, bismuth doped silicon, extrinsic photoconductor pixels multiplexed onto a single output channel using an on focal plane switch integration sampling technique. Noise levels of the order of 400 to 600 rms electrons per sample were demonstrated for this chip and wire hybrid version.

  4. A broadband superconducting detector suitable for use in large arrays.

    PubMed

    Day, Peter K; LeDuc, Henry G; Mazin, Benjamin A; Vayonakis, Anastasios; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2003-10-23

    Cryogenic detectors are extremely sensitive and have a wide variety of applications (particularly in astronomy), but are difficult to integrate into large arrays like a modern CCD (charge-coupled device) camera. As current detectors of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) already have sensitivities comparable to the noise arising from the random arrival of CMB photons, the further gains in sensitivity needed to probe the very early Universe will have to arise from large arrays. A similar situation is encountered at other wavelengths. Single-pixel X-ray detectors now have a resolving power of DeltaE < 5 eV for single 6-keV photons, and future X-ray astronomy missions anticipate the need for 1,000-pixel arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a superconducting detector that is easily fabricated and can readily be incorporated into such an array. Its sensitivity is already within an order of magnitude of that needed for CMB observations, and its energy resolution is similarly close to the targets required for future X-ray astronomy missions.

  5. A Broadband Superconducting Detector Suitable for Use in Large Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Peter K.; LeDuc, Henry G.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Vayonakis, Anastasios; Zmuldzinas, Jonas

    2003-01-01

    Cryogenic detectors are extremely sensitive and have a wide variety of applications (particularly in astronomy), but are difficult to integrate into large arrays like a modern CCD (charge-coupled device) camera. As current detectors of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) already have sensitivities comparable to the noise arising from the random arrival of CMB photons, the further gains in sensitivity needed to probe the very early Universe will have to arise from large arrays. A similar situation is encountered at other wavelengths. Single-pixel X-ray detectors now have a resolving power of (Delta)E < 5 eV for single 6-keV photons, and future X-ray astronomy missions anticipate the need for 1,000-pixel arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a superconducting detector that is easily fabricated and can readily be incorporated into such an array. Its sensitivity is already within an order of magnitude of that needed for CMB observations, and its energy resolution is similarly close to the targets required for future X-ray astronomy missions.

  6. Conceptual design of a hybrid Ge:Ga detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parry, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    For potential applications in space infrared astronomy missions such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility and the Large Deployable Reflector, integrated arrays of long-wavelength detectors are desired. The results of a feasibility study which developed a design for applying integrated array techniques to a long-wavelength (gallium-doped germanium) material to achieve spectral coverage between 30 and 200 microns are presented. An approach which builds up a two-dimensional array by stacking linear detector modules is presented. The spectral response of the Ge:Ga detectors is extended to 200 microns by application of uniaxial stress to the stack of modules. The detectors are assembled with 1 mm spacing between the elements. Multiplexed readout of each module is accomplished with integration sampling of a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) switch chip. Aspects of the overall design, including the anticipated level of particle effects on the array in the space environment, a transparent electrode design for 200 microns response, estimates of optical crosstalk, and mechanical stress design calculations are included.

  7. First Results from the Telescope Array RAdar (TARA) Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Isaac

    2014-03-01

    The TARA cosmic ray detector has been in operation for about a year and a half. This bi-static radar detector was designed with the goal of detecting cosmic rays in coincidence with Telescope Array (TA). A new high power (25 kW, 5 MW effective radiated power) transmitter and antenna array and 250 MHz fPGA-based DAQ have been operational since August 2013. The eight-Yagi antenna array broadcasts a 54.1 MHz tone across the TA surface detector array toward our receiver station 50 km away at the Long Ridge fluorescence detector. Receiving antennas feed an intelligent DAQ that self-adjusts to the fluctuating radio background and which employs a bank of matched filters that search in real-time for chirp radar echoes. Millions of triggers have been collected in this mode. A second mode is a forced trigger scheme that uses the trigger status of the fluorescence telescope. Of those triggers collected in FD-triggered mode, about 800 correspond with well-reconstructed TA events. I will describe recent advancements in calibrating key components in the transmitter and receiver RF chains and the analysis of FD-triggered data. Work supported by W.M. Keck Foundation and NSF.

  8. High resolution decoding of Multi-Anode Microchannel Array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) is a photon counting detector which utilizes a photocathode for photon to electron conversion, a microchannel plate (MCP) for signal amplification and a proximity focused anode array for position sensitivity. The detector electronics decode the position of an event through coincidence discrimination. The decoding algorithm which associates a given event with the appropriate pixel is determined by the geometry of the array. A new algorithm incorporated into a CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) decoder which improves the pixel spatial resolution is described. The new algorithm does not degrade the detector throughput and does not require any modifications to the detector tube. The standard MAMA detector has a pixel size of 25 x 25 square microns, but with the new decoder circuit the pixel size is reduced to 12.5 x 12.5 square microns. We have built the first set of decode electronics utilizing the new ASIC chips and report here on the first imaging tests of this system.

  9. Silicon strip detector for a novel 2D dosimetric method for radiotherapy treatment verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocci, A.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Gallardo, M. I.; Espino, J. M.; Arráns, R.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Abou-Haïdar, Z.; Quesada, J. M.; Pérez Vega-Leal, A.; Pérez Nieto, F. J.

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize a silicon strip detector and its associated data acquisition system, based on discrete electronics, to obtain in a near future absorbed dose maps in axial planes for complex radiotherapy treatments, using a novel technique. The experimental setup is based on two phantom prototypes: the first one is a polyethylene slab phantom used to characterize the detector in terms of linearity, percent depth dose, reproducibility, uniformity and penumbra. The second one is a cylindrical phantom, specifically designed and built to recreate conditions close to those normally found in clinical environments, for treatment planning assessment. This system has been used to study the dosimetric response of the detector, in the axial plane of the phantom, as a function of its angle with respect to the irradiation beam. A software has been developed to operate the rotation of this phantom and to acquire signals from the silicon strip detector. As an innovation, the detector was positioned inside the cylindrical phantom parallel to the beam axis. Irradiation experiments were carried out with a Siemens PRIMUS linac operating in the 6 MV photon mode at the Virgen Macarena Hospital. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using Geant4 toolkit and results were compared to Treatment Planning System (TPS) calculations for the absorbed dose-to-water case. Geant4 simulations were used to estimate the sensitivity of the detector in different experimental configurations, in relation to the absorbed dose in each strip. A final calibration of the detector in this clinical setup was obtained by comparing experimental data with TPS calculations.

  10. Guided Lamb wave based 2-D spiral phased array for structural health monitoring of thin panel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byungseok

    2011-12-01

    In almost all industries of mechanical, aerospace, and civil engineering fields, structural health monitoring (SHM) technology is essentially required for providing the reliable information of structural integrity of safety-critical structures, which can help reduce the risk of unexpected and sometimes catastrophic failures, and also offer cost-effective inspection and maintenance of the structures. State of the art SHM research on structural damage diagnosis is focused on developing global and real-time technologies to identify the existence, location, extent, and type of damage. In order to detect and monitor the structural damage in plate-like structures, SHM technology based on guided Lamb wave (GLW) interrogation is becoming more attractive due to its potential benefits such as large inspection area coverage in short time, simple inspection mechanism, and sensitivity to small damage. However, the GLW method has a few critical issues such as dispersion nature, mode conversion and separation, and multiple-mode existence. Phased array technique widely used in all aspects of civil, military, science, and medical industry fields may be employed to resolve the drawbacks of the GLW method. The GLW-based phased array approach is able to effectively examine and analyze complicated structural vibration responses in thin plate structures. Because the phased sensor array operates as a spatial filter for the GLW signals, the array signal processing method can enhance a desired signal component at a specific direction while eliminating other signal components from other directions. This dissertation presents the development, the experimental validation, and the damage detection applications of an innovative signal processing algorithm based on two-dimensional (2-D) spiral phased array in conjunction with the GLW interrogation technique. It starts with general backgrounds of SHM and the associated technology including the GLW interrogation method. Then, it is focused on the

  11. Photon counting photodiode array detector for far ultraviolet (FUV) astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Moos, H. W.; Pembroke, R.; Bowers, C.

    1982-01-01

    A compact, stable, single-stage intensified photodiode array detector designed for photon-counting, far ultraviolet astronomy applications employs a saturable, 'C'-type MCP (Galileo S. MCP 25-25) to produce high gain pulses with a narrowly peaked pulse height distribution. The P-20 output phosphor exhibits a very short decay time, due to the high current density of the electron pulses. This intensifier is being coupled to a self-scanning linear photodiode array which has a fiber optic input window which allows direct, rigid mechanical coupling with minimal light loss. The array was scanned at a 250 KHz pixel rate. The detector exhibits more than adequate signal-to-noise ratio for pulse counting and event location. Previously announced in STAR as N82-19118

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of the dose response of a novel 2D silicon diode array for use in hybrid MRI–LINAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gargett, Maegan Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Oborn, Brad; Metcalfe, Peter

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided radiation therapy systems (MRIgRT) are being developed to improve online imaging during treatment delivery. At present, the operation of single point dosimeters and an ionization chamber array have been characterized in such systems. This work investigates a novel 2D diode array, named “magic plate,” for both single point calibration and 2D positional performance, the latter being a key element of modern radiotherapy techniques that will be delivered by these systems. Methods: GEANT4 Monte Carlo methods have been employed to study the dose response of a silicon diode array to 6 MV photon beams, in the presence of in-line and perpendicularly aligned uniform magnetic fields. The array consists of 121 silicon diodes (dimensions 1.5 × 1.5 × 0.38 mm{sup 3}) embedded in kapton substrate with 1 cm pitch, spanning a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} area in total. A geometrically identical, water equivalent volume was simulated concurrently for comparison. The dose response of the silicon diode array was assessed for various photon beam field shapes and sizes, including an IMRT field, at 1 T. The dose response was further investigated at larger magnetic field strengths (1.5 and 3 T) for a 4 × 4 cm{sup 2} photon field size. Results: The magic plate diode array shows excellent correspondence (< ± 1%) to water dose in the in-line orientation, for all beam arrangements and magnetic field strengths investigated. The perpendicular orientation, however, exhibits a dose shift with respect to water at the high-dose-gradient beam edge of jaw-defined fields [maximum (4.3 ± 0.8)% over-response, maximum (1.8 ± 0.8)% under-response on opposing side for 1 T, uncertainty 1σ]. The trend is not evident in areas with in-field dose gradients typical of IMRT dose maps. Conclusions: A novel 121 pixel silicon diode array detector has been characterized by Monte Carlo simulation for its performance inside magnetic fields representative of current prototype and proposed MRI

  13. Coloured computational imaging with single-pixel detectors based on a 2D discrete cosine transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bao-Lei; Yang, Zhao-Hua; Liu, Xia; Wu, Ling-An

    2017-02-01

    We propose and demonstrate a computational imaging technique that uses structured illumination based on a two-dimensional discrete cosine transform to perform imaging with a single-pixel detector. A scene is illuminated by a projector with two sets of orthogonal patterns, then by applying an inverse cosine transform to the spectra obtained from the single-pixel detector a full-color image is retrieved. This technique can retrieve an image from sub-Nyquist measurements, and the background noise is easily canceled to give excellent image quality. Moreover, the experimental setup is very simple.

  14. 2D SQIF arrays using 20 000 YBCO high R n Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. E.; Hannam, K. E.; Lazar, J.; Leslie, K. E.; Lewis, C. J.; Grancea, A.; Keenan, S. T.; Lam, S. K. H.; Foley, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting quantum interference filters (SQIFs) have been created using two dimensional arrays of YBCO step-edge Josephson junctions connected together in series and parallel configurations via superconducting loops with a range of loop areas and loop inductances. A SQIF response, as evidenced by a single large anti-peak at zero applied flux, is reported at 77 K for step-edge junction arrays with the junction number N = 1 000 up to 20 000. The SQIF sensitivity (slope of peak) increased linearly with N up to a maximum of 1530 V T-1. Array parameters related to geometry and average junction characteristics are investigated in order to understand and improve the SQIF performance in high temperature superconducting arrays. Initial investigations also focus on the effect of the SQUID inductance factor on the SQIF sensitivity by varying both the mean critical current and the mean inductance of the loops in the array. The RF response to a 30 MHz signal is demonstrated.

  15. Applications of pyroelectric materials in array-based detectors.

    PubMed

    Holden, Anthony J

    2011-09-01

    The development of low-cost, uncooled (room temperature operation) thermal detector arrays has been accelerating in recent years and now commercial products are becoming widely available. As costs come down and volumes rise, these devices are entering the consumer marketplace, providing everything from sophisticated security and people-monitoring devices to hand-held thermal imagers for preventative maintenance and building inspection. Two technologies have established significant market shares in uncooled thermal detector array products. These are resistive microbolometers and pyroelectric ceramics. To address the true mass market, the pyroelectric arrays offer significant cost advantage. In this paper, recent developments in a variety of products based on pyroelectric ceramic arrays are described and their performance and applicability are compared and contrasted with competing technologies. This includes the use of low-element-count arrays for applications in people counting and queue measurement, and the drive for cost-effective imaging arrays for mass-market thermal imaging. The technical challenges in materials production, device development, and low-cost manufacture are reviewed and future opportunities and challenges are outlined.

  16. Order-sorting filter transmittance measured with an array detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaney, James B.; Bradley, Scott E.; Bly, Vincent T.; Ewin, Audrey J.; La, Anh T.

    1993-01-01

    The simultaneous measurement of the spectrally and spatially variant transmittance of a linear variable order-sorting filter in a manner that closely resembles its conditions of actual use is described. The transmittance of a prototype order-sorting filter was measured in the 400- to 880-nm wavelength region by illuminating it with the output beam of a spectrophotometer while the filter was attached to the front of a 30 x 32 pixel silicon array detector. The filter was designed to be used in the output beam of a grating spectrometer to prevent the dispersal of higher diffracted orders onto an array detector. Areas of the filter that were spatially matched to the corresponding detector pixel column had measured peak transmittances of about 90 percent that were uniform to within +/- 1.5 percent along a given column. Transmittances for incident wavelengths shorter than the desired bandpass, corresponding to the order overlap region, were measured in the 0.003 range. Line spread function measurements made with the array detector indicated no significant beam spreading caused by inserting the filter into the beam.

  17. 2D metal profile detector using a polymeric fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Wei-Shu; Hooks, Joshua R.; Erwin, Nicholas A.; Wu, Wen-Jong; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2012-04-01

    As sensors become integrated in more applications, interest in magnetostrictive sensor technology has blossomed. Magnetostrictive materials have many advantages and useful applications in daily life, such as high efficient coupling between elastic and polymer material, large displacement, magnetic field sensors, micro actuator and motion motor, etc. The purpose of this paper is to develop a metal sensor which is capable of detecting different geometries and shapes of metal objects. The main configuration is using a Mach-Zehnder fiber-optic interferometer coated with magnetostrictive material. The metal detector system is a novel design of metal detector, easy to fabricate and capable of high sensitivity. In our design, metal detection is made possible by disrupting the magnetic flux density that encompasses the magnetostriction sensor. In this paper, experimental setups are described and metal sensing results are presented. The results of detecting complex metal's geometry and metal's mapping results are discussed.

  18. The Use of Geometric Properties of 2D Arrays across Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Brett M.; Leichtman, Michelle D.; Costa, Rachel; Bemis, Rhyannon

    2009-01-01

    Four- to 10-year-old children (n = 50) participated in a 2D search task that included geometry (with- and without lines) and feature conditions. During each of 27 trials, participants watched as a cartoon character hid behind one of three landmarks arranged in a triangle on a computer screen. During feature condition trials, participants could use…

  19. A Fast Algorithm for 2D DOA Estimation Using an Omnidirectional Sensor Array.

    PubMed

    Nie, Weike; Xu, Kaijie; Feng, Dazheng; Wu, Chase Qishi; Hou, Aiqin; Yin, Xiaoyan

    2017-03-04

    The traditional 2D MUSIC algorithm fixes the azimuth or the elevation, and searches for the other without considering the directions of sources. A spectrum peak diffusion effect phenomenon is observed and may be utilized to detect the approximate directions of sources. Accordingly, a fast 2D MUSIC algorithm, which performs azimuth and elevation simultaneous searches (henceforth referred to as AESS) based on only three rounds of search is proposed. Firstly, AESS searches along a circle to detect the approximate source directions. Then, a subsequent search is launched along several straight lines based on these approximate directions. Finally, the 2D Direction of Arrival (DOA) of each source is derived by searching on several small concentric circles. Unlike the 2D MUSIC algorithm, AESS does not fix any azimuth and elevation parameters. Instead, the adjacent point of each search possesses different azimuth and elevation, i.e., azimuth and elevation are simultaneously searched to ensure that the search path is minimized, and hence the total spectral search over the angular field of view is avoided. Simulation results demonstrate the performance characters of the proposed AESS over some existing algorithms.

  20. A Fast Algorithm for 2D DOA Estimation Using an Omnidirectional Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Weike; Xu, Kaijie; Feng, Dazheng; Wu, Chase Qishi; Hou, Aiqin; Yin, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    The traditional 2D MUSIC algorithm fixes the azimuth or the elevation, and searches for the other without considering the directions of sources. A spectrum peak diffusion effect phenomenon is observed and may be utilized to detect the approximate directions of sources. Accordingly, a fast 2D MUSIC algorithm, which performs azimuth and elevation simultaneous searches (henceforth referred to as AESS) based on only three rounds of search is proposed. Firstly, AESS searches along a circle to detect the approximate source directions. Then, a subsequent search is launched along several straight lines based on these approximate directions. Finally, the 2D Direction of Arrival (DOA) of each source is derived by searching on several small concentric circles. Unlike the 2D MUSIC algorithm, AESS does not fix any azimuth and elevation parameters. Instead, the adjacent point of each search possesses different azimuth and elevation, i.e., azimuth and elevation are simultaneously searched to ensure that the search path is minimized, and hence the total spectral search over the angular field of view is avoided. Simulation results demonstrate the performance characters of the proposed AESS over some existing algorithms. PMID:28273851

  1. Functional 2D nanoparticle/polymer array: Interfacial assembly, transfer, characterization, and coupling to photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shisheng

    We developed a universal, facile and robust method to prepare free-standing, ordered and patternable nanoparticle/polymer monolayer arrays by evaporation-induced self-assembly at a fluid interface. The ultra-thin monolayer nanoparticle/polymer arrays are sufficiently robust that they can be transferred to arbitrary substrates, even with complex topographies. More importantly, the Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in the system serves as a photoresist enabling two modes of electron beam (e-beam) nanoparticle patterning. These ultra-thin films of monolayer nanoparticle arrays are of fundamental interest as 2D artificial solids for electronic, magnetic and optical properties and are also of technological interest for a diverse range of applications in micro- and macro-scale devices including photovoltaics, sensors, catalysis, and magnetic storage. By co-assembly with block co-polymers, the nanoparticles were selectively positioned in one specific phase, representing a high throughput route for creating nanoparticle patterns. The self-assembly process was investigated by combined in-situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and numerical simulation. By e-beam irradiation of free-standing 2D NP/polymer arrays, anisotropic nanowire arrays have been fabricated. Additionally, preliminary investigation on assembly of binary nanoparticle arrays has also been introduced, serving as promising future directions of interfacial assembly. Controlling the rate of spontaneous emission and thus promoting the photon generation efficiency is a key step toward fabrication of Quantum dot based single-photon sources, and harnessing of light energy from emitters with a broad emitting spectrum. Coupling of photo emitters to photonic cavities without perturbing the optical performance of cavities remains as a challenge in study of Purcell effect based on quantum electrodynamics. Taking advantage of interfacial assembly and transfer, we have achieved controlled deposition

  2. Heterodyne detection with mismatch correction based on array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hongzhou; Li, Guoqiang; Yang, Ruofu; Yang, Chunping; Ao, Mingwu

    2016-07-01

    Based on an array detector, a new heterodyne detection system, which can correct the mismatches of amplitude and phase between signal and local oscillation (LO) beams, is presented in this paper. In the light of the fact that, for a heterodyne signal, there is a certain phase difference between the adjacent two samples of analog-to-digital converter (ADC), we propose to correct the spatial phase mismatch by use of the time-domain phase difference. The corrections can be realized by shifting the output sequences acquired from the detector elements in the array, and the steps of the shifting depend on the quantity of spatial phase mismatch. Numerical calculations of heterodyne efficiency are conducted to confirm the excellent performance of our system. Being different from previous works, our system needs not extra optical devices, so it provides probably an effective means to ease the problem resulted from the mismatches.

  3. Heterodyne detection with mismatch correction base on array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongzhou, Dong; Guoqiang, Li; Ruofu, Yang; Chunping, Yang; Mingwu, Ao

    2016-07-01

    Based on an array detector, a new heterodyne detection system, which can correct the mismatches of amplitude and phase between signal and local oscillation (LO) beams, is presented in this paper. In the light of the fact that, for a heterodyne signal, there is a certain phase difference between the adjacent two samples of analog-to-digital converter (ADC), we propose to correct the spatial phase mismatch by use of the time-domain phase difference. The corrections can be realized by shifting the output sequences acquired from the detector elements in the array, and the steps of the shifting depend on the quantity of spatial phase mismatch. Numerical calculations of heterodyne efficiency are conducted to confirm the excellent performance of our system. Being different from previous works, our system needs not extra optical devices, so it provides probably an effective means to ease the problem resulted from the mismatches.

  4. 2D Radiation MHD K-shell Modeling of Single Wire Array Stainless Steel Experiments on the Z Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Apruzese, J. P.; Chong, Y. K.; Davis, J.; Dasgupta, A.; Whitney, K. G.; Clark, R. W.; Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    Many physical effects can produce unstable plasma behavior that affect K-shell emission from arrays. Such effects include: asymmetry in the initial density profile, asymmetry in power flow, thermal conduction at the boundaries, and non-uniform wire ablation. Here we consider how asymmetry in the radiation field also contributes to the generation of multidimensional plasma behavior that affects K-shell power and yield. To model this radiation asymmetry, we have incorporated into the MACH2 r-z MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE population kinetics based on radiation transport using multi-dimensional ray tracing. Such methodology is necessary for modeling the enhanced radiative cooling that occurs at the anode and cathode ends of the pinch during the run-in phase of the implosion. This enhanced radiative cooling is due to reduced optical depth at these locations producing an asymmetric flow of radiative energy that leads to substantial disruption of large initial diameter (>5 cm) pinches and drives 1D into 2D fluid (i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor like) flows. The impact of this 2D behavior on K-shell power and yield is investigated by comparing 1D and 2D model results with data obtained from a series of single wire array stainless steel experiments performed on the Z generator.

  5. 2D Arrays of Hexagonal Plasmonic Necklaces for Enhanced Second Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Tornero, Alejandro; Tserkezis, Christos; Mateos, Luis; Bausá, Luisa E; Ramírez, Mariola O

    2017-02-10

    Hexagonal plasmonic necklaces of silver nanoparticles organized in 2D superlattices on functional ferroelectric templates are fabricated in large-scale spatial regions by using a surfactant-free photo-deposition process. The plasmonic necklaces support broad radiative plasmonic resonances allowing the enhancement of second harmonic generation (SHG) at the ferroelectric domain boundaries. A 400-fold SHG enhancement is achieved at the near-UV spectral region with subsequent interest for technological applications.

  6. A new detector array for charged particle spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowin, R. L.; Watson, D. L.; Chappell, S. P. G.; Clarke, N. M.; Freer, M.; Fulton, B. R.; Cunningham, R. A.; Curtis, N.; Dillon, G. K.; Lilley, J.; Jones, C. D.; Lee, P.; Rae, W. D. M.

    1999-02-01

    A compact and highly segmented detector array consisting of 44 gas-silicon-caesium iodide, position sensitive, particle identification detector telescopes and up to 10 position-sensitive, silicon strip detectors has been constructed for the study of light-ion-heavy-ion reactions including cluster break-up in the energy range 5-15MeV/nucleon. The detectors are housed in a purpose built vacuum chamber. The telescopes are placed in fixed positions, covering the forward hemisphere from 3 to 30° in the laboratory with the target placed at 535mm from the front of the telescopes or 6-52° with the target placed at 215mm. The strip detectors are placed in any of 30 fixed positions in the forward hemisphere. For 85MeV 12C ions the telescope energy resolution (gas plus silicon) is 345keV with an angular resolution of 0.03°. Using the gas-silicon section ions with Z up to 21 can be identified. For ions that pass through the silicon isotopic identification is achieved using the silicon-CsI combination. The strip detector energy resolution is 200keV, with an angular resolution of 0.1°.

  7. The Telescope Array Middle Drum fluorescence detector simulation on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Zayyad, Tareq; Telescope-Array Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been recognized and widely used as an accelerator for many scientific calculations. In general, problems amenable to parallelization are ones that benefit most from the use of GPUs. The Monte Carlo simulation of fluorescence detector response to air showers presents many opportunities for parallelization. In this paper we report on a Monte Carlo program used for the simulation of the Telescope Array Fluorescence Detector located at the Middle Drum site which uses GPU acceleration. All of the physics simulation from shower development, light production and atmospheric attenuation, as well as, the realistic detector optics and electronics simulations are done on the GPU. A detailed description of the code implementation is given, and results on the accuracy and performance of the simulation are presented as well. Improvements in computational throughput in excess of 50× are reported and the accuracy of the results is on par with the CPU implementation of the simulation.

  8. Imaging MAMA detector systems. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Imaging multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with 1024 x 1024 pixel formats have been produced for visible and UV wavelengths; the UV types employ 'solar blind' photocathodes whose detective quantum efficiencies are significantly higher than those of currently available CCDs operating at far-UV and EUV wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the configurations and performance capabilities of state-of-the-art MAMA detectors, with a view to the development requirements of the hybrid electronic circuits needed for forthcoming spacecraft-sensor applications. Gain, dark noise, uniformity, and dynamic range performance data are presented for the curved-channel 'chevron', 'Z-plate', and helical-channel high gain microchannel plate configurations that are currently under evaluation with MAMA detector systems.

  9. READOUT SYSTEM FOR ARRAYS OF FRISCH-RING CDZNTE DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CUI, Y.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; DE GERONIMO, G.; O'CONNOR, P.; JAMES, R.B.; KARGAR, A.; HARRISON, M.J.; MCGREGOR, D.S.

    2006-10-29

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution for identifying isotopes, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. We will fabricate and test at Brookhaven National Laboratory an integrated module of a 64-element array of 6 x 6 x 12 mm{sup 3} Frisch-ring detectors, coupled with a readout electronics system. It supports 64 readout channels, and includes front-end electronics, signal processing circuit, USB interface and high-voltage power supply. The data-acquisition software is used to process the data stream, which includes amplitude and timing information for each detected event. This paper describes the design and assembly of the detector modules, readout electronics, and a conceptual prototype system. Some test results are also reported.

  10. A Novel 2-D Coherent DOA Estimation Method Based on Dimension Reduction Sparse Reconstruction for Orthogonal Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuhong; Mao, Xingpeng; Wang, Yiming; Zhang, Naitong; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Based on sparse representations, the problem of two-dimensional (2-D) direction of arrival (DOA) estimation is addressed in this paper. A novel sparse 2-D DOA estimation method, called Dimension Reduction Sparse Reconstruction (DRSR), is proposed with pairing by Spatial Spectrum Reconstruction of Sub-Dictionary (SSRSD). By utilizing the angle decoupling method, which transforms a 2-D estimation into two independent one-dimensional (1-D) estimations, the high computational complexity induced by a large 2-D redundant dictionary is greatly reduced. Furthermore, a new angle matching scheme, SSRSD, which is less sensitive to the sparse reconstruction error with higher pair-matching probability, is introduced. The proposed method can be applied to any type of orthogonal array without requirement of a large number of snapshots and a priori knowledge of the number of signals. The theoretical analyses and simulation results show that the DRSR-SSRSD method performs well for coherent signals, which performance approaches Cramer–Rao bound (CRB), even under a single snapshot and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) condition. PMID:27649191

  11. Distributed Antenna-Coupled TES for FIR Detectors Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Peter K.; Leduc, Henry G.; Dowell, C. Darren; Lee, Richard A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2007-01-01

    We describe a new architecture for a superconducting detector for the submillimeter and far-infrared. This detector uses a distributed hot-electron transition edge sensor (TES) to collect the power from a focal-plane-filling slot antenna array. The sensors lay directly across the slots of the antenna and match the antenna impedance of about 30 ohms. Each pixel contains many sensors that are wired in parallel as a single distributed TES, which results in a low impedance that readily matches to a multiplexed SQUID readout These detectors are inherently polarization sensitive, with very low cross-polarization response, but can also be configured to sum both polarizations. The dual-polarization design can have a bandwidth of 50The use of electron-phonon decoupling eliminates the need for micro-machining, making the focal plane much easier to fabricate than with absorber-coupled, mechanically isolated pixels. We discuss applications of these detectors and a hybridization scheme compatible with arrays of tens of thousands of pixels.

  12. The detector calibration system for the CUORE cryogenic bolometer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushman, Jeremy S.; Dally, Adam; Davis, Christopher J.; Ejzak, Larissa; Lenz, Daniel; Lim, Kyungeun E.; Heeger, Karsten M.; Maruyama, Reina H.; Nucciotti, Angelo; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Wise, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale cryogenic experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 130Te and other rare events. The CUORE detector consists of 988 TeO2 bolometers operated underground at 10 mK in a dilution refrigerator at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. Candidate events are identified through a precise measurement of their energy. The absolute energy response of the detectors is established by the regular calibration of each individual bolometer using gamma sources. The close-packed configuration of the CUORE bolometer array combined with the extensive shielding surrounding the detectors requires the placement of calibration sources within the array itself. The CUORE Detector Calibration System is designed to insert radioactive sources into and remove them from the cryostat while respecting the stringent heat load, radiopurity, and operational requirements of the experiment. This paper describes the design, commissioning, and performance of this novel source calibration deployment system for ultra-low-temperature environments.

  13. Digital readouts for large microwave low-temperature detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Day, Peter K.; Irwin, Kent D.; Reintsema, Carl D.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2006-04-01

    Over the last several years many different types of low-temperature detectors (LTDs) have been developed that use a microwave resonant circuit as part of their readout. These devices include microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID), microwave SQUID readouts for transition edge sensors (TES), and NIS bolometers. Current readout techniques for these devices use analog frequency synthesizers and IQ mixers. While these components are available as microwave integrated circuits, one set is required for each resonator. We are exploring a new readout technique for this class of detectors based on a commercial-off-the-shelf technology called software defined radio (SDR). In this method a fast digital to analog (D/A) converter creates as many tones as desired in the available bandwidth. Our prototype system employs a 100 MS/s 16-bit D/A to generate an arbitrary number of tones in 50 MHz of bandwidth. This signal is then mixed up to the desired detector resonant frequency (˜10 GHz), sent through the detector, then mixed back down to baseband. The baseband signal is then digitized with a series of fast analog to digital converters (80 MS/s, 14-bit). Next, a numerical mixer in a dedicated integrated circuit or FPGA mixes the resonant frequency of a specified detector to 0 Hz, and sends the complex detector output over a computer bus for processing and storage. In this paper we will report on our results in using a prototype system to readout a MKID array, including system noise performance, X-ray pulse response, and cross-talk measurements. We will also discuss how this technique can be scaled to read out many thousands of detectors.

  14. 2D Ultrasound Sparse Arrays Multi-Depth Radiation Optimization Using Simulated Annealing and Spiral-Array Inspired Energy Functions.

    PubMed

    Roux, Emmanuel; Ramalli, Alessandro; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian; Robini, Marc; Liebgott, Herve

    2016-08-24

    Full matrix arrays are excellent tools for 3D ultrasound imaging, but the required number of active elements is too high to be individually controlled by an equal number of scanner channels. The number of active elements is significantly reduced by the sparse array techniques, but the position of the remaining elements must be carefully optimized. This issue is here faced by introducing novel energy functions in the simulated annealing algorithm. At each iteration step of the optimization process, one element is freely translated and the associated radiated pattern is simulated. To control the pressure field behavior at multiple depths, three energy functions inspired by the pressure field radiated by a Blackman-tapered spiral array are introduced. Such energy functions aim at limiting the main lobe width while lowering the side lobe and grating lobe levels at multiple depths. Numerical optimization results illustrate the influence of the number of iterations, pressure measurement points and depths as well as the influence of the energy function definition on the optimized layout. It is also shown that performance close to- or even better than the one provided by a spiral array, here assumed as reference, may be obtained. The finite-time convergence properties of simulated annealing allow the duration of the optimization process to be set in advance.

  15. 2-D Ultrasound Sparse Arrays Multidepth Radiation Optimization Using Simulated Annealing and Spiral-Array Inspired Energy Functions.

    PubMed

    Roux, Emmanuel; Ramalli, Alessandro; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian; Robini, Marc C; Liebgott, Herve

    2016-12-01

    Full matrix arrays are excellent tools for 3-D ultrasound imaging, but the required number of active elements is too high to be individually controlled by an equal number of scanner channels. The number of active elements is significantly reduced by the sparse array techniques, but the position of the remaining elements must be carefully optimized. This issue is faced here by introducing novel energy functions in the simulated annealing (SA) algorithm. At each iteration step of the optimization process, one element is freely translated and the associated radiated pattern is simulated. To control the pressure field behavior at multiple depths, three energy functions inspired by the pressure field radiated by a Blackman-tapered spiral array are introduced. Such energy functions aim at limiting the main lobe width while lowering the side lobe and grating lobe levels at multiple depths. Numerical optimization results illustrate the influence of the number of iterations, pressure measurement points, and depths, as well as the influence of the energy function definition on the optimized layout. It is also shown that performance close to or even better than the one provided by a spiral array, here assumed as reference, may be obtained. The finite-time convergence properties of SA allow the duration of the optimization process to be set in advance.

  16. Charge-coupled device/fiber optic taper array x-ray detector for protein crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Naday, I.; Ross, S.; Westbrook, E.M.; Zentai, G.

    1998-04-01

    A large area charge-coupled device (CCD) based fiber optic taper array detector (APS-1) is installed at the insertion-device beamline of the Structural Biology Center at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source x-ray synchrotron. The detector is used in protein crystallography diffraction experiments, where the objective is to measure the position and intensity of x-ray Bragg peaks in diffraction images. Large imaging area, very high spatial resolution, high x-ray sensitivity, good detective quantum efficiency, low noise, wide dynamic range, excellent stability and short readout time are all fundamental requirements in this application. The APS-1 detector converts the 2-D x-ray patterns to visible light images by a thin layer of x-ray sensitive phosphor. The phosphor coating is directly deposited on the large ends of nine fiber optic tapers arranged in a 3{times}3 array. Nine, thermoelectrically cooled 1024{times}1024pixel CCDs image the patterns, demagnified by the tapers. After geometrical and uniformity corrections, the nine areas give a continuous image of the detector face with virtually no gaps between the individual tapers. The 18 parallel analog signal-processing channels and analog-to-digital converters ensure short readout time and low readout noise. We discuss the design and measured performance of the detector. {copyright} {ital 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.}{ital Key words:} charge-coupled device; fiber optic taper; x-ray diffraction; crystallography; imaging detector. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers}

  17. SU-D-12A-04: Investigation of a 2D Antiscatter Grid for Flat Panel Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Altunbas, C; Kavanagh, B; Miften, M; Zhong, Y; Shaw, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To improve CT number accuracy and contrast sensitivity, a novel 2D antiscatter grid (ASG) for flat panel detector (FPD) based CBCT imaging was evaluated. Experiments were performed to characterize the scatter rejection and contrast sensitivity performance of ASG. The reduction in primary transmission for various ASG geometries was also evaluated by a computational model. Methods: The 2D ASG design was based on multi-hole collimators used in Nuclear Medicine. It consisted of abutted hexagon shaped apertures with 2.5 mm pitch and 32 mm height, and separated by 0.25 mm thick lead septa. Scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and mean primary transmission were measured using a benchtop FPD/x-ray source system. Acrylic slabs of varying thicknesses were imaged with a contrast-detail phantom to measure CNR and SPR under different scatter conditions. Primary transmission was also measured by averaging pixel values in flood field images without the phantom. We additionally explored variation of primary transmission with pitch and septum thickness using a computational model of our ASG. Results: Our 2D ASG reduced the SPR from 3.3 to 0.12, and improved CNR by 50% in 20 cm thick slab phantom projections acquired at 120 kVp. While the measured primary transmission was 72.8%, our simulations show that primary transmission can be increased to 86% by reducing the septum thickness to 0.1 mm. Primary transmission further increases to 93% if septum thickness of 0.1 mm is used in conjunction with an increased pitch of 4 mm. Conclusion: The 2D ASG appears to be a promising scatter rejection device, offering both superior scatter rejection and improved contrast sensitivity. Though its lead footprint reduced primary transmission, our work shows that optimization of aperture pitch and septum thickness can significantly improve the primary transmission.

  18. Innovative techniques for the production of low cost 2D laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-05-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a low cost fabrication method for high performance laser diode arrays. The program focussed on reliable and cost effective ways to grow, assemble and test diode bars of molecular beam epitaxy material. Quantum well laser structures were grown on 2 and 3 GaAs substrates. These wafers were photolithographically processed, scribed into bars, and the bars assembled by various techniques. The assemblies were tested for performance, reproducibility, and reliability. The originally proposed assembly, a grooved BeO block, was evaluated and abandoned as unreliable. However, a simplified bar and individual BeO substrate assembly method was developed, and state of the art results achieved on robust 1 cm linear diode arrays, which survived repeated high power testing to power level in excess of 80 watts/bar. This method may be scaled up for multiple bar assemblies without additional complexity by adding laser bars and BeO spacers as required. The BeO sub-mounts are coated prior to assembly in such a fashion to provide a low resistance series connection to each bar in the array, similar to the grooved substrate series connection geometry.

  19. A rapidly modulated multifocal detection scheme for parallel acquisition of Raman spectra from a 2-D focal array.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbo; Chan, James

    2014-07-01

    We report the development of a rapidly modulated multifocal detection scheme that enables full Raman spectra (~500-2000 cm(-1)) from a 2-D focal array to be acquired simultaneously. A spatial light modulator splits a laser beam to generate an m × n multifocal array. Raman signals generated within each focus are projected simultaneously into a spectrometer and imaged onto a TE-cooled CCD camera. A shuttering system using different masks is constructed to collect the superimposed Raman spectra of different multifocal patterns. The individual Raman spectrum from each focus is then retrieved from the superimposed spectra with no crosstalk using a postacquisition data processing algorithm. This system is expected to significantly improve the speed of current Raman-based instruments such as laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy and hyperspectral Raman imaging.

  20. Topological detector: measuring continuous dosimetric quantities with few-element detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhaohui; Brivio, Davide; Sajo, Erno; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    A prototype topological detector was fabricated and investigated for quality assurance of radiation producing medical devices. Unlike a typical array or flat panel detector, a topological detector, while capable of achieving a very high spatial resolution, consists of only a few elements and therefore is much simpler in construction and more cost effective. The key feature allowing this advancement is a geometry-driven design that is customized for a specific dosimetric application. In the current work, a topological detector of two elements was examined for the positioning verification of the radiation collimating devices (jaws, MLCs, and blades etc). The detector was diagonally segmented from a rectangular thin film strip (2.5 cm  ×  15 cm), giving two contiguous but independent detector elements. The segmented area was the central portion of the strip measuring 5 cm in length. Under irradiation, signals from each detector element were separately digitized using a commercial multichannel data acquisition system. The center and size of an x-ray field, which were uniquely determined by the collimator positions, were shown mathematically to relate to the difference and sum of the two signals. As a proof of concept, experiments were carried out using slit x-ray fields ranging from 2 mm to 20 mm in size. It was demonstrated that, the collimator positions can be accurately measured with sub-millimeter precisions.

  1. A 2D 4×4 Channel Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Detectors for Medical Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Martínez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles

    2015-01-01

    We present a 16-channel readout integrated circuit (ROIC) with nanosecond-resolution time to digital converter (TDC) for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) gamma-ray detectors. The 4 × 4 pixel array ROIC is the proof of concept of the 10 × 10 pixel array readout ASIC for positron-emission tomography (PET) scanner, positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanner, and Compton gamma camera. The electronics of each individual pixel integrates an analog front-end with switchable gain, an analog to digital converter (ADC), configuration registers, and a 4-state digital controller. For every detected photon, the pixel electronics provides the energy deposited in the detector with 10-bit resolution, and a fast trigger signal for time stamp. The ASIC contains the 16-pixel matrix electronics, a digital controller, five global voltage references, a TDC, a temperature sensor, and a band-gap based current reference. The ASIC has been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and occupies an area of 5.3 mm × 6.8 mm. The TDC shows a resolution of 95.5 ps, a precision of 600 ps at full width half maximum (FWHM), and a power consumption of 130 μW. In acquisition mode, the total power consumption of every pixel is 200 μW. An equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 160 e−RMS at maximum gain and negative polarity conditions has been measured at room temperature. PMID:26744545

  2. A 2D 4×4 Channel Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Detectors for Medical Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Martínez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles

    2015-10-01

    We present a 16-channel readout integrated circuit (ROIC) with nanosecond-resolution time to digital converter (TDC) for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) gamma-ray detectors. The 4 × 4 pixel array ROIC is the proof of concept of the 10 × 10 pixel array readout ASIC for positron-emission tomography (PET) scanner, positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanner, and Compton gamma camera. The electronics of each individual pixel integrates an analog front-end with switchable gain, an analog to digital converter (ADC), configuration registers, and a 4-state digital controller. For every detected photon, the pixel electronics provides the energy deposited in the detector with 10-bit resolution, and a fast trigger signal for time stamp. The ASIC contains the 16-pixel matrix electronics, a digital controller, five global voltage references, a TDC, a temperature sensor, and a band-gap based current reference. The ASIC has been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and occupies an area of 5.3 mm × 6.8 mm. The TDC shows a resolution of 95.5 ps, a precision of 600 ps at full width half maximum (FWHM), and a power consumption of 130 μW. In acquisition mode, the total power consumption of every pixel is 200 μW. An equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 160 e(-)RMS at maximum gain and negative polarity conditions has been measured at room temperature.

  3. Light Trapping Enhancement in a Thin Film with 2D Conformal Periodic Hexagonal Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Zhou, Suqiong; Wang, Dan; He, Jian; Zhou, Jun; Li, Xiaofeng; Gao, Pingqi; Ye, Jichun

    2015-07-01

    Applying a periodic light trapping array is an effective method to improve the optical properties in thin-film solar cells. In this work, we experimentally and theoretically investigate the light trapping properties of two-dimensional periodic hexagonal arrays in the framework of a conformal amorphous silicon film. Compared with the planar reference, the double-sided conformal periodic structures with all feature periodicities of sub-wavelength (300 nm), mid-wavelength (640 nm), and infrared wavelength (2300 nm) show significant broadband absorption enhancements under wide angles. The films with an optimum periodicity of 300 nm exhibit outstanding antireflection and excellent trade-off between light scattering performance and parasitic absorption loss. The average absorption of the optimum structure with a thickness of 160 nm is 64.8 %, which is much larger than the planar counterpart of 38.5 %. The methodology applied in this work can be generalized to rational design of other types of high-performance thin-film photovoltaic devices based on a broad range of materials.

  4. Fast, High-Precision Readout Circuit for Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rider, David M.; Hancock, Bruce R.; Key, Richard W.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Wrigley, Chris J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Sander, Stanley P.; Blavier, Jean-Francois L.

    2013-01-01

    The GEO-CAPE mission described in NASA's Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey requires high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution measurements to monitor and characterize the rapidly changing chemistry of the troposphere over North and South Americas. High-frame-rate focal plane arrays (FPAs) with many pixels are needed to enable such measurements. A high-throughput digital detector readout integrated circuit (ROIC) that meets the GEO-CAPE FPA needs has been developed, fabricated, and tested. The ROIC is based on an innovative charge integrating, fast, high-precision analog-to-digital circuit that is built into each pixel. The 128×128-pixel ROIC digitizes all 16,384 pixels simultaneously at frame rates up to 16 kHz to provide a completely digital output on a single integrated circuit at an unprecedented rate of 262 million pixels per second. The approach eliminates the need for off focal plane electronics, greatly reducing volume, mass, and power compared to conventional FPA implementations. A focal plane based on this ROIC will require less than 2 W of power on a 1×1-cm integrated circuit. The ROIC is fabricated of silicon using CMOS technology. It is designed to be indium bump bonded to a variety of detector materials including silicon PIN diodes, indium antimonide (InSb), indium gallium arsenide (In- GaAs), and mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) detector arrays to provide coverage over a broad spectral range in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet spectral ranges.

  5. Bolometric Array Detectors for Space-Borne Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Andrew E.

    2000-01-01

    Funding from the NASA Innovative Research Grant was used to develop bolometric detectors. As described in the proposal, silicon nitride micromesh ('spider-web') absorbers had been demonstrated at U.C. Berkeley but not developed to be flight-worthy devices. We proceeded to first fabricate bolometers with Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) Ge thermistors that demonstrated high optical coupling (Church et al. 1996) and were developed for a ground-based millimeter-wave receiver (Mauskopf et al. 1997). The next generation of devices used In bump-bonded thermistors to achieve devices with performance product NEP*sqrt(tau) = 3e - 18 j at 300 mK, demonstrating a full order of magnitude improvement over pervious devices. These devices achieved an NEP = 1e-18 W/rtHz (Murray et al. 1996) as promised in the proposal. Sensitivities as good as 1e - 19 W/rtHz appear achievable with the silicon nitride architecture (Bock et al. 1997). Finally, arrays of micromesh bolometers were shown to be feasible in the last year of the program by etching a large number of devices on a single silicon wafer (75 mm). Full arrays were subsequently demonstrated for selection on the ESA/NASA Far-Infrared Space Telescope (FIRST) in competition with detectors provided by CEA in France and GSFC in the US Micromesh bolometer arrays are now baselined for both the ESA/NASA Planck and FIRST missions.

  6. Design of micro-sensor-array detector for toxic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hai-yang; Tian, Peng

    2010-08-01

    To quickly measure the trace concentration of the single component toxic gas (e.g. sarin), a micro-array toxic gas detector is designed. A 3 x 3 gas sensor array with metalloporphyrins as sensitive materials is introduced. A micro-capsule that can be easy to be loaded and unloaded is designed for the gas reaction. A fiber-array optical path is designed, which is based on the principle that gas sensors will show different colors after reaction with the toxic gas. The tricolor information about the concentration of gas is collected by the color liner CCD. A control handling system with C8051F021 MCU as the core is implemented and embedded into the detector to perform the functions of gas sampling, data collection and analysis calculation. Data acquisition experimental results show that the proposed scheme can effectively collect the color information after gas reaction. Moreover, the system has many important advantages, such as small size, compact structure, high degree of automation, fast detection speed and high performance-cost ratio, etc.

  7. Individual speckle diffraction based 1D and 2D Random Grating Fabrication for detector and solar energy harvesting applications.

    PubMed

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-02-04

    Laser speckles and speckle patterns, which are formed by the random interference of scattered waves from optically rough surfaces, have found tremendous applications in a wide range of metrological and biomedical fields. Here, we demonstrate a novel edge diffraction phenomenon of individual speckle for the fabrication of 1D and 2D micron and sub-micron size random gratings. These random gratings exhibit broadband response with interesting diffusive diffraction patterns. As an immediate application for solar energy harvesting, significant reduction in transmission and enhanced absorption in thin "Si-random grating-Si" sandwich structure is demonstrated. This work has multifaceted significance where we exploited the individual speckle diffraction properties for the first time. Besides the solar harvesting applications, random gratings are suitable structures for fabrication of theoretically proposed random quantum well IR detectors and hence expected that this work will augur well for such studies in the near future.

  8. Individual speckle diffraction based 1D and 2D Random Grating Fabrication for detector and solar energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-02-01

    Laser speckles and speckle patterns, which are formed by the random interference of scattered waves from optically rough surfaces, have found tremendous applications in a wide range of metrological and biomedical fields. Here, we demonstrate a novel edge diffraction phenomenon of individual speckle for the fabrication of 1D and 2D micron and sub-micron size random gratings. These random gratings exhibit broadband response with interesting diffusive diffraction patterns. As an immediate application for solar energy harvesting, significant reduction in transmission and enhanced absorption in thin “Si-random grating-Si” sandwich structure is demonstrated. This work has multifaceted significance where we exploited the individual speckle diffraction properties for the first time. Besides the solar harvesting applications, random gratings are suitable structures for fabrication of theoretically proposed random quantum well IR detectors and hence expected that this work will augur well for such studies in the near future.

  9. Individual speckle diffraction based 1D and 2D Random Grating Fabrication for detector and solar energy harvesting applications

    PubMed Central

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckles and speckle patterns, which are formed by the random interference of scattered waves from optically rough surfaces, have found tremendous applications in a wide range of metrological and biomedical fields. Here, we demonstrate a novel edge diffraction phenomenon of individual speckle for the fabrication of 1D and 2D micron and sub-micron size random gratings. These random gratings exhibit broadband response with interesting diffusive diffraction patterns. As an immediate application for solar energy harvesting, significant reduction in transmission and enhanced absorption in thin “Si-random grating-Si” sandwich structure is demonstrated. This work has multifaceted significance where we exploited the individual speckle diffraction properties for the first time. Besides the solar harvesting applications, random gratings are suitable structures for fabrication of theoretically proposed random quantum well IR detectors and hence expected that this work will augur well for such studies in the near future. PMID:26842242

  10. Arrayed van der Waals Vertical Heterostructures Based on 2D GaSe Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiang; Tang, Lei; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhigang; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Yanwen; Wang, Weiyi; Zou, Yichao; Liu, Cong; Guo, Nan; Zou, Jin; Zhou, Peng; Hu, Weida; Xiu, Faxian

    2015-05-13

    Vertically stacking two-dimensional (2D) materials can enable the design of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices and realize complex functionality. However, the fabrication of such artificial heterostructures on a wafer scale with an atomically sharp interface poses an unprecedented challenge. Here, we demonstrate a convenient and controllable approach for the production of wafer-scale 2D GaSe thin films by molecular beam epitaxy. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction oscillations and Raman spectroscopy reveal a layer-by-layer van der Waals epitaxial growth mode. Highly efficient photodetector arrays were fabricated, based on few-layer GaSe on Si. These photodiodes show steady rectifying characteristics and a high external quantum efficiency of 23.6%. The resultant photoresponse is super-fast and robust, with a response time of 60 μs. Importantly, the device shows no sign of degradation after 1 million cycles of operation. We also carried out numerical simulations to understand the underlying device working principles. Our study establishes a new approach to produce controllable, robust, and large-area 2D heterostructures and presents a crucial step for further practical applications.

  11. Novel Multiplexing Technique for Detector and Mixer Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; McGrath, William R.

    2001-01-01

    Future submillimeter and far-infrared space telescopes will require large-format (many 1000's of elements) imaging detector arrays to perform state-of-the-art astronomical observations. A crucial issue related to a focal plane array is a readout scheme which is compatible with large numbers of cryogenically-cooled (typically < 1 K) detectors elements. When the number of elements becomes of the order of thousands, the physical layout for individual readout amplifiers becomes nearly impossible to realize for practical systems. Another important concern is the large number of wires leading to a 0.1-0.3 K platform. In the case of superconducting transition edge sensors (TES), a scheme for time-division multiplexing of SQUID read-out amplifiers has been recently demonstrated. In this scheme the number of SQUIDs is equal to the number (N) of the detectors, but only one SQUID is turned on at a time. The SQUIDs are connected in series in each column of the array, so the number of wires leading to the amplifiers can be reduced, but it is still of the order of N. Another approach uses a frequency domain multiplexing scheme of the bolometer array. The bolometers are biased with ac currents whose frequencies are individual for each element and are much higher than the bolometer bandwidth. The output signals are connected in series in a summing loop which is coupled to a single SQUID amplifier. The total number of channels depends on the ratio between the SQUID bandwidth and the bolometer bandwidth and can be at least 100 according to the authors. An important concern about this technique is a contribution of the out-of-band Johnson noise which multiplies by factor N(exp 1/2) for each frequency channel. We propose a novel solution for large format arrays based on the Hadamard transform coding technique which requires only one amplifier to read out the entire array of potentially many 1000's of elements and uses approximately 10 wires between the cold stage and room temperature

  12. A Free-Standing and Self-Healable 2D Supramolecular Material Based on Hydrogen Bonding: A Nanowire Array with Sub-2-nm Resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Song, Mengyao; Wu, Guitai; Tang, Zhenyu; Sun, Yunfeng; He, Yunbin; Li, Jinhua; Li, Lei; Gu, Haoshuang; Liu, Xiong; Ma, Chuang; Peng, Zefei; Ai, Zhaoquan; Lewis, David J

    2017-04-07

    In many 2D materials reported thus far, the forces confining atoms in a 2D plane are often strong interactions, such as covalent bonding. Herein, the first demonstration that hydrogen (H)-bonding can be utilized to assemble polydiacetylene (a conductive polymer) toward a 2D material, which is stable enough to be free-standing, is shown. The 2D material is well characterized by a large number of techniques (mainly different microscopy techniques). The H-bonding allows splitting of the material into ribbons, which can reassemble, similar to a zipper, leading to the first example of a healable 2D material. Moreover, such technology can easily create 2D, organic, conductive nanowire arrays with sub-2-nm resolution. This material may have potential applications in stretchable electronics and nanowire cross-bar arrays.

  13. Integrated circuits for volumetric ultrasound imaging with 2-D CMUT arrays.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Anshuman; Choe, Jung Woo; Lee, Byung Chul; Wygant, Ira O; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Ömer; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2013-12-01

    Real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging systems require transmit and receive circuitry to generate ultrasound beams and process received echo signals. The complexity of building such a system is high due to requirement of the front-end electronics needing to be very close to the transducer. A large number of elements also need to be interfaced to the back-end system and image processing of a large dataset could affect the imaging volume rate. In this work, we present a 3-D imaging system using capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technology that addresses many of the challenges in building such a system. We demonstrate two approaches in integrating the transducer and the front-end electronics. The transducer is a 5-MHz CMUT array with an 8 mm × 8 mm aperture size. The aperture consists of 1024 elements (32 × 32) with an element pitch of 250 μm. An integrated circuit (IC) consists of a transmit beamformer and receive circuitry to improve the noise performance of the overall system. The assembly was interfaced with an FPGA and a back-end system (comprising of a data acquisition system and PC). The FPGA provided the digital I/O signals for the IC and the back-end system was used to process the received RF echo data (from the IC) and reconstruct the volume image using a phased array imaging approach. Imaging experiments were performed using wire and spring targets, a ventricle model and a human prostrate. Real-time volumetric images were captured at 5 volumes per second and are presented in this paper.

  14. Normal and shear strain imaging using 2D deformation tracking on beam steered linear array datasets

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiyan; Varghese, Tomy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Previous publications have reported on the use of one-dimensional cross-correlation analysis with beam-steered echo signals. However, this approach fails to accurately track displacements at larger depths (>4.5 cm) due to lower signal-to-noise. In this paper, the authors present the use of adaptive parallelogram shaped two-dimensional processing blocks for deformation tracking. Methods: Beam-steered datasets were acquired using a VFX 9L4 linear array transducer operated at a 6 MHz center frequency for steered angles from −15 to 15° in increments of 1°, on both uniformly elastic and single-inclusion tissue-mimicking phantoms. Echo signals were acquired to a depth of 65 mm with the focus set at 40 mm corresponding to the center of phantom. Estimated angular displacements along and perpendicular to the beam direction are used to compute axial and lateral displacement vectors using a least-squares approach. Normal and shear strain tensor component are then estimated based on these displacement vectors. Results: Their results demonstrate that parallelogram shaped two-dimensional deformation tracking significantly improves spatial resolution (factor of 7.79 along the beam direction), signal-to-noise (5 dB improvement), and contrast-to-noise (8–14 dB improvement) associated with strain imaging using beam steering on linear array transducers. Conclusions: Parallelogram shaped two-dimensional deformation tracking is demonstrated in beam-steered radiofrequency data, enabling its use in the estimation of normal and shear strain components. PMID:23298118

  15. Intra-pixel response of infrared detector arrays for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Tim; Baril, M. R.; Pazder, J.; Stilburn, J. S.

    2008-07-01

    The near-infrared instruments on the James Webb Space Telescope will use 5 micron cutoff HAWAII-2RG detector arrays. We have investigated the response of this type of detector at sub-pixel resolution to determine whether variations at this scale would affect the performance of the instruments. Using a simple experimental setup we were able to get measurements with a resolution of approximately 4 microns. We have measured an un-hybridized HAWAII-1RG multiplexer, a hybridized HAWAII-1RG device with a 5 micron cutoff HgCdTe detector layer, and a hybridized HAWAII-2RG device with a 5 micron cutoff substrate-removed HgCdTe detector layer. We found that the intra-pixel response functions of the hybrid devices are basically smooth and well behaved, and vary little from pixel to pixel. However, we did find numerous sub-pixel sized defects, notably some long straight thin features like scratches. We were not able to detect any significant variations with wavelength between 0.65 and 2.2 microns, but in the -1RG device there was a variation with temperature. When cooled from 80K to 40K, the pixel response became narrower, and some signal began to be lost at the edges of the pixel. We believe this reflects a reduction in charge diffusion at the lower temperature.

  16. Performance simulations of the medusa neutron detector array (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Kremens, R.L.; Russotto, M.A.; Tudman, S. )

    1995-01-01

    A 960-channel neutron detector array is under construction to measure various neutron reaction products from direct-drive laser-driven inertially confined fusion experiments. Analytical and Monte-Carlo model simulations have been completed which demonstrate the usefulness of this diagnostic for broad classes of fusion experiments. The modeling accounts for neutron production rate and spectra from the target and detector and acquisition electronics response. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460 and the University of Rochester. The support of DOE does not constitute an endorsement by DOE of the views expressed in this article.

  17. Undersampling Correction for Array Detector-Based Satellite Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Sioris, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    Array detector-based instruments are now fundamental to measurements of ozone and other atmospheric trace gases from space in the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared. The present generation of such instruments suffers, to a greater or lesser degree, from undersampling of the spectra, leading to difficulties in the analysis of atmospheric radiances. We provide extended analysis of the undersampling suffered by modem satellite spectrometers, which include Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS). The analysis includes basic undersampling, the effects of binning into separate detector pixels, and the application of high-resolution Fraunhofer spectral data to correct for undersampling in many useful cases.

  18. Curved-channel microchannel array plates. [photoelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    The microchannel array plate (MCP) is a photoelectric detector with an imaging capability comparable to that of a photographic plate. Recently MCPs in which the channels are curved to inhibit ion feedback have become available. These devices represent a major advance in MCP technology, since a single curved-channel MCP can be operated stably at high gain in the pulse-counting mode without any of the problems of stability of response or short lifetime reported for 'chevron' MCP detectors. Attention is given to the mode of operation of channel electron multipliers (CEM) and MCP, curved-channel MCP, test procedures, and performance characteristics. The accumulated test data show that the fundamental operating characteristics of the curved-channel MCP are directly related to those for the CEM.

  19. An MLC calibration method using a detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Thomas A.; Kahler, Darren; Simon, William E.; Fox, Christopher; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder; Liu, Chihray

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The authors have developed a quantitative calibration method for a multileaf collimator (MLC) which measures individual leaf positions relative to the MLC backup jaw on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Methods: The method utilizes a commercially available two-axis detector array (Profiler 2; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL). To calibrate the MLC bank, its backup jaw is positioned at the central axis and the opposing jaw is retracted to create a half-beam configuration. The position of the backup jaws field edge is then measured with the array to obtain what is termed the radiation defined reference line. The positions of the individual leaf ends relative to this reference line are then inferred by the detector response in the leaf end penumbra. Iteratively adjusting and remeasuring the leaf end positions to within specifications completes the calibration. Using the backup jaw as a reference for the leaf end positions is based on three assumptions: (1) The leading edge of an MLC leaf bank is parallel to its backup jaw's leading edge, (2) the backup jaw position is reproducible, and (3) the measured radiation field edge created by each leaf end is representative of that leaf's position. Data from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) were used in a similar analysis to check the results obtained with the array. Results: The relative leaf end positions measured with the array differed from those measured with the EPID by an average of 0.11 {+-}0.09 mm per leaf. The maximum leaf positional change measured with the Profiler 2 over a 3 month period was 0.51 mm. A leaf positional accuracy of {+-}0.4 mm is easily attainable through the iterative calibration process. The method requires an average of 40 min to measure both leaf banks. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that the Profiler 2 is an effective tool for efficient and quantitative MLC quality assurance and calibration.

  20. A MEMS probe card with 2D dense-arrayed 'hoe'-shaped metal tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Li, Xinxin; Feng, Songlin

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel MEMS probe card with densely area-arrayed microprobes for the wafer-level test of advanced ICs. In a 4 inch silicon wafer, a total of about 110 000 probe tips can be simultaneously fabricated, with a two-dimensional tip pitch of 240 µm × 160 µm. The 'hoe-shaped' microprobe structure is composed of one or two planar arms and an up-tilted tip, both of which are high-yield fabricated with metal micromachining techniques including low-stress nickel electroplating. With micromachined cavities, the silicon wafer serves as moulds for the up-tilted metal probes. Then, the microprobes are finally flip-chip packaged to a ceramic board for further connection to automatic testing equipment (ATE). After the probe structures are formed, the silicon wafer is removed completely by using TMAH wet etching, while the probes are freed by silicon laterally etching. The measured spring constants for all the three types of probes agree well with the designed values. As both mechanical anchors and electrical interconnections, the Sn-Ag solder-bumps feature satisfactory properties. The tested contact resistance values for three different thin-film pads on dies under test are always below 0.8 Ω, while the current leakage between two adjacent probes is only about 150 pA under 3.3 V.

  1. Dosimetric Characteristics of a Two-Dimensional Diode Array Detector Irradiated with Passively Scattered Proton Beams

    PubMed Central

    Liengsawangwong, Praimakorn; Sahoo, Nanayan; Ding, Xiaoning; Lii, MingFwu; Gillin, Michale T.; Zhu, Xiaorong Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of a two-dimensional (2D) diode array detector irradiated with passively scattered proton beams. Materials and Methods: A diode array detector, MapCHECK (Model 1175, Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL, USA) was characterized in passive-scattered proton beams. The relative sensitivity of the diodes and absolute dose calibration were determined using a 250 MeV beam. The pristine Bragg curves (PBCs) measured by MapCHECK diodes were compared with those of an ion chamber using a range shift method. The water-equivalent thickness (WET) of the diode array detector’s intrinsic buildup also was determined. The inverse square dependence, linearity, and other proton dosimetric quantities measured by MapCHECK were also compared with those of the ion chambers. The change in the absolute dose response of the MapCHECK as a function of accumulated radiation dose was used as an indicator of radiation damage to the diodes. 2D dose distribution with and without the compensator were measured and compared with the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Results: The WET of the MapCHECK diode’s buildup was determined to be 1.7 cm. The MapCHECK-measured PBC were virtually identical to those measured by a parallel-plate ion chamber for 160, 180, and 250 MeV proton beams. The inverse square results of the MapCHECK were within ±0.4% of the ion chamber results. The linearity of MapCHECK results was within 1% of those from the ion chamber as measured in the range between 10 and 300 MU. All other dosimetric quantities were within 1.3% of the ion chamber results. The 2D dose distributions for non-clinical fields without compensator and the patient treatment fields with the compensator were consistent with the TPS results. The absolute dose response of the MapCHECK was changed by 7.4% after an accumulated dose increased by 170 Gy. Conclusions: The MapCHECK is a convenient and useful tool for 2D dose distribution measurements using passively

  2. Active control of microbubbles stream in multi-bifurcated flow by using 2D phased array ultrasound transducer.

    PubMed

    Koda, Ren; Koido, Jun; Hosaka, Naoto; Ito, Takumi; Onogi, Shinya; Mochizuki, Takashi; Masuda, Kohji; Ikeda, Seiichi; Arai, Fumihito

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported our attempt to propel microbbles in flow by a primary Bjerknes force, which is a physical phenomenon where an acoustic wave pushes an obstacle along its direction of propagation. However, when ultrasound was emitted from surface of the body, controlling bubbles in against flow was needed. It is unpractical to use multiple transducers to produce the same number of focal points because single element transducer cannot produce more than two focal points. In this study, we introduced a complex artificial blood vessel according to a capillary model and a 2D array transducer to produce multiple focal points for active control of microbubbles in against flow. Furthermore, we investigated bubble control in viscous fluid. As the results, we confirmed clearly path selection of MBs in viscous fluid as well as in water.

  3. The development of a 2D ultrasonic array system for the in situ inspection of single crystal turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, C. J. L.; Dunhill, A. K.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2012-05-01

    Modern jet-engine turbine blades are cast from single crystals of nickel-based superalloys because of the excellent mechanical properties that these materials exhibit at high temperatures. However, the anisotropic behavior of single crystals causes difficulties when using ultrasound to inspect these components for defects that could potentially initiate in-service. This paper describes the development of a 2D ultrasonic array system for the in situ inspection of these components. The problems associated with the inspection of anisotropic single crystal materials such as the directional dependence of the ultrasonic velocity, beam directivities in anisotropic media and the variation in the crystallographic orientation, are all addressed in this paper. In addition, constraints regarding access to the inspection location within the engine are discussed. Finally, the defect detection sensitivity and sizing capability of the developed system is evaluated.

  4. A 2D ion chamber array audit of wedged and asymmetric fields in an inhomogeneous lung phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, Jessica; Dunn, Leon Alves, Andrew; Kenny, John; Lehmann, Joerg; Williams, Ivan; Kron, Tomas; Cole, Andrew

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) has implemented a new method of a nonreference condition Level II type dosimetric audit of radiotherapy services to increase measurement accuracy and patient safety within Australia. The aim of this work is to describe the methodology, tolerances, and outcomes from the new audit. Methods: The ACDS Level II audit measures the dose delivered in 2D planes using an ionization chamber based array positioned at multiple depths. Measurements are made in rectilinear homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms composed of slabs of solid water and lung. Computer generated computed tomography data sets of the rectilinear phantoms are supplied to the facility prior to audit for planning of a range of cases including reference fields, asymmetric fields, and wedged fields. The audit assesses 3D planning with 6 MV photons with a static (zero degree) gantry. Scoring is performed using local dose differences between the planned and measured dose within 80% of the field width. The overall audit result is determined by the maximum dose difference over all scoring points, cases, and planes. Pass (Optimal Level) is defined as maximum dose difference ≤3.3%, Pass (Action Level) is ≤5.0%, and Fail (Out of Tolerance) is >5.0%. Results: At close of 2013, the ACDS had performed 24 Level II audits. 63% of the audits passed, 33% failed, and the remaining audit was not assessable. Of the 15 audits that passed, 3 were at Pass (Action Level). The high fail rate is largely due to a systemic issue with modeling asymmetric 60° wedges which caused a delivered overdose of 5%–8%. Conclusions: The ACDS has implemented a nonreference condition Level II type audit, based on ion chamber 2D array measurements in an inhomogeneous slab phantom. The powerful diagnostic ability of this audit has allowed the ACDS to rigorously test the treatment planning systems implemented in Australian radiotherapy facilities. Recommendations from audits have led to

  5. Terasonic Excitations in 2D Gold Nanoparticle Arrays in a Water Matrix as Revealed by Atomistic Simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Bolmatov, Dima; Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Zav’yalov, Dmitry; ...

    2016-08-19

    Here in this work we report on terahertz phononic excitations in 2D gold nanoparticle arrays in a water matrix through a series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. For the first time, we observe acoustic Dirac-like crossings in H (H2O) atomic (molecular) networks which emerge due to an intraband phononic scattering. These crossings are the phononic fingerprints of ice-like arrangements of H (H2O) atomic (molecular) networks at nanometer scale. We reveal how phononic excitations in metallic nanoparticles and the water matrix reciprocally impact on one another providing the mechanism for the THz phononics manipulation via structural engineering. In addition, we showmore » that by tuning the arrangement of 2D gold nanoparticle assemblies the Au phononic polarizations experience sub-terahertz hybridization (Kohn anomaly) due to surface electron-phonon relaxation processes. This opens the way for the sound control and manipulation in soft matter metamaterials at nanoscale.« less

  6. Terasonic Excitations in 2D Gold Nanoparticle Arrays in a Water Matrix as Revealed by Atomistic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bolmatov, Dima; Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Zav’yalov, Dmitry; Cai, Yong Q.; Cunsolo, Alessandro

    2016-08-19

    Here in this work we report on terahertz phononic excitations in 2D gold nanoparticle arrays in a water matrix through a series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. For the first time, we observe acoustic Dirac-like crossings in H (H2O) atomic (molecular) networks which emerge due to an intraband phononic scattering. These crossings are the phononic fingerprints of ice-like arrangements of H (H2O) atomic (molecular) networks at nanometer scale. We reveal how phononic excitations in metallic nanoparticles and the water matrix reciprocally impact on one another providing the mechanism for the THz phononics manipulation via structural engineering. In addition, we show that by tuning the arrangement of 2D gold nanoparticle assemblies the Au phononic polarizations experience sub-terahertz hybridization (Kohn anomaly) due to surface electron-phonon relaxation processes. This opens the way for the sound control and manipulation in soft matter metamaterials at nanoscale.

  7. Constraining Polarized Foregrounds for EoR Experiments I: 2D Power Spectra from the PAPER-32 Imaging Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, S. A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Nunhokee, C. D.; Bernardi, G.; Pober, J. C.; Ali, Z. S.; Bradley, R. F.; Carilli, C. L.; DeBoer, D. R.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Jacobs, D. C.; Klima, P.; MacMahon, D. H. E.; Manley, J. R.; Moore, D. F.; Parsons, A. R.; Stefan, I. I.; Walbrugh, W. P.

    2016-06-01

    Current generation low-frequency interferometers constructed with the objective of detecting the high-redshift 21 cm background aim to generate power spectra of the brightness temperature contrast of neutral hydrogen in primordial intergalactic medium. Two-dimensional (2D) power spectra (power in Fourier modes parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight) that formed from interferometric visibilities have been shown to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth foregrounds (known as the wedge) and spectrally structured 21 cm background emission (the EoR window). However, polarized foregrounds are known to possess spectral structure due to Faraday rotation, which can leak into the EoR window. In this work we create and analyze 2D power spectra from the PAPER-32 imaging array in Stokes I, Q, U, and V. These allow us to observe and diagnose systematic effects in our calibration at high signal-to-noise within the Fourier space most relevant to EoR experiments. We observe well-defined windows in the Stokes visibilities, with Stokes Q, U, and V power spectra sharing a similar wedge shape to that seen in Stokes I. With modest polarization calibration, we see no evidence that polarization calibration errors move power outside the wedge in any Stokes visibility to the noise levels attained. Deeper integrations will be required to confirm that this behavior persists to the depth required for EoR detection.

  8. Advanced Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Detector Arrays for CMB Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We are developing high-sensitivity millimeter-wave detector arrays for measuring the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This development is directed to advance the technology readiness of the Inflation Probe mission in NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program. The Inflation Probe is a fourth-generation CMB satellite that will measure the polarization of the CMB to astrophysical limits, characterizing the inflationary polarization signal, mapping large-scale structure based on polarization induced by gravitational lensing, and mapping Galactic magnetic fields through measurements of polarized dust emission. The inflationary polarization signal is produced by a background of gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation, an exponential expansion of space-time in the early universe, with an amplitude that depends on the physical mechanism producing inflation. The inflationary polarization signal may be distinguished by its unique 'B-mode' vector properties from polarization from the density variations that predominantly source CMB temperature anisotropy. Mission concepts for the Inflation Probe are being developed in the US, Europe and Japan. The arrays are based on planar antennas that provide integral beam collimation, polarization analysis, and spectral band definition in a compact lithographed format that eliminates discrete fore-optics such as lenses and feedhorns. The antennas are coupled to transition-edge superconducting bolometers, read out with multiplexed SQUID current amplifiers. The superconducting sensors and readouts developed in this program share common technologies with NASA X-ray and FIR detector applications. Our program targets developments required for space observations, and we discuss our technical progress over the past two years and plans for future development. We are incorporating arrays into active sub-orbital and ground-based experiments, which advance technology readiness while producing state of the art CMB

  9. Capillary Array Waveguide Amplified Fluorescence Detector for mHealth

    PubMed Central

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    array can potentially be used for sensitive analysis of multiple fluorescent detection assays simultaneously. The simple phone based capillary array approach presented in this paper is capable of amplifying weak fluorescent signals thereby improving the sensitivity of optical detectors based on mobile phones. This may allow sensitive biological assays to be measured with low sensitivity detectors and may make mHealth practical for many diagnostics applications, especially in resource-poor and global health settings. PMID:24039345

  10. SU-E-T-778: Use of the 2D MatriXX Detector for Measuring Scanned Ion Beam Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Anvar, M Varasteh; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Guarachi, L Fanola; Cirio, R; Giordanengo, S; Marchetto, F; Vignati, A; Donetti, M; Ciocca, M; Panizza, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The quality assurance (QA) procedure has to check the most relevant beam parameters to ensure the delivery of the correct dose to patients. Film dosimetry, which is commonly used for scanned ion beam QA, does not provide immediate results. The purpose of this work is to answer whether, for scanned ion beam therapy, film dosimetry can be replaced with the 2D MatriXX detector as a real-time tool. Methods: MatriXX, equipped with 32×32 parallel plate ion-chambers, is a commercial device intended for pre-treatment verification of conventional radiation therapy.The MatriXX, placed at the isocenter, and GAFCHROMIC films, positioned on the MatriXX entrance, were exposed to 131.44 MeV proton and 221.45 MeV/u Carbon-ion beams.The OmniPro-I’mRT software, applied for the data taking of MatriXX, gives the possibility of acquiring consecutive snapshots. Using the NI LabVIEW, the data from snapshots were logged as text files for further analysis. Radiochromic films were scanned with EPSON scanner and analyzed using software programs developed in-house for comparative purposes. Results: The field dose uniformity, flatness, beam position and beam width were investigated. The field flatness for the region covering 6×6 cm{sup 2} square field was found to be better than 2%. The relative standard deviations, expected to be constant over 2×2, 4×4 and 6×6 pixels from MatriXX measurement gives a uniformity of 1.5% in good agreement with the film results.The beam center position is determined with a resolution better than 200 µm for Carbon and less than 100 µm for proton beam.The FWHM determination for a beam wider than 10 mm is satisfactory, whilst for smaller beams the determination is uncertain. Conclusion: Precise beam position and fast 2D dose distribution can be determined in real-time using MatriXX detector. The results show that MatriXX is quick and accurate enough to be used in charged-particle therapy QA.

  11. On comparison between 2-D magnetotelluric FEM modering using triangular and rectangular elements along sea-land array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, T.; Toh, H.; Oshiman, N.

    2010-12-01

    The San-in region of SW Japan is classified as an area of high seismicity/volcanic activity, and thus many magneto-telluric (MT) and seismic observations have been conducted. Below this region, the Philippine Sea plate and the Pacific Sea plate are subducting into shallow and deep parts respectively, which makes the subsurface electrical structures very complicated. For example, Adakite rocks from Mt. Daisen, which is the biggest volcano made in the Quaternary, appeared penetrating the alkari rocks of theTertiary(Kimura et al., 2003) In addition the epicenters shallower than 30km in this region was broad planely in the west of Daisen and along about a east-west line in the east of Daisen (Shiozaki et al., 2003). In the San-in region, such seismic/volcanic properties have been studied only using land surveys. However, the studies based on land surveys are not enough to understand the epicenter distributions and where the edge of Philippine Sea plate reaches now, because Mt. Daisen and the distributed epicenters are located near the coastline. Our group, therefore, started seafloor electromagnetic (EM) observations off the San-in region in 2006. As a result, we have obtained seafloor EM data at 10 sites to date. In this study, we compared the accuracy of EM responses calculated by different two-dimensional (2-D) FEM codes using triangular and rectangular elements in order to make a new 2-D inversion code available along sea-land array. That’s why because there are few 2-D MT inversion codes available in a region with coastline. We used Ogawa and Uchida’s (1996) code for rectangular elements and Utada’s (1987) code for triangular ones. We worked on a bathymetry with a constant inclination between the land-sea boundary whose horizontal-to-vertical ratio is 25 up to 4km depth. Using this bathymetry, we conducted 2-D transverse magnetic (TM) forward modeling for both elements and compared the apparent resistivities and phases of MT impedances. As for triangular

  12. Estimation and application of 2-D scattering matrices for sparse array imaging of simulated damage in composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Westin B.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2017-02-01

    Reliable detection of damage in composites is critically important for failure prevention in the aerospace industry since these materials are more frequently being used in high stress applications. Structural health monitoring (SHM) via guided wave sensors mounted on or embedded within a composite structure can help detect and localize damage in real-time while potentially reducing overall maintenance costs. One approach to guided wave SHM is sparse array imaging via the minimum variance algorithm, and it has been shown in prior work that incorporating expected scattering from defects of interest can improve the quality of damage localization and characterization. For this study, simulated damage in the form of attached magnets was used for estimating scattering from recorded wavefield data. Data were recorded on a circle centered at the damage location from multiple incident directions before and after the magnets were attached. Baseline subtraction is used to estimate scattering patterns for each incident direction, and these patterns are combined and interpolated to form a full 2-D scattering matrix. This matrix is then incorporated into the minimum variance imaging algorithm, and the efficacy of this scattering estimation methodology is evaluated by comparing the resulting sparse array images to those generated using simpler scattering assumptions.

  13. Combining the switched-beam and beam-steering capabilities in a 2-D phased array antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yi-Che; Chen, Yin-Bing; Hwang, Ruey-Bing

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the development, fabrication, and measurement of a novel beam-forming system consisting of 16 subarray antennas, each containing four aperture-coupled patch antennas, and the application of this system in smart wireless communication systems. The beam patterns of each of the subarray antennas can be switched toward one of nine zones over a half space by adjusting the specific phase delay angles among the four antenna elements. Furthermore, when all subarrays are pointed at the same zone, slightly continuous beam steering in around 1° increments can be achieved by dynamically altering the progressive phase delay angle among the subarrays. Phase angle calibration was implemented by coupling each transmitter output and down converter into the in-phase/quadrature baseband to calculate the correction factor to the weight. In addition, to validate the proposed concepts and the fabricated 2-D phased array antenna system, this study measured the far-field radiation patterns of the aperture-coupled patch array integrated with feeding networks and a phase-calibration system to carefully verify its spatially switched-beam and beam-steering characteristics at a center frequency of 2.4 GHz which can cover the industrial, scientific, and medical band and some long-term evolution applications. In addition, measured results were compared with calculated results, and agreement between them was observed.

  14. Characterization of a novel two dimensional diode array the ''magic plate'' as a radiation detector for radiation therapy treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J. H. D.; Fuduli, I.; Carolan, M.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Perevertaylo, V. L.; Metcalfe, P.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) utilizes the technology of multileaf collimators to deliver highly modulated and complex radiation treatment. Dosimetric verification of the IMRT treatment requires the verification of the delivered dose distribution. Two dimensional ion chamber or diode arrays are gaining popularity as a dosimeter of choice due to their real time feedback compared to film dosimetry. This paper describes the characterization of a novel 2D diode array, which has been named the ''magic plate'' (MP). It was designed to function as a 2D transmission detector as well as a planar detector for dose distribution measurements in a solid water phantom for the dosimetric verification of IMRT treatment delivery. Methods: The prototype MP is an 11 x 11 detector array based on thin (50 {mu}m) epitaxial diode technology mounted on a 0.6 mm thick Kapton substrate using a proprietary ''drop-in'' technology developed by the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong. A full characterization of the detector was performed, including radiation damage study, dose per pulse effect, percent depth dose comparison with CC13 ion chamber and build up characteristics with a parallel plane ion chamber measurements, dose linearity, energy response and angular response. Results: Postirradiated magic plate diodes showed a reproducibility of 2.1%. The MP dose per pulse response decreased at higher dose rates while at lower dose rates the MP appears to be dose rate independent. The depth dose measurement of the MP agrees with ion chamber depth dose measurements to within 0.7% while dose linearity was excellent. MP showed angular response dependency due to the anisotropy of the silicon diode with the maximum variation in angular response of 10.8% at gantry angle 180 deg. Angular dependence was within 3.5% for the gantry angles {+-} 75 deg. The field size dependence of the MP at isocenter agrees with ion chamber measurement to within 1.1%. In

  15. Apparatus and method for heterodyne-generated two-dimensional detector array using a single element detector

    DOEpatents

    Strauss, Charlie E.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method for heterodyne-generated, two-dimensional detector array using a single detector. Synthetic-array heterodyne detection, permits a single-element optical detector to behave as though it were divided into an array of separate heterodyne detector elements. A fifteen-element synthetic array has successfully been experimentally realized on a single-element detector, permitting all of the array elements to be read out continuously and in parallel from one electrical connection. A CO.sub.2 laser and a single-element HgCdTe photodiode are employed. A different heterodyne local oscillator frequency is incident upon the spatially resolvable regions of the detector surface. Thus, different regions are mapped to different heterodyne beat frequencies. One can determine where the photons were incident on the detector surface even though a single electrical connection to the detector is used. This also prevents the destructive interference that occurs when multiple speckles are imaged (similar to spatial diversity), In coherent LIDAR this permits a larger field of view. An acoustooptic modulator generates the local oscillator frequencies and can achieve adequate spatial separation of optical frequencies of the order of a megahertz apart.

  16. Apparatus and method for heterodyne-generated two-dimensional detector array using a single element detector

    DOEpatents

    Strauss, C.E.

    1997-11-18

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for heterodyne-generated, two-dimensional detector array using a single detector. Synthetic-array heterodyne detection, permits a single-element optical detector to behave as though it were divided into an array of separate heterodyne detector elements. A fifteen-element synthetic array has successfully been experimentally realized on a single-element detector, permitting all of the array elements to be read out continuously and in parallel from one electrical connection. A CO{sub 2} laser and a single-element HgCdTe photodiode are employed. A different heterodyne local oscillator frequency is incident upon the spatially resolvable regions of the detector surface. Thus, different regions are mapped to different heterodyne beat frequencies. One can determine where the photons were incident on the detector surface even though a single electrical connection to the detector is used. This also prevents the destructive interference that occurs when multiple speckles are imaged (similar to spatial diversity), In coherent LIDAR this permits a larger field of view. An acoustooptic modulator generates the local oscillator frequencies and can achieve adequate spatial separation of optical frequencies of the order of a megahertz apart. 4 figs.

  17. Calcification content quantification by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry with a 2D digital radiographic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinten, Jean M.; Robert-Coutant, Christine; Darboux, Michel; Gonon, Georges; Bordy, Thomas

    2003-06-01

    In a previous paper (SPIE Medical Imaging 2001), a dual energy method for bone densitometry using a 2D digital radiographic detector has been presented. In this paper, calcium content quantification performance of the approach is precised. The main challenge is to achieve quantification using scatter-corrected dual energy acquisitions. Therefore a scatter estimation approach, based on an expression of scatter as a functional of the primary flux, has been developed. This expression is derived from the Klein and Nishina equation and includes tabulated scatter level values. The calcium quantification performances are validated on two configurations. A first one is issued from criteria developed by the French "Groupe de Recherche et d'Information sur les Osteoporoses." It is based on the use of a phantom made of five 3mm thick PVC sheets in the form of five steps, representing five different bone mineral density values, included in a lucite container filled with water. Additional lucite plates can be put over the phantom. This phantom has been used for evaluation of quantification robustness versus patient thickness and composition variations, and for accuracy evaluation. The second configuration, composed of small calcified objects (representative of lung nodules), is used for evaluating capacities to differentiate calcified from non calcified nodules and to test calcium content quantification performance.

  18. Mechanical designs and development of TES bolometer detector arrays for the Advanced ACTPol experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jonathan T.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Devlin, Mark J.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Simon, Sara M.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Thornton, Robert; Ullom, Joel N.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-07-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling 5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150 mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline profile leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at the detector array stack assemblies. This experiment will also make use of extensive hardware and software previously developed for ACT, which will be modified to incorporate the new AdvACT instruments. Therefore, we discuss the integration of all AdvACT arrays with pre-existing ACTPol infrastructure.

  19. Mechanical Design and Development of TES Bolometer Detector Arrays for the Advanced ACTPol Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Jonathan T.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Devlin, Mark J.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio M.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling 5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150 mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline pro le leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at the detector array stack assemblies. This experiment will also make use of extensive hardware and software previously developed for ACT, which will be modi ed to incorporate the new AdvACT instruments. Therefore, we discuss the integration of all AdvACT arrays with pre-existing ACTPol infrastructure.

  20. Thermal crosstalk simulation and measurement of linear terahertz detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weizhi; Huang, Zehua; Wang, Jun; Li, Mingyu; Gou, Jun; Jiang, Yadong

    2015-11-01

    Thermal simulation of differently structured linear terahertz detector arrays (TDAs) based on lithium tantalate was performed by finite element analysis (FEA). Simulation results revealed that a relatively simple TDA structure can have good thermal insulation, i.e., low thermal crosstalk effect (TCE), between adjacent pixels, which was thus selected for the real fabrication of TDA sample. Current responsivity (Ri) of the sample for a 2.52 THz source was measured to be 6.66 × 10-6 A/W and non-uniformity (NU) of Ri was 4.1%, showing good performance of the sample. TCE test result demonstrated that small TCE existed in the sample, which was in good agreement with the simulation results.

  1. Electrical breakdown gas detector featuring carbon nanotube array electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongyul; Pal, Sunil; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate here detection of dichloro-difluoro-methane and oxygen in mixtures with helium using a carbon nanotube electrical breakdown sensor device. The sensor is comprised of an aligned array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes deposited on a nickel based super-alloy (Inconel 600) as the anode; the counter electrode is a planar nickel sheet. By monitoring the electrical breakdown characteristics of oxygen and dichloro-difluoro-methane in a background of helium, we find that the detection limit for dichloro-difluoro-methane is approximately 0.1% and the corresponding limit for oxygen is approximately 1%. A phenomenologigal model is proposed to describe the trends observed in detection of the two mixtures. These results indicate that carbon nanotube based electrical breakdown sensors show potential as end detectors in gas-chromatography devices.

  2. Method of fabricating multiwavelength infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Inventor); Olsen, Gregory H. (Inventor); Kim, Dong-Su (Inventor); Lange, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A multiwavelength local plane array infrared detector is included on a common substrate having formed on its top face a plurality of In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As (x.ltoreq.0.53) absorption layers, between each pair of which a plurality of InAs.sub.y P.sub.1-y (y.ltoreq.1) buffer layers are formed having substantially increasing lattice parameters, respectively, relative to said substrate, for preventing lattice mismatch dislocations from propagating through successive ones of the absorption layers of decreasing bandgap relative to said substrate, whereby a plurality of detectors for detecting different wavelengths of light for a given pixel are provided by removing material above given areas of successive ones of the absorption layers, which areas are doped to form a pn junction with the surrounding unexposed portions of associated absorption layers, respectively, with metal contacts being formed on a portion of each of the exposed areas, and on the bottom of the substrate for facilitating electrical connections thereto.

  3. Terahertz spectroscopy with a holographic Fourier transform spectrometer plus array detector using coherent synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolay I. Agladz, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Albert J. Sievers

    2010-06-01

    By use of coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation, we experimentally tested a holographic Fourier transform spectrometer coupled to an array detector to determine its viability as a spectral device. Somewhat surprisingly, the overall performance strongly depends on the absorptivity of the birefringent lithium tantalate pixels in the array detector.

  4. Energy spectrum measured by the telescope array surface detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dmitri

    2012-05-01

    Two conflicting measurements of the ultra high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) flux have been reported by the Akeno Giant Air Shower Array (AGASA) and the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) experiments. HiRes observes a ˜5sigma suppression at E = 1019.75 eV, which is in agreement with the prediction of Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) theory. AGASA, in contrast, sees the flux extended well beyond E = 1020 eV with no visible break, suggesting that the flux is limited only by the rate at which the sources can produce the UHECR and not by interaction of energetic particles with the cosmic microwave background, thus challenging the relativistic invariance principle. In response to this discrepancy, a new experiment named the Telescope Array (TA) has been deployed, which combines the detection elements used separately by HiRes and AGASA. We describe the TA surface detector (SD) analysis using a technique new to the field, which consists of a detailed Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation of the SD response to the natural cosmic rays, validating the MC by comparing its distributions with the data, and calculation of the SD aperture from the MC. We will also describe our reconstruction procedure, based solely upon the data, and its application to both data and the MC. Finally, we will describe the energy spectrum resulting from this analysis, which is found to be in excellent agreement with the HiRes result, and as such, is the first confirmation of the GZK effect by a ground array of scintillation counters.

  5. In vivo liver tracking with a high volume rate 4D ultrasound scanner and a 2D matrix array probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Byram, Brett C.; Harris, Emma J.; Evans, Philip M.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.

    2012-03-01

    The effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is compromised by involuntary motion (e.g. respiration, cardiac activity). The feasibility of processing ultrasound echo data to automatically estimate 3D liver motion for real-time IMRT guidance was previously demonstrated, but performance was limited by an acquisition speed of 2 volumes per second due to hardware restrictions of a mechanical linear array probe. Utilizing a 2D matrix array probe with parallel receive beamforming offered increased acquisition speeds and an opportunity to investigate the benefits of higher volume rates. In vivo livers of three volunteers were scanned with and without respiratory motion at volume rates of 24 and 48 Hz, respectively. Respiration was suspended via voluntary breath hold. Correlation-based, phase-sensitive 3D speckle tracking was applied to consecutively acquired volumes of echo data. Volumes were omitted at fixed intervals and 3D speckle tracking was re-applied to study the effect of lower scan rates. Results revealed periodic motion that corresponded with the heart rate or breathing cycle in the absence or presence of respiration, respectively. For cardiac-induced motion, volume rates for adequate tracking ranged from 8 to 12 Hz and was limited by frequency discrepancies between tracking estimates from higher and lower frequency scan rates. Thus, the scan rate of volume data acquired without respiration was limited by the need to sample the frequency induced by the beating heart. In respiratory-dominated motion, volume rate limits ranged from 4 to 12 Hz, interpretable from the root-mean-squared deviation (RMSD) from tracking estimates at 24 Hz. While higher volume rates yielded RMSD values less than 1 mm in most cases, lower volume rates yielded RMSD values of 2-6 mm.

  6. In vivo liver tracking with a high volume rate 4D ultrasound scanner and a 2D matrix array probe.

    PubMed

    Bell, Muyinatu A Lediju; Byram, Brett C; Harris, Emma J; Evans, Philip M; Bamber, Jeffrey C

    2012-03-07

    The effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is compromised by involuntary motion (e.g. respiration, cardiac activity). The feasibility of processing ultrasound echo data to automatically estimate 3D liver motion for real-time IMRT guidance was previously demonstrated, but performance was limited by an acquisition speed of 2 volumes per second due to hardware restrictions of a mechanical linear array probe. Utilizing a 2D matrix array probe with parallel receive beamforming offered increased acquisition speeds and an opportunity to investigate the benefits of higher volume rates. In vivo livers of three volunteers were scanned with and without respiratory motion at volume rates of 24 and 48 Hz, respectively. Respiration was suspended via voluntary breath hold. Correlation-based, phase-sensitive 3D speckle tracking was applied to consecutively acquired volumes of echo data. Volumes were omitted at fixed intervals and 3D speckle tracking was re-applied to study the effect of lower scan rates. Results revealed periodic motion that corresponded with the heart rate or breathing cycle in the absence or presence of respiration, respectively. For cardiac-induced motion, volume rates for adequate tracking ranged from 8 to 12 Hz and was limited by frequency discrepancies between tracking estimates from higher and lower frequency scan rates. Thus, the scan rate of volume data acquired without respiration was limited by the need to sample the frequency induced by the beating heart. In respiratory-dominated motion, volume rate limits ranged from 4 to 12 Hz, interpretable from the root-mean-squared deviation (RMSD) from tracking estimates at 24 Hz. While higher volume rates yielded RMSD values less than 1 mm in most cases, lower volume rates yielded RMSD values of 2-6 mm.

  7. Assessment study of infrared detector arrays for low-background astronomical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ando, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art of infrared detector arrays employing charge coupled devices (CCD) or charge injection devices (CID) readout are assessed. The applicability, limitations and potentials of such arrays under the low-background astronomical observing conditions of interest for SIRFT (Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility) are determined. The following are reviewed: (1) monolithic extrinsic arrays; (2) monolithic intrinsic arrays; (3) charge injection devices; and (4) hybrid arrays.

  8. Demonstration of a passive, low-noise, millimeter-wave detector array for imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikner, David; Grossman, Erich

    2009-05-01

    The design of a millimeter-wave (MMW) camera is presented. The camera is meant to serve as a demonstration platform for a new 32-channel MMW detector array that requires no pre-amplification prior to detection. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have worked with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and several contractors for four years to develop an affordable MMW detector array technology suitable for use in a large staring array. The camera described uses one particular embodiment of detector array that resulted from the program. This paper reviews the design of the MMW optics that will be used to form imagery with the linear array and the tradeoffs made in that design. Also presented are the results of laboratory tests of the detector array that were made at both ARL and NIST.

  9. Application of Fresnel diffraction from a 2D array of reflective disks in optical profilometry of a flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darudi, Ahmad; Asgari, Pegah; Pourvais, Yousef

    2015-05-01

    Optical methods of three-dimensional profilometry have been of growing interest in both industrial and scientific applications. These techniques provide absolutely non-destructive measurement due to their non-contact nature and maintain their high precision in a large field of view. Most of these techniques however, are based on interferometry which happens to be considerably sensitive to environmental noises such as turbulence and vibration. We have used the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction from phase-steps instead of interferometry to maintain a higher precision and reduce sensitivity to environmental noises. This phenomena has been recently introduced as a method for precise measurement of wavelength, thickness and refractive index. A 2D array of reflective disks are placed above the test surface to provide the required phase-steps. In this paper, theoretical principles of Fresnel diffraction from phase-steps are discussed and the experimental results of testing an optical flat surface are presented. A flat mirror surface has been tested as an optical test surface and is been profiled. The results show that the method is precise and is not sensitive to environmental noises such as vibration and turbulence. Furthermore, the method seems to be a powerful means for testing of curved surfaces, too.

  10. Progress of Multicolor Single Detector to Detector Array Development for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. Nurul; Refaat, Tamer F.; Bhat, Ishwara; Xiao, Ye-Gao; Bandra, Sumith; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of atmospheric species such as CO2, O3, H2O, and CH4 is important for understanding the chemistry and physical cycles involving Earth s atmosphere. Although several remote sensing techniques are suitable for such measurements they are considered high cost techniques involving complicated instrumentation. Therefore, simultaneous measurement of atmospheric species using a single remote sensing instrument is significant for minimizing cost, size and complexity. While maintaining the instrument sensitivity and range, quality of multicolor detector, in terms of high quantum efficiency and low noise are vital for these missions. As the first step for developing multicolor focal plan array, the structure of a single element multicolor detector is presented in this paper. The detector consists of three p-n junction layers of Si, GaSb and InAs wafer bonded to cover the spectral range UV to 900 nm, 800 nm to 1.7 m, and 1.5 m to 3.4 m, respectively. Modeling of the absorption coefficient for each material was carried out for optimizing the layers thicknesses for maximum absorption. The resulted quantum efficiency of each layer has been determined except InAs layer. The optical and electrical characterization of each layer structure is reported including dark current and spectral response measurements of Si pin structure and of GaSb and InAs p-n junctions. The effect of the material processing is discussed.

  11. A Comparative Analysis for Verification of IMRT and VMAT Treatment Plans using a 2-D and 3-D Diode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, Michael J.

    With the added complexity of current radiation treatment dose delivery modalities such as IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy) and VMAT (Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy), quality assurance (QA) of these plans become multifaceted and labor intensive. To simplify the patient specific quality assurance process, 2D or 3D diode arrays are used to measure the radiation fluence for IMRT and VMAT treatments which can then be quickly and easily compared against the planned dose distribution. Because the arrays that can be used for IMRT and VMAT patient-specific quality assurance are of different geometry (planar vs. cylindrical), the same IMRT or VMAT treatment plan measured by two different arrays could lead to different measured radiation fluences, regardless of the output and performance of linear accelerator. Thus, the purpose of this study is to compare patient specific QA results as measured by the MapCHECK 2 and ArcCHECK diode arrays for the same IMRT and VMAT treatment plans to see if one diode array consistently provides a closer comparison to reference data. Six prostate and three thoracic spine IMRT treatment plans as well as three prostate and three thoracic spine VMAT treatment plans were produced. Radiotherapy plans for this study were generated using the Pinnacle TPS v9.6 (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI) using 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, and 10 MV x-ray beams from a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with a 120-millenium multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Each IMRT and VMAT therapy plan was measured on Sun Nuclear's MapCHECK 2 and ArcCHECK diode arrays. IMRT measured data was compared with planned dose distribution using Sun Nuclear's 3DVH quality assurance software program using gamma analysis and dose-volume histograms for target volumes and critical structures comparison. VMAT arc plans measured on the MapCHECK 2 and ArcCHECK were compared using beam-by-beam analysis with the gamma evaluation method with

  12. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Theriault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S{sub c,p}) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Results: Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S{sub c,p} within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone

  13. Conceptual design and optimization of a plastic scintillator array for 2D tomography using a compact D-D fast neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert; Zboray, Robert; Cortesi, Marco; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2014-04-01

    A conceptual design optimization of a fast neutron tomography system was performed. The system is based on a compact deuterium-deuterium fast neutron generator and an arc-shaped array of individual neutron detectors. The array functions as a position sensitive one-dimensional detector allowing tomographic reconstruction of a two-dimensional cross section of an object up to 10 cm across. Each individual detector is to be optically isolated and consists of a plastic scintillator and a Silicon Photomultiplier for measuring light produced by recoil protons. A deterministic geometry-based model and a series of Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the design geometry parameters affecting the reconstructed image resolution. From this, it is expected that with an array of 100 detectors a reconstructed image resolution of ~1.5mm can be obtained. Other simulations were performed in order to optimize the scintillator depth (length along the neutron path) such that the best ratio of direct to scattered neutron counts is achieved. This resulted in a depth of 6-8 cm and an expected detection efficiency of 33-37%. Based on current operational capabilities of a prototype neutron generator being developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, planned implementation of this detector array design should allow reconstructed tomograms to be obtained with exposure times on the order of a few hours.

  14. 13 micron cutoff HgCdTe detector arrays for space and ground-based astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtry, Craig W.; Cabrera, Mario S.; Dorn, Meghan L.; Pipher, Judith L.; Forrest, William J.

    2016-07-01

    With the recent success of our development of 10 micron HgCdTe infrared (IR) detector arrays,1,2 we have used what we learned and extended the cutoff wavelength to 13 microns. These 13 micron HgCdTe detector arrays can operate at higher temperatures than Si:As, e.g. in a properly designed spacecraft with passive cooling, the 13 micron IR array will work well at temperatures around 30K. We present the initial measurements of dark current, noise and quantum efficiency for the first deliveries of 13 micron HgCdTe detector arrays from Teledyne Imaging Sensors. We also discuss our plans to develop 15 micron cutoff HgCdTe detector arrays which would facilitate the detection of the broad CO2 absorption feature in the atmospheres of exoplanets, particularly those in the habitable zone of their host star.

  15. The development and test of ultra-large-format multi-anode microchannel array detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The specific tasks that were accomplished with each of the key elements of the multi-anode microchannel array detector system are described. The modes of operation of position-sensitive electronic readout systems for use with high-gain microchannel plates are described and their performance characteristics compared and contrasted. Multi-anode microchannel array detector systems with formats as large as 256 x 1024 pixels are currently under evaluation. Preliminary performance data for sealed ultraviolet and visible-light detector tubes show that the detector systems have unique characteristics which make them complementary to photoconductive array detectors, such as CCDs, and superior to alternative pulse-counting detector systems employing high-gain MCPs.

  16. Synthesis arrangement and parity correction of linear array infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qun; Hong, Pu; Wang, Bo; Wang, Chensheng

    2010-11-01

    According to the configuration and technical specification of the detector, which has multiple channels, channels mixing, high speed outputs and separate columns between odd and even, a real time digital processing unit based on the CPLD, FPGA and DSP has been developed to achieve the data synthesis and arrangement function and the parity correction algorithm. A special interface circuit with 4 CPLDs is designed to complete the first synthesis step where the 16 channels of data are combined into 4 channels. The second step is finished in FPGA and ROM address encoder where the 4 channels of data are combined into 1 channel. For output data synchronization, FIFO is adopted to achieve the delay of even channels in the parity correction. Data of odd channels enters the columns synthesis unit without any processing and even channels shall be processed in the columns synthesis unit after entering the FIFO unit first and experiencing the delay process. Thereby the pre-processing before image processing of the linear array thermal imager is accomplished.

  17. Micro-patterning of ionic reservoirs within a double bilayer lipid membrane to fabricate a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Sansinena, J. M.; Yee, C. K.; Sapuri, A.; Swanson, Basil I.; Redondo, A.; Parikh, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    We present a simple approach for the design of ionic reservoir arrays within a double phospholipid bilayer to ultimately develop a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors. As a first step, a primary bilayer lipid membrane is deposited onto an array of electrodes patterned onto a substrate surface. Subsequently, an array of microvoids is created within the bilayer by a wet photolithographic patterning of phospholipid bilayers using a deep UV light source and a quartz/chrome photomask. To ensure registry, the photomask used to pattern bilayers is designed to match up the microvoids within the primary bilayer with the array of electrodes on the substrate surface. The deposition of a secondary bilayer lipid membrane onto the primary bilayer that spans across the patterned microvoids leads to the formation of the array of ionic reservoirs within the double phospholipid bilayer. This is accomplished using giant unilamellar vesicles and by exploiting membrane electrostatics. The use of ion-channels incorporated into the secondary bilayer that covers the individual ionic reservoirs allows the construction of a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors that are able to recognize different target-agents simultaneously.

  18. SU-E-T-167: Characterization of In-House Plastic Scintillator Detectors Array for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, T; Liu, H; Dimofte, A; Darafsheh, A; Lin, H; Kassaee, A; Finlay, J; Both, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize basic performance of plastic scintillator detectors (PSD) array designed for dosimetry of radiation therapy. Methods: An in-house PSD array has been developed by placing single point PSD into customized 2D holder. Each point PSD is a plastic scintillating fiber-based detector designed for highly accurate measurement of small radiotherapy fields used in patient plan verification and machine commissioning and QA procedures. A parallel fiber without PSD is used for Cerenkov separation by subtracting from PSD readings. Cerenkov separation was confirmed by optical spectroscopy. Alternative Cerenkov separation approaches are also investigated. The optical signal was converted to electronic signal with a photodiode and then subsequently amplified. We measured its dosimetry performance, including percentage depth dose and output factor, and compared with reference ion chamber measurements. The PSD array is then placed along the radiation beam for multiple point dose measurement, representing subsets of PDD measurements, or perpendicular to the beam for profile measurements. Results: The dosimetry results of PSD point measurements agree well with reference ion chamber measurements. For percentage depth dose, the maximal differences between PSD and ion chamber results are 3.5% and 2.7% for 6MV and 15MV beams, respectively. For the output factors, PSD measurements are within 3% from ion chamber results. PDD and profile measurement with PSD array are also performed. Conclusions: The current design of multichannel PSD array is feasible for the dosimetry measurement in radiation therapy. Dose distribution along or perpendicular to the beam path could be measured. It might as well be used as range verification in proton therapy.A PS hollow fiber detector will be investigated to eliminate the Cerenkov radiation effect so that all 32 channels can be used.

  19. Method of fabricating a PbS-PbSe IR detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, John R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A silicon wafer is provided which does not employ individually bonded leads between the IR sensitive elements and the input stages of multiplexers. The wafer is first coated with lead selenide in a first detector array area and is thereafter coated with lead sulfide within a second detector array area. The described steps result in the direct chemical deposition of lead selenide and lead sulfide upon the silicon wafer to eliminate individual wire bonding, bumping, flip chiping, planar interconnecting methods of connecting detector array elements to silicon chip circuitry, e.g., multiplexers, to enable easy fabrication of very long arrays. The electrode structure employed, produces an increase in the electrical field gradient between the electrodes for a given volume of detector material, relative to conventional electrode configurations.

  20. Method for producing a hybridization of detector array and integrated circuit for readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process is explained for fabricating a detector array in a layer of semiconductor material on one substrate and an integrated readout circuit in a layer of semiconductor material on a separate substrate in order to select semiconductor material for optimum performance of each structure, such as GaAs for the detector array and Si for the integrated readout circuit. The detector array layer is lifted off its substrate, laminated on the metallized surface on the integrated surface, etched with reticulating channels to the surface of the integrated circuit, and provided with interconnections between the detector array pixels and the integrated readout circuit through the channels. The adhesive material for the lamination is selected to be chemically stable to provide electrical and thermal insulation and to provide stress release between the two structures fabricated in semiconductor materials that may have different coefficients of thermal expansion.

  1. Assembly and Integration Process of the First High Density Detector Array for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yaqiong; Choi, Steve; Ho, Shuay-Pwu; Crowley, Kevin T.; Salatino, Maria; Simon, Sara M.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Nati, Federico; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) upgrade on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) consists of multichroicTransition Edge Sensor (TES) detector arrays to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization anisotropies in multiple frequency bands. The first AdvACT detector array, sensitive to both 150 and 230 GHz, is fabricated on a 150 mm diameter wafer and read out with a completely different scheme compared to ACTPol. Approximately 2000 TES bolometers are packed into the wafer leading to both a much denser detector density and readout circuitry. The demonstration of the assembly and integration of the AdvACT arrays is important for the next generation CMB experiments, which will continue to increase the pixel number and density. We present the detailed assembly process of the first AdvACT detector array.

  2. Underground Prototype Water Cherenkov Muon Detector with the Tibet Air Shower Array

    SciTech Connect

    Amenomori, M.; Nanjo, H.; Bi, X. J.; Ding, L. K.; Feng, Zhaoyang; He, H. H.; Hu, H. B.; Lu, H.; Lu, S. L.; Ren, J. R.; Tan, Y. H.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wu, H. R.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, D.; Kawata, K.

    2008-12-24

    We are planning to build a 10,000 m{sup 2} water-Cherenkov-type muon detector (MD) array under the Tibet air shower (AS) array. The Tibet AS+MD array will have the sensitivity to detect gamma rays in the 100 TeV region by an order of the magnitude better than any other previous existing detectors in the world. In the late fall of 2007, a prototype water Cherenkov muon detector of approximately 100 m{sup 2} was constructed under the existing Tibet AS array. The preliminary data analysis is in good agreement with our MC simulation. We are now ready for further expanding the underground water Cherenkov muon detector.

  3. Assembly and integration process of the first high density detector array for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaqiong; Choi, Steve; Ho, Shuay-Pwu; Crowley, Kevin T.; Salatino, Maria; Simon, Sara M.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Nati, Federico; Ward, Jonathan; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Henderson, Shawn; Koopman, Brian J.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Niemack, Michael D.; McMahon, Jeff; Duff, Shannon M.; Schillaci, Alessandro; Hubmayr, Johannes; Hilton, Gene C.; Beall, James A.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-07-01

    The Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) upgrade on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) consists of multichroic Transition Edge Sensor (TES) detector arrays to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization anisotropies in multiple frequency bands. The first AdvACT detector array, sensitive to both 150 and 230 GHz, is fabricated on a 150 mm diameter wafer and read out with a completely different scheme compared to ACTPol. Approximately 2000 TES bolometers are packed into the wafer leading to both a much denser detector density and readout circuitry. The demonstration of the assembly and integration of the AdvACT arrays is important for the next generation CMB experiments, which will continue to increase the pixel number and density. We present the detailed assembly process of the first AdvACT detector array.

  4. SU-E-T-645: Qualification of a 2D Ionization Chamber Array for Beam Steering and Profile Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, S; Balter, P; Rose, M; Simon, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Establish a procedure for beam steering and profile measurement using a 2D ionization chamber array and show equivalence to a water scanning system. Methods: Multiple photon beams (30×30cm{sup 2} field) and electron beams (25×25cm{sup 2} cone) were steered in the radial and transverse directions using Sun Nuclear’s IC PROFILER (ICP). Solid water was added during steering to ensure measurements were beyond the buildup region. With steering complete, servos were zeroed and enabled. Photon profiles were collected in a 30×30cm{sup 2} field at dmax and 2.9 cm depth for flattened and FFF beams respectively. Electron profiles were collected with a 25×25cm{sup 2} cone and effective depth (solid water + 0.9 cm intrinsic buildup) as follows: 0.9 cm (6e), 1.9 cm (9e), 2.9 cm (12e, 16e, 20e). Profiles of the same energy, field size and depth were measured in water with Sun Nuclear’s 3D SCANNER (3DS). Profiles were re-measured using the ICP after the in-water scans. Profiles measured using the ICP and 3DS were compared by (a) examining the differences in Varian’s “Point Difference Symmetry” metric, (b) visual inspection of the overlaid profile shapes and (c) calculation of point-by-point differences. Results: Comparing ICP measurements before and after water scanning showed very good agreement indicating good stability of the linac and measurement system. Comparing ICP Measurements to water phantom measurements using Varian’s symmetry metric showed agreement within 0.5% for all beams. The average magnitude of the agreement was within 0.2%. Comparing ICP Measurements to water phantom measurements using point-by-point difference showed agreement within 0.5% inside of 80% area of the field width. Conclusion: Profile agreement to within 0.5% was observed between ICP and 3DS after steering multiple energies with the ICP. This indicates that the ICP may be used for steering electron beams, and both flattened and FFF photon beams. Song Gao: Sun Nuclear

  5. Characteristics of stereo images from detectors in focal plane array.

    PubMed

    Son, Jung-Young; Yeom, Seokwon; Chun, Joo-Hwan; Guschin, Vladmir P; Lee, Dong-Su

    2011-07-01

    The equivalent ray geometry of two horizontally aligned detectors at the focal plane of the main antenna in a millimeter wave imaging system is analyzed to reveal the reason why the images from the detectors are fused as an image with a depth sense. Scanning the main antenna in both horizontal and vertical directions makes each detector perform as a camera, and the two detectors can work like a stereo camera in the millimeter wave range. However, the stereo camera geometry is different from that of the stereo camera used in the visual spectral range because the detectors' viewing directions are diverging to each other and they are a certain distance apart. The depth sense is mainly induced by the distance between detectors. The images obtained from the detectors in the millimeter imaging system are perceived with a good depth sense. The disparities responsible for the depth sense are identified in the images.

  6. Enhancement of concentration range of chromatographically detectable components with array detector mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Enke, Christie

    2013-02-19

    Methods and instruments for high dynamic range analysis of sample components are described. A sample is subjected to time-dependent separation, ionized, and the ions dispersed with a constant integration time across an array of detectors according to the ions m/z values. Each of the detectors in the array has a dynamically adjustable gain or a logarithmic response function, producing an instrument capable of detecting a ratio of responses or 4 or more orders of magnitude.

  7. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  8. Brief Introduction to the γ-DETECTOR Array at Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, W.; Zhang, N. T.; Liu, M. L.; Zheng, Y.; Fang, Y. D.; Zhou, X. H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Lei, X. G.; Guo, Y. X.

    2013-11-01

    A new γ-detector array at Institute of modern physics in Lanzhou is now in construction. The spherical frame is designed using Solidworks, and is assembled by 4 kinds of irregular polygons. 32 detectors could be placed on this frame in maximum, which are arranged with 4-4-4-8-4-4-4 configuration.

  9. Conductive polymer-mediated 2D and 3D arrays of Mn3O4 nanoblocks and mesoporous conductive polymers as their replicas.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yoshitaka; Kageyama, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Riho; Oaki, Yuya; Imai, Hiroaki

    2015-11-28

    Orientation-controlled 2D and 3D microarrays of Mn3O4 nanocuboids that were mediated by a conductive polymer were fabricated by evaporation-induced self-assembly of the oxide nanoblocks and subsequent polymerization of pyrrole in the interparticle spaces. Free-standing mesoporous polypyrroles (PPy) having chain- and square-grid-like nanovoid arrays were obtained as replicas of the composite assemblies by dissolving the oxide nanoblocks. The PPy-mediated manganese oxide arrays exhibited stable electrochemical performance as an ultrathin anode of a lithium-ion secondary battery.

  10. Vacuum photodiode detector array for broadband UV detection in a tokamak plasma.

    PubMed

    Zweben, S J; Menyuk, C R; Taylor, R J

    1979-08-01

    An array of vacuum photodiode detectors has been used to monitor discharge equilibrium, stability, and cleanliness in the Macrotor tokamak. These detectors use the photoelectric effect on small tungsten plates to measure UV emission in the band lambda approximately 200-1200 angstroms, and so are sensitive mainly to impurity line radiation in Macrotor. The response of this system to controlled impurity contamination experiments and to disruptions is described. The design, construction, and background problems associated with these detectors are discussed in detail.

  11. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) measurement techniques for lenses and linear detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnabel, J. J., Jr.; Kaishoven, J. E., Jr.; Tom, D.

    1984-01-01

    Application is the determination of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for linear detector arrays. A system set up requires knowledge of the MTF of the imaging lens. Procedure for this measurement is described for standard optical lab equipment. Given this information, various possible approaches to MTF measurement for linear arrays is described. The knife edge method is then described in detail.

  12. A near-infrared 64-pixel superconducting nanowire single photon detector array with integrated multiplexed readout

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, M. S. Verma, V. B.; Stevens, M.; Gerrits, T.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R.; Nam, S. W.; Marsili, F.; Beyer, A.; Shaw, M. D.; Kumor, D.

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  13. Smart time-pulse coding photoconverters as basic components 2D-array logic devices for advanced neural networks and optical computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Nikolsky, Alexander I.; Lazarev, Alexander A.; Michalnichenko, Nikolay N.

    2004-04-01

    The article deals with a conception of building arithmetic-logic devices (ALD) with a 2D-structure and optical 2D-array inputs-outputs as advanced high-productivity parallel basic operational training modules for realization of basic operation of continuous, neuro-fuzzy, multilevel, threshold and others logics and vector-matrix, vector-tensor procedures in neural networks, that consists in use of time-pulse coding (TPC) architecture and 2D-array smart optoelectronic pulse-width (or pulse-phase) modulators (PWM or PPM) for transformation of input pictures. The input grayscale image is transformed into a group of corresponding short optical pulses or time positions of optical two-level signal swing. We consider optoelectronic implementations of universal (quasi-universal) picture element of two-valued ALD, multi-valued ALD, analog-to-digital converters, multilevel threshold discriminators and we show that 2D-array time-pulse photoconverters are the base elements for these devices. We show simulation results of the time-pulse photoconverters as base components. Considered devices have technical parameters: input optical signals power is 200nW_200μW (if photodiode responsivity is 0.5A/W), conversion time is from tens of microseconds to a millisecond, supply voltage is 1.5_15V, consumption power is from tens of microwatts to a milliwatt, conversion nonlinearity is less than 1%. One cell consists of 2-3 photodiodes and about ten CMOS transistors. This simplicity of the cells allows to carry out their integration in arrays of 32x32, 64x64 elements and more.

  14. Integrating 2-D position sensitive X-ray detectors with low-density alkali halide storage targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubold, H.-G.; Hoheisel, W.; Hiller, P.

    1986-05-01

    For the use in scattering experiments with synchrotron radiation, integrating position sensitive X-ray detectors are discussed. These detectors store the photon number equivalent charge (PNEC) in low-density alkali halide targets. Performance tests are given for a detector which uses a Gd 2O 2S fluorescence screen for X-ray detection and the low-density KCl storage target of a television SEC vidicon tube for photon integration. Rather than directly by X-rays, this target is charged by 6 keV electrons from the image intensifier section of the vidicon. Its excellent storage capability allows measurements of extremely high-contrast, high-flux X-ray patterns with the same accuracy as achieved with any single photon detection system if the discussed readout techniques are applied.

  15. Detector arrays for high resolution spectroscopy from 5-28 microns (Contributed)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, G.; Jennings, D. E.; Moseley, S. H.; Lamb, G.

    A linear Si:As BIB detector array (Rockwell International) is being implemented in a postdispersion detection system for ground based Fourier transform spectrometers. The array version can be used as a multichannel narrow band filter for extended spectral coverage or for imaging with a narrow bandpass. A Si:As solid state photomultiplier array (Rockwell) is evaluated for use in high resolution infrared spectrometers. Test results and applications are discussed.

  16. Integrated filter and detector array for spectral imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A spectral imaging system having an integrated filter and photodetector array is disclosed. The filter has narrow transmission bands which vary in frequency along the photodetector array. The frequency variation of the transmission bands is matched to, and aligned with, the frequency variation of a received spectral image. The filter is deposited directly on the photodetector array by a low temperature deposition process. By depositing the filter directly on the photodetector array, permanent alignment is achieved for all temperatures, spectral crosstalk is substantially eliminated, and a high signal to noise ratio is achieved.

  17. Two-dimensional focal plane detector arrays for LWIR/VLWIR space and airborne sounding missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S.; Bauer, A.; Bitterlich, H.; Bruder, M.; Haas, L.-D.; Haiml, M.; Hofmann, K.; Mahlein, K.-M.; Nothaft, H.-P.; Schallenberg, T.; Weber, A.; Wendler, J.; Wollrab, R.; Ziegler, J.

    2010-10-01

    An increasing need for high-precision atmospheric data especially in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) and very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) spectral ranges has arisen in the past years not only for the analysis of climate change and its effect on the earth's ecosystem, but also for weather forecast and atmospheric monitoring purposes. Spatially and spectrally resolved atmospheric emission data are advantageously gathered through limb or nadir sounding using an imaging Fourier transform (FT) interferometer with a two-dimensional (2D) high-speed focal plane detector array (FPA). In this paper, AIM reports on its latest results on MCT VLWIR FPAs for Fourier transform infrared sounding applications in the 8-15μm spectral range. The performance of a (112x112) pixel photodiode array with a 40μm pixel pitch incorporating extrinsic p-doping for low dark current, a technique for linearity improvement at high photon fluxes, pixel guards, pixel select/de-select, and a (2x2) super-pixel architecture is discussed. The customized read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) supporting integrate while-read (IWR) operation has a buffered direct injection (BDI) input stage and a full well capacity (FWC) of 143 Megaelectrons per super-pixel. It consists of two independently operating halves with two analog video outputs each. The full frame rate is typically 4k frames/sec, making it suitable for use with rapid scan FT infrared spectrometers. At a 55K operating temperature and an ~14.4μm cut-off wavelength, a photo response of 12.1mV/K and a noise equivalent temperature difference of 24.8mK at half well filling are demonstrated for a 286K reference scene. The nonlinearity error is <0.5%.

  18. Electronics for the Extensive Air Shower Detector Array at the University of Puebla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, E.; Conde, R.; Martínez, O.; Murrieta, T.; Salazar, H.; Villaseñor, L.

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we describe in detail the electronics cards that were designed to be the basis of the data acquisition system (DAS) of the extensive air shower detector array built in the Campus of the University of Puebla. The purpose of this observatory is to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1015 eV. The array consists of 18 liquid scintillator detectors (12 in the first stage) and 6 water Cherenkov detectors (one of 10 m2 cross section and five smaller ones of 1.86 m2 cross section), distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m2. The electronics described here uses analog to digital converters of 10 bits working at a sampling speed of 40 MS/s and field-programmable gate array (FPGA).

  19. Trigger and aperture of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Mičanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santo, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single detector, amongst a large background (mainly random single cosmic ray muons), up to the selection of real events and the rejection of random coincidences. Such trigger makes the surface detector array fully efficient for the detection of EAS with energy above 3×1018eV, for all zenith angles between 0∘ and 60∘, independently of the position of the impact point and of the mass of the primary particle. In these range of energies and angles, the exposure of the surface array can be determined purely on the basis of the geometrical acceptance.

  20. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-05

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays.

  1. Terahertz detectors arrays based on orderly aligned InN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuechen; Liu, Huiqiang; Li, Qiuguo; Chen, Hao; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Sheng; Cheng, Binbin

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructured terahertz detectors employing a single semiconducting nanowire or graphene sheet have recently generated considerable interest as an alternative to existing THz technologies, for their merit on the ease of fabrication and above-room-temperature operation. However, the lack of alignment in nanostructure device hindered their potential toward practical applications. The present work reports ordered terahertz detectors arrays based on neatly aligned InN nanowires. The InN nanostructures (nanowires and nano-necklaces) were achieved by chemical vapor deposition growth, and then InN nanowires were successfully transferred and aligned into micrometer-sized groups by a “transfer-printing” method. Field effect transistors on aligned nanowires were fabricated and tested for terahertz detection purpose. The detector showed good photoresponse as well as low noise level. Besides, dense arrays of such detectors were also fabricated, which rendered a peak responsivity of 1.1 V/W from 7 detectors connected in series.

  2. Terahertz detectors arrays based on orderly aligned InN nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuechen; Liu, Huiqiang; Li, Qiuguo; Chen, Hao; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Sheng; Cheng, Binbin

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured terahertz detectors employing a single semiconducting nanowire or graphene sheet have recently generated considerable interest as an alternative to existing THz technologies, for their merit on the ease of fabrication and above-room-temperature operation. However, the lack of alignment in nanostructure device hindered their potential toward practical applications. The present work reports ordered terahertz detectors arrays based on neatly aligned InN nanowires. The InN nanostructures (nanowires and nano-necklaces) were achieved by chemical vapor deposition growth, and then InN nanowires were successfully transferred and aligned into micrometer-sized groups by a “transfer-printing” method. Field effect transistors on aligned nanowires were fabricated and tested for terahertz detection purpose. The detector showed good photoresponse as well as low noise level. Besides, dense arrays of such detectors were also fabricated, which rendered a peak responsivity of 1.1 V/W from 7 detectors connected in series. PMID:26289498

  3. Super-radiant plasmon mode is more efficient for SERS than the sub-radiant mode in highly packed 2D gold nanocube arrays.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud A

    2015-08-21

    The field coupling in highly packed plasmonic nanoparticle arrays is not localized due to the energy transport via the sub-radiant plasmon modes, which is formed in addition to the regular super-radiant plasmon mode. Unlike the sub-radiant mode, the plasmon field of the super-radiant mode cannot extend over long distances since it decays radiatively with a shorter lifetime. The coupling of the plasmon fields of gold nanocubes (AuNCs) when organized into highly packed 2D arrays was examined experimentally. Multiple plasmon resonance optical peaks are observed for the AuNC arrays and are compared to those calculated using the discrete dipole approximation. The calculated electromagnetic plasmon fields of the arrays displayed high field intensity for the nanocubes located in the center of the arrays for the lower energy super-radiant mode, while the higher energy sub-radiant plasmon mode displayed high field intensity at the edges of the arrays. The Raman signal enhancement by the super-radiant plasmon mode was found to be one hundred fold greater than that by sub-radiant plasmon mode because the super-radiant mode has higher scattering and stronger plasmon field intensity relative to the sub-radiant mode.

  4. Super-radiant plasmon mode is more efficient for SERS than the sub-radiant mode in highly packed 2D gold nanocube arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud A.

    2015-08-21

    The field coupling in highly packed plasmonic nanoparticle arrays is not localized due to the energy transport via the sub-radiant plasmon modes, which is formed in addition to the regular super-radiant plasmon mode. Unlike the sub-radiant mode, the plasmon field of the super-radiant mode cannot extend over long distances since it decays radiatively with a shorter lifetime. The coupling of the plasmon fields of gold nanocubes (AuNCs) when organized into highly packed 2D arrays was examined experimentally. Multiple plasmon resonance optical peaks are observed for the AuNC arrays and are compared to those calculated using the discrete dipole approximation. The calculated electromagnetic plasmon fields of the arrays displayed high field intensity for the nanocubes located in the center of the arrays for the lower energy super-radiant mode, while the higher energy sub-radiant plasmon mode displayed high field intensity at the edges of the arrays. The Raman signal enhancement by the super-radiant plasmon mode was found to be one hundred fold greater than that by sub-radiant plasmon mode because the super-radiant mode has higher scattering and stronger plasmon field intensity relative to the sub-radiant mode.

  5. Some energy considerations in gamma ray burst location determinations by an anisotropic array of detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The anisotropic array of detectors to be used in the Burst and Transient Experiment (BATSE) for locating gamma ray burst sources is examined with respect to its ability to locate those sources by means of the relative response of its eight detectors. It was shown that the energy-dependent attenuation effects of the aluminum window covering each detector has a significant effect on source location determinations. Location formulas were derived as a function of detector counts and gamma ray energies in the range 50 to 150 keV. Deviation formulas were derived and serve to indicate the location error that would be cuased by ignoring the influence of the passive absorber.

  6. Quantum Well and Quantum Dot Modeling for Advanced Infrared Detectors and Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Hill, C. J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of Quantum Well Infrared Detectors (QWIP) and Quantum Dot Infrared Detectors (QDIP) in the development of Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). The QWIP Detector being developed is a dual band detector. It is capable of running on two bands Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) and Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR). The same large-format dual-band FPA technology can be applied to Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIP) with no modification, once QDIP exceeds QWIP in single device performance. Details of the devices are reviewed.

  7. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimeter spatial resolution PET detector module using a digital silicon photomultiplier coupled LGSO array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leem, Hyun Tae; Choi, Yong; Kim, Kyu Bom; Lee, Sangwon; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Yeom, Jung-Yeol

    2017-02-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) for breast, brain and small animal imaging, the spatial resolution of a PET detector is crucial to obtain high quality PET images. In this study, a PET detector for sub-millimeter spatial resolution imaging purpose was assembled using 4×4 pixels of a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM, DPC-3200-22-44, Philips) coupled with a 15×15 LGSO array with BaSO4 reflector, and a 1 mm thick acrylic light guide for light distribution between the dSiPM pixels. The active area of each dSiPM pixel was 3.2×3.9 mm2 and the size of each LGSO scintillator element was 0.7×0.7×6 mm3. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated the performance of the PET detector by measuring the energy resolution, 2D flood map, peak to valley (P/V) ratio, and coincidence resolving time (CRT). All measurements were performed at a temperature of 10±1 ℃. The average energy resolution was 15.6% (without correcting for saturation effects) at 511 keV and the best CRT was 242±5 ps. The 2D flood map obtained with an energy window of 400-600 keV demonstrated clear identification of all pixels, and the average P/V ratio of the X- and Y-directions were 7.31 and 7.81, respectively. This study demonstrated that the PET detector could be suitable for application in high resolution PET while achieving good timing resolution.

  8. A method to improve fluence resolution derived from two-dimensional detector array measurements for patient-specific IMRT verification using the information collected in dynalog files

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Juan Agustin Calama; Utrilla, Miguel Angel Infante; Rodriguez, Maria Elisa Lavado

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for improving the resolution of the fluence derived from detector array measurement using the information collected in dynalog files. From dynalog information, a file is generated with the actual multileaf collimator (MLC) positions and used as input to the treatment planning system (TPS) to obtain the dynalog-derived fluence and the theoretical response over the detector array. In contrast with the measured response, this theoretical response allows for correction of the dynalog-derived fluence and translation into the reconstructed fluence. This fluence is again introduced into the planning system to verify the treatment using clinical tools. Initially, more than 98% of the points passed the two-dimensional (2D) phantom gamma test (3% local dose - 3 mm) for all of the treatment verifications, but in some dose–volume histogram (DVH) comparisons, we note sensitive differences for the planning target volume (PTV) coverage and for the maximum doses in at-risk organs (up to 3.5%). In dose–distribution evaluations, we found differences of up to 5% in the PTV edges in certain cases due to detector array measurement errors. This work improves the resolution of the fluence derived from detector array measurements based on the treatment information, in contrast with the current commercial proposals based on planned data. PMID:26150681

  9. Non-volatile resistive photo-switches for flexible image detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nau, Sebastian; Wolf, Christoph; Sax, Stefan; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2015-09-01

    The increasing quest to find lightweight, conformable or flexible image detectors for machine vision or medical imaging brings organic electronics into the spotlight for these fields of application. Here were we introduce a unique imaging device concept and its utilization in an organic, flexible detector array with simple passive matrix wiring. We present a flexible organic image detector array built up from non-volatile resistive multi-bit photo-switchable elements. This unique realization is based on an organic photodiode combined with an organic resistive memory device wired in a simple crossbar configuration. The presented concept exhibits significant advantages compared to present organic and inorganic detector array technologies, facilitating the detection and simultaneous storage of the image information in one detector pixel, yet also allowing for simple read-out of the information from a simple passive-matrix crossbar wiring. This concept is demonstrated for single photo-switchable pixels as well as for arrays with sizes up to 32 by 32 pixels (1024 bit). The presented results pave the way for a versatile flexible and easy-to-fabricate sensor array technology. In a final step, the concept was expanded to detection of x-rays.

  10. Assembly, characterization, and operation of large-scale TES detector arrays for ACTPol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, Christine Goodwin

    2016-01-01

    The Polarization-sensitive Receiver for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACTPol) is designed to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies on small angular scales. Measurements of the CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies have produced arguably the most important cosmological data to date, establishing the LambdaCDM model and providing the best constraints on most of its parameters. To detect the very small fluctuations in the CMB signal across the sky, ACTPol uses feedhorn-coupled Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) detectors. A TES is a superconducting thin film operated in the transition region between the superconducting and normal states, where it functions as a highly sensitive resistive thermometer. In this thesis, aspects of the assembly, characterization, and in-field operation of the ACTPol TES detector arrays are discussed. First, a novel microfabrication process for producing high-density superconducting aluminum/polyimide flexible circuitry (flex) designed to connect large-scale detector arrays to the first stage of readout is presented. The flex is used in parts of the third ACTPol array and is currently being produced for use in the AdvACT detector arrays, which will begin to replace the ACTPol arrays in 2016. Next, we describe methods and results for the in-lab and on-telescope characterization of the detectors in the third ACTPol array. Finally, we describe the ACTPol TES R(T,I) transition shapes and how they affect the detector calibration and operation. Methods for measuring the exact detector calibration and re-biasing functions, taking into account the R(T,I) transition shape, are presented.

  11. Waveguide biosensor with integrated detector array for tuberculosis testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Rongjin; Lynn, N. Scott; Kingry, Luke C.; Yi, Zhangjing; Slayden, Richard A.; Dandy, David S.; Lear, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    A label-free immunoassay using a local evanescent array coupled (LEAC) biosensor is reported. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor chips with integrated photoconductor arrays are used to detect an antibody to a M. tuberculosis protein antigen, HspX. The metrology limits of the LEAC sensor using dc and ac measurement systems correspond to average film thicknesses of 28 and 14 pm, respectively. Limits of detection are 87 and 108 pm, respectively, for mouse immunoglobulin G antibody patterning and antigen detection.

  12. Coherent summation of spatially distorted Doppler lidar signals using a two-dimensional heterodyne detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kin Pui; Killinger, Dennis K.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio for a coherent Doppler lidar through the use of a multi-element heterodyne detector array. Such an array enables the spatial summation of atmospheric refractive turbulence induced speckles, and time varying target speckles. Our recent experiments have shown that the non-coherent summation of the lidar signals from a heterodyne detector array can enhance the heterodyne mixing efficiency and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. In this paper, we expand this work to include the coherent summation of array signals. The digitized heterodyne signals were stored in a personal computer. Fast Fourier transforms were performed on both the non-coherent and coherent summations of the detector array signals. It was found that the coherent summation greatly enhanced the accuracy in the Doppler frequency estimate. A theoretical analysis was performed and indicated good agreement with experimental results. We have also applied these results to the more general lidar applications including atmospheric wind sensing, and have found that in most lidar applications the Doppler frequency estimate is increased through the use of the heterodyne detector array.

  13. A 16-channel avalanche photodiode detector array for visible and near-infrared flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, William G.; Stapels, Christopher; Farrell, Richard; Tario, Joseph D., Jr.; Podniesinski, Edward; Wallace, Paul K.; Christian, James F.

    2006-02-01

    We report on the development and application of a flow cytometer using a 16-channel avalanche photodiode (APD) linear detector array. The array is configured with a dispersive grating to simultaneously record emission over a broad wavelength range using the 16 APD channels of the linear APD array. The APD detector elements have a peak quantum efficiency of 80% near 900 nm and have at least 40% quantum efficiency over the 400-nm to 1000-nm wavelength range. The extended red sensitivity of the detector array facilitates the use of lower energy excitation sources and near IR emitting dyes which reduces the impact of autofluorescence in signal starved measurements. The wide wavelength sensitivity of the APD array permits the use of multiple excitation sources and many different fluorescent labels to maximize the number of independent parameters in a given experiment. We show the sensitivity and linearity measurements for a single APD detector. Initial results for the flow cytometer with the 16-element APD array and the 16-channel readout ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) are presented.

  14. Slow magnetic relaxation in a hydrogen-bonded 2D array of mononuclear dysprosium(III) oxamates.

    PubMed

    Fortea-Pérez, Francisco R; Vallejo, Julia; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; De Munno, Giovanni; Armentano, Donatella; Pardo, Emilio

    2013-05-06

    The reaction of N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)oxamic acid with dysprosium(III) ions in a controlled basic media afforded the first example of a mononuclear lanthanide oxamate complex exhibiting a field-induced slow magnetic relaxation behavior typical of single-ion magnets (SIMs). The hydrogen-bond-mediated self-assembly of this new bifunctional dysprosium(III) SIM in the solid state provides a unique example of 2D hydrogen-bonded polymer with a herringbone net topology.

  15. Wide-viewing-angle 3D/2D convertible display system using two display devices and a lens array.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heejin; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Kim, Joohwan; Cho, Seong-Woo; Lee, Byoungho

    2005-10-17

    A wide-viewing-angle 3D/2D convertible display system with a thin structure is proposed that is able to display three-dimensional and two-dimensional images. With the use of a transparent display device in front of a conventional integral imaging system, it is possible to display planar images using the conventional system as a backlight source. By experiments, the proposed method is proven and compared with the conventional one.

  16. Performance of high resolution decoding with Multi-Anode Microchannel Array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.; Horch, Elliott P.

    1993-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) is a microchannel plate based photon counting detector with applications in ground-based and space-based astronomy. The detector electronics decode the position of each photon event, and the decoding algorithm that associates a given event with the appropriate pixel is determined by the geometry of the anode array. The standard MAMA detector has a spatial resolution set by the anode array of 25 microns, but the MCP pore resolution exceeds this. The performance of a new algorithm that halves the pixel spacing and improves the pixel spatial resolution is described. The new algorithm does not degrade the pulse-pair resolution of the detector and does not require any modifications to the detector tube. Measurements of the detector's response demonstrate that high resolution decoding yields a 60 percent enhancement in spatial resolution. Measurements of the performance of the high resolution algorithm with a 14 micron MAMA detector are also described. The parameters that control high resolution performance are discussed. Results of the application of high resolution decoding to speckle interferometry are presented.

  17. Development of a mercuric iodide detector array for in-vivo x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, B.E.; Iwanczyk, J.S.; Tornai, M.P.; Levin, C.S.; Hoffman, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    A nineteen element mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) detector array has been developed in order to investigate the potential of using this technology for in-vivo x-ray and gamma-ray imaging. A prototype cross-grid detector array was constructed with hexagonal pixels of 1.9 mm diameter (active area = 3.28 mm{sup 2}) and 0.2 mm thick septa. The overall detector active area is roughly 65 mm{sup 2}. A detector thickness of 1.2 mm was used to achieve about 100% efficiency at 60 keV and 67% efficiency at 140 keV The detector fabrication, geometry and structure were optimized for charge collection and to minimize crosstalk between elements. A section of a standard high resolution cast-lead gamma-camera collimator was incorporated into the detector to provide collimation matching the discrete pixel geometry. Measurements of spectral and spatial performance of the array were made using 241-Am and 99m-Tc sources. These measurements were compared with similar measurements made using an optimized single HgI{sub 2} x-ray detector with active area of about 3 mm{sup 2} and thickness of 500 {mu}m.

  18. Development and characterization of a 2D scintillation detector for quality assurance in scanned carbon ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborini, A.; Raffaele, L.; Mirandola, A.; Molinelli, S.; Viviani, C.; Spampinato, S.; Ciocca, M.

    2016-04-01

    At the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO Foundation), a two-dimensional high resolution scintillating dosimetry system has been developed and tested for daily Quality Assurance measurements (QA) in carbon ion radiotherapy with active scanning technique, for both single pencil beams and scanned fields produced by a synchrotron accelerator. The detector consists of a thin plane organic scintillator (25×25 cm2, 2 mm thick) coupled with a high spatial resolution CCD camera (0.25 mm) in a light-tight box. A dedicated Labview software was developed for image acquisition triggered with the beam extraction, data post-processing and analysis. The scintillator system was preliminary characterized in terms of short-term reproducibility (found to be within±0.5%), linearity with the number of particles (linear fit χ2 = 0.996) and dependence on particle flux (measured to be < 1.5 %). The detector was then tested for single beam spot measurements (Full Width at Half Maximum and position) and for 6×6 cm2 reference scanned field (determination of homogeneity) for carbon ions with energy from 115 MeV/u up to 400 MeV/u. No major differences in the investigated beam parameters measured with scintillator system and the radiochromic EBT3 reference films were observed. The system allows therefore real-time monitoring of the carbon ion beam relevant parameters, with a significant daily time saving with respect to films currently used. The results of this study show the suitability of the scintillation detector for daily QA in a carbon ion facility with an active beam delivery system.

  19. Proton Transfer Reactions Studied Using the VANDLE Neutron Detector Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornsberry, C. R.; Burcher, S.; Gryzwacz, R.; Jones, K. L.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Smith, K.; Vostinar, M.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blankstein, D.; Deboer, J.; Hall, M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Reingold, C.; Tan, W.; Cizewski, J. A.; Lepailleur, A.; Walter, D.; Febbraro, M.; Pain, S. D.; Marley, S. T.

    2016-09-01

    Proton transfer reactions, such as (d,n), are powerful tools for the study of single particle proton states of exotic nuclei. Measuring the outgoing neutron allows for the extraction of spectroscopic information from the recoil nucleus. With the development of new radioactive ion beam facilities, such as FRIB in the U.S., comes the need for new tools for the study of reactions involving radioactive nuclei. Neutron detectors, such as VANDLE, are sensitive to gamma rays in addition to neutrons. This results in high background rates for measurements with high external trigger rates. The use of discriminating recoil particle detectors, such as phoswich detectors, allow for the selection of a clean recoil tag by separating the recoil nucleus of interest from unreacted RIB components. Developments of low energy proton transfer measurements in inverse kinematics and recent (d,n) results will be presented. This work supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  20. Phase-rotation based receive-beamformer for miniaturized volumetric ultrasound imaging scanners using 2-D CMUT-on-ASIC arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bae-Hyung; Lee, Seunghun; Song, Jongkeun; Kim, Youngil; Jeon, Taeho; Cho, Kyungil

    2013-03-01

    Up-to-date capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technologies provide us unique opportunities to minimize the size and cost of ultrasound scanners by integrating front-end circuits into CMUT arrays. We describe a design prototype of a portable ultrasound scan-head probe using 2-D phased CMUT-on-ASIC arrays of 3-MHz 250 micrometer-pitch by fabricating and integrating front-end electronics with 2-D CMUT array elements. One of the objectives of our work is to design a receive beamformer architecture for the smart probe with compact size and comparable performance. In this work, a phase-rotation based receive beamformer using the sampling frequency of 4 times the center frequency and a hybrid beamforming to reduce the channel counts of the system-side are introduced. Parallel beamforming is considered for the purpose of saving power consumption of battery (by firing fewer times per image frame). This architecture has the advantage of directly obtaining I and Q components. By using the architecture, the interleaved I/Q data from the storage is acquired and I/Q demodulation for baseband processing is directly achieved without demodulators including sin and cosine lookup tables and mixers. Currently, we are extending the presented architecture to develop a true smart probe by including lower power devices and cooling systems, and bringing wireless data transmission into consideration.

  1. Plasmonic spectrum on 1D and 2D periodic arrays of rod-shape metal nanoparticle pairs with different core patterns for biosensor and solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumara, N. T. R. N.; Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Huang, Jin-Wei; Huang, Hung Ji; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the near field intensity and absorption spectra of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) periodic arrays of rod-shape metal nanoparticle (MNP) pairs using the finite element method (FEM) and taking into account the different core patterns for biosensor and solar cell applications are investigated. A tunable optical spectrum corresponding to the transverse SPR modes is observed. The peak resonance wavelength (λ res) can be shifted to red as the core patterns in rod-shape MNPs have been changed. We find that the 2D periodic array of core-shell MNP pairs (case 2) exhibit a red shifted SPR that can be tuned the gap enhancement and absorption efficiency simultaneously over an extended wavelength range. The tunable optical performances give us a qualitative idea of the geometrical properties of the periodic array of rod-shape MNP pairs on SPRs that can be as a promising candidate for plasmonic biosensor and solar cell applications.

  2. The DUV Stability of Superlattice-Doped CMOS Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T.; Dickie, M.; Cheng, P.; Greer, H. F.; Nikzad, S.; Sgro, J.; Tsur, S.

    2013-01-01

    JPL and Alacron have recently developed a high performance, DUV camera with a superlattice doped CMOS imaging detector. Supperlattice doped detectors achieve nearly 100% internal quantum efficiency in the deep and far ultraviolet, and a single layer, Al2O3 antireflection coating enables 64% external quantum efficiency at 263nm. In lifetime tests performed at Applied Materials using 263 nm pulsed, solid state and 193 nm pulsed excimer laser, the quantum efficiency and dark current of the JPL/Alacron camera remained stable to better than 1% precision during long-term exposure to several billion laser pulses, with no measurable degradation, no blooming and no image memory at 1000 fps.

  3. A Ring Artifact Correction Method: Validation by Micro-CT Imaging with Flat-Panel Detectors and a 2D Photon-Counting Detector

    PubMed Central

    Eldib, Mohamed Elsayed; Hegazy, Mohamed; Mun, Yang Ji; Cho, Myung Hye; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an efficient ring artifact correction method for a cone-beam computed tomography (CT). In the first step, we correct the defective pixels whose values are close to zero or saturated in the projection domain. In the second step, we compute the mean value at each detector element along the view angle in the sinogram to obtain the one-dimensional (1D) mean vector, and we then compute the 1D correction vector by taking inverse of the mean vector. We multiply the correction vector with the sinogram row by row over all view angles. In the third step, we apply a Gaussian filter on the difference image between the original CT image and the corrected CT image obtained in the previous step. The filtered difference image is added to the corrected CT image to compensate the possible contrast anomaly that may appear due to the contrast change in the sinogram after removing stripe artifacts. We applied the proposed method to the projection data acquired by two flat-panel detectors (FPDs) and a silicon-based photon-counting X-ray detector (PCXD). Micro-CT imaging experiments of phantoms and a small animal have shown that the proposed method can greatly reduce ring artifacts regardless of detector types. Despite the great reduction of ring artifacts, the proposed method does not compromise the original spatial resolution and contrast. PMID:28146088

  4. A Ring Artifact Correction Method: Validation by Micro-CT Imaging with Flat-Panel Detectors and a 2D Photon-Counting Detector.

    PubMed

    Eldib, Mohamed Elsayed; Hegazy, Mohamed; Mun, Yang Ji; Cho, Myung Hye; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-01-30

    We introduce an efficient ring artifact correction method for a cone-beam computed tomography (CT). In the first step, we correct the defective pixels whose values are close to zero or saturated in the projection domain. In the second step, we compute the mean value at each detector element along the view angle in the sinogram to obtain the one-dimensional (1D) mean vector, and we then compute the 1D correction vector by taking inverse of the mean vector. We multiply the correction vector with the sinogram row by row over all view angles. In the third step, we apply a Gaussian filter on the difference image between the original CT image and the corrected CT image obtained in the previous step. The filtered difference image is added to the corrected CT image to compensate the possible contrast anomaly that may appear due to the contrast change in the sinogram after removing stripe artifacts. We applied the proposed method to the projection data acquired by two flat-panel detectors (FPDs) and a silicon-based photon-counting X-ray detector (PCXD). Micro-CT imaging experiments of phantoms and a small animal have shown that the proposed method can greatly reduce ring artifacts regardless of detector types. Despite the great reduction of ring artifacts, the proposed method does not compromise the original spatial resolution and contrast.

  5. Zonal wavefront sensor with reduced number of rows in the detector array.

    PubMed

    Boruah, Bosanta R; Das, Abhijit

    2011-07-10

    In this paper, we describe a zonal wavefront sensor in which the photodetector array can have a smaller number of rows. The test wavefront is incident on a two-dimensional array of diffraction gratings followed by a single focusing lens. The periodicity and the orientation of the grating rulings of each grating can be chosen such that the +1 order beam from the gratings forms an array of focal spots in the detector plane. We show that by using a square array of zones, it is possible to generate an array of +1 order focal spots having a smaller number of rows, thus reducing the height of the required detector array. The phase profile of the test wavefront can be estimated by measuring the displacements of the +1 order focal spots for the test wavefront relative to the +1 order focal spots for a plane reference wavefront. The narrower width of the photodetector array can offer several advantages, such as a faster frame rate of the wavefront sensor, a reduced amount of cross talk between the nearby detector zones, and a decrease in the maximum thermal noise. We also present experimental results of a proof-of-concept experimental arrangement using the proposed wavefront sensing scheme.

  6. Application and Design of Satellite Infrared Spectral Imaging Radiometers with Uncooled Microbolometer Array Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James; Lancaster, Regie; Maschhoff, Kevin; Starr, David OC (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Uncooled infrared microbolometer array detectors have application for space borne spectral imaging radiometer of several types to lower size, power and cost and provide improved performance. Other advantages of eliminating cooling requirement are simplified systems, simplified satellite integration and improved reliability. A prototype microbolometer instrument for cloud observations was flown on the STS-85 space shuttle mission. Extensive data were acquired at_km resolution at four thermal infrared wavelength bands. From the 320x280 detector array both spectral and angular information can be used to advantage in cloud retrievals and has been demonstrated. An engineering model Compact Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer (COVIR) for small satellite missions has been developed. Application of advanced microbolometer array detectors for three axis stabilized GOES thermal imagers has been studied.

  7. A 128 x 128 InGaAs detector array for 1.0 - 1.7 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G.; Joshi, A.; Lange, M.; Woodruff, K.; Mykietyn, E.; Gay, D.; Ackley, D.; Erickson, G.; Ban, V.; Staller, C.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional 128 x 128 detector array for the 1.0 - 1.7 micron spectral region has been demonstrated with indium gallium arsenide. The 30 micron square pixels had 60 micron spacing in both directions and were designed to be compatible with a 2D Reticon multiplexer. Dark currents below 100 pA, capacitance near 0.1 pF, and quantum efficiencies above 80 percent were measured. Probe maps of dark current and quantum efficiency are presented along with pixel dropout data and wafer yield which was as high as 99.89 percent (7 dropouts) in an area of 6528 pixels and 99.37 percent (103 dropouts) over an entire 128 x 128 pixel region.

  8. Analysis of upper and lower bounds of the frame noise in linear detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggi, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper estimates the upper and lower bounds of the frame noise of a linear detector array that uses a one-dimensional scan pattern. Using chi-square distribution, it is analytically shown why it is necessary to use the average of the variances and not the average of the standard deviations to estimate these bounds. Also, a criteria for determining whether any excessively noisy lines exist among the detectors is derived from these bounds. Using a Gaussian standard random variable generator, these bounds are demonstrated to be accurate within the specified confidence interval. A silicon detector array is then used for actual dark current measurements. The criterion developed for determination of noisy detectors is checked on the experimentally obtained data.

  9. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, J. L.; Martel, I.; Jiménez, R.; Galán, J.; Salmerón, P.

    2016-09-01

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from 12C up to 84Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  10. Parasitic antenna effect in terahertz plasmon detector array for real-time imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Ryu, Min Woo; Rok Kim, Kyung; Han, Seong-Tae

    2015-10-01

    The performance uniformity of each pixel integrated with a patch antenna in a terahertz plasmon detector array is very important in building the large array necessary for a real-time imaging system. We found a parasitic antenna effect in the terahertz plasmon detector whose response is dependent on the position of the detector pixel in the illumination area of the terahertz beam. It was also demonstrated that the parasitic antenna effect is attributed to the physical structure consisting of signal pads, bonding wires, and interconnection lines on a chip and a printed circuit board. Experimental results show that the performance of the detector pixel is determined by the sum of the effects of each parasitic antenna and the on-chip integrated antenna designed to detect signals at the operating frequency. The parasitic antenna effect can be minimized by blocking the interconnections with a metallic shield.

  11. Measurements and analysis of optical crosstalk in a microwave kinetic inductance detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisigello, L.; Yates, S. J. C.; Ferrari, L.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Baryshev, A.

    2016-07-01

    The main advantage of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector arrays (MKID) is their multiplexing capability, which allows for building cameras with a large number of pixels and good sensitivity, particularly suitable to perform large blank galaxy surveys. However, to have as many pixels as possible it is necessary to arrange detectors close in readout frequency. Consequently KIDs overlap in frequency and are coupled to each other producing crosstalk. Because crosstalk can be only minimised by improving the array design, in this work we aim to correct for this effect a posteriori. We analysed a MKID array consisting of 880 KIDs with readout frequencies at 4-8 GHz. We measured the beam patterns for every detector in the array and described the response of each detector by using a two-dimensional Gaussian fit. Then, we identified detectors affected by crosstalk above -30 dB level from the maximum and removed the signal of the crosstalking detectors. Moreover, we modelled the crosstalk level for each KID as a function of the readout frequency separation starting from the assumption that the transmission of a KID is a Lorenztian function in power. We were able to describe the general crosstalk level of the array and the crosstalk of each KID within 5 dB, so enabling the design of future arrays with the crosstalk as a design criterion. In this work, we demonstrate that it is possible to process MKID images a posteriori to decrease the crosstalk effect, subtracting the response of each coupled KID from the original map.

  12. SU-E-T-83: A Study On Evaluating the Directional Dependency of 2D Seven 29 Ion Chamber Array Clinically with Different IMRT Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Syam; Aswathi, C.P.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the directional dependency of 2D seven 29 ion chamber array clinically with different IMRT plans. Methods: 25 patients already treated with IMRT plans were selected for the study. Verification plans were created for each treatment plan in eclipse 10 treatment planning system using the AAA algorithm with the 2D array and the Octavius CT phantom. Verification plans were done 2 times for a single patient. First plan with real IMRT (plan-related approach) and second plan with zero degree gantry angle (field-related approach). Measurements were performed on a Varian Clinac-iX, linear accelerator equipped with a millennium 120 multileaf collimator. Fluence was measured for all the delivered plans and analyzed using the verisoft software. Comparison was done by selecting the fluence delivered in static gantry (zero degree gantry) versus IMRT with real gantry angles. Results: The gamma pass percentage is greater than 97 % for all IMRT delivered with zero gantry angle and between 95%–98% for real gantry angles. Dose difference between the TPS calculated and measured for IMRT delivered with zero gantry angle was found to be between (0.03 to 0.06Gy) and with real gantry angles between (0.02 to 0.05Gy). There is a significant difference between the gamma analysis between the zero degree and true angle with a significance of 0.002. Standard deviation of gamma pass percentage between the IMRT plans with zero gantry angle was 0.68 and for IMRT with true gantry angle was found to be 0.74. Conclusion: The gamma analysis for IMRT with zero degree gantry angles shows higher pass percentage than IMRT delivered with true gantry angles. Verification plans delivered with true gantry angles lower the verification accuracy when 2D array is used for measurement.

  13. Hybrid Extensive Air Shower Detector Array at the University of Puebla to Study Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, O.; Pérez, E.; Salazar, H.; Villaseñor, L.

    We describe the design of an extensive air shower detector array built in the Campus of the University of Puebla (located at 19°N, 90°W, 800 gcm -2) to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1015 eV. The array consists of 18 liquid scintillator detectors (12 in the first stage) and 6 water Cherenkov detectors (one of 10 m 2 cross section and five smaller ones of 1.86 m 2 cross section), distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m 2. In this paper we discuss the calibration and stability of the array, and discuss the capability of hybrid arrays, such as this one consisting of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator detectors, to allow a separation of the electromagnetic and muon components of extensive air showers. This separation plays an important role in the determination of the mass and identity of the primary cosmic ray. This facility is also used to train students interested in the field of cosmic rays.

  14. The water Cherenkov detector array for studies of cosmic rays at the University of Puebla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotzomi, J.; Moreno, E.; Murrieta, T.; Palma, B.; Pérez, E.; Salazar, H.; Villaseñor, L.

    2005-11-01

    We describe the design and performance of a hybrid extensive air shower detector array built on the Campus of the University of Puebla ( 19∘N, 90∘W, 800 g/cm2) to measure the energy, arrival direction and composition of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1 PeV, i.e., around the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. The array consists of 3 water Cherenkov detectors of 1.86 m2 cross-section and 12 liquid scintillator detectors of 1 m2 distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m2. We discuss the calibration and stability of the array for both sets of detectors and report on preliminary measurements and reconstruction of the lateral distributions for the electromagnetic (EM) and muonic components of extensive air showers. We also discuss how the hybrid character of the array can be used to measure mass composition of the primary cosmic rays by estimating the relative contents of muons with respect to the EM component of extensive air showers. This facility is also used to train students interested in the field of cosmic rays.

  15. A sub-millimeter resolution PET detector module using a multi-pixel photon counter array

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tae Yong; Wu, Heyu; Komarov, Sergey; Siegel, Stefan B; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    A PET block detector module using an array of sub-millimeter lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals read out by an array of surface-mount, semiconductor photosensors has been developed. The detector consists of a LSO array, a custom acrylic light guide, a 3 × 3 multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) array (S10362-11-050P, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) and a readout board with a charge division resistor network. The LSO array consists of 100 crystals, each measuring 0.8 × 0.8 × 3 mm3 and arranged in 0.86 mm pitches. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to aid the design and fabrication of a custom light guide to control distribution of scintillation light over the surface of the MPPC array. The output signals of the nine MPPC are multiplexed by a charge division resistor network to generate four position-encoded analog outputs. Flood image, energy resolution and timing resolution measurements were performed using standard NIM electronics. The linearity of the detector response was investigated using gamma-ray sources of different energies. The 10 × 10 array of 0.8 mm LSO crystals was clearly resolved in the flood image. The average energy resolution and standard deviation were 20.0% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and ±5.0%, respectively, at 511 keV. The timing resolution of a single MPPC coupled to a LSO crystal was found to be 857 ps FWHM, and the value for the central region of detector module was 1182 ps FWHM when ±10% energy window was applied. The nonlinear response of a single MPPC when used to read out a single LSO was observed among the corner crystals of the proposed detector module. However, the central region of the detector module exhibits significantly less nonlinearity (6.5% for 511 keV). These results demonstrate that (1) a charge-sharing resistor network can effectively multiplex MPPC signals and reduce the number of output signals without significantly degrading the performance of a PET detector and (2) a custom light guide to permit light sharing

  16. 20 element HgI sub 2 energy dispersive x-ray array detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.A.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szczebiot, R.W.; Dabrowski, A.J. ); Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Patt, B.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray detector arrays and associated miniaturized processing electronics for synchrotron radiation research applications. The experimental results with a 20 element array detector were obtained under realistic synchrotron beam conditions at SSRL. An energy resolution of 250 eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV (Mn-K{sub a}) was achieved. Energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate and energy of incoming radiation have been measured. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra were taken from diluted samples simulating proteins with nickel.

  17. 20 element HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray array detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.A.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szczebiot, R.W.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Patt, B.E.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray detector arrays and associated miniaturized processing electronics for synchrotron radiation research applications. The experimental results with a 20 element array detector were obtained under realistic synchrotron beam conditions at SSRL. An energy resolution of 250 eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV (Mn-K{sub a}) was achieved. Energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate and energy of incoming radiation have been measured. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra were taken from diluted samples simulating proteins with nickel.

  18. Extensive Air Shower Detector Array at the Universidad Autonoma de Puebla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotzomi, J.; Moreno, E.; Aguilar, S.; Palma, B.; Martinez, O.; Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.

    2002-07-01

    We describe the operation of an Extensive Air Shower Array located at the campus of the FCFM-BUAP. The array consists of 8 liquid scintillation detectors with a surface of 1 m2 each and a detector spacing of 20 m in a square grid. The array was designed to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary particles that generate extensive air showers (EAS) in the region of 1013 eV - 1016 eV. The angular distribution measured with this array, Cos8(Theta) xSin(Theta), agrees very well with the literature. We also present the measured energies of a number of vertical showers in the range of 5 x1012 eV to 5 x1013 eV.

  19. Complex Waves on 1D, 2D, and 3D Periodic Arrays of Lossy and Lossless Magnetodielectric Spheres

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-16

    attention has been given to artificial dielectrics made from latt ices of different kinds of conducting elements. Similar interest in artificial...procedure is then used as the starting guess for a quasi-Newton method with a finite - difference gradient [44, Appendix A) implemented in the IMSL...ring resonators for example, then the array medium is anisotropic no matter how close ly spaced the elements. 19 At the time of writing [20J and [21 J

  20. Implementation of digital multiplexing for high resolution X-ray detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate for the first time the use of the novel Multiple Module Multiplexer (MMMIC) for a 2×2 array of new electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) based x-ray detectors. It is highly desirable for x-ray imaging systems to have larger fields of view (FOV) extensible in two directions yet to still be capable of doing high resolution imaging over regions-of-interest (ROI). The MMMIC achieves these goals by acquiring and multiplexing data from an array of imaging modules thereby enabling a larger FOV, and at the same time allowing high resolution ROI imaging through selection of a subset of modules in the array. MMMIC also supports different binning modes. This paper describes how a specific two stage configuration connecting three identical MMMICs is used to acquire and multiplex data from a 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors. The first stage contains two MMMICs wherein each MMMIC is getting data from two EMCCD detectors. The multiplexed data from these MMMICs is then forwarded to the second stage MMMIC in the similar fashion. The second stage that has only one MMMIC gives the final 12 bit multiplexed data from four modules. This data is then sent over a high speed Camera Link interface to the image processing computer. X-ray images taken through the 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors using this two stage configuration of MMMICs are shown successfully demonstrating the concept.

  1. Performances Of Arrays Of Ge:Ga Far-Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C.; Farhoomand, J.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents evaluation of performances of two electronic modules containing few-element linear focal-plane arrays of Ge:Ga photodetectors and associated multiplexing readout circuitry. Tested to demonstrate feasibility of many-element, two-dimensional focal-plane arrays of far-infrared detectors and associated circuitry for use in astronomical and other low-background scientific observations. Revealed deficiencies that must be overcome in future designs.

  2. Multispectral Detector Based on Array of Carbon-Nanotube Quantum Wells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    2006-Mar 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MULTISPECTRAL DETECTOR BASED ON AN ARRAY OF CARBON- NANOTUBE QUANTUM WELLS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS FA9550-06-1-0366...carbon nanotube quantum wells exposed to external weak THz fields. Each of the individual well in the array had been independently controlled by a dc...the intrinsic noises considerably. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 23 THz field nanosensors, carbon nanotube quantum wells, Luttinger

  3. The DUV Stability of Superlattice-Doped CMOS Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A.; Jones, T.; Dickie, M.; Cheng, P.; Greer, H. F.; Nikzad, S.; Sgro, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present experimental results and band structure calculations that illuminate the unique properties of superlattice-doped detectors. Numerical band structure calculations are presented to analyze the dependencies of surface passivation on dopant profiles and interface trap densities (Figure 3). Experiments and calculations show that quantum-engineered surfaces, grown at JPL by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy, achieve a qualitative as well as quantitative uniqueness in their near-immunity to high densities of surface and interface traps.

  4. Circuit for high resolution decoding of multi-anode microchannel array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A circuit for high resolution decoding of multi-anode microchannel array detectors consisting of input registers accepting transient inputs from the anode array; anode encoding logic circuits connected to the input registers; midpoint pipeline registers connected to the anode encoding logic circuits; and pixel decoding logic circuits connected to the midpoint pipeline registers is described. A high resolution algorithm circuit operates in parallel with the pixel decoding logic circuit and computes a high resolution least significant bit to enhance the multianode microchannel array detector's spatial resolution by halving the pixel size and doubling the number of pixels in each axis of the anode array. A multiplexer is connected to the pixel decoding logic circuit and allows a user selectable pixel address output according to the actual multi-anode microchannel array detector anode array size. An output register concatenates the high resolution least significant bit onto the standard ten bit pixel address location to provide an eleven bit pixel address, and also stores the full eleven bit pixel address. A timing and control state machine is connected to the input registers, the anode encoding logic circuits, and the output register for managing the overall operation of the circuit.

  5. Laboratory characterization of direct readout Si:Sb and Si:Ga infrared detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckelvey, Mark E.; Moss, Nicolas N.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Estrada, John A.; Goebel, John H.; Mccreight, Craig R.; Savage, Maureen L.; Junga, Frank; Whittemore, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Highlights of recent results obtained at Ames Research Center in performance evaluations of infrared detector arrays are presented. Antimony- and gallium-doped silicon direct readout 58x62 element hybrid devices from Ames' ongoing detector technology development program are described. The observed characteristics meet most of the performance goals specified by the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) instrument teams and compare favorably with the best performance reported for discrete non-integrating extrinsic silicon detectors. Initial results of radiation environment testing are reported, and non-ideal behavior demonstrated by these test devices is discussed.

  6. Experience using an automated fault location system with a time-of-flight wall detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, D.; Greiman, W.; Hall, D.; Balaban, D.; Day, C.

    1990-08-01

    We describe the architecture of a general purpose monitoring system and give examples of its use with a 300 element detector array in a relativistic heavy ion experiment. The system has a simple and well defined interface between the detector specific parts of the system and those which are independent of any detector specific features. Tracking simple statistics on the fundamental data items (ADC and TDC values) are sufficient to diagnose the higher level components in the system. The monitoring of on-line beam data provides a sensitive monitor of global parameters of the experiment.

  7. X-ray source considerations in operation of digital detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Terrence; Wendt, Scott

    2014-02-18

    Digital Detector Arrays (DDA) are increasingly replacing film in radiography applications. Standards exist for characterizing the performance of these detectors, and for using them in specific inspections. We have observed that the selection of the x-ray source to use with these detectors can also have a significant influence on the performance. We look at differences between standard, and micro-focus x-ray tubes, and end-window vs. side-window micro-focus tubes. We find that for best results, one must calibrate the DDA for the source settings used during an inspection. This is particularly true for variable-focus sources.

  8. Detector Arrays for the James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Alexander, David; Brambora, Clifford K.; Derro, Rebecca; Engler, Chuck; Fox, Ori; Garrison, Matthew B.; Henegar, Greg; Hill, robert J.; Johnson, Thomas; Lindler, Don J.; Manthripragada, Sridhar S.; Marshall, Ceryl; Mott, Brent; Parr, Thomas M.; Roher, Wayne D.; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin B.; Smith, Miles; Waczynski, Augustyn; Wen, Yiting; Wilson, Donna; Xia-Serafino, Wei

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) incorporates two 5 micron cutoff (lambda(sub co) = 5 microns) 2048x2048 pixel Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG sensor chip assemblies. These detector arrays, and the two Teledyne SIDECAR application specific integrated circuits that control them, are operated in space at T approx. 37 K. In this article, we provide a brief introduction to NIRSpec, its detector subsystem (DS), detector readout in the space radiation environment, and present a snapshot of the developmental status of the NIRSpec DS as integration and testing of the engineering test unit begins.

  9. A 4 π charged-particle detector array for light-ion-induced nuclear fragmentation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, K.; Alexander, A.; Bracken, D. S.; Brzychczyk, J.; Dorsett, J.; Ensman, R.; Renshaw Foxford, E.; Hamilton, T.; Komisarcik, K.; McDonald, K. N.; Morley, K. B.; Poehlman, J.; Powell, C.; Viola, V. E.; Yoder, N. R.; Ottarson, J.; Madden, N.

    1994-12-01

    Operating characteristics of the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4 π detector array are outlined. The detector geometry is spherical, with 90 telescopes in the forward hemisphere and 72 at backward angles, covering a total solid angle of 74% of 4π. Each telescope consists of a simple gas-ion chamber, operated with C3F8 gas, followed by a 0.5 mm thick ion-implanted silicon detector and a 28 mm CsI(Tl) crystal, readout by a photodiode. Custom-built bias supplies and NIM preamp/shaper modules were used in conjunction with commercial CFD, TDC and ADC CAMAC units.

  10. Dosimetric Verification and Validation of Conformal and IMRT Treatments Fields with an Ionization Chamber 2D-Array

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelina, Figueroa M.; Gabriel, Resendiz G.; Miguel, Perez P.

    2008-08-11

    A three-dimensional treatment planning system requires comparisons of calculated and measured dose distributions. It is necessary to confirm by means of patient specific QA that the dose distributions are correctly calculated, and that the patient data is correctly transferred to and delivered by the treatment machine. We used an analysis software for bi-dimensional dosimetric verification of conformal treatment and IMRT fields using as objective criterion the gamma index. An ionization chamber bi-dimensional array was used for absolute dose measurement in the complete field area.

  11. THz Direct Detector and Heterodyne Receiver Arrays in Silicon Nanoscale Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzyb, Janusz; Pfeiffer, Ullrich

    2015-10-01

    The main scope of this paper is to address various implementation aspects of THz detector arrays in the nanoscale silicon technologies operating at room temperatures. This includes the operation of single detectors, detectors operated in parallel (arrays), and arrays of detectors operated in a video-camera mode with an internal reset to support continuous-wave illumination without the need to synchronize the source with the camera (no lock-in receiver required). A systematic overview of the main advantages and limitations in using silicon technologies for THz applications is given. The on-chip antenna design challenges and co-design aspects with the active circuitry are thoroughly analyzed for broadband detector/receiver operation. A summary of the state-of-the-art arrays of broadband THz direct detectors based on two different operation principles is presented. The first is based on the non-quasistatic resistive mixing process in a MOSFET channel, whereas the other relies on the THz signal rectification by nonlinearity of the base-emitter junction in a high-speed SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). For the MOSFET detector arrays implemented in a 65 nm bulk CMOS technology, a state-of-the-art optical noise equivalent power (NEP) of 14 pW/ at 720 GHz was measured, whereas for the HBT detector arrays in a 0.25 μm SiGe process technology, an optical NEP of 47 pW/ at 700 GHz was found. Based on the implemented 1k-pixel CMOS camera with an average power consumption of 2.5 μW/pixel, various design aspects specific to video-mode operation are outlined and co-integration issues with the readout circuitry are analyzed. Furthermore, a single-chip 2 × 2 array of heterodyne receivers for multi-color active imaging in a 160-1000 GHz band is presented with a well-balanced NEP across the operation bandwidth ranging from 0.1 to 0.24 fW/Hz (44.1-47.8 dB single-sideband NF) and an instantaneous IF bandwidth of 10 GHz. In its present implementation, the receiver RF

  12. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gruner, Sol

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  13. Coherent Detector Arrays for Millimeter and Submillimeter Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Carpenter, John; Erickson, Neal; Fisher, Rick; Ford, John; Gaier, Todd; Groppi, Chris; Harris, Andy; Heyer, Mark; Kulesa, Craig; Lawrence, Charles; Morgan, Matt; Mundy, Lee; Narayanan, Gopal; O'Neil, Karen; Readhead, Tony; Samoska, Lorene; Schloerb, Peter; Snell, Ron; Walker, Christopher; Ziurys, Lucy

    2009-03-01

    Progress in many areas of astronomy requires large-area surveys and observations of extended objects. This includes the cosmic microwave background, nearby galaxies, the Milky Way, and regions of star-forming regions within our galaxy. The ability to carry out such studies is critically dependent on the development of affordable high-sensitivity focal plane arrays, for both spectral line and continuum observations. We discuss a program for the next decade to develop such technology for ground-based and spacebased millimeter and submillimeter astronomy. Appropriate technologies exist, but significant effort is required to make the transition from simply replicating individual pixels to approaching focal plane array design in an integrated fashion from feeds to spectrometers for spectral analysis. This advance is essential to realize the full potential of major new ground-based, suborbital, and future space facilities, and is relevant to the RMS and EOS panels. The recommended budget for this activity is $65M.

  14. Development of 256 x 256 Element Impurity Band Conduction Infrared Detector Arrays for Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domingo, George

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work performed on a one and a half year advance technology program to develop Impurity Band Conduction (IBC) detectors with very low dark current, high quantum efficiency, and with good repeatable processes. The program fabricated several epitaxial growths of Si:As detecting layers from 15 to 35 microns thick and analyzed the performance versus the thickness and the Arsenic concentration of these epitaxial layers. Some of the epitaxial runs did not yield because of excessive residual impurities. The thicker epitaxial layers and the ones with higher Arsenic concentration resulted in good detectors with low dark currents and good quantum efficiency. The program hybridized six detector die from the best detector wafers to a low noise, 256 x 256 readout array and delivered the hybrids to NASA Ames for a more detailed study of the performance of the detectors.

  15. Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Project -- Fully Integrated Linear Detector ArrayStatus Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Roney; Robert Seifert; Bob Pink; Mike Smith

    2011-09-01

    The field-portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography (DRCT) x-ray inspection systems developed for the Project Manager for NonStockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) over the past 13 years have used linear diode detector arrays from two manufacturers; Thomson and Thales. These two manufacturers no longer produce this type of detector. In the interest of insuring the long term viability of the portable DRCT single munitions inspection systems and to improve the imaging capabilities, this project has been investigating improved, commercially available detectors. During FY-10, detectors were evaluated and one in particular, manufactured by Detection Technologies (DT), Inc, was acquired for possible integration into the DRCT systems. The remainder of this report describes the work performed in FY-11 to complete evaluations and fully integrate the detector onto a representative DRCT platform.

  16. Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    correlation coefficient (CC), or some comparable detection statistic, exceeds a given threshold. Since these methods exploit characteristic details of the...multiple channels since stacking can be performed on the correlation coefficient traces with a significant array-gain. A detected event that is co-located...with the master event will record the same time-difference at every site in an arbitrarily spaced network which means that the correlation coefficient traces

  17. VFLOW2D - A Vorte-Based Code for Computing Flow Over Elastically Supported Tubes and Tube Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    WOLFE,WALTER P.; STRICKLAND,JAMES H.; HOMICZ,GREGORY F.; GOSSLER,ALBERT A.

    2000-10-11

    A numerical flow model is developed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow past immersed, elastically supported tube arrays. This work is motivated by the objective of predicting forces and motion associated with both deep-water drilling and production risers in the oil industry. This work has other engineering applications including simulation of flow past tubular heat exchangers or submarine-towed sensor arrays and the flow about parachute ribbons. In the present work, a vortex method is used for solving the unsteady flow field. This method demonstrates inherent advantages over more conventional grid-based computational fluid dynamics. The vortex method is non-iterative, does not require artificial viscosity for stability, displays minimal numerical diffusion, can easily treat moving boundaries, and allows a greatly reduced computational domain since vorticity occupies only a small fraction of the fluid volume. A gridless approach is used in the flow sufficiently distant from surfaces. A Lagrangian remap scheme is used near surfaces to calculate diffusion and convection of vorticity. A fast multipole technique is utilized for efficient calculation of velocity from the vorticity field. The ability of the method to correctly predict lift and drag forces on simple stationary geometries over a broad range of Reynolds numbers is presented.

  18. Silicon Wafer-Scale Substrate for Microshutters and Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Franz, David E.; Ewin, Audrey J.; Jhabvala, Christine; Babu, Sachi; Snodgrass, Stephen; Costen, Nicholas; Zincke, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The silicon substrate carrier was created so that a large-area array (in this case 62,000+ elements of a microshutter array) and a variety of discrete passive and active devices could be mounted on a single board, similar to a printed circuit board. However, the density and number of interconnects far exceeds the capabilities of printed circuit board technology. To overcome this hurdle, a method was developed to fabricate this carrier out of silicon and implement silicon integrated circuit (IC) technology. This method achieves a large number of high-density metal interconnects; a 100-percent yield over a 6-in. (approximately equal to 15-cm) diameter wafer (one unit per wafer); a rigid, thermally compatible structure (all components and operating conditions) to cryogenic temperatures; re-workability and component replaceability, if required; and the ability to precisely cut large-area holes through the substrate. A method that would employ indium bump technology along with wafer-scale integration onto a silicon carrier was also developed. By establishing a silicon-based version of a printed circuit board, the objectives could be met with one solution. The silicon substrate would be 2 mm thick to survive the environmental loads of a launch. More than 2,300 metal traces and over 1,500 individual wire bonds are required. To mate the microshutter array to the silicon substrate, more than 10,000 indium bumps are required. A window was cut in the substrate to allow the light signal to pass through the substrate and reach the microshutter array. The substrate was also the receptacle for multiple unpackaged IC die wire-bonded directly to the substrate (thus conserving space over conventionally packaged die). Unique features of this technology include the implementation of a 2-mmthick silicon wafer to withstand extreme mechanical loads (from a rocket launch); integrated polysilicon resistor heaters directly on the substrate; the precise formation of an open aperture

  19. Accelerated short-TE 3D proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging using 2D-SENSE with a 32-channel array coil.

    PubMed

    Otazo, Ricardo; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Posse, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with whole brain coverage in clinically feasible acquisition times still remains a major challenge. A combination of MRSI with parallel imaging has shown promise to reduce the long encoding times and 2D acceleration with a large array coil is expected to provide high acceleration capability. In this work a very high-speed method for 3D-MRSI based on the combination of proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) with regularized 2D-SENSE reconstruction is developed. Regularization was performed by constraining the singular value decomposition of the encoding matrix to reduce the effect of low-value and overlapped coil sensitivities. The effects of spectral heterogeneity and discontinuities in coil sensitivity across the spectroscopic voxels were minimized by unaliasing the point spread function. As a result the contamination from extracranial lipids was reduced 1.6-fold on average compared to standard SENSE. We show that the acquisition of short-TE (15 ms) 3D-PEPSI at 3 T with a 32 x 32 x 8 spatial matrix using a 32-channel array coil can be accelerated 8-fold (R = 4 x 2) along y-z to achieve a minimum acquisition time of 1 min. Maps of the concentrations of N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, and glutamate were obtained with moderate reduction in spatial-spectral quality. The short acquisition time makes the method suitable for volumetric metabolite mapping in clinical studies.

  20. Core-shell reconfiguration through thermal annealing in Fe(x)O/CoFe2O4 ordered 2D nanocrystal arrays.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Anil O; de Nijs, Bart; Fan, Zhaochuan; Tichelaar, Frans D; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Vlugt, Thijs J H; van Huis, Marijn A; Zandbergen, Henny W

    2014-02-07

    A great variety of single- and multi-component nanocrystals (NCs) can now be synthesized and integrated into nanocrystal superlattices. However, the thermal and temporal stability of these superstructures and their components can be a limiting factor for their application as functional devices. On the other hand, temperature induced reconstructions can also reveal opportunities to manipulate properties and access new types of nanostructures. In situ atomically resolved monitoring of nanomaterials provides insight into the temperature induced evolution of the individual NC constituents within these superstructures at the atomic level. Here, we investigate the effect of temperature annealing on 2D square and hexagonal arrays of FexO/CoFe2O4 core/shell NCs by in situ heating in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Both cubic and spherical NCs undergo a core-shell reconfiguration at a temperature of approximately 300 ° C, whereby the FexO core material segregates at the exterior of the CoFe2O4 shell, forming asymmetric dumbbells ('snowman-type' particles) with a small FexO domain attached to a larger CoFe2O4 domain. Upon continued annealing, the segregated FexO domains form bridges between the CoFe2O4 domains, followed by coalescence of all domains, resulting in loss of ordering in the 2D arrays.

  1. Graphene Paper Decorated with a 2D Array of Dendritic Platinum Nanoparticles for Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Detection of Dopamine Secreted by Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Xiaoli; Wang, Chenxu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To circumvent the bottlenecks of non‐flexibility, low sensitivity, and narrow workable detection range of conventional biosensors for biological molecule detection (e.g., dopamine (DA) secreted by living cells), a new hybrid flexible electrochemical biosensor has been created by decorating closely packed dendritic Pt nanoparticles (NPs) on freestanding graphene paper. This innovative structural integration of ultrathin graphene paper and uniform 2D arrays of dendritic NPs by tailored wet chemical synthesis has been achieved by a modular strategy through a facile and delicately controlled oil–water interfacial assembly method, whereby the uniform distribution of catalytic dendritic NPs on the graphene paper is maximized. In this way, the performance is improved by several orders of magnitude. The developed hybrid electrode shows a high sensitivity of 2 μA cm−2 μm −1, up to about 33 times higher than those of conventional sensors, a low detection limit of 5 nm, and a wide linear range of 87 nm to 100 μm. These combined features enable the ultrasensitive detection of DA released from pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells. The unique features of this flexible sensor can be attributed to the well‐tailored uniform 2D array of dendritic Pt NPs and the modular electrode assembly at the oil–water interface. Its excellent performance holds much promise for the future development of optimized flexible electrochemical sensors for a diverse range of electroactive molecules to better serve society. PMID:26918612

  2. Feasibility of vibro-acoustography with a quasi-2D ultrasound array transducer for detection and localizing of permanent prostate brachytherapy seeds: A pilot ex vivo study

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Kinnick, Randall R.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra; Davis, Brian J.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Effective permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) requires precise placement of radioactive seeds in and around the prostate. The impetus for this research is to examine a new ultrasound-based imaging modality, vibro-acoustography (VA), which may serve to provide a high rate of PPB seed detection while also effecting enhanced prostate imaging. The authors investigate the ability of VA, implemented on a clinical ultrasound (US) scanner and equipped with a quasi-2D (Q2D) array US transducer, to detect and localize PPB seeds in excised prostate specimens. Methods: Nonradioactive brachytherapy seeds were implanted into four excised cadaver prostates. A clinical US scanner equipped with a Q2D array US transducer was customized to acquire both US and C-scan VA images at various depths. The VA images were then used to detect and localize the implanted seeds in prostate tissue. To validate the VA results, computed tomography (CT) images of the same tissue samples were obtained to serve as the reference by which to evaluate the performance of VA in PPB seed detection. Results: The results indicate that VA is capable of accurately identifying the presence and distribution of PPB seeds with a high imaging contrast. Moreover, a large ratio of the PPB seeds implanted into prostate tissue samples could be detected through acquired VA images. Using CT-based seed identification as the standard, VA was capable of detecting 74%–92% of the implanted seeds. Additionally, the angular independency of VA in detecting PPB seeds was demonstrated through a well-controlled phantom experiment. Conclusions: Q2DVA detected a substantial portion of the seeds by using a 2D array US transducer in excised prostate tissue specimens. While VA has inherent advantages associated with conventional US imaging, it has the additional advantage of permitting detection of PPB seeds independent of their orientation. These results suggest the potential of VA as a method for PPB imaging that

  3. Development and test of photon-counting microchannel plate detector arrays for use on space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    The full sensitivity, dynamic range, and photometric stability of microchannel array plates(MCP) are incorporated into a photon-counting detection system for space operations. Components of the system include feedback-free MCP's for high gain and saturated output pulse-height distribution with a stable response; multi-anode readout arrays mounted in proximity focus with the output face of the MCP; and multi-layer ceramic headers to provide electrical interface between the anode array in a sealed detector tube and the associated electronics.

  4. Uniform Non-stoichiometric Titanium Nitride Thin Films for Improved Kinetic Inductance Detector Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coiffard, G.; Schuster, K.-F.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Pignard, S.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Goupy, J.; Monfardini, A.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the fabrication of homogeneous sub-stoichiometric titanium nitride films for microwave kinetic inductance detector (KID) arrays. Using a 6'' sputtering target and a homogeneous nitrogen inlet, the variation of the critical temperature over a 2'' wafer was reduced to {<}25 %. Measurements of a 132-pixel KID arrays from these films reveal a sensitivity of 16 kHz/pW in the 100 GHz band, comparable to the best aluminum KIDs. We measured a noise equivalent power of NEP = 3.6× 10^{-15} W/Hz^{1/2}. Finally, we describe possible routes to further improve the performance of these TiN KID arrays.

  5. Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    correlation coefficient , or some comparable detection statistic, exceeds a given threshold. Since these methods exploit characteristic details of the full waveform, they provide exquisitely sensitive detectors with far lower detection thresholds than typical short-term average/long-term average (STA/LTA) algorithms. The drawback is that the form of the sought-after signal needs to be known quite accurately a priori, which limits such methods to instances of seismicity whereby a very similar signal has already been observed by every station used. Such instances include

  6. 4D ICE: A 2D Array Transducer with Integrated ASIC in a 10 Fr Catheter for Real-Time 3D Intracardiac Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wildes, Douglas; Lee, Warren; Haider, Bruno; Cogan, Scott; Sundaresan, Krishnakumar; Mills, David; Yetter, Christopher; Hart, Patrick; Haun, Christopher; Concepcion, Mikael; Kirkhorn, Johan; Bitoun, Marc

    2016-10-12

    We developed a 2.5 x 6.6 mm 2D array transducer with integrated transmit/receive ASIC for 4D ICE (real-time 3D IntraCardiac Echocardiography) applications. The ASIC and transducer design were optimized so that the high voltage transmit, low-voltage TGC (time-gain control) and preamp, subaperture beamformer, and digital control circuits for each transducer element all fit within the 0.019 mm2 area of the element. The transducer assembly was deployed in a 10 Fr (3.3 mm diameter) catheter, integrated with a GE Vivid1 E9 ultrasound imaging system, and evaluated in three pre-clinical studies. 2D image quality and imaging modes were comparable to commercial 2D ICE catheters. The 4D field of view was at least 90° x 60° x 8 cm and could be imaged at 30 volumes/sec, sufficient to visualize cardiac anatomy and other diagnostic and therapy catheters. 4D ICE should significantly reduce X-ray fluoroscopy use and dose during electrophysiology (EP) ablation procedures. 4D ICE may be able to replace trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE), and the associated risks and costs of general anesthesia, for guidance of some structural heart procedures.

  7. Progress in the development and demonstration of a 2D-matrix phased array ultrasonic probe for under-sodium viewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larche, M. R.; Baldwin, D. L.; Edwards, M. K.; Mathews, R. A.; Prowant, M. S.; Diaz, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Optically opaque liquid sodium used in liquid metal fast reactors poses a unique set of challenges for nondestructive evaluation. The opaque nature of the sodium prevents visual examinations of components within this medium, but ultrasonic waves are able to propagate through sodium so an ultrasonic testing (UT) technique can be applied for imaging objects in sodium. A UT sensor used in liquid sodium during a refueling outage must be capable of withstanding the 260°C corrosive environment and must also be able to wet (couple the ultrasonic waves) so that sound can propagate into the sodium. A multi-year iterative design effort, based on earlier work in the 1970s, has set out to improve the design and fabrication processes needed for a UT sensor technology capable of overcoming the temperature and wetting issues associated with this environment. Robust materials and improved fabrication processes have resulted in single-element sensors and two different linear-array sensors that have functioned in liquid sodium. More recent efforts have been focused on improving signal-to-noise ratio and image resolution in the highly attenuating liquid sodium. In order to accomplish this, modeling and simulation tools were used to design a 60-element 2D phased-array sensor operating at 2 MHz that features a separate transmitter and receiver. This design consists of 30 transmit elements and another 30 receive elements, each arranged in a rectangular matrix pattern that is 10 rows tall and 3 wide. The fabrication of this 2D array is currently underway and will be followed by a series of performance tests in water, hot oil, and finally in liquid sodium at 260°C. The performance testing cycle will evaluate multiple characteristics of the sensor that are crucial to performance including: transmit-uniformity, element sensitivity variations, element-to-element energy leakage, sound field dimensions, and spatial resolution. This paper will present a summary of results from the previous UT

  8. Conceptual design of the early implementation of the NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) with AGATA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüyük, Tayfun; Di Nitto, Antonio; Jaworski, Grzegorz; Gadea, Andrés; Javier Valiente-Dobón, José; Nyberg, Johan; Palacz, Marcin; Söderström, Pär-Anders; Jose Aliaga-Varea, Ramon; de Angelis, Giacomo; Ataç, Ayşe; Collado, Javier; Domingo-Pardo, Cesar; Egea, Francisco Javier; Erduran, Nizamettin; Ertürk, Sefa; de France, Gilles; Gadea, Rafael; González, Vicente; Herrero-Bosch, Vicente; Kaşkaş, Ayşe; Modamio, Victor; Moszynski, Marek; Sanchis, Enrique; Triossi, Andrea; Wadsworth, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) project aims at the construction of a new high-efficiency compact neutron detector array to be coupled with large γ-ray arrays such as AGATA. The application of NEDA ranges from its use as selective neutron multiplicity filter for fusion-evaporation reaction to a large solid angle neutron tagging device. In the present work, possible configurations for the NEDA coupled with the Neutron Wall for the early implementation with AGATA has been simulated, using Monte Carlo techniques, in order to evaluate their performance figures. The goal of this early NEDA implementation is to improve, with respect to previous instruments, efficiency and capability to select multiplicity for fusion-evaporation reaction channels in which 1, 2 or 3 neutrons are emitted. Each NEDA detector unit has the shape of a regular hexagonal prism with a volume of about 3.23l and it is filled with the EJ301 liquid scintillator, that presents good neutron- γ discrimination properties. The simulations have been performed using a fusion-evaporation event generator that has been validated with a set of experimental data obtained in the 58Ni + 56Fe reaction measured with the Neutron Wall detector array.

  9. Converting films for X-ray detectors, applied to amorphous silicon arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, S.; Zentai, G.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents results from the on-going efforts to characterize semiconductor thin films for direct X-ray conversion. The authors deposit these thin films onto an amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) readout array with the overall goal of developing a large area X-ray detector for protein crystallography, and for other X-ray imaging fields.

  10. Converting films for x-ray detectors, applied to amorphous silicon arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, S.; Zentai, G.

    1997-12-05

    This paper presents results from our on-going efforts to characterize semiconductor thin films for direct x-ray conversion. We deposit these thin films onto an amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) readout array with the overall goal of developing a large area x-ray detector for protein crystallography, and for other x-ray imaging fields.

  11. First Data with the Hybrid Array of Gamma-Ray Detectors (HAGRiD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Karl; Burcher, S.; Carter, A. B.; Gryzwacz, R.; Jones, K. L.; Munoz, S.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Schmitt, K.; Thornsberry, C.; Chipps, K. A.; Febbraro, M.; Pain, S. D.; Baugher, T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Toomey, B.

    2016-09-01

    The structure of nuclei provides insight into astrophysical reaction rates that are difficult to measure directly. These studies are often performed with transfer reaction and beta-decay measurements. These experiments benefit from particle-gamma coincident measurements providing information beyond that of particle detection alone. The Hybrid Array of Gamma Ray Detectors (HAGRiD) of LaBr3(Ce) scintillators has been designed with this purpose in mind. The design of the array permits it to be coupled with particle detector systems, such as the Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors and the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE). It is also designed to operate with the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) advanced target system. HAGRiD's design avoids compromising the charged-particle angular resolution due to compact geometries often used to increase the gamma efficiency in other systems. First experimental data with HAGRiD coupled to VANDLE as well as ORRUBA and JENSA will be presented. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Nuclear Physics and the National Science Foundation.

  12. Arrays of Encapsulated CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, C. E.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Prettyman, T. H.; Reedy, R. C.; Smith, M. K.; Sweet, M. R.

    2000-01-01

    Recent results from encapsulated multi-element CdZnTe room-temperature semiconductor gamma-ray detectors are presented. Our multi-element-array design is a good low-mass and low-power candidate for elemental mapping on future planetary missions.

  13. Mitigation of 2D Rayleigh-Taylor Instability In an Imploding Wire Array With the Introduction of 3D Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzon, M. S.; Nash, T. J.; Ryutov, D. D.

    1997-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is one of the most serious obstacles to applications of imploding wire arrays. In this paper, we propose to mitigate the instability with a deliberate introduction of periodic azimuthal non- uniformities. Their presence should interfere with the fastest-growing axisymmetric perturbations, destroy their coherence and reduce the velocity at which the "fingers" of the liner material penetrate to the axis. Because of the azimuthally varying surface mass density introduced, the liner is expected to become azimuthally corrugated (under the action of the magnetic pressure). Diagnosis of the improved pinch conditions would be made by observation of the power rise time and peak power and determination of the spatial frequencies in the x-ray emission as obtained with gated framing cameras and 1D streaked x-ray instruments.

  14. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams.

  15. Multiple detector focal plane array ultraviolet spectrometer for the AMPS laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    The possibility of meeting the requirements of the amps spectroscopic instrumentation by using a multi-element focal plane detector array in a conventional spectrograph mount was examined. The requirements of the detector array were determined from the optical design of the spectrometer which in turn depends on the desired level of resolution and sensitivity required. The choice of available detectors and their associated electronics and controls was surveyed, bearing in mind that the data collection rate from this system is so great that on-board processing and reduction of data are absolutely essential. Finally, parallel developments in instrumentation for imaging in astronomy were examined, both in the ultraviolet (for the Large Space Telescope as well as other rocket and satellite programs) and in the visible, to determine what progress in that area can have direct bearing on atmospheric spectroscopy.

  16. Performance Measurements On A 32X32 InSb-CID Detector Array For Astronomical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiphene, D.; Lacombe, F.; Rouan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The use at liquid helium temperature of a InSb-CID detector array differs significantly from opera-tion at conditions usually adopted by the manufacturer (77K). In particular, the dark current behaviour hugely changes between the two temperatures. Only the tunnel current, independant of temperature conditions, is still active at 4.2K while the thermal-family currents vanish. We have studied the tunnel current of one InSb-MIS detector to determine its suitability to the low background conditions that will be met in the space experiment ISO. The search for the maximum integration time and the best quantum efficiency, the constraint about the photonic response linearity (especially at low photon flux), and the reduction of the readout noise constitute the main points of this study. Moreover, laboratory measurements showed secondary effects due to the detector (lag) or to the wiring (crosstalk). The CID array reactions to high energy radiations (Gamma rays) are finally discussed.

  17. Novel Usage for a Cosmic Ray Detector: Study of Lightning at Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, John; Okuda, Takeshi

    We describe observations performed at the Telescope Array Observatory in which "bursts" of air shower triggers of the surface detector occur in close temporal and spatial coincidence with lighting. These events appear to be consistent with other observations of high-energy particle showers produced by lightning. Telescope Array has the ability to reconstruct these showers using modified UHECR air shower reconstruction techniques, and thus determine the source of particles in the atmospheric breakdown. We describe new efforts to deploy lightning mapping detectors at the Telescope Array site which will enable further study of this phenomenon, along with enabling us to search for evidence of lightning strikes being "seeded" under certain atmospheric conditions by the passage of a UHECR air shower.

  18. Charge Sharing and Charge Loss in a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Fine-Pixel Detector Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, J. A.; Sharma, D. P.; Ramsey, B. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of its high atomic number, room temperature operation, low noise, and high spatial resolution a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) multi-pixel detector is ideal for hard x-ray astrophysical observation. As part of on-going research at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) to develop multi-pixel CdZnTe detectors for this purpose, we have measured charge sharing and charge loss for a 4x4 (750micron pitch), lmm thick pixel array and modeled these results using a Monte-Carlo simulation. This model was then used to predict the amount of charge sharing for a much finer pixel array (with a 300micron pitch). Future work will enable us to compare the simulated results for the finer array to measured values.

  19. A photon-counting photodiode array detector for far ultraviolet (FUV) astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Moos, H. W.; Pembroke, R.; Bowers, C.

    1982-01-01

    A compact, stable, single-stage intensified photodiode array detector designed for photon-counting, far ultraviolet astronomy applications employs a saturable, 'C'-type MCP (Galileo S. MCP 25-25) to produce high gain pulses with a narrowly peaked pulse height distribution. The P-20 output phosphor exhibits a very short decay time, due to the high current density of the electron pulses. This intensifier is being coupled to a self-scanning linear photodiode array which has a fiber optic input window which allows direct, rigid mechanical coupling with minimal light loss. The array was scanned at a 250 KHz pixel rate. The detector exhibits more than adequate signal-to-noise ratio for pulse counting and event location.

  20. SU-E-T-35: A General Fill Factor Definition Serving to Characterise the MLC Misalignment Detection Capabilities of Two-Dimensional Detector Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Stelljes, T.S.; Looe, H.K.; Poppe, B.; Harder, D.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a general definition of the fill factor realistically characterizing the “field coverage”, i.e. the MLC misalignment detection capabilities of a detector array. Methods: According to Gago-Arias et al.{sup 1} the fill factor of a 2D array is defined as the ratio of the area enclosed by the FWHM of the fluence response function KM(x) of a single detector and its cell area defined by the detector spacing. More generally - accounting also for the possible overlap between FWHM’s of neighboured detectors - the fill factor is here defined as that fraction of the sum of the detector cell areas in which a defined MLC misalignment is detectable when the induced percentage signal changes exceed a detection threshold d. Ideally the generalized fill factor may reach 100 %. With user code EGS-chamber and a 2 MeV photon slit beam 0.25 mm wide, both types of the fill factor were calculated for an array with total cell area 100 cm{sup 2} for chamber widths 1–9 mm, using =1mm, d=5%. Results: For single chamber width 5 mm, fill factors were 0.49 (FWHM) and 0.61 (generalized). For chamber width 2 mm the FWHM fill factor was 0.13 whereas the generalized fill factor was 0.32. For chamber widths above 7 mm, the FWHM fill factor exceeds unity, and the general fill factor is exactly 1.00. Conclusions: An updated fill factor definition is introduced which, as a generalization of the FWHM-based definition, more closely estimates the performance of small array chambers and gives a realistic value in the case of overlapping sensitive areas of neighboured chambers. References:{sup 1}A. Gago-Arias, L. Brualla-Gonzalez, D.M. Gonzalez-Castano, F. Gomez, M.S. Garcia, V.L. Vega, J.M. Sueiro, J. Pardo-Montero, “Evaluation of chamber response function influence on IMRT verification using 2D commercial detector arrays,” Phys. Med. Biol. 57, 2005–2020 (2012)

  1. Masking mechanisms applied to thin-film coatings for the manufacturing of linear variable filters for two-dimensional array detectors.

    PubMed

    Abel-Tibérini, Laëtitia; Lemarquis, Frédéric; Lequime, Michel

    2008-10-20

    We propose a method for manufacturing linear variable interference filters for two-dimensional (2D) array detectors, based on the use of correcting masks combining both rotation and translation movements of the masks and substrates. The major advantage of this method is its capability to produce several identical filters in a single run. 20 mm x 20 mm samples were manufactured with a wavelength ratio almost equal to 2 along the thickness gradient direction. In agreement with calculations, the measured uniformity perpendicular to the gradient is about 99.8% along 20 mm.

  2. 3D Dose Verification Using Tomotherapy CT Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Ke; Jones, Ryan; Yang Wensha; Saraiya, Siddharth; Schneider, Bernard; Chen Quan; Sobering, Geoff; Olivera, Gustavo; Read, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-dimensional dose verification method based on the exit dose using the onboard detector of tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study included 347 treatment fractions from 24 patients, including 10 prostate, 5 head and neck (HN), and 9 spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases. Detector sonograms were retrieved and back-projected to calculate entrance fluence, which was then forward-projected on the CT images to calculate the verification dose, which was compared with ion chamber and film measurement in the QA plans and with the planning dose in patient plans. Results: Root mean square (RMS) errors of 2.0%, 2.2%, and 2.0% were observed comparing the dose verification (DV) and the ion chamber measured point dose in the phantom plans for HN, prostate, and spinal SBRT patients, respectively. When cumulative dose in the entire treatment is considered, for HN patients, the error of the mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) varied from 1.47% to 5.62% with a RMS error of 3.55%. For prostate patients, the error of the mean dose to the prostate target volume varied from -5.11% to 3.29%, with a RMS error of 2.49%. The RMS error of maximum doses to the bladder and the rectum were 2.34% (-4.17% to 2.61%) and 2.64% (-4.54% to 3.94%), respectively. For the nine spinal SBRT patients, the RMS error of the minimum dose to the PTV was 2.43% (-5.39% to 2.48%). The RMS error of maximum dose to the spinal cord was 1.05% (-2.86% to 0.89%). Conclusions: An excellent agreement was observed between the measurement and the verification dose. In the patient treatments, the agreement in doses to the majority of PTVs and organs at risk is within 5% for the cumulative treatment course doses. The dosimetric error strongly depends on the error in multileaf collimator leaf opening time with a sensitivity correlating to the gantry rotation period.

  3. New detector array - the HRIBF Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolinska-Cichocka, Marzena; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof; Karny, Marek; Kuzniak, Aleksandra; Grzywacz, Robert; Rasco, Charlie; Miller, David; Gross, Carl J.; Johnson, Jim

    2011-10-01

    The construction of a new Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS) at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be presented. The total absorption gamma spectra measured with MTAS will be used to derive a true beta-feeding pattern and resulting beta strength function for fission products. In particular, the measurements of decay heat released by radioactive nuclei produced in nuclear fuels at power reactors will be performed. MTAS is made up of 19 large NaI(Tl) crystals each encapsulated with a 0.8-mm-thick carbon fiber. There are also two 1-mm- thick Silicon Strip Detectors surrounding a moving tape collector that count beta-energy loss signals. The structure is shielded by more than 1-inch of lead around MTAS which reduces background radiation significantly. MTAS efficiency for full energy deposition of gamma ray approaches nearly 90% for 300 keV gammas and over 75% for a 5 MeV gamma transition. Research supported by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics.

  4. Dynamic range considerations for EUV MAMA detectors. [Extreme UV Multianode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illing, Rainer M. E.; Bybee, Richard L.; Timothy, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    The multianode microchannel array (MAMA) has been chosen as the detector for two instruments on the ESA/NASA Solar Heliospheric Observatory. The response of the MAMA to the two extreme types of solar spectra, disk and corona, have been modeled with a view toward evaluating dynamic range effects present. The method of MAMA operation is discussed, with emphasis given to modeling the effect of electron cloud charge spreading to several detector anodes and amplifiers (n-fold events). Representative synthetic EUV spectra have been created. The detector response to these spectra is modeled by dissecting the input photon radiation field across the detector array into contributions to the various amplifier channels. The results of this dissection are shown for spectral regions across the entire wavelength region of interest. These results are used to identify regions in which total array photon counting rate or individual amplifier rate may exceed the design limits. This allows the design or operational modes to be tailored to eliminate the problem areas.

  5. Large format array NIR detectors for future ESA astronomy missions: characterization and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooding, David; Crouzet, Pierre-Elie; Duvet, Ludovic; Prod'homme, Thibaut; Smit, Hans; Ter Haar, Jörg; Blommaert, Sander; Visser, Ivo; Lemmel, Frederic; Heijnen, Jerko; Van Der Luijt, Cornelis; Butler, Bart; Beaufort, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    The Payload Technology Validation section in the Future Missions office of ESA's Science directorate at ESTEC provides testing support to present and future missions at different stages in their lifetime, from early technology developments to mission operation validation. In this framework, a test setup to characterize near-infrared (NIR) detectors has been created. In the context of the Astronomy Large Format Array for the near-infrared ("ALFA-N") technology development program, detectors from different suppliers are tested. We report on the characterization progress of the ALFA-N detectors, for which a series of rigorous tests have been performed on two different detectors; one provided by CEA/Leti-CEA/IRFU-SOFRADIR, France and the other by SELEX- UK/ATC, UK. Experimental techniques, the test bench and methods are presented. The conversion gain of two different detectors is measured using the photon transfer curve method. For a Leti LPE detector the persistence effect has been probed across a range of illumination levels to reveal a sharp linear increase of persistence below full-well and a plateauing beyond saturation. The same detector has been proton irradiated which has resulted in no significant dark current increase.

  6. Photoacoustic projection imaging using a 64-channel fiber optic detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Felbermayer, Karoline; Bouchal, Klaus-Dieter; Veres, Istvan A.; Grün, Hubert; Burgholzer, Peter; Berer, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present photoacoustic projection imaging with a 64-channel integrating line detector array, which average the pressure over cylindrical surfaces. For imaging, the line detectors are arranged parallel to each other on a cylindrical surface surrounding a specimen. Thereby, the three-dimensional imaging problem is reduced to a twodimensional problem, facilitating projection imaging. After acquisition of a dataset of pressure signals, a twodimensional photoacoustic projection image is reconstructed. The 64 channel line detector array is realized using optical fibers being part of interferometers. The parts of the interferometers used to detect the ultrasonic pressure waves consist of graded-index polymer-optical fibers (POFs), which exhibit better sensitivity than standard glass-optical fibers. Ultrasonic waves impinging on the POFs change the phase of light in the fiber-core due to the strain-optic effect. This phase shifts, representing the pressure signals, are demodulated using high-bandwidth balanced photo-detectors. The 64 detectors are optically multiplexed to 16 detection channels, thereby allowing fast imaging. Results are shown on a Rhodamine B dyed microsphere.

  7. A novel, SiPM-array-based, monolithic scintillator detector for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaart, Dennis R.; van Dam, Herman T.; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Löhner, Herbert; Beekman, Freek J.

    2009-06-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are of great interest to positron emission tomography (PET), as they enable new detector geometries, for e.g., depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination, are MR compatible, and offer faster response and higher gain than other solid-state photosensors such as avalanche photodiodes. Here we present a novel detector design with DOI correction, in which a position-sensitive SiPM array is used to read out a monolithic scintillator. Initial characterization of a prototype detector consisting of a 4 × 4 SiPM array coupled to either the front or back surface of a 13.2 mm × 13.2 mm × 10 mm LYSO:Ce3+ crystal shows that front-side readout results in significantly better performance than conventional back-side readout. Spatial resolutions <1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) were measured at the detector centre in response to an ~0.54 mm FWHM diameter test beam. Hardly any resolution losses were observed at angles of incidence up to 45°, demonstrating excellent DOI correction. About 14% FWHM energy resolution was obtained. The timing resolution, measured in coincidence with a BaF2 detector, equals 960 ps FWHM.

  8. A novel, SiPM-array-based, monolithic scintillator detector for PET.

    PubMed

    Schaart, Dennis R; van Dam, Herman T; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Löhner, Herbert; Beekman, Freek J

    2009-06-07

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are of great interest to positron emission tomography (PET), as they enable new detector geometries, for e.g., depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination, are MR compatible, and offer faster response and higher gain than other solid-state photosensors such as avalanche photodiodes. Here we present a novel detector design with DOI correction, in which a position-sensitive SiPM array is used to read out a monolithic scintillator. Initial characterization of a prototype detector consisting of a 4 x 4 SiPM array coupled to either the front or back surface of a 13.2 mm x 13.2 mm x 10 mm LYSO:Ce(3+) crystal shows that front-side readout results in significantly better performance than conventional back-side readout. Spatial resolutions <1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) were measured at the detector centre in response to an approximately 0.54 mm FWHM diameter test beam. Hardly any resolution losses were observed at angles of incidence up to 45 degrees , demonstrating excellent DOI correction. About 14% FWHM energy resolution was obtained. The timing resolution, measured in coincidence with a BaF(2) detector, equals 960 ps FWHM.

  9. X-ray Characterization of a Multichannel Smart-Pixel Array Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Steve; Haji-Sheikh, Michael; Huntington, Andrew; Kline, David; Lee, Adam; Li, Yuelin; Rhee, Jehyuk; Tarpley, Mary; Walko, Donald A.; Westberg, Gregg; Williams, George; Zou, Haifeng; Landahl, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Voxtel VX-798 is a prototype X-ray pixel array detector (PAD) featuring a silicon sensor photodiode array of 48 x 48 pixels, each 130 mu m x 130 mu m x 520 mu m thick, coupled to a CMOS readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The first synchrotron X-ray characterization of this detector is presented, and its ability to selectively count individual X-rays within two independent arrival time windows, a programmable energy range, and localized to a single pixel is demonstrated. During our first trial run at Argonne National Laboratory's Advance Photon Source, the detector achieved a 60 ns gating time and 700 eV full width at half-maximum energy resolution in agreement with design parameters. Each pixel of the PAD holds two independent digital counters, and the discriminator for X-ray energy features both an upper and lower threshold to window the energy of interest discarding unwanted background. This smart-pixel technology allows energy and time resolution to be set and optimized in software. It is found that the detector linearity follows an isolated dead-time model, implying that megahertz count rates should be possible in each pixel. Measurement of the line and point spread functions showed negligible spatial blurring. When combined with the timing structure of the synchrotron storage ring, it is demonstrated that the area detector can perform both picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements.

  10. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate block detector readout by avalanche photodiode arrays for high resolution animal PET.

    PubMed

    Pichler, B J; Swann, B K; Rochelle, J; Nutt, R E; Cherry, S R; Siegel, S B

    2004-09-21

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) have proven to be useful as light detectors for high resolution positron emission tomography (PET). Their compactness makes these devices excellent candidates for replacing bulky photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in PET systems where space limitations are an issue. The readout of densely packed, 10 x 10 lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) block detectors (crystal size 2.0 x 2.0 x 12 mm3) with custom-built monolithic 3 x 3 APD arrays was investigated. The APDs had a 5 x 5 mm2 active surface and were arranged on a 6.25 mm pitch. The dead space on the edges of the array was 1.25 mm. The APDs were operated at a bias voltage of approximately 380 V for a gain of 100 and a dark current of 10 nA per APD. The standard deviation in gain between the APDs in the array ranged from 1.8 to 6.5% as the gain was varied from 50 to 108. A fast, low-noise, multi-channel charge sensitive preamplifier application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) was developed for the APD readout. The amplifier had a rise time of 8 ns, a noise floor of 515 e- rms and a 9 e- pF(-1) noise slope. An acquired flood image showed that all 100 crystals from the block detector could be resolved. Timing measurements with single-channel LSO-APD detectors, as well as with the array, against a plastic scintillator and PMT assembly showed a time resolution of 1.2 ns and 2.5 ns, respectively. The energy resolution measured with a single 4.0 x 4.0 x 10 mm3 LSO crystal, wrapped in four-layer polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape and coupled with optical grease on a single APD of the array, yielded 15% (full width at half maximum, FWHM) at 511 keV. Stability tests over 9 months of operation showed that the APD arrays do not degrade appreciably. These results demonstrate the ability to decode densely packed LSO scintillation blocks with compact APD arrays. The good timing and energy resolution makes these detectors suitable for high resolution PET.

  11. Development of a Prototype for the Fluorescence Detector Array of Single-Pixel Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, T.; Malacari, M.; Bertaina, M.; Casolino, M.; Dawson, B.; Jiang, J.; Matalon, A.; Matthews, J. N.; Motloch, P.; Privitera, P.; Takizawa, Y.; Yamazaki, K.

    We present a concept for large-area, low-cost detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with a Fluorescence detector Array of Single-pixel Telescopes (FAST), addressing the requirements for the next generation of UHECR experiments. In the FAST design, a large field of view is covered by a few pixels at the focal plane of a mirror or Fresnel lens. We report preliminary results of a FAST prototype installed at the Telescope Array site, consisting of a single 200 mm photo-multiplier tube at the focal plane of a 1 m2 Fresnel lens system taken from the prototype of the JEM-EUSO experiment.

  12. Detection and localization of particle-emitting sources with compound-eye inspired detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi

    2007-08-01

    We develop methods to detect and localize particle-emitting sources using detector arrays that are inspired by biological compound eyes. The sources of interest may be optical, nuclear, or cosmic; they emit particles such as visible photons, neutrons, protons, or charged particles. Our results may have wide applications to artificial vision, which can be important in robotics (robot vision) or medicine (e.g., artificial eyes for the blind); security, where the detection of nuclear materials is needed; or astronomy. This dissertation consists of three parts. First, we detect a far-field particle source using two directional detector arrays: cubic and spherical. We propose a mean-difference test (MDT) detector, analyze its statistical performance, and show that the MDT has a number of advantages over the generalized likelihood- ratio test (GLRT). Second, we localize the source by proposing a novel biologically inspired detector array, whose configuration generalizes the compound eye of insects. This array combines the advantages of compound eyes (e.g., large field-of-view) and human eyes (e.g., high angular resolution). Based on a statistical model of the array measurements, we analyze the array performance by computing the Cramérao bound (CRB) on the error in estimating the source direction. We also derive lower bounds on the mean-square angular error (MSAE) of the source localization and investigate the MSAE of two source- direction estimators. Numerical examples, including the optimal array design, are presented to further illustrate the array performance. Third, we derive a statistical angular resolution limit (ARL) on resolving two closely spaced point sources in a three-dimensional frame, which is applicable to various measurement models (e.g., radar, sonar, or astronomy). Using the asymptotic analysis of the GLRT, we derive the ARL with constraints on the probabilities of false alarm and detection. Our results give explicit analytical expression for the ARL

  13. 20-element HgI[sub 2] energy dispersive x-ray array detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szczebiot, R.W.; Dabrowski, A.J. ); Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Patt, B.E. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI[sub 2] energy dispersive x-ray arrays and associated miniaturized processing electronics for synchrotron radiation research applications. The experimental results with a 20-element array detector were obtained under realistic synchrotron beam conditions at SSRL. An energy resolution of 250 eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV (Mn-K[sub alpha]) was achieved. Energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate and energy of incoming radiation have been measured. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra were taken form diluted samples simulating proteins with nickel.

  14. The HgI sub 2 energy dispersive x-ray array detectors and minaturized processing electronics project

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szawlowski . Inst. of Physics); Patt, W.K. ); Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.)

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray detector arrays for synchrotron radiation research and their associated miniaturized processing electronics. Deploying a 5 element HgI{sub 2} array detector under realistic operating conditions at SSRL, an energy resolution of 252 eV FWHM at 5.9 keV (Mn-K{alpha}) was obtained. The authors also report energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate. The results from the HgI{sub 2} system are then compared to those obtained under identical conditions from a commercial 13 element Ge detector array.

  15. Development of an 8× 8 CPW Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector (MKID) Array at 0.35 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Yang, Jin-Ping; Lin, Zhen-Hui; Liu, Dong; Shi, Sheng-Cai; Mima, S.; Furukawa, N.; Otani, C.

    2016-07-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) are promising for THz direct detector arrays of large size, particularly with simple frequency-division multiplexing. Purple Mountain Observatory is developing a terahertz superconducting imaging array (TeSIA) for the DATE5 telescope to be constructed at Dome A, Antarctica. Here we report on the development of a prototype array for the TeSIA, namely an 8× 8 CPW MKID array at 0.35 THz. The resonance frequencies of the MKIDs span the 4-5.575 GHz band with an interval of 25 MHz. Each detector is integrated with a twin-slot antenna centered at 0.5 THz and with a relative bandwidth of 10 %, while the whole MKID array with a micro-lens array. Detailed design and measurement results will be presented.

  16. A surface micromachined thermopile detector array with an interference-based absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Emadi, A.; Sarro, P. M.; de Graaf, G.; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2011-07-01

    A thermo-electric (TE) infrared detector array composed of 23 thermopiles, each with 5 thermocouples on a suspended beam of 650 × 36 µm2 dimensions, has been fabricated in a CMOS-compatible MEMS process. The array is used for realization of an IR micro-spectrometer in the 1-5 µm spectral range. Interference filter-based IR absorbers using titanium/aluminum layers with a silicon carbide cavity layer have been designed, fabricated and validated. These thin film stacks are more suitable for the subsequent processes as compared to conventional techniques. The silicon carbide layer is also used for device protection. The TE detector with an interference filter-based absorber features a sensitivity of 294 V W-1 in the 2.15 µm wavelength range and a thermal time constant of 4.85 ms in vacuum.

  17. SU-E-T-375: Evaluation of a MapCHECK2(tm) Planar 2-D Diode Array for High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Treatment Delivery Verifications

    SciTech Connect

    Macey, N; Siebert, M; Shvydka, D; Parsai, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Despite improvements of HDR brachytherapy delivery systems, verification of source position is still typically based on the length of the wire reeled out relative to the parked position. Yet, the majority of errors leading to medical events in HDR treatments continue to be classified as missed targets or wrong treatment sites. We investigate the feasibility of using dose maps acquired with a two-dimensional diode array to independently verify the source locations, dwell times, and dose during an HDR treatment. Methods: Custom correction factors were integrated into frame-by-frame raw counts recorded for a Varian VariSource™ HDR afterloader Ir-192 source located at various distances in air and in solid water from a MapCHECK2™ diode array. The resultant corrected counts were analyzed to determine the dwell position locations and doses delivered. The local maxima of polynomial equations fitted to the extracted dwell dose profiles provided the X and Y coordinates while the distance to the source was determined from evaluation of the full width at half maximum (FWHM). To verify the approach, the experiment was repeated as the source was moved through dwell positions at various distances along an inclined plane, mimicking a vaginal cylinder treatment. Results: Dose map analysis was utilized to provide the coordinates of the source and dose delivered over each dwell position. The accuracy in determining source dwell positions was found to be +/−1.0 mm of the preset values, and doses within +/−3% of those calculated by the BrachyVision™ treatment planning system for all measured distances. Conclusion: Frame-by-frame data furnished by a 2 -D diode array can be used to verify the dwell positions and doses delivered by the HDR source over the course of treatment. Our studies have verified that measurements provided by the MapCHECK2™ can be used as a routine QA tool for HDR treatment delivery verification.

  18. Underground water Cherenkov muon detector array with the Tibet air shower array for gamma-ray astronomy in the 100 TeV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenomori, M.; Ayabe, S.; Bi, X. J.; Chen, D.; Cui, S. W.; Danzengluobu; Ding, L. K.; Ding, X. H.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z. Y.; Gao, X. Y.; Geng, Q. X.; Guo, H. W.; He, H. H.; He, M.; Hibino, K.; Hotta, N.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H. B.; Huang, J.; Huang, Q.; Jia, H. Y.; Kajino, F.; Kasahara, K.; Katayose, Y.; Kato, C.; Kawata, K.; Labaciren; Le, G. M.; Li, A. F.; Li, J. Y.; Lu, H.; Lu, S. L.; Meng, X. R.; Mizutani, K.; Mu, J.; Munakata, K.; Nagai, A.; Nanjo, H.; Nishizawa, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohta, I.; Onuma, H.; Ouchi, T.; Ozawa, S.; Ren, J. R.; Saito, T.; Saito, T. Y.; Sakata, M.; Sako, T. K.; Sasaki, T.; Shibata, M.; Shiomi, A.; Shirai, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Takita, M.; Tan, Y. H.; Tateyama, N.; Torii, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Udo, S.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. G.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yan, C. T.; Yang, X. C.; Yasue, S.; Ye, Z. H.; Yu, G. C.; Yuan, A. F.; Yuda, T.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, N. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.

    2007-06-01

    We propose to build a large water-Cherenkov-type muon-detector array (Tibet MD array) around the 37 000 m2 Tibet air shower array (Tibet AS array) already constructed at 4300 m above sea level in Tibet, China. Each muon detector is a waterproof concrete pool, 6 m wide × 6 m long × 1.5 m deep in size, equipped with a 20 inch-in-diameter PMT. The Tibet MD array consists of 240 muon detectors set up 2.5 m underground. Its total effective area will be 8640 m2 for muon detection. The Tibet MD array will significantly improve gamma-ray sensitivity of the Tibet AS array in the 100 TeV region (10 1000 TeV) by means of gamma/hadron separation based on counting the number of muons accompanying an air shower. The Tibet AS+MD array will have the sensitivity to gamma rays in the 100 TeV region by an order of magnitude better than any other previous existing detectors in the world.

  19. Quantum efficiency performances of the NIR European Large Format Array detectors tested at ESTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzet, P.-E.; Duvet, L.; de Wit, F.; Beaufort, T.; Blommaert, S.; Butler, B.; Van Duinkerken, G.; ter Haar, J.; Heijnen, J.; van der Luijt, K.; Smit, H.

    2015-10-01

    Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 10/12/2015, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 10/23/2015. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance. The Payload Technology Validation Section (SRE-FV) at ESTEC has the goal to validate new technology for future or on-going mission. In this framework, a test set up to characterize the quantum efficiency of near-infrared (NIR) detectors has been created. In the context of the NIR European Large Format Array ("LFA"), 3 deliverables detectors coming from SELEX-UK/ATC (UK) on one side, and CEA/LETI- CEA/IRFU-SOFRADIR (FR) on the other side were characterized. The quantum efficiency of an HAWAII-2RG detector from Teledyne was as well measured. The capability to compare on the same setup detectors from different manufacturers is a unique asset for the future mission preparation office. This publication will present the quantum efficiency results of a HAWAII-2RG detector from Teledyne with a 2.5um cut off compared to the LFA European detectors prototypes developed independently by SELEX-UK/ATC (UK) on one side, and CEA/LETI- CEA/IRFU-SOFRADIR (FR) on the other side.

  20. Investigation of Very Fast Light Detectors: Silicon Photomultiplier and Micro PMT for a Cosmic Ray Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes, Omar; Reyes, Liliana; Hooks, Tyler; Perez, Luis; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To construct a cosmic detector array using 4 scintillation detectors, we investigated 2 recent light sensor technologies from Hamamatsu, as possible readout detectors. First, we investigated several homemade versions of the multipixel photon counter (MPPC) light sensors. These detectors were either biased with internal or external high voltage power supplies. We made extensive measurements to confirm for the coincidence of the MPPC devices. Each sensor is coupled to a wavelength shifting fiber (WSF) that is embedded along a plastic scintillator sheet (30cmx60cmx1/4''). Using energetic cosmic rays, we evaluated several of these homemade detector modules placed above one another in a light proof enclosure. Next, we assembled 2 miniaturized micro photomultiplier (micro PMT), a device recently marketed by Hamamatsu. These sensors showed very fast response times. With 3 WSF embedded in scintillator sheets, we performed coincidence experiments. The detector waveforms were captured using the 5GS/sec domino ring sampler, the DRS4 and our workflow using the CERN PAW package and data analysis results would be presented. Title V Grant.

  1. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS): 38 GHz Detector Array of Bolometric Polarimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appel, John W.; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dunner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Harrington, Kathleen; Kogut, Alan J..; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel H.; Stevenson, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) experiment aims to map the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at angular scales larger than a few degrees. Operating from Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert of Chile, it will observe over 65% of the sky at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. In this paper we discuss the design, construction, and characterization of the CLASS 38 GHz detector focal plane, the first ever Q-band bolometric polarimeter array.

  2. AFRL Nanotechnology Initiative: Hybrid Nanomaterials in Photonic Crystal Cavities for Multi-Spectral Infrared Detector Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-31

    INITIATIVE) HYBRID NANOMATERIALS IN PHOTONIC CRYSTAL CAVITIES FOR MULTI -SPECTRAL INFRARED DETECTOR ARRAYS 5b. GRANT NUMBER F A9550-06-1-0482 5c...IR) photodetector using hybrid nanornaterials in photonic crystal (PC) cavities for enhanced absorption at selected wavelengths. The simultaneous...infrared photodetection, quantum dots, photonic crystal cavities, matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  3. Lung counting: comparison of detector performance with a four detector array that has either metal or carbon fibre end caps, and the effect on mda calculation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Asm Sabbir; Hauck, Barry; Kramer, Gary H

    2012-08-01

    This study described the performance of an array of high-purity Germanium detectors, designed with two different end cap materials-steel and carbon fibre. The advantages and disadvantages of using this detector type in the estimation of the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for different energy peaks of isotope (152)Eu were illustrated. A Monte Carlo model was developed to study the detection efficiency for the detector array. A voxelised Lawrence Livermore torso phantom, equipped with lung, chest plates and overlay plates, was used to mimic a typical lung counting protocol with the array of detectors. The lung of the phantom simulated the volumetric source organ. A significantly low MDA was estimated for energy peaks at 40 keV and at a chest wall thickness of 6.64 cm.

  4. Performance of the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE)

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, W. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Madurga, M.; Matei, C.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Bardayan, D. W.; Brune, C. R.; Allen, J.; Allen, J. M.; Bergstrom, Z.; Blackmon, J.; Brewer, N. T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Copp, P.; Howard, M. E.; Ikeyama, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Manning, B.; Massey, T. N.; Matos, M.; Merino, E.; O'Malley, P. D.; Raiola, F.; Reingold, C. S.; Sarazin, F.; Spassova, I.; Taylor, S.; Walter, D.

    2016-08-26

    The Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) is a new, highly efficient plastic-scintillator array constructed for decay and transfer reaction experimental setups that require neutron detection. The versatile and modular design allows for customizable experimental setups including beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy and (d,n) transfer reactions in normal and inverse kinematics. The neutron energy and prompt-photon discrimination is determined through the time of flight technique. Fully digital data acquisition electronics and integrated triggering logic enables some VANDLE modules to achieve an intrinsic efficiency over 70% for 300-keV neutrons, measured through two different methods. A custom Geant4 simulation models aspects of the detector array and the experimental setups to determine efficiency and detector response. Lastly, a low detection threshold, due to the trigger logic and digitizing data acquisition, allowed us to measure the light-yield response curve from elastically scattered carbon nuclei inside the scintillating plastic from incident neutrons with kinetic energies below 2 MeV.

  5. Performance of the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, W. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Madurga, M.; Matei, C.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Bardayan, D. W.; Brune, C. R.; Allen, J.; Allen, J. M.; Bergstrom, Z.; Blackmon, J.; Brewer, N. T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Copp, P.; Howard, M. E.; Ikeyama, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Manning, B.; Massey, T. N.; Matos, M.; Merino, E.; O'Malley, P. D.; Raiola, F.; Reingold, C. S.; Sarazin, F.; Spassova, I.; Taylor, S.; Walter, D.

    2016-11-01

    The Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) is a new, highly efficient plastic-scintillator array constructed for decay and transfer reaction experimental setups that require neutron detection. The versatile and modular design allows for customizable experimental setups including beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy and (d,n) transfer reactions in normal and inverse kinematics. The neutron energy and prompt-photon discrimination is determined through the time of flight technique. Fully digital data acquisition electronics and integrated triggering logic enables some VANDLE modules to achieve an intrinsic efficiency over 70% for 300-keV neutrons, measured through two different methods. A custom GEANT4 simulation models aspects of the detector array and the experimental setups to determine efficiency and detector response. A low detection threshold, due to the trigger logic and digitizing data acquisition, allowed us to measure the light-yield response curve from elastically scattered carbon nuclei inside the scintillating plastic from incident neutrons with kinetic energies below 2 MeV.

  6. Performance of the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE)

    DOE PAGES

    Peters, W. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Madurga, M.; ...

    2016-08-26

    The Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) is a new, highly efficient plastic-scintillator array constructed for decay and transfer reaction experimental setups that require neutron detection. The versatile and modular design allows for customizable experimental setups including beta-delayed neutron spectroscopy and (d,n) transfer reactions in normal and inverse kinematics. The neutron energy and prompt-photon discrimination is determined through the time of flight technique. Fully digital data acquisition electronics and integrated triggering logic enables some VANDLE modules to achieve an intrinsic efficiency over 70% for 300-keV neutrons, measured through two different methods. A custom Geant4 simulation models aspectsmore » of the detector array and the experimental setups to determine efficiency and detector response. Lastly, a low detection threshold, due to the trigger logic and digitizing data acquisition, allowed us to measure the light-yield response curve from elastically scattered carbon nuclei inside the scintillating plastic from incident neutrons with kinetic energies below 2 MeV.« less

  7. A space qualified thermal imaging system using a Pt Si detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astheimer, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    EDO Corporation, Barnes Engineering Division designed and constructed a high resolution thermal imaging system on contract to Lockheed for use in the SDI Star Lab. This employs a Pt Si CCD array which is sensitive in the spectral range of 3 to 5 microns. Star Lab will be flown in the Shuttle bay and consists basically of a large, reflecting, tracking telescope with associated sensors and electronics. The thermal imaging system is designed to operate in the focal plane of this telescope. The configuration of the system is illustrated. The telescope provides a collimated beam output which is focussed onto the detector array by a silicon objective lens. The detector array subtends a field of view of 1.6 degrees x 1.22 degrees. A beam switching mirror permits bypassing the large telescope to give a field of 4 degrees x 3 degrees. Two 8 position filter wheels are provided, and background radiation is minimized by Narcissus mirrors. The detector is cooled with a Joule-Thompson cryostat fed from a high pressure supply tank. This was selected instead of a more convenient closed-cycle system because of concern with vibration. The latter may couple into the extremely critical Starlab tracking telescope. The electronics produce a digitized video signal for recording. Offset and responsivity correction factors are stored for all pixels and these corrections are made to the digitized output in real time.

  8. Development of mercuric iodide energy dispersive x-ray array detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Warburton, W.K.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Patt, B.E.

    1988-02-01

    There are various areas of synchrotron radiation research particularly Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) on dilute solutions and anomalous scattering, which would strongly benefit from the availability of energy dispersive detector arrays with high energy resolution and good spatial resolution. The goal of this development project is to produce high energy resolution mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) detector sub-modules, consisting of several elements. These sub-modules can later be grouped into larger arrays of 100-400 elements. A prototype 5 element HgI/sub 2/ array detector was constructed and tested. Dimensions of each element were 7.3 mm x 0.7 mm. An energy resolution of 335 eV (FWHM) for Mn0K..cap alpha.. at 5.9 keV has been measured. The novel fiber-optic pulsed light feedback has been introduced into the charge preamplifiers in order to minimize electronic crosstalk between channels.

  9. Local polarization phenomena in In-doped CdTe x-ray detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Toshiyuki; Sato, Kenji; Ishida, Shinichiro; Kiri, Motosada; Hirooka, Megumi; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kanamori, Hitoshi

    1995-10-01

    Local polarization phenomena have been studied in detector arrays with the detector element size of 500 {micro}m x 500 {micro}m, which are fabricated from high-resistivity In-doped CdTe crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. It has been found for the first time that a polarization effect, which is characterized by a progressive decrease of the pulse counting rate with increasing photon fluence, strongly depends on the detector elements, that is, the portion of crystals used. The influence of several parameters, such as the applied electric field strength, time, and temperature, on this local polarization effect is also investigated. From the photoluminescence measurements of the inhomogeneity of In dopant, it is concluded that the local polarization effect observed here originates from a deep level associated with In dopant in CdTe crystals.

  10. a Cosmic Ray Detector Array for Schools in the Cambridge Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wotton, S. A.; Goodrick, M. J.; Hommels, B.; Parker, M. A.

    2011-06-01

    Particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology are areas of research that have captured the imagination of the general public in recent years. By giving school students first-hand experience of building and operating a particle detector and the analysis of the data in a collaborative environment we anticipate that they will gain a deeper insight into the many and diverse facets of experimental particle physics. Cosmic rays provide a readily available source of high energy particles and other projects have already exploited this in building arrays of cosmic ray detectors located in schools and linked together via the internet. We aim to extend this concept by creating our own network of detectors in our region with a particular emphasis on hands-on involvement by school students in the partner schools. This talk outlines our plans towards the implementation of this project and our wider goals of integrating our local network with other projects both nationally and internationally.

  11. Charge-coupled-device/fiberoptic taper array x-ray detector for protein crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Naday, I.; Ross, S.; Westbrook, E.M.; Zentai, G.

    1997-12-31

    A large area, charge-couple-device (CCD) based fiberoptic taper array detector (APS-1) has been installed at the insertion-device beamline of the Structural Biology Center at the ANL Advanced Photon Source. The detector is used in protein crystallography diffraction experiments, where the objective is to measure the position and intensity of X-ray Bragg peaks in diffraction images. Large imaging area, very high spatial resolution, high X-ray sensitivity, good detective quantum efficiency, low noise, wide dynamic range, excellent stability and short readout time are all fundamental requirements in this application. The APS-1 detector converts the two-dimensional X-ray patterns to a visible light images by a thin layer of X-ray sensitive phosphor. The phosphor coating is directly deposited on the large ends of nine fiberoptic tapers arranged in a 3 x 3 array. Nine, thermoelectrically cooled 1,024 x 1,024 pixel CCD`s image the patterns, demagnified by the tapers. After geometrical and uniformity corrections, the nine areas give a continuous image of the detector face with virtually no gaps between the individual tapers. The 18 parallel analog signal-processing channels and analog-to-digital converters assure short readout time and low readout noise.

  12. Charge-coupled-device/fiberoptic taper array X-ray detector for protein crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Naday, I.; Ross, S.; Westbrook, E.M.; Zentai, G.

    1997-03-01

    A large area, charge-couple-device (CCD) based fiberoptic taper array detector (APS-1) has been installed at the insertion-device beamline of the Structural Biology Center at the ANL Advanced Photon Source. The detector is used in protein crystallography diffraction experiments, where the objective is to measure the position and intensity of X-ray Bragg peaks in diffraction images. Large imaging area, very high spatial resolution, high X-ray sensitivity, good detective quantum efficiency, low noise, wide dynamic range, excellent stability and short readout time are all fundamental requirements in this application. The APS-1 detector converts the two-dimensional X-ray patterns to a visible light images by a thin layer of X-ray sensitive phosphor. The phosphor coating is directly deposited on the large ends of nine fiberoptic tapers arranged in a 3x3 array. Nine, thermoelectrically cooled 1024 x 1024 pixel CCD`s image the patterns, demagnified by the tapers. After geometrical and uniformity corrections, the nine areas give a continuous image of the detector face with virtually no gaps between the individual tapers. The 18 parallel analog signal-processing channels and analog-to-digital converters assure short readout time and low readout noise.

  13. Studies of Nuclear Structure using Radioactive Decay and a Large Array of Compton Suppressed Ge Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, John L.

    2000-11-01

    Radioactive decay has long played a role in contributing to the elucidation of nuclear structure. However compared to in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy, which has been combined with the extraordinary power of multi-detector arrays, radioactive decay scheme studies have been carried out usually with rather modest detector set-ups (two detectors, no Compton suppression). An extensive program to rectify this situation has been initiated using the "8-PI spectrometer"[1]. This is an array of 20 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors with exceptional stability and peak-to-total ratio. Experiments performed[2] recently at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, to better characterize nuclear deformation properties and the onset of deformation in nuclei, will be described. Future plans for the study of nuclei far from beta stability at the TRIUMF/ISAC Facility using the 8-PI spectrometer will also be outlined. [1] J.P.Martin et al., Nucl.Instr.Meth. A 257, 301 (1987). [2] See, e.g., W.D.Kulp et al. Bull.Am.Phys.Soc. 44, 63 (1999); W.D.Kulp et al., ibid., Williamsburg Meeting, Oct 4-7 (2000).

  14. Development of arrays of Silicon Drift Detectors and readout ASIC for the SIDDHARTA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaglia, R.; Schembari, F.; Bellotti, G.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Ficorella, F.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N.

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the development of new Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) and readout electronics for the upgrade of the SIDDHARTA experiment. The detector is based on a SDDs array organized in a 4×2 format with each SDD square shaped with 64 mm2 (8×8) active area. The total active area of the array is therefore 32×16 mm2 while the total area of the detector (including 1 mm border dead area) is 34 × 18mm2. The SIDDHARTA apparatus requires 48 of these modules that are designed and manufactured by Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK). The readout electronics is composed by CMOS preamplifiers (CUBEs) and by the new SFERA (SDDs Front-End Readout ASIC) circuit. SFERA is a 16-channels readout ASIC designed in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology, which features in each single readout channel a high order shaping amplifier (9th order Semi-Gaussian complex-conjugate poles) and a high efficiency pile-up rejection logic. The outputs of the channels are connected to an analog multiplexer for the external analog to digital conversion. An on-chip 12-bit SAR ADC is also included. Preliminary measurements of the detectors in the single SDD format are reported. Also measurements of low X-ray energies are reported in order to prove the possible extension to the soft X-ray range.

  15. Mercuric iodide room-temperature array detectors for gamma-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, B.

    1994-11-15

    Significant progress has been made recently in the development of mercuric iodide detector arrays for gamma-ray imaging, making real the possibility of constructing high-performance small, light-weight, portable gamma-ray imaging systems. New techniques have been applied in detector fabrication and then low noise electronics which have produced pixel arrays with high-energy resolution, high spatial resolution, high gamma stopping efficiency. Measurements of the energy resolution capability have been made on a 19-element protypical array. Pixel energy resolutions of 2.98% fwhm and 3.88% fwhm were obtained at 59 keV (241-Am) and 140-keV (99m-Tc), respectively. The pixel spectra for a 14-element section of the data is shown together with the composition of the overlapped individual pixel spectra. These techniques are now being applied to fabricate much larger arrays with thousands of pixels. Extension of these principles to imaging scenarios involving gamma-ray energies up to several hundred keV is also possible. This would enable imaging of the 208 keV and 375-414 keV 239-Pu and 240-Pu structures, as well as the 186 keV line of 235-U.

  16. Performance of charge-injection-device infrared detector arrays at low and moderate backgrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckelvey, M. E.; Mccreight, C. R.; Goebel, J. H.; Reeves, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    Three 2 x 64 element charge injection device infrared detector arrays were tested at low and moderate background to evaluate their usefulness for space based astronomical observations. Testing was conducted both in the laboratory and in ground based telescope observations. The devices showed an average readout noise level below 200 equivalent electrons, a peak responsivity of 4 A/W, and a noise equivalent power of 3x10 sq root of W/Hz. Array well capacity was measured to be significantly smaller than predicted. The measured sensitivity, which compares well with that of nonintegrating discrete extrinsic silicon photoconductors, shows these arrays to be useful for certain astronomical observations. However, the measured readout efficiency and frequency response represent serious limitations in low background applications.

  17. Experimental study of double-{beta} decay modes using a CdZnTe detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J. V.; Goessling, C.; Koettig, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Rajek, S.; Schulz, O.; Janutta, B.; Zuber, K.; Junker, M.; Reeve, C.; Wilson, J. R.

    2009-08-15

    An array of sixteen 1 cm{sup 3} CdZnTe semiconductor detectors was operated at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS) to further investigate the feasibility of double-{beta} decay searches with such devices. As one of the double-{beta} decay experiments with the highest granularity the 4x4 array accumulated an overall exposure of 18 kg days. The setup and performance of the array is described. Half-life limits for various double-{beta} decay modes of Cd, Zn, and Te isotopes are obtained. No signal has been found, but several limits beyond 10{sup 20} years have been performed. They are an order of magnitude better than those obtained with this technology before and comparable to most other experimental approaches for the isotopes under investigation. An improved limit for the {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of {sup 120}Te is given.

  18. Microelectrode Arrays with Overlapped Diffusion Layers as Electroanalytical Detectors: Theory and Basic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tomčík, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This contribution contains a survey of basic literature dealing with arrays of microelectrodes with overlapping diffusion layers as prospective tools in contemporary electrochemistry. Photolithographic thin layer technology allows the fabrication of sensors of micrometric dimensions separated with a very small gap. This fact allows the diffusion layers of single microelectrodes to overlap as members of the array. Various basic types of microelectrode arrays with interacting diffusion layers are described and their analytical abilities are accented. Theoretical approaches to diffusion layer overlapping and the consequences of close constitution effects such as collection efficiency and redox cycling are discussed. Examples of basis applications in electroanalytical chemistry such as amperometric detectors in HPLC and substitutional stripping voltammetry are also given. PMID:24152927

  19. Time-resolved dosimetric verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy exposures using a high-resolution 2D ionisation chamber array.

    PubMed

    King, R B; Agnew, C E; O'Connell, B F; Prise, K M; Hounsell, A R; McGarry, C K

    2016-08-07

    The aim of this work was to track and verify the delivery of respiratory-gated irradiations, performed with three versions of TrueBeam linac, using a novel phantom arrangement that combined the OCTAVIUS(®) SRS 1000 array with a moving platform. The platform was programmed to generate sinusoidal motion of the array. This motion was tracked using the real-time position management (RPM) system and four amplitude gating options were employed to interrupt MV beam delivery when the platform was not located within set limits. Time-resolved spatial information extracted from analysis of x-ray fluences measured by the array was compared to the programmed motion of the platform and to the trace recorded by the RPM system during the delivery of the x-ray field. Temporal data recorded by the phantom and the RPM system were validated against trajectory log files, recorded by the linac during the irradiation, as well as oscilloscope waveforms recorded from the linac target signal. Gamma analysis was employed to compare time-integrated 2D x-ray dose fluences with theoretical fluences derived from the probability density function for each of the gating settings applied, where gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm and 0.5%/0.5 mm were used to evaluate the limitations of the RPM system. Excellent agreement was observed in the analysis of spatial information extracted from the SRS 1000 array measurements. Comparisons of the average platform position with the expected position indicated absolute deviations of  <0.5 mm for all four gating settings. Differences were observed when comparing time-resolved beam-on data stored in the RPM files and trajectory logs to the true target signal waveforms. Trajectory log files underestimated the cycle time between consecutive beam-on windows by 10.0  ±  0.8 ms. All measured fluences achieved 100% pass-rates using gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm and 50% of the fluences achieved pass-rates  >90% when criteria of 0.5%/0.5

  20. Time-resolved dosimetric verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy exposures using a high-resolution 2D ionisation chamber array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, R. B.; Agnew, C. E.; O'Connell, B. F.; Prise, K. M.; Hounsell, A. R.; McGarry, C. K.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to track and verify the delivery of respiratory-gated irradiations, performed with three versions of TrueBeam linac, using a novel phantom arrangement that combined the OCTAVIUS® SRS 1000 array with a moving platform. The platform was programmed to generate sinusoidal motion of the array. This motion was tracked using the real-time position management (RPM) system and four amplitude gating options were employed to interrupt MV beam delivery when the platform was not located within set limits. Time-resolved spatial information extracted from analysis of x-ray fluences measured by the array was compared to the programmed motion of the platform and to the trace recorded by the RPM system during the delivery of the x-ray field. Temporal data recorded by the phantom and the RPM system were validated against trajectory log files, recorded by the linac during the irradiation, as well as oscilloscope waveforms recorded from the linac target signal. Gamma analysis was employed to compare time-integrated 2D x-ray dose fluences with theoretical fluences derived from the probability density function for each of the gating settings applied, where gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm and 0.5%/0.5 mm were used to evaluate the limitations of the RPM system. Excellent agreement was observed in the analysis of spatial information extracted from the SRS 1000 array measurements. Comparisons of the average platform position with the expected position indicated absolute deviations of  <0.5 mm for all four gating settings. Differences were observed when comparing time-resolved beam-on data stored in the RPM files and trajectory logs to the true target signal waveforms. Trajectory log files underestimated the cycle time between consecutive beam-on windows by 10.0  ±  0.8 ms. All measured fluences achieved 100% pass-rates using gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm and 50% of the fluences achieved pass-rates  >90% when criteria of 0.5%/0.5 mm were

  1. NOTE: Hybrid plan verification for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the 2D ionization chamber array I'mRT MatriXX—a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobler, Barbara; Streck, Natalia; Klein, Elisabeth; Loeschel, Rainer; Haertl, Petra; Koelbl, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The 2D ionization chamber array I'mRT MatriXX (IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany) has been developed for absolute 2D dosimetry and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for perpendicular beam incidence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of I'mRT MatriXX for oblique beam incidence and hybrid plan verification of IMRT with original gantry angles. For the assessment of angular dependence, open fields with gantry angles in steps of 10° were calculated on a CT scan of I'mRT MatriXX. For hybrid plan verification, 17 clinical IMRT plans and one rotational plan were used. Calculations were performed with pencil beam (PB), collapsed cone (CC) and Monte Carlo (MC) methods, which had been previously validated. Measurements were conducted on an Elekta SynergyS linear accelerator. To assess the potential and limitations of the system, gamma evaluation was performed with different dose tolerances and distances to agreement. Hybrid plan verification passed the gamma test with 4% dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement in all cases, in 82-88% of the cases for tolerances of 3%/3 mm, and in 59-76% of the cases if 3%/2 mm were used. Separate evaluation of the low dose and high dose regions showed that I'mRT MatriXX can be used for hybrid plan verification of IMRT plans within 3% dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement with a relaxed dose tolerance of 4% in the low dose region outside the multileaf collimator (MLC).

  2. NORSAR Final Scientific Report Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, S J; Ringdal, F; Harris, D B

    2009-04-16

    Correlation detection is a relatively new approach in seismology that offers significant advantages in increased sensitivity and event screening over standard energy detection algorithms. The basic concept is that a representative event waveform is used as a template (i.e. matched filter) that is correlated against a continuous, possibly multichannel, data stream to detect new occurrences of that same signal. These algorithms are therefore effective at detecting repeating events, such as explosions and aftershocks at a specific location. This final report summarizes the results of a three-year cooperative project undertaken by NORSAR and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The overall objective has been to develop and test a new advanced, automatic approach to seismic detection using waveform correlation. The principal goal is to develop an adaptive processing algorithm. By this we mean that the detector is initiated using a basic set of reference ('master') events to be used in the correlation process, and then an automatic algorithm is applied successively to provide improved performance by extending the set of master events selectively and strategically. These additional master events are generated by an independent, conventional detection system. A periodic analyst review will then be applied to verify the performance and, if necessary, adjust and consolidate the master event set. A primary focus of this project has been the application of waveform correlation techniques to seismic arrays. The basic procedure is to perform correlation on the individual channels, and then stack the correlation traces using zero-delay beam forming. Array methods such as frequency-wavenumber analysis can be applied to this set of correlation traces to help guarantee the validity of detections and lower the detection threshold. In principle, the deployment of correlation detectors against seismically active regions could involve very large numbers of very specific detectors. To

  3. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2016-01-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed. PMID:26917125

  4. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    DOE PAGES

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; ...

    2016-01-28

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses atmore » megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. Lastly, we detail the characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector.« less

  5. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2016-01-28

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. Lastly, we detail the characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector.

  6. Three-dimensional modeling and inversion of x-ray pinhole detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Finkenthal, M.

    2006-10-15

    X-ray pinhole detectors are a common and useful diagnostic for high temperature and fusion-grade plasmas. While the measurements from such diagnostics are line integrated, local emission can be recovered by inverting or modeling the data using varying assumptions including toroidal symmetry, flux surface isoemissivity, and one-dimensional (1D) chordal lines of sight. This last assumption is often valid when the structure sizes and gradient scale lengths of interest are much larger than the spatial resolution of the detector elements. However, x-ray measurements of, for example, the strong gradients in the H-mode pedestal may require a full three-dimensional (3D) treatment of the detector geometry when the emission of the plasma has a significant variation within the field of view, especially in a high-triangularity, low aspect ratio plasma. Modeling of a high spatial resolution tangential edge array for NSTX has shown that a proper 3D treatment can improve the effective spatial resolution of the detector by 10%-40% depending on the modeled signal-to-noise ratio and gradient scale length. Results from a general treatment of arbitrary detector geometry will provide a guideline for the amount of systematic error that can be expected by a 1D versus 3D field of view analysis.

  7. Real-time scintillation array dosimetry for radiotherapy: The advantages of photomultiplier detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Paul Z. Y.; Suchowerska, Natalka; Abolfathi, Peter; McKenzie, David R.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: In this paper, a photomultiplier tube (PMT) array dosimetry system has been developed and tested for the real-time readout of multiple scintillation signals from fiber optic dosimeters. It provides array dosimetry with the advantages in sensitivity provided by a PMT, but without the need for a separate PMT for each detector element. Methods: The PMT array system consisted of a multianode PMT, a multichannel data acquisition system, housing and optic fiber connections suitable for clinical use. The reproducibility, channel uniformity, channel crosstalk, acquisition speed, and sensitivity of the PMT array were quantified using a constant light source. Its performance was compared to other readout systems used in scintillation dosimetry. An in vivo HDR brachytherapy treatment was used as an example of a clinical application of the dosimetry system to the measurement of dose at multiple sites in the rectum. The PMT array system was also tested in the pulsed beam of a linear accelerator to test its response speed and its application with two separate methods of Cerenkov background removal. Results: The PMT array dosimetry system was highly reproducible with a measurement uncertainty of 0.13% for a 10 s acquisition period. Optical crosstalk between neighboring channels was accounted for by omitting every second channel. A mathematical procedure was used to account for the crosstalk in next-neighbor channels. The speed and sensitivity of the PMT array system were found be superior to CCD cameras, allowing for measurement of more rapid changes in dose rate. This was further demonstrated by measuring the dose delivered by individual photon pulses of a linear accelerator beam. Conclusions: The PMT array system has advantages over CCD camera-based systems for the readout of scintillation light. It provided a more sensitive, more accurate, and faster response to meet the demands of future developments in treatment delivery.

  8. Mini Compton Camera Based on an Array of Virtual Frisch-Grid CdZnTe Detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Wonho; Bolotnikov, Aleksey; Lee, Taewoong; ...

    2016-02-15

    In this study, we constructed a mini Compton camera based on an array of CdZnTe detectors and assessed its spectral and imaging properties. The entire array consisted of 6×6 Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors, each with a size of 6×6 ×15 mm3. Since it is easier and more practical to grow small CdZnTe crystals rather than large monolithic ones, constructing a mosaic array of parallelepiped crystals can be an effective way to build a more efficient, large-volume detector. With the fully operational CdZnTe array, we measured the energy spectra for 133Ba -, 137Cs -, 60Co-radiation sources; we also located these sources usingmore » a Compton imaging approach. Although the Compton camera was small enough to hand-carry, its intrinsic efficiency was several orders higher than those generated in previous researches using spatially separated arrays, because our camera measured the interactions inside the CZT detector array, wherein the detector elements were positioned very close to each other. Lastly, the performance of our camera was compared with that based on a pixelated detector.« less

  9. Mini Compton Camera Based on an Array of Virtual Frisch-Grid CdZnTe Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonho; Bolotnikov, Aleksey; Lee, Taewoong; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; Gul, Rubi; Hossain, Anwar; Utpal, Roy; Yang, Ge; James, Ralph

    2016-02-15

    In this study, we constructed a mini Compton camera based on an array of CdZnTe detectors and assessed its spectral and imaging properties. The entire array consisted of 6×6 Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors, each with a size of 6×6 ×15 mm3. Since it is easier and more practical to grow small CdZnTe crystals rather than large monolithic ones, constructing a mosaic array of parallelepiped crystals can be an effective way to build a more efficient, large-volume detector. With the fully operational CdZnTe array, we measured the energy spectra for 133Ba -, 137Cs -, 60Co-radiation sources; we also located these sources using a Compton imaging approach. Although the Compton camera was small enough to hand-carry, its intrinsic efficiency was several orders higher than those generated in previous researches using spatially separated arrays, because our camera measured the interactions inside the CZT detector array, wherein the detector elements were positioned very close to each other. Lastly, the performance of our camera was compared with that based on a pixelated detector.

  10. Two dimensional extensible array configuration for EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Cartwright, A. N.; Titus, A. H.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic x-ray detector to be used for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The heart of the detector is a 1024 ×1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm2 (Model CCD201-20, e2v Technologies, Inc.), bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Our aim is to design an array of these detectors that could be extended to any arbitrary X × Y size in two dimensions to provide a larger field of view (FOV). A physical configuration for a 3×3 array is presented that includes two major sub-systems. First is an optical front end that includes (i) a phosphor to convert the x-ray photons into light photons, and (ii) a fused array of FOTs that focuses light photons from the phosphor onto an array of EMCCD's optically coupled using FOPs. Second is an electronic front end that includes (i) an FPGA board used for generating clocks and for data acquisition (ii) driver boards to drive and digitize the analog output from the EMCCDs, (iii) a power board, and (iv) headboards to hold the EMCCD's while they are connected to their respective driver board using flex cables. This configuration provides a larger FOV as well as region-of-interest (ROI) high-resolution imaging as required by modern neurovascular procedures.

  11. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C.; Hartsough, Neal E.; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C.

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm2/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a 57Co source. An output rate of 6×106 counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and energy

  12. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging.

    PubMed

    Iwanczyk, Jan S; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C; Hartsough, Neal E; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm(2)/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a (57)Co source. An output rate of 6×10(6) counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and

  13. Singlet delta oxygen production in a 2D micro-discharge array in air: effect of gas residence time and discharge power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Gaurav; Santos Sousa, João; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2017-03-01

    The production of singlet delta oxygen (O2(a 1Δg)) is of growing interest for many applications. We report on the measurement of O2(a 1Δg) and ozone (O3) in a room temperature atmospheric pressure discharge in dry air. The plasma source is a 2D array of micro-discharges generated by an alternating current voltage at 20 kHz. The study focuses on the effect of gas flow through the discharge. The maximum investigated flow rate allows reducing the gas residence time in the discharge zone to half the discharge period. Results indicate that the residence time and discharge power have a major effect on the O2(a 1Δg) production. Different O2(a 1Δg) density dependencies on power are observed for different flow rates. Effects of collisional quenching on the as-produced and measured O2(a 1Δg) densities are discussed. The flow rate also allows for control of the O2(a 1Δg) to O3 density ratio in the effluent from 0.7 to conditions of pure O3.

  14. A four-pixel single-photon pulse-position array fabricated from WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, V. B. Horansky, R.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.; Marsili, F.; Stern, J. A.; Shaw, M. D.

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate a scalable readout scheme for an infrared single-photon pulse-position camera consisting of WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors. For an N × N array, only 2 × N wires are required to obtain the position of a detection event. As a proof-of-principle, we show results from a 2 × 2 array.

  15. The multi-element mercuric iodide detector array with computer controlled miniaturized electronics for EXAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, B.E.; Iwanczyk, J.S.; Szczebiot, R.; Maculewicz, G.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Cox, A.D. |

    1995-08-01

    Construction of a 100-element HgI{sub 2} detector array, with miniaturized electronics, and software developed for synchrotron applications in the 5 keV to 35 keV region has been completed. Recently, extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data on dilute ({approximately} 1mM) metallo-protein samples were obtained with up to seventy-five elements of the system installed. The data quality obtained is excellent and shows that the detector is quite competitive as compared to commercially available systems. The system represents the largest detector array ever developed for high resolution, high count rate x-ray synchrotron applications. It also represents the first development and demonstration of high-density miniaturized spectroscopy electronics with this high level of performance. Lastly, the integration of the whole system into an automated computer-controlled environment represents a major advancement in the user interface for XAS measurements. These experiments clearly demonstrate that the HgI{sub 2} system, with the miniaturized electronics and associated computer control functions well. In addition it shows that the new system provides superior ease of use and functionality, and that data quality is as good as or better than with state-of-the-art cryogenically cooled Ge systems.

  16. The Indiana silicon sphere 4 π charged-particle detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, K.; Bracken, D. S.; Morley, K. B.; Brzychczyk, J.; Foxford, E. Renshaw; Komisarcik, K.; Viola, V. E.; Yoder, N. R.; Dorsett, J.; Poehlman, J.; Madden, N.; Ottarson, J.

    1995-02-01

    A low threshold charged particle detector array for the study of fragmentation processes in light-ion-induced reactions has been constructed and successfully implemented at the IUCF and Saturne II accelerators. The array consists of 162-triple-element detector telescopes mounted in a spherical geometry and covering 74% of 4π in solid angle. Telescope elements are composed of (1) an axial-field gas ionization chamber operated with C3F8 gas; (2) a 0.5 mm thick passivated silicon detector, and (3) a 2.8 cm thick CsI(TI) scintillation crystal with photodiode readout. Discrete element identification is obtained for ejectiles up to Z ~ 16 over the dynamic range 0.7 <= E/A <= 95 MeV/nucleon. Isotopes are also distinguished for H, He, Li and Be ejectiles with 8 <~ E/A <~ 95 MeV. Custom-designed electronics are employed for bias supplies and linear signal processing. Data are acquired via a CAMAC/VME/Ethernet system.

  17. Population density estimated from locations of individuals on a passive detector array

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Efford, Murray G.; Dawson, Deanna K.; Borchers, David L.

    2009-01-01

    The density of a closed population of animals occupying stable home ranges may be estimated from detections of individuals on an array of detectors, using newly developed methods for spatially explicit capture–recapture. Likelihood-based methods provide estimates for data from multi-catch traps or from devices that record presence without restricting animal movement ("proximity" detectors such as camera traps and hair snags). As originally proposed, these methods require multiple sampling intervals. We show that equally precise and unbiased estimates may be obtained from a single sampling interval, using only the spatial pattern of detections. This considerably extends the range of possible applications, and we illustrate the potential by estimating density from simulated detections of bird vocalizations on a microphone array. Acoustic detection can be defined as occurring when received signal strength exceeds a threshold. We suggest detection models for binary acoustic data, and for continuous data comprising measurements of all signals above the threshold. While binary data are often sufficient for density estimation, modeling signal strength improves precision when the microphone array is small.

  18. THE COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRUM OBSERVED WITH THE SURFACE DETECTOR OF THE TELESCOPE ARRAY EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Hanlon, W.; Aida, R.; Azuma, R.; Fukuda, T.; Cheon, B. G.; Cho, E. J.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; and others

    2013-05-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) collaboration has measured the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with primary energies above 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} eV. This measurement is based upon four years of observation by the surface detector component of TA. The spectrum shows a dip at an energy of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} eV and a steepening at 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV which is consistent with the expectation from the GZK cutoff. We present the results of a technique, new to the analysis of UHECR surface detector data, that involves generating a complete simulation of UHECRs striking the TA surface detector. The procedure starts with shower simulations using the CORSIKA Monte Carlo program where we have solved the problems caused by use of the ''thinning'' approximation. This simulation method allows us to make an accurate calculation of the acceptance of the detector for the energies concerned.

  19. β-Decay Studies of r-Process Nuclei Using the Advanced Implantation Detector Array (AIDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, C. J.; Davinson, T.; Estrade, A.; Braga, D.; Burrows, I.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Grahn, T.; Grant, A.; Harkness-Brennan, L. J.; Kiss, G.; Kogimtzis, M.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Liu, Z.; Lorusso, G.; Matsui, K.; Nishimura, S.; Page, R. D.; Prydderch, M.; Phong, V. H.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Roberts, O. J.; Seddon, D. A.; Simpson, J.; Thomas, S. L.; Woods, P. J.

    Thought to produce around half of all isotopes heavier than iron, the r-process is a key mechanism for nucleosynthesis. However, a complete description of the r-process is still lacking and many unknowns remain. Experimental determination of β-decay half-lives and β-delayed neutron emission probabilities along the r-process path would help to facilitate a greater understanding of this process. The Advanced Implantation Detector Array (AIDA) represents the latest generation of silicon implantation detectors for β-decay studies with fast radioactive ion beams. Preliminary results from commissioning experiments demonstrate successful operation of AIDA and analysis of the data obtained during the first official AIDA experiments is now under-way.

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of Linear Terahertz Detector Arrays Based on Lithium Tantalate Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weizhi; Wang, Jun; Gou, Jun; Huang, Zehua; Jiang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Two samples of 30-pixel linear terahertz detector arrays (TDAs) were fabricated based on lithium tantalate (LT) crystals. Pixel readout circuit (ROC) was designed to extract the weak current signal of TDAs. A test platform was established for performance evaluation of TDA+ROC components. By using a 2.52THz laser as radiation source, the test results reveal that average voltage responsivities of the components were larger than 7000V/W and non-uniformity no more than 2.1%. Average noise equivalent power ( NEP) of one sample was measured to be 1.5×10-9 W/Hz1/2, which is low enough and desirable for high performance THz detector.

  1. A new linear array detector for high resolution and low dose digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettuzzi, Matteo; Cornacchia, Samantha; Rossi, Massimo; Paltrinieri, Enrica; Morigi, Maria Pia; Brancaccio, Rosa; Romani, Davide; Casali, Franco

    2004-01-01

    At the Department of Physics of the University of Bologna a new intensified linear array detector is under development. The core of the system is a digital intensified CCD camera, the electron bombarded charge coupled device (EBCCD). The main innovation is a coherent rectangular-to-linear fiber optics adapter coupling the 1 in. diameter photocathode of the camera with a linear 129 mm × 1.45 mm strip of Gd 2O 2S:Tb. In this way a high spatial resolution over an extended length is obtained. The detector works as an X-ray scanner by means of a high-precision translation mechanical device to inspect a 13 cm × 18 cm area. A complete characterisation of the system has been made in terms of linearity, dynamic range, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). At last, radiographic tests on a set of samples have been made and will be presented.

  2. Mosaic wedge-and-strip arrays for large format microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Christopher; Rasmussen, Andrew

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a novel method for joining wedge-and-strip patterns on single anodes in a mosaic array. With only a modest increase in complexity over three-conductor anodes currently in use, the ultimate detector position resolution can be significantly improved, and large-format microchannel plate detectors with pore-size-limited resolution are made possible. The problem of the transition from one anode to the next has been solved with a novel linear encoding scheme, which exhibits essentially distortionless behavior at boundaries parallel to the conducting elements and only slight distortion at the orthogonal boundaries. The ultimate resolution for two anode designs, one designed for large-format imaging and the other for high-resolution spectroscopy, is also predicted.

  3. A compact pulse shape discriminator module for large neutron detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramanan, S.; Gupta, Arti; Golda, K. S.; Singh, Hardev; Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2008-11-01

    A cost-effective high-performance pulse shape discriminator module has been developed to process signals from organic liquid scintillator-based neutron detectors. This module is especially designed for the large neutron detector array used for studies of nuclear reaction dynamics at the Inter University Accelerator Center (IUAC). It incorporates all the necessary pulse processing circuits required for neutron spectroscopy in a novel fashion by adopting the zero crossover technique for neutron-gamma (n- γ) pulse shape discrimination. The detailed layout of the circuit and different features of the module are described in the present paper. The quality of n- γ separation obtained with this electronics is much better than that of commercial modules especially in the low-energy region. The results obtained with our module are compared with similar setups available in other laboratories.

  4. A Failure Mode in Dense Infrared Detector Arrays Resulting in Increased Dark Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkie, Benjamin; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate a failure mode that arises in dense infrared focal plane detector arrays as a consequence of the interactions of neighboring pixels through the minority carrier profiles in the common absorber layer. We consider the situation in which one pixel in a hexagonal array becomes de-biased relative to its neighbors and show that the dark current in the six neighboring pixels increases exponentially as a function of the difference between the nominal and anomalous biases. Moreover, we show that the current increase in the six nearest-neighbor pixels is in total larger than that by which the current in the affected pixel decreases, causing a net increase in the dark current. The physical origins of this effect are explained as being due to increased lateral diffusion currents that arise as a consequence of breaking the symmetry of the minority carrier profiles. We then perform a parametric study to quantify the magnitude of this effect for a number of detector geometric parameters, operating temperatures, and spectral bands. Particularly, numerical simulations are carried out for short-, mid-, and long-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detectors operating between 77 K and 210 K. We show that this effect is most prevalent in architectures for which the lateral diffusion current is the largest component of the total dark current—high operating temperature devices with narrow epitaxial absorber thicknesses and pitches small compared to the diffusion length of minority carriers. These results could prove significant particularly for short- and mid-wave infrared detectors, which are typically designed to fit these conditions.

  5. Evaluation of a far infrared Ge:Ga multiplexed detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Mccreight, Craig

    1990-01-01

    The performance of a multielement Ge:Ga linear array under low-background conditions is investigated. On-focal plane switching is accomplished by MOSFET switches and the integrated charge is made available through MOSFET source followers. The tests were conducted at 106 microns and the radiation on the detectors was confined to a spectral window 1.25 microns wide using a stack of cold filters. At 4.2 K, the responsivity was measured to be nominally 584 A/W, and the NEP was 1.0 x 10 exp -16 W/sq rt Hz. A detailed description of the test setup and the procedure is presented.

  6. Radioactive Background Measurements in the Neutral Current Detector Array at SNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, G. A.; Doe, P. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; McGee, S.; Stonehill, L. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Wall, B. L.; Wilkerson, J. F. W.; Hallin, A. L.; Poon, A. W. P.; Wouters, J. M.

    2003-10-01

    The third phase of data taking at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is currently scheduled to begin in the autumn of 2003 with the installation of the Neutral Current Detectors (NCD). The NCDs, an array of ^3He proportional counters constructed from ultra-pure nickel, will measure the flux of ^8B solar neutrinos at SNO. The major sources of internal backgrounds in the NCD counters arise from U and Th chain decays. Analysis techniques have been developed to determine the level of these contaminations. These techniques and the impact of the U and Th levels on the neutral current flux measurement will be discussed.

  7. Short range laser obstacle detector. [for surface vehicles using laser diode array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriger, W. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A short range obstacle detector for surface vehicles is described which utilizes an array of laser diodes. The diodes operate one at a time, with one diode for each adjacent azimuth sector. A vibrating mirror a short distance above the surface provides continuous scanning in elevation for all azimuth sectors. A diode laser is synchronized with the vibrating mirror to enable one diode laser to be fired, by pulses from a clock pulse source, a number of times during each elevation scan cycle. The time for a given pulse of light to be reflected from an obstacle and received is detected as a measure of range to the obstacle.

  8. Observation of high energy atmospheric neutrinos with antarctic muon and neutrino detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, J.; Andres, E.; Bai, X.; Barouch, G.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.C.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Bouhali, O.; Boyce, M.M.; Carius, S.; Chen, A.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Costa, C.G.S.; Cowen, D.F.; Dalberg, E.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Doksus, P.; Edsjo, J.; Ekstrom, P.; Feser, T.; Frere, J.-M.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gaug, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Heukenkamp, H.; Hill, G.C.; Hulth, P.O.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Koci, B.; Kopke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Loaiza, P.; Lowder, D.M.; Madsen, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Miller, T.C.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.C.; Morse, R.; Neunhoffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Reed, C.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Starinsky, N.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Streicher, O.; Sudhoff, P.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Vander Donckt, M.; Walck, C.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedeman, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    2002-05-07

    The Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) began collecting data with ten strings in 1997. Results from the first year of operation are presented. Neutrinos coming through the Earth from the Northern Hemisphere are identified by secondary muons moving upward through the array. Cosmic rays in the atmosphere generate a background of downward moving muons, which are about 10{sup 6} times more abundant than the upward moving muons. Over 130 days of exposure, we observed a total of about 300 neutrino events. In the same period, a background of 1.05 x 10{sup 9} cosmic ray muon events was recorded. The observed neutrino flux is consistent with atmospheric neutrino predictions. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that 90 percent of these events lie in the energy range 66 GeV to 3.4 TeV. The observation of atmospheric neutrinos consistent with expectations establishes AMANDA-B10 as a working neutrino telescope.

  9. DENSITY: software for analysing capture-recapture data from passive detector arrays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Efford, M.G.; Dawson, D.K.; Robbins, C.S.

    2004-01-01

    A general computer-intensive method is described for fitting spatial detection functions to capture-recapture data from arrays of passive detectors such as live traps and mist nets. The method is used to estimate the population density of 10 species of breeding birds sampled by mist-netting in deciduous forest at Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, Maryland, U.S.A., from 1961 to 1972. Total density (9.9 ? 0.6 ha-1 mean ? SE) appeared to decline over time (slope -0.41 ? 0.15 ha-1y-1). The mean precision of annual estimates for all 10 species pooled was acceptable (CV(D) = 14%). Spatial analysis of closed-population capture-recapture data highlighted deficiencies in non-spatial methodologies. For example, effective trapping area cannot be assumed constant when detection probability is variable. Simulation may be used to evaluate alternative designs for mist net arrays where density estimation is a study goal.

  10. Performance of A Compact Multi-crystal High-purity Germanium Detector Array for Measuring Coincident Gamma-ray Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt; Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.; Champagne, Art; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori; Glasgow, Brian D.; Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne

    2015-02-18

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center of mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the segmented nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within the uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance will be presented.

  11. Graphical User Interface for a Dual-Module EMCCD X-ray Detector Array.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Huang, Ying; Qu, Bin; Gupta, Sandesh K; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-03-16

    A new Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed using Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) for a high-resolution, high-sensitivity Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII), which is a new x-ray detector for radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging, consisting of an array of Electron-Multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) each having a variable on-chip electron-multiplication gain of up to 2000× to reduce the effect of readout noise. To enlarge the field-of-view (FOV), each EMCCD sensor is coupled to an x-ray phosphor through a fiberoptic taper. Two EMCCD camera modules are used in our prototype to form a computer-controlled array; however, larger arrays are under development. The new GUI provides patient registration, EMCCD module control, image acquisition, and patient image review. Images from the array are stitched into a 2k×1k pixel image that can be acquired and saved at a rate of 17 Hz (faster with pixel binning). When reviewing the patient's data, the operator can select images from the patient's directory tree listed by the GUI and cycle through the images using a slider bar. Commonly used camera parameters including exposure time, trigger mode, and individual EMCCD gain can be easily adjusted using the GUI. The GUI is designed to accommodate expansion of the EMCCD array to even larger FOVs with more modules. The high-resolution, high-sensitivity EMCCD modular-array SSXII imager with the new user-friendly GUI should enable angiographers and interventionalists to visualize smaller vessels and endovascular devices, helping them to make more accurate diagnoses and to perform more precise image-guided interventions.

  12. Graphical user interface for a dual-module EMCCD x-ray detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Huang, Ying; Qu, Bin; Gupta, Sandesh K.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    A new Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed using Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) for a high-resolution, high-sensitivity Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII), which is a new x-ray detector for radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging, consisting of an array of Electron-Multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) each having a variable on-chip electron-multiplication gain of up to 2000x to reduce the effect of readout noise. To enlarge the field-of-view (FOV), each EMCCD sensor is coupled to an x-ray phosphor through a fiberoptic taper. Two EMCCD camera modules are used in our prototype to form a computer-controlled array; however, larger arrays are under development. The new GUI provides patient registration, EMCCD module control, image acquisition, and patient image review. Images from the array are stitched into a 2kx1k pixel image that can be acquired and saved at a rate of 17 Hz (faster with pixel binning). When reviewing the patient's data, the operator can select images from the patient's directory tree listed by the GUI and cycle through the images using a slider bar. Commonly used camera parameters including exposure time, trigger mode, and individual EMCCD gain can be easily adjusted using the GUI. The GUI is designed to accommodate expansion of the EMCCD array to even larger FOVs with more modules. The high-resolution, high-sensitivity EMCCD modular-array SSXII imager with the new user-friendly GUI should enable angiographers and interventionalists to visualize smaller vessels and endovascular devices, helping them to make more accurate diagnoses and to perform more precise image-guided interventions.

  13. The evaluation of a 2D diode array in “magic phantom” for use in high dose rate brachytherapy pretreatment quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Espinoza, A.; Petasecca, M.; Fuduli, I.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Howie, A.; Bucci, J.; Corde, S.; Jackson, M.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a treatment method that is used increasingly worldwide. The development of a sound quality assurance program for the verification of treatment deliveries can be challenging due to the high source activity utilized and the need for precise measurements of dwell positions and times. This paper describes the application of a novel phantom, based on a 2D 11 × 11 diode array detection system, named “magic phantom” (MPh), to accurately measure plan dwell positions and times, compare them directly to the treatment plan, determine errors in treatment delivery, and calculate absorbed dose. Methods: The magic phantom system was CT scanned and a 20 catheter plan was generated to simulate a nonspecific treatment scenario. This plan was delivered to the MPh and, using a custom developed software suite, the dwell positions and times were measured and compared to the plan. The original plan was also modified, with changes not disclosed to the primary authors, and measured again using the device and software to determine the modifications. A new metric, the “position–time gamma index,” was developed to quantify the quality of a treatment delivery when compared to the treatment plan. The MPh was evaluated to determine the minimum measurable dwell time and step size. The incorporation of the TG-43U1 formalism directly into the software allows for dose calculations to be made based on the measured plan. The estimated dose distributions calculated by the software were compared to the treatment plan and to calibrated EBT3 film, using the 2D gamma analysis method. Results: For the original plan, the magic phantom system was capable of measuring all dwell points and dwell times and the majority were found to be within 0.93 mm and 0.25 s, respectively, from the plan. By measuring the altered plan and comparing it to the unmodified treatment plan, the use of the position–time gamma index showed that all modifications made could be

  14. Long-term decoding stability of local field potentials from silicon arrays in primate motor cortex during a 2D center out task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Li, Yue; Wang, Yiwen; Zhu, Junming; Zhang, Shaomin; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Many serious concerns exist in the long-term stability of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) based on spike signals (single unit activity, SUA; multi unit activity, MUA). Some studies showed local field potentials (LFPs) could offer a stable decoding performance. However, the decoding stability of LFPs was examined only when high quality spike signals were recorded. Here we aim to examine the long-term decoding stability of LFPs over a larger time scale when the quality of spike signals was from good to poor or even no spike was recorded. Approach. Neural signals were collected from motor cortex of three monkeys via silicon arrays over 230, 290 and 690 days post-implantation when they performed 2D center out task. To compare long-term stability between LFPs and spike signals, we examined them in neural signals characteristics, directional tuning properties and offline decoding performance, respectively. Main results. We observed slow decreasing trends in the number of LFP channels recorded and mean LFP power in different frequency bands when spike signals quality decayed over time. The number of significantly directional tuning LFP channels decreased more slowly than that of tuning SUA and MUA. The variable preferred directions for the same signal features across sessions indicated non-stationarity of neural activity. We also found that LFPs achieved better decoding performance than SUA and MUA in retrained decoder when the quality of spike signals seriously decayed. Especially, when no spike was recorded in one monkey after 671 days post-implantation, LFPs still provided some kinematic information. In addition, LFPs outperformed MUA in long-term decoding stability in a static decoder. Significance. Our results suggested that LFPs were more durable and could provide better decoding performance when spike signals quality seriously decayed. It might be due to their resistance to recording degradation and their high redundancy among channels.

  15. WE-AB-BRB-09: Real Time In Vivo Scintillating Fiber Array Detector for Medical LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Knewtson, T; Pokhrel, S; Hernandez-Morales, D; Loyalka, S; Rangaraj, D; Izaguirre, E; Price, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: An in vivo transmission scintillation fiber detector was developed to monitor patient treatment in real time for the enhancement of patient safety and treatment accuracy. The detector system is capable of monitoring each pulse from a medical LINAC during treatment to determine the dose delivered as treatment progresses. Methods: The detector system consists of 60 parallel scintillating fibers coupled to fast data processing optoelectronics that can monitor the beam fluence in real time. Each 2.5mm{sup 2} square fiber is aligned with an MLC leaf pair and is long enough to capture a 40cm field. The fibers are embedded within a water equivalent polymer substrate that is secured in the LINAC accessory tray. The fibers are coupled to high speed photosensors and front end amplifiers that filter noise and pass each pulse to a high speed analog-to-digital converter. The system components are capable of detecting pulse repetition times shorter than what is delivered by a medical LINAC to ensure true real time data acquisition. Results: The system was able to capture and record the signal from each linac pulse and display the information in real time with no pulse pile up. It was found that the fiber array attenuates 2.65% of the beam which can easily be compensated for in treatment planning. The fibers responded linearly with dose, are independent of clinical beam energies, and are independent of dose rate. Calibration of the system was performed as a function of beam energy, beam size, dose rate, and monitor units to optimize beam fluence error detection. Conclusion: The detector system presented provides true real time in vivo beam monitoring to enhance patient safety and treatment delivery accuracy. Furthermore, the detector can be used for current patient specific QA.

  16. Development of novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor on for Si drift detectors and detector arrays for X-ray and nuclear physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-01

    A novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor (SBA) has been developed. A single SBA is used for biasing a Si drift detector (SDD) and SDD array. The use of an SBA reduces the biasing current. This paper shows the calculation of the geometry of an SBA and an SDD to get the best drift field in the SDD and SDD array. Prototype SBAs have been fabricated to verify the concept. Electrical measurements on these SBAs are in agreement with the expectations. The new SDD array with an SBA can be used for X-ray detection and in nuclear physics experiments.

  17. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hack, Erwin; Valzania, Lorenzo; Gäumann, Gregory; Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P; Zolliker, Peter

    2016-02-06

    In terahertz (THz) materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8-14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i) vanadium oxide; (ii) amorphous silicon; (iii) a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv) a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  18. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hack, Erwin; Valzania, Lorenzo; Gäumann, Gregory; Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P.; Zolliker, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In terahertz (THz) materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8–14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i) vanadium oxide; (ii) amorphous silicon; (iii) a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv) a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed. PMID:26861341

  19. CMOS detector arrays in a virtual 10-kilopixel camera for coherent terahertz real-time imaging.

    PubMed

    Boppel, Sebastian; Lisauskas, Alvydas; Max, Alexander; Krozer, Viktor; Roskos, Hartmut G

    2012-02-15

    We demonstrate the principle applicability of antenna-coupled complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect transistor arrays as cameras for real-time coherent imaging at 591.4 GHz. By scanning a few detectors across the image plane, we synthesize a focal-plane array of 100×100 pixels with an active area of 20×20 mm2, which is applied to imaging in transmission and reflection geometries. Individual detector pixels exhibit a voltage conversion loss of 24 dB and a noise figure of 41 dB for 16 μW of the local oscillator (LO) drive. For object illumination, we use a radio-frequency (RF) source with 432 μW at 590 GHz. Coherent detection is realized by quasioptical superposition of the image and the LO beam with 247 μW. At an effective frame rate of 17 Hz, we achieve a maximum dynamic range of 30 dB in the center of the image and more than 20 dB within a disk of 18 mm diameter. The system has been used for surface reconstruction resolving a height difference in the μm range.

  20. Performance analysis of MIMO FSO systems with radial array beams and finite sized detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökçe, Muhsin C.; Kamacıoǧlu, Canan; Uysal, Murat; Baykal, Yahya

    2014-10-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems are employed in free space optical (FSO) links to mitigate the degrading effects of atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, we consider a MIMO FSO system with practical transmitter and receiver configurations that consists of a radial laser array with Gaussian beams and finite sized detectors. We formulate the average received intensity and the power scinitillation as a function of the receiver coordinates in the presence of weak atmospheric turbulence by using the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. Then, integrations over the finite sized multiple detectors are performed and the effect of the receiver aperture averaging is quantified. We further derive an outage probability expression of this MIMO system in the presence of turbulence-induced fading channels. Using the derived expressions, we demonstrate the effect of several practical system parameters such as the ring radius, the number of array beamlets, the source size, the link length, structure constant and the receiver aperture radius on the system performance.

  1. Small-angle scatter tomography with a photon-counting detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shuo; Zhu, Zheyuan; Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle x-ray scatter imaging has a high intrinsic contrast in cancer research and other applications, and provides information on molecular composition and micro-structure of the tissue. In general, the implementations of small-angle coherent scatter imaging can be divided into two main categories: direct tomography and angular dispersive computerized tomography. Based on the recent development of energy-discriminative photon-counting detector array, here we propose a computerized tomography setup based on energy-dispersive measurement with a photon-counting detector array. To show merits of the energy-dispersive approach, we have performed numerical tests with a phantom containing various tissue types, in comparison with the existing imaging approaches. The results show that with an energy resolution of ~6 keV, the energy dispersive tomography system with a broadband tabletop x-ray would outperform the angular dispersive system, which makes the x-ray small-angle scatter tomography promising for high-specificity tissue imaging.

  2. Spectrum measurement with the Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE) fluorescence detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zundel, Zachary James

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment is the largest Ultra High Energy cosmic ray observatory in the northern hemisphere and is designed to be sensitive to cosmic ray air showers above 1018eV. Despite the substantial measurements made by TA and AUGER (the largest cosmic ray observatory in the southern hemisphere), there remains uncertainty about whether the highest energy cosmic rays are galactic or extragalactic in origin. Locating features in the cosmic ray energy spectrum below 1018eV that indicate a transition from galactic to extragalactic sources would clarify the interpretation of measurements made at the highest energies. The Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE) is designed to extend the energy threshold of the TA observatory down to 1016.5eV in order to make such measurements. This dissertation details the construction, calibration, and operation of the TALE flu- orescence detector. A measurement of the flux of cosmic rays in the energy range of 1016.5 -- 1018.5eV is made using the monocular data set taken between September 2013 and January 2014. The TALE fluorescence detector observes evidence for a softening of the cosmic spectrum at 1017.25+/-0.5eV. The evidence of a change in the spectrum motivates continued study of 1016.5 -- 1018.5eV cosmic rays.

  3. Design and implementation of an array of micro-electrochemical detectors for two-dimensional liquid chromatography-proof of principle

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, Joe; Mriziq, Khaled S; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) is an implementation of two-dimensional liquid chromatography which has the potential to provide very fast, yet highly efficient separations. It is based on the use of time x space and space x space separation systems. The basic principle of this instrument has been validated long ago by the success of two-dimensional thin layer chromatography. The construction of a pressurized wide and flat column (100 mm x 100 mm x 1 mm) operated under an inlet pressure of up to 50 bar was described previously. However, to become a modern analytical method, simultaneous 2D-LC requires the development of detectors suitable for the monitoring of the composition of the eluent of this pressurized planar, wide column. An array of five equidistant micro-electrochemical sensors was built for this purpose and tested. Each sensor is a three-electrode system, with the working electrode being a 25 {micro}m polished platinum micro-electrode. The auxiliary electrode is a thin platinum wire and the reference electrode an Ag/AgCl (3 M sat. KCl) electrode. In this first implementation, proof of principle is demonstrated, but the final instrument will require a much larger array.

  4. Preliminary results from a novel CdZnTe linear pad detector array x-ray imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, J.; Tuemer, T.O.; Petrini, B.M.; Kravis, S.D.; Yin, S.; Parnham, K.B.; Glick, B.; Willson, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    The excellent energy-resolution and short charge collection time, especially the possibility of room temperature operation, make CdZnTe semiconductor detectors an excellent candidate for x-ray imaging and spectroscopic application in nuclear physics. Because of these characteristics, CdZnTe pad detectors with a novel geometry and approximately 1 mm{sup 2} pad area have been developed. These pad type linear arrays are new and important for many scanning type applications using a wide energy range from about 10 to 300 keV energies. A prototype x-ray imaging system has been developed consisting of a state-of-the-art pad type linear array of CdZnTe detectors manufactured by eV Products and low noise readout electronics developed by NOVA R and D, Inc. A series of measurements on the temperature dependence of the performance of CdZnTe linear pad detector arrays has been performed at NOVA R and D, Inc. The changes in dark (leakage) current against temperature have been studied. High resolution x-ray spectra has been obtained using {sup 57}Co source at different temperatures. A low noise front-end electronics ASIC chip for reading out the detector array was developed that can achieve fast data acquisition with dual energy imaging capability. Several prototype CdZnTe pad detector arrays are placed next to each other to form an approximately 30 cm long linear array. This array is used to make preliminary dual energy scanned images of complex objects using a 90 kV x-ray generator. Some of the images will be presented. The results show that the system is excellent for applications in industrial and medical imaging.

  5. Proton irradiation results for long-wave HgCdTe infrared detector arrays for Near-Earth Object Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Meghan L.; Pipher, Judith L.; McMurtry, Craig; Hartman, Spencer; Mainzer, Amy; McKelvey, Mark; McMurray, Robert; Chevara, David; Rosser, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    HgCdTe detector arrays with a cutoff wavelength of ˜10 μm intended for the Near-Earth Object Camera (NEOCam) space mission were subjected to proton-beam irradiation at the University of California Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. Three arrays were tested-one with 800-μm substrate intact, one with 30-μm substrate, and one completely substrate-removed. The CdZnTe substrate, on which the HgCdTe detector is grown, has been shown to produce luminescence in shorter wave HgCdTe arrays that causes an elevated signal in nonhit pixels when subjected to proton irradiation. This testing was conducted to ascertain whether or not full substrate removal is necessary. At the dark level of the dewar, we detect no luminescence in nonhit pixels during proton testing for both the substrate-removed detector array and the array with 30-μm substrate. The detector array with full 800-μm substrate exhibited substantial photocurrent for a flux of 103 protons/cm2 s at a beam energy of 18.1 MeV (˜750 e-/s) and 34.4 MeV (˜65 e-/s). For the integrated space-like ambient proton flux level measured by the Spitzer Space Telescope, the luminescence would be well below the NEOCam dark current requirement of <200 e-/s, but the pattern of luminescence could be problematic, possibly complicating calibration.

  6. Analyzing the performance of ArcCHECK diode array detector for VMAT plan

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Nambiraj, Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Kumar, Ashok; Subramani, Vikraman; Kothandaraman

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to evaluate performance of ArcCHECK diode array detector for the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) patient specific quality assurance (QA). VMAT patient specific QA results were correlated with ion chamber measurement. Dose response of the ArcCHECK detector was studied. Background VMAT delivery technique improves the dose distribution. It is complex in nature and requires proper QA before its clinical implementation. ArcCHECK is a novel three dimensional dosimetry system. Materials and methods Twelve retrospective VMAT plans were calculated on ArcCHECK phantom. Point dose and dose map were measured simultaneously with ion chamber (IC-15) and ArcCHECK diode array detector, respectively. These measurements were compared with their respective TPS calculated values. Results The ion chamber measurements are in good agreement with TPS calculated doses. Mean difference between them is 0.50% with standard deviation of 0.51%. Concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) obtained for ion chamber measurements is 0.9996. These results demonstrate a strong correlation between the absolute dose predicted by our TPS and the measured dose. The CCC between ArcCHECK doses and TPS predictions on the CAX was found to be 0.9978. In gamma analysis of dose map, the mean passing rate was 98.53% for 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement. Conclusions The VMAT patient specific QA with an ion chamber and ArcCHECK phantom are consistent with the TPS calculated dose. Statistically good agreement was observed between ArcCHECK measured and TPS calculated. Hence, it can be used for routine VMAT QA. PMID:26900358

  7. Diagnostic and quality-assurance tools for low-contrast images obtained from array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, D. B.; Sandel, Bill R.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate methods of estimating a background image frame for subtraction from a data frame for use when a more suitable measured background frame is not available. We define background as any signal component that is not attributable to the phenomenon currently under investigation. We describe a technique that is based on pixel-by-pixel least-squares regression of images for computing a background frame from available data. We argue that the same technique can be a useful quality-assurance tool for evaluating instrument performance. For example, it can help to separate image structure resulting from the reading process from structure resulting from the characteristics of the detector itself. We demonstrate that background estimation can be nontrivial by comparing the results of different background estimation procedures by using data obtained from a CCD array detector. We investigate the temperature-dependent contributions of the detector and readout electronics to the total signal as a demonstration of the diagnostic capabilities of least-squares image regression.

  8. A slot-scanned photodiode-array/CCD hybrid detector for digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Mainprize, James G; Ford, Nancy L; Yin, Shi; Tümer, Türmay; Yaffe, Martin J

    2002-02-01

    We have developed a novel direct conversion detector for use in a slot-scanning digital mammography system. The slot-scan concept allows for dose efficient scatter rejection and the ability to use small detectors to produce a large-area image. The detector is a hybrid design with a 1.0 mm thick silicon PIN photodiode array (the x-ray absorber) indium-bump bonded to a CCD readout that is operated in time-delay integration (TDI) mode. Because the charge capacity requirement for good image quality exceeds the capabilities of standard CCDs, a novel CCD was developed. This CCD consists of 24 independent sections, each acting as a miniature CCD with eight rows for TDI. The signal from each section is combined off-chip to produce a full signal image. The MTF and DQE for the device was measured at several exposures and compared to a linear systems model of signal and noise propagation. Because of the scanning nature of TDI imaging, both the MTF(f) and DQE(f) are reduced along the direction of the scanning motion. For a 26 kVp spectrum, the DQE(0) was measured to be 0.75+/-0.02 for an exposure of 1.29 x 10(-5) C/kg (50 mR).

  9. Photoconductive terahertz near-field detector with a hybrid nanoantenna array cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Mitrofanov, Oleg; Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting S.; ...

    2015-11-19

    Nanoscale structuring of optical materials leads to modification of their properties and can be used for improving efficiencies of photonic devices and for enabling new functionalities. In ultrafast optoelectronic switches for generation and detection of terahertz (THz) radiation, incorporation of nanostructures allows us to overcome inherent limitations of photoconductive materials. We propose and demonstrate a nanostructured photoconductive THz detector for sampling highly localized THz fields, down to the level of λ/150. The nanostructure that consists of an array of optical nanoantennas and a distributed Bragg reflector forms a hybrid cavity, which traps optical gate pulses within the photoconductive layer. Themore » effect of photon trapping is observed as enhanced absorption at a designed wavelength. This optically thin photoconductive THz detector allows us to detect highly confined evanescent THz fields coupled through a deeply subwavelength aperture as small as 2 μm (λ/150 at 1 THz). As a result, by monolithically integrating the THz detector with apertures ranging from 2 to 5 μm we realize higher spatial resolution and higher sensitivity in aperture-type THz near-field microscopy and THz time-domain spectroscopy.« less

  10. A Deuterated Neutron Detector Array For Nuclear (Astro)Physics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaraz-Calderon, Sergio; Asher, B. W.; Barber, P.; Hanselman, K.; Perello, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    The properties of neutron-rich nuclei are at the forefront of research in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and nuclear astrophysics. The advent of intense rare isotope beams (RIBs) has opened a new door for studies of systems with very short half-lives and possible fascinating properties. Neutron spectroscopic techniques become increasingly relevant when these neutron rich nuclei are used in a variety of experiments. At Florida State University, we are developing a neutron detector array that will allow us to perform high-resolution neutron spectroscopic studies with stable and radioactive beams. The neutron detection system consists of 16 deuterated organic liquid scintillation detectors with fast response and pulse-shape discrimination capabilities. In addition to these properties, there is the potential to use the structure in the pulse-height spectra to extract the energy of the neutrons and thus produce directly excitation spectra. This type of detector uses deuterated benzene (C6D6) as the liquid scintillation medium. The asymmetric nature of the scattering between a neutron and a deuterium in the center of mass produces a pulse-height spectrum from the deuterated scintillator which contains useful information on the initial energy of the neutron. Work supported in part by the State of Florida and NSF Grant No. 1401574.

  11. Development of a unit cell for a Ge:Ga detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Two modules of gallium-doped germanium (Ge:Ga) infrared detectors with integrated multiplexing readouts and supporting drive electronics were designed and tested. This development investigated the feasibility of producing two-dimensional Ge:Ga arrays by stacking linear modules in a housing capable of providing uniaxial stress for enhanced long-wavelength response. Each module includes 8 detectors (1x1x2 mm) mounted to a sapphire board. The element spacing is 12 microns. The back faces of the detector elements are beveled with an 18 deg angle, which was proved to significantly enhance optical absorption. Each module includes a different silicon metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) readout. The first circuit was built from discrete MOSFET components; the second incorporated devices taken from low-temperature integrated circuit multiplexers. The latter circuit exhibited much lower stray capacitance and improved stability. Using these switched-FET circuits, it was demonstrated that burst readout, with multiplexer active only during the readout period, could successfully be implemented at approximately 3.5 K.

  12. Intensity information extraction in Geiger mode detector array based three-dimensional imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei

    2013-09-01

    Geiger-mode detectors have single photon sensitivity and picoseconds timing resolution, which make it a good candidate for low light level ranging applications, especially in the case of flash three dimensional imaging applications where the received laser power is extremely limited. Another advantage of Geiger-mode APD is their capability of large output current which can drive CMOS timing circuit directly, which means that larger format focal plane arrays can be easily fabricated using the mature CMOS technology. However Geiger-mode detector based FPAs can only measure the range information of a scene but not the reflectivity. Reflectivity is a major characteristic which can help target classification and identification. According to Poisson statistic nature, detection probability is tightly connected to the incident number of photon. Employing this relation, a signal intensity estimation method based on probability inversion is proposed. Instead of measuring intensity directly, several detections are conducted, then the detection probability is obtained and the intensity is estimated using this method. The relation between the estimator's accuracy, measuring range and number of detections are discussed based on statistical theory. Finally Monte-Carlo simulation is conducted to verify the correctness of this theory. Using 100 times of detection, signal intensity equal to 4.6 photons per detection can be measured using this method. With slight modification of measuring strategy, intensity information can be obtained using current Geiger-mode detector based FPAs, which can enrich the information acquired and broaden the application field of current technology.

  13. Photoconductive terahertz near-field detector with a hybrid nanoantenna array cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrofanov, Oleg; Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting S.; Reno, John L.

    2015-11-19

    Nanoscale structuring of optical materials leads to modification of their properties and can be used for improving efficiencies of photonic devices and for enabling new functionalities. In ultrafast optoelectronic switches for generation and detection of terahertz (THz) radiation, incorporation of nanostructures allows us to overcome inherent limitations of photoconductive materials. We propose and demonstrate a nanostructured photoconductive THz detector for sampling highly localized THz fields, down to the level of λ/150. The nanostructure that consists of an array of optical nanoantennas and a distributed Bragg reflector forms a hybrid cavity, which traps optical gate pulses within the photoconductive layer. The effect of photon trapping is observed as enhanced absorption at a designed wavelength. This optically thin photoconductive THz detector allows us to detect highly confined evanescent THz fields coupled through a deeply subwavelength aperture as small as 2 μm (λ/150 at 1 THz). As a result, by monolithically integrating the THz detector with apertures ranging from 2 to 5 μm we realize higher spatial resolution and higher sensitivity in aperture-type THz near-field microscopy and THz time-domain spectroscopy.

  14. SU-E-P-24: Simplified EDW Profile Measurements Using Two Commonly Available Detector Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T; Arentsen, L; Watanabe, Y; Alaei, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) profiles are needed as part of the commissioning of a treatment planning system. This work compares the acquisition of EDW profiles using a linear diode array (LDA) with two commonly used detector arrays available in the clinics, with the goal of identifying the simplest approach for these measurements. Methods: The measurements of EDW profiles were performed on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator for 6, 10, and 18 MV photon beams for all seven wedge angles at four depths. The measurements were done using the LDA 99 in Blue Phantom2 (IBA Dosimetry), and IC Profiler and MapCHECK2 (Sun Nuclear) in solid water phantoms. The water phantom was set up at 100 cm SSD, whereas the two other devices were set up at 75 cm due to the size limitations of the devices. The largest possible field size was used. The average and maximum percentage differences were examined within the central 90% of the field and in the penumbra. Results: Dose profiles measured with IC Profiler were in a good agreement with LDA 99 data. The average percentage difference within the field did not exceed 0.5% for all energies. MapCHECK2 measurements matched well with LDA 99 for 10 and 18 MV (within 0.3%) with discrepancies of up to 1.4% observed for the 6 MV beam. The maximum percentage differences for both devices in the penumbra exhibited larger variations than LDA 99 results due to differences in detector spacing and high dose gradient, as expected. Conclusion: Common linac QA devices such as IC Profiler or MapCHECK2 provide EDW beam profile data of reasonable accuracy as compared to measurements performed using a linear diode array in a water phantom, saving the expense and time involved in acquiring and setting up a LDA.

  15. High-performance SPAD array detectors for parallel photon timing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rech, I.; Cuccato, A.; Antonioli, S.; Cammi, C.; Gulinatti, A.; Ghioni, M.

    2012-02-01

    Over the past few years there has been a growing interest in monolithic arrays of single photon avalanche diodes (SPAD) for spatially resolved detection of faint ultrafast optical signals. SPADs implemented in planar technologies offer the typical advantages of microelectronic devices (small size, ruggedness, low voltage, low power, etc.). Furthermore, they have inherently higher photon detection efficiency than PMTs and are able to provide, beside sensitivities down to single-photons, very high acquisition speeds. In order to make SPAD array more and more competitive in time-resolved application it is necessary to face problems like electrical crosstalk between adjacent pixel, moreover all the singlephoton timing electronics with picosecond resolution has to be developed. In this paper we present a new instrument suitable for single-photon imaging applications and made up of 32 timeresolved parallel channels. The 32x1 pixel array that includes SPAD detectors represents the system core, and an embedded data elaboration unit performs on-board data processing for single-photon counting applications. Photontiming information is exported through a custom parallel cable that can be connected to an external multichannel TCSPC system.

  16. Fabrication of 721-pixel silicon lens array of a microwave kinetic inductance detector camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Kenji; Nitta, Tom; Okada, Norio; Sekimoto, Yutaro; Karatsu, Kenichi; Sekiguchi, Shigeyuki; Sekine, Masakazu; Noguchi, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    We have been developed a lens-integrated superconducting camera for millimeter and submillimeter astronomy. High-purity silicon (Si) is suitable for the lens array of the microwave kinetic inductance detector camera due to its high refractive index and low dielectric loss at low temperatures. The camera is an antenna-coupled Al coplanar waveguide on a Si substrate. Thus the lens and the device are made of the same material. We report a fabrication method of a 721-pixel Si lens array with an antireflection (AR) coating. The Si lens array was fabricated with an ultraprecision cutting machine. It uses TiAlN-coated carbide end mills attached with a high-speed spindle. The shape accuracy was less than 50 μm peak-to-valley and the surface roughness was arithmetic average roughness (Ra) of 1.8 μm. The mixed epoxy was used as an AR coating to adjust the refractive index. It was shaved to yield a thickness of 185 μm for 220 GHz. Narrow grooves were made between the lenses to prevent cracking due to the different thermal expansion coefficients of Si and the epoxy. The surface roughness of the AR coating was Ra of 2.4 to 4.2 μm.

  17. A 2×2 array of EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed a new solid-state x-ray imaging system that consists of a 2×2 array of electron multiplying charge coupled devices (EMCCDs). This system is intended for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The key components are the four 1024 × 1024 pixel EMCCDs with a pixel size of 13 × 13 µm(2). Each EMCCD is bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 µm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a 3.22∶1 fiber optic taper (FOT). The detector provides x-ray images of 9 line pairs/mm resolution at 15 frames/sec and real-time live video at 30 frames/sec with binning at a lower resolution, independent of the electronic gain applied to the EMCCD. The total field of view (FOV) of the array is 8.45 cm × 8.45 cm. The system is designed to also provide the ability to do region-of- interest imaging (ROI) by selectively enabling individual modules of the array.

  18. A new DOI detector design using discrete crystal array with depth-dependent reflector patterns and single-ended readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Chaeyeong; Kang, Jihoon; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    We developed a depth of interaction (DOI) positron emission tomography (PET) detector using depth-dependent reflector patterns in a discrete crystal array. Due to the different reflector patterns at depth, light distribution was changed relative to depth. As a preliminary experiment, we measured DOI detector module crystal identification performance. The crystal consisted of a 9×9 array of 2 mmx2 mmx20 mm lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals. The crystal array was optically coupled to a 64-channel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube with a 2 mmx2 mm anode size and an 18.1 mmx18.1 mm effective area. We obtained the flood image with an Anger-type calculation. DOI layers and 9×9 pixels were well distinguished in the obtained images. Preclinical PET scanners based on this detector design offer the prospect of high and uniform spatial resolution.

  19. SU-E-T-35: An Investigation of the Accuracy of Cervical IMRT Dose Distribution Using 2D/3D Ionization Chamber Arrays System and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Yang, J; Liu, H; Liu, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to compare the verification results of three solutions (2D/3D ionization chamber arrays measurement and Monte Carlo simulation), the results will help make a clinical decision as how to do our cervical IMRT verification. Methods: Seven cervical cases were planned with Pinnacle 8.0m to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. The plans were recalculated in the Matrixx and Delta4 phantom with the accurate plans parameters. The plans were also recalculated by Monte Carlo using leaf sequences and MUs for individual plans of every patient, Matrixx and Delta4 phantom. All plans of Matrixx and Delta4 phantom were delivered and measured. The dose distribution of iso slice, dose profiles, gamma maps of every beam were used to evaluate the agreement. Dose-volume histograms were also compared. Results: The dose distribution of iso slice and dose profiles from Pinnacle calculation were in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation, Matrixx and Delta4 measurement. A 95.2%/91.3% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Pinnacle distributions within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. A 96.4%/95.6% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation within 2mm/2% gamma criteria, almost 100% gamma pass ratio within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. The DVH plot have slightly differences between Pinnacle and Delta4 measurement as well as Pinnacle and Monte Carlo simulation, but have excellent agreement between Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation. Conclusion: It was shown that Matrixx/Delta4 and Monte Carlo simulation can be used very efficiently to verify cervical IMRT delivery. In terms of Gamma value the pass ratio of Matrixx was little higher, however, Delta4 showed more problem fields. The primary advantage of Delta4 is the fact it can measure true 3D dosimetry while Monte Carlo can simulate in patients CT images but not in phantom.

  20. 1024 × 1024 Si:As IBC detector arrays for JWST MIRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Peter J.; Hoffman, Alan W.; Lum, Nancy A.; Ando, Ken J.; Rosbeck, Joe; Ritchie, William D.; Therrien, Neil J.; Holcombe, Roger S.; Corrales, Elizabeth

    2005-08-01

    1K × 1K Si:As Impurity Band Conduction (IBC) arrays have been developed by RVS for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI). MIRI provides imaging, coronagraphy, and low and medium resolution spectroscopy over the 5 - 28 μm band. The IBC devices are also suitable for other low-background applications. The Si:As IBC detectors have a pixel dimension of 25 μm and respond to infrared radiation between 5 and 28 μm, covering an important Mid-IR region beyond the 1 - 5 μm range covered by the JWST NIRCam and NIRSpec instruments. Due to high terrestrial backgrounds at the longer Mid-IR wavelengths, it is very difficult to conduct ground-based observations at these wavelengths. Hence, the MIRI instrument on JWST can provide science not obtainable from the ground. We describe results of the development of a new 1024 × 1024 Si:As IBC array that responds with high quantum efficiency over the wavelength range 5 to 28 μm. The previous generation's largest, most sensitive infrared (IR) detectors at these wavelengths were the 256 × 256 / 30 μm pitch Si:As IBC devices built by Raytheon for the SIRTF/IRAC instrument1. Detector performance results will be discussed, including relative spectral response, Responsive Quantum Efficiency (RQE) vs. detector bias, and dark current versus temperature. In addition, Sensor Chip Assembly (SCA) data will be presented from the first Engineering SCAs. The detector ROIC utilizes a PMOS Source Follower per Detector (SFD) input circuit with a well capacity of about 2 × 105 electrons. The read noise of the "bare" MUX is less than 12 e- rms with Fowler-8 sampling at an operating temperature of 7 K. A companion paper by Craig McMurtry (University of Rochester) will discuss the details of SB305 MUX noise measurements2. Other features of the IBC array include 4 video outputs and a separate reference output with a frame rate of 0.36 Hz (2.75 sec frame time). Power dissipation is about 0.5 mW at a 0.36 Hz frame rate

  1. Electronics and data acquisition system of the extensive air shower detector array at the University of Puebla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, E.; Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.; Martinez, O.; Conde, R.; Murrieta, T.

    Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are playing an increasing role in DAQ systems in cosmic ray experiments due to their high speed and integration and their low cost and low power comsumption. In this paper we describe in detail the new electronics and data acquisition system based on FPGA boards of the extensive air shower detector array built in the Campus of the University of Puebla. The purpose of this detector array is to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1015 eV. The array consists of 10 liquid scintillator detectors and 6 water Cherenkov detectors (of 1.86 m2 cross section), distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m2. The electronics described also makes use of analog to digital converters with a resolution of 10 bits and sampling speeds of 100 MS/s to digitize the PMT signals. We also discuss the advantages of discriminating the PMT signals inside the FPGAs with respect to the conventional use of dedicated discrimination circuits.

  2. Signal-Conditioning Block of a 1 × 200 CMOS Detector Array for a Terahertz Real-Time Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Han, Seong-Tae

    2016-01-01

    A signal conditioning block of a 1 × 200 Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) detector array is proposed to be employed with a real-time 0.2 THz imaging system for inspecting large areas. The plasmonic CMOS detector array whose pixel size including an integrated antenna is comparable to the wavelength of the THz wave for the imaging system, inevitably carries wide pixel-to-pixel variation. To make the variant outputs from the array uniform, the proposed signal conditioning block calibrates the responsivity of each pixel by controlling the gate bias of each detector and the voltage gain of the lock-in amplifiers in the block. The gate bias of each detector is modulated to 1 MHz to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the imaging system via the electrical modulation by the conditioning block. In addition, direct current (DC) offsets of the detectors in the array are cancelled by initializing the output voltage level from the block. Real-time imaging using the proposed signal conditioning block is demonstrated by obtaining images at the rate of 19.2 frame-per-sec of an object moving on the conveyor belt with a scan width of 20 cm and a scan speed of 25 cm/s. PMID:26950128

  3. Signal-Conditioning Block of a 1 × 200 CMOS Detector Array for a Terahertz Real-Time Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Han, Seong-Tae

    2016-03-02

    A signal conditioning block of a 1 × 200 Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) detector array is proposed to be employed with a real-time 0.2 THz imaging system for inspecting large areas. The plasmonic CMOS detector array whose pixel size including an integrated antenna is comparable to the wavelength of the THz wave for the imaging system, inevitably carries wide pixel-to-pixel variation. To make the variant outputs from the array uniform, the proposed signal conditioning block calibrates the responsivity of each pixel by controlling the gate bias of each detector and the voltage gain of the lock-in amplifiers in the block. The gate bias of each detector is modulated to 1 MHz to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the imaging system via the electrical modulation by the conditioning block. In addition, direct current (DC) offsets of the detectors in the array are cancelled by initializing the output voltage level from the block. Real-time imaging using the proposed signal conditioning block is demonstrated by obtaining images at the rate of 19.2 frame-per-sec of an object moving on the conveyor belt with a scan width of 20 cm and a scan speed of 25 cm/s.

  4. Coherent summation of spatially distorted laser Doppler signals by using a two-dimensional heterodyne detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kin P.; Killinger, Dennis K.

    1992-01-01

    Phase-sensitive coherent summation of individual heterodyne detector array signals was demonstrated for the enhanced detection of spatially distorted laser Doppler returns. With the use of a 2 x 2 heterodyne detector array, the phase and amplitude of a time-varying speckle pattern was detected, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the Doppler shift estimate was shown to be improved by a factor of 2, depending on the extent of spatial coherence loss. These results are shown to agree with a first-order analysis and indicate the advantage of coherent summation for both short-range laser Doppler velocimetry and long-range atmospheric coherent lidar.

  5. Linear charge coupled device detector array for imaging light propagating in an integrated thin-film optical waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. L.; Boyd, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Device design, fabrication, and operation of a linear charge coupled device (CCD) detector array integrated with a thin film optical waveguide and applications of this structure to integrated optical signal processing and fiber optical communications were discussed. A two phase, overlapping-gate CCD is connected in parallel by means of a series of gates to an array of photodiodes. The photodiode provides an electrode free surface region so that a highly efficient waveguide detector coupling technique can be implemented. A thermally-oxidized layer of SiO2 forms an effective substrate for the optical waveguide.

  6. SiPM detectors for the ASTRI project in the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billotta, Sergio; Marano, Davide; Bonanno, Giovanni; Belluso, Massimiliano; Grillo, Alessandro; Garozzo, Salvatore; Romeo, Giuseppe; Timpanaro, Maria Cristina; Maccarone, Maria Concetta C.; Catalano, Osvaldo; La Rosa, Giovanni; Sottile, Giuseppe; Impiombato, Domenico; Gargano, Carmelo; Giarrusso, Salavtore

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a worldwide new generation project aimed at realizing an array of a hundred ground based gamma-ray telescopes. ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is the Italian project whose primary target is the development of an end-to-end prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, of the CTA small size class of telescopes devoted to investigation of the highest energy region, from 1 to 100 TeV. Next target is the implementation of an ASTRI/CTA mini-array based on seven identical telescopes. Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are the semiconductor photosensor devices designated to constitute the camera detection system at the focal plane of the ASTRI telescopes. SiPM photosensors are suitable for the detection of the Cherenkov flashes, since they are very fast and sensitive to the light in the 300-700nm wavelength spectrum. Their drawbacks compared to the traditional photomultiplier tubes are high dark count rates, after-pulsing and optical cross-talk contributions, and intrinsic gains strongly dependent on temperature. Nonetheless, for a single pixel, the dark count rate is well below the Night Sky Background, the effects of cross-talk and afterpulses are typically lower than 20%, and the gain can be kept stable against temperature variations by means of adequate bias voltage compensation strategies. This work presents and discusses some experimental results from a large set of measurements performed on the SiPM sensors to be used for the ASTRI SST-2M prototype camera and on recently developed detectors demonstrating outstanding performance for the future evolution of the project in the ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  7. Large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic TES detectors for CMB measurements with the SPT-3G receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, Chrystian M.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Anderson, Adam J.; Avva, Jessica; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Arnold, Kam S.; Austermann, Jason; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Byrum, Karen; Carlstrom, John E.; Carter, Faustin W.; Chang, Clarence; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Cukierman, Ari; Czaplewski, David A.; Ding, Junjia; Divan, Ralu N. S.; de Haan, Tijmen; Dobbs, Matt; Dutcher, Daniel; Everett, Wenderline; Gannon, Renae N.; Guyser, Robert J.; Halverson, Nils W.; Harrington, Nicholas L.; Hattori, Kaori; Henning, Jason W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Holzapfel, William L.; Huang, Nicholas; Irwin, Kent D.; Jeong, Oliver; Khaire, Trupti; Korman, Milo; Kubik, Donna L.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lee, Adrian T.; Leitch, Erik M.; Lendinez Escudero, Sergi; Meyer, Stephan S.; Miller, Christina S.; Montgomery, Joshua; Nadolski, Andrew; Natoli, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Hogan; Novosad, Valentyn; Padin, Stephen; Pan, Zhaodi; Pearson, John E.; Rahlin, Alexandra; Reichardt, Christian L.; Ruhl, John E.; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Shirley, Ian; Sayre, James T.; Shariff, Jamil A.; Shirokoff, Erik D.; Stan, Liliana; Stark, Antony A.; Sobrin, Joshua; Story, Kyle; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tang, Qing Yang; Thakur, Ritoban B.; Thompson, Keith L.; Tucker, Carole E.; Vanderlinde, Keith; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Wang, Gensheng; Whitehorn, Nathan; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Yoon, Ki Won

    2016-07-01

    Detectors for cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments are now essentially background limited, so a straightforward alternative to improve sensitivity is to increase the number of detectors. Large arrays of multichroic pixels constitute an economical approach to increasing the number of detectors within a given focal plane area. Here, we present the fabrication of large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic transition-edge-sensor (TES) bolometers for the South Pole Telescope third-generation CMB receiver (SPT-3G). The complete SPT-3G receiver will have 2690 pixels, each with six detectors, allowing for individual measurement of three spectral bands (centered at 95 GHz, 150 GHz and 220 GHz) in two orthogonal polarizations. In total, the SPT-3G focal plane will have 16140 detectors. Each pixel is comprised of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a niobium microstrip transmission line. In-line filters are used to define the different band-passes before the millimeter-wavelength signal is fed to the respective Ti/Au TES sensors. Detectors are read out using a 64x frequency domain multiplexing (fMux) scheme. The microfabrication of the SPT-3G detector arrays involves a total of 18 processes, including 13 lithography steps. Together with the fabrication process, the effect of processing on the Ti/Au TES's Tc is discussed. In addition, detectors fabricated with Ti/Au TES films with Tc between 400 mK 560 mK are presented and their thermal characteristics are evaluated. Optical characterization of the arrays is presented as well, indicating that the response of the detectors is in good agreement with the design values for all three spectral bands (95 GHz, 150 GHz, and 220 GHz). The measured optical efficiency of the detectors is between 0.3 and 0.8. Results discussed here are extracted from a batch of research of development wafers used to develop the baseline process for the fabrication of the arrays of detectors to be deployed with the SPT-3G receiver. Results from

  8. Performance of multiplexed Ge:Ga detector arrays in the far infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Mccreight, Craig

    1990-01-01

    The performance of two multi-element, multiplexed Ge:Ga linear arrays under low-background conditions was investigated. The on-focal switching is accomplished by MOSFET switches, and the integrated charge is made available through MOSFET source followers. The tests were conducted at 106 microns, and the radiation on the detectors was confined to a spectral window 1.25 microns wide using a stack of cold filters. At 4.2 K, the highest responsivity was 584 A/W, the noise equivalent power was 1.0 x 10(exp -16) W/square root of Hz, and the read noise was 6100 electrons/sample. A detailed description of the test setup and procedure is presented.

  9. On the estimation of target depth using the single transmit multiple receive metal detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. C.; Gader, P. D.

    2012-06-01

    This paper investigates the use of the Single Transmit Multiple Receive (STMR) metal detector (MD) array to estimate the depth of metal targets, such as 155mm shells. The depth estimation problem using MD has been investigated by a number of researchers and the processing was performed along the down-track. The proposed method takes a different approach by exploring the MD responses in cross-track to achieve the depth estimation. It is found that the normalized energy spread of the MD output is narrower for shallow targets and wider for deeper targets. Based on this observation, a method is derived to estimate the depth of a target. Experimental results from the data collected at an U.S. Army test site validate the performance of the proposed depth estimator.

  10. Development of Multilayer Analyzer Array Detectors for X-ray Fluorescence at the Third Generation Synchrotron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Rosenbaum, G.; Liu, R.; Liu, C.; Carmeli, C.; Bunker, G.; Fischer, D.

    2004-05-01

    The development of Multilayer Analyzer Array Detector (MAAD) for X-ray fluorescence eliminates the count rate limitation encountered with multi-element Ge detectors. A 24-element multilayer detector has been fabricated that is tunable in a large energy region. This detector has been operational for more than two years at the BioCAT Beamline of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Here we report our recent progress in developing multilayer detectors working in lower energy regions, in particular, performance at Ca Kα fluorescence energy and test results at soft x-ray energies. The band width of the analyzer response is found to be 3-4% of the fluorescence energy. Namely, at the Ca Kα energy, the band width is 140 eV; it is reduced to about 60 eV at Al Kα fluorescence energy. The throughput of the detector in this energy region (1.5-3.6 KeV) is 20% to 30%. These results demonstrate the feasibility for constructing multilayer analyzer array detectors for use in the soft x-ray region.

  11. The angular dependence of a two dimensional monolithic detector array for dosimetry in small radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stansook, N.; Petasecca, M.; Utitsarn, K.; Newall, M.; Metcalfe, P.; Carolan, M.; Lerch, M.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the directional dependence of a two dimensional monolithic detector array (M512) under 6 MV photon irradiation and to evaluate the effect of field size on angular dependence. Square fields of sizes: 3x3 cm2 and 10x10 cm2 were measured at the iso-centre of a cylindrical phantom. Beam angles with incidences from 00- 1800 in increments of 150 were used to investigate the central pixel angular response of M512, normalized to the pixel response for normal (0°) beam incidence. The angular response of the detector was compared to the response of EBT3 radiochromic film in the identical geometric orientation. The maximum angular dependence was observed at the angle 90°±15° to be -18.62% and -17.70% for the field sizes 3x3 cm2 and 10x10 cm2, respectively. The angular dependence of M512 showed no significant difference between field sizes of 3x3 cm2 and 10x10 cm2 (p>0.05). The maximum dose difference measured by the central pixel of M512 and EBT3 for all angles are -20% for 3x3 cm2 field size and -18.58% for the 10x10 cm2 field. The diode array’s size and packaging effects the angular response of the detector. The angular correction factor is necessary to apply to increase accuracy in dosimetry for arc treatment delivery.

  12. Effect of scattered electrons on the ‘Magic Plate’ transmission array detector response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrowaili, Z. A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Carolan, M.; Rosenfeld, A.

    2017-02-01

    Transmission type detectors can provide a measure of the energy fluence and if they are real-time systems that do not significantly attenuate the radiation beam have a distinct advantage over the current method as Quality Assurance (QA) could in principle be done during the actual patient treatment. The use of diode arrays in QA holds much promise due to real-time operation and feedback when compared to other methods e.g. films which are not real-time. The goal of this work is to describe the characterization of the radiation response of a silicon diode array called the Magic Plate (MP) when operated in transmission mode (MPTM). The response linearity of MPTM was excellent (R2=1). When the MP was placed in linac block tray position; the change in PDD at phantom surface (SSD 100 cm) for a 10 × 10 cm2 was -0.037 %, -0.178 % and -0.949 % for 6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV beams. Therefore, MP does not provide a significant increase in skin dose to the patient and the percentage depth doses showed an excellent agreement with and without MPTM for 6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV beams.

  13. Calibration Scheme for Large Kinetic Inductance Detector Arrays Based on Readout Frequency Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisigello, L.; Yates, S. J. C.; Murugesan, V.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) provides a way to build large ground-based sub-mm instruments such as NIKA and A-MKID. For such instruments, therefore, it is important to understand and characterize the response to ensure good linearity and calibration over a wide dynamic range. We propose to use the MKID readout frequency response to determine the MKID responsivity to an input optical source power. A signal can be measured in a KID as a change in the phase of the readout signal with respect to the KID resonant circle. Fundamentally, this phase change is due to a shift in the KID resonance frequency, in turn due to a radiation induced change in the quasiparticle number in the superconducting resonator. We show that the shift in resonant frequency can be determined from the phase shift by using KID phase versus frequency dependence using a previously measured resonant frequency. Working in this calculated resonant frequency, we gain near linearity and constant calibration to a constant optical signal applied in a wide range of operating points on the resonance and readout powers. This calibration method has three particular advantages: first, it is fast enough to be used to calibrate large arrays, with pixel counts in the thousands of pixels; second, it is based on data that are already necessary to determine KID positions; third, it can be done without applying any optical source in front of the array.

  14. Device localization and dynamic scan plane selection using a wireless MRI detector array

    PubMed Central

    Riffe, Matthew J.; Yutzy, Stephen R.; Jiang, Yun; Twieg, Michael D.; Blumenthal, Colin J.; Hsu, Daniel P.; Pan, Li; Gilson, Wesley D.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Flask, Christopher A.; Duerk, Jeffrey L.; Nakamoto, Dean; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A prototype wireless guidance device using single sideband amplitude modulation (SSB) is presented for a 1.5T MRI system. Methods The device contained three fiducial markers each mounted to an independent receiver coil equipped with wireless SSB technology. Acquiring orthogonal projections of these markers determined the position and orientation of the device, which was used to define the scan plane for a subsequent image acquisition. Device localization and scan plane update required approximately 30 ms, so it could be interleaved with high temporal resolution imaging. Since the wireless device is used for localization and doesn’t require full imaging capability, the design of the SSB wireless system was simplified by allowing an asynchronous clock between the transmitter and receiver. Results When coupled to a high readout bandwidth, the error caused by the lack of a shared frequency reference was quantified to be less than one pixel (0.78 mm) in the projection acquisitions. Image-guidance with the prototype was demonstrated with a phantom where a needle was successfully guided to a target and contrast was delivered. Conclusion The feasibility of active tracking with a wireless detector array is demonstrated. Wireless arrays could be incorporated into devices to assist in image-guided procedures. PMID:23900921

  15. Examination of cotton fibers and common contaminants using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemical imaging of cotton fibers and common contaminants in fibers is presented. Chemical imaging was performed with an infrared microscope equipped with a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In a...

  16. Performance of new 8-inch photomultiplier tube used for the Tibet muon-detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, J.; Chen, D.; Zhai, L.-M.; Chen, X.; Hu, X.-B.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jin, H.-B.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Feng, C.-F.; Jia, H.-Y.; Zhou, X.-X.; Danzengluobu; Chen, T.-L.; Labaciren; Liu, M.-Y.; Gao, Q.; Zhaxiciren

    2016-06-01

    Since 2014, a new hybrid experiment consisting of a high-energy air-shower-core array (YAC-II), a high-density air-shower array (Tibet-III) and a large underground water-Cherenkov muon-detector array (MD) has been continued by the Tibet ASγ collaboration to measure the chemical composition of cosmic rays in the wide energy range including the ``knee''. In this experiment, YAC-II is used to select high energy core events induced by cosmic rays in the above energy region, while MD is used to estimate the type of nucleus of primary particles by measuring the number of muons contained in the air showers. However, the dynamic range of each MD cell is only 5 to 2000 photoelectrons (PEs) which is mainly designed for observation of high-energy celestial gamma rays. In order to obtain the primary proton, helium and iron spectra and their ``knee'' positions with energy up to 1016 eV, each of PMTs equipped to the MD cell is required to measure the number of photons capable of covering a wide dynamic range of 100-106 PEs according to Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we firstly compare the characteristic features between R5912-PMT made by Japan Hamamatsu and CR365-PMT made by Beijing Hamamatsu. If there exists no serious difference, we will then add two 8-inch-in-diameter PMTs to meet our requirements in each MD cell, which are responsible for the range of 100-10000 PEs and 2000-1000000 PEs, respectively. That is, MD cell is expected to be able to measure the number of muons over 6 orders of magnitudes.

  17. Room-temperature InGaAs detector arrays for 1.0 - 1.7 microns spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. H.; Joshi, A. M.; Mykietyn, E.; Colosi, J.; Woodruff, K. M.

    1989-01-01

    Linear arrays of 256 element InGaAs detectors with 100 x 30 micron pixels were mounted in multiplexer packages and tested in an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA). Typical performance characteristics include dark current (-5V) of 400 picoamps and responsivities of 0.75 A/W (1.3 microns) and 0.14 A/W (0.85 microns). The 256 element exhibited a mean room-temperature dark current of under 400 picoamps when mounted in the OMA and a dynamic range over 11 bits (2000:1). Future applications, including room-temperature detector arrays for 2.5 microns and avalanche photodiode arrays for 1.0-1.7 microns, are discussed.

  18. Thermal and Cold Neutron Computed Tomography at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center Using an Amorphous Silicon Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, T.N.; Schwab, M.J.; Farnum, E.H.; McDonald, T.E.; Summa, D.A.; Sheats, M.J.; Stupin, D.M.; Sievers, W.L.

    1998-07-19

    The use of the EG and G-Heimann RTM 128 or dpiX FS20 amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector array for thermal neutron radiography/computed tomography has proven to be a quick and efficient means of producing high quality digital radiographic images. The resolution, although not as good as film, is about 750 pm with the RTM and 127 pm with the dpiX array with a dynamic range in excess of 2,800. In many respects using an amorphous silicon detector is an improvement over other techniques such as imaging with a CCD camera, using a storage phosphor plate or film radiography. Unlike a CCD camera, which is highly susceptible to radiation damage, a-Si detectors can be placed in the beam directly behind the object under examination and do not require any special optics or turning mirrors. The amorphous silicon detector also allows enough data to be acquired to construct a digital image in just a few seconds (minimum gate time 40 ms) whereas film or storage plate exposures can take many minutes and then need to be digitized with a scanner. The flat panel can therefore acquire a complete 3D computed tomography data set in just a few tens of minutes. While a-Si detectors have been proposed for use in imaging neutron beams, this is the first reported implementation of such a detector for neutron imaging.

  19. Design, fabrication and testing of 17um pitch 640x480 uncooled infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lijun; Liu, Haitao; Chi, Jiguang; Qian, Liangshan; Pan, Feng; Liu, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Uncooled infrared focal plane array (UIRFPA) detectors are widely used in industrial thermography cameras, night vision goggles, thermal weapon sights, as well as automotive night vision systems. To meet the market requirement for smaller pixel pitch and higher resolution, we have developed a 17um pitch 640x480 UIRFPA detector. The detector is based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) microbolometer technology, the readout integrated circuit (ROIC) is designed and manufactured with 0.35um standard CMOS technology on 8 inch wafer, the microbolometer is fabricated monolithically on the ROIC using an unique surface micromachining process developed inside the company, the fabricated detector is vacuum packaged with hermetic metal package and tested. In this paper we present the design, fabrication and testing of the 17um 640x480 detector. The design trade-off of the detector ROIC and pixel micro-bridge structure will be discussed, by comparison the calculation and simulation to the testing results. The novel surface micromachining process using silicon sacrificial layer will be presented, which is more compatible with the CMOS process than the traditional process with polyimide sacrificial layer, and resulted in good processing stability and high fabrication yield. The performance of the detector is tested, with temperature equivalent temperature difference (NETD) less than 60mK at F/1 aperture, operability better than 99.5%. The results demonstrate that the detector can meet the requirements of most thermography and night vision applications.

  20. Design, development, characterization and qualification of infrared focal plane area array detectors for space-borne imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ankur; Banerjee, Arup

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses the design, development, characterization and qualification aspects of large format Infrared Focal Plane Arrays (IRFPA) required for panchromatic, multi-, hyper- and ultra-spectral imaging applications from a space-borne imager. Detection of feeble radiant flux from the intended target in narrow spectral bands requires a highly sensitive low noise sensor array with high well capacity. For this the photodiode arrays responsive in desired spectral band are grown using different growth techniques and flip-chip bonded with a suitable Si Read-out ICs (ROICs) for signal conditioning. IR detectors require cryogenic cooling to achieve background limited performance. Although passive radiative cooling is always the preferred choice of cooling in space, it is not suitable for cooling IRFPAs due to high thermal loads. To facilitate characterization of IRFPAs and cool them to desired cryogenic temperature, an Integrated Detector Dewar Cooler Assembly (IDDCA) is essential where the detector array sits over the cold tip of an active cooler and the detector cooler assembly is vacuum sealed in a thermally isolated Dewar. A cold shield above the sensor array inside the Dewar restricts its field-of-view and a cold filter fine tunes its spectral response. In this paper, various constituents of an IRFPA like sensor array materials, growth techniques, ROICs, filters, cold shields, cooling techniques etc., their types and selection criteria for different applications are discussed in detail. Design aspects of IRFPA characterization test bench, challenges involved in radiometric and spectral characterization and space qualification of such IDDCA based IRFPAs are also discussed.

  1. Pilot Study on the Detection of Simulated Lesions Using a 2D and 3D Digital Full-Field Mammography System with a Newly Developed High Resolution Detector Based on Two Shifts of a-Se.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Wendtland, R; Bani, M; Lux, M P; Schwab, S; Loehberg, C R; Jud, S M; Rauh, C; Bayer, C M; Beckmann, M W; Uder, M; Fasching, P A; Adamietz, B; Meier-Meitinger, M

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Experimental study of a new system for digital 2D and 3D full-field mammography (FFDM) using a high resolution detector based on two shifts of a-Se. Material and Methods: Images were acquired using the new FFDM system Amulet® (FujiFilm, Tokio, Japan), an a-Se detector (receptor 24 × 30 cm(2), pixel size 50 µm, memory depth 12 bit, spatial resolution 10 lp/mm, DQE > 0.50). Integrated in the detector is a new method for data transfer, based on optical switch technology. The object of investigation was the Wisconsin Mammographic Random Phantom, Model 152A (Radiation Measurement Inc., Middleton, WI, USA) and the same parameters and exposure data (Tungsten, 100 mAs, 30 kV) were consistently used. We acquired 3 different pairs of images in the c-c and ml planes (2D) and in the c-c and c-c planes with an angle of 4 degrees (3D). Five radiologists experienced in mammography (experience ranging from 3 months to more than 5 years) analyzed the images (monitoring) which had been randomly encoded (random generator) with regard to the recognition of details such as specks of aluminum oxide (200-740 µm), nylon fibers (0.4-1.6 mm) and round lesions/masses (diameters 5-14 mm), using special linear glasses for 3D visualization, and compared the results. Results: A total of 225 correct positive decisions could be detected: we found 222 (98.7 %) correct positive results for 2D and 3D visualization in each case. Conclusion: The results of this phantom study showed the same detection rates for both 2D and 3D imaging using full field digital mammography. Our results must be confirmed in further clinical trials.

  2. Development of megapixel HgCdTe detector arrays with 15 micron cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, William J.; McMurtry, Craig W.; Dorn, Meghan L.; Pipher, Judith; Cabrera, Mario S.

    2016-06-01

    I. HistoryHgCdTe is a versatile II-VI semiconductor with a direct-bandgap tunable via the Hg:Cd ratio. Hg:Cd ratio = 53:47 (2.5 micron cutoff) was used on the NICMOS instrument on HST and the 2MASS. Increasing Hg:Cd ratio to 70:30 leads to a 5.4 micron cutoff, utilized in NEOWISE and many JWST instruments. Bailey, Wu et al. (1998) motivated extending this technology to 10 microns and beyond. Bacon, McMurtry et al. (2003, 2004) indicated significant progress toward this longwave (LW) goal.Warm-Spitzer has pioneered passive cooling to below 30 K in space, enabling the JWST mission.II. CurrentNASA's proposed NEOcam mission selected HgCdTe with a 10.6 micron cutoff because it promises natural Zodiacal background limited sensitivity with modest cooling (40 K). Teledyne Imaging Systems (TIS) is producing megapixel arrays with excellent performance (McMurtry, Lee, Dorn et al. (2013)) for this mission.III. FutureModest cooling requirements (circa 30 K) coupled with megapixel arrays and LW sensitivity in the thermal IR make HgCdTe attractive for many infrared instruments. For instance, the spectral signature of a terrestrial planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a nearby star will be the deep and wide absorption by CO_2 centered at 15 microns (Seager and Deming, 2010). LW instruments can enhance Solar System missions, such as exploration of the Enceladus geysers (Spencer, Buratti et al. 2006). Passive cooling will be adequate for these missions. Modern ground-based observatories will benefit from infrared capability out to the N band (7.5-13.6 microns). The required detector temperatures (30-40 K) are easily achievable using commercially available mechanical cryo-coolers (refrigerators).IV. Progress to dateTIS is developing megapixel HgCdTe arrays sensitive out to 15 microns under the direction of the University of Rochester. As a first step, we have produced arrays with a 13 micron cutoff. The initial measurements indicate very promising performance. We will present the

  3. Development of megapixel HgCdTe detector arrays with 15 micron cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, William J.; McMurtry, Craig W.; Dorn, Meghan; Pipher, Judith; Cabrera, Mario S.

    2016-10-01

    I. HistoryHgCdTe is a versatile II-VI semiconductor with a direct-bandgap tunable via the Hg:Cd ratio. Hg:Cd ratio = 53:47 (2.5 micron cutoff) was used on the NICMOS instrument on HST and the 2MASS. Increasing Hg:Cd ratio to 70:30 leads to a 5.4 micron cutoff, utilized in NEOWISE and many JWST instruments. Bailey, Wu et al. (1998) motivated extending this technology to 10 microns and beyond. Bacon, McMurtry et al. (2003, 2004) indicated significant