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Sample records for 2-d dna typing

  1. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  2. PCV2d-2 is the predominant type of PCV2 DNA in pig samples collected in the U.S. during 2014-2016.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chao-Ting; Harmon, Karen M; Halbur, Patrick G; Opriessnig, Tanja

    2016-12-25

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccination was introduced in the US in 2006 and since has been adopted by most pig producers. While porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) outbreaks are now relatively uncommon in the US, PCV2 remains a concern which is emphasized by increasing numbers of PCR and sequencing requests for PCV2. In the present study, randomly selected lung tissues from 586 pigs submitted in 2015 were tested for presence of PCV2 DNA. Positive samples were further characterized by sequencing and combined with available PCV2 open-reading-frame (ORF) 2 sequences from the client data base of the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. The prevalence of PCV2 in the randomly selected lung tissues was 23% (135/586) with 11.3% PCV2a, 29% PCV2b and 71.8% for PCV2d subgroup PCV2d-2. A total of 455 ORF2 sequences obtained from 2014 through 2016 were analyzed and PCV2d accounted for 66.7% of the 2014 sequences, 71.8% of the 2015 sequences, and 72% of the 2016 sequences. Interestingly, only 1.9% (9/455) of the sequences belonged to the recently identified PCV2e genotype. The present data indicates that despite an almost 100% PCV2 vaccine coverage in the US, PCV2 DNA can still be detected in almost 1 of 4 randomly selected pig tissues. PCV2d-2 is now the predominant genotype in the USA suggesting that PCV2d-2 may have some advantage over PCV2a and PCV2b in its ability to replicate in pigs under vaccination pressure.

  3. Application of 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Tan, Mingshu; Ding, Kequan

    2005-10-01

    Recently, we proposed a 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence [Bo Liao, A 2-D graphical representation of DNA sequence, Chem. Phys. Lett. 401 (2005) 196-199]. Based on this representation, we consider properties of mutations and compute the similarities among 11 mitochondrial sequences belonging to different species. The elements of the similarity matrix are used to construct phylogenic tree. Unlike most existing phylogeny construction methods, the proposed method does not require multiple alignment.

  4. Cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2, PAP2d, with two different transcripts PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyun; Gu, Shaohua; Sun, Yaqiong; Zheng, Dan; Wu, Qihan; Li, Xin; Dai, Jianfeng; Dai, Jianliang; Ji, Chaoneng; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    This study reports the cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 isoform cDNAs (PAP2d) from the foetal brain cDNA library. The PAP2d gene is localized on chromosome 1p21.3. It contains six exons and spans 112 kb of the genomic DNA. By large-scale cDNA sequencing we found two splice variants of PAP2d, PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 1722 bp in length and spans an open reading frame from nucleotide 56 to 1021, encoding a 321aa protein. The PAP2d_v2 cDNA is 1707 bp in length encoding a 316aa protein from nucleotide 56-1006. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 15 bp longer than the PAP2d_v2 cDNA in the terminal of the fifth exon and it creates different ORF. Both of the proteins contain a well-conserved PAP2 motif. The PAP2d_v1 is mainly expressed in human brain, lung, kidney, testis and colon, while PAP2d_v2 is restricted to human placenta, skeletal muscle, and kidney. The two splice variants are co-expressed only in kidney.

  5. Substrate-assisted 2D DNA lattices and algorithmic lattices from single-stranded tiles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghoon; Ha, Tai Hwan; Park, Sung Ha

    2015-08-07

    We present a simple route to circumvent kinetic traps which affect many types of DNA nanostructures in their self-assembly process. Using this method, a new 2D DNA lattice made up of short, single-stranded tile (SST) motifs was created. Previously, the growth of SST DNA assemblies was restricted to 1D (tubes and ribbons) or finite-sized 2D (molecular canvases). By utilizing the substrate-assisted growth method, sets of SSTs were designed as unit cells to self-assemble into periodic and aperiodic 2D lattices which continuously grow both along and orthogonal to the helical axis. Notably, large-scale (∼1 μm(2)) fully periodic 2D lattices were fabricated using a minimum of just 2 strand species. Furthermore, the ability to create 2D lattices from a few motifs enables certain rules to be encoded into these SSTs to carry out algorithmic self-assembly. A set of these motifs was designed to execute simple 1-input 1-output COPY and NOT algorithms, the space-time manifestations which were aperiodic 2D algorithmic SST lattices. The methodology presented here can be straightforwardly applied to other motifs which fall into this type of kinetic trap to create novel DNA crystals.

  6. ATM-dependent phosphorylation of MEF2D promotes neuronal survival after DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chan, Shing Fai; Sances, Sam; Brill, Laurence M; Okamoto, Shu-Ichi; Zaidi, Rameez; McKercher, Scott R; Akhtar, Mohd W; Nakanishi, Nobuki; Lipton, Stuart A

    2014-03-26

    Mutations in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, which encodes a kinase critical for the normal DNA damage response, cause the neurodegenerative disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). The substrates of ATM in the brain are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ATM phosphorylates and activates the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), which plays a critical role in promoting survival of cerebellar granule cells. ATM associates with MEF2D after DNA damage and phosphorylates the transcription factor at four ATM consensus sites. Knockdown of endogenous MEF2D with a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) increases sensitivity to etoposide-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death. Interestingly, substitution of endogenous MEF2D with an shRNA-resistant phosphomimetic MEF2D mutant protects cerebellar granule cells from cell death after DNA damage, whereas an shRNA-resistant nonphosphorylatable MEF2D mutant does not. In vivo, cerebella in Mef2d knock-out mice manifest increased susceptibility to DNA damage. Together, our results show that MEF2D is a substrate for phosphorylation by ATM, thus promoting survival in response to DNA damage. Moreover, dysregulation of the ATM-MEF2D pathway may contribute to neurodegeneration in AT.

  7. 2D-dynamic representation of DNA sequences as a graphical tool in bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielińska-Wa̧Ż, D.; Wa̧Ż, P.

    2016-10-01

    2D-dynamic representation of DNA sequences is briefly reviewed. Some new examples of 2D-dynamic graphs which are the graphical tool of the method are shown. Using the examples of the complete genome sequences of the Zika virus it is shown that the present method can be applied for the study of the evolution of viral genomes.

  8. Nanomanufacturing of 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Materials Using Self-Assembled DNA Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jungwook; Chen, Haorong; Li, Feiran; Yang, Lingming; Kim, Steve S; Naik, Rajesh R; Ye, Peide D; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2015-11-04

    2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are nanomanufactured using a generalized strategy with self-assembled DNA nanotubes. DNA nanotubes of various lengths serve as lithographic etch masks for the dry etching of TMDCs. The nanostructured TMDCs are studied by atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. This parallel approach can be used to manufacture 2D TMDC nanostructures of arbitrary geometries with molecular-scale precision.

  9. On the uniqueness of quantitative DNA difference descriptors in 2D graphical representation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, A.; Nandy, P.

    2003-01-01

    The rapid growth in additions to databases of DNA primary sequence data have led to searches for methods to numerically characterize these data and help in fast identification and retrieval of relevant sequences. The DNA descriptors derived from the 2D graphical representation technique have already been proposed to index chemical toxicity and single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) genes but the inherent degeneracies in this representation have given rise to doubts about their suitability. We prove in this paper that such degeneracies will exist only in very restricted cases and that the method can be relied upon to provide unique descriptors for, in particular, the SNP genes and several other classes of DNA sequences.

  10. Linkage analysis by two-dimensional DNA typing

    SciTech Connect

    Meerman, G.J. te; Meulen, M.A. van der ); Mullaart, E.; Morolli, B.; Uitterlinden, A.G. ); Daas, J.H.G. den ); Vijg, J. Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA )

    1993-12-01

    In two-dimensional (2-D) DNA typing, genomic DNA fragments are separated, first according to size by electrophoresis in a neutral polyacrylamide gel and second according to sequence by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, followed by hybridization analysis using micro- and minisatellite core probes. The 2-D DNA typing method generates a large amount of information on polymorphic loci per gel. Here, the authors demonstrate the potential usefulness of 2-D DNA typing in an empirical linkage study on the red factor in cattle, and the authors show an example of the 2-D DNA typing analysis of a human pedigree. The power efficiency of 2-D DNA typing in general is compared with that of single-locus typing by simulation. The results indicate that, although 2-D DNA typing is very efficient in generating data on polymorphic loci, its power to detect linkage is lower than single-locus typing, because it is not obvious whether a spot represents the presence of one or two alleles. It is possible to compensate for this lower informativeness by increasing the sample size. Genome scanning by 2-D DNA typing has the potential to be more efficient than current genotyping methods in scoring polymorphic loci. Hence, it could become a method of choice in mapping genetic traits in humans and animals. 13 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. A chimeric virus created by DNA shuffling of the capsid genes of different subtypes of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in the backbone of the non-pathogenic PCV1 induces protective immunity against the predominant PCV2b and the emerging PCV2d in pigs.

    PubMed

    Matzinger, Shannon R; Opriessnig, Tanja; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Catanzaro, Nicholas; Beach, Nathan M; Slade, David E; Nitzel, Gregory P; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-11-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary causative agent of porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD). Available commercial vaccines all target PCV2a subtype, although the circulating predominant subtype worldwide is PCV2b, and the emerging PCV2d subtype is also increasingly associated with PCVAD. Here we molecularly bred genetically-divergent strains representing PCV2a, PCV2b, PCV2c, PCV2d, and "divergent PCV2a" subtypes by DNA-shuffling of the capsid genes to produce a chimeric virus representing PCV2 global genetic diversity. When placed in the PCV2a backbone, one chimeric virus (PCV2-3cl14) induced higher neutralizing antibody titers against different PCV2 subtypes. Subsequently, a candidate vaccine (PCV1-3cl14) was produced by cloning the shuffled 3cl14 capsid into the backbone of the non-pathogenic PCV1. A vaccine efficacy study revealed that chimeric virus PCV1-3cl14 induces protective immunity against challenge with PCV2b or PCV2d in pigs. The chimeric PCV1-3cl14 virus is a strong candidate for a novel vaccine in pigs infected with variable PCV2 strains.

  12. Targeting multiple types of tumors using NKG2D-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Cook, W. James; Zhang, Tong; Sentman, Charles L.

    2014-11-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) hold great potential for cancer therapy. Actively targeting IONPs to tumor cells can further increase therapeutic efficacy and decrease off-target side effects. To target tumor cells, a natural killer (NK) cell activating receptor, NKG2D, was utilized to develop pan-tumor targeting IONPs. NKG2D ligands are expressed on many tumor types and its ligands are not found on most normal tissues under steady state conditions. The data showed that mouse and human fragment crystallizable (Fc)-fusion NKG2D (Fc-NKG2D) coated IONPs (NKG2D/NPs) can target multiple NKG2D ligand positive tumor types in vitro in a dose dependent manner by magnetic cell sorting. Tumor targeting effect was robust even under a very low tumor cell to normal cell ratio and targeting efficiency correlated with NKG2D ligand expression level on tumor cells. Furthermore, the magnetic separation platform utilized to test NKG2D/NP specificity has the potential to be developed into high throughput screening strategies to identify ideal fusion proteins or antibodies for targeting IONPs. In conclusion, NKG2D/NPs can be used to target multiple tumor types and magnetic separation platform can facilitate the proof-of-concept phase of tumor targeting IONP development.

  13. Probing the 2-D Kinematic Structure of Early-Type Galaxies Out to 3 Effective Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Robert N.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Spolaor, Max; Trevor Mendel, J.; Spitler, Lee

    2010-06-01

    We detail an innovative new technique for measuring the 2-D velocity moments (rotation velocity, velocity dispersion and Gauss-Hermite coefficients h3 and h4) using spectra from Keck DEIMOS multi-object spectroscopic observations. The data are used to reconstruct 2-D rotation velocity maps. Here we present data for one of five early-type galaxies whose kinematics we have measured out to ~3 effective radii (see [1]). From these data 2D kinematic maps are constructed. We show such analyses can provide significant insights into the global kinematic structure of galaxies, and, in some cases, challenge the accepted morphological classification. Our results are of particular importance to studies which attempt to classify galaxies by their kinematic structure within one effective radius, such as the recent definition of fast- and slow- rotator classes by the SAURON project.

  14. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: spectral types and luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkes, Simon; Ronen, Shai; Price, Ian; Lahav, Ofer; Colless, Matthew; Maddox, Steve; Deeley, Kathryn; Glazebrook, Karl; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Driver, Simon P.; Dalton, Gavin; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Kaiser, Nick; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Peacock, John; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    1999-09-01

    We describe the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and the current status of the observations. In this exploratory paper, we apply a principal component analysis to a preliminary sample of 5869 galaxy spectra and use the two most significant components to split the sample into five spectral classes. These classes are defined by considering visual classifications of a subset of the 2dF spectra, and also by comparison with high-quality spectra of local galaxies. We calculate a luminosity function for each of the different classes and find that later-type galaxies have a fainter characteristic magnitude, and a steeper faint-end slope. For the whole sample we find M*=-19.7 (for Ω=1, H_0=100kms^-1Mpc^-1), α=-1.3, φ*=0.017. For class 1 (`early-type') we find M*=-19.6, α=-0.7, while for class 5 (`late-type') we find M*=-19.0, α=-1.7. The derived 2dF luminosity functions agree well with other recent luminosity function estimates.

  15. Analysis of Telomere-Homologous DNA with Different Conformations Using 2D Agarose Electrophoresis and In-Gel Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zepeng; Hu, Qian; Zhao, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In mammalian cells, in addition to double-stranded telomeric DNA at chromosome ends, extra telomere-homologous DNA is present that adopts different conformations, including single-stranded G- or C-rich DNA, extrachromosomal circular DNA (T-circle), and telomeric complex (T-complex) with an unidentified structure. The formation of such telomere-homologous DNA is closely related to telomeric DNA metabolism and chromosome end protection by telomeres. Conventional agarose gel electrophoresis is unable to separate DNA based on conformation. Here, we introduce the method of two-dimensional (2D) agarose electrophoresis in combination with in-gel native/denatured hybridization to determine different conformations formed by telomere-homologous DNA.

  16. DNA typing by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis is becoming more and more important in nucleic acid analysis including DNA sequencing, typing and disease gene measurements. This work summarized the background of DNA typing. The recent development of capillary electrophoresis was also discussed. The second part of the thesis showed the principle of DNA typing based on using the allelic ladder as the absolute standard ladder in capillary electrophoresis system. Future work will be focused on demonstrating DNA typing on multiplex loci and examples of disease diagnosis in the on-line format of PCR-CE. Also capillary array electrophoresis system should allow high throughput, fast speed DNA typing. Only the introduction and conclusions for this report are available here. A reprint was removed for separate processing.

  17. Hysteretic Spin Crossover in Two-Dimensional (2D) Hofmann-Type Coordination Polymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Lu; Su, Yu-Jun; Chen, Yan-Cong; Tucek, Jiri; Zboril, Radek; Ni, Zhao-Ping; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2015-09-08

    Three new two-dimensional (2D) Hofmann-type coordination polymers with general formula [Fe(3-NH2py)2M(CN)4] (3-NH2py = 3-aminopyridine, M = Ni (1), Pd (2), Pt (3)) have been synthesized. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show that they exhibited cooperative spin crossover (SCO) with remarkable hysteretic behaviors. Their hysteresis widths are 25, 37, and 30 K for 1-3, respectively. The single-crystal structure of 1 suggest that the pseudo-octahedral Fe sites are equatorially bridged by [M(CN)4](2-) to form 2D grids and axially coordinated by 3-NH2py ligands. The intermolecular interactions between layers (the offset face-to-face π···π interactions, hydrogen bonds, and weak N(amino)···Ni(II) contacts) together with the covalent bonds bridged by [M(CN)4](2-) units are responsible to the significant cooperativity.

  18. In situ fluid typing and quantification with 1D and 2D NMR logging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boqin

    2007-05-01

    In situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fluid typing has recently gained momentum due to data acquisition and inversion algorithm enhancement of NMR logging tools. T(2) distributions derived from NMR logging contain information on bulk fluids and pore size distributions. However, the accuracy of fluid typing is greatly overshadowed by the overlap between T(2) peaks arising from different fluids with similar apparent T(2) relaxation times. Nevertheless, the shapes of T(2) distributions from different fluid components are often different and can be predetermined. Inversion with predetermined T(2) distributions allows us to perform fluid component decomposition to yield individual fluid volume ratios. Another effective method for in situ fluid typing is two-dimensional (2D) NMR logging, which results in proton population distribution as a function of T(2) relaxation time and fluid diffusion coefficient (or T(1) relaxation time). Since diffusion coefficients (or T(1) relaxation time) for different fluid components can be very different, it is relatively easy to separate oil (especially heavy oil) from water signal in a 2D NMR map and to perform accurate fluid typing. Combining NMR logging with resistivity and/or neutron/density logs provides a third method for in situ fluid typing. We shall describe these techniques with field examples.

  19. Host determinants of DNA alkylation and DNA repair activity in human colorectal tissue: O(6)-methylguanine levels are associated with GSTT1 genotype and O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity with CYP2D6 genotype.

    PubMed

    Povey, A C; Hall, C N; Badawi, A F; Cooper, D P; Guppy, M J; Jackson, P E; O'Connor, P J; Margison, G P

    2001-08-22

    There is increasing evidence that alkylating agent exposure may increase large bowel cancer risk and factors which either alter such exposure or its effects may modify risk. Hence, in a cross-sectional study of 78 patients with colorectal disease, we have examined whether (i) metabolic genotypes (GSTT1, GSTM1, CYP2D6, CYP2E1) are associated with O(6)-methyldeoxyguanosine (O(6)-MedG) levels, O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity or K-ras mutations, and (ii) there was an association between ATase activity and O(6)-MedG levels. Patients with colon tumours and who were homozygous GSTT1(*)2 genotype carriers were more likely than patients who expressed GSTT1 to have their DNA alkylated (83 versus 32%, P=0.03) and to have higher O(6)-MedG levels (0.178+/-0.374 versus 0.016+/-0.023 micromol O(6)-MedG/mol dG, P=0.04) in normal, but not tumour, DNA. No such association was observed between the GSTT1 genotype and the frequency of DNA alkylation or O(6)-MedG levels in patients with benign colon disease or rectal tumours. Patients with colon tumours or benign colon disease who were CYP2D6-poor metabolisers had higher ATase activity in normal tissue than patients who were CYP2D6 extensive metabolisers or CYP2D6 heterozygotes. Patients with the CYP2E1 Dra cd genotype were less likely to have a K-ras mutation: of 55 patients with the wild-type CYP2E1 genotype (dd), 23 had K-ras mutations, whereas none of the 7 individuals with cd genotype had a K-ras mutation (P=0.04). No other associations were observed between GSTT1, GSTM1, CYP2D6 and CYP2E1 Pst genotypes and adduct levels, ATase activity or mutational status. O(6)-MedG levels were not associated with ATase activity in either normal or tumour tissue. However, in 15 patients for whom both normal and tumour DNA contained detectable O(6)-MedG levels, there was a strong positive association between the normal DNA/tumour DNA adduct ratio and the normal tissue/tumour tissue ATase ratio (r(2)=0.66, P=0.001). These

  20. Lipophilic chemical exposure as a cause of type 2 diabetes (T2D).

    PubMed

    Zeliger, Harold I

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide in pandemic-like numbers. It is considered, at least in part, to be an environmental illness. Recent research has shown that diabetes can be caused by exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs), exudates from common plastics, air pollution, primary and secondary tobacco smoke, and some pharmaceuticals. These chemicals vary widely in structure, chemical properties, and composition and are not currently believed to induce a similar effect. A unifying explanation for the induction of T2D by this diversified group of chemicals is proposed here. These toxicants have one thing in common. All are lipophilic species that permeate lipophilic body membranes, thereby promoting the absorption of toxic hydrophilic species that would otherwise not penetrate lipophilic membranes. It is further proposed that exposure to the lipophilic and hydrophilic species need not occur simultaneously but can occur sequentially, with the lipophile absorbed first and retained in body serum, followed by a subsequent exposure to the hydrophile. The lipophilic chemical can be one of the POPs (including dioxins, furans, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or organochlorine pesticides); a more rapidly metabolized or eliminated species including plastic exudates like phthalate esters and bisphenol A; air pollutants and tobacco smoke components including aliphatic, aromatic, or polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons; or pharmaceuticals like some statins and second-generation antipsychotic drugs. This hypothesis suggests that the T2D pandemic as well as the rapid increase of other environmental disease prevalence is, at least in part, due to sequential exposure to levels of lipophilic and hydrophilic environmental pollutants that are much lower than those currently believed to be toxic. As a consequence of this hypothesis, the allowable levels of exposure to these pollutants should be

  1. DUC-Curve, a highly compact 2D graphical representation of DNA sequences and its application in sequence alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yushuang; Liu, Qian; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2016-08-01

    A highly compact and simple 2D graphical representation of DNA sequences, named DUC-Curve, is constructed through mapping four nucleotides to a unit circle with a cyclic order. DUC-Curve could directly detect nucleotide, di-nucleotide compositions and microsatellite structure from DNA sequences. Moreover, it also could be used for DNA sequence alignment. Taking geometric center vectors of DUC-Curves as sequence descriptor, we perform similarity analysis on the first exons of β-globin genes of 11 species, oncogene TP53 of 27 species and twenty-four Influenza A viruses, respectively. The obtained reasonable results illustrate that the proposed method is very effective in sequence comparison problems, and will at least play a complementary role in classification and clustering problems.

  2. A Specification for a Godunov-type Eulerian 2-D Hydrocode, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Nystrom, William D; Robey, Jonathan M

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this code specification is to describe an algorithm for solving the Euler equations of hydrodynamics in a 2D rectangular region in sufficient detail to allow a software developer to produce an implementation on their target platform using their programming language of choice without requiring detailed knowledge and experience in the field of computational fluid dynamics. It should be possible for a software developer who is proficient in the programming language of choice and is knowledgable of the target hardware to produce an efficient implementation of this specification if they also possess a thorough working knowledge of parallel programming and have some experience in scientific programming using fields and meshes. On modern architectures, it will be important to focus on issues related to the exploitation of the fine grain parallelism and data locality present in this algorithm. This specification aims to make that task easier by presenting the essential details of the algorithm in a systematic and language neutral manner while also avoiding the inclusion of implementation details that would likely be specific to a particular type of programming paradigm or platform architecture.

  3. Diffusion of latex and DNA chains in 2D confined media.

    PubMed

    Mathé, Jérôme; Di Meglio, Jean-Marc; Tinland, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    We report a study on the dynamics of latex polystyrene beads and of DNA molecules confined in two dimensions, using fluorescence video-microscopy. We particularly focus on the character of the confined objects (hard or soft) and on the nature of the confinement: liquid (in a soap film) or solid (between two glass plates). For weak confinements, whatever the nature of confinement, we observe that DNA molecules and latex beads behave very similarly: the tighter the confinement, the slower the diffusion with a good agreement with theory. For strong confinements between solid walls (thickness of confinement smaller than the bulk radius of gyration), DNA coils are not immobilized and still diffuse. We show in this case that the conformation of DNA chains is in good agreement with the predictions of De Gennes and Brochard (radius approximately e (-1/4), with e the confinement gap); on the other hand, we cannot really check the theoretical predictions for the diffusion coefficient. Interestingly, strong confinement of latex beads in a soap film leads to a anomalous slow diffusion, certainly associated with an additional viscous drag generated by the interfaces.

  4. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Michael T; Landon, Preston B; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-06-28

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine.

  5. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Michael T.; Landon, Preston B.; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H.; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine. PMID:27298347

  6. Discovery of 4,5,6,7-Tetrahydrobenzo[1,2-d]thiazoles as Novel DNA Gyrase Inhibitors Targeting the ATP-Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Tomašič, Tihomir; Katsamakas, Sotirios; Hodnik, Žiga; Ilaš, Janez; Brvar, Matjaž; Solmajer, Tom; Montalvão, Sofia; Tammela, Päivi; Banjanac, Mihailo; Ergović, Gabrijela; Anderluh, Marko; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija; Kikelj, Danijel

    2015-07-23

    Bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV are essential enzymes that control the topological state of DNA during replication and validated antibacterial drug targets. Starting from a library of marine alkaloid oroidin analogues, we identified low micromolar inhibitors of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase based on the 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinazoline and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[1,2-d]thiazole scaffolds. Structure-based optimization of the initial hits resulted in low nanomolar E. coli DNA gyrase inhibitors, some of which exhibited micromolar inhibition of E. coli topoisomerase IV and of Staphylococcus aureus homologues. Some of the compounds possessed modest antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacterial strains, while their evaluation against wild-type, impA and ΔtolC E. coli strains suggests that they are efflux pump substrates and/or do not possess the physicochemical properties necessary for cell wall penetration. Our study provides a rationale for optimization of this class of compounds toward balanced dual DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV inhibitors with antibacterial activity.

  7. Stimulus control by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine in wild-type and CYP2D6-humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Winter, J C; Amorosi, D J; Rice, Kenner C; Cheng, Kejun; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2011-09-01

    In previous studies we have observed that, in comparison with wild type mice, Tg-CYP2D6 mice have increased serum levels of bufotenine [5-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine] following the administration of 5-MeO-DMT. Furthermore, following the injection of 5-MeO-DMT, harmaline was observed to increase serum levels of bufotenine and 5-MeO-DMT in both wild-type and Tg-CYP2D6 mice. In the present investigation, 5-MeO-DMT-induced stimulus control was established in wild-type and Tg-CYP2D6 mice. The two groups did not differ in their rate of acquisition of stimulus control. When tested with bufotenine, no 5-MeO-DMT-appropriate responding was observed. In contrast, the more lipid soluble analog of bufotenine, acetylbufotenine, was followed by an intermediate level of responding. The combination of harmaline with 5-MeO-DMT yielded a statistically significant increase in 5-MeO-DMT-appropriate responding in Tg-CYP2D6 mice; a comparable increase occurred in wild-type mice. In addition, it was noted that harmaline alone was followed by a significant degree of 5-MeO-DMT-appropriate responding in Tg-CYP2D6 mice. It is concluded that wild-type and Tg-CYPD2D6 mice do not differ in terms of acquisition of stimulus control by 5-MeO-DMT or in their response to bufotenine and acetylbufotenine. In both groups of mice, harmaline was found to enhance the stimulus effects of 5-MeO-DMT.

  8. Genomic Data and Disease Forecasting: Application to Type 2 Diabetes (T2D)

    PubMed Central

    Sirovich, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    A general approach is presented for the extraction of a classifier of disease risk that is latent in large scale disease/control databases. Novel features are the following: (1) a data reorganization into a regularized standard form that emphasizes individual alleles instead of the single nucleotide polymorphism (Snp) allele pair to which they belong; (2) from this a procedure that significantly enhances the discovery of high value genomic loci; (3) an investigative analysis based on the hypothesis that disease represents a very small signal (small signal-to-noise) that is latent in the data. The resulting analyses applied to the FUSION T2D database leads to the polling of thousands of genomic loci to classify disease. This large genomic kernel of loci is shared by non-diabetics at nearly the same high level; but a small well defined separation exists and it is speculated that this might be due to unconventional disease mechanisms. Another analysis demonstrates that the FUSION database size limits its disease predictability, and only one third of the resulting classifier loci are estimated to relate to T2D. The remainder is associated with hidden features that might contrast the disease and control populations and that more data would eliminate. PMID:24465649

  9. Alternating zinc fingers in the human male associated protein ZFY: 2D NMR structure of an even finger and implications for jumping-linker DNA recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Kochoyan, M.; Havel, T.F.; Dahl, C.E. ); Nguyen, D.T.; Keutmann, H.T. ); Weiss, M.A. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston )

    1991-04-09

    ZFY, a sex-related Zn-finger protein encoded by the human Y chromosome, is distinguished from the general class of Zn-finger proteins by the presence of a two-finger repeat. Whereas odd-numbered domains and linkers fit a general consensus, even-numbered domains and linkers exhibit systematic differences. Because this alternation may have fundamental implications for the mechanism of protein-DNA recognition, the authors have undertaken biochemical and structural studies of fragments of ZFY. They describe here the solution structure of a representative nonconsensus (even-numbered) Zn finger based on 2D NMR studies of a 30-residue peptide. Structural modeling by distance geometry and simulated annealing (DG/SA) demonstrates that this peptide folds as a miniglobular domain containing a C-terminal {beta}-hairpin and N-terminal {alpha}-helix ({beta}{beta}{alpha} motif). These features are similar to (but not identical with) those previously described in consensus-type Zn fingers (derived from ADR1 and Xfin); the similarities suggest that even and odd ZFY domains bind DNA by a common mechanism. A model of the protein-DNA complex (designated the jumping-linker model) is presented and discussed in terms of the ZFY two-finger repeat. In this model every other linker is proposed to cross the minor groove by means of a putative finger/linker submotif HX{sub 4}HX{sub 3}-hydrophobic residue-X{sub 3}.

  10. DNA methylation in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Vanessa Derenji Ferreira; Pulkkinen, Leena; Lalli, Marianne; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Uusitupa, Matti

    2014-05-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms related to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and other degenerative diseases at a molecular level, a better understanding of the changes in the chromatin structure and the corresponding functional changes in molecular pathways is still needed. For example, persons with low birth weight are at a high risk for development of T2D later in life, suggesting that the intrauterine environment contributes to the disease. One of the hypotheses is that epigenetic regulation, including changes in DNA methylation leading to modifications in chromatin structure, are behind metabolic alterations, e.g. leading to the phenomenon termed metabolic memory. Altered DNA methylation has been shown to affect healthy aging and also to promote age-related health problems. There is suggestive evidence that lifestyle changes including weight loss can have an impact on DNA methylation and consequently gene expression. In this review we provide an overview of human studies investigating DNA methylation in obesity and T2D and associated risk factors behind these diseases.

  11. Melting in 2D Lennard-Jones Systems: What Type of Phase Transition?

    SciTech Connect

    Patashinski, Alexander Z.; Orlik, Rafal; Mitus, Antonio C.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2010-12-09

    A typical configuration of an equilibrium 2D system of 2500 Lennard-Jones particles at melting is found to be a mosaic of crystallites and amorphous clusters. This mosaic significantly changed at times around the period τ of local vibrations, while most particles retain their nearest neighbors for times much longer than τ. In a system of 2500 particles, we found no phase separation for length scales larger than that of a crystallite. With decreasing density, the number of small amorphous clusters increased, and proliferation and percolation of amorphous matter separated the crystalline-ordered parts so that correlations between local order orientations of remote crystallites disappeared. We suggest that the mosaic is a manifestation of diminished stability of the crystalline structure resulting from competition between attraction and repulsion forces.

  12. Synaptic Deficits at Neuromuscular Junctions in Two Mouse Models of Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 2d

    PubMed Central

    Spaulding, Emily L.; Sleigh, James N.; Morelli, Kathryn H.; Pinter, Martin J.; Burgess, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 2D (CMT2D), caused by dominant mutations in Glycl tRNA synthetase (GARS), present with progressive weakness, consistently in the hands, but often in the feet also. Electromyography shows denervation, and patients often report that early symptoms include cramps brought on by cold or exertion. Based on reported clinical observations, and studies of mouse models of CMT2D, we sought to determine whether weakened synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is an aspect of CMT2D. Quantal analysis of NMJs in two different mouse models of CMT2D (GarsP278KY, GarsC201R), found synaptic deficits that correlated with disease severity and progressed with age. Results of voltage-clamp studies revealed presynaptic defects characterized by: (1) decreased frequency of spontaneous release without any change in quantal amplitude (miniature endplate current), (2) reduced amplitude of evoked release (endplate current) and quantal content, (3) age-dependent changes in the extent of depression in response to repetitive stimulation, and (4) release failures at some NMJs with high-frequency, long-duration stimulation. Drugs that modify synaptic efficacy were tested to see whether neuromuscular performance improved. The presynaptic action of 3,4 diaminopyridine was not beneficial, whereas postsynaptic-acting physostigmine did improve performance. Smaller mutant NMJs with correspondingly fewer vesicles and partial denervation that eliminates some release sites also contribute to the reduction of release at a proportion of mutant NMJs. Together, these voltage-clamp data suggest that a number of release processes, while essentially intact, likely operate suboptimally at most NMJs of CMT2D mice. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We have uncovered a previously unrecognized aspect of axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease in mouse models of CMT2D. Synaptic dysfunction contributes to impaired neuromuscular performance and disease progression. This

  13. DNA demethylation and histone H3K9 acetylation determine the active transcription of the NKG2D gene in human CD8+ T and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Alba; Baragaño Raneros, Aroa; Carvajal Palao, Reyes; Sanz, Ana B.; Ortiz, Alberto; Ortega, Francisco; Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The human activating receptor NKG2D is mainly expressed by NK, NKT, γδ T and CD8+ T cells and, under certain conditions, by CD4+ T cells. This receptor recognizes a diverse family of ligands (MICA, MICB and ULBPs 1–6) leading to the activation of effector cells and triggering the lysis of target cells. The NKG2D receptor-ligand system plays an important role in the immune response to infections, tumors, transplanted graft and autoantigens. Elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of NKG2D is therefore essential for therapeutic purposes. In this study, we speculate whether epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone acetylation, participate in NKG2D gene regulation in T lymphocytes and NK cells. DNA methylation in the NKG2D gene was observed in CD4+ T lymphocytes and T cell lines (Jurkat and HUT78), while this gene was unmethylated in NKG2D-positive cells (CD8+ T lymphocytes, NK cells and NKL cell line) and associated with high levels of histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9Ac). Treatment with the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor curcumin reduces H3K9Ac levels in the NKG2D gene, downregulates NKG2D transcription and leads to a marked reduction in the lytic capacity of NKG2D-mediated NKL cells. These findings suggest that differential NKG2D expression in the different cell subsets is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms and that its modulation by epigenetic treatments might provide a new strategy for treating several pathologies. PMID:23235109

  14. Spectroscopic-tomography of biological membrane with high-spatial resolution by the imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Asuka; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Qi, Wei; Takuma, Takashi; Ishimaru, Ichirou

    2011-07-01

    We proposed the imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy that is the phase-shift interferometry between the objective lights. The proposed method can measure the 2D spectral image at the limited depth. Because of the imaging optical system, the 2D spectral images can be measured in high spatial resolution. And in the depth direction, we can get the spectral distribution only in the focal plane. In this report, we mention about the principle of the proposed wide field imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy. And, we obtained the spectroscopic tomography of biological tissue of mouse's ear. In the visible region, we confirmed the difference of spectral characteristics between blood vessel region and other region. In the near infrared region (λ=900nm~1700nm), we can obtain the high-contrast blood vessel image of mouse's ear in the deeper part by InGaAs camera. Furthermore, in the middle infrared region(λ=8μ~14μm), we have successfully measured the radiation spectroscopic-imaging with wild field of view by the infrared module, such as the house plants. Additionally, we propose correction geometrical model that can convert the mechanical phase-shift value into the substantial phase difference in each oblique optical axes. We successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed correction geometrical model and can reduce the spectral error into the error range into +/-3nm using the He-Ne laser whose wavelength 632.8nm.

  15. Types and Consequences of DNA Damage

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review provides a concise overview of the types of DNA damage and the molecular mechanisms by which a cell senses DNA damage, repairs the damage, converts the damage into a mutation, or dies as a consequence of unrepaired DNA damage. Such information is important in consid...

  16. On the assimilation of SWOT type data into 2D shallow-water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frédéric, Couderc; Denis, Dartus; Pierre-André, Garambois; Ronan, Madec; Jérôme, Monnier; Jean-Paul, Villa

    2013-04-01

    In river hydraulics, assimilation of water level measurements at gauging stations is well controlled, while assimilation of images is still delicate. In the present talk, we address the richness of satellite mapped information to constrain a 2D shallow-water model, but also related difficulties. 2D shallow models may be necessary for small scale modelling in particular for low-water and flood plain flows. Since in both cases, the dynamics of the wet-dry front is essential, one has to elaborate robust and accurate solvers. In this contribution we introduce robust second order, stable finite volume scheme [CoMaMoViDaLa]. Comparisons of real like tests cases with more classical solvers highlight the importance of an accurate flood plain modelling. A preliminary inverse study is presented in a flood plain flow case, [LaMo] [HoLaMoPu]. As a first step, a 0th order data processing model improves observation operator and produces more reliable water level derived from rough measurements [PuRa]. Then, both model and flow behaviours can be better understood thanks to variational sensitivities based on a gradient computation and adjoint equations. It can reveal several difficulties that a model designer has to tackle. Next, a 4D-Var data assimilation algorithm used with spatialized data leads to improved model calibration and potentially leads to identify river discharges. All the algorithms are implemented into DassFlow software (Fortran, MPI, adjoint) [Da]. All these results and experiments (accurate wet-dry front dynamics, sensitivities analysis, identification of discharges and calibration of model) are currently performed in view to use data from the future SWOT mission. [CoMaMoViDaLa] F. Couderc, R. Madec, J. Monnier, J.-P. Vila, D. Dartus, K. Larnier. "Sensitivity analysis and variational data assimilation for geophysical shallow water flows". Submitted. [Da] DassFlow - Data Assimilation for Free Surface Flows. Computational software http

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF A 2D-SICf/SIC COMPOSITE MADE BY ICVI WITH HI-NICALON (Trademark) TYPE S FABRIC

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Jones, Russell H.

    2003-09-03

    In this report, the mechanical and thermal properties of a 2D-SiCf/SiC composite made by the CVI-process with the Hi-Nicalon (Trademark) type S fabric are assessed in detail with respect to meeting fusion design requirements. Minimum strength and stiffness structural requirements likely can be met by CVI-processed SiCf/SiC composites when made with advanced SiC fibers. Unfortunately, it appears unlikely that the minimum thermal conduction goals can be met for CVI-processed material. Even for an optimized 2D SiCf/SiC system, the margin of improvement required is just too large for only minor improvements potentially possible through CVI-processing upgrades or other structural or architectural methods.

  18. In silico study on the inhibitory interaction of drugs with wild-type CYP2D6.1 and the natural variant CYP2D6.17.

    PubMed

    Handa, Koichi; Nakagome, Izumi; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Gouda, Hiroaki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    The natural variant of the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2D6.1, CYP2D6.17, is most common in African populations, has three amino acid substitutions (T107I, R296C, and S486T) compared to the wild-type, and is known to have a different ligand preference from CYP2D6.1. It is becoming increasingly important to understand differences in the metabolism of medicines in different ethnic groups in order to assess the relevance of clinical data from different countries. This study investigated differences in the inhibition profiles of drugs for CYP2D6 with respect to gene polymorphisms. Firstly, we used computer docking with six drugs to several CYP2D6.1 structures, sampled from the trajectory of MD simulations, and calculated MM-GB/SA scores representing binding free energies. We then used regression analysis to predict the potency with which drugs inhibited CYP2D6.1 based on MM-GB/SA scores. The pKi-values obtained were in good agreement with experimental values measured for the six drugs (r(2) = 0.81). We carried out the same analysis for CYP2D6.17 and the pKi-values calculated were also in good agreement with experimental values (r(2) = 0.92). Finally, we were able to successfully explain the different abilities of CYP2D6.1 and CYP2D6.17 to metabolize drugs in different ethnic groups with reference to their 3D-structures.

  19. [Sonographic diagnosis of a case of type 1 achondrogenesis in the 2d trimester].

    PubMed

    Schramm, T; Nerlich, A

    1989-10-01

    The authors report on a prenatal ultrasonic diagnosis of lethal osteochondrodysplasia achondrogenesis type I (Parenti-Fraccaro) in the 17th week of pregnancy. The prenatal findings were confirmed by necropsy after termination of the pregnancy. The possibility to recognize lethal skeletal disorders early in pregnancy is discussed as well as the patho-anatomical criteria and possible patho-physiological mechanisms of achondrogenesis.

  20. A Novel Numerical Algorithm of Numerov Type for 2D Quasi-linear Elliptic Boundary Value Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, R. K.; Kumar, Ravindra

    2014-11-01

    In this article, using three function evaluations, we discuss a nine-point compact scheme of O(Δ y2 + Δ x4) based on Numerov-type discretization for the solution of 2D quasi-linear elliptic equations with given Dirichlet boundary conditions, where Δy > 0 and Δx > 0 are grid sizes in y- and x-directions, respectively. Iterative methods for diffusion-convection equation are discussed in detail. We use block iterative methods to solve the system of algebraic linear and nonlinear difference equations. Comparative results of some physical problems are given to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed method.

  1. Warm ionized gas in CALIFA early-type galaxies. 2D emission-line patterns and kinematics for 32 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.; Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Lehnert, M. D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Ziegler, B.; Breda, I.; Dos Reis, S. N.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Bomans, D. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; García-Benito, R.; Márquez, I.; Del Olmo, A.; Masegosa, J.; Mollá, M.; Marino, R. A.; González Delgado, R. M.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; CALIFA Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Context. The morphological, spectroscopic, and kinematical properties of the warm interstellar medium (wim) in early-type galaxies (ETGs) hold key observational constraints to nuclear activity and the buildup history of these massive, quiescent systems. High-quality integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data with a wide spectral and spatial coverage, such as those from the CALIFA survey, offer an unprecedented opportunity for advancing our understanding of the wim in ETGs. Aims: This article centers on a 2D investigation of the wim component in 32 nearby (≲150 Mpc) ETGs from CALIFA, complementing a previous 1D analysis of the same sample. Methods: The analysis presented here includes Hα intensity and equivalent width (EW) maps and radial profiles, diagnostic emission-line ratios, and ionized-gas and stellar kinematics. It is supplemented by τ-ratio maps, which are a more efficient means to quantify the role of photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component than alternative mechanisms (e.g., AGN, low-level star formation). Results: Confirming and strengthening our previous conclusions, we find that ETGs span a broad continuous sequence in the properties of their wim, exemplified by two characteristic classes. The first (type i) comprises systems with a nearly constant EW(Hα) in their extranuclear component, which quantitatively agrees with (but is no proof of) the hypothesis that photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component is the main driver of extended wim emission. The second class (type ii) stands for virtually wim-evacuated ETGs with a very low (≤0.5 Å), outwardly increasing EW(Hα). These two classes appear indistinguishable from one another by their LINER-specific emission-line ratios in their extranuclear component. Here we extend the tentative classification we proposed previously by the type i+, which is assigned to a subset of type i ETGs exhibiting ongoing low-level star-forming activity in their periphery. This finding along with faint

  2. The Type 2 dUTPase of Bacteriophage ϕNM1 Initiates Mobilization of Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Pathogenicity Island 1.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rosanne L L; Dokland, Terje

    2016-01-16

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are genetic elements that are mobilized by specific helper phages. The initial step in mobilization is the derepression of the SaPI by the interaction of a phage protein with the SaPI master repressor Stl. Stl proteins are highly divergent between different SaPIs and respond to different phage-encoded derepressors. One such SaPI, SaPIbov1, is derepressed by the dUTPase (Dut) of bacteriophage 80α (Dut80α) and its phage ϕ11 homolog, Dut11. We previously showed that SaPIbov1 could also be mobilized by phage ϕNM1, even though its dut gene is not homologous with that of 80α. Here, we show that ϕNM1 dut encodes a type 2 dUTPase (DutNM1), which has an α-helical structure that is distinct from the type 1 trimeric, β-sheet structure of Dut80α. Deletion of dutNM1 abolishes the ability of ϕNM1 to mobilize SaPIbov1. Like Dut80α, DutNM1 forms a direct interaction with SaPIbov1 Stl both in vivo and in vitro, leading to inhibition of the dUTPase activity and Stl release from its target DNA. This work provides novel insights into the diverse mechanisms of genetic mobilization in S. aureus.

  3. Decreased percentage of NKG2D+NK cells in patients with incident onset of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yupan; Wang, Haifeng; Lou, Xiaoqian; Qu, Xiaozhang; Gao, Lichao; Liu, Xiaolei; Li, Man; Guo, Hui; Jiang, Yanfang

    2017-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is characterized by absolute insulin deficiency owing to autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β cells. A significant decrease in natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood has been observed in patients with untreated T1DM. In the present study, we aimed to explore the role of NK cells and their subsets in young T1DM patients. A total of 30 children and adolescents with untreated T1DM and 27 healthy controls (HC) were recruited in this study. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that the percentage of peripheral blood CD3-CD56+ NK cells and NK cells subsets (CD56bright, CD56dim and CD56neg), were significantly decreased in the T1DM patients compared to healthy controls. In addition, the percentage of inducible CD107a+ and IFN-γ-secreting NK cells was significantly decreased compared to HC. Interestingly, the percentage of NKG2D+ NK cells negatively correlated with the level of serum TCHOL and TG in T1DM patients. Our data indicate that decreased number and impaired function of NK cells may have a role in the pathogenesis of T1DM.

  4. Pendulum-type optical DNA nanodevice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zaisheng; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Songbai; Zhang, Xiaobing; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2010-04-07

    A pendulum-type DNA nanoswitch, which can perform a reversible on/off molecular motion at an about 9.1-nm scale is developed as a proof-of-concept, and the sequence-specific recognition and quantification of target oligonucleotides are demonstrated utilizing this screening scheme.

  5. Separating stratiform and convective rain types based on the drop size distribution characteristics using 2D video disdrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurai, M.; Gatlin, P. N.; Bringi, V. N.

    2016-03-01

    A technique for separating stratiform and convective rain types using the characteristics of two of the main drop size distribution (DSD) parameters is presented. The method was originally developed based on observations from dual-frequency profiler and dual-polarization radar observations in Darwin, Australia. In this paper, we will present the testing of the method using data from 2D video disdrometers (2DVD) from two very different locations, namely, Ontario, Canada, and Huntsville, Alabama, USA. One-minute DSDs from 2DVD are used as input to a gamma-fitting procedure and our separation technique uses the fitted values of log10(NW) and D0 (where NW is the scaling parameter and D0 is the median volume diameter) and an "index" to quantify where the points lie in the log10(NW) versus D0 domain. For the Ontario location, the output of the classification is compared with simultaneous observations from a collocated, vertically pointing, X-band Doppler radar. A "bright-band" detection algorithm is used to classify each height profile as either stratiform or convective, depending on whether or not a clearly defined melting layer is present at an expected height. If present, the maximum reflectivity within the melting layer and the corresponding height are determined. Similar testing is carried out for two events in Huntsville and compared with observations from a collocated UHF profiler (with Doppler capability). Additional case studies are required, but these results indicate our separation technique seems to be applicable to many different locations and climatologies based on previously published data.

  6. Metabolite profile of a mouse model of Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 2D neuropathy: implications for disease mechanisms and interventions

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Preeti; Beebe, Kirk; Morelli, Kathryn H.; Currie, Meagan E.; Norberg, Sara N.; Evsikov, Alexei V.; Miers, Kathy E.; Seburn, Kevin L.; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Kremensky, Ivo; Jordanova, Albena; Bult, Carol J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease encompasses a genetically heterogeneous class of heritable polyneuropathies that result in axonal degeneration in the peripheral nervous system. Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 2D neuropathy (CMT2D) is caused by dominant mutations in glycyl tRNA synthetase (GARS). Mutations in the mouse Gars gene result in a genetically and phenotypically valid animal model of CMT2D. How mutations in GARS lead to peripheral neuropathy remains controversial. To identify putative disease mechanisms, we compared metabolites isolated from the spinal cord of Gars mutant mice and their littermate controls. A profile of altered metabolites that distinguish the affected and unaffected tissue was determined. Ascorbic acid was decreased fourfold in the spinal cord of CMT2D mice, but was not altered in serum. Carnitine and its derivatives were also significantly reduced in spinal cord tissue of mutant mice, whereas glycine was elevated. Dietary supplementation with acetyl-L-carnitine improved gross motor performance of CMT2D mice, but neither acetyl-L-carnitine nor glycine supplementation altered the parameters directly assessing neuropathy. Other metabolite changes suggestive of liver and kidney dysfunction in the CMT2D mice were validated using clinical blood chemistry. These effects were not secondary to the neuromuscular phenotype, as determined by comparison with another, genetically unrelated mouse strain with similar neuromuscular dysfunction. However, these changes do not seem to be causative or consistent metabolites of CMT2D, because they were not observed in a second mouse Gars allele or in serum samples from CMT2D patients. Therefore, the metabolite ‘fingerprint’ we have identified for CMT2D improves our understanding of cellular biochemical changes associated with GARS mutations, but identification of efficacious treatment strategies and elucidation of the disease mechanism will require additional studies. PMID:27288508

  7. Systematic E2 screening reveals a UBE2D-RNF138-CtIP axis promoting DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Sczaniecka-Clift, Matylda; Coates, Julia; Jhujh, Satpal; Demir, Mukerrem; Cornwell, Matthew; Beli, Petra; Jackson, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is crucial for proper cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). If unrepaired, these highly cytotoxic lesions cause genome instability, tumourigenesis, neurodegeneration or premature ageing. Here, we conduct a comprehensive, multilayered screen to systematically profile all human ubiquitin E2-enzymes for impacts on cellular DSB responses. Applying a widely applicable approach, we use an exemplary E2 family, UBE2Ds, to identify ubiquitylation-cascade components downstream of E2s. Thus, we uncover the nuclear E3-ligase RNF138 as a key homologous recombination (HR)-promoting factor that functions with UBE2Ds in cells. Mechanistically, UBE2Ds and RNF138 accumulate at DNA-damage sites and act at early resection stages by promoting CtIP ubiquitylation and accrual. This work supplies insights into regulation of DSB repair by HR. Moreover, it provides a rich information resource on E2s that can be exploited by follow-on studies. PMID:26502057

  8. 1,25 (OH)2D3 enhances PTH-induced Ca2+ transients in preosteoblasts by activating L-type Ca2+ channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, W.; Duncan, R. L.; Karin, N. J.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    We previously demonstrated electrophysiologically that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] shifts the activation threshold of L-type Ca2+ channels in osteoblasts toward the resting potential and prolongs mean open time. Presently, we used single-cell Ca2+ imaging to study the combined effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 and parathyroid hormone (PTH) during generation of Ca2+ transients in fura 2-loaded MC3T3-E1 cells. Pretreatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations, which alone did not produce Ca2+ transients, consistently enhanced Ca2+ responses to PTH. Enhancement was dose dependent over the range of 1 to 10 nM and was blocked by pretreatment with 5 microM nitrendipine during pretreatment. A 1,25(OH)2D3 analog that activates L-type channels and shifts their activation threshold also enhanced PTH responses. In contrast, an analog devoid of membrane Ca2+ effects did not enhance PTH-induced Ca2+ transients. The PTH-induced Ca2+ transient involved activation of a dihydropyridine-insensitive cation channel that was inhibited by Gd3+. Together, these data suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 increases osteoblast responsiveness to PTH through rapid modification of L-type Ca2+ channel gating properties, whose activation enhances Ca2+ entry through other channels such as the PTH-responsive, Gd(3+)-sensitive cation channel.

  9. A novel sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor for PSA detection based on PtCu bimetallic hybrid (2D/2D) rGO/g-C3N4.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinhui; Li, Yueyun; Li, Mingdang; Li, Faying; Han, Jian; Dong, Yunhui; Chen, Zhiwei; Wang, Ping; Liu, Hui; Wei, Qin

    2017-05-15

    In this work, a sensitive sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor was designed for the quantitative detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) by amperometric i-t. The Au loaded on thionine functionalized graphene oxide (Au@Th/GO) was used as a platform to immobilize primary antibodies (Ab1) and accelerate the electron transfer on the electrode interface. PtCu bimetallic hybrid were loaded on 2D/2D reduced graphene oxide/graphitic carbon nitride (PtCu@rGO/g-C3N4) with large surface area and biocompatibility, which were employed as labels for combining secondary antibodies (Ab2) and amplifying signals to improve the sensitivity of the designed immunosensor which attributes to its good activity for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Under optimal conditions, the designed immunosensor exhibited a linear concentration range from 50fg/mL to 40ng/mL, with a low detection limit of 16.6fg/mL (S/N=3) for PSA. Additionally, the designed immunosensor showed acceptable selectivity, reproducibility and stability. The satisfactory results in analyze human serum samples indicated potential application promising in clinical monitoring of tumor markers.

  10. Variola type IB DNA topoisomerase: DNA binding and supercoil unwinding using engineered DNA minicircles.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Breeana G; Stivers, James T

    2014-07-08

    Type IB topoisomerases unwind positive and negative DNA supercoils and play a key role in removing supercoils that would otherwise accumulate at replication and transcription forks. An interesting question is whether topoisomerase activity is regulated by the topological state of the DNA, thereby providing a mechanism for targeting the enzyme to highly supercoiled DNA domains in genomes. The type IB enzyme from variola virus (vTopo) has proven to be useful in addressing mechanistic questions about topoisomerase function because it forms a reversible 3'-phosphotyrosyl adduct with the DNA backbone at a specific target sequence (5'-CCCTT-3') from which DNA unwinding can proceed. We have synthesized supercoiled DNA minicircles (MCs) containing a single vTopo target site that provides highly defined substrates for exploring the effects of supercoil density on DNA binding, strand cleavage and ligation, and unwinding. We observed no topological dependence for binding of vTopo to these supercoiled MC DNAs, indicating that affinity-based targeting to supercoiled DNA regions by vTopo is unlikely. Similarly, the cleavage and religation rates of the MCs were not topologically dependent, but topoisomers with low superhelical densities were found to unwind more slowly than highly supercoiled topoisomers, suggesting that reduced torque at low superhelical densities leads to an increased number of cycles of cleavage and ligation before a successful unwinding event. The K271E charge reversal mutant has an impaired interaction with the rotating DNA segment that leads to an increase in the number of supercoils that were unwound per cleavage event. This result provides evidence that interactions of the enzyme with the rotating DNA segment can restrict the number of supercoils that are unwound. We infer that both superhelical density and transient contacts between vTopo and the rotating DNA determine the efficiency of supercoil unwinding. Such determinants are likely to be important in

  11. The hybrid A/B type ν12 band of trans-ethylene-1,2-d2 by high-resolution Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. L.; Ng, L. L.; Gabona, M. G.

    2015-06-01

    The FTIR absorption spectrum of the hybrid A/B type ν12 band of trans-ethylene-1,2-d2 (trans-C2H2D2) centered at 1298.038145(19) cm-1 in the 1220-1420 cm-1 region was recorded at an unapodized resolution of 0.0063 cm-1. Using Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation, a total of 2892 a- and b-type transitions was assigned and fitted to upper state (ν12 = 1) rovibrational constants up to three sextic terms. The b-type feature of the band was analyzed for the first time. The root-mean-square deviation of the upper state ν12 = 1 fit was 0.00037 cm-1 while the accuracy of the measurements of the line frequencies was limited to ±0.00065 cm-1. A set of ground state rovibrational constants up to three sextic terms was also derived from the simultaneous fit of 4597 ground state combination differences from the present analysis and those of the ν4 + ν8 and ν4 bands of trans-C2H2D2 with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.00039 cm-1. The transition dipole moment ratio |μa/μb | of the ν12 band of trans-C2H2D2 was found to be 5.0 ± 0.3.

  12. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  13. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-02-06

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  14. Role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Satyender; Kumar, Vivek; Vashisht, Kapil; Singh, Priyanka; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen; Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Rai, Arvind

    2011-11-15

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are primarily metabolized by several xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs). Very few studies have explored genetic polymorphisms of XMEs and their association with DNA damage in pesticide-exposed workers. The present study was designed to determine the role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to OPs. We examined 284 subjects including 150 workers occupationally exposed to OPs and 134 normal healthy controls. The DNA damage was evaluated using the alkaline comet assay and genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP. The results revealed that the PONase activity toward paraoxonase and AChE activity was found significantly lowered in workers as compared to control subjects (p < 0.001). Workers showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to control subjects (14.37 {+-} 2.15 vs. 6.24 {+-} 1.37 tail% DNA, p < 0.001). Further, the workers with CYP2D6*3 PM and PON1 (QQ and MM) genotypes were found to have significantly higher DNA damage when compared to other genotypes (p < 0.05). In addition, significant increase in DNA damage was also observed in workers with concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes which need further extensive studies. In conclusion, the results indicate that the PON1 and CYP2D6 genotypes can modulate DNA damage elicited by some OPs possibly through gene-environment interactions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C, CYP2D6 and PON1 genotypes on DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Workers exposed to some OPs demonstrated increased DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYP2D6 *3 PM and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes are associated with DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 genotypes can increase DNA damage.

  15. Role of positively charged amino acids in the M2D transmembrane helix of Ktr/Trk/HKT type cation transporters.

    PubMed

    Kato, Naoki; Akai, Masaro; Zulkifli, Lalu; Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Kato, Yasuhiro; Goshima, Shinobu; Hazama, Akihiro; Yamagami, Mutsumi; Guy, H Robert; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Studies suggest that Ktr/Trk/HKT-type transporters have evolved from multiple gene fusions of simple K(+) channels of the KcsA type into proteins that span the membrane at least eight times. Several positively charged residues are present in the eighth transmembrane segment, M2(D), in the transporters but not K(+) channels. Some models of ion transporters require a barrier to prevent free diffusion of ions down their electrochemical gradient, and it is possible that the positively charged residues within the transporter pore may prevent transporters from being channels. Here we studied the functional role of these positive residues in three Ktr/Trk/HKT-type transporters (Synechocystis KtrB-mediated K(+) uniporter, Arabidopsis AtHKT1-mediated Na(+) uniporter and wheat TaHKT1-mediated K(+)/Na(+) symporter) by examining K(+) uptake rates in E. coli, electrophysiological measurements in oocytes and growth rates of E. coli and yeast. The conserved Arg near the middle of the M2(D) segment was essential for the K(+) transport activity of KtrB and plant HKTs. Combined replacement of several positive residues in TaHKT1 showed that the positive residue at the beginning of the M2(D), which is conserved in many K(+) channels, also contributed to cation transport activity. This positive residue and the conserved Arg both face towards the ion conducting pore side. We introduced an atomic-scale homology model for predicting amino acid interactions. Based on the experimental results and the model, we propose that a salt bridge(s) exists between positive residues in the M2(D) and conserved negative residues in the pore region to reduce electrostatic repulsion against cation permeation caused by the positive residue(s). This salt bridge may help stabilize the transporter configuration, and may also prevent the conformational change that occurs in channels.

  16. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  17. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  18. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  19. Assessment of DNA damage and mRNA/miRNA transcriptional expression profiles in hyperglycemic versus non-hyperglycemic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Danilo J; Takahashi, Paula; Evangelista, Adriane F; Foss-Freitas, Maria C; Foss, Milton C; Donadi, Eduardo A; Passos, Geraldo A; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T

    2015-06-01

    The development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with a number of genetic and environmental factors. Hyperglycemia, a T2D hallmark, is related to several metabolic complications, comorbidities and increased DNA damage. However, the molecular alterations of a proper glucose control are still unclarified. In this study, we aimed to evaluate DNA damage (comet assay), as well as to compare the transcriptional expression (mRNA and miRNA analyzed by the microarray technique) displayed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from three distinct groups: hyperglycemic T2D patients (T2D-H, n=14), non-hyperglycemic T2D patients (T2D-N, n=15), and healthy non-diabetic individuals (n=16). The comet assay revealed significantly (p<0.05) higher levels of DNA damage in T2D-H group compared to both T2D-N and control groups, while a significant difference was not observed between the control and T2D-N groups. After bioinformatics analysis, the differentially expressed mRNAs were subjected to functional enrichment analysis (DAVID) and inflammatory response was among the enriched terms found when comparing T2D-N with controls and T2D-H with T2D-N. Concerning the gene set enrichment and gene set analyses, among the differentially expressed gene sets, three were of interest: regulation of DNA repair (T2D-H versus T2D-N), superoxide response (T2D-H versus control group), and response to endoplasmic reticulum stress (T2D-H versus control group). We also identified miRNAs related with T2D and hyperglycemia not yet associated with these conditions in the literature. Some of the differentially expressed mRNAs were among the predicted targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs. Our results showed the association of hyperglycemia with increased DNA damage and aberrant expression of miRNAs and genes related to several biological processes, such as inflammation, DNA repair, ROS production and antioxidant defense, highlighting the importance of proper glycemic control

  20. DNA synthesis and DNA polymerase activity of herpes simplex virus type 1 temperature-sensitive mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Aron, G M; Purifoy, D J; Schaffer, P A

    1975-01-01

    Fifteen temperature-sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 were studied with regard to the relationship between their ability to synthesize viral DNA and to induce viral DNA polymerase (DP) activity at permissive (34 C) and nonpermissive (39 C) temperatures. At 34 C, all mutants synthesized viral DNA, while at 39 C four mutants demonstrated a DNA+ phenotype, three were DNA+/-, and eight were DNA-. DNA+ mutants induced levels of DP activity similar to thhose of the wild-type virus at both temperatures, and DNA+/- mutants induced reduced levels of DP activity at 39 C but not at 34 C. Among the DNA- mutants three were DP+, two were DP+/-, and three showed reduced DP activity at 34 C with no DP activity at 39 C. DNA-, DP- mutants induced the synthesis of a temperature-sensitive DP as determined by in vivo studies. PMID:169388

  1. Effect of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and lipopolysaccharide on mononuclear cell inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy uremia.

    PubMed

    Wu, E L; Cui, H X

    2016-08-29

    The prevention and treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic nephropathy (DN), which are disorders with high incidence rates, is of primary importance. In this study, we analyzed the effect of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in combination with interleukin (IL)-15 on the inflammatory immune response and expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in mononuclear cells of T2DM and DN uremia (DNU) patients. The human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1 was treated with peripheral blood serum isolated from 30 healthy controls and T2DM and DNU patients each, cultured in the presence or absence of 1,25-(OH)2D3, and subsequently treated with LPS and IL-15. The VDR mRNA and protein expression in THP-1 cells was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot (and immunofluorescence assay), respectively, and IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations in the culture supernatant were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. LPS treatment induced a significant decrease in VDR mRNA expression in T2DM and DNU serum-treated THP-1 cells compared to the control cells (P < 0.05). The VDR protein expression in DNU serum-treated THP-1 cells was also significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05). LPS treatment induced IL-6 secretion in serum-treated THP-1 cells (P < 0.05), while 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment inhibited IL-6 secretion to some extent. These findings suggested that LPS down-regulates the expression of VDR in mononuclear cells of T2DM and DNU patients and induces an imbalance in the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine response, while 1,25-(OH)2D3 partially reversed the effect of LPS and protected patients with T2DM and DNU.

  2. Effects of various types of molecular dynamics on 1D and 2D (2)H NMR studied by random walk simulations

    PubMed

    Vogel; Rossler

    2000-11-01

    By carrying out random walk simulations we systematically study the effects of various types of complex molecular dynamics on (2)H NMR experiments in solids. More precisely, we calculate one-dimensional (1D) (2)H NMR spectra and the results of two dimensional (2D) (2)H NMR experiments in time domain, taking into account isotropic as well as highly restricted motions which involve rotational jumps about different finite angles. Although the dynamical models are chosen to mimic the primary and secondary relaxation in supercooled liquids and glasses, we do not intend to describe experimental results quantitatively but rather to show general effects appearing for complex reorientations. We carefully investigate whether 2D (2)H NMR in time domain, which was originally designed to measure correlation times of ultraslow motions (tau >/= 1 ms), can be used to obtain shorter tau, too. It is demonstrated that an extension of the time window to tau >/= 10 &mgr;s is possible when dealing with exponential relaxation, but that it will fail if there is a distribution of correlation times G(lgtau). Vice versa, we show that 1D (2)H NMR spectra, usually recorded to look at dynamics with tau in the microsecond regime, are also applicable for studying ultraslow motions provided that the loss of correlation is achieved step by step. Therefore, it is useful to carry out 1D and 2D NMR experiments simultaneously in order to reveal the mechanism of complex molecular motions. In addition, we demonstrate that highly restricted dynamics can be clearly observed in 1D spectra and in 2D NMR in time domain if long solid-echo delays and large evolution times are applied, respectively. Finally, unexpected observations are described which appear in the latter experiment when considering very broad distributions G(lgtau). Because of these effects, time scale and geometry of a considered motion cannot be extracted from a straightforward analysis of experimental results. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Bulk anisotropic excitons in type-II semiconductors built with 1D and 2D low-dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyotecatl, H. A.; Del Castillo-Mussot, M.; Reyes, J. A.; Vazquez, G. J.; Montemayor-Aldrete, J. A.; Reyes-Esqueda, J. A.; Cocoletzi, G. H.

    2005-08-01

    We used a simple variational approach to account for the difference in the electron and hole effective masses in Wannier-Mott excitons in type-II semiconducting heterostructures in which the electron is constrained in an one-dimensional quantum wire (1DQW) and the hole is in a two-dimensional quantum layer (2DQL) perpendicular to the wire or viceversa. The resulting Schrodinger equation is similar to that of a 3D bulk exciton because the number of free (nonconfined) variables is three; two coming from the 2DQL and one from the 1DQW. In this system the effective electron-hole interaction depends on the confinement potentials.

  4. Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom: Crystal structure and magnetic study with 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Feng; Chen, YiPing; You, ZhuChai; Xia, ZeMin; Ge, SuZhi; Sun, YanQiong; Huang, BiHua

    2013-06-01

    Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates, [Co(phen)₃]₃[CoW₁₂O₄₀]·9H₂O 1 (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) and [Fe(phen)₃]₂[FeW₁₂O₄₀]·H₃O·H₂O 2, have been synthesized via the hydrothermal technique and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, IR, XPS, TG analysis, UV–DRS, XRD, thermal-dependent and magnetic-dependent 2D-COS IR (two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy). Crystal structure analysis reveals that the polyanions in compound 1 are linked into 3D supramolecule through hydrogen bonding interactions between lattice water molecules and terminal oxygen atoms of polyanion units, and [Co(phen)₃]²⁺ cations distributed in the polyanion framework with many hydrogen bonding interactions. The XPS spectra indicate that all the Co atoms in 1 are +2 oxidation state, the Fe atoms in 2 existing with +2 and +3 mixed oxidation states. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic-dependent synchronous 2D correlation IR spectra of 1 (a), 2 (b) over 0–50 mT in the range of 600–1000 cm⁻¹, the obvious response indicate two Keggin polyanions skeleton susceptible to applied magnetic field. Highlights: • Two Keggin-type heteropolytungstates with transition metal as a central atom has been obtained. • Compound 1 forms into 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding between water molecules and polyanions. • Magnetic-dependent 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy was introduced to discuss the magnetism of polyoxometalate.

  5. Optimization of Metal Coverage on the Emitter in n-Type Interdigitated Back Contact Solar Cells Using a PC2D Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Chen; Jia, Rui; Janssen, G. J. M.; Zhang, Dai-Sheng; Xing, Zhao; Bronsveld, P. C. P.; Weeber, A. W.; Jin, Zhi; Liu, Xin-Yu

    2013-07-01

    In interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells, the metal-electrode coverage on a p-type emitter is optimized by a PC2D simulation. The result shows that the variation of the metal coverage ratio (MCR) will affect both the surface passivation and the electrode-contact properties for the p-type emitter in IBC solar cells. We find that when Rc ranges from 0.08 to 0.16Ω·cm2, the MCR is optimized with a value of 25% and 33%, resulting in a highest energy-conversion efficiency. The dependences of both Voc and fill factor on MCR are simulated in order to explore the mechanism of the IBC solar cells.

  6. Active vitamin D3, 1,25-(OH)2D3, protects against macrovasculopathy in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ma, R; Deng, X L; Du, G L; Li, C; Xiao, S; Aibibai, Y; Zhu, J

    2016-06-03

    To investigate the protective effect of the active form of vitamin D3, 1,25-(OH)2D3, on macrovasculopathy in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), 8-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control group, T2DM group, and treatment group. The T2DM model was established after 6 weeks by administering an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (30 mg/kg). 1,25-(OH)2D3 was administered by gavage to rats in the treatment group, and an equal volume of peanut oil was administered to rats in the T2DM group. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) cholesterols were measured in all rats. The morphology of the thoracic aorta was examined, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), endothelin (ET), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), CD54, and CD106 in the thoracic aorta was determined by immunohistochemistry. The expression of FPG, TG, TC, and LDL-C in rats from the T2DM and treatment groups was significantly elevated compared with rats from the control group (P < 0.05). Compared with that in control group, the expression of TNF-α, ET, eNOS, and CD106 was significantly upregulated in the T2DM group and the treatment group, while the expression of CD54 was increased only in the T2DM group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the levels of TNF-α, CD54, and CD106 in rats from the treatment group were lower than those in the T2DM group (P < 0.05). These data suggest that 1,25-(OH)2D3 may protect the macrovessels from injury in T2DM rats by inhibiting the expression of TNF-α, CD54, and CD106.

  7. Recurrent mutations in NF-κB pathway components, KMT2D, and NOTCH1/2 in ocular adnexal MALT-type marginal zone lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Patricia; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Grabellus, Florian; Arnold, Georg; Klapper, Wolfram; Pförtner, Roman; Dührsen, Ulrich; Eckstein, Anja; Dürig, Jan; Küppers, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of ocular adnexal marginal zone lymphomas of mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue-type (OAML) is still poorly understood. We analyzed 63 cases of such lymphomas for non-synonymous mutations in 24 candidate genes by amplicon sequencing. We validated frequent mutations in the NF-κB regulators MYD88, TNFAIP3 and TNIP1 in OAML, but also identified recurrent mutations in several additional components of the NF-κB pathway, including BCL10 and NFKBIA. Overall, 60% of cases had mutations in at least one component of NF-κB signaling, pointing to a central role of its genetic deregulation in OAML pathogenesis. Mutations in NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 were each found in 8% of cases, indicating a pathogenetic function of these factors in OAML. KMT2D was identified as the first epigenetic regulator with mutations in OAML, being mutated in 22% of cases. Mutations in MYD88 were associated with an inferior disease-free survival. Overall, we identified here highly recurrent genetic lesions in components of the NF-κB pathway, of NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 as well as KMT2D in OAML and thereby provide major novel insights into the pathogenesis of this B cell malignancy. PMID:27566587

  8. Giant piezoresistance of p-type nano-thick silicon induced by interface electron trapping instead of 2D quantum confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Li, Xinxin

    2011-01-07

    The p-type silicon giant piezoresistive coefficient is measured in top-down fabricated nano-thickness single-crystalline-silicon strain-gauge resistors with a macro-cantilever bending experiment. For relatively thicker samples, the variation of piezoresistive coefficient in terms of silicon thickness obeys the reported 2D quantum confinement effect. For ultra-thin samples, however, the variation deviates from the quantum-effect prediction but increases the value by at least one order of magnitude (compared to the conventional piezoresistance of bulk silicon) and the value can change its sign (e.g. from positive to negative). A stress-enhanced Si/SiO(2) interface electron-trapping effect model is proposed to explain the 'abnormal' giant piezoresistance that should be originated from the carrier-concentration change effect instead of the conventional equivalent mobility change effect for bulk silicon piezoresistors. An interface state modification experiment gives preliminary proof of our analysis.

  9. Pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives as type II kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) inhibitors: CoMFA and CoMSIA studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Wen-Hua; Wu, Shu-Guang; Tian, Yuan-Xin; Zhang, Jia-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) inhibitors have been proved to be very effective anticancer agents. Molecular docking, 3D-QSAR methods, CoMFA and CoMSIA were performed on pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives as non-ATP competitive KDR inhibitors (type II). The bioactive conformation was explored by docking one potent compound 20 into the active site of KDR in its DFG-out inactive conformation. The constructed CoMFA and CoMSIA models produced statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficients q(2) of 0.542 and 0.552, non-cross-validated correlation coefficients r(2) of 0.912 and 0.955, and predicted correction coefficients r(2) (pred) of 0.913 and 0.897, respectively. These results ensure the CoMFA and CoMSIA models as a tool to guide the design of a series of new potent KDR inhibitors.

  10. African Origin of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 2 (HTLV-2) Supported by a Potential New HTLV-2d Subtype in Congolese Bambuti Efe Pygmies

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Salemi, Marco; Van Brussel, Marianne; Liu, Hsin-Fu; Van Laethem, Kristel; Van Ranst, Marc; Michels, Ludovic; Desmyter, Jan; Goubau, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    We identified a potential new subtype within human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2), HTLV-2d, present in members of an isolated Efe Bambuti Pygmy tribe. Two of 23 Efe Pygmies were HTLV-2 seropositive, with HTLV-2 Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay reactivities. From one of them the entire genome of the HTLV-2 strain Efe2 could be amplified and sequenced. In all gene regions analyzed, this strain was the most divergent HTLV-2 strain, differing by 2.4% (tax/rex) to 10.7% (long terminal repeat) from both subtypes HTLV-2a and HTLV-2b, yet major functional elements are conserved. The similarity between the HTLV-2 Efe2 Gag and Env proteins and the corresponding HTLV-2a and -2b proteins is consistent with the observed serological reactivity. In the proximal pX region, one of the two alternative splice acceptor sites is abolished in HTLV-2 Efe2. Another interesting feature of this potential new subtype is that it has a Tax protein of 344 amino acids (aa), which is intermediate in length between the HTLV-2a Tax protein (331 aa) and the HTLV-2b and -2c Tax proteins (356 aa) and similar to the simian T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (STLV-2) PP1664 Tax protein. Together these two findings suggest a different phenotype for the HTLV-2 Efe2 strain. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that the Pygmy Efe2 strain potentially belonged to a new and quite divergent subtype, HTLV-2d. When the STLV-2 bonobo viruses PP1664 and PanP were used as an outgroup, it was clear that the Pygmy HTLV-2 Efe2 strain had the longest independent evolution and that HTLV-2 evolution is consistent with an African origin. PMID:9557723

  11. Forensic DNA-typing of dog hair: DNA-extraction and PCR amplification.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, I; Völkel, I; Täubert, H; Brenig, B

    2004-05-10

    The forensic application of DNA-typing for the identification of dog hair provides objective evidence in the characterisation of traces found at crime scenes. During the past few years forensic dog identity testing has been improved considerably using multiplex PCR systems. However, DNA-typing from samples of one up to 10 dog hairs is often problematic in forensic science. A single dog hair contains very small quantities of DNA or the hair sample consists of hairs with roots of bad quality or even of broken hairshafts without roots. Here we describe an experimental study about dog hairs by means of a Ca(2+) improved DNA-extraction method, quantification and amplification.

  12. Association of genetic variants in INS (rs689), INSR (rs1799816) and PP1G.G (rs1799999) with type 2 diabetes (T2D): a case-control study in three ethnic groups from North-West India.

    PubMed

    Sokhi, Jasmine; Sikka, Ruhi; Raina, Priyanka; Kaur, Ramandeep; Matharoo, Kawaljit; Arora, Punit; Bhanwer, Ajs

    2016-02-01

    Genetic contributions towards Type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been assessed through association studies across different world populations with inconsistencies. The majority of the T2D susceptibility loci are common across different races or populations but show ethnicity-specific differences. The pathogenesis of T2D involves genetic variants in the candidate genes. The interactions between the genes involved in insulin signaling and secretory pathways are believed to play an important role in determining an individual's susceptibility towards T2D. Therefore, the present study was initiated to examine the differences, if any, in the contribution of polymorphisms towards T2D susceptibility in the background of different ethnic specifications. The present case-control study included a total of 1216 T2D cases and healthy controls from three ethnic groups (Jat Sikhs, Banias and Brahmins) of North-West India. Polymorphisms were selected on the basis of information available in the literature for INS (rs689), INSR (rs1799816) and PP1G.G (rs1799999) in context to T2D. The genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP method. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 16.0. The analyses revealed that INS (rs689) polymorphism conferred risk towards T2D susceptibility in all the three ethnic groups whereas INSR (rs1799816) polymorphism conferred risk towards T2D in Brahmins only and PP1G.G (rs1799999) polymorphism indicated T2D risk in Jat Sikhs only. Furthermore, interaction analyses indicated the cumulative role of three genetic variants in modulating T2D susceptibility in the three ethnic groups. In conclusion, our results substantiated the evidences for the role of ethnicity in differential susceptibility to T2D in the background of same genetic variants.

  13. Electrostatics of DNA DNA juxtapositions: consequences for type II topoisomerase function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Graham L.; Montgomery Pettitt, B.; Buck, Gregory R.; Zechiedrich, E. Lynn

    2006-04-01

    Type II topoisomerases resolve problematic DNA topologies such as knots, catenanes, and supercoils that arise as a consequence of DNA replication and recombination. Failure to remove problematic DNA topologies prohibits cell division and can result in cell death or genetic mutation. Such catastrophic consequences make topoisomerases an effective target for antibiotics and anticancer agents. Despite their biological and clinical importance, little is understood about how a topoisomerase differentiates DNA topologies in a molecule that is significantly larger than the topoisomerase itself. It has been proposed that type II topoisomerases recognize angle and curvature between two DNA helices characteristic of knotted and catenated DNA to account for the enzyme's preference to unlink instead of link DNA. Here we consider the electrostatic potential of DNA juxtapositions to determine the possibility of juxtapositions occurring through Brownian diffusion. We found that despite the large negative electrostatic potential formed between two juxtaposed DNA helices, a bulk counterion concentration as small as 50 mM provides sufficient electrostatic screening to prohibit significant interaction beyond an interhelical separation of 3 nm in both hooked and free juxtapositions. This suggests that instead of electrostatics, mechanical forces such as those occurring in anaphase, knots, catenanes, or the writhe of supercoiled DNA may be responsible for the formation of DNA juxtapositions.

  14. Global methylation profiles in DNA from different blood cell types.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Chen; Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Flom, Julie D; Kappil, Maya; Ferris, Jennifer S; Liao, Yuyan; Santella, Regina M; Terry, Mary Beth

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation measured in white blood cell DNA is increasingly being used as in studies of cancer susceptibility. However, little is known about the correlation between different assays to measure global methylation and whether the source of DNA matters when examining methylation profiles in different blood cell types. Using information from 620 women, 217 and 403 women with DNA available from granulocytes (Gran), and total white blood cells (WBC), respectively, and 48 women with DNA available from four different sources (WBC, Gran, mononuclear (MN), and lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL)), we compared DNA methylation for three repetitive elements (LINE1, Sat2, Alu) by MethyLight, luminometric methylation assay (LUMA), and [(3)H]-methyl acceptance assay. For four of the five assays, DNA methylation levels measured in Gran were not correlated with methylation in LBC, MN, or WBC; the exception was Sat2. DNA methylation in LCL was correlated with methylation in MN and WBC for the [(3)H]-methyl acceptance, LINE1, and Alu assays. Methylation in MN was correlated with methylation in WBC for the [(3)H]-methyl acceptance and LUMA assays. When we compared the five assays to each other by source of DNA, we observed statistically significant positive correlations ranging from 0.3-0.7 for each cell type with one exception (Sat2 and Alu in MN). Among the 620 women stratified by DNA source, correlations among assays were highest for the three repetitive elements (range 0.39-0.64). Results from the LUMA assay were modestly correlated with LINE1 (0.18-0.20). These results suggest that both assay and source of DNA are critical components in the interpretation of global DNA methylation patterns from WBC.

  15. Influence of amino acid residue 374 of cytochrome P-450 2D6 (CYP2D6) on the regio- and enantio-selective metabolism of metoprolol.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, S W; Rowland, K; Ackland, M J; Rekka, E; Simula, A P; Lennard, M S; Wolf, C R; Tucker, G T

    1996-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is an important human drug-metabolizing enzyme responsible for the oxidation of more than 30 widely used therapeutic agents. The enzymes encoded by the published genomic [Kimura, Umeno, Skoda, Meyer and Gonzalez (1989) Am. J. Hum. Genet. 45, 889-904] and cDNA [Gonzalez, Skoda, Kimura, Umeno, Zanger, Nebert, Gelboin, Hardwick and Meyer (1988) Nature 331, 442-446] sequences of CYP2D6, and presumed to represent wild-type sequences, differ at residue 374 and encode valine (CYP2D6-Val) and methionine (CYP2D6-Met) respectively. The influence of this amino acid difference on cytochrome P-450 expression, ligand binding, catalysis and stereoselective oxidation of metoprolol was investigated by the heterologous expression of the corresponding cDNAs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The level of expression of apo- and holo-protein was similar with each form of CYP2D6 cDNA, and the binding affinities of a series of ligands to CYP2D6-Val and CYP2D6-Met were identical. The enantioselective O-demethylation and alpha-hydroxylation of metoprolol were also similar with each form of CYP2D6, O-demethylation being R-(+)- enantioselective (CYP2D6-Val: R/S, 1.6; CYP2D6-Met: R/S, 1.4), whereas alpha-hydroxylation showed a preference for S-(-)-metoprolol (CYP2D6-Val: R/S, 0.7; CYP2D6-Met: R/S, 0.8). However, although the favoured regiomer overall was O-demethylmetoprolol (ODM), the regioselectivity for O-demethylation of each metoprolol enantiomer was significantly greater for CYP2D6-Val [R-(+)-: ODM/alpha-hydroxymetoprolol (alpha OH), 5.9; S-(-)-: ODM/alpha OH, 2.5) than that observed for CYP2D6-Met [R-(+)-: ODM/alpha OH, 2.2; S-(-)-: ODM/alpha OH, 1.4]. The stereoselective properties of CYP2D6-Val were consistent with those observed for CYP2D6 in human liver microsomes. The difference in the stereoselective properties of CYP2D6-Val and CYP2D6-Met were rationalized with respect to a homology model of the active site of CYP2D6 based on an alignment with

  16. Charge carrier transport and lifetimes in n-type and p-type phosphorene as 2D device active materials: an ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Tea, E; Hin, C

    2016-08-10

    In this work, we provide a detailed analysis of phosphorene's performance as an n-type and p-type active material. This study is based on first principles calculations of the phosphorene electronic structure, and the resulting electron and hole scattering rates and lifetimes. Emphasis is put on extreme regimes commonly found in semiconductor devices, i.e. high electric fields and heavy doping, where impact ionization and Auger recombination can occur. We found that electron-initiated impact ionization is weaker than the hole-initiated process, when compared to carrier-phonon interaction rates, suggesting resilience to impact ionization initiated breakdown. Moreover, calculated minority electron lifetimes are limited by radiative recombination only, not by Auger processes, suggesting that phosphorene could achieve good quantum efficiencies in optoelectronic devices. The provided scattering rates and lifetimes are critical input data for the modeling and understanding of phosphorene-based device physics.

  17. Marmoset cytochrome P450 2D8 in livers and small intestines metabolizes typical human P450 2D6 substrates, metoprolol, bufuralol and dextromethorphan.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Hagihira, Yuya; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Inoue, Takashi; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    1. Although the New World non-human primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), is a potentially useful animal model, comprehensive understanding of drug metabolizing enzymes is insufficient. 2. A cDNA encoding a novel cytochrome P450 (P450) 2D8 was identified in marmosets. The amino acid sequence deduced from P450 2D8 cDNA showed a high sequence identity (83-86%) with other primate P450 2Ds. Phylogenetic analysis showed that marmoset P450 2D8 was closely clustered with human P450 2D6, unlike P450 2Ds of miniature pig, dog, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse or rat. 3. Marmoset P450 2D8 mRNA was predominantly expressed in the liver and small intestine among the tissues types analyzed, whereas marmoset P450 2D6 mRNA was expressed predominantly in the liver where P450 2D protein was detected by immunoblotting. 4. By metabolic assays using marmoset P450 2D8 protein heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, although P450 2D8 exhibits lower catalytic efficiency compared to marmoset and human P450 2D6 enzymes, P450 2D8 mediated O-demethylations of metoprolol and dextromethorphan and bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation. 5. These results suggest that marmoset P450 2D8 (also expressed in the extrahepatic tissues) has potential roles in drug metabolism in a similar manner to those of human and marmoset P450 2D6.

  18. Miniaturized technology for DNA typing: cassette PCR.

    PubMed

    Manage, Dammika P; Pilarski, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    With the smaller size, low cost, and rapid testing capabilities, miniaturized lab-on-a-chip devices can change the way medical diagnostics are currently performed in the health-care system. We have demonstrated such a device that is self-contained, simple, disposable, and inexpensive. It is capable of performing DNA amplification on an inexpensive instrument suitable for near point of care settings. This technology will enable on the spot evaluation of patients in the clinic for faster medical decision-making and more informed therapeutic choices. Our device, a gel capillary cassette, termed cassette PCR, contains capillary reaction units each holding a defined primer set, with arrays of capillary reaction units for simultaneously detecting multiple targets. With the exception of the sample to be tested, each capillary reaction unit holds all the reagents needed for PCR in a desiccated form that can be stored at room temperature for up to 3 months and even longer in colder conditions. It relies on capillary forces for sample delivery of microliter volumes through capillaries, hence avoiding the need for pumps or valves. In the assembled cassette, the wax architecture supporting the capillaries melts during the PCR and acts as a vapor barrier as well as segregating capillaries with different primer sets. No other chip sealing techniques are required. Cassette PCR accepts raw samples such as urine, genital swabs, and blood. The cassette is made with off-the-shelf components and contains integrated positive and negative controls.

  19. Isolation of cDNA and genomic DNA clones encoding type II collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Young, M F; Vogeli, G; Nunez, A M; Fernandez, M P; Sullivan, M; Sobel, M E

    1984-01-01

    A cDNA library constructed from total chick embryo RNA was screened with an enriched fraction of type II collagen mRNA. Two overlapping cDNA clones were characterized and shown to encode the COOH propeptide of type II collagen. In addition, a type II collagen clone was isolated from a Charon 4A library of chick genomic fragments. Definitive identification of the clones was based on DNA sequence analysis. The 3' end of the type II collagen gene appears to be similar to that of other interstitial collagen genes. Northern hybridization data indicates that there is a marked decrease in type II collagen mRNA levels in chondrocytes treated with the dedifferentiating agent 5-bromodeoxyuridine. The major type II collagen mRNA species is 5300 bases long, similar to that of other interstitial collagen RNAs. Images PMID:6203098

  20. DNA typing in wildlife crime: recent developments in species identification.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Shanan S; Linacre, Adrian

    2010-09-01

    Species identification has become a tool in the investigation of acts of alleged wildlife crimes. This review details the steps required in DNA testing in wildlife crime investigations and highlights recent developments where not only can individual species be identified within a mixture of species but multiple species can be identified simultaneously. 'What species is this?' is a question asked frequently in wildlife crime investigations. Depending on the material being examined, DNA analysis may offer the best opportunity to answer this question. Species testing requires the comparison of the DNA type from the unknown sample to DNA types on a database. The areas of DNA tested are on the mitochondria and include predominantly the cytochrome b gene and the cytochrome oxidase I gene. Standard analysis requires the sequencing of part of one of these genes and comparing the sequence to that held on a repository of DNA sequences such as the GenBank database. Much of the DNA sequence of either of these two genes is conserved with only parts being variable. A recent development is to target areas of those sequences that are specific to a species; this can increase the sensitivity of the test with no loss of specificity. The benefit of targeting species specific sequences is that within a mixture of two of more species, the individual species within the mixture can be identified. This identification would not be possible using standard sequencing. These new developments can lead to a greater number of samples being tested in alleged wildlife crimes.

  1. Effect of DNA type on response of DNA biosensor for carcinogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, Nor Diyana bt. Md.; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah; Lazim, Azwani Mat

    2013-11-01

    Carcinogens are cancer causing chemicals that can bind to DNA and cause damage to the DNA. These chemicals are available everywhere including in water, air, soil and food. Therefore, a sensor that can detect the presence of these chemicals will be a very useful tool. Since carcinogens bind to DNA, DNA can be used as the biological element in a biosensor. This study has utilized different types of DNA in a biosensor for carcinogen detection. The DNAs include double stranded calf thymus DNA, single stranded calf thymus DNA and guanine rich single stranded DNA. The modified SPE was exposed to a carcinogen followed by interaction with methylene blue which acts as the electroactive indicator. The SPE was then analysed using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Optimization studies were conducted for MB concentration and accumulation time, DNA concentration, as well as effect of buffer concentration, buffer pH and ionic strength. The performance of the biosensor was tested on a group 1 carcinogen, formaldehyde. The results indicated that the usage of guanine rich single stranded DNA also gives higher response as carcinogens prefer to bind with guanine compared to other bases.

  2. Analysis of branched DNA replication and recombination intermediates from prokaryotic cells by two-dimensional (2D) native-native agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    Branched DNA molecules are generated by the essential processes of replication and recombination. Owing to their distinctive extended shapes, these intermediates migrate differently from linear double-stranded DNA under certain electrophoretic conditions. However, these branched species exist in the cell at much low abundance than the bulk linear DNA. Consequently, branched molecules cannot be visualized by conventional electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining. Two-dimensional native-native agarose electrophoresis has therefore been developed as a method to facilitate the separation and visualization of branched replication and recombination intermediates. A wide variety of studies have employed this technique to examine branched molecules in eukaryotic, archaeal, and bacterial cells, providing valuable insights into how DNA is duplicated and repaired in all three domains of life.

  3. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  4. Toward DNA electrochemical sensing by free-standing ZnO nanosheets grown on 2D thin-layered MoS2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Chen, Meijing; Kong, Qianqian; Luo, Xiliang; Jiao, Kui

    2017-03-15

    Very recently, the 2-dimensional MoS2 layer as base substrate integrated with other materials has caused people's emerging attention. In this paper, a thin-layered MoS2 was prepared through an ultrasonic exfoliation method from bulk MoS2 and then the free-standing ZnO nanosheet was electrodeposited on the MoS2 scaffold for DNA sensing. The ZnO/MoS2 nanocomposite revealed smooth and vertical nanosheets morphology by scanning electron microscopy, compared with the sole MoS2 and sole ZnO. Importantly, the partially negative charged MoS2 layer is beneficial to the nucleation and growth of ZnO nanosheets under the effect of electrostatic interactions. Classic methylene blue, which possesses different affinities to dsDNA and ssDNA, was adopted as the measure signal to confirm the immobilization and hybridization of DNA on ZnO nanosheets and pursue the optimal synthetic conditions. And the results demonstrated that the free-standing ZnO/MoS2 nanosheets had low detection limit (6.6×10(-16)M) and has a positive influence on DNA immobilization and hybridization.

  5. The ATP requirements of adenovirus type 5 DNA replication and cellular DNA replication.

    PubMed

    De Jong, P J; Kwant, M M; van Driel, W; Jansz, H S; van der Vliet, P C

    1983-01-15

    Several in vitro DNA replication systems were employed to characterize the ATP dependency of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) DNA replication. Ad5 DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei, representing the elongation of nascent DNA chains, was slightly ATP dependent. Reduction of the ATP concentration from the optimum (8 mM) to the endogenous value (0.16 microM) reduced Ad5 DNA replication only to 70%. No change in the pattern of replication was observed as indicated by the analysis of replicative intermediates using agarose gel electrophoresis. ATP could be replaced by dATP, but not by GTP or other nucleoside triphosphates. By contrast, cellular DNA replication in isolated nuclei from HeLa cells was reduced to 12% by the omission of ATP. These differences could not be explained by different ATP pools or by effects of ATP on dNTP pools. Cellular DNA replication in contrast to viral DNA replication was sensitive to low concentrations of adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). Inhibition by this ATP analog was competitive with ATP (Ki = 0.4 mM). Adenovirus DNA replication by DNA-free nuclear extracts, representing initiation plus elongation (Challberg and Kelly, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 655-659, 1979), exhibited a nearly absolute requirement for ATP. ATP could be substituted not only by dATP, but also by GTP and dGTP and to a lesser extent by pyrimidine triphosphates. Similar results were found when the formation of a covalent complex between dCTP and the precursor terminal protein was studied. This reaction is essential for the initiation of Ad5 DNA replication. The results indicate that different ATP-requiring functions are employed during the initiation and elongation stages of adenovirus DNA replication.

  6. Dopamine D1, D2, D3 Receptors, Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Type-2 (VMAT2) and Dopamine Transporter (DAT) Densities in Aged Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianjun; Xu, Jinbin; Cairns, Nigel J.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Mach, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine D1, D2, D3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2), and dopamine transporter (DAT) densities were measured in 11 aged human brains (aged 77–107.8, mean: 91 years) by quantitative autoradiography. The density of D1 receptors, VMAT2, and DAT was measured using [3H]SCH23390, [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [3H]WIN35428, respectively. The density of D2 and D3 receptors was calculated using the D3-preferring radioligand, [3H]WC-10 and the D2-preferring radioligand [3H]raclopride using a mathematical model developed previously by our group. Dopamine D1, D2, and D3 receptors are extensively distributed throughout striatum; the highest density of D3 receptors occurred in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). The density of the DAT is 10–20-fold lower than that of VMAT2 in striatal regions. Dopamine D3 receptor density exceeded D2 receptor densities in extrastriatal regions, and thalamus contained a high level of D3 receptors with negligible D2 receptors. The density of dopamine D1 linearly correlated with D3 receptor density in the thalamus. The density of the DAT was negligible in the extrastriatal regions whereas the VMAT2 was expressed in moderate density. D3 receptor and VMAT2 densities were in similar level between the aged human and aged rhesus brain samples, whereas aged human brain samples had lower range of densities of D1 and D2 receptors and DAT compared with the aged rhesus monkey brain. The differential density of D3 and D2 receptors in human brain will be useful in the interpretation of PET imaging studies in human subjects with existing radiotracers, and assist in the validation of newer PET radiotracers having a higher selectivity for dopamine D2 or D3 receptors. PMID:23185343

  7. How Y-Family DNA polymerase IV is more accurate than Dpo4 at dCTP insertion opposite an N2-dG adduct of benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Sholder, Gabriel; Creech, Amanda; Loechler, Edward L

    2015-11-01

    To bypass DNA damage, cells have Y-Family DNA polymerases (DNAPs). One Y-Family-class includes DNAP κ and DNAP IV, which accurately insert dCTP opposite N(2)-dG adducts, including from the carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BP). Another class includes DNAP η and DNAP V, which insert accurately opposite UV-damage, but inaccurately opposite BP-N(2)-dG. To investigate structural differences between Y-Family-classes, regions are swapped between DNAP IV (a κ/IV-class-member) and Dpo4 (a η/V-class-member); the kinetic consequences are evaluated via primer-extension studies with a BP-N(2)-dG-containing template. Four key structural elements are revealed. (1) Y-Family DNAPs have discreet non-covalent contacts between their little finger-domain (LF-Domain) and their catalytic core-domain (CC-Domain), which we call "non-covalent bridges" (NCBs). Arg37 and Arg38 in DNAP IV's CC-Domain near the active site form a non-covalent bridge (AS-NCB) by interacting with Glu251 and Asp252, respectively, in DNAP IV's LF-Domain. Without these interactions dATP/dGTP/dTTP misinsertions increase. DNAP IV's AS-NCB suppresses misinsertions better than Dpo4's equivalent AS-NCB. (2) DNAP IV also suppresses dATP/dGTP/dTTP misinsertions via a second non-covalent bridge, which is ∼8Å from the active site (Distal-NCB). Dpo4 has no Distal-NCB, rendering it inferior at dATP/dGTP/dTTP suppression. (3) dCTP insertion is facilitated by the larger minor groove opening near the active site in DNAP IV versus Dpo4, which is sensible given that Watson/Crick-like [dCTP:BP-N(2)-dG] pairing requires the BP-moiety to be in the minor groove. (4) Compared to Dpo4, DNAP IV has a smaller major groove opening, which suppresses dGTP misinsertion, implying BP-N(2)-dG bulk in the major groove during Hoogsteen syn-adduct-dG:dGTP pairing. In summary, DNAP IV has a large minor groove opening to enhance dCTP insertion, a plugged major groove opening to suppress dGTP misinsertion, and two non-covalent bridges (near and distal

  8. Specific DNA recognition mediated by a type IV pilin

    PubMed Central

    Cehovin, Ana; Simpson, Peter J.; McDowell, Melanie A.; Brown, Daniel R.; Noschese, Rossella; Pallett, Mitchell; Brady, Jacob; Baldwin, Geoffrey S.; Lea, Susan M.; Matthews, Stephen J.; Pelicic, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Natural transformation is a dominant force in bacterial evolution by promoting horizontal gene transfer. This process may have devastating consequences, such as the spread of antibiotic resistance or the emergence of highly virulent clones. However, uptake and recombination of foreign DNA are most often deleterious to competent species. Therefore, model naturally transformable Gram-negative bacteria, including the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, have evolved means to preferentially take up homotypic DNA containing short and genus-specific sequence motifs. Despite decades of intense investigations, the DNA uptake sequence receptor in Neisseria species has remained elusive. We show here, using a multidisciplinary approach combining biochemistry, molecular genetics, and structural biology, that meningococcal type IV pili bind DNA through the minor pilin ComP via an electropositive stripe that is predicted to be exposed on the filaments surface and that ComP displays an exquisite binding preference for DNA uptake sequence. Our findings illuminate the earliest step in natural transformation, reveal an unconventional mechanism for DNA binding, and suggest that selective DNA uptake is more widespread than previously thought. PMID:23386723

  9. DNA polymerase-α regulates type I interferon activation through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J.; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C.; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K.; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R.; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations disrupting nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts expression of POLA1, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency results in increased type I interferon production. This enzyme is necessary for RNA:DNA primer synthesis during DNA replication and strikingly, POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Altogether, this work identified POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  10. Cloning of monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA integrated within cell DNA from a cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, T.; Kanda, T.; Furuno, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kawana, T.; Yoshiike, K.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have molecularly cloned and characterized monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA with flanking cell DNA sequences from a cervical carcinoma. Determination of nucleotide sequence around the junctions of human papillomavirus and cell DNAs revealed that at the site of integration within cell DNA the cloned viral DNA had a deletion between nucleotides 1284 and 4471 (numbering system from K. Seedorf, G. Kraemmer, M. Duerst, S. Suhai, and W.G. Roewkamp), which includes the greater part of E1 gene and the entire E2 gene. In the remaining part of the E1 gene, three guanines were found at the location where two guanines at nucleotides 1137 and 1138 have been recorded. This additional guanine shifted the reading frame and erased an interruption in the E1 gene. The data strongly suggest that, like other papillomaviruses, human papillomavirus type 16 has an uninterrupted E1 gene.

  11. Establishment of the 1st World Health Organization international standards for human papillomavirus type 16 DNA and type 18 DNA.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dianna E; Baylis, Sally A; Padley, David; Heath, Alan B; Ferguson, Morag; Pagliusi, Sonia R; Quint, Wim G; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2010-06-15

    A World Health Organization collaborative study was conducted to evaluate candidate international standards for human papillomavirus (HPV) Type 16 DNA (NIBSC code 06/202) and HPV Type 18 DNA (NIBSC code 06/206) for use in the amplification and detection steps of nucleic acid-based assays. The freeze-dried candidate international standards were prepared from bulk preparations of cloned plasmid containing full-length HPV-16 or HPV-18 genomic DNA. Nineteen laboratories from 13 countries participated in the study using a variety of commercial and in-house quantitative and qualitative assays. The data presented here indicate that, upon freeze-drying, there is no significant loss in potency for the candidate HPV-18 DNA and a slight loss in potency for the candidate HPV-16 DNA; although this is likely not scientifically relevant when assay precision is considered. In general, the individual laboratory mean estimates for each study sample were grouped +/- approximately 2 log(10) around the theoretical HPV DNA concentration of the reconstituted ampoule (1 x 10(7) HPV genome equivalents/mL). The agreement between laboratories is improved when potencies are made relative to the candidate international standards, demonstrating their utility in harmonizing amplification and detection steps of HPV-16 and -18 DNA assays. Degradation studies indicate that the candidate international standards are extremely stable and suitable for long-term use. Based on these findings, the candidate standards were established as the 1st WHO international standards for HPV-16 DNA and HPV-18 DNA, each with a potency of 5 x 10(6) international units (IU) per ampoule or 1 x 10(7) IU mL(-1) when reconstituted as directed.

  12. Aristoxazole analogues. Conversion of 8-nitro-1-naphthoic acid to 2-methylnaphtho[1,2-d]oxazole-9-carboxylic acid: comments on the chemical mechanism of formation of DNA adducts by the aristolochic acids.

    PubMed

    Priestap, Horacio A; Barbieri, Manuel A; Johnson, Francis

    2012-07-27

    2-Methylnaphtho[1,2-d]oxazole-9-carboxylic acid was obtained by reduction of 8-nitro-1-naphthoic acid with zinc-acetic acid. This naphthoxazole is a condensation product between an 8-nitro-1-naphthoic acid reduction intermediate and acetic acid and is a lower homologue of aristoxazole, a similar condensation product of aristolochic acid I with acetic acid that was previously reported. Both oxazoles are believed to arise via a common nitrenium/carbocation ion mechanism that is likely related to that which leads to aristolochic acid-DNA-adducts.

  13. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing. PMID:27534818

  14. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-08-18

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing.

  15. Precise and selective sensing of DNA-DNA hybridization by graphene/Si-nanowires diode-type biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkil; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Sung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Hee; Han, Joong-Soo; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Single-Si-nanowire (NW)-based DNA sensors have been recently developed, but their sensitivity is very limited because of high noise signals, originating from small source-drain current of the single Si NW. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposition-grown large-scale graphene/surface-modified vertical-Si-NW-arrays junctions can be utilized as diode-type biosensors for highly-sensitive and -selective detection of specific oligonucleotides. For this, a twenty-seven-base-long synthetic oligonucleotide, which is a fragment of human DENND2D promoter sequence, is first decorated as a probe on the surface of vertical Si-NW arrays, and then the complementary oligonucleotide is hybridized to the probe. This hybridization gives rise to a doping effect on the surface of Si NWs, resulting in the increase of the current in the biosensor. The current of the biosensor increases from 19 to 120% as the concentration of the target DNA varies from 0.1 to 500 nM. In contrast, such biosensing does not come into play by the use of the oligonucleotide with incompatible or mismatched sequences. Similar results are observed from photoluminescence microscopic images and spectra. The biosensors show very-uniform current changes with standard deviations ranging ~1 to ~10% by ten-times endurance tests. These results are very promising for their applications in accurate, selective, and stable biosensing.

  16. RNA cell typing and DNA profiling of mixed samples: can cell types and donors be associated?

    PubMed

    Harteveld, Joyce; Lindenbergh, Alexander; Sijen, Titia

    2013-09-01

    Forensic samples regularly involve mixtures, which are readily recognised in forensic analyses. Combined DNA and mRNA profiling is an upcoming forensic practice to examine donors and cell types from the exact same sample. From DNA profiles individual genotypes may be deconvoluted, but to date no studies have established whether the cell types identified in corresponding RNA profiles can be associated with individual donors. Although RNA expression levels hold many variables from which an association may not be expected, proof of concept is important to forensic experts who may be cross examined about this possible correlation in court settings. Clearly, the gender-specificity of certain body fluids (semen, vaginal mucosa, menstrual secretion) can be instructive. However, when donors of the same gender or gender-neutral cell types are involved, alternatives are needed. Here we analyse basic two-component mixtures (two cell types provided by different donors) composed of six different cell types, and assess whether the heights of DNA and RNA peaks may guide association of donor and cell type. Divergent results were obtained; for some mixtures RNA peak heights followed the DNA results, but for others the major DNA component did not present higher RNA peaks. Also, variation in mixture ratios was observed for RNA profiling replicates and when different donor couples gave the same two body fluids. As sample degradation may affect the two nucleic acids and/or distinct cell types differently (and thus influence donor and cell type association), mixtures were subjected to elevated temperature or UV-light. Variation in DNA and RNA stability was observed both between and within cell types and depended on the method inducing degradation. Taken together, we discourage to associate cell types and donors from peak heights when performing RNA and DNA profiling.

  17. Investigation into the promoter DNA methylation of three genes (CAMK1D, CRY2 and CALM2) in the peripheral blood of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jia; Tang, Linlin; Hong, Qingxiao; Ye, Huadan; Xu, Xuting; Xu, Leiting; Bu, Shizhong; Wang, Qinwen; Dai, Dongjun; Jiang, Danjie; Duan, Shiwei

    2014-08-01

    Promoter DNA methylation may reflect the interaction between genetic backgrounds and environmental factors in the development of metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes (T2D). Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1D (CAMK1D), cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) and calmodulin 2 (CALM2) genes have been identified to be associated with a risk of T2D. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of promoter DNA methylation of these genes to the risk of T2D. Using bisulfite pyrosequencing technology, the DNA methylation levels of the CpG dinucleotides within the CAMK1D, CRY2 and CALM2 gene promoters were measured in 48 patients with T2D and 48 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The results demonstrated that the promoters of these three genes were hypomethylated in the peripheral blood of all the subjects, and DNA methylation of these three genes did not contribute to the risk of T2D.

  18. HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in anal carcinomas worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, L; Saunier, M; Alvarado, I; Quirós, B; Salmeron, J; Shin, HR; Pirog, E; Guimerà, N; Hernández, GA; Felix, A; Clavero, O; Lloveras, B; Kasamatsu, E; Goodman, MT; Hernandez, BY; Laco, J; Tinoco, L; Geraets, DT; Lynch, CF; Mandys, V; Poljak, M; Jach, R; Verge, J; Clavel, C; Ndiaye, C; Klaustermeier, J; Cubilla, A; Castellsagué, X; Bravo, IG; Pawlita, M; Quint, W; Muñoz, N; Bosch, FX; Sanjosé, S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about the human papillomaviruses (HPV) types in anal cancers in some world regions is scanty. Here we describe the HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in a series of invasive anal cancers and anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN) grades 2/3 from 24 countries. We analyzed 43 AIN 2/3 cases and 496 anal cancers diagnosed from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 116 cancers was further tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance in cancer dataset. HPV DNA was detected in 88.3% of anal cancers (95%CI:85.1–91.0%) and in 95.4% of AIN 2/3 (95%CI:84.2–99.4%). Among cancers, the highest prevalence was observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, in younger patients and in North American geographical region. There were no statistically significant differences in prevalence by gender. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both cancers (80.7%) and AIN 2/3 lesions (75.4%). HPV18 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.6%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 95% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers. In view of HPV DNA results and high proportion of p16INK4a overexpression, infection by HPV is most likely to be a necessary cause for anal cancers in both men and women. The large contribution of HPV16 reinforces the potential impact of HPV vaccines in the prevention of these lesions. PMID:24817381

  19. Mechanisms of DNA disentangling by type II topoisomerases. Comment on "Disentangling DNA molecules" by Alexander Vologodskii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jie

    2016-09-01

    In this article [1] Dr. Vologodskii presents a comprehensive discussion on the mechanisms by which the type II topoisomerases unknot/disentangle DNA molecules. It is motivated by a mysterious capability of the nanometer-size enzymes to keep the steady-state probability of DNA entanglement/knot almost two orders of magnitude below that expected from thermal equilibrium [2-5]. In spite of obvious functional advantages of the enzymes, it raises a question regarding how such high efficiency could be achieved. The off-equilibrium steady state distribution of DNA topology is powered by ATP consumption. However, it remains unclear how this energy is utilized to bias the distribution toward disentangled/unknotted topological states of DNA.

  20. Crystal structure of a complex of a type IA DNA topoisomerase with a single-stranded DNA molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Changela, A.; Digate, R.J.; Mondragon, A.

    2010-03-05

    A variety of cellular processes, including DNA replication, transcription, and chromosome condensation, require enzymes that can regulate the ensuing topological changes occurring in DNA. Such enzymes - DNA topoisomerases - alter DNA topology by catalysing the cleavage of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), the passage of DNA through the resulting break, and the rejoining of the broken phosphodiester backbone. DNA topoisomerase III from Escherichia coli belongs to the type IA family of DNA topoisomerases, which transiently cleave ssDNA via formation of a covalent 5' phosphotyrosine intermediate. Here we report the crystal structure, at 2.05 {angstrom} resolution, of an inactive mutant of E. coli DNA topoisomerase III in a non-covalent complex with an 8-base ssDNA molecule. The enzyme undergoes a conformational change that allows the oligonucleotide to bind within a groove leading to the active site. We note that the ssDNA molecule adopts a conformation like that of B-DNA while bound to the enzyme. The position of the DNA within the realigned active site provides insight into the role of several highly conserved residues during catalysis. These findings confirm various aspects of the type IA topoisomerase mechanism while suggesting functional implications for other topoisomerases and proteins that perform DNA rearrangements.

  1. Epidemiological typing of Moraxella catarrhalis by using DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, D; Scriver, S; Bergeron, M G; Low, D E; Parr, T R; Patterson, J E; Matlow, A; Roy, P H

    1993-01-01

    Small-fragment restriction enzyme analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization were used to compare 60 strains of Moraxella catarrhalis isolated from various geographic locations. Restriction enzyme analysis with HaeIII resulted in 46 different patterns, 7 of which were shared by more than one isolate. Hybridizations with two DNA probes resulted in 18 different patterns, 11 of which were shared by more than one isolate. Strains with the same restriction enzyme pattern always had the same hybridization pattern. However, of the 50 strains that shared the 11 hybridization patterns, 39 could be further differentiated by restriction enzyme analysis. We found that hybridization is a method that is specific for the epidemiological typing of M. catarrhalis, but because of limited sensitivity, combination with small-fragment restriction enzyme analysis may be necessary to better determine the relatedness of strains. Images PMID:8096219

  2. Towards the chemoinformatic-based identification of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors: 2D- and 3D-similarity profile of screening libraries.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jakyung; Medina-Franco, José Luis

    2012-12-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) are emerging targets for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. The quinolone-based compound, SGI-1027, is a promising inhibitor of DNMT1 with a distinct mode of action and it is an attractive starting point for further research. Several experimental and computational approaches can be used to further develop novel DNMT1 inhibitors based on SGI-1027. In this work, we used a chemoinformatic-based approach to explore the potential to identify novel inhibitors in large screening collections of natural products and synthetic commercial libraries. Using the principles of similarity searching, the similarity profile to the active reference compound SGI-1027 was computed for four different screening libraries using a total of 22 two- and three- dimensional representations and two similarity metrics. The compound library with the overall highest similarity profile to the probe molecule was identified as the most promising collection for experimental testing. Individual compounds with high similarity to the reference were also selected as suitable candidates for experimental validation. During the course of this work, the 22 two- and three- dimensional representations were compared to each other and classified based on the similarity values computed with the reference compound. This classification is valuable to select structure representations for similarity searching of any other screening library. This work represents a step forward to further advance epigenetic therapies using computational approaches.

  3. DNA synthesis in pulmonary alveolar macrophages and type II cells: effects of ozone exposure and treatment with alpha-difluoromethylornithine

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, E.S.; White, D.M.; Brady, A.N.; Li, L.C.; D'Arcy, J.B.; Smiler, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    An increase in the number of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (AM) can be induced by a number of toxic insults to the lung, including ozone, an important photochemical oxidant air pollutant. This increase could arise from an influx of monocytes from the vascular or interstitial compartments, or from proliferation of AM in situ. While proliferation of alveolar type II cells after oxidant exposure has been well documented, it is not clear whether AM are also capable of this response. Rats were exposed to air or to 0.12, 0.25, or 0.50 ppm ozone for 1, 2, 3, 7, or 14 d, 20 h/d. The labeling index in both AM and type II cells increased about 10-fold after 2 d of exposure to 0.25 and 0.50 ppm of ozone, but returned to control levels by the end of 1 wk of exposure. These changes closely paralleled the temporal and dose-response characteristics of changes in total lung DNA synthesis. alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) administered to rats during a 2-d exposure to 0.50 ppm ozone did not inhibit the ozone-induced increase in labeling index in AM or type II cells, although evidence of inhibition of lung ornithine decarboxylase activity was obtained, and the ozone-induced increase in total lung DNA synthesis was inhibited by 23%. These results suggest that, like type II cells, AM are capable of entering the cell cycle and synthesizing new DNA in situ in response to short-term exposure to environmentally relevant doses of ozone, and that the ozone-induced stimulation of DNA synthesis in these cell types was refractory to inhibition by DFMO.

  4. Purslane (Portulaca oleracea) Seed Consumption And Aerobic Training Improves Biomarkers Associated with Atherosclerosis in Women with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D).

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Firouzeh; Soori, Rahman; Gholami, Khadijeh; Abolmaesoomi, Mitra; Yusof, Ashril; Muniandy, Sekaran; Heidarzadeh, Sara; Farzanegi, Parvin; Ali Azarbayjani, Mohammad

    2016-12-05

    The aim of this study was to investigate the responses of atherosclerosis plaque biomarkers to purslane seed consumption and aerobic training in women with T2D. 196 women with T2D were assigned into; (1) placebo (PL), (2) aerobic training+placebo (AT + PL), 3) purslane seeds (PS), aerobic training+purslane seeds (AT + PS). The training program and purslane seeds consumption (2.5 g lunch and 5 g dinner) were carried out for 16 weeks. The components of purslane seed were identified and quantified by GC-MS. Blood samples were withdrawn via venipuncture to examine blood glucose, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), creatinine, urea, uric acid, NF-κB, GLP1, GLP1R, TIMP-1, MMP2, MMP9, CRP, CST3, and CTSS expressions. Blood glucose, LDL, cholesterol, TG, creatinine, urea, and uric acid levels in the (P), (AT), and (AT + PS) groups were significantly decreased compared to the pre-experimental levels or the placebo group, while HDL, significantly increased. Furthermore, the protein and mRNA levels of NF-κB, TIMP-1, MMP2 &9, CRP, CST3, and CTSS in the (P), (AT), (AT + PS) significantly decreased compared to pre-experimental or the placebo group, while level of GLP1 and GLP1-R increased drastically. Findings suggest that purslane seed consumption alongside exercising could improve atherosclerosis plaque biomarkers through synergistically mechanisms in T2D.

  5. Purslane (Portulaca oleracea) Seed Consumption And Aerobic Training Improves Biomarkers Associated with Atherosclerosis in Women with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D)

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Firouzeh; Soori, Rahman; Gholami, Khadijeh; Abolmaesoomi, Mitra; Yusof, Ashril; Muniandy, Sekaran; Heidarzadeh, Sara; Farzanegi, Parvin; Ali azarbayjani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the responses of atherosclerosis plaque biomarkers to purslane seed consumption and aerobic training in women with T2D. 196 women with T2D were assigned into; (1) placebo (PL), (2) aerobic training+placebo (AT + PL), 3) purslane seeds (PS), aerobic training+purslane seeds (AT + PS). The training program and purslane seeds consumption (2.5 g lunch and 5 g dinner) were carried out for 16 weeks. The components of purslane seed were identified and quantified by GC–MS. Blood samples were withdrawn via venipuncture to examine blood glucose, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), creatinine, urea, uric acid, NF-κB, GLP1, GLP1R, TIMP-1, MMP2, MMP9, CRP, CST3, and CTSS expressions. Blood glucose, LDL, cholesterol, TG, creatinine, urea, and uric acid levels in the (P), (AT), and (AT + PS) groups were significantly decreased compared to the pre-experimental levels or the placebo group, while HDL, significantly increased. Furthermore, the protein and mRNA levels of NF-κB, TIMP-1, MMP2 &9, CRP, CST3, and CTSS in the (P), (AT), (AT + PS) significantly decreased compared to pre-experimental or the placebo group, while level of GLP1 and GLP1-R increased drastically. Findings suggest that purslane seed consumption alongside exercising could improve atherosclerosis plaque biomarkers through synergistically mechanisms in T2D. PMID:27917862

  6. Structural Studies of E. coli Topoisomerase III-DNA Complexes Reveal a Novel Type IA Topoisomerase-DNA Conformational Intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Changela, Anita; DiGate, Russell J.; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-03-05

    Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase III belongs to the type IA family of DNA topoisomerases, which transiently cleave single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) via a 5{prime} phosphotyrosine intermediate. We have solved crystal structures of wild-type E. coli topoisomerase III bound to an eight-base ssDNA molecule in three different pH environments. The structures reveal the enzyme in three distinct conformational states while bound to DNA. One conformation resembles the one observed previously with a DNA-bound, catalytically inactive mutant of topoisomerase III where DNA binding realigns catalytic residues to form a functional active site. Another conformation represents a novel intermediate in which DNA is bound along the ssDNA-binding groove but does not enter the active site, which remains in a catalytically inactive, closed state. A third conformation shows an intermediate state where the enzyme is still in a closed state, but the ssDNA is starting to invade the active site. For the first time, the active site region in the presence of both the catalytic tyrosine and ssDNA substrate is revealed for a type IA DNA topoisomerase, although there is no evidence of ssDNA cleavage. Comparative analysis of the various conformational states suggests a sequence of domain movements undertaken by the enzyme upon substrate binding.

  7. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  8. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  9. Binding of 7-methoxy-4-(aminomethyl)-coumarin to wild-type and W128F mutant cytochrome P450 2D6 studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stortelder, Aike; Keizers, Peter H. J.; Oostenbrink, Chris; De Graaf, Chris; De Kruijf, Petra; Vermeulen, Nico P. E.; Gooijer, Cees; Commandeur, Jan N. M.; Van Der Zwan, Gert

    2005-01-01

    Enzyme structure and dynamics may play a main role in substrate binding and the subsequent steps in the CYP (cytochrome P450) catalytic cycle. In the present study, changes in the structure of human CYP2D6 upon binding of the substrate are studied using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods, focusing not only on the emission of the tryptophan residues, but also on emission of the substrate. As a substrate, MAMC [7-methoxy-4-(aminomethyl)-coumarin] was selected, a compound exhibiting native fluorescence. As well as the wild-type, the W128F (Trp128→Phe) mutant of CYP2D6 was studied. After binding, a variety of energy transfer possibilities exist, and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate distances and relative orientations of donors and acceptors. Energy transfer from Trp128 to haem appeared to be important; its emission was related to the shortest of the three average tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes observed for CYP2D6. MAMC to haem energy transfer was very efficient as well: when bound in the active site, the emission of MAMC was fully quenched. Steady-state anisotropy revealed that besides the MAMC in the active site, another 2.4% of MAMC was bound outside of the active site to wild-type CYP2D6. The tryptophan residues in CYP2D6 appeared to be less accessible for the external quenchers iodide and acrylamide in presence of MAMC, indicating a tightening of the enzyme structure upon substrate binding. However, the changes in the overall enzyme structure were not very large, since the emission characteristics of the enzyme were not very different in the presence of MAMC. PMID:16190863

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr protein binds to the uracil DNA glycosylase DNA repair enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Bouhamdan, M; Benichou, S; Rey, F; Navarro, J M; Agostini, I; Spire, B; Camonis, J; Slupphaug, G; Vigne, R; Benarous, R; Sire, J

    1996-01-01

    The role of the accessory gene product Vpr during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection remains unclear. We have used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify cellular proteins that interact with Vpr and could be involved in its function. A cDNA clone which encodes the human uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a DNA repair enzyme involved in removal of uracil in DNA, has been isolated. Interaction between Vpr and UNG has been demonstrated by in vitro protein-protein binding assays using translated, radiolabeled Vpr and UNG recombinant proteins expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. Conversely, purified UNG has been demonstrated to interact with Vpr recombinant protein expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that Vpr and UNG are associated within cells expressing Vpr. By using a panel of C- and N-terminally deleted Vpr mutants, we have determined that the core protein of Vpr, spanning amino acids 15 to 77, is involved in the interaction with UNG. We also demonstrate by in vitro experiments that the enzymatic activity of UNG is retained upon interaction with Vpr. PMID:8551605

  11. Interpretation of radiative divertor studies with impurity seeding in type-I ELMy H-mode plasmas in JET-ILW using EDGE2D-EIRENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaervinen, A. E.; Groth, M.; Airila, M.; Belo, P.; Beurskens, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Clever, M.; Corrigan, G.; Devaux, S.; Drewelow, P.; Eich, T.; Giroud, C.; Harting, D.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Lawson, K.; Lipschultz, B.; Maddison, G.; Maggi, C.; Makkonen, T.; Marchetto, C.; Marsen, S.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Moulton, D.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.; Wischmeier, M.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen seeded JET-ILW H-mode plasmas have been investigated with EDGE2D-EIRENE. The simulations reproduce the experimentally observed factor of 10 reduction in the outer target power deposition when the normalized divertor radiation, Praddiv/PSOL, increases from the unseeded levels of 15% up to the 50% levels required for detachment. At these radiation levels, nitrogen is predicted dominate the total radiation with a contribution of 85%, consistent with previous measurements in JET-C. Due to the low radiative potential of nitrogen at the electron temperatures above 100 eV, more than 80% of the radiation is predicted to occur in the scrape-off layer, making nitrogen a suitable divertor radiator for typical JET divertor conditions with Te around 30 eV. The simulations reproduce the experimentally observed particle flux reduction at the low-field side target without the need for strong recombination. This is due to strong impurity radiation reducing the power levels entering the deuterium ionization front.

  12. High Prevalence and Diversity of Kidney Dysfunction in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Coronary Artery Disease: The BARI 2D Baseline Data

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Barry M; Hardison, Regina M.; Molitch, Mark E; Marroquin, Oscar C; McGill, Janet B.; August, Phyllis A

    2010-01-01

    Background We describe baseline renal function and albumin excretion rate in patients enrolled in BARI 2D, a randomized clinical trial comparing revascularization and medical therapy with medical therapy alone and deferred or no revascularization, and the impact of glycemic control with either insulin providing or insulin sensitizing drugs, on 5 year mortality. Methods Study participants had T2DM, documented CAD, and creatinine < 2 mg/dl. Albuminuria status (albumin/creatinine ratio [ACR]) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), utilizing the abbreviated MDRD equation, were determined at baseline. Univariate and multivariate relationships between baseline clinical characteristics and the presence of albuminuria and reduced eGFR rate were estimated. Results 2146 subjects were included in the analysis. 43% of the cohort had evidence of kidney dysfunction at baseline: 23% had an eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 with either micro (>30 ACR; 17%) or macro (> 300 ACR; 6%) albuminuria. 21 % had a reduced eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2; 52 % with reduced eGFR had no albuminuria; 28 % had microalbuminuria and 20 % had macroalbuminuria. Race, smoking status, duration of diabetes, hypertension, HbA1c, triglycerides, vascular disease, abnormal ejection fraction, and reduced eGFR were associated with greater albuminuria. Age, sex, duration of diabetes, ACR, HbA1c, HDL, and number of hypertensive medications were associated with reduced eGFR. Conclusion Kidney dysfunction is common in older patients with T2DM and CAD; Albuminuria was present in 33%. Reduced eGFR was present in 21%, and half the patients with reduced eGFR had no evidence of albuminuria. PMID:20375690

  13. DNA flow cytometric analysis in variable types of hydropic placentas

    PubMed Central

    Atabaki pasdar, Fatemeh; Khooei, Alireza; Fazel, Alireza; Rastin, Maryam; Tabasi, Nafise; Peirouvi, Tahmineh; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Differential diagnosis between complete hydatidiform mole, partial hydatidiform mole and hydropic abortion, known as hydropic placentas is still a challenge for pathologists but it is very important for patient management. Objective: We analyzed the nuclear DNA content of various types of hydropic placentas by flowcytometry. Materials and Methods: DNA ploidy analysis was performed in 20 non-molar (hydropic and non-hydropic spontaneous abortions) and 20 molar (complete and partial moles), formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples by flow cytometry. The criteria for selection were based on the histopathologic diagnosis. Results: Of 10 cases histologically diagnosed as complete hydatiform mole, 9 cases yielded diploid histograms, and 1 case was tetraploid. Of 10 partial hydatidiform moles, 8 were triploid and 2 were diploid. All of 20 cases diagnosed as spontaneous abortions (hydropic and non-hydropic) yielded diploid histograms. Conclusion: These findings signify the importance of the combined use of conventional histology and ploidy analysis in the differential diagnosis of complete hydatidiform mole, partial hydatidiform mole and hydropic abortion. PMID:26221125

  14. Env-2dCD4 S60C complexes act as super immunogens and elicit potent, broadly neutralizing antibodies against clinically relevant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Killick, Mark A; Grant, Michelle L; Cerutti, Nichole M; Capovilla, Alexio; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A

    2015-11-17

    The ability to induce a broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) response following vaccination is regarded as a crucial aspect in developing an effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The bNAbs target the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) which is exposed on the virus surface, thereby preventing cell entry. To date, conventional vaccine approaches such as the use of Env-based immunogens have been unsuccessful. We expressed, purified, characterized and evaluated the immunogenicity of several unique HIV-1 subtype C Env immunogens in small animals. Here we report that vaccine immunogens based on Env liganded to a two domain CD4 variant, 2dCD4(S60C) are capable of consistently eliciting potent, broadly neutralizing antibody responses in New Zealand white rabbits against a panel of clinically relevant HIV-1 pseudoviruses. This was irrespective of the Env protein subtype and context. Importantly, depletion of the anti-CD4 antibodies appeared to abrogate the neutralization activity in the rabbit sera. Taken together, this data suggests that the Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes described here are "super" immunogens, and potentially immunofocus antibody responses to a unique epitope spanning the 2dCD4(60C). Recent data from the two available anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, Ibalizumab and CD4-Ig (and bispecific variants thereof) have highlighted that the use of these broad and potent entry inhibitors could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine targeting HIV-1. Overall, the ability of the unique Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes to elicit potent bNAb responses has not been described previously, reinforcing that further investigation for their utility in preventing and controlling HIV-1/SIV infection is warranted.

  15. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on avidin-biotin conjugation for influenza virus (type A) detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Da-Jung; Kim, Ki-Chul; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2011-09-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor (E-DNA biosensor) was fabricated by avidin-biotin conjugation of a biotinylated probe DNA, 5'-biotin-ATG AGT CTT CTA ACC GAG GTC GAA-3', and an avidin-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to detect the influenza virus (type A). An avidin-modified GCE was prepared by the reaction of avidin and a carboxylic acid-modified GCE, which was synthesized by the electrochemical reduction of 4-carboxyphenyl diazonium salt. The current value of the E-DNA biosensor was evaluated after hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The current value decreased after the hybridization of the probe DNA and target DNA. The DNA that was used follows: complementary target DNA, 5'-TTC GAC CTC GGT TAG AAG ACT CAT-3' and two-base mismatched DNA, 5'-TTC GAC AGC GGT TAT AAG ACT CAT-3'.

  16. Natural History of Cardiac and Respiratory Involvement, Prognosis and Predictive Factors for Long-Term Survival in Adult Patients with Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophies Type 2C and 2D

    PubMed Central

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Ogna, Adam; Chaffaut, Cendrine; Chevret, Sylvie; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Leturcq, France; Wahbi, Karim; Prigent, Helene; Lofaso, Frederic; Nardi, Olivier; Clair, Bernard; Behin, Anthony; Stojkovic, Tanya; Laforet, Pascal; Orlikowski, David; Annane, Djillali

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2C and 2D limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a group of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies manifested by proximal myopathy, impaired respiratory muscle function and cardiomyopathy. The correlation and the prognostic impact of respiratory and heart impairment are poorly described. We aimed to describe the long-term cardiac and respiratory follow-up of these patients and to determine predictive factors of cardio-respiratory events and mortality in LGMD 2C and 2D. Methods We reviewed the charts of 34 LGMD patients, followed from 2005 to 2015, to obtain echocardiographic, respiratory function and sleep recording data. We considered respiratory events (acute respiratory failure, pulmonary sepsis, atelectasis or pneumothorax), cardiac events (acute heart failure, significant cardiac arrhythmia or conduction block, ischemic stroke) and mortality as outcomes of interest for the present analysis. Results A total of 21 patients had type 2C LGMD and 13 patients had type 2D. Median age was 30 years [IQR 24–38]. At baseline, median pulmonary vital capacity (VC) was 31% of predicted value [20–40]. Median maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) was 31 cmH2O [IQR 20.25–39.75]. Median maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) was 30 cm H2O [20–36]. Median left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 55% [45–64] with 38% of patients with LVEF <50%. Over a median follow-up of 6 years, we observed 38% respiratory events, 14% cardiac events and 20% mortality. Among baseline characteristics, LVEF and left ventricular end diastolic diameter (LVEDD) were associated with mortality, whilst respiratory parameters (VC, MIP, MEP) and the need for home mechanical ventilation (HMV) were associated with respiratory events. Conclusion In our cohort of severely respiratory impaired type 2C and 2D LGMD, respiratory morbidity was high. Cardiac dysfunction was frequent in particular in LGMD 2C and had an impact on long-term mortality. Trial Registration

  17. Cationic comb-type copolymers for DNA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won Jong; Sato, Yuichi; Akaike, Toshihiro; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2003-12-01

    Genetic diagnoses, such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing, allow elucidation of gene-based physiological differences, such as susceptibility to diseases and response to drugs, among individuals. Many detection technologies, including allele-specific hybridization, allele-specific primer extension and oligonucleotide ligation, are being used to discriminate SNP alleles. These methods still have many unsolved practical issues. In general they require adequate and specific hybridizations of primer or probe DNAs with target DNAs. This frequently needs optimization of the probe/primer structures and operating conditions. In nature, highly homology-sensitive hybridization is assisted by a nucleic acid chaperone that reduces the energy barrier associated with breakage and reassociation of nucleic base pairs. Here we report a simple, quick, precise but enzyme-free method for SNP analysis. The method uses cationic comb-type copolymers (CCCs) producing high nucleic acid chaperone activities. A single-base mismatch in 20-mer DNA can be detected within a few minutes at ambient temperatures (25-37 °C). Even without careful optimization processes, the method has the sensitivity to detect the mismatches causing subtle changes (ΔTm ~ 1 °C) in duplex thermal stability. CCCs may have various bioanalytical applications where precise hybridization of nucleic acids is needed.

  18. Knockdown of DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 by RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type I DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Muylaert, Isabella; Elias, Per

    2007-04-13

    Herpes simplex virus has a linear double-stranded DNA genome with directly repeated terminal sequences needed for cleavage and packaging of replicated DNA. In infected cells, linear genomes rapidly become endless. It is currently a matter of discussion whether the endless genomes are circles supporting rolling circle replication or arise by recombination of linear genomes forming concatemers. Here, we have examined the role of mammalian DNA ligases in the herpes simplex virus, type I (HSV-1) life cycle by employing RNA interference (RNAi) in human 1BR.3.N fibroblasts. We find that RNAi-mediated knockdown of DNA ligase IV and its co-factor XRCC4 causes a hundred-fold reduction of virus yield, a small plaque phenotype, and reduced DNA synthesis. The effect is specific because RNAi against DNA ligase I or DNA ligase III fail to reduce HSV-1 replication. Furthermore, RNAi against DNA ligase IV and XRCC4 does not affect replication of adenovirus. In addition, high multiplicity infections of HSV-1 in human DNA ligase IV-deficient cells reveal a pronounced delay of production of infectious virus. Finally, we demonstrate that formation of endless genomes is inhibited by RNAi-mediated depletion of DNA ligase IV and XRCC4. Our results suggests that DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 serves an important role in the replication cycle of herpes viruses and is likely to be required for the formation of the endless genomes early during productive infection.

  19. A comprehensive explanation and exercise of the source terms in hyperbolic systems using Roe type solutions. Application to the 1D-2D shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, J.; Navas-Montilla, A.

    2016-12-01

    Powerful numerical methods have to consider the presence of source terms of different nature, that intensely compete among them and may lead to strong spatiotemporal variations in the flow. When applied to shallow flows, numerical preservation of quiescent equilibrium, also known as the well-balanced property, is still nowadays the keystone for the formulation of novel numerical schemes. But this condition turns completely insufficient when applied to problems of practical interest. Energy balanced methods (E-schemes) can overcome all type of situations in shallow flows, not only under arbitrary geometries, but also with independence of the rheological shear stress model selected. They must be able to handle correctly transient problems including modeling of starting and stopping flow conditions in debris flow and other flows with a non-Newtonian rheological behavior. The numerical solver presented here satisfies these properties and is based on an approximate solution defined in a previous work. Given the relevant capabilities of this weak solution, it is fully theoretically derived here for a general set of equations. This useful step allows providing for the first time an E-scheme, where the set of source terms is fully exercised under any flow condition involving high slopes and arbitrary shear stress. With the proposed solver, a Roe type first order scheme in time and space, positivity conditions are explored under a general framework and numerical simulations can be accurately performed recovering an appropriate selection of the time step, allowed by a detailed analysis of the approximate solver. The use of case-dependent threshold values is unnecessary and exact mass conservation is preserved.

  20. The Weighted Burgers Vector: a new quantity for constraining dislocation densities and types using electron backscatter diffraction on 2D sections through crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, J; Mariani, E; Piazolo, S; Prior, D J; Trimby, P; Drury, M R

    2009-03-01

    The Weighted Burgers Vector (WBV) is defined here as the sum, over all types of dislocations, of [(density of intersections of dislocation lines with a map) x (Burgers vector)]. Here we show that it can be calculated, for any crystal system, solely from orientation gradients in a map view, unlike the full dislocation density tensor, which requires gradients in the third dimension. No assumption is made about gradients in the third dimension and they may be non-zero. The only assumption involved is that elastic strains are small so the lattice distortion is entirely due to dislocations. Orientation gradients can be estimated from gridded orientation measurements obtained by EBSD mapping, so the WBV can be calculated as a vector field on an EBSD map. The magnitude of the WBV gives a lower bound on the magnitude of the dislocation density tensor when that magnitude is defined in a coordinate invariant way. The direction of the WBV can constrain the types of Burgers vectors of geometrically necessary dislocations present in the microstructure, most clearly when it is broken down in terms of lattice vectors. The WBV has three advantages over other measures of local lattice distortion: it is a vector and hence carries more information than a scalar quantity, it has an explicit mathematical link to the individual Burgers vectors of dislocations and, since it is derived via tensor calculus, it is not dependent on the map coordinate system. If a sub-grain wall is included in the WBV calculation, the magnitude of the WBV becomes dependent on the step size but its direction still carries information on the Burgers vectors in the wall. The net Burgers vector content of dislocations intersecting an area of a map can be simply calculated by an integration round the edge of that area, a method which is fast and complements point-by-point WBV calculations.

  1. The Effect of the AGN Feedback on the Interstellar Medium of Early-Type Galaxies:2D Hydrodynamical Simulations of the Low-Rotation Case.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciotti, Luca; Pellegrini, Silvia; Negri, Andrea; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2017-01-01

    We present two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations for the evolution of early-type galaxies containing central massive black holes (MBHs), starting at an age of ≃ 2 {Gyr}. The code contains accurate and physically consistent radiative and mechanical active galactic nucleus (AGN) wind feedback, with parsec-scale central resolution. Mass input comes from stellar evolution; energy input includes Type Ia (SNIa) and II supernovae and stellar heating; star formation (SF) is included. Realistic, axisymmetric dynamical galaxy models are built solving the Jeans’ equations. The lowest mass models ({M}\\star =8 {10}10 {M}ȯ ) develop global outflows sustained by SNIa heating, ending with a lower amount of hot gas and new stars. In more massive models, nuclear outbursts last to the present epoch, with large and frequent fluctuations in nuclear emission and from the gas ({L}{{X}}). Each burst lasts ∼ {10}7.5 years, during which cold, inflowing, and hot, outflowing gas phases coexist. The {L}{{X}}{--}{T}{{X}} relation for the gas matches that of local galaxies. AGN activity causes positive feedback for SF. Roughly half of the total mass loss is recycled into new stars ({{Δ }}{M}\\star ), just ≃3% of it is accreted on the MBH, the remainder being ejected from the galaxy. The ratio between the mass of gas expelled to that in new stars, the load factor, is ≃ 0.6. Rounder galaxy shapes lead to larger final MBH masses, {{Δ }}{M}\\star , and {L}{{X}}. Almost all of the time is spent at very low nuclear luminosities, yet one quarter of the total energy is emitted at an Eddington ratio > 0.1. The duty-cycle of AGN activity is approximately 4%.

  2. DNA Macroarray for Identification and Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Trad, Salim; Allignet, Jeanine; Frangeul, Lionel; Davi, Marilyne; Vergassola, Massimo; Couve, Elisabeth; Morvan, Anne; Kechrid, Amel; Buchrieser, Carmen; Glaser, Philippe; El Solh, Névine

    2004-01-01

    A DNA macroarray containing 465 intragenic amplicons was designed to identify Staphylococcus aureus at the species level and to type S. aureus isolates. The genes selected included those encoding (i) S. aureus-specific proteins, (ii) staphylococcal and enterococcal proteins mediating antibiotic resistance and factors involved in their expression, (iii) putative virulence proteins and factors controlling their expression, and (iv) proteins produced by mobile elements. The macroarray was hybridized with the cellular DNAs of 80 S. aureus clinical isolates that were previously typed by analyses of their antibiograms and SmaI patterns. The set selected contained unrelated, endemic, and outbreak-related isolates belonging to 45 SmaI genotypes. In a gene content dendrogram, the 80 isolates were distributed into 52 clusters. The outbreak-related isolates were linked in the same or a closely related cluster(s). Clustering based on gene content provided a better discrimination than SmaI pattern analysis for the tested mecA+ isolates that were endemic to Europe. All of the antibiotic resistance genes detected could be correlated with their corresponding phenotypes, except for one isolate which carried a mecA gene without being resistant. The 16 isolates responsible for bone infections were distinguishable from the 12 isolates from uninfected nasal carriers by a significantly higher prevalence of the sdrD gene coding for a putative SD (serine-aspartate) adhesin (in 15 and 7 isolates, respectively). In conclusion, the macroarray designed for this study offers an attractive and rapid typing method which has the advantage of providing additional information concerning the gene content of the isolate of interest. PMID:15131170

  3. DNA typing in forensic medicine and in criminal investigations: a current survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benecke, Mark

    Since 1985 DNA typing of biological material has become one of the most powerful tools for personal identification in forensic medicine and in criminal investigations [1-6]. Classical DNA 〝fingerprinting'' is increasingly being replaced by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based technology which detects very short polymorphic stretches of DNA [7-15]. DNA loci which forensic scientists study do not code for proteins, and they are spread over the whole genome [16, 17]. These loci are neutral, and few provide any information about individuals except for their identity. Minute amounts of biological material are sufficient for DNA typing. Many European countries are beginning to establish databases to store DNA profiles of crime scenes and known offenders. A brief overview is given of past and present DNA typing and the establishment of forensic DNA databases in Europe.

  4. Replication of adenovirus type 4 DNA by a purified fraction from infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Temperley, S M; Hay, R T

    1991-01-01

    An extract from Adenovirus type 4 infected HeLa cells was fractionated by ion-exchange and DNA affinity chromatography. One fraction, which bound tightly to single stranded DNA, contained predominantly a protein of apparent molecular weight 65,000 and three less abundant proteins. Immunological cross-reactivity with adenovirus type 2 proteins confirmed the presence of preterminal protein and indicated that the abundant species was the virus coded DNA binding protein. This fraction contained an aphidicolin resistant DNA polymerase activity and in the presence of a linearised plasmid containing the adenovirus type 4 origin of DNA replication efficient transfer of dCMP onto preterminal protein, indicative of initiation, was observed. Furthermore, addition of all four deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and an ATP regenerating system resulted in the elongation of initiated molecules to generate plasmid molecules covalently attached to preterminal protein. Adenovirus type 4 DNA binding protein was extensively purified from crude adenovirus-4 infected HeLa extract by immunoaffinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody raised against adenovirus type 2 DNA binding protein. A low level of initiation of DNA replication was detected in the fraction depleted of DNA binding protein but activity was restored by addition of purified DNA binding protein. DNA binding protein therefore plays an important role in the initiation of Ad4 DNA replication. Images PMID:1829516

  5. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-364 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined

  6. DNA G-segment bending is not the sole determinant of topology simplification by type II DNA topoisomerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Neil H.; Santos, Sergio; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Stuchinskaya, Tanya; Taylor, James A.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    DNA topoisomerases control the topology of DNA. Type II topoisomerases exhibit topology simplification, whereby products of their reactions are simplified beyond that expected based on thermodynamic equilibrium. The molecular basis for this process is unknown, although DNA bending has been implicated. To investigate the role of bending in topology simplification, the DNA bend angles of four enzymes of different types (IIA and IIB) were measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The enzymes tested were Escherichia coli topo IV and yeast topo II (type IIA enzymes that exhibit topology simplification), and Methanosarcina mazei topo VI and Sulfolobus shibatae topo VI (type IIB enzymes, which do not). Bend angles were measured using the manual tangent method from topographical AFM images taken with a novel amplitude-modulated imaging mode: small amplitude small set-point (SASS), which optimises resolution for a given AFM tip size and minimises tip convolution with the sample. This gave improved accuracy and reliability and revealed that all 4 topoisomerases bend DNA by a similar amount: ~120° between the DNA entering and exiting the enzyme complex. These data indicate that DNA bending alone is insufficient to explain topology simplification and that the `exit gate' may be an important determinant of this process.

  7. Simulation of the type of coralin alkaloid-DNA binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, K. G.; Koshlan, T. V.

    2015-05-01

    Interaction between a synthesized coralin protoberberine alkaloid and the DNA double helix of the calf's thymus in a salt solution is studied by optical absorption spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry. The dependence of the spectral characteristics of the alkaloid on a ratio between the DNA base pair concentration and the alkaloid molecule concentration is considered. The parameters of bonds between the coralin alkaloid and the DNA double helix are determined using modified McGhee-von Hippel equations.

  8. Adjustment of Cell-Type Composition Minimizes Systematic Bias in Blood DNA Methylation Profiles Derived by DNA Collection Protocols.

    PubMed

    Shiwa, Yuh; Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Ryohei; Ohmomo, Hideki; Ono, Kanako; Kudo, Hisaaki; Hata, Jun; Hozawa, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Matsuda, Koichi; Minegishi, Naoko; Satoh, Mamoru; Tanno, Kozo; Yamaji, Taiki; Wakai, Kenji; Hitomi, Jiro; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sobue, Kenji; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Differences in DNA collection protocols may be a potential confounder in epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) using a large number of blood specimens from multiple biobanks and/or cohorts. Here we show that pre-analytical procedures involved in DNA collection can induce systematic bias in the DNA methylation profiles of blood cells that can be adjusted by cell-type composition variables. In Experiment 1, whole blood from 16 volunteers was collected to examine the effect of a 24 h storage period at 4°C on DNA methylation profiles as measured using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. Our statistical analysis showed that the P-value distribution of more than 450,000 CpG sites was similar to the theoretical distribution (in quantile-quantile plot, λ = 1.03) when comparing two control replicates, which was remarkably deviated from the theoretical distribution (λ = 1.50) when comparing control and storage conditions. We then considered cell-type composition as a possible cause of the observed bias in DNA methylation profiles and found that the bias associated with the cold storage condition was largely decreased (λ adjusted = 1.14) by taking into account a cell-type composition variable. As such, we compared four respective sample collection protocols used in large-scale Japanese biobanks or cohorts as well as two control replicates. Systematic biases in DNA methylation profiles were observed between control and three of four protocols without adjustment of cell-type composition (λ = 1.12-1.45) and no remarkable biases were seen after adjusting for cell-type composition in all four protocols (λ adjusted = 1.00-1.17). These results revealed important implications for comparing DNA methylation profiles between blood specimens from different sources and may lead to discovery of disease-associated DNA methylation markers and the development of DNA methylation profile-based predictive risk models.

  9. DNA translocation blockage, a general mechanism of cleavage site selection by type I restriction enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Janscak, P; MacWilliams, M P; Sandmeier, U; Nagaraja, V; Bickle, T A

    1999-01-01

    Type I restriction enzymes bind to a specific DNA sequence and subsequently translocate DNA past the complex to reach a non-specific cleavage site. We have examined several potential blocks to DNA translocation, such as positive supercoiling or a Holliday junction, for their ability to trigger DNA cleavage by type I restriction enzymes. Introduction of positive supercoiling into plasmid DNA did not have a significant effect on the rate of DNA cleavage by EcoAI endonuclease nor on the enzyme's ability to select cleavage sites randomly throughout the DNA molecule. Thus, positive supercoiling does not prevent DNA translocation. EcoR124II endonuclease cleaved DNA at Holliday junctions present on both linear and negatively supercoiled substrates. The latter substrate was cleaved by a single enzyme molecule at two sites, one on either side of the junction, consistent with a bi-directional translocation model. Linear DNA molecules with two recognition sites for endonucleases from different type I families were cut between the sites when both enzymes were added simultaneously but not when a single enzyme was added. We propose that type I restriction enzymes can track along a DNA substrate irrespective of its topology and cleave DNA at any barrier that is able to halt the translocation process. PMID:10228175

  10. Methylated DNA-binding protein is present in various mammalian cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Supakar, P.C.; Weist, D.; Zhang, D.; Inamdar, N.; Zhang, Xianyang; Khan, R.; Ehrlich, M. ); Ehrlich, K.C. )

    1988-08-25

    A DNA-binding protein from human placenta, methylated DNA-binding protein (MDBP), binds to certain DNA sequences only when they contain 5-methylcytosine (m{sup 5}C) residues at specific positions. The authors found a very similar DNA-binding activity in nuclear extracts of rat tissues, calf thymus, human embryonal carcinoma cells, HeLa cells, and mouse LTK cells. Like human placental MDBP, the analogous DNA-binding proteins from the above mammalian cell lines formed a number of different low-electrophoretic-mobility complexes with a 14-bp MDBP-specific oligonucleotide duplex. All of these complexes exhibited the same DNA methylation specificity and DNA sequence specificity. Although MDBP activity was found in various mammalian cell types, it was not detected in extracts of cultured mosquito cells and so may be associated only with cells with vertebrate-type DNA methylation.

  11. Adjusting for Cell Type Composition in DNA Methylation Data Using a Regression-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jones, Meaghan J; Islam, Sumaiya A; Edgar, Rachel D; Kobor, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of DNA methylation in a population context has the potential to uncover novel gene and environment interactions as well as markers of health and disease. In order to find such associations it is important to control for factors which may mask or alter DNA methylation signatures. Since tissue of origin and coinciding cell type composition are major contributors to DNA methylation patterns, and can easily confound important findings, it is vital to adjust DNA methylation data for such differences across individuals. Here we describe the use of a regression method to adjust for cell type composition in DNA methylation data. We specifically discuss what information is required to adjust for cell type composition and then provide detailed instructions on how to perform cell type adjustment on high dimensional DNA methylation data. This method has been applied mainly to Illumina 450K data, but can also be adapted to pyrosequencing or genome-wide bisulfite sequencing data.

  12. Forensic genetic SNP typing of low-template DNA and highly degraded DNA from crime case samples.

    PubMed

    Børsting, Claus; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Morling, Niels

    2013-05-01

    Heterozygote imbalances leading to allele drop-outs and disproportionally large stutters leading to allele drop-ins are known stochastic phenomena related to STR typing of low-template DNA (LtDNA). The large stutters and the many drop-ins in typical STR stutter positions are artifacts from the PCR amplification of tandem repeats. These artifacts may be avoided by typing bi-allelic markers instead of STRs. In this work, the SNPforID multiplex assay was used to type LtDNA. A sensitized SNP typing protocol was introduced, that increased signal strengths without increasing noise and without affecting the heterozygote balance. Allele drop-ins were only observed in experiments with 25 pg of DNA and not in experiments with 50 and 100 pg of DNA. The allele drop-in rate in the 25 pg experiments was 0.06% or 100 times lower than what was previously reported for STR typing of LtDNA. A composite model and two different consensus models were used to interpret the SNP data. Correct profiles with 42-49 SNPs were generated from the 50 and 100 pg experiments, whereas a few incorrect genotypes were included in the generated profiles from the 25 pg experiments. With the strict consensus model, between 35 and 48 SNPs were correctly typed in the 25 pg experiments and only one allele drop-out (error rate: 0.07%) was observed in the consensus profiles. A total of 28 crime case samples were selected for typing with the sensitized SNPforID protocol. The samples were previously typed with old STR kits during the crime case investigation and only partial profiles (0-6 STRs) were obtained. Eleven of the samples could not be quantified with the Quantifiler™ Human DNA Quantification kit because of partial or complete inhibition of the PCR. For eight of these samples, SNP typing was only possible when the buffer and DNA polymerase used in the original protocol was replaced with the AmpFℓSTR(®) SEfiler Plus™ Master Mix, which was developed specifically for challenging forensic samples. All

  13. DNA Vaccines against Dengue Virus Type 2 Based on Truncate Envelope Protein or Its Domain III

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Adriana S.; Yamamura, Anna M. Y.; Freire, Marcos S.; Trindade, Gisela F.; Bonaldo, Myrna; Galler, Ricardo; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2011-01-01

    Two DNA vaccines were constructed encoding the ectodomain (domains I, II and III) of the DENV2 envelope protein (pE1D2) or only its domain III (pE2D2), fused to the human tissue plasminogen activator signal peptide (t-PA). The expression and secretion of recombinant proteins was confirmed in vitro in BHK cells transfected with the two plasmids, detected by immunofluorescence or immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled gene products, using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against DENV2. Besides, results reveal that the ectodomain of the E protein can be efficiently expressed in vivo, in a mammalian system, without the prM protein that is hypothesized to act as a chaperonin during dengue infection. Balb/c mice were immunized with the DNA vaccines and challenged with a lethal dose of DENV2. All pE1D2-vaccinated mice survived challenge, while 45% of animals immunized with the pE2D2 died after infection. Furthermore, only 10% of pE1D2-immunized mice presented some clinical signs of infection after challenge, whereas most of animals inoculated with the pE2D2 showed effects of the disease with high morbidity degrees. Levels of neutralizing antibodies were significantly higher in pE1D2-vaccinated mice than in pE2D2-immunized animals, also suggesting that the pE1D2 vaccine was more protective than the pE2D2. PMID:21779317

  14. Past, present and future of forensic DNA typing.

    PubMed

    Giardina, Emiliano; Spinella, Aldo; Novelli, Giuseppe

    2011-02-01

    Recent advances in our ability to dissect the human genome and the availability of platforms for genome-wide analysis and whole-genome sequencing are expected to develop new tools for both biomedical and forensic DNA analyses. Nowadays, we can individualize single cells left at the crime scene or analyze ancient human remains. Here, we provide a general view on the past, current and likely future directions of forensic DNA analysis.

  15. Genetic diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets in a cohort study: Tubular reabsorption of phosphate and 1,25(OH)2D serum levels are associated with PHEX mutation type

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic Hypophosphatemic Rickets (HR) is a group of diseases characterized by renal phosphate wasting with inappropriately low or normal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D) serum levels. The most common form of HR is X-linked dominant HR (XLHR) which is caused by inactivating mutations in the PHEX gene. The purpose of this study was to perform genetic diagnosis in a cohort of patients with clinical diagnosis of HR, to perform genotype-phenotype correlations of those patients and to compare our data with other HR cohort studies. Methods Forty three affected individuals from 36 non related families were analyzed. For the genetic analysis, the PHEX gene was sequenced in all of the patients and in 13 cases the study was complemented by mRNA sequencing and Multiple Ligation Probe Assay. For the genotype-phenotype correlation study, the clinical and biochemical phenotype of the patients was compared with the type of mutation, which was grouped into clearly deleterious or likely causative, using the Mann-Whitney and Fisher's exact test. Results Mutations in the PHEX gene were identified in all the patients thus confirming an XLHR. Thirty four different mutations were found distributed throughout the gene with higher density at the 3' end. The majority of the mutations were novel (69.4%), most of them resulted in a truncated PHEX protein (83.3%) and were family specific (88.9%). Tubular reabsorption of phosphate (TRP) and 1,25(OH)2D serum levels were significantly lower in patients carrying clearly deleterious mutations than in patients carrying likely causative ones (61.39 ± 19.76 vs. 80.14 ± 8.80%, p = 0.028 and 40.93 ± 30.73 vs. 78.46 ± 36.27 pg/ml, p = 0.013). Conclusions PHEX gene mutations were found in all the HR cases analyzed, which was in contrast with other cohort studies. Patients with clearly deleterious PHEX mutations had lower TRP and 1,25(OH)2D levels suggesting that the PHEX type of mutation might predict the XLHR phenotype severity. PMID

  16. Accumulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA in T cells: results of multiple infection events.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, H L; Zinkus, D M

    1990-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA synthesis was followed in a CD4+ line of T cells (C8166) grown in the presence or absence of a monoclonal antibody to CD4 that blocks infection By 48 h after infection, cultures grown in the presence of the antibody contained approximately 4 copies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA per cell, whereas those grown in the absence of the antibody contained approximately 80 copies of viral DNA per cell. Most of the viral DNA in cultures grown in the absence of the antibody was present in a broad smear of apparently incomplete viral sequences. In cultures grown in the presence or absence of the antibody, the 9.6-kilobase linear duplex of viral DNA appeared to undergo integration within 24 h of its appearance. These results demonstrate that T cells accumulate unintegrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA as a result of multiple virions entering cells. Images PMID:2398529

  17. Direct measurement of DNA bending by type IIA topoisomerases: implications for non-equilibrium topology simplification

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Ashley H.; Sarkar, Susanta K.; Seol, Yeonee; Liou, Grace F.; Osheroff, Neil; Neuman, Keir C.

    2011-01-01

    Type IIA topoisomerases modify DNA topology by passing one segment of duplex DNA (transfer or T–segment) through a transient double-strand break in a second segment of DNA (gate or G–segment) in an ATP-dependent reaction. Type IIA topoisomerases decatenate, unknot and relax supercoiled DNA to levels below equilibrium, resulting in global topology simplification. The mechanism underlying this non-equilibrium topology simplification remains speculative. The bend angle model postulates that non-equilibrium topology simplification scales with the bend angle imposed on the G–segment DNA by the binding of a type IIA topoisomerase. To test this bend angle model, we used atomic force microscopy and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to measure the extent of bending imposed on DNA by three type IIA topoisomerases that span the range of topology simplification activity. We found that Escherichia coli topoisomerase IV, yeast topoisomerase II and human topoisomerase IIα each bend DNA to a similar degree. These data suggest that DNA bending is not the sole determinant of non-equilibrium topology simplification. Rather, they suggest a fundamental and conserved role for DNA bending in the enzymatic cycle of type IIA topoisomerases. PMID:21421557

  18. Crystal Structure of a Bacterial Type IB DNA Topoisomerase Reveals a Preassembled Active Site in the Absence of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Asmita; Shuman, Stewart; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-03-08

    Type IB DNA topoisomerases are found in all eukarya, two families of eukaryotic viruses (poxviruses and mimivirus), and many genera of bacteria. They alter DNA topology by cleaving and resealing one strand of duplex DNA via a covalent DNA-(3-phosphotyrosyl)-enzyme intermediate. Bacterial type IB enzymes were discovered recently and are described as poxvirus-like with respect to their small size, primary structures, and bipartite domain organization. Here we report the 1.75-{angstrom} crystal structure of Deinococcus radiodurans topoisomerase IB (DraTopIB), a prototype of the bacterial clade. DraTopIB consists of an amino-terminal (N) {beta}-sheet domain (amino acids 1-90) and a predominantly {alpha}-helical carboxyl-terminal (C) domain (amino acids 91-346) that closely resemble the corresponding domains of vaccinia virus topoisomerase IB. The five amino acids of DraTopIB that comprise the catalytic pentad (Arg-137, Lys-174, Arg-239, Asn-280, and Tyr-289) are preassembled into the active site in the absence of DNA in a manner nearly identical to the pentad configuration in human topoisomerase I bound to DNA. This contrasts with the apoenzyme of vaccinia topoisomerase, in which three of the active site constituents are either displaced or disordered. The N and C domains of DraTopIB are splayed apart in an 'open' conformation, in which the surface of the catalytic domain containing the active site is exposed for DNA binding. A comparison with the human topoisomerase I-DNA cocrystal structure suggests how viral and bacterial topoisomerase IB enzymes might bind DNA circumferentially via movement of the N domain into the major groove and clamping of a disordered loop of the C domain around the helix.

  19. Identification and epidemiological typing of Naegleria fowleri with DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Kilvington, S; Beeching, J

    1995-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a small free-living amoeboflagellate found in warm water habitats worldwide. The organism is pathogenic to humans, causing fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. When monitoring the environment for the presence of N. fowleri, it is important to reliably differentiate the organism from other closely related but nonpathogenic species. To this end, we have developed species-specific DNA probes for use in the rapid identification of N. fowleri from the environment. Samples were taken from the thermal springs in Bath, England, and cultured for amoebae. Of 84 isolates of thermophilic Naegleria spp., 10 were identified as N. fowleri by probe hybridization. The identity of these isolates was subsequently confirmed by their specific whole-cell DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). One DNA clone was found to contain a repeated element that detected chromosomal RFLPs that were not directly visible on agarose gels. This enabled the further differentiation of strains within geographically defined whole-cell DNA RFLP groups. N. fowleri DNA probes represent a specific and potentially rapid method for the identification of the organism soon after primary isolation from the environment. PMID:7793928

  20. Extraction of DNA from forensic-type sexual assault specimens using simple, rapid sonication procedures.

    PubMed

    Crouse, C A; Ban, J D; D'Alessio, J K

    1993-10-01

    Sonication procedures for the extraction of DNA from forensic-type semen specimens have been developed, which, when compared to currently utilized sperm DNA extraction techniques, are simple, rapid and result in comparable DNA yields. Sperm DNA extraction by sonication was performed on whole semen, seminal stains, buccal swabs and post-coital specimens. Ultrasound disruption of sperm cells and their ultimate release of cellular DNA has been conducted in the presence of sperm wash buffers followed by organic extraction or Chelex 100 with little or no compromise to DNA quality, quantity or amplifiability. Two advantages of sonication over currently used forensic techniques to extract sperm DNA include 1) sperm DNA extraction that occurs within five minutes of sonication compared with an hour or greater for water bath incubations in classic enzyme digestion DNA extractions and 2) one less preparatory step with the Chelex/sonication protocol and three less steps with the sonication/organic protocol compared with other procedures thus eliminating potential sample-to-sample cross-contamination. Sperm DNA extracted by optimum sonication procedures was used for forensic HLA DQ alpha typing and restriction fragment length polymorphisms analysis without any adverse effects on typing results.

  1. Overview of DNA microarrays: types, applications, and their future.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Roger

    2013-01-01

    This unit provides an overview of DNA microarrays. Microarrays are a technology in which thousands of nucleic acids are bound to a surface and are used to measure the relative concentration of nucleic acid sequences in a mixture via hybridization and subsequent detection of the hybridization events. This overview first discusses the history of microarrays and the antecedent technologies that led to their development. This is followed by discussion of the methods of manufacture of microarrays and the most common biological applications. The unit ends with a brief description of the limitations of microarrays and discusses how microarrays are being rapidly replaced by DNA sequencing technologies.

  2. Adjustment of Cell-Type Composition Minimizes Systematic Bias in Blood DNA Methylation Profiles Derived by DNA Collection Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Shiwa, Yuh; Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Ryohei; Ohmomo, Hideki; Ono, Kanako; Kudo, Hisaaki; Hata, Jun; Hozawa, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Matsuda, Koichi; Minegishi, Naoko; Satoh, Mamoru; Tanno, Kozo; Yamaji, Taiki; Wakai, Kenji; Hitomi, Jiro; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sobue, Kenji; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Differences in DNA collection protocols may be a potential confounder in epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) using a large number of blood specimens from multiple biobanks and/or cohorts. Here we show that pre-analytical procedures involved in DNA collection can induce systematic bias in the DNA methylation profiles of blood cells that can be adjusted by cell-type composition variables. In Experiment 1, whole blood from 16 volunteers was collected to examine the effect of a 24 h storage period at 4°C on DNA methylation profiles as measured using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. Our statistical analysis showed that the P-value distribution of more than 450,000 CpG sites was similar to the theoretical distribution (in quantile-quantile plot, λ = 1.03) when comparing two control replicates, which was remarkably deviated from the theoretical distribution (λ = 1.50) when comparing control and storage conditions. We then considered cell-type composition as a possible cause of the observed bias in DNA methylation profiles and found that the bias associated with the cold storage condition was largely decreased (λadjusted = 1.14) by taking into account a cell-type composition variable. As such, we compared four respective sample collection protocols used in large-scale Japanese biobanks or cohorts as well as two control replicates. Systematic biases in DNA methylation profiles were observed between control and three of four protocols without adjustment of cell-type composition (λ = 1.12–1.45) and no remarkable biases were seen after adjusting for cell-type composition in all four protocols (λadjusted = 1.00–1.17). These results revealed important implications for comparing DNA methylation profiles between blood specimens from different sources and may lead to discovery of disease-associated DNA methylation markers and the development of DNA methylation profile-based predictive risk models. PMID:26799745

  3. Testing the feasibility of DNA typing for human identification by PCR and an oligonucleotide ligation assay.

    PubMed Central

    Delahunty, C.; Ankener, W.; Deng, Q.; Eng, J.; Nickerson, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The use of DNA typing in human genome analysis is increasing and finding widespread application in the area of forensic and paternity testing. In this report, we explore the feasibility of typing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by using a semiautomated method for analyzing human DNA samples. In this approach, PCR is used to amplify segments of human DNA containing a common SNP. Allelic nucleotides in the amplified product are then typed by a colorimetric implementation of the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). The results of the combined assay, PCR/OLA, are read directly by a spectrophotometer; the absorbances are compiled; and the genotypes are automatically determined. A panel of 20 markers has been developed for DNA typing and has been tested using a sample panel from the CEPH pedigrees (CEPH parents). The results of this typing, as well as the potential to apply this method to larger populations, are discussed. Images Figure 2 PMID:8651301

  4. Testing the feasibility of DNA typing for human identification by PCR and an oligonucleotide ligation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Delahunty, C.; Ankener, W.; Deng, Qiang

    1996-06-01

    The use of DNA typing in human genome analysis is increasing and finding widespread application in the area of forensic and paternity testing. In this report, we explore the feasibility of typing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by using a semiautomated method for analyzing human DNA samples. In this approach, PCR is used to amplify segments of human DNA containing a common SNP. Allelic nucleotides in the amplified product are then typed by a calorimetric implementation of the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). The results of the combined assay, PCR/OLA, are read directly by a spectrophotometer; the absorbances are compiled and the genotypes are automatically determined. A panel of 20 markers has been developed for DNA typing and has been tested using a sample panel from the CEPH pedigrees (CEPH parents). The results of this typing, as well as the potential to apply this method to larger populations, are discussed. 62 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Presence and potential of cell free DNA in different types of forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Vandewoestyne, Mado; Van Hoofstat, David; Franssen, Aimée; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter

    2013-02-01

    Extracellular or cell free DNA has been found to exist in many biological media such as blood and saliva. To check whether cell free DNA is present in the supernatant which is normally discarded during several DNA extraction processes, such as Chelex(®) extraction, DNA profiles of cell pellet and concentrated supernatant from 30 artificial case like samples and from 100 real forensic samples were compared. Presence of cell free DNA was shown in all investigated sample types. Moreover, in some samples additional alleles, not detected during analysis of the cell pellet, were detected, offering valuable information which would normally have been discarded together with the supernatant. The results presented here indicate that cell free DNA deserves further consideration since it has the potential to increase the DNA yield in forensic casework samples in general and in contact traces in particular.

  6. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in periungual squamous cell carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, R.L.; Eliezri, Y.D.; Bennett, R.G. ); Nuovo, G.J.; Siverstein, S. Columbia Univ., New York, NY ); Zitelli, J.A. )

    1989-05-12

    Ten squamous cell carcinomas (in situ or invasive) of the fingernail region were analyzed for the presence of DNA sequences homologous to human papilloma-virus (HPV) by dot blot hybridization. In most patients, the lesions were verrucae of long-term duration that were refractory to conventional treatment methods. Eight of the lesions contained HPV DNA sequences, and in six of these the sequences were related to HPV 16 as deduced from low-stringency nucleic acid hybridization followed by low- and high-stringency washes. Furthermore, the restriction endonuclease digestion pattern of DNA isolated from four of these lesions was diagnostic of episomal HPV 16. The high-frequency association of HPV 16 with periungual squamous cell carcinoma is similar to that reported for HPV 16 with squamous cell carcinomas on mucous membranes at other sites, notably the genital tract. The findings suggest that HPV 16 may play an important role in the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the finger, most notably those lesions that are chronic and located in the periungual area.

  7. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  8. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  9. Dynamic investigation of DNA bending and wrapping by type II topoisomerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qing; Finzi, Laura; Dunlap, David

    2009-11-01

    Type II topoisomerases catalyze DNA decatenation and unwinding which is crucial for cell division, and therefore type II topoisomerases are some of the main targets of anti-cancer drugs. A recent crystal structure shows that, during the catalytic cycle, a yeast type II topoimerase can bend a 10 base pair DNA segment by up to 150 degrees. Bacterial gyrase, another type II topoisomerase, can wrap DNA into a tight 180 degree turn. Bending a stiff polymer like DNA requires considerable energy and could represent the rate limiting step in the catalytic (topological) cycle. Using modified deoxyribonucleotides in PCR reactions, stiffer DNA fragments have been produced and used as substrates for topoisomerase II-mediated relaxation of plectonemes introduced in single molecules using magnetic tweezers. The wrapping ability of gyrase decreases for diamino-purine-substituted DNA in which every base pair has three hydrogen-bonds. The overall rate of relaxation of plectonemes by recombinant human topoisomerase II alpha also decreases. These results reveal the dynamic properties of DNA bending and wrapping by type II topisomerases and suggest that A:T base pair melting is a rate determining step for bending and wrapping.

  10. Base-Displaced Intercalated Conformation of the 2-Amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline N(2)-dG DNA Adduct Positioned at the Nonreiterated G(1) in the NarI Restriction Site.

    PubMed

    Stavros, Kallie M; Hawkins, Edward K; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Stone, Michael P

    2015-07-20

    The conformation of an N(2)-dG adduct arising from the heterocyclic amine 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), a potent food mutagen, was determined in 5'-d(C(1)T(2)C(3)X(4)G(5)C(6)G(7)C(8)C(9)A(10)T(11)C(12))-3':5'-d(G(13)A(14)T(15)G(16)G(17)C(18)G(19)C(20)C(21)G(22)A(23)G(24))-3'; X = N(2)-dG-IQ, in which the modified nucleotide X(4) corresponds to G(1) in the 5'-d(G(1)G(2)CG(3)CC)-3' NarI restriction endonuclease site. Circular dichroism (CD) revealed blue shifts relative to the unmodified duplex, consistent with adduct-induced twisting, and a hypochromic effect for the IQ absorbance in the near UV region. NMR revealed that the N(2)-dG-IQ adduct adopted a base-displaced intercalated conformation in which the modified guanine remained in the anti conformation about the glycosidic bond, the IQ moiety intercalated into the duplex, and the complementary base C(21) was displaced into the major groove. The processing of the N(2)-dG-IQ lesion by hpol η is sequence-dependent; when placed at the reiterated G(3) position, but not at the G(1) position, this lesion exhibits a propensity for frameshift replication [Choi, J. Y., et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem., 281, 25297-25306]. The structure of the N(2)-dG-IQ adduct at the nonreiterated G(1) position was compared to that of the same adduct placed at the G(3) position [Stavros, K. M., et al. (2014) Nucleic Acids Res., 42, 3450-3463]. CD indicted minimal spectral differences between the G(1) vs G(3) N(2)-dG-IQ adducts. NMR indicated that the N(2)-dG-IQ adduct exhibited similar base-displaced intercalated conformations at both the G(1) and G(3) positions. This result differed as compared to the corresponding C8-dG-IQ adducts placed at the same positions. The C8-dG-IQ adduct adopted a minor groove conformation when placed at position G(1) but a base-displaced intercalated conformation when placed at position G(3) in the NarI sequence. The present studies suggest that differences in lesion bypass by hpol η may be

  11. Base-Displaced Intercalated Conformation of the 2-Amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline N2-dG DNA Adduct Positioned at the Nonreiterated G1 in the NarI Restriction Site

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The conformation of an N2-dG adduct arising from the heterocyclic amine 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), a potent food mutagen, was determined in 5′-d(C1T2C3X4G5C6G7C8C9A10T11C12)-3′:5′-d(G13A14T15G16G17C18G19C20C21G22A23G24)-3′; X = N2-dG-IQ, in which the modified nucleotide X4 corresponds to G1 in the 5′-d(G1G2CG3CC)-3′ NarI restriction endonuclease site. Circular dichroism (CD) revealed blue shifts relative to the unmodified duplex, consistent with adduct-induced twisting, and a hypochromic effect for the IQ absorbance in the near UV region. NMR revealed that the N2-dG-IQ adduct adopted a base-displaced intercalated conformation in which the modified guanine remained in the anti conformation about the glycosidic bond, the IQ moiety intercalated into the duplex, and the complementary base C21 was displaced into the major groove. The processing of the N2-dG-IQ lesion by hpol η is sequence-dependent; when placed at the reiterated G3 position, but not at the G1 position, this lesion exhibits a propensity for frameshift replication [Choi, J. Y., et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem., 281, 25297–25306]. The structure of the N2-dG-IQ adduct at the nonreiterated G1 position was compared to that of the same adduct placed at the G3 position [Stavros, K. M., et al. (2014) Nucleic Acids Res., 42, 3450–3463]. CD indicted minimal spectral differences between the G1 vs G3N2-dG-IQ adducts. NMR indicated that the N2-dG-IQ adduct exhibited similar base-displaced intercalated conformations at both the G1 and G3 positions. This result differed as compared to the corresponding C8-dG-IQ adducts placed at the same positions. The C8-dG-IQ adduct adopted a minor groove conformation when placed at position G1 but a base-displaced intercalated conformation when placed at position G3 in the NarI sequence. The present studies suggest that differences in lesion bypass by hpol η may be mediated by differences in the 3′-flanking sequences, perhaps modulating the ability

  12. A prediction of the amino acids and structures involved in DNA recognition by type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, S S; Dryden, D T

    1997-01-01

    The S subunits of type I DNA restriction/modification enzymes are responsible for recognising the DNA target sequence for the enzyme. They contain two domains of approximately 150 amino acids, each of which is responsible for recognising one half of the bipartite asymmetric target. In the absence of any known tertiary structure for type I enzymes or recognisable DNA recognition motifs in the highly variable amino acid sequences of the S subunits, it has previously not been possible to predict which amino acids are responsible for sequence recognition. Using a combination of sequence alignment and secondary structure prediction methods to analyse the sequences of S subunits, we predict that all of the 51 known target recognition domains (TRDs) have the same tertiary structure. Furthermore, this structure is similar to the structure of the TRD of the C5-cytosine methyltransferase, Hha I, which recognises its DNA target via interactions with two short polypeptide loops and a beta strand. Our results predict the location of these sequence recognition structures within the TRDs of all type I S subunits. PMID:9254696

  13. DNA Microarray-Based Typing of Streptococcus agalactiae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, Heike; Slickers, Peter; Müller, Elke; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae frequently colonizes the urogenital tract, and it is a major cause of bacterial septicemia, meningitis, and pneumonia in newborns. For typing purposes, a microarray targeting group B streptococcus (GBS) virulence-associated markers and resistance genes was designed and validated with reference strains, as well as clinical and veterinary isolates. Selected isolates were also subjected to multilocus sequence typing. It was observed that putative typing markers, such as alleles of the alpha-like protein or capsule types, vary independently of each other, and they also vary independently from the affiliation to their multilocus sequence typing (MLST)-defined sequence types. Thus, it is not possible to assign isolates to sequence types based on the identification of a single distinct marker, such as a capsule type or alp allele. This suggests the occurrence of frequent genomic recombination. For array-based typing, a set of 11 markers (bac, alp, pil1 locus, pepS8, fbsB, capsule locus, hylB, abiG-I/-II plus Q8DZ34, pil2 locus, nss plus srr plus rogB2, and rgfC/A/D/B) was defined that provides a framework for splitting the tested 448 S. agalactiae isolates into 76 strains that clustered mainly according to MLST-defined clonal complexes. There was evidence for region- and host-specific differences in the population structure of S. agalactiae, as well as an overrepresentation of strains related to sequence type 17 among the invasive isolates. The arrays and typing scheme described here proved to be a convenient tool for genotyping large numbers of clinical/veterinary isolates and thus might help obtain insight into the epidemiology of S. agalactiae. PMID:25165085

  14. Specific melanin content in human hairs and mitochondrial DNA typing success.

    PubMed

    Linch, Charles A; Champagne, Jarrod R; Bonnette, Michelle D; Dawson Cruz, Tracey

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated whether a difference exists in the ability to obtain quality mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data from hair shafts due to specific melanin content differences. Eumelanin, the pigment in darker hairs, protects nuclear DNA in the skin by absorbing and scattering UV radiation. In contrast, sensitized pheomelanin, the predominate melanin in red hairs and some blond hairs, is unable to prevent DNA damage in skin upon exposure to UV radiation. It has been reported in the literature that darker hairs (predominate eumelanin content) have a higher mtDNA sequencing success rate than lighter colored hairs. However, others have reported to the contrary when different methodologies are used. In this study, 2-cm hair fragments were cut from dark brown, red, and gray white hairs and typed using standard casework mtDNA sequence analysis methods. All 30 hair fragments produced quality mtDNA sequence data on first attempt from the second half of hypervariable region 1. These results are likely due to the apparent shielding of mtDNA by the hard protein of the hair shaft fiber from radiation-induced damage, regardless of melanin type, after 10-months minimal solar exposure. Nonetheless, this study may serve as a guide for future quantitative studies that investigate hair mtDNA photodamage in circumstances of increased solar, chemical, environmental, or mechanical damage.

  15. Use of Divalent Metal Ions in the DNA Cleavage Reaction of Human Type II Topoisomerases†

    PubMed Central

    Deweese, Joseph E.; Burch, Amber M.; Burgin, Alex B.; Osheroff, Neil

    2009-01-01

    All type II topoisomerases require divalent metal ions in order to cleave and ligate DNA. In order to further elucidate the mechanistic basis for these critical enzyme-mediated events, the role of the metal ion in the DNA cleavage reaction of human topoisomerase IIβ was characterized and compared to that of topoisomerase IIα. The present study utilized divalent metal ions with varying thiophilicities in conjunction with DNA cleavage substrates that substituted a sulfur atom for the 3′-bridging oxygen or the non-bridging oxygens of the scissile phosphate. Based on time courses of DNA cleavage, cation titrations, and metal ion mixing experiments, we propose the following model for the use of divalent metal ions by human type II topoisomerases. First, both enzymes employ a two-metal-ion mechanism to support DNA cleavage. Second, an interaction between one divalent metal ion and the 3′-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate greatly enhances enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage, most likely by stabilizing the leaving 3′-oxygen. Third, there is an important interaction between a divalent second metal ion and a non-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate that stimulates DNA cleavage mediated by topoisomerase IIβ. If this interaction exists in topoisomerase IIα, its effects on DNA cleavage are equivocal. This last aspect of the model highlights a difference in metal ion utilization during DNA cleavage mediated by human topoisomerase IIα and IIβ. PMID:19222228

  16. Stimulation of DNA synthesis in cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, C.C.; McCormick-Shannon, K.; Robinson, P.C.; Mason, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Restoration of the alveolar epithelium after injury is thought to be dependent on the proliferation of alveolar type II cells. To understand the factors that may be involved in promoting type II cell proliferation in vivo, we determined the effect of potential mitogens and culture substrata on DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. Type II cells cultured in basal medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) exhibited essentially no DNA synthesis. Factors that stimulated /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation included cholera toxin, epidermal growth factor, and rat serum. The greatest degree of stimulation was achieved by plating type II cells on an extracellular matrix prepared from bovine corneal endothelial cells and then by culturing the pneumocytes in medium containing rat serum, cholera toxin, insulin, and epidermal growth factor. Under conditions of stimulation of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation there was an increased DNA content per culture dish but no increase in cell number. The ability of various culture conditions to promote DNA synthesis in type II cells was verified by autoradiography. Type II cells were identified by the presence of cytoplasmic inclusions, which were visualized by tannic acid staining before autoradiography. These results demonstrate the importance of soluble factors and culture substratum in stimulating DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture.

  17. Triglyceride High-Density Lipoprotein Ratios Predict Glycemia-Lowering in Response to Insulin Sensitizing Drugs in Type 2 Diabetes: A Post Hoc Analysis of the BARI 2D

    PubMed Central

    Zonszein, Joel; Lombardero, Manuel; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Palumbo, Pasquale; Foucher, Suzy; Groenewoud, Yolanda; Cushing, Gary; Wajchenberg, Bernardo; Genuth, Saul; BARI 2D Study Group

    2015-01-01

    Glycemic management is central in prevention of small vessel and cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes. With the plethora of newer medications and recommendations for a patient centered approach, more information is necessary to match the proper drug to each patient. We showed that BARI 2D, a five-year trial designed to compare two different glycemic treatment strategies, was suitable for assessing different responses according to different phenotypic characteristics. Treatment with insulin sensitizing medications such as thiazolidinediones and metformin was more effective in improving glycemic control, particularly in the more insulin resistant patient, when compared to the insulin provision strategy using insulin and or sulfonylureas. Triglyceride and high density lipoprotein ratio (TG/HDL-cholesterol ratio) was found to be a readily available and practical biomarker that helps to identify the insulin resistant patient. These results support the concept that not all medications for glycemic control work the same in all patients. Thus, tailored therapy can be done using phenotypic characteristics rather than a “one-size-fits-all approach.” PMID:26106623

  18. DNA typing of Diptera collected from human corpses in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Cainé, Laura M; Real, Francisco Corte; Saloña-Bordas, Marta I; de Pancorbo, M Martínez; Lima, Gabiela; Magalhães, Teresa; Pinheiro, Fátima

    2009-01-30

    Medico-legal entomology, one area in the broad field of entomology, is routinely used in forensic applications. Insects are often collected from a corpse during criminal information related to the body, but requires the fast and accurate identification of the species attracted to the remains. The local entomofauna in most cases is important for explaining entomological evidence. The survey of the local entomofauna has become a fundamental first step in forensic entomological studies, because different geographical distributions, seasonal and environmental factors may influence the decomposition process and the occurrence of different species on corpses. A morphological and DNA-based methods for species identification were used in this study. Thirty-two cases are reported from indoors and outdoors conditions. Specimens were collected from corpses during autopsy procedures in the National Institute of Legal Medicine, Portugal, and cases were summarized by sex, death local, month of discovery, probable cause of death, species found and number of analyzed specimens. Just eight species, mainly Calliphoridae together with one Sarcophagidae were reported from corpses. The DNA sequencing was performed to study the mitochondrial encoded subunit I of the cytochrome oxidase gene. The aim of this work was the beginning of a database of the cadaveric entomofauna in Portugal.

  19. Induction of Cervical Neoplasia in the Mouse by Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Donald D.; Budd Wentz, W.; Reagan, James W.; Heggie, Alfred D.

    1989-06-01

    Induction of cervical neoplasia in the mouse cervix by herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) has been reported. The present study was done to determine if transfection with DNA of HSV-2 can induce carcinogenesis in this animal model. Genomic HSV-2 DNA was isolated from infected HEp-2 cells and separated from host cell DNA by cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation. The DNA was applied to mouse cervix for periods of 80-100 weeks. Experimental controls were treated with uninfected genomic HEp-2 cell DNA or with calf thymus DNA. Vaginal cytological preparations from all animals were examined monthly to detect epithelial abnormalities. Animals were sacrificed and histopathology studies were done when cellular changes indicative of premalignant or malignant lesions were seen on vaginal smears. Cytologic and histologic materials were coded and evaluated without knowledge of whether they were from animals treated with virus or control DNA. Premalignant and malignant cervical lesions similar to those that occur in women were detected in 61% of the histologic specimens obtained from animals exposed to HSV-2 DNA. The yield of invasive cancers was 21% in animals treated with HSV-2 DNA. No cancers were detected in mice treated with either HEp-2 or calf thymus DNA. Dysplasia was detected in only one of these control animals.

  20. Binding of bufuralol, dextromethorphan, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine to wild-type and F120A mutant cytochrome P450 2D6 studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bonifacio, Alois . E-mail: zwan@few.vu.nl

    2006-05-12

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is one of the most important drug-metabolizing enzymes in humans. Resonance Raman data, reported for First time for CYP2D6, show that the CYP2D6 heme is found to be in a six-coordinated low-spin state in the absence of substrates, and it is perturbed to different extents by bufuralol, dextromethorphan, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA). Dextromethorphan and MDMA induce in CYP2D6 a significant amount of five-coordinated high-spin heme species and reduce the polarity of its heme-pocket, whereas bufuralol does not. Spectra of the F120A mutant CYP2D6 suggest that Phe{sup 12} is involved in substrate-binding of dextromethorphan and MDMA, being responsible for the spectral differences observed between these two compounds and bufuralol. These differences could be explained postulating a different substrate mobility for each compound in the CYP2D6 active site, consistently with the role previously suggested for Phe{sup 12} in binding dextromethorphan and MDMA.

  1. Evaluation of the human hair root for DNA typing subsequent to microscopic comparison.

    PubMed

    Linch, C A; Smith, S L; Prahlow, J A

    1998-03-01

    Telogen human hairs are one of the most common useful evidence findings at crime scenes and/or on homicide victims. Occasionally, the microscopic characterization of the found telogen hair is the only physical evidence association to a victim or suspect. Recently efforts to characterize these hairs by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methods have progressed. The nature of the telogen hair root morphology and ultrastructure has, however, been largely ignored. Examiners have recognized these hairs are unlikely to be typable by nuclear DNA (nuDNA) methods. Most forensic biologists have little knowledge of the complex cellular composition of anagen, catagen, and telogen hair roots or their morphogenesis. This paper reviews ex situ human hair root morphology as it relates to the likelihood of successful nuclear DNA typing. Dermatology texts of hair root morphology always demonstrate their microscopic appearance in the skin. This study investigates the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) methods to sex type telogen head hairs, and it further investigates hair root morphology as it relates to the potential nuclear DNA content of evidence hairs. There is a need for the use of appropriate, consensus terminology for describing hair root morphology. There is also a need for standardized laboratory light microscopic methods in evaluating a hair root for DNA typing. FISH was found to be an unsuitable technique for sex determination of telogen hair clubs. It was determined that anagen/catagen hair roots without translucent sheath material are excellent candidates for nuDNA PCR-based typing and that hairs with telogen club root material only should not be submitted for nuDNA typing attempts.

  2. Post-coital vaginal sampling with nylon flocked swabs improves DNA typing.

    PubMed

    Benschop, Corina C G; Wiebosch, Danielle C; Kloosterman, Ate D; Sijen, Titia

    2010-02-01

    In the examination of sexual assault cases, DNA typing of vaginal samples mostly occurs after differential DNA extraction. Notwithstanding the differential extraction method, the DNA profiles from the seminal fraction often show the male alleles at low-level in combination with female alleles. This unfavorable ratio male to female DNA is due to a limited amount of sperm cells and an overwhelming quantity of female cells. In this study, we compared standard cotton and nylon flocked swabs for post-coital vaginal sampling. Twelve couples donated 88 vaginal swabs - 44 cotton, 44 nylon flocked - which were taken with a time since intercourse (TSI) up to 84 h. These vaginal swabs were sorted into categories on the basis of the TSI and submitted to (1) microscopic examination for the presence of male cells, (2) presumptive tests for the detection of seminal fluid and (3) DNA typing. Cellular elution was found to be 6-fold more efficient from the nylon flocked swabs. This makes microscopic analysis less time consuming as the higher cell yield and better cell morphology simplify detection of male cells. Both swab types reveal similar results regarding presumptive tests and male DNA typing. Positive presumptive tests (RSID-semen and PSA) were obtained up to 60 h TSI and male autosomal profiles up to 72 h TSI. Interestingly, over 50% of the samples negative for both presumptive tests resulted in informative male STR profiles. After differential extraction, less DNA was left on the nylon flocked swabs and more male DNA was isolated. Our results imply that the use of nylon flocked swabs for vaginal sampling will improve microscopic analysis and DNA typing in the medical forensic investigation of sexual assault cases.

  3. An ENU-induced mutation in mouse glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) causes peripheral sensory and motor phenotypes creating a model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Achilli, Francesca; Bros-Facer, Virginie; Williams, Hazel P.; Banks, Gareth T.; AlQatari, Mona; Chia, Ruth; Tucci, Valter; Groves, Michael; Nickols, Carole D.; Seburn, Kevin L.; Kendall, Rachel; Cader, Muhammed Z.; Talbot, Kevin; van Minnen, Jan; Burgess, Robert W.; Brandner, Sebastian; Martin, Joanne E.; Koltzenburg, Martin; Greensmith, Linda; Nolan, Patrick M.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations in the enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) cause motor and sensory axon loss in the peripheral nervous system in humans, described clinically as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D or distal spinal muscular atrophy type V. Here, we characterise a new mouse mutant, GarsC201R, with a point mutation that leads to a non-conservative substitution within GARS. Heterozygous mice with a C3H genetic background have loss of grip strength, decreased motor flexibility and disruption of fine motor control; this relatively mild phenotype is more severe on a C57BL/6 background. Homozygous mutants have a highly deleterious set of features, including movement difficulties and death before weaning. Heterozygous animals have a reduction in axon diameter in peripheral nerves, slowing of nerve conduction and an alteration in the recovery cycle of myelinated axons, as well as innervation defects. An assessment of GARS levels showed increased protein in 15-day-old mice compared with controls; however, this increase was not observed in 3-month-old animals, indicating that GARS function may be more crucial in younger animals. We found that enzyme activity was not reduced detectably in heterozygotes at any age, but was diminished greatly in homozygous mice compared with controls; thus, homozygous animals may suffer from a partial loss of function. The GarsC201R mutation described here is a contribution to our understanding of the mechanism by which mutations in tRNA synthetases, which are fundamentally important, ubiquitously expressed enzymes, cause axonopathy in specific sets of neurons. PMID:19470612

  4. Microbial Typing by Machine Learned DNA Melt Signatures.

    PubMed

    Andini, Nadya; Wang, Bo; Athamanolap, Pornpat; Hardick, Justin; Masek, Billie J; Thair, Simone; Hu, Anne; Avornu, Gideon; Peterson, Stephen; Cogill, Steven; Rothman, Richard E; Carroll, Karen C; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Wang, Jeff Tza-Huei; Batzoglou, Serafim; Yang, Samuel

    2017-02-06

    There is still an ongoing demand for a simple broad-spectrum molecular diagnostic assay for pathogenic bacteria. For this purpose, we developed a single-plex High Resolution Melt (HRM) assay that generates complex melt curves for bacterial identification. Using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as the phylogenetic marker for HRM, we observed complex melt curve signatures as compared to 16S rDNA amplicons with enhanced interspecies discrimination. We also developed a novel Naïve Bayes curve classification algorithm with statistical interpretation and achieved 95% accuracy in differentiating 89 bacterial species in our library using leave-one-out cross-validation. Pilot clinical validation of our method correctly identified the etiologic organisms at the species-level in 59 culture-positive mono-bacterial blood culture samples with 90% accuracy. Our findings suggest that broad bacterial sequences may be simply, reliably and automatically profiled by ITS HRM assay for clinical adoption.

  5. Microbial Typing by Machine Learned DNA Melt Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Andini, Nadya; Wang, Bo; Athamanolap, Pornpat; Hardick, Justin; Masek, Billie J.; Thair, Simone; Hu, Anne; Avornu, Gideon; Peterson, Stephen; Cogill, Steven; Rothman, Richard E.; Carroll, Karen C.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Wang, Jeff Tza-Huei; Batzoglou, Serafim; Yang, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    There is still an ongoing demand for a simple broad-spectrum molecular diagnostic assay for pathogenic bacteria. For this purpose, we developed a single-plex High Resolution Melt (HRM) assay that generates complex melt curves for bacterial identification. Using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as the phylogenetic marker for HRM, we observed complex melt curve signatures as compared to 16S rDNA amplicons with enhanced interspecies discrimination. We also developed a novel Naïve Bayes curve classification algorithm with statistical interpretation and achieved 95% accuracy in differentiating 89 bacterial species in our library using leave-one-out cross-validation. Pilot clinical validation of our method correctly identified the etiologic organisms at the species-level in 59 culture-positive mono-bacterial blood culture samples with 90% accuracy. Our findings suggest that broad bacterial sequences may be simply, reliably and automatically profiled by ITS HRM assay for clinical adoption. PMID:28165067

  6. Multiplexed SNP typing of ancient DNA clarifies the origin of Andaman mtDNA haplogroups amongst South Asian tribal populations.

    PubMed

    Endicott, Phillip; Metspalu, Mait; Stringer, Chris; Macaulay, Vincent; Cooper, Alan; Sanchez, Juan J

    2006-12-20

    The issue of errors in genetic data sets is of growing concern, particularly in population genetics where whole genome mtDNA sequence data is coming under increased scrutiny. Multiplexed PCR reactions, combined with SNP typing, are currently under-exploited in this context, but have the potential to genotype whole populations rapidly and accurately, significantly reducing the amount of errors appearing in published data sets. To show the sensitivity of this technique for screening mtDNA genomic sequence data, 20 historic samples of the enigmatic Andaman Islanders and 12 modern samples from three Indian tribal populations (Chenchu, Lambadi and Lodha) were genotyped for 20 coding region sites after provisional haplogroup assignment with control region sequences. The genotype data from the historic samples significantly revise the topologies for the Andaman M31 and M32 mtDNA lineages by rectifying conflicts in published data sets. The new Indian data extend the distribution of the M31a lineage to South Asia, challenging previous interpretations of mtDNA phylogeography. This genetic connection between the ancestors of the Andamanese and South Asian tribal groups approximately 30 kya has important implications for the debate concerning migration routes and settlement patterns of humans leaving Africa during the late Pleistocene, and indicates the need for more detailed genotyping strategies. The methodology serves as a low-cost, high-throughput model for the production and authentication of data from modern or ancient DNA, and demonstrates the value of museum collections as important records of human genetic diversity.

  7. A new compound, withangulatin A, promotes type II DNA topoisomerase-mediated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Juang, J K; Huang, H W; Chen, C M; Liu, H J

    1989-03-31

    Withangulatin A, a new compound with a known chemical structure and from the antitumor Chinese herb Physalis angulata L, was found to act on topoisomerase II to induce topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage in vitro. It has two effective dosage ranges of approximate 0.5 and 20 microM, with about one-third the activity of 20 microM VM-26.

  8. National Prociency Testing Result of CYP2D6*10 Genotyping for Adjuvant Tamoxifen Therapy in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guigao; Zhang, Kuo; Yi, Lang; Han, Yanxi; Xie, Jiehong; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen has been successfully used for treating breast cancer and preventing cancer recurrence. Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) plays a key role in the process of metabolizing tamoxifen to its active moiety, endoxifen. Patients with variants of the CYP2D6 gene may not receive the full benefit of tamoxifen treatment. The CYP2D6*10 variant (the most common variant in Asians) was analyzed to optimize the prescription of tamoxifen in China. To ensure referring clinicians have accurate information for genotype-guided tamoxifen treatment, the Chinese National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL) organized a national proficiency testing (PT) to evaluate the performance of laboratories providing CYP2D6*10 genotyping. Ten genomic DNA samples with CYP2D6 wild-type or CYP2D6*10 variants were validated by PCR-sequencing and sent to 28 participant laboratories. The genotyping results and pharmacogenomic test reports were submitted and evaluated by NCCL experts. Additional information regarding the number of samples tested, the accreditation/certification status, and detecting technology was also requested. Thirty-one data sets were received, with a corresponding analytical sensitivity of 98.2% (548/558 challenges; 95% confidence interval: 96.7–99.1%) and an analytic specificity of 96.5% (675/682; 95% confidence interval: 97.9–99.5%). Overall, 25/28 participants correctly identified CYP2D6*10 status in 10 samples; however, two laboratories made serious genotyping errors. Most of the essential information was included in the 20 submitted CYP2D6*10 test reports. The majority of Chinese laboratories are reliable for detecting the CYP2D6*10 variant; however, several issues revealed in this study underline the importance of PT schemes in continued external assessment and provision of guidelines. PMID:27603206

  9. Differential CYP 2D6 metabolism alters primaquine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Potter, Brittney M J; Xie, Lisa H; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T; Bandara Herath, H M T; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N P; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Nolan, Christina K; Sciotti, Richard J; Zottig, Victor E; Smith, Philip L; Paris, Robert M; Read, Lisa T; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S; Sousa, Jason C; Reichard, Gregory A; Marcsisin, Sean R

    2015-04-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity.

  10. A first generation factory for typing DNA polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.L.; Klug, D.; David, D.

    1994-09-01

    Although linkage mapping of fully penetrant, single-gene disorders can readily be accomplished using {open_quotes}manual{close_quotes} polymorphism genotyping methods, mapping of genes responsible for genetically more complex disorders such as asthma and schizophrenia will likely require more highly automated approaches. Routine clinical application of linkage analysis will also require reliable automated methods. To meet these needs we have initiated a first generation factory for analysis of short tandem repeat polymorphisms. The factory includes an eight-pronged pipetting robot for efficient PCR setup, amplification within high density microtiter plates, and a scanning fluorescence detection system for automatic sizing of amplification products. Initial throughput for the factory will be several hundred thousand genotypes per year. The heart of the factory is a new scanning fluorescence detection system for gel electrophoresis. The system employs an argon laser for excitation and has the capability of simultaneously detecting four different fluorescent dyes. The detector scans across the bottom of short, wide denaturing polyacrylamide gels which routinely contain 144 lanes. Emitted fluorescent light is collected with a high numerical aperture microscope objective and transmitted through a fiber optic cable, dichroic mirrors and band pass filters to a series of photomultiplier tubes. Amplified output from the photomultiplier tubes is digitized and fed into computers for further analysis. Software has been written for viewing the gel images, for lane finding and for allele identification. Rhodamine-labeled {lambda} DNA standard fragments ranging in size from 70 to 300 bases are utilized for lane identification and allele sizing. Each gel run takes 3 hours, and each gel can be loaded at least three times. Multiple markers can be amplified simultaneously and detected without prior concentration.

  11. Efficacy of DNA vaccines expressing the type F botulinum toxin Hc fragment using different promoters.

    PubMed

    Jathoul, Amit P; Holley, Jane L; Garmory, Helen S

    2004-09-28

    DNA vaccines which expressed the Hc fragment of the Clostridium botulinum type F neurotoxin (BoNT/F Hc) fused to a signal peptide downstream of four different eukaryotic promoters were prepared. Subsequently, the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccines and protection afforded in mice against challenge with 10(4) MLD of type F botulinum toxin was evaluated. The DNA vaccine containing the human ubiquitin gene (UbC) promoter induced the highest BoNT/F Hc-specific antibody concentration following two intramuscular immunisations and afforded 90% protection against challenge. The results from this study indicate that the selection of promoter used in DNA vaccination studies may be of importance in designing optimised vaccines.

  12. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: from phage typing to whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Anita C; van Soolingen, Dick

    2012-06-01

    Current typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex evolved from simple phenotypic approaches like phage typing and drug susceptibility profiling to DNA-based strain typing methods, such as IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) typing. Examples of the usefulness of molecular typing are source case finding and epidemiological linkage of tuberculosis (TB) cases, international transmission of MDR/XDR-TB, the discrimination between endogenous reactivation and exogenous re-infection as a cause of relapses after curative treatment of tuberculosis, the evidence of multiple M. tuberculosis infections, and the disclosure of laboratory cross-contaminations. Simultaneously, phylogenetic analyses were developed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genomic deletions usually referred to as regions of difference (RDs) and spoligotyping which served both strain typing and phylogenetic analysis. National and international initiatives that rely on the application of these typing methods have brought significant insight into the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. However, current DNA fingerprinting methods have important limitations. They can often not distinguish between genetically closely related strains and the turn-over of these markers is variable. Moreover, the suitability of most DNA typing methods for phylogenetic reconstruction is limited as they show a high propensity of convergent evolution or misinfer genetic distances. In order to fully explore the possibilities of genotyping in the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis and to study the phylogeny of the causative bacteria reliably, the application of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis for all M. tuberculosis isolates is the optimal, although currently still a costly solution. In the last years WGS for typing of pathogens has been explored and yielded important additional information on strain diversity in comparison to the

  13. Mitochondrial DNA variant at HVI region as a candidate of genetic markers of type 2 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumilar, Gun Gun; Purnamasari, Yunita; Setiadi, Rahmat

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is maternally inherited. mtDNA mutations which can contribute to the excess of maternal inheritance of type 2 diabetes. Due to the high mutation rate, one of the areas in the mtDNA that is often associated with the disease is the hypervariable region I (HVI). Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the genetic variants of human mtDNA HVI that related to the type 2 diabetes in four samples that were taken from four generations in one lineage. Steps being taken include the lyses of hair follicles, amplification of mtDNA HVI fragment using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), detection of PCR products through agarose gel electrophoresis technique, the measurement of the concentration of mtDNA using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, determination of the nucleotide sequence via direct sequencing method and analysis of the sequencing results using SeqMan DNASTAR program. Based on the comparison between nucleotide sequence of samples and revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS) obtained six same mutations that these are C16147T, T16189C, C16193del, T16127C, A16235G, and A16293C. After comparing the data obtained to the secondary data from Mitomap and NCBI, it were found that two mutations, T16189C and T16217C, become candidates as genetic markers of type 2 diabetes even the mutations were found also in the generations of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The results of this study are expected to give contribution to the collection of human mtDNA database of genetic variants that associated to metabolic diseases, so that in the future it can be utilized in various fields, especially in medicine.

  14. Genome-derived cytosolic DNA mediates type I interferon-dependent rejection of B cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu J; Le Bert, Nina; Chitre, Anuja A; Koo, Christine Xing'Er; Nga, Xing H; Ho, Samantha S W; Khatoo, Muznah; Tan, Nikki Y; Ishii, Ken J; Gasser, Stephan

    2015-04-21

    The DNA damage response (DDR) induces the expression of type I interferons (IFNs), but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show the presence of cytosolic DNA in different mouse and human tumor cells. Treatment of cells with genotoxic agents increased the levels of cytosolic DNA in a DDR-dependent manner. Cloning of cytosolic DNA molecules from mouse lymphoma cells suggests that cytosolic DNA is derived from unique genomic loci and has the potential to form non-B DNA structures, including R-loops. Overexpression of Rnaseh1, which resolves R-loops, reduced the levels of cytosolic DNA, type I Ifn transcripts, and type I IFN-dependent rejection of lymphoma cells. Live-cell imaging showed a dynamic contact of cytosolic DNA with mitochondria, an important organelle for innate immune recognition of cytosolic nucleotides. In summary, we found that cytosolic DNA is present in many tumor cells and contributes to the immunogenicity of tumor cells.

  15. Impact of Sample Type and DNA Isolation Procedure on Genomic Inference of Microbiome Composition

    PubMed Central

    Munk, Patrick; Lukjancenko, Oksana; Priemé, Anders; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Explorations of complex microbiomes using genomics greatly enhance our understanding about their diversity, biogeography, and function. The isolation of DNA from microbiome specimens is a key prerequisite for such examinations, but challenges remain in obtaining sufficient DNA quantities required for certain sequencing approaches, achieving accurate genomic inference of microbiome composition, and facilitating comparability of findings across specimen types and sequencing projects. These aspects are particularly relevant for the genomics-based global surveillance of infectious agents and antimicrobial resistance from different reservoirs. Here, we compare in a stepwise approach a total of eight commercially available DNA extraction kits and 16 procedures based on these for three specimen types (human feces, pig feces, and hospital sewage). We assess DNA extraction using spike-in controls and different types of beads for bead beating, facilitating cell lysis. We evaluate DNA concentration, purity, and stability and microbial community composition using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and for selected samples using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Our results suggest that inferred community composition was dependent on inherent specimen properties as well as DNA extraction method. We further show that bead beating or enzymatic treatment can increase the extraction of DNA from Gram-positive bacteria. Final DNA quantities could be increased by isolating DNA from a larger volume of cell lysate than that in standard protocols. Based on this insight, we designed an improved DNA isolation procedure optimized for microbiome genomics that can be used for the three examined specimen types and potentially also for other biological specimens. A standard operating procedure is available from https://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.3475406. IMPORTANCE Sequencing-based analyses of microbiomes may lead to a breakthrough in our understanding of the microbial worlds associated with

  16. Codon Constraints on Closed 2D Shapes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    19843$ CODON CONSTRAINTS ON CLOSED 2D SHAPES Go Whitman Richards "I Donald D. Hoffman’ D T 18 Abstract: Codons are simple primitives for describing plane...RSONAL AUT"ORtIS) Richards, Whitman & Hoffman, Donald D. 13&. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED N/A P8 AT F RRrT t~r. Ago..D,) is, PlE COUNT Reprint...outlines, if figure and ground are ignored. Later, we will address the problem of indexing identical codon descriptors that have different figure

  17. Single-molecule analysis of DNA uncoiling by a type II topoisomerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strick, Terence R.; Croquette, Vincent; Bensimon, David

    2000-04-01

    Type II DNA topoisomerases are ubiquitous ATP-dependent enzymes capable of transporting a DNA through a transient double-strand break in a second DNA segment. This enables them to untangle DNA and relax the interwound supercoils (plectonemes) that arise in twisted DNA. In vivo, they are responsible for untangling replicated chromosomes and their absence at mitosis or meiosis ultimately causes cell death. Here we describe a micromanipulation experiment in which we follow in real time a single Drosophila melanogaster topoisomerase II acting on a linear DNA molecule which is mechanically stretched and supercoiled. By monitoring the DNA's extension in the presence of ATP, we directly observe the relaxation of two supercoils during a single catalytic turnover. By controlling the force pulling on the molecule, we determine the variation of the reaction rate with the applied stress. Finally, in the absence of ATP, we observe the clamping of a DNA crossover by a single topoisomerase on at least two different timescales (configurations). These results show that single molecule experiments are a powerful new tool for the study of topoisomerases.

  18. DNA damage primes the type I interferon system via the cytosolic DNA sensor STING to promote anti-microbial innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Härtlova, Anetta; Erttmann, Saskia F; Raffi, Faizal Am; Schmalz, Anja M; Resch, Ulrike; Anugula, Sharath; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Nilsson, Lisa M; Kröger, Andrea; Nilsson, Jonas A; Ek, Torben; Weiss, Siegfried; Gekara, Nelson O

    2015-02-17

    Dysfunction in Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a central component of the DNA repair machinery, results in Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT), a cancer-prone disease with a variety of inflammatory manifestations. By analyzing AT patient samples and Atm(-/-) mice, we found that unrepaired DNA lesions induce type I interferons (IFNs), resulting in enhanced anti-viral and anti-bacterial responses in Atm(-/-) mice. Priming of the type I interferon system by DNA damage involved release of DNA into the cytoplasm where it activated the cytosolic DNA sensing STING-mediated pathway, which in turn enhanced responses to innate stimuli by activating the expression of Toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like receptors, cytoplasmic DNA sensors, and their downstream signaling partners. This study provides a potential explanation for the inflammatory phenotype of AT patients and establishes damaged DNA as a cell intrinsic danger signal that primes the innate immune system for a rapid and amplified response to microbial and environmental threats.

  19. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  20. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  1. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  2. Nucleotide sequence of the transforming early region E1b of adenovirus type 12 DNA: structure and gene organization, and comparison with those of adenovirus type 5 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, T; Sawada, Y; Shinawawa, M; Shimizu, Y; Shiroki, K; Shimojo, H; Sugisaki, H; Takanami, M; Uemizu, Y; Fujinaga, K

    1981-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the entire transforming early region of E1b of the highly oncogenic adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) DNA has been determined. The total sequence (3860 base pairs) encompasses the entire transforming early region E1 of Ad12 DNA. From the sequence for the E1b region of Ad12, and the transcription map of the E1b region (1, 2, 3, and this paper) the structure and gene organization of the early region E1b of Ad12 DNA were analyzed and compared with those of the E1b region in the non-oncogenic Ad5 DNA (4, 5). Most of the sequences in the E1b region of Ad12 was highly homologous to that of Ad5. It is predicted that the Ad12 region E1b codes for polypeptides of 53.9, 19.1, and 8.9 kd. This situation is identical with that of the Ad5 region E1b which codes for polypeptides of 54.9, 20.6, and 8.3 kd. The function of these predicted polypeptides encoded by the E1b regions in cell transformation is discussed. PMID:6275367

  3. Genome-derived cytosolic DNA contributes to type I interferon expression and immunogenicity of B-cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu J; Ho, Samantha S W; Tan, Nikki Y; Koo, Christine Xing'Er; Khatoo, Muznah; Cheung, Florence S G; Gasser, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    We recently provided evidence that genome-derived DNA is present in the cytosol of many tumor cells. Genomic loci that give rise to cytosolic DNA can potentially form non-B DNA structures including triple-stranded RNA:DNA structures (R-loops). The RNA:DNA-specific endonuclease RNaseh1 reduced the levels of cytosolic DNA and type I interferon-dependent rejection of B-cell lymphoma suggesting that cytosolic DNA may contribute to immune surveillance of B-cell lymphoma.

  4. Amplification of Herpes simplex type 1 and Human Herpes type 5 viral DNA from formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, John D; Royall, Donald; Daum, Luke T; Kagan-Hallet, Kathleen; Chambers, James P

    2005-12-16

    It is known that nucleic acids from formalin-fixed tissues are not nearly as good templates for DNA amplification as those extracted from fresh tissues. However, specimens stored in most pathologic archives are initially fixed in formalin. The possibility of an infectious etiology of several diseases including Alzheimer's underscores the usefulness of archived tissue in assessing the association of infectious agents with specific pathology. In this report, we describe in detail a method resulting in robust amplification of HSV1 and Human Herpes type (HHV) 5 viral DNA targets using formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain frontal and temporal tissue as source of amplification template. Herpes simplex type 2 viral DNA was not detected in the limited samples examined in this study. Amplicons were verified by sequence analysis. Brain tissue stored in formalin longer than 1 year prior to post-formalin-fixation analysis gave rise to significantly shorter amplicons consistent with the observation that template DNA integrity decreases significantly with increasing time of storage in formalin. Thus, this report should be useful in PCR-based investigations assessing the regional presence of viral DNAs in formalin-fixed brain tissue.

  5. Structure of an ‘open’ clamp type II topoisomerase-DNA complex provides a mechanism for DNA capture and transport

    PubMed Central

    Laponogov, Ivan; Veselkov, Dennis A.; Crevel, Isabelle M.-T.; Pan, Xiao-Su; Fisher, L. Mark; Sanderson, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases regulate DNA supercoiling and chromosome segregation. They act as ATP-operated clamps that capture a DNA duplex and pass it through a transient DNA break in a second DNA segment via the sequential opening and closure of ATPase-, G-DNA- and C-gates. Here, we present the first ‘open clamp’ structures of a 3-gate topoisomerase II-DNA complex, the seminal complex engaged in DNA recognition and capture. A high-resolution structure was solved for a (full-length ParE-ParC55)2 dimer of Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV bound to two DNA molecules: a closed DNA gate in a B-A-B form double-helical conformation and a second B-form duplex associated with closed C-gate helices at a novel site neighbouring the catalytically important β-pinwheel DNA-binding domain. The protein N gate is present in an ‘arms-wide-open’ state with the undimerized N-terminal ParE ATPase domains connected to TOPRIM domains via a flexible joint and folded back allowing ready access both for gate and transported DNA segments and cleavage-stabilizing antibacterial drugs. The structure shows the molecular conformations of all three gates at 3.7 Å, the highest resolution achieved for the full complex to date, and illuminates the mechanism of DNA capture and transport by a type II topoisomerase. PMID:23965305

  6. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  7. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  8. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  9. Translocation-coupled DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Mahesh Kumar; Nirwan, Neha; Diffin, Fiona M.; van Aelst, Kara; Kulkarni, Manasi; Pernstich, Christian; Szczelkun, Mark D.; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2015-01-01

    Endonucleolytic double-strand DNA break production requires separate strand cleavage events. Although catalytic mechanisms for simple dimeric endonucleases are available, there are many complex nuclease machines which are poorly understood in comparison. Here we studied the single polypeptide Type ISP restriction-modification (RM) enzymes, which cleave random DNA between distant target sites when two enzymes collide following convergent ATP-driven translocation. We report the 2.7 Angstroms resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Type ISP enzyme-DNA complex, revealing that both the helicase-like ATPase and nuclease are unexpectedly located upstream of the direction of translocation, inconsistent with simple nuclease domain-dimerization. Using single-molecule and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that each ATPase remodels its DNA-protein complex and translocates along DNA without looping it, leading to a collision complex where the nuclease domains are distal. Sequencing of single cleavage events suggests a previously undescribed endonuclease model, where multiple, stochastic strand nicking events combine to produce DNA scission. PMID:26389736

  10. Discrete and infinite 1D, 2D/3D cage frameworks with inclusion of anionic species and anion-exchange reactions of Ag3L2 type receptor with tetrahedral and octahedral anions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Ke; Huang, Xiaohua; Lu, Tianhong; Wang, Xiujian; Sun, Wei-Yin; Kang, Bei-Sheng

    2008-06-28

    Complexes [PF6 subset(Ag3(titmb)2](PF6)2 (8) and {SbF6 subset[Ag3(titmb)2](SbF6)2}.H2O.1.5 CH3OH (9) are obtained by reaction of titmb and Ag+ salts with different anions (PF6(-) and SbF6(-)), and crystal structures reveal that they are both M3L2 cage complexes with short Ag...F interactions between the silver atoms and the fluorine atoms of the anions. In complex 8, a novel cage dimer is formed by weak Ag...F contacts; an unique cage tetramer formed via Ag...pi interactions (Ag...eta5-imidazole) between dimers and an infinite 1D cage chain is presented. However, each of the external non-disordered SbF6(-) anions connect with six cage 9s via Ag...F contacts, and each cage 9 in turn connects with three SbF6(-) anions to form a 2D network cage layer; and the layers are connected by pi-pi interactions to form a 3D network. The anion-exchange reactions of four Ag3L2 type complexes ([BF4 subset(Ag3(titmb)2](BF4)2 (6), [ClO4 subset(Ag3(titmb)2](ClO4)2 (7b), [PF6 subset(Ag3(titmb)2](PF6)2 (8) and [SbF6 subset(Ag3(titmb)2](SbF6)2.1.5CH3OH (9)) with tetrahedral and octahedral anions (ClO4(-), BF4(-), PF6(-) and SbF6(-)) are also reported. The anion-exchange experiments demonstrate that the anion selective order is SbF6(-) > PF6(-) > BF4(-), ClO4(-), and this anion receptor is preferred to trap octahedral and tetrahedral anions rather than linear or triangle anions; SbF6(-) is the biggest and most preferable one, so far. The dimensions of cage complexes with or without internal anions, anion-exchange reactions, cage assembly and anion inclusions, silver(I) coordination environments, Ag-F and Ag-pi interactions of Ag3L2 complexes 1-9 are discussed.

  11. Distinct circular single-stranded DNA viruses exist in different soil types.

    PubMed

    Reavy, Brian; Swanson, Maud M; Cock, Peter J A; Dawson, Lorna; Freitag, Thomas E; Singh, Brajesh K; Torrance, Lesley; Mushegian, Arcady R; Taliansky, Michael

    2015-06-15

    The potential dependence of virus populations on soil types was examined by electron microscopy, and the total abundance of virus particles in four soil types was similar to that previously observed in soil samples. The four soil types examined differed in the relative abundances of four morphological groups of viruses. Machair, a unique type of coastal soil in western Scotland and Ireland, differed from the others tested in having a higher proportion of tailed bacteriophages. The other soils examined contained predominantly spherical and thin filamentous virus particles, but the Machair soil had a more even distribution of the virus types. As the first step in looking at differences in populations in detail, virus sequences from Machair and brown earth (agricultural pasture) soils were examined by metagenomic sequencing after enriching for circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) virus genomes. Sequences from the family Microviridae (icosahedral viruses mainly infecting bacteria) of CRESS-DNA viruses were predominant in both soils. Phylogenetic analysis of Microviridae major coat protein sequences from the Machair viruses showed that they spanned most of the diversity of the subfamily Gokushovirinae, whose members mainly infect obligate intracellular parasites. The brown earth soil had a higher proportion of sequences that matched the morphologically similar family Circoviridae in BLAST searches. However, analysis of putative replicase proteins that were similar to those of viruses in the Circoviridae showed that they are a novel clade of Circoviridae-related CRESS-DNA viruses distinct from known Circoviridae genera. Different soils have substantially different taxonomic biodiversities even within ssDNA viruses, which may be driven by physicochemical factors.

  12. DNA targeting by the type I-G and type I-A CRISPR–Cas systems of Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Joshua; Deighan, Trace; Westpheling, Jan; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas systems silence plasmids and viruses in prokaryotes. CRISPR–Cas effector complexes contain CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that include sequences captured from invaders and direct CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to destroy corresponding invader nucleic acids. Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) harbors three CRISPR–Cas immune systems: a Cst (Type I-G) system with an associated Cmr (Type III-B) module at one locus, and a partial Csa (Type I-A) module (lacking known invader sequence acquisition and crRNA processing genes) at another locus. The Pfu Cmr complex cleaves complementary target RNAs, and Csa systems have been shown to target DNA, while the mechanism by which Cst complexes silence invaders is unknown. In this study, we investigated the function of the Cst as well as Csa system in Pfu strains harboring a single CRISPR–Cas system. Plasmid transformation assays revealed that the Cst and Csa systems both function by DNA silencing and utilize similar flanking sequence information (PAMs) to identify invader DNA. Silencing by each system specifically requires its associated Cas3 nuclease. crRNAs from the 7 shared CRISPR loci in Pfu are processed for use by all 3 effector complexes, and Northern analysis revealed that individual effector complexes dictate the profile of mature crRNA species that is generated. PMID:26519471

  13. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse.

  14. Rapid Discrimination of Mitochondrial DNA Type and Use of Results to Study Mitochondrial Inheritance in Pleurotus spp.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, I; Moriyama, Y; Yanagi, S O; Ando, A; Nagata, Y

    1998-01-01

    We have reported a simple and rapid method to discriminate species in the genus Pleurotus by analysis of restriction-fragment-length polymorphism of whole-cell DNA, and found that several restriction enzymes gave DNA bands useful in such discrimination, but other enzymes tested did not. In the present study, we report the reason why there were useful and useless enzymes; the effective enzymes digested rDNA into small fragments that did not interfere with the detection of DNA bands useful for discrimination. The origin of these discriminative DNA bands was found to be mitochondrial DNA when the banding profiles of whole-cell DNA, mitochondrial DNA, and nuclear DNA were compared. Consequently, our method could be used for rapid and simple identification of mitochondrial DNA type in the genus Pleurotus. The results were used to study mitochondrial inheritance, and we found that only the nucleus but not the mitochondria migrated during the mating of Pleurotus cornucopiae with P. citrinopileatus.

  15. Detection of HLA-D/DR-related DNA polymorphism in HLA-D homozygous typing cells.

    PubMed Central

    Owerbach, D; Lernmark, A; Rask, L; Peterson, P A; Platz, P; Svejgaard, A

    1983-01-01

    Sequences of different sizes are generated when DNA from homozygous HLA-Dw/DR typing cells are digested with restriction endonuclease and analyzed by hybridization with a HLA-D region class II antigen beta-chain cDNA probe. The patterns of hybridization were highly polymorphic but one endonuclease, BamHI, defined sequences unique to all HLA-Dw/DR specificities 1-8 except HLA-Dw/DR 2 and 6; however, these two specificities were resolved with the enzyme EcoRI. Digestion with other endonucleases such as Pst I results in patterns of restriction fragments that differ between homozygous typing cells of the same HLA-Dw/DR specificity. HLA-D region beta-chain probes permit HLA-D region genotyping at the DNA level and may allow detection of genes controlling the association of HLA specificities with a wide variety of diseases. Images PMID:6304735

  16. Frequency of undetected CYP2D6 hybrid genes in clinical samples: impact on phenotype prediction.

    PubMed

    Black, John Logan; Walker, Denise L; O'Kane, Dennis J; Harmandayan, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is highly polymorphic. CYP2D6-2D7 hybrid genes can be present in samples containing CYP2D6*4 and CYP2D6*10 alleles. CYP2D7-2D6 hybrid genes can be present in samples with duplication signals and in samples with homozygous genotyping results. The frequency of hybrid genes in clinical samples is unknown. We evaluated 1390 samples for undetected hybrid genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, PCR fragment analysis, TaqMan copy number assays, DNA sequencing, and allele-specific primer extension assay. Of 508 CYP2D6*4-containing samples, 109 (21.5%) harbored CYP2D6*68 + *4-like, whereas 9 (1.8%) harbored CYP2D6*4N + *4-like. Of 209 CYP2D6*10-containing samples, 44 (21.1%) were found to have CYP2D6*36 + *10. Of 332 homozygous samples, 4 (1.2%) harbored a single CYP2D7-2D6 hybrid, and of 341 samples with duplication signals, 25 (7.3%) harbored an undetected CYP2D7-2D6 hybrid. Phenotype before and after accurate genotyping was predicted using a method in clinical use. The presence of hybrid genes had no effect on the phenotype prediction of CYP2D6*4- and CYP2D6*10-containing samples. Four of four (100%) homozygous samples containing a CYP2D7-2D6 gene had a change in predicted phenotype, and 23 of 25 (92%) samples with a duplication signal and a CYP2D7-2D6 gene had a change in predicted phenotype. Four novel genes were identified (CYP2D6*13A1 variants 1 and 2, CYP2D6*13G1, and CYP2D6*13G2), and two novel hybrid tandem structures consisting of CYP2D6*13B + *68×2 + *4-like and CYP2D6*13A1 variant 2 + *1×N were observed.

  17. Location of the Origin of DNA Replication in Adenovirus Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Marshall S.

    1974-01-01

    Utilizing the isolated left and right halves of both adenovirus type 2 and the nondefective adenovirus simian virus 40 hybrid (Ad2+ND1), studies were undertaken to find the site on the DNA molecules at which replication begins. The data are consistent with several models which include an initiation event at both ends and bidirectional growth. PMID:4363250

  18. DNA polymorphisms in the tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase gene in "drug-type" and "fiber-type" Cannabis sativa L.

    PubMed

    Kojoma, Mareshige; Seki, Hikaru; Yoshida, Shigeo; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2006-06-02

    The cannabinoid content of 13 different strains of cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.) was analyzed. Six strains fell into the "drug-type" class, with high Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) content, and seven strains into the "fiber-type" class, with low THCA using HPLC analysis. Genomic DNA sequence polymorphisms in the THCA synthase gene from each strain were studied. A single PCR fragment of the THCA synthase gene was detected from six strains of "drug-type" plants. We could also detect the fragment from seven strains of "fiber-type" plants, although no or very low content of THCA were detected in these samples. These were 1638 bp from all 13 strains and no intron among the sequences obtained. There were two variants of the THCA synthase gene in the "drug-type" and "fiber-type" cannabis plants, respectively. Thirty-seven major substitutions were detected in the alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences from these variants. Furthermore, we identified a specific PCR marker for the THCA synthase gene for the "drug-type" strains. This PCR marker was not detected in the "fiber-type" strains.

  19. Typing of bacteriophages by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR to assess genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Martín-Platero, Antonio M; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; García, Pilar; Martínez, Beatriz

    2011-09-01

    The recent boom in phage therapy and phage biocontrol requires the design of suitable cocktails of genetically different bacteriophages. The current methods for typing phages need significant quantities of purified DNA, may require a priori genetic information and are cost and time consuming. We have evaluated the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR technique to produce unique and reproducible band patterns from 26 different bacteriophages infecting Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactococcus lactis, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus thermophilus, Bacillus subtilis and Lactobacillus casei bacterial strains. Initially, purified DNA and phage suspensions of seven selected phages were used as a template. The conditions that were found to be optimal 8 μM of 10-mer primers, 3 μM magnesium oxalacetate and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide. The RAPD genomic fingerprints using a phage titer suspension higher than 10(9) PFU mL(-1) were highly reproducible. Clustering by the Pearson correlation coefficient and the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages clustering algorithm correlated largely with genetically different phages infecting the same bacterial species, although closely related phages with a similar DNA restriction pattern were indistinguishable. The results support the use of RAPD-PCR for quick typing of phage isolates and preliminary assessment of their genetic diversity bypassing tedious DNA purification protocols and previous knowledge of their sequence.

  20. DNA extraction from aged skeletal samples for STR typing by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Huel, René; Amory, Sylvain; Bilić, Ana; Vidović, Stojko; Jasaragić, Edin; Parsons, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    STR analysis of DNA extracted from skeletal samples can play an important role in the identification of missing persons. Here we present a method for the extraction of DNA from skeletal samples involving complete demineralization and digestion of the sample, followed by purification by silica binding. This method, together with the multiplex STR typing approach also presented, has proven highly successful in the recovery of DNA profiles from degraded, aged skeletal remains from a wide range of environmental contexts. The methodological steps presented include bone decontamination and grinding, DNA extraction, repurification in the case of highly inhibited samples, quantification, STR multiplex amplification, and profile reporting guidelines. However, the conditions applied for amplification and the criteria for allele calling and profile submission must be based on the results of each laboratory's internal validation experiments involving the type of samples relevant to the project at hand. The methods presented here have permitted large-scale DNA-based identification of persons missing from mass disasters and armed conflict.

  1. DNA methylation of cord blood cell types: Applications for mixed cell birth studies.

    PubMed

    Bakulski, Kelly M; Feinberg, Jason I; Andrews, Shan V; Yang, Jack; Brown, Shannon; L McKenney, Stephanie; Witter, Frank; Walston, Jeremy; Feinberg, Andrew P; Fallin, M Daniele

    2016-05-03

    Epigenome-wide association studies of disease widely use DNA methylation measured in blood as a surrogate tissue. Cell proportions can vary between people and confound associations of exposure or outcome. An adequate reference panel for estimating cell proportions from adult whole blood for DNA methylation studies is available, but an analogous cord blood cell reference panel is not yet available. Cord blood has unique cell types and the epigenetic signatures of standard cell types may not be consistent throughout the life course. Using magnetic bead sorting, we isolated cord blood cell types (nucleated red blood cells, granulocytes, monocytes, natural killer cells, B cells, CD4(+)T cells, and CD8(+)T cells) from 17 live births at Johns Hopkins Hospital. We confirmed enrichment of the cell types using fluorescence assisted cell sorting and ran DNA from the separated cell types on the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. After filtering, the final analysis was on 104 samples at 429,794 probes. We compared cell type specific signatures in cord to each other and methylation at 49.2% of CpG sites on the array differed by cell type (F-test P < 10(-8)). Differences between nucleated red blood cells and the remainder of the cell types were most pronounced (36.9% of CpG sites at P < 10(-8)) and 99.5% of these sites were hypomethylated relative to the other cell types. We also compared the mean-centered sorted cord profiles to the available adult reference panel and observed high correlation between the overlapping cell types for granulocytes and monocytes (both r=0.74), and poor correlation for CD8(+)T cells and NK cells (both r=0.08). We further provide an algorithm for estimating cell proportions in cord blood using the newly developed cord reference panel, which estimates biologically plausible cell proportions in whole cord blood samples.

  2. Noncanonical autophagy is required for type I interferon secretion in response to DNA-immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Henault, Jill; Martinez, Jennifer; Riggs, Jeffrey M; Tian, Jane; Mehta, Payal; Clarke, Lorraine; Sasai, Miwa; Latz, Eicke; Brinkmann, Melanie M; Iwasaki, Akiko; Coyle, Anthony J; Kolbeck, Roland; Green, Douglas R; Sanjuan, Miguel A

    2012-12-14

    Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) is largely responsible for discriminating self from pathogenic DNA. However, association of host DNA with autoantibodies activates TLR9, inducing the pathogenic secretion of type I interferons (IFNs) from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Here, we found that in response to DNA-containing immune complexes (DNA-IC), but not to soluble ligands, IFN-α production depended upon the convergence of the phagocytic and autophagic pathways, a process called microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3)-associated phagocytosis (LAP). LAP was required for TLR9 trafficking into a specialized interferon signaling compartment by a mechanism that involved autophagy-related proteins, but not the conventional autophagic preinitiation complex, or adaptor protein-3 (AP-3). Our findings unveil a new role for nonconventional autophagy in inflammation and provide one mechanism by which anti-DNA autoantibodies, such as those found in several autoimmune disorders, bypass the controls that normally restrict the apportionment of pathogenic DNA and TLR9 to the interferon signaling compartment.

  3. Analysis of the adenovirus type 5 terminal protein precursor and DNA polymerase by linker insertion mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Roovers, D J; van der Lee, F M; van der Wees, J; Sussenbach, J S

    1993-01-01

    A series of adenovirus type 5 precursor terminal protein (pTP) and DNA polymerase (Ad pol) genes with linker insertion mutations were separately introduced into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a late vaccinia virus promoter. The recombinant viruses were used for overexpression of the mutant genes in HeLa cells. In total, 22 different mutant pTP and 10 different Ad pol vaccinia virus recombinants were constructed, including some that expressed carboxyl-terminus-truncated forms of both proteins and one that produced the mutant H5ts149 Ad pol. To investigate the structure-function relationships of both proteins, extracts from cells infected with the recombinant viruses were tested for in vitro complementation of the initiation and elongation steps in adenovirus DNA replication. The results were in accordance with those of earlier in vivo experiments with these insertion mutants and indicate that multiple regions of both proteins are essential for adenovirus DNA replication. The carboxyl termini of both pTP and Ad pol were shown to be essential for proper functioning of these proteins during initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. Three different DNA replication-negative pTP mutants were shown to have residual activity in the initiation assay, suggesting not only that pTP is required for initiation but also that it may play a role in DNA replication after the deoxycytidylation step. Images PMID:8416372

  4. Detection of bovine papillomavirus type 14 DNA sequences in urinary bladder tumors in cattle.

    PubMed

    Roperto, Sante; Munday, John S; Corrado, Federica; Goria, Maria; Roperto, Franco

    2016-07-15

    Bovine papillomavirus type 14 (BPV-14) is a novel Deltapapillomavirus (δPV) which is most closely related to BPV-1, -2, and -13, well-known members of the δPV genus. So far BPV-14 has been detected in cutaneous neoplastic lesions in cattle and in feline sarcoids. As BPV-14 may share biological and pathological properties with BPV-1, -2 and -13, it has been hypothesized that, like other δPVs, BPV-14 could be associated with bovine bladder neoplasia. In this study, 50 tumors of the urinary bladder of cattle were diagnosed. DNA was extracted from all tumor samples as well as from 25 normal bladder samples and submitted to BPV-14 L1 PCR and subsequent amplicon sequencing analysis. BPV-14 L1 DNA sequences of specific 195bp amplicons were obtained from 17 of 50 (34%) tumor DNA isolates; no BPV-14 DNA was detected from 25 normal samples. Amplicons revealed a 99% homology with the corresponding BPV-14 L1 DNA region (GenBank accession number KP276343.1). Co-infections by two or three δPV types were also seen. This study reveals the presence of BPV-14 DNA alone or in combination with other δPV DNA in bovine bladder tumors alone and suggests that BPV-14 could also be involved in bladder neoplasia as its E5 oncoprotein has the potential to induce cell proliferation. Furthermore, this is the first study to show the presence of BPV-14 in Europe, suggesting that BPV-14, like other δPVs, has a worldwide distribution.

  5. Discriminatory power and reproducibility of novel DNA typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Kristin; Arnold, Catherine; Cataldi, Angel; Gutiérrez, M Cristina; Haas, Walter H; Panaiotov, Stefan; Skuce, Robin A; Supply, Philip; van der Zanden, Adri G M; van Soolingen, Dick

    2005-11-01

    In recent years various novel DNA typing methods have been developed which are faster and easier to perform than the current internationally standardized IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing method. However, there has been no overview of the utility of these novel typing methods, and it is largely unknown how they compare to previously published methods. In this study, the discriminative power and reproducibility of nine recently described PCR-based typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis were investigated using the strain collection of the interlaboratory study of Kremer et al. This strain collection contains 90 M. tuberculosis complex and 10 non-M. tuberculosis complex mycobacterial strains, as well as 31 duplicated DNA samples to assess reproducibility. The highest reproducibility was found with variable numbers of tandem repeat typing using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU VNTR) and fast ligation-mediated PCR (FLiP), followed by second-generation spoligotyping, ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR), VNTR typing using five repeat loci identified at the Queens University of Belfast (QUB VNTR), and the Amadio speciation PCR. Poor reproducibility was associated with fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism typing, which was performed in three different laboratories. The methods were ordered from highest discrimination to lowest by the Hunter-Gaston discriminative index as follows: QUB VNTR typing, MIRU VNTR typing, FLiP, LM-PCR, and spoligotyping. We conclude that both VNTR typing methods and FLiP typing are rapid, highly reliable, and discriminative epidemiological typing methods for M. tuberculosis and that VNTR typing is the epidemiological typing method of choice for the near future.

  6. Compatibility of plasmids encoding bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 and type 2 E2 in a single DNA vaccine formulation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rong; Babiuk, Lorne A; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2007-08-10

    Type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has become increasingly prevalent worldwide, and currently the ratio of type 2 to type 1 strains in the USA approaches 50%. Although there is cross-reactivity between BVDV type 1 and type 2 strains, BVDV1 vaccine strains poorly protect from type 2 infection, so vaccines against BVDV should contain antigens from both BVDV types. Previously we demonstrated efficacy of a BVDV1 E2 DNA vaccine, and in this study we optimized a BVDV2 E2 DNA vaccine. Furthermore, as an approach to vaccinate with a DNA vaccine against both BVDV types, we compared two strategies, mixing of plasmids encoding type 1 and type 2 E2, and co-expression of type 1 and type 2 E2 from one plasmid with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). An evaluation of the IRES-containing plasmids demonstrated that the C-terminally expressed protein is produced at lower levels and induces weaker immune responses than the N-terminally expressed protein, regardless of the position of the type 1 and type 2 E2 genes. In contrast, when both plasmids encoding type 1 and type 2 E2 were administered to mice, the immune responses were similar to those induced by the individual plasmids. Thus, a mixture of plasmids encoding type 1 and type 2 E2 could be a potential DNA vaccine candidate against both BVDV1 and BVDV2.

  7. DNA damage in leukocytes from pretreatment mucopolysaccharidosis type II patients; protective effect of enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Filippon, Letícia; Wayhs, Carlos A Y; Atik, Diana M; Manfredini, Vanusa; Herber, Silvani; Carvalho, Clarissa G; Schwartz, Ida V D; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen R

    2011-04-03

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is an X-linked recessive disease caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase, leading to progressive accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in nearly all cell types, tissues and organs. Enzyme replacement therapy reduces the storage of these substances in the lysosomes. Oxidative stress is related to the pathophysiology of many disorders, including inborn errors of metabolism. Oxidative damage to protein and lipid has been described in MPS types I and III. The aim of this study was to analyze DNA damage, as determined by the alkaline comet assay using silver staining, in peripheral leukocytes from MPS II patients before treatment and during the first six months of enzyme replacement therapy. We also correlated DNA damage with lipid and protein oxidative damages, analyzed by plasma malondialdehyde levels and carbonyl group content, respectively. We found a significant increase in lipid and protein damage in MPS II patients before treatment when compared to controls. Also, our results showed greater DNA damage in terms of damage index (DI) in pretreatment MPS II patients (DI=18.0 ± 2.4) when compared to controls (DI=66.0 ± 2.0). Enzyme replacement therapy led to a significant decrease in levels of malondialdehyde and DNA damage when compared to pretreatment, but did not reach control values. Significant positive correlations between DNA damage and malondialdehyde levels, as well as carbonyl group content, were observed. Our findings indicate that MPS II patients are subject to DNA damage and that enzyme replacement therapy is able to protect against this process.

  8. An integrated system of ABO typing and multiplex STR testing for forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xianhua; He, Juan; Jia, Fei; Shen, Hongying; Zhao, Jinling; Chen, Chuguang; Bai, Liping; Liu, Feng; Hou, Guangwei; Guo, Faye

    2012-12-01

    A new amplification system for ABO and STR genotyping in a single reaction has been successfully developed. Two types of information can be obtained from a biological sample at one time. One is the classical information of ABO blood group typing for screening suspects and the other is STR information for individual identification. The system allows for the simultaneous detection of 15 autosomal STR loci (containing all CODIS STR loci as well as Penta D and Penta E), six ABO genotypes (O/O, B/B, A/A, A/O, A/B, and B/O) and the gender-determining locus Amelogenin. Primers are designed so that the amplicons are distributed ranging from 75bp to 500bp within a four-dye fluorescent design, leaving a fourth dye for the internal size standard. With 30 cycles, the results showed that the optimal amount of DNA template for this multiplex ranges from 250pg to 2ng and the lowest detection threshold is 125pg (as low as 63pg for ABO loci). For the DNA template outside the optimal detection range, we could adjust the number of cycles to obtain the robust profiles. Mixture studies showed that over 83% of minor alleles were detected at 1:9 ratios. The full profiles were still observed when 4ng of degraded DNA was digested by DNase I and 1ng undegraded DNA was added to 40μM haematin. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based conditions including the concentrations of primers, magnesium and the Taq polymerase as well as volume, cycle numbers and annealing temperature were examined and optimised. In addition, the system was validated by 364 bloodstain samples and 32 common casework samples. According to the Chinese National Standards and Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) guidelines, our system demonstrates good detection performance and is an ideal tool for forensic DNA typing with potential application.

  9. Fibroblast growth factor type 2 signaling is critical for DNA repair in human keratinocyte stem cells.

    PubMed

    Harfouche, Ghida; Vaigot, Pierre; Rachidi, Walid; Rigaud, Odile; Moratille, Sandra; Marie, Mélanie; Lemaitre, Gilles; Fortunel, Nicolas O; Martin, Michèle T

    2010-09-01

    Tissue stem cells must be endowed with superior maintenance and repair systems to ensure genomic stability over multiple generations, which would be less necessary in more differentiated cells. We previously reported that human keratinocyte stem cells were more resistant to ionizing radiation toxicity than their direct progeny, the keratinocyte progenitor cells. In the present study we addressed the mechanisms underlying this difference. Investigations of DNA repair showed that both single and double DNA strand breaks were repaired more rapidly and more efficiently in stem cells than in progenitors. As cell signaling is a key regulatory step in the management of DNA damage, a gene profiling study was performed. Data revealed that several genes of the fibroblast growth factor type 2 (FGF2) signaling pathway were induced by DNA damage in stem cells and not in progenitors. Furthermore, an increased content of the FGF2 protein was found in irradiated stem cells, both for the secreted and the cellular forms of the protein. To examine the role of endogenous FGF2 in DNA repair, stem cells were exposed to FGF2 pathway inhibitors. Blocking the FGF2 receptor (FGF receptor 1) or the kinase (Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) resulted in a inhibition of single and double DNA strand-break repair in the keratinocyte stem cells. Moreover, supplementing the progenitor cells with exogenous FGF2 activated their DNA repair. We propose that, apart from its well-known role as a strong mitogen and prosurvival factor, FGF2 helps to maintain genomic integrity in stem cells by activating stress-induced DNA repair.

  10. Effect of nucleic acid binding dyes on DNA extraction, amplification, and STR typing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Alicia M; Tobe, Shanan S; Kobus, Hilton J; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-10-01

    We report on the effects of six dyes used in the detection of DNA on the process of DNA extraction, amplification, and detection of STR loci. While dyes can be used to detect the presence of DNA, their use is restricted if they adversely affect subsequent DNA typing processes. Diamond™ Nucleic Acid Dye, GelGreen™, GelRed™, RedSafe™, SYBR(®) Green I, and EvaGreen™ were evaluated in this study. The percentage of dye removed during the extraction process was determined to be: 70.3% for SYBR(®) Green I; 99.6% for RedSafe™; 99.4% for EvaGreen™; 52.7% for Diamond™ Dye; 50.6% for GelRed™, and; could not be determined for GelGreen™. It was then assumed that the amount of dye in the fluorescent quantification assay had no effect on the DNA signal. The presence of all six dyes was then reviewed for their effect on DNA extraction. The t-test showed no significant difference between the dyes and the control. These extracts were then STR profiled and all dyes and control produced full DNA profiles. STR loci in the presence of GelGreen(TM) at 1X concentration showed increased amplification products in comparison to the control samples. Full STR profiles were detected in the presence of EvaGreen™ (1X), although with reduced amplification products. RedSafe™ (1X), Diamond™ Dye (1X), and SYBR(®) Green I (1X) all exhibited varying degrees of locus drop-out with GelRed™ generating no loci at all. We provide recommendations for the best dye to visualize the presence of DNA profile as a biological stain and its subsequent amplification and detection.

  11. Parental diabetes status reveals association of mitochondrial DNA haplogroup J1 with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Feder, Jeanette; Ovadia, Ofer; Blech, Ilana; Cohen, Josef; Wainstein, Julio; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Glaser, Benjamin; Mishmar, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Background Although mitochondrial dysfunction is consistently manifested in patients with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the association of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variants with T2DM varies among populations. These differences might stem from differing environmental influences among populations. However, other potentially important considerations emanate from the very nature of mitochondrial genetics, namely the notable high degree of partitioning in the distribution of human mtDNA variants among populations, as well as the interaction of mtDNA and nuclear DNA-encoded factors working in concert to govern mitochondrial function. We hypothesized that association of mtDNA genetic variants with T2DM could be revealed while controlling for the effect of additional inherited factors, reflected in family history information. Methods To test this hypothesis we set out to investigate whether mtDNA genetic variants will be differentially associated with T2DM depending on the diabetes status of the parents. To this end, association of mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplogroups) with T2DM was assessed in 1055 Jewish patients with and without T2DM parents ('DP' and 'HP', respectively). Results Haplogroup J1 was found to be 2.4 fold under-represented in the 'HP' patients (p = 0.0035). These results are consistent with a previous observation made in Finnish T2DM patients. Moreover, assessing the haplogroup distribution in 'DP' versus 'HP' patients having diabetic siblings revealed that haplogroup J1 was virtually absent in the 'HP' group. Conclusion These results imply the involvement of inherited factors, which modulate the susceptibility of haplogroup J1 to T2DM. PMID:19534826

  12. Theory of phase segregation in DNA assemblies containing two different base-pair sequence types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (O’ Lee, Dominic J.; Wynveen, Aaron; Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous pairing of homologous DNA sequences—a challenging subject in molecular biophysics, often referred to as ‘homology recognition’—has been observed in vitro for several DNA systems. One of these experiments involved liquid crystalline quasi-columnar phases formed by a mixture of two kinds of double stranded DNA oligomer. Both oligomer types were of the same length and identical stoichiometric base-pair composition, but the base-pairs followed a different order. Phase segregation of the two DNA types was observed in the experiments, with the formation of boundaries between domains rich in molecules of one type (order) of base pair sequence. We formulate here a modified ‘X–Y model’ for phase segregation in such assemblies, obtain approximate solutions of the model, compare analytical results to Monte Carlo simulations, and rationalise past experimental observations. This study, furthermore, reveals the factors that affect the degree of segregation. Such information could be used in planning new versions of similar segregation experiments, needed for deepening our understanding of forces that might be involved, e.g., in gene–gene recognition.

  13. The Effect of Dimethyl Sulfoxide on Supercoiled DNA Relaxation Catalyzed by Type I Topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bei; Dai, Yunjia; Liu, Ju; Zhuge, Qiang; Li, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    The effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on supercoiled plasmid DNA relaxation catalyzed by two typical type I topoisomerases were investigated in our studies. It is shown that DMSO in a low concentration (less than 20%, v/v) can induce a dose-related enhancement of the relaxation efficiency of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (type IA). Conversely, obvious inhibitory effect on the activity of calf thymus topoisomerase I (type IB) was observed when the same concentration of DMSO is used. In addition, our studies demonstrate that 20% DMSO has an ability to reduce the inhibitory effect on EcTopo I, which was induced by double-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides while the same effect cannot be found in the case of CtTopo I. Moreover, our AFM examinations suggested that DMSO can change the conformation of negatively supercoiled plasmid by creating some locally loose regions in DNA molecules. Combining all the lines of evidence, we proposed that DMSO enhanced EcTopo I relaxation activity by (1) increasing the single-stranded DNA regions for the activities of EcTopo I in the early and middle stages of the reaction and (2) preventing the formation of double-stranded DNA-enzyme complex in the later stage, which can elevate the effective concentration of the topoisomerase in the reaction solution.

  14. Complete nucleotide sequence of a subviral DNA molecule of porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Wen, Han

    2016-07-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is a member of the genus Circovirus in the family Circoviridae. Most subgenomic molecules of PCV2 have been mapped. Here, the first full-length sequence of a subviral molecule of PCV2 (CH-IVT12) containing a reverse complement sequence of the PCV2 genome was determined by sequencing DNA extracted from PK15 cells infected with PCV2. The circular CH-IVT12 DNA consists of 1136 nucleotides and contains one major open reading frame.

  15. Nonlinear matching measure for the analysis of on-off type DNA microarray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong D.; Park, Misun; Kim, Jongwon

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new nonlinear matching measure for automatic analysis of the on-off type DNA microarray images in which the hybridized spots are detected by the template matching method. The targeting spots of HPV DNA chips are designed for genotyping the human papilloma virus(HPV). The proposed measure is obtained by binarythresholding over the whole template region and taking the number of white pixels inside the spotted area. This measure is evaluated in terms of the accuracy of the estimated marker location to show better performance than the normalized covariance.

  16. Multiple types of logic gates based on a single G-quadruplex DNA strand.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yahui; Zhou, Lu; Xu, Lijun; Zhou, Xiaodong; Hu, Jiming; Pei, Renjun

    2014-12-04

    In this work, we demonstrate the use of a single DNA strand and G-quadruplex-specific dye NMM as a label-free switch for the construction of series of basic logic gates (YES, NOT, OR, INHIBIT, NOR, AND). The simple GT-rich sequence could be used to interact with several molecules (K(+), thrombin, Hg(2+), and Pb(2+)) to form different structures that can be distinguished by the label-free dye NMM. Our study showed that a single G-qudruplex DNA strand can function as multiple types of one-input and two-input logic gates with different combinations of input molecules.

  17. The nucleotide sequence at the termini of adenovirus type 5 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Steenbergh, P H; Maat, J; van Ormondt, H; Sussenbach, J S

    1977-01-01

    The sequences of the first 194 base pairs at both termini of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) DNA have been determined, using the chemical degradation technique developed by Maxam and Gilbert (Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 74 (1977), pp. 560-564). The nucleotide sequences 1-75 were confirmed by analysis of labeled RNA transcribed from the terminal HhaI fragments in vitro. The sequence data show that Ad5 DNA has a perfect inverted terminal repetition of 103 base pairs long. Images PMID:600799

  18. Molecular organization of the 5S rDNA gene type II in elasmobranchs

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Sergio I.; Hleap, Jose S.; Cárdenas, Heiber; Blouin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 5S rDNA gene is a non-coding RNA that can be found in 2 copies (type I and type II) in bony and cartilaginous fish. Previous studies have pointed out that type II gene is a paralog derived from type I. We analyzed the molecular organization of 5S rDNA type II in elasmobranchs. Although the structure of the 5S rDNA is supposed to be highly conserved, our results show that the secondary structure in this group possesses some variability and is different than the consensus secondary structure. One of these differences in Selachii is an internal loop at nucleotides 7 and 112. These mutations observed in the transcribed region suggest an independent origin of the gene among Batoids and Selachii. All promoters were highly conserved with the exception of BoxA, possibly due to its affinity to polymerase III. This latter enzyme recognizes a dT4 sequence as stop signal, however in Rajiformes this signal was doubled in length to dT8. This could be an adaptation toward a higher efficiency in the termination process. Our results suggest that there is no TATA box in elasmobranchs in the NTS region. We also provide some evidence suggesting that the complexity of the microsatellites present in the NTS region play an important role in the 5S rRNA gene since it is significantly correlated with the length of the NTS. PMID:26488198

  19. Rapid antigenic-type replacement and DNA sequence evolution of canine parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, C R; Aquadro, C F; Strassheim, M L; Evermann, J F; Sgro, J Y; Mohammed, H O

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of canine parvovirus (CPV) isolates with a panel of monoclonal antibodies showed that after 1986, most viruses isolated from dogs in many parts of the United States differed antigenically from the viruses isolated prior to that date. The new antigenic type (designated CPV type 2b) has largely replaced the previous antigenic type (CPV type 2a) among virus isolates from the United States. This represents the second occurrence of a new antigenic type of this DNA virus since its emergence in 1978, as the original CPV type (CPV type 2) had previously been replaced between 1979 and 1981 by the CPV type 2a strain. DNA sequence comparisons showed that CPV types 2b and 2a differed by as few as two nonsynonymous (amino acid-changing) nucleotide substitutions in the VP-1 and VP-2 capsid protein genes. One mutation, resulting in an Asn-Asp difference at residue 426 in the VP-2 sequence, was shown by comparison with a neutralization-escape mutant selected with a non-CPV type 2b-reactive monoclonal antibody to determine the antigenic change. The mutation selected by that monoclonal antibody, a His-Tyr difference in VP-2 amino acid 222, was immediately adjacent to residue 426 in the three-dimensional structure of the CPV capsid. The CPV type 2b isolates are phylogenetically closely related to the CPV type 2a isolates and are probably derived from a common ancestor. Phylogenetic analysis showed a progressive evolution away from the original CPV type. This pattern of viral evolution appears most similar to that seen in some influenza A viruses. Images PMID:1942246

  20. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    difficult to calculate mathematically the precise confidence levels associated with life - cycle cost estimates prepared for Major Defense Acquisition...Contractor Location South Oyster Bay Road 600 Grumman Road West Bethpage, NY 11714-3582 Contract Number, Type N00019-12-C-0063/5, FFP Award Date...and Evaluation Squadron One (VX-1)* - 2 aircraft at Naval Strike Air Warfare Center (NSAWC)* Aircraft Flight Hours Life Limit: 9,600 Pipeline

  1. Using multiplex PCR amplification and typing kits for the analysis of DNA evidence in a serial killer case.

    PubMed

    Hochmeister, M N; Budowle, B; Eisenberg, A; Borer, U V; Dirnhofer, R

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of DNA evidence in a serial killer case was performed using the AmpliType HLA-DQ alpha-, AmpliType PM-, and the GenePrint STR Multiplex System PCR Amplification Kits. In addition, a sex typing procedure using the X-Y homologous gene amelogenin was carried out. DNA profiles from a single hair with attached sheath material, recovered from underneath the seat cover of the suspect's car seat were compared with DNA profiles derived from reference head hairs from a homicide victim. From the evidentiary sample only 9 ng of human DNA could be recovered. In a sample, where the quantity of DNA becomes a critical issue a powerful route is the simultaneous amplification of several loci (multiplex PCR). This is the first report where commercially available multiplex PCR amplification and typing kits have been introduced for the analysis of DNA evidence in a serial killer case and the analysis has been admitted in court.

  2. Control of self-assembled 2D nanostructures by methylation of guanine.

    PubMed

    Bald, Ilko; Wang, Yao-guang; Dong, Mingdong; Rosen, Christian B; Ravnsbaek, Jens B; Zhuang, Gui-lin; Gothelf, Kurt V; Wang, Jian-guo; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2011-04-04

    Methylation of DNA nucleobases is an important control mechanism in biology applied, for example, in the regulation of gene expression. The effect of methylation on the intermolecular interactions between guanine molecules is studied through an interplay between scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory with empirical dispersion correction (DFT-D). The present STM and DFT-D results show that methylation of guanine can have subtle effects on the hydrogen-bond strength with a strong dependence on the position of methylation. It is demonstrated that the methylation of DNA nucleobases is a precise means to tune intermolecular interactions and consequently enables very specific recognition of DNA methylation by enzymes. This scheme is used to generate four different types of artificial 2D nanostructures from methylated guanine. For instance, a 2D guanine windmill motif that is stabilized by cooperative hydrogen bonding is revealed. It forms by self-assembly on a graphite surface under ambient conditions at the liquid-solid interface when the hydrogen-bonding donor at the N1 site of guanine is blocked by a methyl group.

  3. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  4. 2D vs. 3D mammography observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, James Reza F.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using a mammography phantom was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this ne 3D mammography technique. In comparing 3D and 2D mammography there was no difference in calcification detection, and mass detection was better in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Given the limitations of the mammography phantom used, however, a clearer picture in comparing 3D and 2D mammography may be better acquired with the incorporation of human studies in the future.

  5. Intronic T-DNA insertion in Arabidopsis NBR1 conditionally affects wild-type transcript level

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Milagros Collados; Wawrzyńska, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The SALK_135513 line of Arabidopsis thaliana is annotated by GenBank to have the T-DNA insertion in the fourth exon of NBR1 (At4g24690). Careful molecular analyses of the homozygous plants of SALK_135513 line indicated the place of T-DNA insertion in the fourth intron. Unexpectedly, 2 kinds of NBR1 transcripts, the wild-type and the mutated, resulting from alternative splicing events, were detected in those plants. Our findings explain the problems encountered by us with phenotypic evaluation of this line and emphasize the necessity for independent verification of the exact insertion site followed by careful expression studies when working with Arabidopsis T-DNA insertional mutants. PMID:25482782

  6. Intronic T-DNA insertion in Arabidopsis NBR1 conditionally affects wild-type transcript level.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Milagros Collados; Wawrzyńska, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    The SALK_135513 line of Arabidopsis thaliana is annotated by GenBank to have the T-DNA insertion in the fourth exon of NBR1 (At4g24690). Careful molecular analyses of the homozygous plants of SALK_135513 line indicated the place of T-DNA insertion in the fourth intron. Unexpectedly, 2 kinds of NBR1 transcripts, the wild-type and the mutated, resulting from alternative splicing events, were detected in those plants. Our findings explain the problems encountered by us with phenotypic evaluation of this line and emphasize the necessity for independent verification of the exact insertion site followed by careful expression studies when working with Arabidopsis T-DNA insertional mutants.

  7. A Type IV Pilus Mediates DNA Binding during Natural Transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Laurenceau, Raphaël; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Baconnais, Sonia; Gault, Joseph; Malosse, Christian; Dujeancourt, Annick; Campo, Nathalie; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Le Cam, Eric; Claverys, Jean-Pierre; Fronzes, Rémi

    2013-01-01

    Natural genetic transformation is widely distributed in bacteria and generally occurs during a genetically programmed differentiated state called competence. This process promotes genome plasticity and adaptability in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Transformation requires the binding and internalization of exogenous DNA, the mechanisms of which are unclear. Here, we report the discovery of a transformation pilus at the surface of competent Streptococcus pneumoniae cells. This Type IV-like pilus, which is primarily composed of the ComGC pilin, is required for transformation. We provide evidence that it directly binds DNA and propose that the transformation pilus is the primary DNA receptor on the bacterial cell during transformation in S. pneumoniae. Being a central component of the transformation apparatus, the transformation pilus enables S. pneumoniae, a major Gram-positive human pathogen, to acquire resistance to antibiotics and to escape vaccines through the binding and incorporation of new genetic material. PMID:23825953

  8. STR DNA typing: increased sensitivity and efficient sample consumption using reduced PCR reaction volumes.

    PubMed

    Leclair, Benoît; Sgueglia, Joanne B; Wojtowicz, Patricia C; Juston, Ann C; Frégeau, Chantal J; Fourney, Ron M

    2003-09-01

    Improvements in detection limits/sensitivity and lower sample consumption are potential benefits of reducing PCR reaction volumes used in forensic DNA typing of crime scene samples. This premise was studied first with experimental mixtures and a nine-loci megaplex, which demonstrated stochiometric amplification and accurate detection. Next, adjudicated casework samples were subjected to amplification under 15 different template DNA to PCR reaction volume ratios. Reduction of PCR reaction volume and DNA down to 10 microL and 0.500 ng, respectively, produced identical profiles with the same signal intensity and heterozygous allele peak height ratio (HR). Reduction to 5 microL and 0.063 ng yielded HR values that were slightly affected in one to three STR loci. PCR reaction volume reduction can enhance detection and sensitivity while reducing the consumption of irreplaceable crime scene samples.

  9. Cleavage of DNA containing 5-fluorocytosine or 5-fluorouracil by type II restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Agata; Dadová, Jitka; Mačková, Michaela; Hocek, Michal

    2015-11-01

    A systematic study of the cleavage of DNA sequences containing 5-fluorocytosine or 5-fluorouracil by type II restriction endonucleases (REs) was performed and the results compared with the same sequences containing natural pyrimidine bases, uracil or 5-methylcytosine. The results show that some REs recognize fluorine as a hydrogen on cytosine and cleave the corresponding sequences where the presence of m5dC leads to blocking of the cleavage. However, on uracil, the same REs recognize the F as a methyl surrogate and cleave the sequences which are not cleaved if uracil is incorporated instead of thymine. These results are interesting for understanding the recognition of DNA sequences by REs and for manipulation of the specific DNA cutting.

  10. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  11. [Capsular types, virulence factors and DNA types of Klebsiella oxytoca strains isolated from blood and bile].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yuka; Yagi, Tetsuya; Mochizuki, Mariko; Ohta, Michio

    2012-03-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca is an opportunistic pathogen and is isolated at the second highest frequency among genus Klebsiella from hospitalized patients. According to previous reports, the major virulence factors of K. pneumoniae include capsules and several kinds of pill, whereas the virulence factors of K. oxytoca have not been well investigated. We noticed an increased frequency of K. oxytoca isolates from patients who had undergone a biliary tract operation in a general hospital from May through November, 2009. We then performed a PCR analysis of the virulence factors and an epidemiological analysis with capsular typing (serotyping) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for K. oxytoca of 11 blood isolates and 10 bile isolates. As a result, serotypes of K9, K15, K26, K31, K43, K47, K55, K70, and K79 were identified in these strains, and K1 and K2 which are frequent serotypes in K. pneumoniae strains were not observed. Two blood isolates of the K55 serotype showed almost the same PFGE pattern, suggesting that these isolates were very closely related and caused cross-infection in a hospital ward. Strains of the K43 serotype were three blood isolates and 1 bile isolate, all of which showed different PFGE patterns. There were no common isolates among the blood and bile isolates. A PCR search revealed that fimH and mrkD genes which are relevant to type 1 and type 2 pili, respectively, were present in all strains, whereas kfuBC, an iron uptake gene, and cf29a were detected in only a few strains. Neither of the mucoid phenotype-related genes magA and rmpA was present in any strains. These results strongly suggest that type 1 and/or type 3 pili would have important roles in the pathogenesis of blood infection and bile infection caused by K. oxytoca.

  12. Massively parallel DNA sequencing facilitates diagnosis of patients with Usher syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Hidekane; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Kumakawa, Kozo; Tono, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yumiko; Sato, Hiroaki; Nagai, Kyoko; Ishikawa, Kotaro; Ikezono, Tetsuo; Naito, Yasushi; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Oshikawa, Chie; Kimitsuki, Takashi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder manifesting hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa and vestibular dysfunction, and having three clinical subtypes. Usher syndrome type 1 is the most severe subtype due to its profound hearing loss, lack of vestibular responses, and retinitis pigmentosa that appears in prepuberty. Six of the corresponding genes have been identified, making early diagnosis through DNA testing possible, with many immediate and several long-term advantages for patients and their families. However, the conventional genetic techniques, such as direct sequence analysis, are both time-consuming and expensive. Targeted exon sequencing of selected genes using the massively parallel DNA sequencing technology will potentially enable us to systematically tackle previously intractable monogenic disorders and improve molecular diagnosis. Using this technique combined with direct sequence analysis, we screened 17 unrelated Usher syndrome type 1 patients and detected probable pathogenic variants in the 16 of them (94.1%) who carried at least one mutation. Seven patients had the MYO7A mutation (41.2%), which is the most common type in Japanese. Most of the mutations were detected by only the massively parallel DNA sequencing. We report here four patients, who had probable pathogenic mutations in two different Usher syndrome type 1 genes, and one case of MYO7A/PCDH15 digenic inheritance. This is the first report of Usher syndrome mutation analysis using massively parallel DNA sequencing and the frequency of Usher syndrome type 1 genes in Japanese. Mutation screening using this technique has the power to quickly identify mutations of many causative genes while maintaining cost-benefit performance. In addition, the simultaneous mutation analysis of large numbers of genes is useful for detecting mutations in different genes that are possibly disease modifiers or of digenic inheritance.

  13. Functional analysis of environmental DNA-derived type II polyketide synthases reveals structurally diverse secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhiyang; Kallifidas, Dimitris; Brady, Sean F.

    2011-01-01

    A single gram of soil is predicted to contain thousands of unique bacterial species. The majority of these species remain recalcitrant to standard culture methods, prohibiting their use as sources of unique bioactive small molecules. The cloning and analysis of DNA extracted directly from environmental samples (environmental DNA, eDNA) provides a means of exploring the biosynthetic capacity of natural bacterial populations. Environmental DNA libraries contain large reservoirs of bacterial genetic diversity from which new secondary metabolite gene clusters can be systematically recovered and studied. The identification and heterologous expression of type II polyketide synthase-containing eDNA clones is reported here. Functional analysis of three soil DNA-derived polyketide synthase systems in Streptomyces albus revealed diverse metabolites belonging to well-known, rare, and previously uncharacterized structural families. The first of these systems is predicted to encode the production of the known antibiotic landomycin E. The second was found to encode the production of a metabolite with a previously uncharacterized pentacyclic ring system. The third was found to encode the production of unique KB-3346-5 derivatives, which show activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis. These results, together with those of other small-molecule-directed metagenomic studies, suggest that culture-independent approaches are capable of accessing biosynthetic diversity that has not yet been extensively explored using culture-based methods. The large-scale functional screening of eDNA clones should be a productive strategy for generating structurally previously uncharacterized chemical entities for use in future drug development efforts. PMID:21768346

  14. Structures of herpes simplex virus type 1 genes required for replication of virus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, D J; Dalrymple, M A; Dolan, A; McNab, D; Perry, L J; Taylor, P; Challberg, M D

    1988-01-01

    Recently, a method has been developed to identify regions in the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) which contain genes required for DNA synthesis from an HSV-1 origin of DNA replication, and seven genomic loci have been identified as representing the necessary and sufficient gene set for such replication (C. A. Wu, N. J. Nelson, D. J. McGeoch, and M. D. Challberg, J. Virol. 62:435-443, 1988). Two of the loci represent the well-known genes for DNA polymerase and major DNA-binding protein, but the remainder had little or no previous characterization. In this report we present the DNA sequences of the five newly identified genes and their deduced transcript organizations and encoded amino acid sequences. These genes were designated UL5, UL8, UL9, UL42, and UL52 and were predicted to encode proteins with molecular weights of, respectively, 99,000, 80,000, 94,000, 51,000, and 114,000. All of these genes had clear counterparts in the genome of the related alphaherpesvirus varicella-zoster virus, but only UL5 and UL52 were detectably conserved in the distantly related gammaherpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus, as judged by amino acid sequence similarity. The sequence of the UL5 protein, and of its counterparts in the other viruses, contained a region closely resembling known ATP-binding sites; this could be indicative, for instance, of a helicase or primase activity. PMID:2826807

  15. How quantum entanglement in DNA synchronizes double-strand breakage by type II restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Kurian, P; Dunston, G; Lindesay, J

    2016-02-21

    Macroscopic quantum effects in living systems have been studied widely in pursuit of fundamental explanations for biological energy transport and sensing. While it is known that type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, induce DNA double-strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, the mechanism by which simultaneous cutting is coordinated between the catalytic centers remains unclear. We propose a quantum mechanical model for collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix, where dipole-dipole oscillations are quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the enzyme. Zero-point modes of coherent oscillations would provide the energy required for double-strand breakage. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise by the enzyme's displacement of water surrounding the DNA recognition sequence. The enzyme thus serves as a decoherence shield. Palindromic mirror symmetry of the enzyme-DNA complex should conserve parity, because symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the complex is violated or when physiological parameters are perturbed from optima. Persistent correlations in DNA across longer spatial separations-a possible signature of quantum entanglement-may be explained by such a mechanism.

  16. Single-molecule study of DNA unlinking by eukaryotic and prokaryotic type-II topoisomerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvin, G.; Bensimon, D.; Croquette, V.

    2003-08-01

    Type-II topoisomerases are responsible for untangling DNA during replication by removing supercoiled and interlinked DNA structures. Using a single-molecule micromanipulation setup, we follow the real-time decatenation of two mechanically braided DNA molecules by Drosophila melanogaster topoisomerase (Topo) II and Escherichia coli Topo IV. Although Topo II relaxes left-handed (L) and right-handed (R-) braids similarly at a rate of 2.9 s-1, Topo IV has a marked preference for L-braids, which it relaxes completely and processively at a rate of 2.4 s-1. However, Topo IV can unlink R-braids at about half that rate when they supercoil to form L-plectonemes. These results imply that the preferred substrate for unlinking by Topo IV has the symmetry of an L-crossing and shed new light on the decatenation of daughter strands during DNA replication, which are usually assumed to be linked in an R-braid. DNA replication

  17. DNA replication catalyzed by herpes simplex virus type 1 proteins reveals trombone loops at the fork.

    PubMed

    Bermek, Oya; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D

    2015-01-30

    Using purified replication factors encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1 and a 70-base minicircle template, we obtained robust DNA synthesis with leading strand products of >20,000 nucleotides and lagging strand fragments from 600 to 9,000 nucleotides as seen by alkaline gel electrophoresis. ICP8 was crucial for the synthesis on both strands. Visualization of the deproteinized products using electron microscopy revealed long, linear dsDNAs, and in 87%, one end, presumably the end with the 70-base circle, was single-stranded. The remaining 13% had multiple single-stranded segments separated by dsDNA segments 500 to 1,000 nucleotides in length located at one end. These features are diagnostic of the trombone mechanism of replication. Indeed, when the products were examined with the replication proteins bound, a dsDNA loop was frequently associated with the replication complex located at one end of the replicated DNA. Furthermore, the frequency of loops correlated with the fraction of DNA undergoing Okazaki fragment synthesis.

  18. Increased DNA methylation variability in type 1 diabetes across three immune effector cell types

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Dirk S.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Dang, Mary A.N.; Lowe, Robert; Hawa, Mohammed I.; Ecker, Simone; Beyan, Huriya; Cunningham, Stephanie; Fouts, Alexandra R.; Ramelius, Anita; Burden, Frances; Farrow, Samantha; Rowlston, Sophia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Frontini, Mattia; Downes, Kate; Busche, Stephan; Cheung, Warren A.; Ge, Bing; Simon, Marie-Michelle; Bujold, David; Kwan, Tony; Bourque, Guillaume; Datta, Avik; Lowy, Ernesto; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Libertini, Emanuele; Heath, Simon; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pastinen, Tomi; Soranzo, Nicole; Hofer, Sabine E.; Karges, Beate; Meissner, Thomas; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Cilio, Corrado; Elding Larsson, Helena; Lernmark, Åke; Steck, Andrea K.; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Beck, Stephan; Leslie, R. David

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) has substantially increased over the past decade, suggesting a role for non-genetic factors such as epigenetic mechanisms in disease development. Here we present an epigenome-wide association study across 406,365 CpGs in 52 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for T1D in three immune effector cell types. We observe a substantial enrichment of differentially variable CpG positions (DVPs) in T1D twins when compared with their healthy co-twins and when compared with healthy, unrelated individuals. These T1D-associated DVPs are found to be temporally stable and enriched at gene regulatory elements. Integration with cell type-specific gene regulatory circuits highlight pathways involved in immune cell metabolism and the cell cycle, including mTOR signalling. Evidence from cord blood of newborns who progress to overt T1D suggests that the DVPs likely emerge after birth. Our findings, based on 772 methylomes, implicate epigenetic changes that could contribute to disease pathogenesis in T1D. PMID:27898055

  19. Determination of mutated genes in the presence of wild-type DNA by using molecular beacons as probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yonghua; Ai, Junjie; Gu, Qiaorong; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2017-03-01

    Low-abundance mutations in the presence of wild-type DNA can be determined using molecular beacon (MB) as probe. A MB is generally used as DNA probe because it can distinguish single-base mismatched target DNA from fully matched target DNA. However, the probe can not determine low-abundance mutations in the presence of wild-type DNA. In this study, this limitation is addressed by enhancing the stability of unpaired base-containing dsDNA with a hydrogen-bonding ligand, which was added after hybridization of the MB to the target DNA. The ligand formed hydrogen bonds with unpaired bases and stabilized the unpaired base-containing dsDNA if target DNA is mutated one. As a result, more MBs were opened by the mutant genes in the presence of the ligand and a further increase in the fluorescence intensity was obtained. By contrast, fluorescence intensity did not change if target DNA is wild-type one. Consequent increase in the fluorescence intensity of the MB was regarded as a signal derived from mutant genes. The proposed method was applied in synthetic template systems to determine point mutation in DNA obtained from PCR analysis. The method also allows rapid and simple discrimination of a signal if it is originated in the presence of mutant gene or alternatively by a lower concentration of wild gene.

  20. NKG2D ligands mediate immunosurveillance of senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Moshayev, Zhana; Vadai, Ezra; Wensveen, Felix; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golani, Ofra; Polic, Bojan; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Induction of cellular senescence commonly coincides with an immunogenic phenotype that promotes self-elimination by components of the immune system, thereby facilitating tumor suppression and limiting excess fibrosis during wound repair. The mechanisms by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance are not completely understood. Here we show that ligands of an activating Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor (NKG2D), MICA and ULBP2 are consistently up-regulated following induction of replicative senescence, oncogene-induced senescence and DNA damage - induced senescence. MICA and ULBP2 proteins are necessary for efficient NK-mediated cytotoxicity towards senescent fibroblasts. The mechanisms regulating the initial expression of NKG2D ligands in senescent cells are dependent on a DNA damage response, whilst continuous expression of these ligands is regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. In liver fibrosis, the accumulation of senescent activated stellate cells is increased in mice lacking NKG2D receptor leading to increased fibrosis. Overall, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating the expression of immune ligands in senescent cells and reveal the importance of NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction in protecting against liver fibrosis. PMID:26878797

  1. Integration of an insertion-type transferred DNA vector from Agrobacterium tumefaciens into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome by gap repair.

    PubMed Central

    Risseeuw, E; Franke-van Dijk, M E; Hooykaas, P J

    1996-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can transfer transferred DNA (T-DNA) to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and that this T-DNA, when used as a replacement vector, is integrated via homologous recombination into the yeast genome. To test whether T-DNA can be a suitable substrate for integration via the gap repair mechanism as well, a model system developed for detection of homologous recombination events in plants was transferred to S. cerevisiae. Analysis of the yeast transformants revealed that an insertion type T-DNA vector can indeed be integrated via gap repair. Interestingly, the transformation frequency and the type of recombination events turned out to depend strongly on the orientation of the insert between the borders in such an insertion type T-DNA vector. PMID:8816506

  2. PCR-based DNA typing of saliva on stamps and envelopes.

    PubMed

    Allen, M; Saldeen, T; Gyllensten, U

    1994-09-01

    In forensic cases involving mail bombs, extortion, kidnapping or threatening letters, biological evidence such as the saliva used to attach the stamp and seal the envelope could be used for genetic analysis. We have developed a highly sensitive semi-nested PCR method for the HLA-DRB1 locus; suitable for the analyses of very limited amounts of DNA. When applied to a set of stamps and envelopes with saliva from control individuals, typing results were consistent with those obtained using hairs drawn from the same individuals. No interference was found due to DNA from the fingerprints of people handling the letters. The system was applied to three forensic cases with threatening letters. The first case resulted in an exclusion of the suspect. In the second case, the suspect could not be excluded (probability of identical genotype by chance > 0.01). These results demonstrate that biological evidence in cases with threatening letters is amenable to genetic typing.

  3. Papilloma formation in human foreskin xenografts after inoculation of human papillomavirus type 16 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Brandsma, J L; Brownstein, D G; Xiao, W; Longley, B J

    1995-01-01

    A mouse model of high-risk human papillomavirus infection was developed in which human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA was inoculated into human foreskin grafted to the skin of severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice. Grafted skin contained human epidermis and dermis and, like normal human skin, expressed involucrin in differentiating keratinocytes. HPV type 16 DNA, attached to gold particles, was delivered directly into human epidermal cells and induced exophytic papilloma with histologic features of papillomavirus infection, including koilocytosis and expression of papillomavirus capsid antigen. This model should be useful for determining in vivo the functions of viral genes and for developing strategies to prevent and treat HPV-associated disease. It may also be of value in developing animal models of other human skin diseases. PMID:7884930

  4. Impact parameters on hybridization process in detecting influenza virus (type A) using conductimetric-based DNA sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Tuan, Mai Anh; Van Hieu, Nguyen; Chien, Nguyen Duc

    2009-08-01

    This paper report various impact parameters on hybridization of probe/target DNA to detect the influenza virus (type A-H5N1) such as hybridization temperature, probe concentration, mismatch target and hybridization time. The DNA probe was attached to sensor surface by means of covalent bonding between amine of 3-aminopropyl-triethoxy-silance (APTS) and phosphate group of DNA sequence. The hybridization of probe/target DNA strands were detected by changing the surface conductance of sensors, which leads to the change in output signal of the system. The results reveal that the DNA sensor can detect as low as 0.5 nM of target DNA in real samples. The response time of DNA sensor is approximately 4 min, and the sensitivity of DNA sensor is about 0.03 mV/nM.

  5. Role of cytochrome P450 2D6 genetic polymorphism in carvedilol hydroxylation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Li; Xu, Ren-ai; Zhan, Yun-yun; Huang, Cheng-ke; Dai, Da-peng; Cai, Jian-ping; Hu, Guo-xin

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a highly polymorphic enzyme that catalyzes the metabolism of a great number of therapeutic drugs. Up to now, >100 allelic variants of CYP2D6 have been reported. Recently, we identified 22 novel variants in the Chinese population in these variants. The purpose of this study was to examine the enzymatic activity of the variants toward the CYP2D6 substrate carvedilol in vitro. The CYP2D6 proteins, including CYP2D6.1 (wild type), CYP2D6.2, CYP2D6.10, and 22 other novel CYP2D6 variants, were expressed from insect microsomes and incubated with carvedilol ranging from 1.0 μM to 50 μM at 37°C for 30 minutes. After termination, the carvedilol metabolites were extracted and detected using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. Among the 24 CYP2D6 variants, CYP2D6.92 and CYP2D6.96 were catalytically inactive and the remaining 22 variants exhibited significantly decreased intrinsic clearance values (ranging from ~25% to 95%) compared with CYP2D6.1. The present data in vitro suggest that the newly found variants significantly reduced catalytic activities compared with CYP2D6.1. Given that CYP2D6 protein activities could affect carvedilol plasma levels, these findings are greatly relevant to personalized medicine. PMID:27354764

  6. Constitutive stable DNA replication in Escherichia coli cells lacking type 1A topoisomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Martel, Makisha; Balleydier, Aurélien; Sauriol, Alexandre; Drolet, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Type 1A topoisomerases (topos) are ubiquitous enzymes involved in supercoiling regulation and in the maintenance of genome stability. Escherichia coli possesses two type 1A enzymes, topo I (topA) and topo III (topB). Cells lacking both enzymes form very long filaments and have severe chromosome segregation and growth defects. We previously found that RNase HI overproduction or a dnaT::aph mutation could significantly correct these phenotypes. This leads us to hypothesize that they were related to unregulated replication originating from R-loops, i.e. constitutive stable DNA replication (cSDR). cSDR, first observed in rnhA (RNase HI) mutants, is characterized by its persistence for several hours following protein synthesis inhibition and by its requirement for primosome components, including DnaT. Here, to visualize and measure cSDR, the incorporation of the nucleotide analog ethynyl deoxyuridine (EdU) during replication in E. coli cells pre-treated with protein synthesis inhibitors, was revealed by "click" labeling with Alexa Fluor(®) 488 in fixed cells, and flow cytometry analysis. cSDR was detected in rnhA mutants, but not in wild-type strains, and the number of cells undergoing cSDR was significantly reduced by the introduction of the dnaT::aph mutation. cSDR was also found in topA, double topA topB but not in topB null cells. This result is consistent with the established function of topo I in the inhibition of R-loop formation. Moreover, our finding that topB rnhA mutants are perfectly viable demonstrates that topo III is not uniquely required during cSDR. Thus, either topo I or III can provide the type 1A topo activity that is specifically required during cSDR to allow chromosome segregation.

  7. Rapid PCR protocols for forensic DNA typing on six thermal cycling platforms.

    PubMed

    Butts, Erica L R; Vallone, Peter M

    2014-11-01

    Rapid PCR protocols for the amplification of typing STR multiplexes were evaluated on six different thermal cyclers. Through the use of a faster DNA polymerase coupled with the use of rapid thermal cyclers the amplification cycling times were reduced down to as little as 14 min using PCR primers from the commercially available multiplex STR typing kit Identifiler. Previously described two-step and three-step thermal cycling protocols were evaluated for the six thermal cyclers on 95 unique single-source DNA extracts. CE characterization of the PCR products indicates good peak balance between loci (median values greater than 0.84), and N minus four stutter ratios on averages were 30 to 40% higher than for standard Identifiler PCR conditions. Nonspecific amplification artifacts were observed, but were not observed to migrate within the allele calling bins. With the exception of one locus (D18S51) in a single sample, genotyping results were concordant with manufacturer's recommended amplification conditions utilizing standard thermal cycling procedures. Assay conditions were robust enough to routinely amplify 250 to 500 pg of template DNA. This work describes the protocols for the rapid PCR amplification of STR multiplexes on various PCR thermal cyclers with the future intent to support validation for typing single-source samples in a database laboratory.

  8. Ultrathin 2D Metal-Organic Framework Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meiting; Wang, Yixian; Ma, Qinglang; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao; Ping, Jianfeng; Zhang, Zhicheng; Lu, Qipeng; Yu, Yifu; Xu, Huan; Zhao, Yanli; Zhang, Hua

    2015-12-02

    A facile surfactant-assisted bottom-up synthetic method to prepare a series of freestanding ultrathin 2D M-TCPP (M = Zn, Cu, Cd or Co, TCPP = tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin) nanosheets with a thickness of sub-10 nm is developed. As a proof-of-concept application, some of them are successfully used as new platforms for DNA detection. The Cu-TCPP nanosheet-based sensor shows excellent fluorescent sensing performance and is used for the simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets.

  9. DNA typing in populations of mule deer for forensic use in the Province of Alberta.

    PubMed

    Jobin, Richard M; Patterson, Denise; Zhang, Youfang

    2008-06-01

    The present study involves the development of forensic DNA typing tests and databases for mule deer in the Province of Alberta. Two multiplex PCR reactions interrogating 10 loci were used to analyze samples from three populations of mule deer. Additionally, an amelogenin based sex-typing marker was used to determine the gender of samples. Results show that the tests and databases are appropriate for use in forensic applications. Additionally, the results indicate that there is little population structure in mule deer in Alberta and that no changes to management of this game species are suggested.

  10. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  11. Bushmeat genetics: setting up a reference framework for the DNA typing of African forest bushmeat.

    PubMed

    Gaubert, Philippe; Njiokou, Flobert; Olayemi, Ayodeji; Pagani, Paolo; Dufour, Sylvain; Danquah, Emmanuel; Nutsuakor, Mac Elikem K; Ngua, Gabriel; Missoup, Alain-Didier; Tedesco, Pablo A; Dernat, Rémy; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-05-01

    The bushmeat trade in tropical Africa represents illegal, unsustainable off-takes of millions of tons of wild game - mostly mammals - per year. We sequenced four mitochondrial gene fragments (cyt b, COI, 12S, 16S) in >300 bushmeat items representing nine mammalian orders and 59 morphological species from five western and central African countries (Guinea, Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea). Our objectives were to assess the efficiency of cross-species PCR amplification and to evaluate the usefulness of our multilocus approach for reliable bushmeat species identification. We provide a straightforward amplification protocol using a single 'universal' primer pair per gene that generally yielded >90% PCR success rates across orders and was robust to different types of meat preprocessing and DNA extraction protocols. For taxonomic identification, we set up a decision pipeline combining similarity- and tree-based approaches with an assessment of taxonomic expertise and coverage of the GENBANK database. Our multilocus approach permitted us to: (i) adjust for existing taxonomic gaps in GENBANK databases, (ii) assign to the species level 67% of the morphological species hypotheses and (iii) successfully identify samples with uncertain taxonomic attribution (preprocessed carcasses and cryptic lineages). High levels of genetic polymorphism across genes and taxa, together with the excellent resolution observed among species-level clusters (neighbour-joining trees and Klee diagrams) advocate the usefulness of our markers for bushmeat DNA typing. We formalize our DNA typing decision pipeline through an expert-curated query database - DNA BUSHMEAT - that shall permit the automated identification of African forest bushmeat items.

  12. Glycoxidative damage to human DNA: Neo-antigenic epitopes on DNA molecule could be a possible reason for autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saheem; Moinuddin; Shahab, Uzma; Habib, Safia; Salman Khan, M; Alam, Khursheed; Ali, Asif

    2014-03-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are known to be mutagenic, diabetogenic and vascular disease risk factors. Methylglyoxal (MG) is a dicarbonyl species that reacts with biological macromolecule (proteins, DNA and lipids) to give AGEs. Nonenzymatic glycation of MG with lysine (Lys) in the presence of copper (Cu(2+)) is reported to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) capable of causing DNA damage. We show that DNA modification in MG-Lys-Cu(2+) system results in the generation of strand breaks, base modification, hyperchromicity and increased fluorescence intensity. Superoxide generation in the MG-Lys system was found to be significantly higher when compared with that in the MG and Lys alone. Moreover, d-penicillamine and pyridoxal phosphate significantly inhibited the formation of glycation products. The presence of a major DNA glycation adduct, N(2)-carboxyethyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG), was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). As reported earlier, modified DNA (MG-Lys-Cu(2+)-DNA) was highly immunogenic in experimental animals. Furthermore, induced anti-MG-Lys-Cu(2+)-DNA antibodies were effective probe for detecting glycoxidative lesions in human genomic DNA of type I diabetes patients. Our results clearly imply that interaction of MG-Lys and Cu(2+) leads to the formation of AGEs and also the production of potent ROS, capable of causing DNA damage, thereby playing an important role in diabetes mellitus.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA integration: fine structure target analysis using synthetic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, T; Murphy, E; Groarke, J; Drlica, K

    1993-01-01

    The target specificity of DNA strand transfer mediated by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase was examined in vitro with synthetic oligonucleotides. Although insertion occurred at most locations in the target, some sites were preferred over others by at least 15-fold. Changing the nucleotide sequence of the target changed the distribution of preferred sites in complex ways, some of which included changes in target preference distant from the sequence alteration. Alignment of target sequences revealed that adenosine is preferred adjacent to the insertion site. Strand transfer occurred to within 2 nucleotides of the 3' end and to within 3 nucleotides of the 5' end of the target. This suggests that only 2 or 3 nucleotides flanking the target site are required for integration; such restricted contact with target DNA would allow integrase to insert the two ends of viral DNA into two closely spaced sites in host DNA, consistent with the concerted in vivo integration reaction that generates a 5-bp target duplication. Images PMID:8419642

  14. 2D microscopic model of graphene fracture properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    2015-05-01

    An analytical two-dimensional (2D) microscopic fracture model based on Morse-type interaction is derived containing no adjustable parameter. From the 2D Young’s moduli and 2D intrinsic strengths of graphene measured by nanoindentation based on biaxial tension and calculated by density functional theory for uniaxial tension the widely unknown breaking force, line or edge energy, surface energy, fracture toughness, and strain energy release rate were determined. The simulated line energy agrees well with ab initio calculations and the fracture toughness of perfect graphene sheets is in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations and the fracture toughness evaluated for defective graphene using the Griffith relation. Similarly, the estimated critical strain energy release rate agrees well with result of various theoretical approaches based on the J-integral and surface energy. The 2D microscopic model, connecting 2D and three-dimensional mechanical properties in a consistent way, provides a versatile relationship to easily access all relevant fracture properties of pristine 2D solids.

  15. STR-typing of human DNA from human fecal matter using the QIAGEN QIAamp stool mini kit.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Donald J; Martin, Liane R; Roberts, Katherine A

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the QIAGEN QIAamp Stool Mini Kit against a standard phenolchloroform procedure for the extraction, quantitation, and STR-typing of human nuclear DNA from human feces. Stools from six subjects were sampled by swabbing and excision. Samples extracted with the QIAamp kit gave a wide range of DNA yields, whereas those extracted by the organic method yielded no DNA. DNA was not recovered from one subject's stools by either procedure. The QIAamp extracts were amplified with the Profiler Plus and COfiler kits, and PCR inhibition was observed with DNA extracts that were further concentrated. Substitution of water or TE-4 for the QIAamp elution buffer eliminated most, if not all, of the inhibition. A modified QIAamp procedure was used to extract thirty samples, which were subjected to one of five environmental conditions. DNA was recovered from all of these samples, and typing results were obtained on 93% of the samples.

  16. African swine fever virus ORF P1192R codes for a functional type II DNA topoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando; Leitão, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerases modulate the topological state of DNA during processes, such as replication and transcription, that cause overwinding and/or underwinding of the DNA. African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a nucleo-cytoplasmic double-stranded DNA virus shown to contain an OFR (P1192R) with homology to type II topoisomerases. Here we observed that pP1192R is highly conserved among ASFV isolates but dissimilar from other viral, prokaryotic or eukaryotic type II topoisomerases. In both ASFV/Ba71V-infected Vero cells and ASFV/L60-infected pig macrophages we detected pP1192R at intermediate and late phases of infection, cytoplasmically localized and accumulating in the viral factories. Finally, we used a Saccharomyces cerevisiae temperature-sensitive strain in order to demonstrate, through complementation and in vitro decatenation assays, the functionality of P1192R, which we further confirmed by mutating its predicted catalytic residue. Overall, this work strengthens the idea that P1192R constitutes a target for studying, and possibly controlling, ASFV transcription and replication.

  17. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  18. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  19. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  20. The preservation of microbial DNA in archived soils of various genetic types

    PubMed Central

    Korvigo, Ilia O.; Aparin, Boris F.; Chirak, Evgenii L.; Pershina, Elizaveta V.; Romaschenko, Nikolay S.; Provorov, Nikolai A.; Andronov, Evgeny E.

    2017-01-01

    This study is a comparative analysis of samples of archived (stored for over 70–90 years) and modern soils of two different genetic types–chernozem and sod-podzolic soils. We revealed a reduction in biodiversity of archived soils relative to their modern state. Particularly, long-term storage in the museum exerted a greater impact on the microbiomes of sod-podzolic soils, while chernozem samples better preserved the native community. Thus, the persistence of microbial DNA in soil is largely determined by the physico-chemical characteristics that differ across soil types. Chernozems create better conditions for the long-term DNA preservation than sod-podzolic soils. This results in supposedly higher levels of biodiversity conservation in the microbiomes of chernozem with preservation of major microbial taxa dominant in the modern (control) soil samples, which makes archived chernozems a promising object for paleosoil studies. PMID:28339464

  1. Probe classification of on-off type DNA microarray images with a nonlinear matching measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Munho; Kim, Jong Dae; Min, Byoung Goo; Kim, Jongwon; Kim, Y. Y.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a nonlinear matching measure, called counting measure, as a signal detection measure that is defined as the number of on pixels in the spot area. It is applied to classify probes for an on-off type DNA microarray, where each probe spot is classified as hybridized or not. The counting measure also incorporates the maximum response search method, where the expected signal is obtained by taking the maximum among the measured responses of the various positions and sizes of the spot template. The counting measure was compared to existing signal detection measures such as the normalized covariance and the median for 2390 patient samples tested on the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA chip. The counting measure performed the best regardless of whether or not the maximum response search method was used. The experimental results showed that the counting measure combined with the positional search was the most preferable.

  2. Age-dependent systemic DNA damage in early Type 2 Diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rogulj, Dinko; El Aklouk, Ismail; Konjevoda, Paško; Ljubić, Spomenka; Pibernik Okanović, Mirjana; Barbir, Ante; Luburić, Marijana; Radman, Maja; Budinski, Ninoslav; Vučić Lovrenčić, Marijana

    2017-03-30

    Oxidative stress, capable of eliciting damage to various biomolecules including DNA, is a recognized component of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), as well as other unfavorable outcomes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of oxidative stress in the development of T2DM, by investigating association of oxidative DNA damage with metabolic parameters in subjects with MetS and early T2DM. Selected anthropometric and biochemical parameters of MetS, inflammation and oxidative DNA damage: body mass index (BMI), fatty liver index (FLI), waist circumference (WC), total cholesterol, HDL and LDL-cholesterol, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), uric acid, C-reactive protein (CRP), total leukocyte/neutrophil count, and urinary 8-hidroxy-deoxyguanosine (u-8-OHdG) were assessed in male subjects with MetS and both younger (≤55 years) and older (>55 years) subjects with T2DM of short duration without complications. BMI, FLI, WC, total and LDL-cholesterol and uric acid were higher, while the u-8-OHdG was lower in MetS group, when compared to older T2DM subjects. None of these parameters were different neither between MetS and younger T2DM, nor between two sub-groups of subjects with T2DM. Values of CRP, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, GGT, leukocytes and neutrophils were not different between all examined groups of subjects. Higher 8-OHdG in older subjects with T2DM suggests that both aging process and diabetes could contribute to the development of DNA damage. Oxidative DNA damage cannot serve as an universal early marker of T2DM.

  3. Sanfilippo syndrome type B: cDNA and gene encoding human {alpha}-N-acetylglucosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H.G.; Lopez, R.; Rennecker, J.

    1994-09-01

    Deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme {alpha}-N-acetlyglucosaminidase underlies the type B Sanfilippo syndrome (MPS III B), a mucopolysaccharide storage disease with profound neurologic deterioration. We are acquiring tools to study the molecular basis of the disorder. The enzyme was purified from bovine testis; after ConA-, DEAE- and phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, it was subjected to SDS-PAGE without preheating. Of two bands of activity detected on the gel, 170 kDa and 87 kDa, the larger one, which coincided with a well-defined Coomassie blue band, was selected for sequence analysis. Degenerate 17-base oligonucleotides, corresponding to the ends of an internal 23 amino acid sequence, were used for RT-PCR of RNA from human fibroblasts. A 41-mer was synthesized from the sequence of the RT-PCR product and used to screen a human testis cDNA library. A number of cDNA inserts were isolated, all lacking the 5{prime} end and none longer than 1.7 kb. An additional 300 bp segment has been obtained by RACE. The cDNA sequence accounts for 9 of 11 peptides, allowing for species difference. Northern analysis of fibroblast RNA with a 1.5 kb cDNA probe showed the presence of a 3 kb mRNA; marked deficiency of this mRNA in two MPS III B fibroblast lines confirmed the authenticity of the cloned cDNA. While no homologous amino acid sequence has been found in a search of GenBank, the nucleotide sequence (interrupted by 4 introns) is present in a flanking region upstream of an unrelated gene on chromosome 17q11-21 (human 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase). This must therefore be the chromosomal locus of the {alpha}-N-acetylglucosaminidase gene and of MPS III B.

  4. Clinical optimization of antigen specific modulation of type 1 diabetes with the plasmid DNA platform.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Peter; Utz, Paul J; Robinson, William; Steinman, Lawrence

    2013-12-01

    Some clinical trials in humans have aimed at modulation of type 1 diabetes (T1D) via alteration of the immune response to putative islet cell antigens, particularly proinsulin and insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase and the peptide, DiaPep 277, derived from heat shock protein 60. The focus here is on development of a specially engineered DNA plasmid encoding proinsulin to treat T1D. The plasmid is engineered to turn off adaptive immunity to proinsulin. This approach yielded exciting results in a randomized placebo controlled trial in 80 adult patients with T1D. The implications of this trial are explored in regards to the potential for sparing inflammation in islets and thus allowing the functioning beta cells to recover and produce more insulin. Strategies to further strengthen the effects seen thus far with the tolerizing DNA plasmid to proinsulin will be elucidated. The DNA platform affords an opportunity for easy modifications. In addition standard exploration of dose levels, route of administration and frequency of dose are practical. Optimization of the effects seen to date on C-peptide and on depletion of proinsulin specific CD8 T cells are feasible, with expected concomitant improvement in other parameters like hemoglobin A1c and reduction in insulin usage. T1D is one of the few autoimmune conditions where antigen specific therapy can be achieved, provided the approach is tested intelligently. Tolerizing DNA vaccines to proinsulin and other islet cell autoantigens is a worthy pursuit to potentially treat, prevent and to perhaps even 'cure' or 'prevent' type 1 diabetes.

  5. Fusion of GFP to the M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase produces a new probe of Type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kai; Roberts, Gareth A.; Stephanou, Augoustinos S.; Cooper, Laurie P.; White, John H.; Dryden, David T.F.

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Successful fusion of GFP to M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase. {yields} GFP located at C-terminal of sequence specificity subunit does not later enzyme activity. {yields} FRET confirms structural model of M.EcoKI bound to DNA. -- Abstract: We describe the fusion of enhanced green fluorescent protein to the C-terminus of the HsdS DNA sequence-specificity subunit of the Type I DNA modification methyltransferase M.EcoKI. The fusion expresses well in vivo and assembles with the two HsdM modification subunits. The fusion protein functions as a sequence-specific DNA methyltransferase protecting DNA against digestion by the EcoKI restriction endonuclease. The purified enzyme shows Foerster resonance energy transfer to fluorescently-labelled DNA duplexes containing the target sequence and to fluorescently-labelled ocr protein, a DNA mimic that binds to the M.EcoKI enzyme. Distances determined from the energy transfer experiments corroborate the structural model of M.EcoKI.

  6. Identification and characterization of a DNA primase activity present in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, A.M.; Wietstock, S.M.; Ruyechan, W.T. )

    1988-03-01

    A novel DNA primase activity has been identified in HeLa cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Such an activity has not been detected in mock-infected cells. The primase activity coeluted with a portion of HSV-1 DNA polymerase from single-stranded DNA agarose columns loaded with high-salt extracts derived from infected cells. This DNA primase activity could be distinguished from host HeLa cell DNA primase by several criteria. First, the pH optimum of the HSV primase was relatively broad and peaked at 8.2 to 8.7 pH units. Second, freshly isolated HSV DNA primase was less salt sensitive than the HeLa primase. Third, antibodies raised against individual peptides of the calf thymus DNA polymerase:primase complex cross-reacted with the HeLa primase but did not react with the HSV DNA primase. Fourth, freshly prepared HSV DNA primase appeared to be associated with the HSV polymerase, but after storage at 4{degree}C for several weeks, the DNA primase separated from the viral DNA polymerase. This free DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 40 kilodaltons, whereas free HeLa DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 110 kilodaltons. On the basis of these data, the authors believe that the novel DNA primase activity in HSV-infected cells may be virus coded and that this enzyme represents a new and important function involved in the replication of HSV DNA.

  7. DNA vaccines encoding proteins from wild-type and attenuated canine distemper virus protect equally well against wild-type virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Line; Jensen, Trine Hammer; Kristensen, Birte; Jensen, Tove Dannemann; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Lund, Morten; Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2012-10-01

    Immunity induced by DNA vaccines containing the hemagglutinin (H) and nucleoprotein (N) genes of wild-type and attenuated canine distemper virus (CDV) was investigated in mink (Mustela vison), a highly susceptible natural host of CDV. All DNA-immunized mink seroconverted, and significant levels of virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies were present on the day of challenge with wild-type CDV. The DNA vaccines also primed the cell-mediated memory responses, as indicated by an early increase in the number of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-producing lymphocytes after challenge. Importantly, the wild-type and attenuated CDV DNA vaccines had a long-term protective effect against wild-type CDV challenge. The vaccine-induced immunity induced by the H and N genes from wild-type CDV and those from attenuated CDV was comparable. Because these two DNA vaccines were shown to protect equally well against wild-type virus challenge, it is suggested that the genetic/antigenic heterogeneity between vaccine strains and contemporary wild-type strains are unlikely to cause vaccine failure.

  8. Forensic animal DNA typing: Allele nomenclature and standardization of 14 feline STR markers.

    PubMed

    Schury, N; Schleenbecker, U; Hellmann, A P

    2014-09-01

    Since the domestic cat (Felis catus) has become one of the most popular pets and owners usually develop a close relationship to their cats, it is necessary to take traces of cats into account for forensic casework. For this purpose feline short tandem (STR) repeat markers have been investigated in several earlier studies, but no detailed description of sequence data, allelic variations or a repeat-based nomenclature is available. The aim of the study was to provide a suggestion for the allele nomenclature of 14 cat STR markers according to the recommendations of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) for human DNA typing and to present a standardized system for a secure DNA typing of samples. Samples of 122 unrelated cats from a local animal shelter and private owners in Germany were used to generate a population database with allele frequencies and to analyze the tandemly repeated sequence variations within the alleles of each STR marker. These markers could be grouped into two STR classes: simple repeat STRs and complex STRs (some with the supplement highly complex), consisting of di- and tetranucleotide repeat motifs. After analyzing the repeat structure and elaborating a repeat based nomenclature, allelic ladders of common and rarely occurring alleles for each marker were designed to enable accurate typing of alleles that differ in fragment length and to facilitate data exchange.

  9. The a2 Mating-Type Locus Genes lga2 and rga2 Direct Uniparental Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Inheritance and Constrain mtDNA Recombination During Sexual Development of Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Fedler, Michael; Luh, Kai-Stephen; Stelter, Kathrin; Nieto-Jacobo, Fernanda; Basse, Christoph W.

    2009-01-01

    Uniparental inheritance of mitochondria dominates among sexual eukaryotes. However, little is known about the mechanisms and genetic determinants. We have investigated the role of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis genes lga2 and rga2 in uniparental mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance during sexual development. The lga2 and rga2 genes are specific to the a2 mating-type locus and encode small mitochondrial proteins. On the basis of identified sequence polymorphisms due to variable intron numbers in mitochondrial genotypes, we could demonstrate that lga2 and rga2 decisively influence mtDNA inheritance in matings between a1 and a2 strains. Deletion of lga2 favored biparental inheritance and generation of recombinant mtDNA molecules in combinations in which inheritance of mtDNA of the a2 partner dominated. Conversely, deletion of rga2 resulted in predominant loss of a2-specific mtDNA and favored inheritance of the a1 mtDNA. Furthermore, expression of rga2 in the a1 partner protected the associated mtDNA from elimination. Our results indicate that Lga2 in conjunction with Rga2 directs uniparental mtDNA inheritance by mediating loss of the a1-associated mtDNA. This study shows for the first time an interplay of mitochondrial proteins in regulating uniparental mtDNA inheritance. PMID:19104076

  10. The a2 mating-type locus genes lga2 and rga2 direct uniparental mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance and constrain mtDNA recombination during sexual development of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Fedler, Michael; Luh, Kai-Stephen; Stelter, Kathrin; Nieto-Jacobo, Fernanda; Basse, Christoph W

    2009-03-01

    Uniparental inheritance of mitochondria dominates among sexual eukaryotes. However, little is known about the mechanisms and genetic determinants. We have investigated the role of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis genes lga2 and rga2 in uniparental mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance during sexual development. The lga2 and rga2 genes are specific to the a2 mating-type locus and encode small mitochondrial proteins. On the basis of identified sequence polymorphisms due to variable intron numbers in mitochondrial genotypes, we could demonstrate that lga2 and rga2 decisively influence mtDNA inheritance in matings between a1 and a2 strains. Deletion of lga2 favored biparental inheritance and generation of recombinant mtDNA molecules in combinations in which inheritance of mtDNA of the a2 partner dominated. Conversely, deletion of rga2 resulted in predominant loss of a2-specific mtDNA and favored inheritance of the a1 mtDNA. Furthermore, expression of rga2 in the a1 partner protected the associated mtDNA from elimination. Our results indicate that Lga2 in conjunction with Rga2 directs uniparental mtDNA inheritance by mediating loss of the a1-associated mtDNA. This study shows for the first time an interplay of mitochondrial proteins in regulating uniparental mtDNA inheritance.

  11. Conserved DNA motifs in the type II-A CRISPR leader region

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Kesavan; Najar, Fares Z.

    2017-01-01

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats associated (CRISPR-Cas) systems consist of RNA-protein complexes that provide bacteria and archaea with sequence-specific immunity against bacteriophages, plasmids, and other mobile genetic elements. Bacteria and archaea become immune to phage or plasmid infections by inserting short pieces of the intruder DNA (spacer) site-specifically into the leader-repeat junction in a process called adaptation. Previous studies have shown that parts of the leader region, especially the 3′ end of the leader, are indispensable for adaptation. However, a comprehensive analysis of leader ends remains absent. Here, we have analyzed the leader, repeat, and Cas proteins from 167 type II-A CRISPR loci. Our results indicate two distinct conserved DNA motifs at the 3′ leader end: ATTTGAG (noted previously in the CRISPR1 locus of Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710) and a newly defined CTRCGAG, associated with the CRISPR3 locus of S. thermophilus DGCC7710. A third group with a very short CG DNA conservation at the 3′ leader end is observed mostly in lactobacilli. Analysis of the repeats and Cas proteins revealed clustering of these CRISPR components that mirrors the leader motif clustering, in agreement with the coevolution of CRISPR-Cas components. Based on our analysis of the type II-A CRISPR loci, we implicate leader end sequences that could confer site-specificity for the adaptation-machinery in the different subsets of type II-A CRISPR loci. PMID:28392985

  12. Effect of Regulatory Element DNA Methylation on Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rivier-Cordey, Anne-Sophie; Caetano, Carlos; Fish, Richard J.; Kruithof, Egbert K. O.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the tissue-type plasminogen activator gene (t-PA; gene name PLAT) is regulated, in part, by epigenetic mechanisms. We investigated the relationship between PLAT methylation and PLAT expression in five primary human cell types and six transformed cell lines. CpG methylation was analyzed in the proximal PLAT gene promoter and near the multihormone responsive enhancer (MHRE) -7.3 kilobase pairs upstream of the PLAT transcriptional start site (TSS, -7.3 kb). In Bowes melanoma cells, the PLAT promoter and the MHRE were fully unmethylated and t-PA secretion was extremely high. In other cell types the region from -647 to -366 was fully methylated, whereas an unmethylated stretch of DNA from -121 to +94 was required but not sufficient for detectable t-PA mRNA and t-PA secretion. DNA methylation near the MHRE was not correlated with t-PA secretion. Specific methylation of the PLAT promoter region -151 to +151, inserted into a firefly luciferase reporter gene, abolished reporter gene activity. The region -121 to + 94 contains two well-described regulatory elements, a PMA-responsive element (CRE) near -106 and a GC-rich region containing an Sp1 binding site near +59. Methylation of double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing the CRE or the GC-rich region had little or no effect on transcription factor binding. Methylated CpGs may attract co-repressor complexes that contain histone deacetylases (HDAC). However, reporter gene activity of methylated plasmids was not restored by the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin. In conclusion, efficient PLAT gene expression requires a short stretch of unmethylated CpG sites in the proximal promoter. PMID:27973546

  13. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: revised and extended guidelines for mitochondrial DNA typing.

    PubMed

    Parson, W; Gusmão, L; Hares, D R; Irwin, J A; Mayr, W R; Morling, N; Pokorak, E; Prinz, M; Salas, A; Schneider, P M; Parsons, T J

    2014-11-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the question of human identification. Previous recommendations published in 2000 addressed the analysis and interpretation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in forensic casework. While the foundations set forth in the earlier recommendations still apply, new approaches to the quality control, alignment and nomenclature of mitochondrial sequences, as well as the establishment of mtDNA reference population databases, have been developed. Here, we describe these developments and discuss their application to both mtDNA casework and mtDNA reference population databasing applications. While the generation of mtDNA for forensic casework has always been guided by specific standards, it is now well-established that data of the same quality are required for the mtDNA reference population data used to assess the statistical weight of the evidence. As a result, we introduce guidelines regarding sequence generation, as well as quality control measures based on the known worldwide mtDNA phylogeny, that can be applied to ensure the highest quality population data possible. For both casework and reference population databasing applications, the alignment and nomenclature of haplotypes is revised here and the phylogenetic alignment proffered as acceptable standard. In addition, the interpretation of heteroplasmy in the forensic context is updated, and the utility of alignment-free database searches for unbiased probability estimates is highlighted. Finally, we discuss statistical issues and define minimal standards for mtDNA database searches.

  14. cis and trans requirements for the selective packaging of adenovirus type 5 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gräble, M; Hearing, P

    1992-01-01

    Polar packaging of adenovirus DNA into virions is dependent on the presence of cis-acting sequences at the left end of the viral genome. Our previous analyses demonstrated that the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) packaging domain (nucleotides 194 to 358) is composed of at least five elements that are functionally redundant. A repeated sequence, termed the A repeat, was associated with packaging function. Here we report a more detailed analysis of the requirements for the selective packaging of Ad5 DNA. By introducing site-directed point mutations into specific A repeat sequences, we demonstrate that the A repeats represent cis-acting functional components of the packaging signal. Additional elements, located outside the originally defined packaging domain boundaries and that resemble the A repeat consensus sequence, also are capable of promoting the packaging of viral DNA. The cis-acting components of the packaging signal appear to be subject to certain spatial constraints for function, possibly reflecting a necessity for the coordinate binding of packaging proteins to these sites. In agreement with this idea, we present evidence that the interaction of a limiting trans-acting factor(s) with the packaging domain in vivo is required for efficient encapsidation of the Ad5 genome. Images PMID:1731109

  15. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome and Predisposes to Type 1 Diabetes in Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Daniela; Costa, Frederico R. C.; Pereira, Camila A.; Rocha, Fernanda A.; Yaochite, Juliana N. U.; Oliveira, Gabriela G.; Carneiro, Fernando S.; Tostes, Rita C.; Ramos, Simone G.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Camara, Niels O. S.; Ryffel, Bernhard; Silva, João S.

    2017-01-01

    Although a correlation between polymorphisms of NOD-like receptor family-pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) and predisposition to type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been identified, the potential function and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in T1D have not been clarified. The present study shows that non-obese diabetic mice exhibited increased NLRP3, and pro-IL-1β gene expression in pancreatic lymph nodes (PLNs). Similar increases in gene expression of NLRP3, apoptosis associated speck like protein (ASC) and pro-IL-1β were induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ) in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, diabetic C57BL/6 mice also exhibited increased IL-1β protein expression in the pancreatic tissue at day 7, which remained elevated until day 15. Diabetic mice also showed increased positive caspase-1 macrophages in the PLNs, which were decreased in NLRP3−/− mice, but not in ASC−/− mice, after STZ treatment. NLRP3- and IL-1R-deficient mice, but not ASC-deficient mice, showed reduced incidence of diabetes, less insulitis, lower hyperglycemia, and normal insulin levels compared to wild-type (WT) diabetic mice. Notably, these mice also displayed a decrease in IL-17-producing CD4 and CD8 T cells (Th17 and Tc17) and IFN-γ-producing CD4 and CD8 T cells (Th1 and Tc1) in the PLNs. Following STZ treatment to induce T1D, NLRP3-deficient mice also exhibited an increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cell and mast cell numbers in the PLNs along with a significant increase in IL-6, IL-10, and IL-4 expression in the pancreatic tissue. Interestingly, diabetic mice revealed increased circulating expression of genes related to mitochondrial DNA, such as cytochrome b and cytochrome c, but not NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (NADH). Mitochondrial DNA (mDNA) from diabetic mice, but not from non-diabetic mice, induced significant IL-1β production and caspase-1 activation by WT macrophages, which was reduced in NLRP3−/− macrophages. Finally, mDNA administration in vivo increased

  17. Circulating Differentially Methylated Amylin DNA as a Biomarker of β-Cell Loss in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, John A.; Kenna, Lauren A.; Spelios, Michael G.; Hessner, Martin J.; Akirav, Eitan M.

    2016-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), β-cell loss is silent during disease progression. Methylation-sensitive quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) of β-cell-derived DNA in the blood can serve as a biomarker of β-cell death in T1D. Amylin is highly expressed by β-cells in the islet. Here we examined whether demethylated circulating free amylin DNA (cfDNA) may serve as a biomarker of β-cell death in T1D. β cells showed unique methylation patterns within the amylin coding region that were not observed with other tissues. The design and use of methylation-specific primers yielded a strong signal for demethylated amylin in purified DNA from murine islets when compared with other tissues. Similarly, methylation-specific primers detected high levels of demethylated amylin DNA in human islets and enriched human β-cells. In vivo testing of the primers revealed an increase in demethylated amylin cfDNA in sera of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice during T1D progression and following the development of hyperglycemia. This increase in amylin cfDNA did not mirror the increase in insulin cfDNA, suggesting that amylin cfDNA may detect β-cell loss in serum samples where insulin cfDNA is undetected. Finally, purified cfDNA from recent onset T1D patients yielded a high signal for demethylated amylin cfDNA when compared with matched healthy controls. These findings support the use of demethylated amylin cfDNA for detection of β-cell-derived DNA. When utilized in conjunction with insulin, this latest assay provides a comprehensive multi-gene approach for the detection of β-cell loss. PMID:27111653

  18. Electron microscopic studies of the interaction between a Bacillus subtilis alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore protein with DNA: protein binding is cooperative, stiffens the DNA, and induces negative supercoiling.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, J; Makhov, A; Santiago-Lara, L; Setlow, P

    1994-01-01

    DNA within spores of Bacillus subtilis is complexed with a group of alpha/beta-type small acid-soluble spore proteins (alpha/beta-type SASPs), which have almost identical primary sequences and DNA binding properties. Here electron microscopic and cyclization studies were carried out on alpha/beta-type SASP-DNA complexes. When an alpha/beta-type SASP was incubated with linear DNA, the protein bound cooperatively, forming a helical coating 6.6 +/- 0.4 nm wide with a 2.9 +/- 0.3 nm periodicity. alpha/beta-Type SASP binding to an 890-bp DNA was weakest at an (A+T)-rich region that was highly bent, but binding eliminated the bending. alpha/beta-Type SASP binding did not alter the rise per bp in DNA but greatly increased the DNA stiffness as measured by both electron microscopic and cyclization assays. Addition of alpha/beta-type SASPs to negatively supertwisted DNA led to protein binding without significant alteration of the plectonemically interwound appearance of the DNA. Addition of alpha/beta-type SASPs to relaxed or nicked circular DNA led to molecules that by electron microscopy appeared similar to supertwisted DNA. The introduction of negative supertwists in nicked circular DNA by alpha/beta-type SASPs was confirmed by ligation of these molecules followed by topoisomer analyses using agarose gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:8058784

  19. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is a cytosolic DNA sensor that activates the type I interferon pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Wu, Jiaxi; Du, Fenghe; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Zhijian J

    2013-02-15

    The presence of DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal that triggers host immune responses such as the production of type I interferons. Cytosolic DNA induces interferons through the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP-AMP, or cGAMP), which binds to and activates the adaptor protein STING. Through biochemical fractionation and quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified a cGAMP synthase (cGAS), which belongs to the nucleotidyltransferase family. Overexpression of cGAS activated the transcription factor IRF3 and induced interferon-β in a STING-dependent manner. Knockdown of cGAS inhibited IRF3 activation and interferon-β induction by DNA transfection or DNA virus infection. cGAS bound to DNA in the cytoplasm and catalyzed cGAMP synthesis. These results indicate that cGAS is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces interferons by producing the second messenger cGAMP.

  20. Microscale 2D separation systems for proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Liu, Ke; Fan, Z. Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Microscale 2D separation systems have been implemented in capillaries and microfabricated channels. They offer advantages of faster analysis, higher separation efficiency and less sample consumption than the conventional methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC) in a column and slab gel electrophoresis. In this article, we review their recent advancement, focusing on three types of platforms, including 2D capillary electrophoresis (CE), CE coupling with capillary LC, and microfluidic devices. A variety of CE and LC modes have been employed to construct 2D separation systems via sophistically designed interfaces. Coupling of different separation modes has also been realized in a number of microfluidic devices. These separation systems have been applied for the proteomic analysis of various biological samples, ranging from a single cell to tumor tissues. PMID:22462786

  1. Applications of Doppler Tomography in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M.; Budaj, J.; Agafonov, M.; Sharova, O.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past few years, the applications of Doppler tomography have been extended beyond the usual calculation of 2D velocity images of circumstellar gas flows. This technique has now been used with the new Shellspec spectrum synthesis code to demonstrate the effective modeling of the accretion disk and gas stream in the TT Hya Algol binary. The 2D tomography procedure projects all sources of emission onto a single central (Vx, Vy) velocity plane even though the gas is expected to flow beyond that plane. So, new 3D velocity images were derived with the Radioastronomical Approach method by assuming a grid of Vz values transverse to the central 2D plane. The 3D approach has been applied to the U CrB and RS Vul Algol-type binaries to reveal substantial flow structures beyond the central velocity plane.

  2. An unequal cross-over event within the CYP2D gene cluster generates a chimeric CYP2D7/CYP2D6 gene which is associated with the poor metabolizer phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Panserat, S; Mura, C; Gérard, N; Vincent-Viry, M; Galteau, M M; Jacoz-Aigrain, E; Krishnamoorthy, R

    1995-01-01

    1. The study of the CYP2D genotype and phenotype of a Caucasian family revealed that a XbaI-9 kb allele was associated with the poor metabolizer phenotype. 2. A Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-based assay showed that the previously described mutations D6A and D6B are not associated with the XbaI-9 kb allele. 3. To explore the molecular basis of the poor metabolizer phenotype associated with the XbaI-9 kb allele, complete sequencing of the nine exons and intron-exon boundaries of the CYP2D6 gene was undertaken after amplification by PCR. 4. All the exons were successfully amplified using CYP2D6 gene-specific primers except exon 1 which required a combination of CYP2D7 gene-specific 5' primer and a CYP2D6 gene-specific 3' primer. 5. Sequence data derived from this amplified product revealed that the XbaI-9 kb allele corresponds to a novel rearrangement of the locus. This involved a deletion of an approximately 20 kilobase (kb) DNA segment generating a hybrid 5' CYP2D7/CYP2D6 3' gene. 6. The chimeric gene is non-functional presumably due to an insertion in exon 1 (characteristic of the exon 1 of the CYP2D7 gene) which causes a shift in the reading frame with premature termination of translation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8554938

  3. Isobenzofuranone derivatives exhibit antileishmanial effect by inhibiting type II DNA topoisomerase and inducing host response

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amartya; Vinayagam, Jayaraman; Saha, Sourav; Chowdhury, Sayan; Roychowdhury, Somenath; Jaisankar, Parasuraman; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania, a protozoan parasite, causes a wide range of human diseases ranging from the localized self-healing cutaneous lesions to fatal visceral leishmaniasis. Toxicity of traditional first line drugs and emergence of drug-resistant strains have worsened the situation. DNA topoisomerase II in kinetoplastid protozoan parasites are of immense interest as drug target because they take part in replication of unusual kinetoplast DNA network. In this study, we have taken target-based therapeutic approaches to combat leishmaniasis. Two isobenzofuranone compounds, viz., (1) 3,5-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-7-hydroxyisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (JVPH3) and (2) (4-bromo)-3′-hydroxy-5′-(4-bromophenyl)-benzophenone(JVPH4) were synthesized chemically and characterized by NMR and mass spectrometry analysis. Activity of type II DNA topoisomerase of leishmania (LdTOPII) was monitored by decatenation assay and plasmid cleavage assay. The antiparasitic activity of these compounds was checked in experimental BALB/c mice model of visceral leishmaniasis. Isobenzofuranone derivatives exhibited potent antileishmanial effect on both antimony (Sb) sensitive and resistant parasites. Treatment with isobenzofuranone derivatives on promastigotes caused induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis like cell death in leishmania. Both the compounds inhibited the decatenation activity of LdTOPII but have no effect on bi-subunit topoisomerase IB. Treatment of LdTOPII with isobenzofuranone derivatives did not stabilize cleavage complex formation both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, treatment with isobenzofuranone derivatives on Leishmania donovani-infected mice resulted in clearance of parasites in liver and spleen by induction of Th1 cytokines. Taken together, our data suggest that these compounds can be exploited as potential antileishmanial agents targeted to DNA topoisomerase II of the parasite. PMID:25505614

  4. Role of DNA methylation at the placental RTL1 gene locus in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Belot, Marie-Pierre; Nadéri, Kambiz; Mille, Clémence; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Benachi, Alexandra; Bougnères, Pierre; Fradin, Delphine

    2016-05-13

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 40 T1D loci associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D). How these polymorphisms interact with environmental factors to trigger T1D is unknown, but recent evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms could play a role. To begin to explore the contribution of epigenetics to T1D, we have examined DNA methylation in a pilot study of whole blood cells DNA from 10 young T1D patients and 10 young controls. Through the study of >900 000 CG loci across a diverse set of functionally relevant genomic regions using a custom DNA methylation array, we identified 250 T1D-differentially methylated region (DMR) at p < 0.05 and 1 DMR using next a permutation-based multiple testing correction method. This DMR is located in an imprinted region previously associated with T1D on the chromosome 14 that encompasses RTL1 gene and 2 miRNAs (miR136 and miR432). Using pyrosequencing-based bisulfite PCR, we replicated this association in a different and larger set of T1D patients and controls. DNA methylation at this DMR was inversely correlated with RTL1 gene expression and positively correlated with miR136 expression in human placentas. The DMR identified in this study presents suggestive evidence for altered methylation site in T1D and provide a promising new candidate gene. RTL1 is essential for placental permeability function in the mid-to-late fetal stages. We suggest that hypo-methylation could increase the fetal exposure to environmental factors in T1D susceptibility.

  5. Solution conformation of 2-aminopurine (2-AP) dinucleotide determined by ultraviolet 2D fluorescence spectroscopy (UV-2D FS).

    PubMed

    Widom, Julia R; Johnson, Neil P; von Hippel, Peter H; Marcus, Andrew H

    2013-02-01

    We have observed the conformation-dependent electronic coupling between the monomeric subunits of a dinucleotide of 2-aminopurine (2-AP), a fluorescent analog of the nucleic acid base adenine. This was accomplished by extending two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) - a fluorescence-detected variation of 2D electronic spectroscopy - to excite molecular transitions in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. A collinear sequence of four ultrafast laser pulses centered at 323 nm was used to resonantly excite the coupled transitions of 2-AP dinucleotide. The phases of the optical pulses were continuously swept at kilohertz frequencies, and the ensuing nonlinear fluorescence was phase-synchronously detected at 370 nm. Upon optimization of a point-dipole coupling model to our data, we found that in aqueous buffer the 2-AP dinucleotide adopts an average conformation in which the purine bases are non-helically stacked (center-to-center distance R12 = 3.5 Å ± 0.5 Å, twist angle θ12 = 5° ± 5°), which differs from the conformation of such adjacent bases in duplex DNA. These experiments establish UV-2D FS as a method for examining the local conformations of an adjacent pair of fluorescent nucleotides substituted into specific DNA or RNA constructs, which will serve as a powerful probe to interpret, in structural terms, biologically significant local conformational changes within the nucleic acid framework of protein-nucleic acid complexes.

  6. Induction of a Cellular DNA Damage Response by Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Facilitates Viral Replication and Mediates Apoptotic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Quan, Rong; Yan, Xu; Li, Zixue; Hou, Lei; Wang, Naidong; Yang, Yi; Jiang, Haijun; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Cellular DNA damage response (DDR) triggered by infection of DNA viruses mediate cell cycle checkpoint activation, DNA repair, or apoptosis induction. In the present study, infection of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which serves as a major etiological agent of PCV2-associated diseases (PCVAD), was found to elicit a DNA damage response (DDR) as observed by the phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA32 following infection. The response requires active viral replication, and all the ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase), ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related kinase), and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase) are the transducers of the DDR signaling events in the PCV2-infected cells as demonstrated by the phosphorylation of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK signalings as well as reductions in their activations after treatment with specific kinase inhibitors. Inhibitions of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK activations block viral replication and prevent apoptotic responses as observed by decreases in cleaved poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3 as well as fragmented DNA following PCV2 infection. These results reveal that PCV2 is able to exploit the cellular DNA damage response machinery for its own efficient replication and for apoptosis induction, further extending our understanding for the molecular mechanism of PCV2 infection. PMID:27982097

  7. Analysis of chromosome-sized DNA and genome typing of isolated strains of Taylorella equigenitalis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, M; Asami, Y; Miyazawa, T; Samata, T; Isayama, Y; Honda, M; Ide, Y

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of chromosome-sized DNA and genome typing of Taylorella equigenitalis NCTC11184, Kentucky 188, and five strains of T. equigenitalis isolated in Japan were carried out. The three restriction enzymes used, ApaI, NaeI and NotI, cleaved the genomic DNAs of five Japanese strains of T. equigenitalis into relatively limited numbers of restriction fragments, which were well resolved on crossed-field gel electrophoresis (CFGE). The respective profiles after CFGE of the restriction fragments from all five strains were essentially identical to each other after digestion by ApaI, NaeI or NotI. Hence it appears that these strains have a common genome type with respect to these three restriction enzymes. It was also shown that the respective profiles from these strains were essentially different from those of T. equigenitalis NCTC11184 and those of Kentucky 188 after digestion with ApaI, NaeI or NotI.

  8. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  9. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  10. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  11. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  12. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  13. Rare deficiency types of alpha 1-antitrypsin: electrophoretic variation and DNA haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D W; Billingsley, G D

    1989-01-01

    A deficiency of the plasma protease inhibitor alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT), is usually associated with the deficiency allele PI*Z. However, other alleles can also produce a deficiency. Some of these rare deficiency alleles produce a low concentration (3%-15% of normal) of alpha 1AT and include Mmalton, Mduarte, Mheerlen, and Mprocida. Null, or nonproducing, alleles are associated with trace amounts (less than 1%) of plasma alpha 1AT. We have identified, using isoelectric focusing, the deficiency alleles in 222 patients (68 children and 154 adults) with alpha 1AT deficiency. In addition to PI*Z, we found low-producing alleles PI*Mmalton and PI*Mcobalt and four null (PI*QO) alleles. On the basis of a population frequency of .0122 for PI*Z, frequencies for other deficiency alleles are 1.1 x 10(-4) for PI*Mmalton, 2.5 x 10(-5) for PI*Mcobalt (which may be the same as that for PI*Mduarte, and 1.4 x 10(-4) for all null alleles combined. Using 12 polymorphic restriction sites with seven different restriction enzymes, we have obtained DNA haplotypes for each of the rare deficiency types. All of the rare deficiency alleles can be distinguished from PI*Z by their DNA haplotype, and most can be distinguished from each other. DNA haplotypes are useful to indicate the presence of new types of null alleles, to identify genetic compounds for rare deficiency alleles, and to identify the original normal allele from which each deficiency allele is derived. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2786333

  14. Comparison of microsatellite length polymorphism and multilocus sequence typing for DNA-Based typing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Cabaret, Odile; Lecellier, Gael; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Hoinard, Damien; Raoux, Dorothée; Costa, Jean-Marc; Dromer, Françoise; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2007-12-01

    For genotyping Candida albicans isolates, two PCR-based methods have recently emerged: multilocus sequence typing (MLST), based on the sequence of selected genes, and microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP), based on the length of PCR products containing variable numbers of short DNA repeats. To compare the two methods in their abilities to differentiate and group C. albicans isolates, we selected 50 independent isolates collected at the National Reference Center for Mycoses and Antifungals. MLST typing was performed using sequencing of seven loci as described at (http://test1.mlst.net). The MLP method consisted of a single multiplex PCR testing three different loci. Dendrograms were constructed by the unweighted pair group cluster method with Euclidean metric for both methods. The correlation between the distance matrices was performed with a Mantel test tested with 1,000 random permutations. The sensitivity and specificity of the MLP typing system were determined after allocating MLST groups for the greater number of isolates of each distinct MLP group. The discriminatory power index was >0.99, and the distances between the isolates were highly correlated with both systems. The Mantel coefficient and the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient were 35,699 and 0.32, respectively (P < or = 1.2 x 10(-6)). Using MLP, the average specificity and sensitivity of clustering compared to MLST were 83% and 73%, respectively, when the singletons were excluded. The two methods are similarly discriminatory and can be interchangeable depending on the objectives. MLP is less expensive and faster than MLST. However, MLST is currently more accurate and additional standardization is needed for MLP.

  15. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  16. Novel betulin derivatives as antileishmanial agents with mode of action targeting type IB DNA topoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sayan; Mukherjee, Tulika; Sengupta, Souvik; Chowdhury, Somenath Roy; Mukhopadhyay, Sibabrata; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2011-10-01

    Toward developing antileishmanial agents with mode of action targeted to DNA topoisomerases of Leishmania donovani, we have synthesized a large number of derivatives of betulin. The compound, a natural triterpene isolated from the cork layer of Betula spp. plants exhibits several pharmacological properties. Three compounds (disuccinyl betulin, diglutaryl dihydrobetulin, and disuccinyl dihydrobetulin) inhibit growth of the parasite as well as relaxation activity of the enzyme type IB topoisomerase [Leishmania donovani topoisomerase I (LdTOP1LS)] of the parasite. Mechanistic studies suggest that these compounds interact with the enzyme in a reversible manner. The stoichiometry of these compounds binding to LdTOP1LS is 1:1 (mole/mole) with a dissociation constant on the order of ∼10(-6) M. Unlike CPT, these compounds do not stabilize the cleavage complex; rather, they abrogate the covalent complex formation. In processive mode of relaxation assay condition, these compounds slow down the strand rotation event, which ultimately affects the relaxation of supercoiled DNA. It is noteworthy that these compounds reduce the intracellular parasite burden in macrophages infected with wild-type L. donovani as well as with sodium antimony gluconate resistant parasite (GE1). Taken together, our data suggest that these betulin derivatives can be exploited as potential drug candidates against threatening drug resistant leishmaniasis.

  17. How do type II topoisomerases use ATP hydrolysis to simplify DNA topology beyond equilibrium? Investigating the relaxation reaction of nonsupercoiling type II topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Stuchinskaya, Tanya; Mitchenall, Lesley A; Schoeffler, Allyn J; Corbett, Kevin D; Berger, James M; Bates, Andrew D; Maxwell, Anthony

    2009-02-06

    DNA topoisomerases control the topology of DNA (e.g., the level of supercoiling) in all cells. Type IIA topoisomerases are ATP-dependent enzymes that have been shown to simplify the topology of their DNA substrates to a level beyond that expected at equilibrium (i.e., more relaxed than the product of relaxation by ATP-independent enzymes, such as type I topoisomerases, or a lower-than-equilibrium level of catenation). The mechanism of this effect is currently unknown, although several models have been suggested. We have analyzed the DNA relaxation reactions of type II topoisomerases to further explore this phenomenon. We find that all type IIA topoisomerases tested exhibit the effect to a similar degree and that it is not dependent on the supercoil-sensing C-terminal domains of the enzymes. As recently reported, the type IIB topoisomerase, topoisomerase VI (which is only distantly related to type IIA enzymes), does not exhibit topology simplification. We find that topology simplification is not significantly dependent on circle size in the range approximately 2-9 kbp and is not altered by reducing the free energy available from ATP hydrolysis by varying the ADP:ATP ratio. A direct test of one model (DNA tracking; i.e., sliding of a protein clamp along DNA to trap supercoils) suggests that this is unlikely to be the explanation for the effect. We conclude that geometric selection of DNA segments by the enzymes is likely to be a primary source of the effect, but that it is possible that other kinetic factors contribute. We also speculate whether topology simplification might simply be an evolutionary relic, with no adaptive significance.

  18. How do type II topoisomerases use ATP hydrolysis to simplify DNA topology beyond equilibrium? Investigating the relaxation reaction of non-supercoiling type II topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Stuchinskaya, Tanya; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Corbett, Kevin D.; Berger, James M.; Bates, Andrew D.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases control the topology of DNA (e.g. the level of supercoiling) in all cells. Type IIA topoisomerases are ATP-dependent enzymes that have been shown to simplify the topology of their DNA substrates to a level beyond that expected at equilibrium (i.e. more relaxed than the product of relaxation by ATP-independent enzymes, such as type I topoisomerases, or a lower than equilibrium level of catenation). The mechanism of this effect is currently unknown, although several models have been suggested. We have analysed the DNA relaxation reactions of type II topoisomerases to further explore this phenomenon. We find that all type IIA topoisomerases tested exhibit the effect to a similar degree and that it is not dependent on the C-terminal domains of the enzymes. As recently reported, the type IIB topoisomerase, topo VI (which is only distantly related to the type IIA enzymes), does not exhibit topology simplification. We find that topology simplification is not significantly dependent on circle size in the range ~2–9 kbp, and is not altered by reducing the free energy available from ATP hydrolysis by varying the ATP:ADP ratio. A direct test of one model (DNA tracking, i.e. sliding of a protein clamp along DNA to trap supercoils) suggests that this is unlikely to be the explanation for the effect. We conclude that geometric selection of DNA segments by the enzymes is likely to be a primary source of the effect but that it is possible that other factors contribute. We also speculate whether topology simplification might simply be an evolutionary relic, with no adaptive significance. PMID:19094994

  19. Mapping DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes following long-range communication between DNA sites in different orientations

    PubMed Central

    van Aelst, Kara; Saikrishnan, Kayarat; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes are single-chain proteins comprising an Mrr-family nuclease, a superfamily 2 helicase-like ATPase, a coupler domain, a methyltransferase, and a DNA-recognition domain. Upon recognising an unmodified DNA target site, the helicase-like domain hydrolyzes ATP to cause site release (remodeling activity) and to then drive downstream translocation consuming 1–2 ATP per base pair (motor activity). On an invading foreign DNA, double-strand breaks are introduced at random wherever two translocating enzymes form a so-called collision complex following long-range communication between a pair of target sites in inverted (head-to-head) repeat. Paradoxically, structural models for collision suggest that the nuclease domains are too far apart (>30 bp) to dimerise and produce a double-strand DNA break using just two strand-cleavage events. Here, we examined the organisation of different collision complexes and how these lead to nuclease activation. We mapped DNA cleavage when a translocating enzyme collides with a static enzyme bound to its site. By following communication between sites in both head-to-head and head-to-tail orientations, we could show that motor activity leads to activation of the nuclease domains via distant interactions of the helicase or MTase-TRD. Direct nuclease dimerization is not required. To help explain the observed cleavage patterns, we also used exonuclease footprinting to demonstrate that individual Type ISP domains can swing off the DNA. This study lends further support to a model where DNA breaks are generated by multiple random nicks due to mobility of a collision complex with an overall DNA-binding footprint of ∼30 bp. PMID:26507855

  20. CYP2D6 Genetic Polymorphisms and Phenotypes in Different Ethnicities of Malaysian Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Chin, Fee Wai; Chan, Soon Choy; Abdul Rahman, Sabariah; Noor Akmal, Sharifah; Rosli, Rozita

    2016-01-01

    The cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily D, polypeptide 6 (CYP2D6) is an enzyme that is predominantly involved in the metabolism of tamoxifen. Genetic polymorphisms of the CYP2D6 gene may contribute to inter-individual variability in tamoxifen metabolism, which leads to the differences in clinical response to tamoxifen among breast cancer patients. In Malaysia, the knowledge on CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms as well as metabolizer status in Malaysian breast cancer patients remains unknown. Hence, this study aimed to comprehensively identify CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms among 80 Malaysian breast cancer patients. The genetic polymorphisms of all the 9 exons of CYP2D6 gene were identified using high-resolution melting analysis and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Seven CYP2D6 alleles consisting of CYP2D6*1, CYP2D6*2, CYP2D6*4, CYP2D6*10, CYP2D6*39, CYP2D6*49, and CYP2D6*75 were identified in this study. Among these alleles, CYP2D6*10 is the most common allele in both Malaysian Malay (54.8%) and Chinese (71.4%) breast cancer patients, whereas CYP2D6*4 in Malaysian Indian (28.6%) breast cancer patients. In relation to CYP2D6 genotype, CYP2D6*10/*10 is more frequently observed in both Malaysian Malay (28.9%) and Chinese (57.1%) breast cancer patients, whereas CYP2D6*4/*10 is more frequently observed in Malaysian Indian (42.8%) breast cancer patients. In terms of CYP2D6 phenotype, 61.5% of Malaysian Malay breast cancer patients are predicted as extensive metabolizers in which they are most likely to respond well to tamoxifen therapy. However, 57.1% of Chinese as well as Indian breast cancer patients are predicted as intermediate metabolizers and they are less likely to gain optimal benefit from the tamoxifen therapy. This is the first report of CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms and phenotypes in Malaysian breast cancer patients for different ethnicities. These data may aid clinicians in selecting an optimal drug therapy for Malaysian breast cancer patients, hence improve the

  1. Micro-structural Fluctuations in 2D Dusty Plasma Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    I Lin; Huang, Y.-H.; Teng, L.-W.

    2007-07-13

    We address structural fluctuations in a cold 2D dusty plasma liquid which is self-organized through the strong Coulomb coupling of the negatively charged micro-meter sized dust particles suspending in weakly ionized discharges. The 2D liquids consist of triangular type ordered domains surrounded by defect clusters, which can be reorganized through avalanche type hopping under the interplay of strong Coulomb coupling and thermal fluctuations. The spatio-temporal evolutions of the local bond-orientational order are directly tracked through digital optical microscopy. The power law scaling of the temporal persistence length of fluctuations is obtained for the cold liquid. The measurement of the conditional probability of the persistence lengths of the successive fluctuating cycles suggests certain types of the persistence length combinations are more preferred. The memory of persistence lasts a few fluctuating cycles.

  2. Re-evaluating the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis during initiation of DNA sliding by Type III restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Júlia; Bollins, Jack; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2015-12-15

    DNA cleavage by the Type III restriction enzymes requires long-range protein communication between recognition sites facilitated by thermally-driven 1D diffusion. This 'DNA sliding' is initiated by hydrolysis of multiple ATPs catalysed by a helicase-like domain. Two distinct ATPase phases were observed using short oligoduplex substrates; the rapid consumption of ∼10 ATPs coupled to a protein conformation switch followed by a slower phase, the duration of which was dictated by the rate of dissociation from the recognition site. Here, we show that the second ATPase phase is both variable and only observable when DNA ends are proximal to the recognition site. On DNA with sites more distant from the ends, a single ATPase phase coupled to the conformation switch was observed and subsequent site dissociation required little or no further ATP hydrolysis. The overall DNA dissociation kinetics (encompassing site release, DNA sliding and escape via a DNA end) were not influenced by the second phase. Although the data simplifies the ATP hydrolysis scheme for Type III restriction enzymes, questions remain as to why multiple ATPs are hydrolysed to prepare for DNA sliding.

  3. Re-evaluating the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis during initiation of DNA sliding by Type III restriction enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Júlia; Bollins, Jack; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    DNA cleavage by the Type III restriction enzymes requires long-range protein communication between recognition sites facilitated by thermally-driven 1D diffusion. This ‘DNA sliding’ is initiated by hydrolysis of multiple ATPs catalysed by a helicase-like domain. Two distinct ATPase phases were observed using short oligoduplex substrates; the rapid consumption of ∼10 ATPs coupled to a protein conformation switch followed by a slower phase, the duration of which was dictated by the rate of dissociation from the recognition site. Here, we show that the second ATPase phase is both variable and only observable when DNA ends are proximal to the recognition site. On DNA with sites more distant from the ends, a single ATPase phase coupled to the conformation switch was observed and subsequent site dissociation required little or no further ATP hydrolysis. The overall DNA dissociation kinetics (encompassing site release, DNA sliding and escape via a DNA end) were not influenced by the second phase. Although the data simplifies the ATP hydrolysis scheme for Type III restriction enzymes, questions remain as to why multiple ATPs are hydrolysed to prepare for DNA sliding. PMID:26538601

  4. Preferential access to genetic information from endogenous hominin ancient DNA and accurate quantitative SNP-typing via SPEX

    PubMed Central

    Brotherton, Paul; Sanchez, Juan J.; Cooper, Alan; Endicott, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of targeted genetic loci from ancient, forensic and clinical samples is usually built upon polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-generated sequence data. However, many studies have shown that PCR amplification from poor-quality DNA templates can create sequence artefacts at significant levels. With hominin (human and other hominid) samples, the pervasive presence of highly PCR-amplifiable human DNA contaminants in the vast majority of samples can lead to the creation of recombinant hybrids and other non-authentic artefacts. The resulting PCR-generated sequences can then be difficult, if not impossible, to authenticate. In contrast, single primer extension (SPEX)-based approaches can genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms from ancient fragments of DNA as accurately as modern DNA. A single SPEX-type assay can amplify just one of the duplex DNA strands at target loci and generate a multi-fold depth-of-coverage, with non-authentic recombinant hybrids reduced to undetectable levels. Crucially, SPEX-type approaches can preferentially access genetic information from damaged and degraded endogenous ancient DNA templates over modern human DNA contaminants. The development of SPEX-type assays offers the potential for highly accurate, quantitative genotyping from ancient hominin samples. PMID:19864251

  5. Phage type and DNA plasmid profile of Salmonella typhimurium isolates in the area of Isernia, Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Fantasia, M.; Ricci, N.; Manuppella, A.; Martini, A.; Filetici, E.; Laurelli, T.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-eight Salmonella typhimurium strains isolated from December 1987 to March 1988 in Isernia, Central Italy, were characterized on the basis of their phage type, resistance to antimicrobials and plasmid profiles. According to their phage types, the isolates could be assigned to one of six groups, the prevalent one being PT 195 which accounted for 73.6% of isolates. On the basis of their plasmid content, the isolates could be assigned to one of ten groups. The prevalent plasmid profile (60.0; 6.0; 4.3; 4.0; 3.2 megadaltons) was found in 60.4% of isolates. All the isolates from a particular food (salsicce), and as most of isolates from humans who had consumed this food belonged to phage type 195 and were of the same plasmid profile. The combined use of phage typing and DNA plasmid analysis proved to be a useful tool in identifying epidemiologically related isolates in this investigation. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2209736

  6. Thermolabile in vivo DNA-binding activity associated with a protein encoded by mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C K; Knipe, D M

    1983-01-01

    The major DNA-binding protein encoded by several temperature-sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 was thermolabile for binding to intracellular viral DNA. The ability of DNase I to release this protein from isolated nuclei was used as a measure of the amount of protein bound to viral DNA. This assay was based upon our previous observation that the fraction of herpesviral DNA-binding protein which can be eluted from nuclei with DNase I represents proteins associated with progeny viral DNA (D. M. Knipe and A. E. Spang, J. Virol. 43:314-324, 1982). In this study, we found that several temperature-sensitive mutants encoded proteins which rapidly chased from a DNase I-sensitive to a DNase I-resistant nuclear form upon shift to the nonpermissive temperature. We interpret this change in DNase I sensitivity to represent the denaturation of the DNA-binding site at the nonpermissive temperature and the association with the nuclear framework via a second site on the protein. The DNA-binding activity measured by the DNase I sensitivity assay represents an important function of the protein in viral replication because three of five mutants tested were thermolabile for this activity. A fourth mutant encoded a protein which did not associate with the nucleus at the nonpermissive temperature and therefore would not be available for DNA binding in the nucleus. We also present supportive evidence for the binding of the wild-type protein to intracellular viral DNA by showing that a monoclonal antibody coprecipitated virus-specific DNA sequences with the major DNA-binding protein. Images PMID:6304350

  7. A quadruplex real-time qPCR assay for the simultaneous assessment of total human DNA, human male DNA, DNA degradation and the presence of PCR inhibitors in forensic samples: a diagnostic tool for STR typing.

    PubMed

    Hudlow, William R; Chong, Mavis Date; Swango, Katie L; Timken, Mark D; Buoncristiani, Martin R

    2008-03-01

    A quadruplex real-time qPCR assay was developed to simultaneously assess total human DNA, human male DNA, DNA degradation and PCR inhibitors in forensic samples. Specifically, the assay utilizes a approximately 170-190bp target sequence that spans the TH01 STR locus to quantify total human DNA (nuTH01), a 137 bp target sequence directly adjacent to the SRY gene to quantify human male DNA (nuSRY), a 67 bp target sequence flanking the CSF1PO STR locus (nuCSF) to assess degradation (nuCSF:nuTH01 ratio) and a 77 bp synthetic DNA template used as an internal PCR control target sequence (IPC) for the assessment of PCR inhibition. Validation studies, performed on an ABI 7500 SDS instrument using TaqMan and TaqManMGB detection, indicate each of the targets in the quadruplex assay performs effectively and is informative even when challenged with DNase-degraded and hematin-inhibited samples. The nuTH01-nuSRY-nuCSF-IPC quadruplex qPCR assay is envisioned to assist in the choice of the most informative DNA typing system available, which may include standard autosomal STR typing when the results indicate the presence of non-degraded, single gender DNA or non-degraded, male:female mixtures at ratios expected to yield probative alleles; Y STR typing in samples containing a male component that is overwhelmed by the presence of an excess of female DNA; reduced amplicon size STR typing ("MiniSTRs") where the nuCSF:nuTH01 ratio indicates the sample is highly degraded; enhanced STR amplification with additional AmpliTaq Gold/BSA and/or sample clean-up when the presence of PCR inhibitors is suggested by a delayed IPC C(T) value or mitochondrial DNA typing in samples where little to no nuclear DNA is detected. The present study includes evaluations of species specificity, sensitivity, precision, reproducibility, male-female mixtures, population samples and applications to various casework-type samples as indicated by the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM

  8. Cytochrome P-450 2D6 (CYP2D6) Genotype and Breast Cancer Recurrence in Tamoxifen-Treated Patients: Evaluating the Importance of Loss of Heterozygosity.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Thomas P; Hertz, Daniel L; Damkier, Per; Ejlertsen, Bent; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen J; Rae, James M; Regan, Meredith M; Thompson, Alastair M; Lash, Timothy L; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P

    2017-01-15

    Tamoxifen therapy for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer reduces the risk of recurrence by approximately one-half. Cytochrome P-450 2D6, encoded by the polymorphic cytochrome P-450 2D6 gene (CYP2D6), oxidizes tamoxifen to its most active metabolites. Steady-state concentrations of endoxifen (4-hydroxy-N-desmethyltamoxifen), the most potent antiestrogenic metabolite, are reduced in women whose CYP2D6 genotypes confer poor enzyme function. Thirty-one studies of the association of CYP2D6 genotype with breast cancer survival have yielded heterogeneous results. Some influential studies genotyped DNA from tumor-infiltrated tissues, and their results may have been susceptible to germline genotype misclassification from loss of heterozygosity at the CYP2D6 locus. We systematically reviewed 6 studies of concordance between genotypes obtained from paired nonneoplastic and breast tumor-infiltrated tissues, all of which showed excellent CYP2D6 genotype agreement. We applied these concordance data to a quantitative bias analysis of the subset of the 31 studies that were based on genotypes from tumor-infiltrated tissue to examine whether genotyping errors substantially biased estimates of association. The bias analysis showed negligible bias by discordant genotypes. Summary estimates of association, with or without bias adjustment, indicated no clinically important association between CYP2D6 genotype and breast cancer survival in tamoxifen-treated women.

  9. G-rich DNA-induced stress response blocks type-I-IFN but not CXCL10 secretion in monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Herzner, Anna-Maria; Wolter, Steven; Zillinger, Thomas; Schmitz, Saskia; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Bartok, Eva; Schlee, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Excessive inflammation can cause damage to host cells and tissues. Thus, the secretion of inflammatory cytokines is tightly regulated at transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational levels and influenced by cellular stress responses, such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress or apoptosis. Here, we describe a novel type of post-transcriptional regulation of the type-I-IFN response that was induced in monocytes by cytosolic transfection of a short immunomodulatory DNA (imDNA), a G-tetrad forming CpG-free derivative of the TLR9 agonist ODN2216. When co-transfected with cytosolic nucleic acid stimuli (DNA or 3P-dsRNA), imDNA induced caspase-3 activation, translational shutdown and upregulation of stress-induced genes. This stress response inhibited the type-I-IFN induction at the translational level. By contrast, the induction of most type-I-IFN-associated chemokines, including Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Ligand (CXCL)10 was not affected, suggesting a differential translational regulation of chemokines and type-I-IFN. Pan-caspase inhibitors could restore IFN-β secretion, yet, strikingly, caspase inhibition did not restore global translation but instead induced a compensatory increase in the transcription of IFN-β but not CXCL10. Altogether, our data provide evidence for a differential regulation of cytokine release at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels which suppresses type-I-IFN induction yet allows for CXCL10 secretion during imDNA-induced cellular stress. PMID:27941826

  10. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  11. Serum flecainide S/R ratio reflects the CYP2D6 genotype and changes in CYP2D6 activity.

    PubMed

    Doki, Kosuke; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Kuga, Keisuke; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Homma, Masato

    2015-08-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify whether the ratio of S- to R-flecainide (S/R ratio) in the serum flecainide concentration was associated with the stereoselectivity of flecainide metabolism, and to investigate the effects of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 (CYP2D6) genotype and CYP2D6 inhibitor on the serum flecainide S/R ratio. In vitro studies using human liver microsomes and cDNA-expressed CYP isoforms suggested that variability in the serum flecainide S/R ratio was associated with the stereoselectivity of CYP2D6-mediated flecainide metabolism. We examined the serum flecainide S/R ratio in 143 patients with supraventricular tachyarrhythmia. The S/R ratio was significantly lower in intermediate metabolizers and poor metabolizers (IMs/PMs) than in extensive metabolizers (EMs) identified by the CYP2D6 genotype. The cut-off value for the S/R ratio to allow the discrimination between CYP2D6 EMs and IMs/PMs was 0.99. The S/R ratio in patients with co-administration of bepridil, a potent CYP2D6 inhibitor, was lower than 0.99, regardless of the CYP2D6 genotype status. Other factors, including age, sex, body weight, and renal function, did not affect the serum flecainide S/R ratio. This study suggests that the serum flecainide S/R ratio reflects the CYP2D6 genotype and changes in CYP2D6 activity on co-administration of a CYP2D6 inhibitor.

  12. Conserved region 3 of the adenovirus type 5 DNA-binding protein is important for interaction with single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Neale, G A; Kitchingman, G R

    1990-01-01

    The adenovirus-encoded single-stranded DNA-binding protein (DBP) functions in viral DNA replication and several aspects of RNA metabolism. Previous studies (G. A. M. Neale and G. R. Kitchingman, J. Biol. Chem. 264:3153-3159, 1989) have defined three highly conserved regions in the carboxy-terminal domain of the protein (amino acids 178 to 186, 322 to 330, and 464 to 475) that may be involved in the binding of the protein to single-stranded DNA. We examined the role of conserved region 3 (464 to 475) by constructing nine classes of point mutants with from one to four amino acid changes. The point mutants were tested for their ability to assist adeno-associated virus DNA replication. All nine differed from wild-type DBP; seven were essentially nonfunctional, whereas two had 55 and 145%, respectively, of the wild-type DBP helper activity. Three of the mutants were found to be temperature sensitive, with significantly greater helper activity at 33 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. All nine mutants produced essentially wild-type levels of protein. One monoclonal antibody against the DBP, termed 2/4, did not immunoprecipitate the mutant DBPs as well as wild-type DBP, indicating either that the antibody recognized sequences around CR3 or that the conformation of the protein around the epitope recognized by 2/4 had changed. Two of the three temperature-sensitive DBP mutants bound to single-stranded DNA-cellulose with the same affinity as wild-type DBP at 4 degrees C; the remaining mutants all showed reduced affinity. These results demonstrated that many of the residues within conserved region 3 of the DBP are important for interaction of the protein with nucleic acid. Images PMID:2296078

  13. DNA polymorphism analysis of candidate genes for type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Mexican ethnic group.

    PubMed

    Flores-Martínez, S E; Islas-Andrade, S; Machorro-Lazo, M V; Revilla, M C; Juárez, R E; Mújica-López, K I; Morán-Moguel, M C; López-Cardona, M G; Sánchez-Corona, J

    2004-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disorder resulting from the action and interaction of many genetic and environmental factors. It has been reported that polymorphisms in genes involved in the metabolism of glucose are associated with the susceptibility to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus increases with age, as well as with obesity and hypertension, its prevalence and incidence are different among geographical regions and ethnic groups. In Mexico, a higher prevalence and incidence has been described in the south of the country, and differences between urban and rural communities have been observed. We studied 73 individuals from Santiago Jamiltepec, a small indigenous community from Oaxaca State, Mexico. This population has shown a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between the Pst I (insulin gene), Nsi I (insulin receptor gene) and Gly972Arg (insulin receptor substrate 1 gene) polymorphisms and type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity and hypertension in this population. Clinical evaluation consisted of BMI and blood pressure measurements, and biochemical assays consisted of determination of fasting plasma insulin and glucose levels. PCR and restriction enzyme digestion analysis were applied to genomic DNA to identify the three polymorphisms. From statistical analysis carried out here, individually, the Pst I, Nsi I and Gly972Arg polymorphisms were not associated with the type 2 diabetes, obese or hypertensive phenotypes in this population. Nevertheless, there was an association between the Nsi I and Pst I polymorphisms and increased serum insulin levels.

  14. Common CYP2D6 polymorphisms affecting alternative splicing and transcription: long-range haplotypes with two regulatory variants modulate CYP2D6 activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danxin; Poi, Ming J; Sun, Xiaochun; Gaedigk, Andrea; Leeder, J Steven; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is involved in the metabolism of 25% of clinically used drugs. Genetic polymorphisms cause substantial variation in CYP2D6 activity and serve as biomarkers guiding drug therapy. However, genotype-phenotype relationships remain ambiguous except for poor metabolizers carrying null alleles, suggesting the presence of yet unknown genetic variants. Searching for regulatory CYP2D6 polymorphisms, we find that a SNP defining the CYP2D6*2 allele, rs16947 [R296C, 17-60% minor allele frequency (MAF)], previously thought to convey normal activity, alters exon 6 splicing, thereby reducing CYP2D6 expression at least 2-fold. In addition, two completely linked SNPs (rs5758550/rs133333, MAF 13-42%) increase CYP2D6 transcription more than 2-fold, located in a distant downstream enhancer region (>100 kb) that interacts with the CYP2D6 promoter. In high linkage disequilibrium (LD) with each other, rs16947 and the enhancer SNPs form haplotypes that affect CYP2D6 enzyme activity in vivo. In a pediatric cohort of 164 individuals, rs16947 alone (minor haplotype frequency 28%) was associated with reduced CYP2D6 metabolic activity (measured as dextromethorphan/metabolite ratios), whereas rs5758550/rs133333 alone (frequency 3%) resulted in increased CYP2D6 activity, while haplotypes containing both rs16947 and rs5758550/rs133333 were similar to the wild-type. Other alleles used in biomarker panels carrying these variants such as CYP2D6*41 require re-evaluation of independent effects on CYP2D6 activity. The occurrence of two regulatory variants of high frequency and in high LD, residing on a long haplotype, highlights the importance of gene architecture, likely shaped by evolutionary selection pressures, in determining activity of encoded proteins.

  15. New Type of Papillomavirus and Novel Circular Single Stranded DNA Virus Discovered in Urban Rattus norvegicus Using Circular DNA Enrichment and Metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Thomas Arn; Fridholm, Helena; Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg; Kjartansdóttir, Kristín Rós; Willerslev, Eske; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Hansen, Anders Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Rattus norvegicus (R. norvegicus) are ubiquitous and their presence has several effects on the human populations in our urban areas on a global scale. Both historically and presently, this close interaction has facilitated the dissemination of many pathogens to humans, making screening for potentially zoonotic and emerging viruses in rats highly relevant. We have investigated faecal samples from R. norvegicus collected from urban areas using a protocol based on metagenomic enrichment of circular DNA genomes and subsequent sequencing. We found a new type of papillomavirus, with a L1 region 82% identical to that of the known R. norvegicus Papillomavirus 2. Additionally, we found 20 different circular replication associated protein (Rep)-encoding single stranded DNA (CRESS-DNA) virus-like genomes, one of which has homology to the replication-associated gene of Beak and feather disease virus. Papillomaviruses are a group of viruses known for their carcinogenic potential, and although they are known to infect several different vertebrates, they are mainly studied and characterised in humans. CRESS-DNA viruses are found in many different environments and tissue types. Both papillomaviruses and CRESS-DNA viruses are known to have pathogenic potential and screening for novel and known viruses in R. norvegicus could help identify viruses with pathogenic potential.

  16. The ancestral role of ATP hydrolysis in type II topoisomerases: prevention of DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Andrew D.; Berger, James M.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Type II DNA topoisomerases (topos) catalyse changes in DNA topology by passing one double-stranded DNA segment through another. This reaction is essential to processes such as replication and transcription, but carries with it the inherent danger of permanent double-strand break (DSB) formation. All type II topos hydrolyse ATP during their reactions; however, only DNA gyrase is able to harness the free energy of hydrolysis to drive DNA supercoiling, an energetically unfavourable process. A long-standing puzzle has been to understand why the majority of type II enzymes consume ATP to support reactions that do not require a net energy input. While certain type II topos are known to ‘simplify’ distributions of DNA topoisomers below thermodynamic equilibrium levels, the energy required for this process is very low, suggesting that this behaviour is not the principal reason for ATP hydrolysis. Instead, we propose that the energy of ATP hydrolysis is needed to control the separation of protein–protein interfaces and prevent the accidental formation of potentially mutagenic or cytotoxic DSBs. This interpretation has parallels with the actions of a variety of molecular machines that catalyse the conformational rearrangement of biological macromolecules. PMID:21525132

  17. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark A; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals.

  18. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Mark A.; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  19. Crystal Structure of Mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding Domain in Complex with Type II TGF-[beta] Receptor Promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-08-18

    The Ets family of transcription factors is composed of more than 30 members. One of its members, Elf3, is expressed in virtually all epithelial cells as well as in many tumors, including breast tumors. Several studies observed that the promoter of the type II TGF-{beta} receptor gene (T{beta}R-II) is strongly stimulated by Elf3 via two adjacent Elf3 binding sites, the A-site and the B-site. Here, we report the 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment, containing the DNA-binding Ets domain, in complex with the B-site of mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter DNA (mT{beta}R-II{sub DNA}). Elf3 contacts the core GGAA motif of the B-site from a major groove similar to that of known Ets proteins. However, unlike other Ets proteins, Elf3 also contacts sequences of the A-site from the minor groove of the DNA. DNA binding experiments and cell-based transcription studies indicate that minor groove interaction by Arg349 located in the Ets domain is important for Elf3 function. Equally interesting, previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Elf3, which flanks the Ets domain, is required for Elf3 binding to DNA. In this study, we determined that Elf3 amino acid residues within this flanking region, including Trp361, are important for the structural integrity of the protein as well as for the Efl3 DNA binding and transactivation activity.

  20. Nucleic acid (cDNA) and amino acid sequences of alpha-type gliadins from wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed Central

    Kasarda, D D; Okita, T W; Bernardin, J E; Baecker, P A; Nimmo, C C; Lew, E J; Dietler, M D; Greene, F C

    1984-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence for an alpha-type gliadin protein of wheat (Triticum aestivum Linnaeus) endosperm has been derived from a cloned cDNA sequence. An additional cDNA clone that corresponds to about 75% of a similar alpha-type gliadin has been sequenced and shows some important differences. About 97% of the composite sequence of A-gliadin (an alpha-type gliadin fraction) has also been obtained by direct amino acid sequencing. This sequence shows a high degree of similarity with amino acid sequences derived from both cDNA clones and is virtually identical to one of them. On the basis of sequence information, after loss of the signal sequence, the mature alpha-type gliadins may be divided into five different domains, two of which may have evolved from an ancestral gliadin gene, whereas the remaining three contain repeating sequences that may have developed independently. Images PMID:6589619

  1. Forensic identification of skeletal remains from members of Ernesto Che Guevara's guerrillas in Bolivia based on DNA typing.

    PubMed

    Lleonart, R; Riego, E; Saínz de la Peña, M V; Bacallao, K; Amaro, F; Santiesteban, M; Blanco, M; Currenti, H; Puentes, A; Rolo, F; Herrera, L; de la Fuente, J

    2000-01-01

    We report the positive identification of several members of the guerrillas led by Ernesto "Che" Guevara on the 1960 s in Bolivia by means of DNA fingerprinting. Successful DNA typing of both short tandem repeat loci and the hypervariable region of the human mitochondrial DNA was achieved after extracting total DNA from bones obtained from two burial sites. Given the size of the Cuban database for the STR allele frequencies, a conservative approach was followed to estimate the statistical significance of the genetic evidence. The estimated probabilities of paternity for the two cases in which the paternity logic was applied were higher than 99%. One case was analyzed using mitochondrial DNA and could not be excluded from the identity proposed by the forensic anthropology team. A fourth case was identified by exclusion, on the basis of the positive identification of the other remains, the historical and other anthropological evidence.

  2. The presumptive reagent fluorescein for detection of dilute bloodstains and subsequent STR typing of recovered DNA.

    PubMed

    Budowle, B; Leggitt, J L; Defenbaugh, D A; Keys, K M; Malkiewicz, S F

    2000-09-01

    A presumptive reagent for dilute blood detection other than luminol is fluorescein. The sensitivity of fluorescein approaches the sensitivity of detection levels of luminol. The fluorescein detection method offers the advantages of working in a lighted environment, and the reaction persists longer than luminol. A series of diluted bloodstains, ranging from neat to 1:1,000,000, was placed on a variety of substrates. Three sets were made per substrate. One set was exposed to fluorescein, one set was exposed to luminol, and one set served as an uncontaminated control. The fluorescein signal persisted longer than luminol. However, background staining for fluorescein was observed on some substrates within 30 s to 1 min, and no background staining was observed for luminol. Stains on non-absorbent surfaces were detectable at 1:100,000 dilutions, and stains on absorbent surfaces were detectable usually at no more than 1:100. The sensitivity of detection of fluorescein was comparable to that of luminol in this study. In all cases, where sufficient DNA was recovered, typeable results at all 13 core CODIS STR loci were obtained from treated bloodstains and controls. The results from STR typing indicate that there was no evidence of DNA degradation.

  3. Apoptotic Caspases Suppress mtDNA-Induced STING-Mediated Type I IFN Production

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Kate; Metcalf, Donald; Lane, Rachael M.; Cambier, John C.; Herold, Marco J.; van Delft, Mark F.; Bedoui, Sammy; Lessene, Guillaume; Ritchie, Matthew E.; Huang, David C.S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Activated caspases are a hallmark of apoptosis induced by the intrinsic pathway, but they are dispensable for cell death and the apoptotic clearance of cells in vivo. This has led to the suggestion that caspases are activated not just to kill but to prevent dying cells from triggering a host immune response. Here, we show that the caspase cascade suppresses type I interferon (IFN) production by cells undergoing Bak/Bax-mediated apoptosis. Bak and Bax trigger the release of mitochondrial DNA. This is recognized by the cGAS/STING-dependent DNA sensing pathway, which initiates IFN production. Activated caspases attenuate this response. Pharmacological caspase inhibition or genetic deletion of caspase-9, Apaf-1, or caspase-3/7 causes dying cells to secrete IFN-β. In vivo, this precipitates an elevation in IFN-β levels and consequent hematopoietic stem cell dysfunction, which is corrected by loss of Bak and Bax. Thus, the apoptotic caspase cascade functions to render mitochondrial apoptosis immunologically silent. PMID:25525874

  4. Apoptotic caspases suppress mtDNA-induced STING-mediated type I IFN production.

    PubMed

    White, Michael J; McArthur, Kate; Metcalf, Donald; Lane, Rachael M; Cambier, John C; Herold, Marco J; van Delft, Mark F; Bedoui, Sammy; Lessene, Guillaume; Ritchie, Matthew E; Huang, David C S; Kile, Benjamin T

    2014-12-18

    Activated caspases are a hallmark of apoptosis induced by the intrinsic pathway, but they are dispensable for cell death and the apoptotic clearance of cells in vivo. This has led to the suggestion that caspases are activated not just to kill but to prevent dying cells from triggering a host immune response. Here, we show that the caspase cascade suppresses type I interferon (IFN) production by cells undergoing Bak/Bax-mediated apoptosis. Bak and Bax trigger the release of mitochondrial DNA. This is recognized by the cGAS/STING-dependent DNA sensing pathway, which initiates IFN production. Activated caspases attenuate this response. Pharmacological caspase inhibition or genetic deletion of caspase-9, Apaf-1, or caspase-3/7 causes dying cells to secrete IFN-β. In vivo, this precipitates an elevation in IFN-β levels and consequent hematopoietic stem cell dysfunction, which is corrected by loss of Bak and Bax. Thus, the apoptotic caspase cascade functions to render mitochondrial apoptosis immunologically silent.

  5. A highly specific and sensitive DNA probe derived from chromosomal DNA of Helicobacter pylori is useful for typing H. pylori isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Ferguson, D A; Ha, T; Chi, D S; Thomas, E

    1993-01-01

    HindIII-digested DNA fragments derived from an EcoRI-digested 6.5-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA prepared from Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43629 (type strain) were cloned into the pUC19 vector. A 0.86-kb insert was identified as a potential chromosomal DNA probe. The specificity of the probe was evaluated by testing 166 non-H. pylori bacterial strains representing 38 genera and 91 species which included aerobic, anaerobic, and microaerophilic flora of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts. None of the 166 non-H. pylori strains hybridized with this probe (100% specificity), and the sensitivity of this probe was also 100% when H. pylori isolates from 72 patients with gastritis and with the homologous ATCC type strain were tested by dot blot hybridization. The capability of this probe for differentiating between strains of H. pylori was evaluated by Southern blot hybridization of HaeIII-digested chromosomal DNA from 68 clinical isolates and the homologous ATCC type strain of H. pylori. Fifty-one unique hybridization patterns were seen among the 69 strains tested, demonstrating considerable genotypic variation among H. pylori clinical isolates. We propose that this probe would be of significant value for conducting epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:8370744

  6. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  7. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  8. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  9. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  10. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  11. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  12. Comparison between Urine and Cervical Samples for HPV DNA Detection and Typing in Young Women in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cómbita, Alba Lucía; Gheit, Tarik; González, Paula; Puerto, Devi; Murillo, Raúl Hernando; Montoya, Luisa; Vorsters, Alex; Van Keer, Severien; Van Damme, Pierre; Tommasino, Massimo; Hernández-Suárez, Gustavo; Sánchez, Laura; Herrero, Rolando; Wiesner, Carolina

    2016-09-01

    Urine sampling for HPV DNA detection has been proposed as an effective method for monitoring the impact of HPV vaccination programs; however, conflicting results have been reported. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of optimized urine HPV DNA testing in women aged 19 to 25 years. Optimization process included the use of first void urine, immediate mixing of urine with DNA preservative, and the concentration of all HPV DNA, including cell-free DNA fragments. Urine and cervical samples were collected from 535 young women attending cervical screening at health centers from two Colombian cities. HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using an HPV type-specific multiplex genotyping assay, which combines multiplex polymerase chain reaction with bead-based Luminex technology. Concordance between HPV DNA detection in urine and cervical samples was determined using kappa statistics and McNemar tests. The accuracy of HPV DNA testing in urine samples was evaluated measuring sensitivity and specificity using as reference the results obtained from cervical samples. Statistical analysis was performed using STATA11.2 software. The findings revealed an overall HPV prevalence of 60.00% in cervical samples and 64.72% in urine samples, HPV-16 being the most frequent HPV type detected in both specimens. Moreover, our results indicate that detection of HPV DNA in first void urine provides similar results to those obtained with cervical samples and can be used to monitor HPV vaccination trials and programs as evidenced by the substantial concordance found for the detection of the four vaccine types. Cancer Prev Res; 9(9); 766-71. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Repair of DNA following incorporation of 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine into herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bubley, G.J.; Crumpacker, C.S.; Schnipper, L.E.

    1984-05-01

    The nucleoside analogue 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) is incorporated into herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA, and this correlates with inhibition of virus replication. The technique of Weigle-type reactivation (WR) was used to compare the ability of induced cellular DNA repair pathways to recognize or repair ara-C incorporated into HSV-1 DNA and ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated virus DNA (254 nm). Pretreatment of monkey cells with low-fluence UV irradiation, growth in cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II), or growth in ara-C followed by infection after a 24-hr incubation period resulted in enhanced survival of UV-irradiated HSV-1. Under the same experimental conditions, no reactivation of HSV-1 inactivated by growth in ara-C is observed. Comparisons between uninfected Vero cells exposed to UV irradiation (30 J/m2) or grown in 10(-6) M ara-C demonstrated repair replication in irradiated cells, whereas there was no evidence for DNA repair at various time intervals following removal of the nucleoside analogue. These observations suggest that, once ara-C is incorporated into HSV-1 or eukaryotic DNA, it is not recognized as a repairable lesion within the limits of the DNA repair assays used in these studies.

  15. 2D Distributed Sensing Via TDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    plate VEGF CompositeSensor Experimental Setup Air 279 mm 61 78 VARTM profile: slope RTM profile: rectangle 22 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware...2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Vision: Non-contact 2D sensing ü VARTM setup constructed within TL can be sensed by its EM field: 2D...300.0 mm/ns. 1 2 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Model Validation “ RTM Flow” TDR Response to 139 mm VEGC

  16. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  17. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in DNA immunized mink challenged with wild-type canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Line; Søgaard, Mette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Jensen, Trine Hammer; Jensen, Tove Dannemann; Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2009-07-30

    The aim of the study was to investigate the different phases of the immune response after DNA immunization with the hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein genes from canine distemper virus (CDV). Although attenuated live CDV vaccines have effectively reduced the incidence of disease, canine distemper is still a problem worldwide. The broad host range of CDV creates a constant viral reservoir among wildlife animals. Our results demonstrated early humoral and cell-mediated immune responses (IFN-gamma) in DNA vaccinated mink compared to mock-vaccinated mink after challenge with a Danish wild-type CDV. The DNA vaccine-induced immunity protected the natural host against disease development.

  18. A 2D-QSAR and Grid-Independent Molecular Descriptor (GRIND) Analysis of Quinoline-Type Inhibitors of Akt2: Exploration of the Binding Mode in the Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Noreen; Jabeen, Ishrat

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase B-β (PKBβ/Akt2) is a serine/threonine-specific protein kinase that has emerged as one of the most important regulators of cell growth, differentiation, and division. Upregulation of Akt2 in various human carcinomas, including ovarian, breast, and pancreatic, is a well-known tumorigenesis phenomenon. Early on, the concept of the simultaneous administration of anticancer drugs with inhibitors of Akt2 was advocated to overcome cell proliferation in the chemotherapeutic treatment of cancer. However, clinical studies have not lived up to the high expectations, and several phase II and phase III clinical studies have been terminated prematurely because of severe side effects related to the non-selective isomeric inhibition of Akt2. The notion that the sequence identity of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains within Akt-isoforms is less than 30% might indicate the possibility of the development of selective antagonists against the Akt2 PH domain. Therefore, in this study, various in silico tools were utilized to explore the hypothesis that quinoline-type inhibitors bind in the Akt2 PH domain. A Grid-Independent Molecular Descriptor (GRIND) analysis indicated that two hydrogen bond acceptors, two hydrogen bond donors and one hydrophobic feature at a certain distance from each other were important for the selective inhibition of Akt2. Our docking results delineated the importance of Lys30 as an anchor point for mapping the distances of important amino acid residues in the binding pocket, including Lys14, Glu17, Arg25, Asn53, Asn54 and Arg86. The binding regions identified complement the GRIND-based pharmacophoric features. PMID:28036396

  19. Nondetectability of restriction fragments and independence of DNA fragment sizes within and between loci in RFLP typing of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Zhong, Y.; Jin, L. ); Budowle, B. )

    1994-08-01

    The authors provide experimental evidence showing that, during the restriction-enzyme digestion of DNA samples, some of the HaeIII-digested DNA fragments are small enough to prevent their reliable sizing on a Southern gel. As a result of such nondetectability of DNA fragments, individuals who show a single-band DNA profile at a VNTR locus may not necessarily be true homozygotes. In a population database, when the presence of such nondetectable alleles is ignored, they show that a pseudodependence of alleles within as well as across loci may occur. Using a known statistical method, under the hypothesis of independence of alleles within loci, they derive an efficient estimate of null allele frequency, which may be subsequently used for testing allelic independence within and across loci. The estimates of null allele frequencies, thus derived, are shown to agree with direct experimental data on the frequencies of HaeIII-null alleles. Incorporation of null alleles into the analysis of the forensic VNTR database suggests that the assumptions of allelic independence within and between loci are appropriate. In contrast, a failure to incorporate the occurrence of null alleles would provide a wrong inference regarding the independence of alleles within and between loci. 47 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-[beta] receptor promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-10-08

    Ets proteins are transcription factors that activate or repress the expression of genes that are involved in various biological processes, including cellular proliferation, differentiation, development, transformation and apoptosis. Like other Ets-family members, Elf3 functions as a sequence-specific DNA-binding transcriptional factor. A mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment (amino-acid residues 269-371) containing the DNA-binding domain has been crystallized in complex with mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter (TR-II) DNA. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.66, b = 52, c = 99.78 {angstrom}, and diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 {angstrom}.

  1. DNA vaccine encoding the Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoite-specific surface antigens SAG2CDX protect BALB/c mice against type II parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Zhao, Lingxiao; Song, Jing; Li, Ying; Zhao, Qunli; He, Shenyi; Cong, Hua

    2013-09-23

    The surface antigens SAG2C, SAG2D, and SAG2X, which expressed specifically on bradyzoite stage of Toxoplasma gondii, have been demonstrated to be important for persistence of cyst in the brain. In this study, DNA vaccines expressing SAG2C, SAG2D, and SAG2X of T. gondii were constructed and their protective efficacy were evaluated in BALB/c mice. Mice vaccinated with pVAX1-SAG2C (pSAG2C), pVAX1-2D (pSAG2D) or pVAX1-2X (pSAG2C) showed higher levels of serum IgG antibodies and lymphocyte proliferation response compared to PBS and pVAX1 treated mice (p<0.05). The immune response was characterized by a strong Th1 response and increased cytokine production of IL-2 and IFN-γ. Vaccinated mice displayed significant protection against the challenge with the cyst of T. gondii genotype II strain of PRU (cyst-forming in mouse). A significant reduction in the brain cyst burden was detected in the mice immunized with pSAG2C (72%), pSAG2D (23%), pSAG2X (69%) alone and even more reduction rate, 77%, was achieved in the combination group compared to PBS treated mice. The results implied that immunization with DNA vaccines expressing SAG2C, SAG2D, and SAG2X, and, in particular, a combination of all three DNA plasmids, could effectively protect the mice against T. gondii chronic infection.

  2. ELLIPT2D: A Flexible Finite Element Code Written Python

    SciTech Connect

    Pletzer, A.; Mollis, J.C.

    2001-03-22

    The use of the Python scripting language for scientific applications and in particular to solve partial differential equations is explored. It is shown that Python's rich data structure and object-oriented features can be exploited to write programs that are not only significantly more concise than their counter parts written in Fortran, C or C++, but are also numerically efficient. To illustrate this, a two-dimensional finite element code (ELLIPT2D) has been written. ELLIPT2D provides a flexible and easy-to-use framework for solving a large class of second-order elliptic problems. The program allows for structured or unstructured meshes. All functions defining the elliptic operator are user supplied and so are the boundary conditions, which can be of Dirichlet, Neumann or Robbins type. ELLIPT2D makes extensive use of dictionaries (hash tables) as a way to represent sparse matrices.Other key features of the Python language that have been widely used include: operator over loading, error handling, array slicing, and the Tkinter module for building graphical use interfaces. As an example of the utility of ELLIPT2D, a nonlinear solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation is computed using a Newton iterative scheme. A second application focuses on a solution of the toroidal Laplace equation coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic stability code, a problem arising in the context of magnetic fusion research.

  3. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  4. The basics of 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The technique of two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for separating complex mixtures of proteins, but since its inception in the mid 1970s, it acquired the stigma of being a very difficult application to master and was generally used to its best effect by experts. The introduction of commercially available immobilized pH gradients in the early 1990s provided enhanced reproducibility and easier protocols, leading to a pronounced increase in popularity of the technique. However gel-to-gel variation was still difficult to control without the use of technical replicates. In the mid 1990s (at the same time as the birth of "proteomics"), the concept of multiplexing fluorescently labeled proteins for 2D gel separation was realized by Jon Minden's group and has led to the ability to design experiments to virtually eliminate gel-to-gel variation, resulting in biological replicates being used for statistical analysis with the ability to detect very small changes in relative protein abundance. This technology is referred to as 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE).

  5. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; ...

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  6. Multilocus sequence typing is a reliable alternative method to DNA fingerprinting for discriminating among strains of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Robles, Juan C; Koreen, Larry; Park, Steven; Perlin, David S

    2004-06-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) has emerged as a powerful new DNA-typing tool for the evaluation of intraspecies genetic relatedness. This method relies on DNA sequence analysis of nucleotide polymorphisms in housekeeping genes and has shown a high degree of intraspecies discriminatory power for bacterial and fungal pathogens. However, the results of the MLST scheme for Candida albicans have heretofore never been formally compared to those of other established typing techniques. To assess the value of MLST relative to those of other DNA fingerprinting tools for discriminating among strains of C. albicans, we applied it to a previously well-characterized set of 29 C. albicans isolates evaluated by the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), and Ca3 Southern hybridization probe techniques. MLST identified three clusters of genetically related isolates, with 82.3% direct concordance with MLEE, 82.7% with RAPD analysis, and 86.2% with the Ca3 Southern hybridization technique. When MLST was applied to a subset of 22 isolates of unrelated origins, it identified 21 independent diploid sequence types (DSTs), resulting in a discriminatory power of 99.6%. These DSTs were 96.9, 99.6, and 99.6% concordant with the genotypes identified by RAPD analysis, MLEE, and Ca3 Southern hybridization, respectively. These results demonstrate that MLST is a highly effective technique that performs at least comparably to other established DNA fingerprinting techniques.

  7. Comparative analysis of DNA methylome and transcriptome of skeletal muscle in lean-, obese-, and mini-type pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yalan; Liang, Guoming; Niu, Guanglin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Rong; Wang, Yanfang; Mu, Yulian; Tang, Zhonglin; Li, Kui

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a pivotal role in biological processes by affecting gene expression. However, how DNA methylation mediates phenotype difference of skeletal muscle between lean-, obese-, and mini-type pigs remains unclear. We systematically carried out comparative analysis of skeletal muscle by integrating analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation, mRNA, lncRNA and miRNA profiles in three different pig breeds (obese-type Tongcheng, lean-type Landrace, and mini-type Wuzhishan pigs). We found that the differentially methylated genes (DMGs) were significantly associated with lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and muscle development. Among the identified DMGs, 253 genes were related to body-size and obesity. A set of lncRNAs and mRNAs including UCP3, FHL1, ANK1, HDAC4, and HDAC5 exhibited inversely changed DNA methylation and expression level; these genes were associated with oxidation reduction, fatty acid metabolism and cell proliferation. Gene regulatory networks involved in phenotypic variation of skeletal muscle were related to lipid metabolism, cellular movement, skeletal muscle development, and the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. DNA methylation potentially influences the propensity for obesity and body size by affecting gene expression in skeletal muscle. Our findings provide an abundant information of epigenome and transcriptome that will be useful for animal breeding and biomedical research. PMID:28045116

  8. Type II guanine oxidation photoinduced by the antibacterial fluoroquinolone Rufloxacin in isolated DNA and in 2'-deoxyguanosine.

    PubMed

    Belvedere, Alessandra; Boscá, Francisco; Catalfo, Alfio; Cuquerella, Maria C; de Guidi, Guido; Miranda, Miguel A

    2002-09-01

    The role played by type I (radical) and type II (singlet oxygen) mechanisms in the Rufloxacin (RFX)-photoinduced production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA has been evaluated. This fluoroquinolone drug has been shown to be able to photoinduce increased levels of some DNA base oxidation products, such as 8-OH-dGuo, that are indicative of mutagenic and carcinogenic events, with probable implications in aging processes. The relative weight of the two photosensitization mechanisms was obtained via determination of two different photoproducts of 2'-deoxyguanosine (dGuo), which are diagnostic of the two different pathways, namely, (4R)- and (4S)-4,8-dihydro-4-hydroxy-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine and 2,2-diamino-4-[(2-deoxy-beta-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)amino]-2,5-dihydrooxazol-5-one. The observed predominance of type II reaction is in agreement with the fact that the triplet state of RFX is able to transfer with high efficiency its energy to molecular oxygen, giving rise to singlet oxygen. Photophysical measurements suggest that hydrated electrons produced by Rufloxacin photoionization react with dGuo, Thd, and DNA, whereas these biomolecules quench the RFX triplet state with low efficiency. Static quenching of Rufloxacin fluorescence indicates an interaction of this drug both with DNA and with dGuo. On the basis of these experimental data, Rufloxacin photosensitization of DNA is proposed to occur by a type II mechanism.

  9. Low template STR typing: effect of replicate number and consensus method on genotyping reliability and DNA database search results.

    PubMed

    Benschop, Corina C G; van der Beek, Cornelis P; Meiland, Hugo C; van Gorp, Ankie G M; Westen, Antoinette A; Sijen, Titia

    2011-08-01

    To analyze DNA samples with very low DNA concentrations, various methods have been developed that sensitize short tandem repeat (STR) typing. Sensitized DNA typing is accompanied by stochastic amplification effects, such as allele drop-outs and drop-ins. Therefore low template (LT) DNA profiles are interpreted with care. One can either try to infer the genotype by a consensus method that uses alleles confirmed in replicate analyses, or one can use a statistical model to evaluate the strength of the evidence in a direct comparison with a known DNA profile. In this study we focused on the first strategy and we show that the procedure by which the consensus profile is assembled will affect genotyping reliability. In order to gain insight in the roles of replicate number and requested level of reproducibility, we generated six independent amplifications of samples of known donors. The LT methods included both increased cycling and enhanced capillary electrophoresis (CE) injection [1]. Consensus profiles were assembled from two to six of the replications using four methods: composite (include all alleles), n-1 (include alleles detected in all but one replicate), n/2 (include alleles detected in at least half of the replicates) and 2× (include alleles detected twice). We compared the consensus DNA profiles with the DNA profile of the known donor, studied the stochastic amplification effects and examined the effect of the consensus procedure on DNA database search results. From all these analyses we conclude that the accuracy of LT DNA typing and the efficiency of database searching improve when the number of replicates is increased and the consensus method is n/2. The most functional number of replicates within this n/2 method is four (although a replicate number of three suffices for samples showing >25% of the alleles in standard STR typing). This approach was also the optimal strategy for the analysis of 2-person mixtures, although modified search strategies may be

  10. Simplified protocol for DNA extraction and amplification of 2 molecular markers to detect and type Giardia duodenalis.

    PubMed

    Uda-Shimoda, Carla Fernanda; Colli, Cristiane Maria; Pavanelli, Mariana Felgueira; Falavigna-Guilherme, Ana Lúcia; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of 3 kits: QIAmp® DNA stool mini kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany), PureLink PCR Purification®, and PureLink™ Genomic DNA® (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA, USA) for DNA extraction, and of 2 molecular markers (heat shock protein [HSP] and β-giardin genes) for detection and genotyping of Giardia duodenalis stool samples. The detection and typing limits of the markers were determined by the DNA concentration of trophozoites and cysts and were tested in 26 clinical samples. Of the 3 kits tested, the PureLink PCR Purification gave the best results when tested with clinical samples with low, intermediate, and high numbers of cysts. The DNA extracted from trophozoites and cysts was diluted successively in 1:2 ratios until it was no longer possible to observe the amplified product in polyacrylamide gel. Similarly, a suspension of cysts was diluted until no cysts were observed, and then the DNA was extracted. The amount of DNA of trophozoites and cysts for the typing of the parasite was smaller for the HSP marker than for β-giardin. Combined use of both markers allowed us to detect DNA of Giardia in parasitologically positive samples in a higher percentage (75%) than the results obtained for each marker and in 1 parasitologically negative sample, indicating that this combination increased the potential to accurately detect and genotype this parasite. We also concluded that the HSP marker has a higher limit of detection and typing than the β-giardin marker and that the DNA extraction method tested for G. duodenalis is simpler and more efficient than those that are currently in use and can be applied on a large scale.

  11. 2D and 3D Chromosome Painting in Malaria Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    George, Phillip; Sharma, Atashi; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of whole arm chromosome probes is a robust technique for mapping genomic regions of interest, detecting chromosomal rearrangements, and studying three-dimensional (3D) organization of chromosomes in the cell nucleus. The advent of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and whole genome amplification (WGA) allows obtaining large quantities of DNA from single cells. The increased sensitivity of WGA kits prompted us to develop chromosome paints and to use them for exploring chromosome organization and evolution in non-model organisms. Here, we present a simple method for isolating and amplifying the euchromatic segments of single polytene chromosome arms from ovarian nurse cells of the African malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. This procedure provides an efficient platform for obtaining chromosome paints, while reducing the overall risk of introducing foreign DNA to the sample. The use of WGA allows for several rounds of re-amplification, resulting in high quantities of DNA that can be utilized for multiple experiments, including 2D and 3D FISH. We demonstrated that the developed chromosome paints can be successfully used to establish the correspondence between euchromatic portions of polytene and mitotic chromosome arms in An. gambiae. Overall, the union of LCM and single-chromosome WGA provides an efficient tool for creating significant amounts of target DNA for future cytogenetic and genomic studies. PMID:24429496

  12. Cell-Type Specific Responses to DNA Replication Stress in Early C. elegans Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Holly; Williams, Ashley B.

    2016-01-01

    To better understand how the cellular response to DNA replication stress is regulated during embryonic development, we and others have established the early C. elegans embryo as a model system to study this important problem. As is the case in most eukaryotic cell types, the replication stress response is controlled by the ATR kinase in early worm embryos. In this report we use RNAi to systematically characterize ATR pathway components for roles in promoting cell cycle delay during a replication stress response, and we find that these genetic requirements vary, depending on the source of stress. We also examine how individual cell types within the embryo respond to replication stress, and we find that the strength of the response, as defined by duration of cell cycle delay, varies dramatically within blastomeres of the early embryo. Our studies shed light on how the replication stress response is managed in the context of embryonic development and show that this pathway is subject to developmental regulation. PMID:27727303

  13. 2D-2D tunneling field-effect transistors using WSe2/SnSe2 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tania; Tosun, Mahmut; Hettick, Mark; Ahn, Geun Ho; Hu, Chenming; Javey, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional materials present a versatile platform for developing steep transistors due to their uniform thickness and sharp band edges. We demonstrate 2D-2D tunneling in a WSe2/SnSe2 van der Waals vertical heterojunction device, where WSe2 is used as the gate controlled p-layer and SnSe2 is the degenerately n-type layer. The van der Waals gap facilitates the regulation of band alignment at the heterojunction, without the necessity of a tunneling barrier. ZrO2 is used as the gate dielectric, allowing the scaling of gate oxide to improve device subthreshold swing. Efficient gate control and clean interfaces yield a subthreshold swing of ˜100 mV/dec for >2 decades of drain current at room temperature, hitherto unobserved in 2D-2D tunneling devices. The subthreshold swing is independent of temperature, which is a clear signature of band-to-band tunneling at the heterojunction. A maximum switching ratio ION/IOFF of 107 is obtained. Negative differential resistance in the forward bias characteristics is observed at 77 K. This work bodes well for the possibilities of two-dimensional materials for the realization of energy-efficient future-generation electronics.

  14. Detection of possible restriction sites for type II restriction enzymes in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Gagniuc, P; Cimponeriu, D; Ionescu-Tîrgovişte, C; Mihai, Andrada; Stavarachi, Monica; Mihai, T; Gavrilă, L

    2011-01-01

    In order to make a step forward in the knowledge of the mechanism operating in complex polygenic disorders such as diabetes and obesity, this paper proposes a new algorithm (PRSD -possible restriction site detection) and its implementation in Applied Genetics software. This software can be used for in silico detection of potential (hidden) recognition sites for endonucleases and for nucleotide repeats identification. The recognition sites for endonucleases may result from hidden sequences through deletion or insertion of a specific number of nucleotides. Tests were conducted on DNA sequences downloaded from NCBI servers using specific recognition sites for common type II restriction enzymes introduced in the software database (n = 126). Each possible recognition site indicated by the PRSD algorithm implemented in Applied Genetics was checked and confirmed by NEBcutter V2.0 and Webcutter 2.0 software. In the sequence NG_008724.1 (which includes 63632 nucleotides) we found a high number of potential restriction sites for ECO R1 that may be produced by deletion (n = 43 sites) or insertion (n = 591 sites) of one nucleotide. The second module of Applied Genetics has been designed to find simple repeats sizes with a real future in understanding the role of SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) in the pathogenesis of the complex metabolic disorders. We have tested the presence of simple repetitive sequences in five DNA sequence. The software indicated exact position of each repeats detected in the tested sequences. Future development of Applied Genetics can provide an alternative for powerful tools used to search for restriction sites or repetitive sequences or to improve genotyping methods.

  15. An Ultra-High Discrimination Y Chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Multiplex DNA Typing System

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Erin K.; Ballantyne, Jack

    2007-01-01

    In forensic casework, Y chromosome short tandem repeat markers (Y-STRs) are often used to identify a male donor DNA profile in the presence of excess quantities of female DNA, such as is found in many sexual assault investigations. Commercially available Y-STR multiplexes incorporating 12–17 loci are currently used in forensic casework (Promega's PowerPlex® Y and Applied Biosystems' AmpFlSTR® Yfiler®). Despite the robustness of these commercial multiplex Y-STR systems and the ability to discriminate two male individuals in most cases, the coincidence match probabilities between unrelated males are modest compared with the standard set of autosomal STR markers. Hence there is still a need to develop new multiplex systems to supplement these for those cases where additional discriminatory power is desired or where there is a coincidental Y-STR match between potential male participants. Over 400 Y-STR loci have been identified on the Y chromosome. While these have the potential to increase the discrimination potential afforded by the commercially available kits, many have not been well characterized. In the present work, 91 loci were tested for their relative ability to increase the discrimination potential of the commonly used ‘core’ Y-STR loci. The result of this extensive evaluation was the development of an ultra high discrimination (UHD) multiplex DNA typing system that allows for the robust co-amplification of 14 non-core Y-STR loci. Population studies with a mixed African American and American Caucasian sample set (n = 572) indicated that the overall discriminatory potential of the UHD multiplex was superior to all commercial kits tested. The combined use of the UHD multiplex and the Applied Biosystems' AmpFlSTR® Yfiler® kit resulted in 100% discrimination of all individuals within the sample set, which presages its potential to maximally augment currently available forensic casework markers. It could also find applications in human evolutionary

  16. Concatemeric intermediates of equine herpesvirus type 1 DNA replication contain frequent inversions of adjacent long segments of the viral genome.

    PubMed

    Slobedman, B; Simmons, A

    1997-03-17

    In common with other alpha-herpesviruses, the genome of equine herpesvirus type-1 (EHV-1) comprises covalently linked long and short unique sequences of DNA, each flanked by inverted repeats. Equimolar amounts of two genomic isomers, generated by free inversion of the short segment, relative to the long segment, are packaged into EHV-1 virions. In contrast with herpes simplex virus (HSV), inversion of genomic long segments has not been described. In the current work, the structures of high molecular weight intermediates of EHV-1 DNA replication were studied by field inversion gel electrophoresis. It is shown that adjacent long segments of the viral genome are frequently inverted in concatemeric intermediates of EHV-1 DNA replication. Further, like HSV concatemers, high molecular weight intermediates of EHV-1 replication are flanked exclusively by the long segment of the viral genome. Hence, despite the fact that only two, rather than four, isomers of EHV-1 DNA are packaged into virions, the intermediates of EHV-1 DNA replication closely resemble those of herpes simplex virus type 1 in structure. These data have implications relating to the mechanisms involved in packaging of alpha-herpesvirus DNA.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the type IIL restriction enzyme MmeI in complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Scott J.; Morgan, Richard D.; Jain, Rinku; Townson, Sharon A.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Roberts, Richard J.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2012-05-29

    Type IIL restriction enzymes have rejuvenated the search for user-specified DNA binding and cutting. By aligning and contrasting the highly comparable amino-acid sequences yet diverse recognition specificities across the family of enzymes, amino acids involved in DNA binding have been identified and mutated to produce alternative binding specificities. To date, the specificity of MmeI (a type IIL restriction enzyme) has successfully been altered at positions 3, 4 and 6 of the asymmetric TCCRAC (where R is a purine) DNA-recognition sequence. To further understand the structural basis of MmeI DNA-binding specificity, the enzyme has been crystallized in complex with its DNA substrate. The crystal belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.73, b = 94.96, c = 161.24 {angstrom}, {alpha} = 72.79, {beta} = 89.12, {gamma} = 71.68{sup o}, and diffracted to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution when exposed to synchrotron radiation. The structure promises to reveal the basis of MmeI DNA-binding specificity and will complement efforts to create enzymes with novel specificities.

  18. Evaluation of a co-extraction method for real-time PCR-based body fluid identification and DNA typing.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ken; Iwashima, Yasuki; Akutsu, Tomoko; Sekiguchi, Kazumasa; Sakurada, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Body fluid identification and individual identification are an important series of tests in usual criminal investigations. Recent reports have demonstrated a new approach using DNA/RNA co-extraction methods in which RNA for body fluid identification and DNA for short tandem repeat (STR) typing are extracted simultaneously from the same sample. This study evaluated a standard co-extraction kit, the AllPrep® DNA/RNA Mini Kit, in order to demonstrate the availability of the co-extraction procedure for those real-time polymerase chain reaction-based body fluid identification methods that we have validated previously. We demonstrated that the use of the Allprep Kit, for which we adjusted the lysis temperature to 56°C to improve extraction efficiency, can simultaneously extract sufficient RNA and DNA for body fluid identification and STR analysis; however, a longer incubation at a high temperature slightly affected the ΔCt value of each target gene and appeared to be not as effective for DNA extraction from old stains as from 1-day-old stains. This method is promising for future forensic investigations because the use of this kit can reduce sample consumption for body fluid identification and DNA typing.

  19. Characterization of human lymphoid cell lines GM9947 and GM9948 as intra- and interlaboratory reference standards for DNA typing

    SciTech Connect

    Fregeau, C.J.; Elliott, J.C.; Fourney, R.M.

    1995-07-20

    The incorporation of reference DNA is crucial to the validation of any DNA typing protocol. Currently, reference DNA standards are restricted to molecular size DNA ladders and/or tumor cell line DNA. Either of these, however, presents some limitations. We have rigorously characterized two Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-immortalized human lymphoid cell lines-GM9947 (female) and GM9948 (male)-to determine their suitability as alternative in-line standards for three widely employed allele profiling strategies. Twenty-one highly polymorphic VNTR-based allelic systems (7 RFLPs, 2 AmpFLPs, and 12 STRs) distributed over 12 chromosomes were scrutinized along with 3 gender-based discriminatory systems. The genetic stability of each locus was confirmed over a period of 225 in vitro population doublings. Allele size estimates and degree of informativeness for each of the 21 VNTR systems were compiled. The reproducibility of allele scoring by traditional RFLP analyses, using both cell lines as reference standards, was also verified by an interlaboratory validation study involving 13 analysts from two geographically distinct forensic laboratories. Taken together, our data indicate that GM9947 and GM9948 genomic DNAs could be adopted as reliable reference standards for DNA typing. 82 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. A clinical correlation of anti-DNA-AGE autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes mellitus with disease duration.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Jalaluddin M; Arfat, Mir Yasir; Arif, Zarina; Ahmad, Jamal; Moinuddin; Alam, Khursheed

    2015-02-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of amino groups of DNA bases by reducing sugars can generate advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Cellular formation of AGEs under normal physiology is continuously scanned and removed by efficient system in the cells. However, excess formation and accumulation of AGEs may be cause or consequence of some human diseases. Mammalian DNA incubated with d-glucose for 28 days at 37°C showed structural changes in DNA as confirmed by UV, fluorescence, CD, melting temperature, S1 nuclease sensitivity and gel electrophoresis. Formation of DNA-AGE was confirmed by HPLC and LC-MS. Enzyme immunoassay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay of autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes patients' sera with disease duration of 5-15 years exhibited significantly high binding with DNA-AGE as compared to patients with 1-5 years of disease duration. Autoantibodies against aberrant DNA-AGE may be important in the assessment of initiation/progression of secondary complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  1. Effect of exogenous surfactants on viability and DNA synthesis in A549, immortalized mouse type II and isolated rat alveolar type II cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In mechanically ventilated preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), exogenous surfactant application has been demonstrated both to decrease DNA-synthesis but also and paradoxically to increase epithelial cell proliferation. However, the effect of exogenous surfactant has not been studied directly on alveolar type II cells (ATII cells), a key cell type responsible for alveolar function and repair. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two commercially available surfactant preparations on ATII cell viability and DNA synthesis. Methods Curosurf® and Alveofact® were applied to two ATII cell lines (human A549 and mouse iMATII cells) and to primary rat ATII cells for periods of up to 24 h. Cell viability was measured using the redox indicator resazurin and DNA synthesis was measured using BrdU incorporation. Results Curosurf® resulted in slightly decreased cell viability in all cell culture models. However, DNA synthesis was increased in A549 and rat ATII cells but decreased in iMATII cells. Alveofact® exhibited the opposite effects on A549 cells and had very mild effects on the other two cell models. Conclusion This study showed that commercially available exogenous surfactants used to treat preterm infants with RDS can have profound effects on cell viability and DNA synthesis. PMID:21324208

  2. CBP/p300 acetyltransferases regulate the expression of NKG2D ligands on tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, M; Schuldner, M; Hoffmann, N; Cetintas, A; Reiners, K S; Shatnyeva, O; Hallek, M; Hansen, H P; Gasser, S; von Strandmann, E P

    2017-01-01

    Tumor surveillance of natural killer (NK) cells is mediated by the cytotoxicity receptor natural-killer group 2 member D (NKG2D). Ligands for NKG2D are generally not expressed on healthy cells, but induced on the surface of malignant cells. To date, NKG2D ligand (NKG2D-L) induction was mainly described to depend on the activation of the DNA damage response, although the molecular mechanisms that regulate NKG2D-L expression remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the acetyltransferases CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 play a crucial role in the regulation of NKG2D-L on tumor cells. Loss of CBP/p300 decreased the basal cell surface expression of human ligands and reduced the upregulation of MICA/B and ULBP2 in response to histone deacetylase inhibitors or DNA damage. Furthermore, CBP/P300 deficiency abrogated the sensitivity of stressed cells to NK cell-mediated killing. CBP/p300 were also identified as major regulators of mouse NKG2D ligand RAE-1 in vitro and in vivo using the Eμ-Myc lymphoma model. Mechanistically, we observed an enhanced activation of the CBP/p300 binding transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) correlating to the NKG2D-L upregulation. Moreover, increased binding of CREB and CBP/p300 to NKG2D-L promoters and elevated histone acetylation were detectable. This study provides strong evidence for a major role of CBP and p300 in orchestrating NKG2D-L induction and consequently immunosurveillance of tumors in mice and humans. These findings might help to develop novel immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. PMID:27477692

  3. Wild-type p53 is not a negative regulator of simian virus 40 DNA replication in infected monkey cells.

    PubMed Central

    von der Weth, A; Deppert, W

    1993-01-01

    To analyze the proposed growth-inhibitory function of wild-type p53, we compared simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA replication in primary rhesus monkey kidney (PRK) cells, which express wild-type p53, and in the established rhesus monkey kidney cell line LLC-MK2, which expresses a mutated p53 that does not complex with large T antigen. SV40 DNA replication proceeded identically in both cell types during the course of infection. Endogenously expressed wild-type p53 thus does not negatively modulate SV40 DNA replication in vivo. We suggest that inhibition of SV40 DNA replication by wild-type p53 in in vitro replication assays is due to grossly elevated ratios of p53 to large T antigen, thus depleting the replication-competent free large T antigen in the assay mixtures by complex formation. In contrast, the ratio of p53 to large T antigen in in vivo replication is low, leaving the majority of large T antigen in a free, replication-competent state. Images PMID:8380470

  4. Mapping of Variable DNA Methylation Across Multiple Cell Types Defines a Dynamic Regulatory Landscape of the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junchen; Stevens, Michael; Xing, Xiaoyun; Li, Daofeng; Zhang, Bo; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Oltz, Eugene M.; Jarvis, James N.; Jiang, Kaiyu; Cicero, Theodore; Costello, Joseph F.; Wang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification involved in many biological processes and diseases. Many studies have mapped DNA methylation changes associated with embryogenesis, cell differentiation, and cancer at a genome-wide scale. Our understanding of genome-wide DNA methylation changes in a developmental or disease-related context has been steadily growing. However, the investigation of which CpGs are variably methylated in different normal cell or tissue types is still limited. Here, we present an in-depth analysis of 54 single-CpG-resolution DNA methylomes of normal human cell types by integrating high-throughput sequencing-based methylation data. We found that the ratio of methylated to unmethylated CpGs is relatively constant regardless of cell type. However, which CpGs made up the unmethylated complement was cell-type specific. We categorized the 26,000,000 human autosomal CpGs based on their methylation levels across multiple cell types to identify variably methylated CpGs and found that 22.6% exhibited variable DNA methylation. These variably methylated CpGs formed 660,000 variably methylated regions (VMRs), encompassing 11% of the genome. By integrating a multitude of genomic data, we found that VMRs enrich for histone modifications indicative of enhancers, suggesting their role as regulatory elements marking cell type specificity. VMRs enriched for transcription factor binding sites in a tissue-dependent manner. Importantly, they enriched for GWAS variants, suggesting that VMRs could potentially be implicated in disease and complex traits. Taken together, our results highlight the link between CpG methylation variation, genetic variation, and disease risk for many human cell types. PMID:26888867

  5. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J. Q.; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D.; Lewenza, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg2+ or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities. PMID:27271742

  6. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J Q; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D; Lewenza, Shawn; Dong, Tao G

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg(2+) or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities.

  7. Fabrication and electrical characterization of Al/DNA-CTMA/ p-type a-Si:H photodiode based on DNA-CTMA biomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siva Pratap Reddy, M.; Puneetha, Peddathimula; Lee, Young-Woong; Jeong, Seong-Hoon; Park, Chinho

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a deoxyribonucleic acid-cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (DNA-CTMA) biomaterial based p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon ( a-Si:H) photodiode (PD) is fabricated and its electrical characteristics are investigated. The Al/DNA-CTMA/ p-type a-Si:H PD parameters are studied using current-voltage ( I-V), capacitancevoltage-frequency ( C-V-f) and conductance-voltage-frequency ( G/ω-V-f) measurements. The barrier height and the ideality factor of the diode are found to be 0.78 eV and 1.9, respectively. The electrical and photoconductivity properties of the diode are analyzed by using dark I-V and transient photocurrent techniques. The C-V-f and G/ω-V-f measurements indicate that the capacitance and conductance of the diode depend on the voltage and frequency, respectively. The experimental results reveal that the decreases in capacitance and the increases in conductance with an increase in frequency can be explained on the basis of interface states ( N SS ). Series resistance ( R S ) measurements are performed on the diode and discussed here. The obtained electrical parameters confirm that the Al/DNA-CTMA/ p-type a-Si:H PD can be used as an optical sensor for the development of commercial applications that are environmentally benign. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of DNA methylation for head and neck cancer varies by sample type and number of markers tested

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xu; Guan, Chao; Jiang, Xuejun; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal methylation of certain cancer related genes strongly predicts a diagnosis of head and neck cancer (HNC), while the predictive power of methylation of other DNA markers for HNC remains unclear. To systemically assess the diagnostic value of DNA methylation patterns for HNC and the effect of methylation platform techniques and sample types, we performed a PubMed search for studies of the correlation between DNA methylation and HNC completed before July 2016, and extracted the sensitivity and specificity for methylated biomarkers. Across these studies, DNA methylation showed high sensitivity for diagnosing HNC in solid tissue (0.57), and high specificity in saliva (0.89). Area under the curve (AUC) from summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves revealed that DNA methylation had more diagnostic power in solid tissue (AUC = 0.82) than saliva (AUC = 0.80) or blood (AUC = 0.77). Combinations of multiple methylated genes were more sensitive diagnostic markers than single methylated genes. Our results suggest that the diagnostic accuracy of methylated biomarkers for HNC varied by sample type and were most accurate when results from multiple sample types were considered. PMID:27683120

  9. Missing Genes, Multiple ORFs, and C-to-U Type RNA Editing in Acrasis kona (Heterolobosea, Excavata) Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Cheng-Jie; Sheikh, Sanea; Miao, Wei; Andersson, Siv G.E.; Baldauf, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Discoba (Excavata) is an ancient group of eukaryotes with great morphological and ecological diversity. Unlike the other major divisions of Discoba (Jakobida and Euglenozoa), little is known about the mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) of Heterolobosea. We have assembled a complete mtDNA genome from the aggregating heterolobosean amoeba, Acrasis kona, which consists of a single circular highly AT-rich (83.3%) molecule of 51.5 kb. Unexpectedly, A. kona mtDNA is missing roughly 40% of the protein-coding genes and nearly half of the transfer RNAs found in the only other sequenced heterolobosean mtDNAs, those of Naegleria spp. Instead, over a quarter of A. kona mtDNA consists of novel open reading frames. Eleven of the 16 protein-coding genes missing from A. kona mtDNA were identified in its nuclear DNA and polyA RNA, and phylogenetic analyses indicate that at least 10 of these 11 putative nuclear-encoded mitochondrial (NcMt) proteins arose by direct transfer from the mitochondrion. Acrasis kona mtDNA also employs C-to-U type RNA editing, and 12 homologs of DYW-type pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins implicated in plant organellar RNA editing are found in A. kona nuclear DNA. A mapping of mitochondrial gene content onto a consensus phylogeny reveals a sporadic pattern of relative stasis and rampant gene loss in Discoba. Rampant loss occurred independently in the unique common lineage leading to Heterolobosea + Tsukubamonadida and later in the unique lineage leading to Acrasis. Meanwhile, mtDNA gene content appears to be remarkably stable in the Acrasis sister lineage leading to Naegleria and in their distant relatives Jakobida. PMID:25146648

  10. Missing genes, multiple ORFs, and C-to-U type RNA editing in Acrasis kona (Heterolobosea, Excavata) mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Fu, Cheng-Jie; Sheikh, Sanea; Miao, Wei; Andersson, Siv G E; Baldauf, Sandra L

    2014-08-21

    Discoba (Excavata) is an ancient group of eukaryotes with great morphological and ecological diversity. Unlike the other major divisions of Discoba (Jakobida and Euglenozoa), little is known about the mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) of Heterolobosea. We have assembled a complete mtDNA genome from the aggregating heterolobosean amoeba, Acrasis kona, which consists of a single circular highly AT-rich (83.3%) molecule of 51.5 kb. Unexpectedly, A. kona mtDNA is missing roughly 40% of the protein-coding genes and nearly half of the transfer RNAs found in the only other sequenced heterolobosean mtDNAs, those of Naegleria spp. Instead, over a quarter of A. kona mtDNA consists of novel open reading frames. Eleven of the 16 protein-coding genes missing from A. kona mtDNA were identified in its nuclear DNA and polyA RNA, and phylogenetic analyses indicate that at least 10 of these 11 putative nuclear-encoded mitochondrial (NcMt) proteins arose by direct transfer from the mitochondrion. Acrasis kona mtDNA also employs C-to-U type RNA editing, and 12 homologs of DYW-type pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins implicated in plant organellar RNA editing are found in A. kona nuclear DNA. A mapping of mitochondrial gene content onto a consensus phylogeny reveals a sporadic pattern of relative stasis and rampant gene loss in Discoba. Rampant loss occurred independently in the unique common lineage leading to Heterolobosea + Tsukubamonadida and later in the unique lineage leading to Acrasis. Meanwhile, mtDNA gene content appears to be remarkably stable in the Acrasis sister lineage leading to Naegleria and in their distant relatives Jakobida.

  11. RNA and DNA Targeting by a Reconstituted Thermus thermophilus Type III-A CRISPR-Cas System

    PubMed Central

    Iavarone, Anthony T.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) systems are RNA-guided adaptive immunity pathways used by bacteria and archaea to defend against phages and plasmids. Type III-A systems use a multisubunit interference complex called Csm, containing Cas proteins and a CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to target cognate nucleic acids. The Csm complex is intriguing in that it mediates RNA-guided targeting of both RNA and transcriptionally active DNA, but the mechanism is not well understood. Here, we overexpressed the five components of the Thermus thermophilus (T. thermophilus) Type III-A Csm complex (TthCsm) with a defined crRNA sequence, and purified intact TthCsm complexes from E. coli cells. The complexes were thermophilic, targeting complementary ssRNA more efficiently at 65°C than at 37°C. Sequence-independent, endonucleolytic cleavage of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by TthCsm was triggered by recognition of a complementary ssRNA, and required a lack of complementarity between the first 8 nucleotides (5′ tag) of the crRNA and the 3′ flanking region of the ssRNA. Mutation of the histidine-aspartate (HD) nuclease domain of the TthCsm subunit, Cas10/Csm1, abolished DNA cleavage. Activation of DNA cleavage was dependent on RNA binding but not cleavage. This leads to a model in which binding of an ssRNA target to the Csm complex would stimulate cleavage of exposed ssDNA in the cell, such as could occur when the RNA polymerase unwinds double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during transcription. Our findings establish an amenable, thermostable system for more in-depth investigation of the targeting mechanism using structural biology methods, such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography. PMID:28114398

  12. RNA and DNA Targeting by a Reconstituted Thermus thermophilus Type III-A CRISPR-Cas System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tina Y; Iavarone, Anthony T; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) systems are RNA-guided adaptive immunity pathways used by bacteria and archaea to defend against phages and plasmids. Type III-A systems use a multisubunit interference complex called Csm, containing Cas proteins and a CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to target cognate nucleic acids. The Csm complex is intriguing in that it mediates RNA-guided targeting of both RNA and transcriptionally active DNA, but the mechanism is not well understood. Here, we overexpressed the five components of the Thermus thermophilus (T. thermophilus) Type III-A Csm complex (TthCsm) with a defined crRNA sequence, and purified intact TthCsm complexes from E. coli cells. The complexes were thermophilic, targeting complementary ssRNA more efficiently at 65°C than at 37°C. Sequence-independent, endonucleolytic cleavage of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by TthCsm was triggered by recognition of a complementary ssRNA, and required a lack of complementarity between the first 8 nucleotides (5' tag) of the crRNA and the 3' flanking region of the ssRNA. Mutation of the histidine-aspartate (HD) nuclease domain of the TthCsm subunit, Cas10/Csm1, abolished DNA cleavage. Activation of DNA cleavage was dependent on RNA binding but not cleavage. This leads to a model in which binding of an ssRNA target to the Csm complex would stimulate cleavage of exposed ssDNA in the cell, such as could occur when the RNA polymerase unwinds double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during transcription. Our findings establish an amenable, thermostable system for more in-depth investigation of the targeting mechanism using structural biology methods, such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography.

  13. Compatible embedding for 2D shape animation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, William V; Barla, Pascal; Anjyo, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We present new algorithms for the compatible embedding of 2D shapes. Such embeddings offer a convenient way to interpolate shapes having complex, detailed features. Compared to existing techniques, our approach requires less user input, and is faster, more robust, and simpler to implement, making it ideal for interactive use in practical applications. Our new approach consists of three parts. First, our boundary matching algorithm locates salient features using the perceptually motivated principles of scale-space and uses these as automatic correspondences to guide an elastic curve matching algorithm. Second, we simplify boundaries while maintaining their parametric correspondence and the embedding of the original shapes. Finally, we extend the mapping to shapes' interiors via a new compatible triangulation algorithm. The combination of our algorithms allows us to demonstrate 2D shape interpolation with instant feedback. The proposed algorithms exhibit a combination of simplicity, speed, and accuracy that has not been achieved in previous work.

  14. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  15. Extrinsic Cation Selectivity of 2D Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    From a systematic study of the concentration driven diffusion of positive and negative ions across porous 2D membranes of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), we prove their cation selectivity. Using the current–voltage characteristics of graphene and h-BN monolayers separating reservoirs of different salt concentrations, we calculate the reversal potential as a measure of selectivity. We tune the Debye screening length by exchanging the salt concentrations and demonstrate that negative surface charge gives rise to cation selectivity. Surprisingly, h-BN and graphene membranes show similar characteristics, strongly suggesting a common origin of selectivity in aqueous solvents. For the first time, we demonstrate that the cation flux can be increased by using ozone to create additional pores in graphene while maintaining excellent selectivity. We discuss opportunities to exploit our scalable method to use 2D membranes for applications including osmotic power conversion. PMID:28157333

  16. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  17. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  18. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.

  19. Quasiparticle interference in unconventional 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-03-01

    At present, research of 2D systems mainly focuses on two kinds of materials: graphene-like materials and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Both of them host unconventional 2D electronic properties: pseudospin and the associated chirality of electrons in graphene-like materials, and spin-valley-coupled electronic structures in the TMDs. These exotic electronic properties have attracted tremendous interest for possible applications in nanodevices in the future. Investigation on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) in 2D systems is an effective way to uncover these properties. In this review, we will begin with a brief introduction to 2D systems, including their atomic structures and electronic bands. Then, we will discuss the formation of Friedel oscillation due to QPI in constant energy contours of electron bands, and show the basic concept of Fourier-transform scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (FT-STM/STS), which can resolve Friedel oscillation patterns in real space and consequently obtain the QPI patterns in reciprocal space. In the next two parts, we will summarize some pivotal results in the investigation of QPI in graphene and silicene, in which systems the low-energy quasiparticles are described by the massless Dirac equation. The FT-STM experiments show there are two different interference channels (intervalley and intravalley scattering) and backscattering suppression, which associate with the Dirac cones and the chirality of quasiparticles. The monolayer and bilayer graphene on different substrates (SiC and metal surfaces), and the monolayer and multilayer silicene on a Ag(1 1 1) surface will be addressed. The fifth part will introduce the FT-STM research on QPI in TMDs (monolayer and bilayer of WSe2), which allow us to infer the spin texture of both conduction and valence bands, and present spin-valley coupling by tracking allowed and forbidden scattering channels.

  20. 2D Metals by Repeated Size Reduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanwen; Tang, Hao; Fang, Minghao; Si, Wenjie; Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Zhaohui; Gu, Lin; Pan, Wei; Yao, Jie; Nan, Cewen; Wu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    A general and convenient strategy for manufacturing freestanding metal nanolayers is developed on large scale. By the simple process of repeatedly folding and calendering stacked metal sheets followed by chemical etching, free-standing 2D metal (e.g., Ag, Au, Fe, Cu, and Ni) nanosheets are obtained with thicknesses as small as 1 nm and with sizes of the order of several micrometers.

  1. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  2. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  3. Irreversibility-inversions in 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew; de Lillo, Filippo; Boffetta, Guido

    2016-11-01

    We consider a recent theoretical prediction that for inertial particles in 2D turbulence, the nature of the irreversibility of their pair dispersion inverts when the particle inertia exceeds a certain value. In particular, when the particle Stokes number, St , is below a certain value, the forward-in-time (FIT) dispersion should be faster than the backward-in-time (BIT) dispersion, but for St above this value, this should invert so that BIT becomes faster than FIT dispersion. This non-trivial behavior arises because of the competition between two physically distinct irreversibility mechanisms that operate in different regimes of St . In 3D turbulence, both mechanisms act to produce faster BIT than FIT dispersion, but in 2D, the two mechanisms have opposite effects because of the inverse energy cascade in the turbulent velocity field. We supplement the qualitative argument given by Bragg et al. by deriving quantitative predictions of this effect in the short-time dispersion limit. These predictions are then confirmed by results of inertial particle dispersion in a direct numerical simulation of 2D turbulence.

  4. Metoclopramide is metabolized by CYP2D6 and is a reversible inhibitor, but not inactivator, of CYP2D6.

    PubMed

    Livezey, Mara R; Briggs, Erran D; Bolles, Amanda K; Nagy, Leslie D; Fujiwara, Rina; Furge, Laura Lowe

    2014-04-01

    1. Metoclopramide is a widely used clinical drug in a variety of medical settings with rare acute dystonic events reported. The aim of this study was to assess a previous report of inactivation of CYP2D6 by metoclopramide, to determine the contribution of various CYPs to metoclopramide metabolism, and to identify the mono-oxygenated products of metoclopramide metabolism. 2. Metoclopramide interacted with CYP2D6 with Type I binding and a Ks value of 9.56 ± 1.09 µM. CYP2D6 was the major metabolizer of metoclopramide and the two major products were N-deethylation of the diethyl amine and N-hydroxylation on the phenyl ring amine. CYPs 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, and 3A4 also metabolized metoclopramide. 3. While reversible inhibition of CYP2D6 was noted, CYP2D6 inactivation by metoclopramide was not observed under conditions of varying concentration or varying time using Supersomes(TM) or pooled human liver microsomes. 4. The major metabolites of metoclopramide were N-hydroxylation and N-deethylation formed most efficiently by CYP2D6 but also formed by all CYPs examined. Also, while metoclopramide is metabolized primarily by CYP2D6, it is not a mechanism-based inactivator of CYP2D6 in vitro.

  5. Regulation of Neuronal Survival Factor MEF2D by Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; She, Hua; Gearing, Marla; Colla, Emanuela; Lee, Michael; Shacka, John J.; Mao, Zixu

    2009-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy controls the degradation of selective cytosolic proteins and may protect neurons against degeneration. In a neuronal cell line, we found that chaperone-mediated autophagy regulated the activity of myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), a transcription factor required for neuronal survival. MEF2D was observed to continuously shuttle to the cytoplasm, interact with the chaperone Hsc70, and undergo degradation. Inhibition of chaperone-mediated autophagy caused accumulation of inactive MEF2D in the cytoplasm. MEF2D levels were increased in the brains of α-synuclein transgenic mice and patients with Parkinson’s disease. Wild-type α-synuclein and a Parkinson’s disease–associated mutant disrupted the MEF2D-Hsc70 binding and led to neuronal death. Thus, chaperone-mediated autophagy modulates the neuronal survival machinery, and dysregulation of this pathway is associated with Parkinson’s disease. PMID:19119233

  6. Manipulation of NKG2D Ligands by Cytomegaloviruses: Impact on Innate and Adaptive Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Slavuljica, Irena; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan

    2011-01-01

    NKG2D is a potent activating receptor expressed on NK cells, NKT cells, γδ T cells, and CD8 T cells. NKG2D recognizes cell surface molecules structurally related to MHC class I proteins induced by infection or other type of cellular stress. The engagement of NKG2D leads to NK cell cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion or to a co-stimulation of CD8 T cells. Both human and mouse cytomegalovirus (CMV) have evolved numerous mechanisms to evade NKG2D-mediated immune response. This review describes the mechanisms used by CMV to inhibit NKG2D ligand expression and the recent advances in exploiting the NKG2D recognition pathway for mounting efficient and long-lasting immune response. PMID:22566874

  7. ITS1 sequence variabilities correlate with 18S rDNA sequence types in the genus Acanthamoeba (Protozoa: Amoebozoa).

    PubMed

    Köhsler, Martina; Leitner, Brigitte; Blaschitz, Marion; Michel, Rolf; Aspöck, Horst; Walochnik, Julia

    2006-01-01

    The subgenus classification of the ubiquitously spread and potentially pathogenic acanthamoebae still poses a great challenge. Fifteen 18S rDNA sequence types (T1-T15) have been established, but the vast majority of isolates fall into sequence type T4, and so far, there is no means to reliably differentiate within T4. In this study, the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1), a more variable region than the 18S rRNA gene, was sequenced, and the sequences of 15 different Acanthamoeba isolates were compared to reveal if ITS1 sequence variability correlates with 18S rDNA sequence typing and if the ITS1 sequencing allows a differentiation within T4. It was shown that the variability in ITS1 is tenfold higher than in the 18S rDNA, and that ITS1 clusters correlate with the 18S rDNA clusters and thus corroborate the Acanthamoeba sequence type system. Moreover, high sequence dissimilarities and distinctive microsatellite patterns could enable a more detailed differentiation within T4.

  8. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  9. Genomic analyses identify recurrent MEF2D fusions in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhaohui; Churchman, Michelle; Roberts, Kathryn; Li, Yongjin; Liu, Yu; Harvey, Richard C.; McCastlain, Kelly; Reshmi, Shalini C.; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Shao, Ying; Chen, I-Ming; Valentine, Marcus; Pei, Deqing; Mungall, Karen L.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Ma, Yussanne; Moore, Richard; Marra, Marco; Stonerock, Eileen; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Dai, Yunfeng; Wood, Brent; Borowitz, Michael; Larsen, Eric E.; Maloney, Kelly; Mattano Jr, Leonard A.; Angiolillo, Anne; Salzer, Wanda L.; Burke, Michael J.; Gianni, Francesca; Spinelli, Orietta; Radich, Jerald P.; Minden, Mark D.; Moorman, Anthony V.; Patel, Bella; Fielding, Adele K.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Luger, Selina M.; Bhatia, Ravi; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Forman, Stephen J.; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Stock, Wendy; Kornblau, Steven; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Konopleva, Marina; Paietta, Elisabeth; Willman, Cheryl L.; L. Loh, Mignon; P. Hunger, Stephen; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are initiating events in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Here using RNA sequencing of 560 ALL cases, we identify rearrangements between MEF2D (myocyte enhancer factor 2D) and five genes (BCL9, CSF1R, DAZAP1, HNRNPUL1 and SS18) in 22 B progenitor ALL (B-ALL) cases with a distinct gene expression profile, the most common of which is MEF2D-BCL9. Examination of an extended cohort of 1,164 B-ALL cases identified 30 cases with MEF2D rearrangements, which include an additional fusion partner, FOXJ2; thus, MEF2D-rearranged cases comprise 5.3% of cases lacking recurring alterations. MEF2D-rearranged ALL is characterized by a distinct immunophenotype, DNA copy number alterations at the rearrangement sites, older diagnosis age and poor outcome. The rearrangements result in enhanced MEF2D transcriptional activity, lymphoid transformation, activation of HDAC9 expression and sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment. Thus, MEF2D-rearranged ALL represents a distinct form of high-risk leukaemia, for which new therapeutic approaches should be considered. PMID:27824051

  10. Vaccine-Induced Immunity in Baboons by Using DNA and Replication-Incompetent Adenovirus Type 5 Vectors Expressing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gag Gene

    PubMed Central

    Casimiro, Danilo R.; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Ling; Fu, Tong-Ming; Evans, Robert K.; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Freed, Daniel C.; Hurni, William; Aste-Amezaga, Jose M.; Guan, Liming; Long, Romnie; Huang, Lingyi; Harris, Virginia; Nawrocki, Denise K.; Mach, Henryk; Troutman, Robert D.; Isopi, Lynne A.; Murthy, Krishna K.; Rice, Karen; Wilson, Keith A.; Volkin, David B.; Emini, Emilio A.; Shiver, John W.

    2003-01-01

    The cellular immunogenicity of formulated plasmid DNA and replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vaccine vectors expressing a codon-optimized human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene was examined in baboons. The Ad5 vaccine was capable of inducing consistently strong, long-lived CD8+-biased T-cell responses and in vitro cytotoxic activities. The DNA vaccine-elicited immune responses were weaker than those elicited by the Ad5 vaccine and highly variable; formulation with chemical adjuvants led to moderate increases in the levels of Gag-specific T cells. Increasing the DNA-primed responses with booster doses of either Ad5 or modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccines suggests a difference in the relative levels of cytotoxic and helper responses. The implications of these results are discussed. PMID:12805466

  11. T cells detect intracellular DNA but fail to induce type I IFN responses: implications for restriction of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Berg, Randi K; Rahbek, Stine H; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Holm, Christian K; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Jensen, David G; Hansen, Anne Louise; Jørgensen, Louise B; Ostergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Larsen, Carsten S; Paludan, Søren R; Jakobsen, Martin R; Mogensen, Trine H

    2014-01-01

    HIV infects key cell types of the immune system, most notably macrophages and CD4+ T cells. Whereas macrophages represent an important viral reservoir, activated CD4+ T cells are the most permissive cell types supporting high levels of viral replication. In recent years, it has been appreciated that the innate immune system plays an important role in controlling HIV replication, e.g. via interferon (IFN)-inducible restriction factors. Moreover, innate immune responses are involved in driving chronic immune activation and the pathogenesis of progressive immunodeficiency. Several pattern recognition receptors detecting HIV have been reported, including Toll-like receptor 7 and Retinoic-inducible gene-I, which detects viral RNA. Here we report that human primary T cells fail to induce strong IFN responses, despite the fact that this cell type does express key molecules involved in DNA signaling pathways. We demonstrate that the DNA sensor IFI16 migrates to sites of foreign DNA localization in the cytoplasm and recruits the signaling molecules stimulator of IFN genes and Tank-binding kinase, but this does not result in expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes. Importantly, we show that cytosolic DNA fails to affect HIV replication. However, exogenous treatment of activated T cells with type I IFN has the capacity to induce expression of IFN-stimulated genes and suppress HIV replication. Our data suggest the existence of an impaired DNA signaling machinery in T cells, which may prevent this cell type from activating cell-autonomous anti-HIV responses. This phenomenon could contribute to the high permissiveness of CD4+ T cells for HIV-1.

  12. Bipartite recognition of target RNAs activates DNA cleavage by the Type III-B CRISPR–Cas system

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Joshua R.; Sheppard, Nolan F.; Ramia, Nancy; Deighan, Trace; Li, Hong; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas systems eliminate nucleic acid invaders in bacteria and archaea. The effector complex of the Type III-B Cmr system cleaves invader RNAs recognized by the CRISPR RNA (crRNA ) of the complex. Here we show that invader RNAs also activate the Cmr complex to cleave DNA. As has been observed for other Type III systems, Cmr eliminates plasmid invaders in Pyrococcus furiosus by a mechanism that depends on transcription of the crRNA target sequence within the plasmid. Notably, we found that the target RNA per se induces DNA cleavage by the Cmr complex in vitro. DNA cleavage activity does not depend on cleavage of the target RNA but notably does require the presence of a short sequence adjacent to the target sequence within the activating target RNA (rPAM [RNA protospacer-adjacent motif]). The activated complex does not require a target sequence (or a PAM) in the DNA substrate. Plasmid elimination by the P. furiosus Cmr system also does not require the Csx1 (CRISPR-associated Rossman fold [CARF] superfamily) protein. Plasmid silencing depends on the HD nuclease and Palm domains of the Cmr2 (Cas10 superfamily) protein. The results establish the Cmr complex as a novel DNA nuclease activated by invader RNAs containing a crRNA target sequence and a rPAM. PMID:26848045

  13. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in relation to global LINE-1 DNA methylation in peripheral blood: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Martín-Núñez, Gracia María; Rubio-Martín, Elehazara; Cabrera-Mulero, Rebeca; Rojo-Martínez, Gemma; Olveira, Gabriel; Valdés, Sergio; Soriguer, Federico; Castaño, Luis; Morcillo, Sonsoles

    2014-10-01

    In the last years, epigenetic processes have emerged as a promising area of complex diseases research. DNA methylation measured in Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element 1 (LINE-1) sequences has been considered a surrogate marker for global genome methylation. New findings have suggested the potential involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as a crucial interface between the effects of genetic predisposition and environmental influences. Our study evaluated whether global DNA methylation predicted increased risk from T2DM or other carbohydrate metabolism disorders in a cohort study. We used a prospective cohort intervention study and a control group. We collected phenotypic, anthropometric, biochemical, and nutritional information from all subjects. Global LINE-1 DNA methylation was quantified by pyrosequencing technology. Subjects that did not improve their carbohydrate metabolism status showed lower levels of global LINE-1 DNA methylation (63.9 ± 1.7 vs. 64.7 ± 2.4) and they practiced less intense physical activity (5.8% vs. 21.5%). Logistic regression analyses showed a significant association between LINE-1 DNA methylation and metabolic status after adjustment for sex, age, BMI, and physical activity. Our study showed that lower LINE-1 DNA methylation levels were associated with a higher risk metabolic status worsening, independent of other classic risk factors. This finding highlights the potential role for epigenetic biomarkers as predictors of T2DM risk or other related metabolic disorders.

  14. Recombinant mouse cytomegalovirus expressing a ligand for the NKG2D receptor is attenuated and has improved vaccine properties

    PubMed Central

    Slavuljica, Irena; Busche, Andreas; Babić, Marina; Mitrović, Maja; Gašparović, Iva; Cekinović, Đurđica; Markova Car, Elitza; Pernjak Pugel, Ester; Ciković, Ana; Lisnić, Vanda Juranić; Britt, William J.; Koszinowski, Ulrich; Messerle, Martin; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan

    2010-01-01

    Human CMV (HCMV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in both congenitally infected and immunocompromised individuals. Development of an effective HCMV vaccine would help protect these vulnerable groups. NK group 2, member D (NKG2D) is a potent activating receptor expressed by cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Its importance in HCMV immune surveillance is indicated by the elaborative evasion mechanisms evolved by the virus to avoid NKG2D. In order to study this signaling pathway, we engineered a recombinant mouse CMV expressing the high-affinity NKG2D ligand RAE-1γ (RAE-1γMCMV). Expression of RAE-1γ by MCMV resulted in profound virus attenuation in vivo and lower latent viral DNA loads. RAE-1γMCMV infection was efficiently controlled by immunodeficient hosts, including mice lacking type I interferon receptors or immunosuppressed by sublethal γ-irradiation. Features of MCMV infection in neonates were also diminished. Despite tight innate immune control, RAE-1γMCMV infection elicited strong and long-lasting protective immunity. Maternal RAE-1γMCMV immunization protected neonatal mice from MCMV disease via placental transfer of antiviral Abs. Despite strong selective pressure, the RAE-1γ transgene did not exhibit sequence variation following infection. Together, our results indicate that use of a recombinant virus encoding the ligand for an activating NK cell receptor could be a powerful approach to developing a safe and immunogenic HCMV vaccine. PMID:21099111

  15. Ku antigen displays the AP lyase activity on a certain type of duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Kosova, Anastasiya A; Khodyreva, Svetlana N; Lavrik, Olga I

    2016-09-01

    In the search for proteins reactive to apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, it has been earlier found that proteins of human cell extracts formed the Schiff-base-dependent covalent adduct with an apparent molecular mass of 100kDa with a partial DNA duplex containing an AP site and 5'- and 3'-protruding ends (DDE-AP DNA). The adduct of such electrophoretic mobility was characteristic of only DDE-AP DNA (Ilina et al., Biochem. Biophys. Acta 1784 (2008) 1777-1785). The protein in this unusual adduct was identified as the Ku80 subunit of Ku antigen by peptide mass mapping based on MALDI-TOF MS data (Kosova et al., Biopolym. Cell 30 (2014) 42-46). Here we studied the interaction of Ku with DDE-AP DNA in details. Purified Ku (the Ku80 subunit) was shown to form the 100-kDa adduct highly specific for AP DNA with a certain length of protruding ends, base opposite the AP site and AP site location. Ku is capable of AP site cleavage in DDE-AP DNA unlike in analogous AP DNA with blunt ends. Ku cleaves AP sites via β-elimination and prefers apurinic sites over apyrimidinic ones. The AP site in DDE-DNA can be repaired in an apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-independent manner via the successive action of Ku (cleavage of the AP site), tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (removal of the 3'-deoxyribose residue), polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase (removal of the 3'-phosphate), DNA polymerase β (incorporation of dNMP), and DNA ligase (sealing the nick). These results provide a new insight into the role of Ku in the repair of AP sites.

  16. Safety and immunogenicity of a novel therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen for rheumatoid arthritis in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Juan, Long; Xiao, Zhao; Song, Yun; Zhijian, Zhang; Jing, Jin; Kun, Yu; Yuna, Hao; Dongfa, Dai; Lili, Ding; Liuxin, Tan; Fei, Liang; Nan, Liu; Fang, Yuan; Yuying, Sun; Yongzhi, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Current clinically available treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fail to cure the disease or unsatisfactorily halt disease progression. To overcome these limitations, the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines and boosters may offer new promising strategies. Because type II collagen (CII) as a critical autoantigen in RA and native chicken type II collagen (nCCII) has been used to effectively treat RA, we previously developed a novel therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding CCII (pcDNA-CCOL2A1) with efficacy comparable to that of the current "gold standard", methotrexate(MTX). Here, we systemically evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine in normal Wistar rats. Group 1 received only a single intramuscular injection into the hind leg with pcDNA-CCOL2A1 at the maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg on day 0; Group 2 was injected with normal saline (NS) as a negative control. All rats were monitored daily for any systemic adverse events, reactions at the injection site, and changes in body weights. Plasma and tissues from all experimental rats were collected on day 14 for routine examinations of hematology and biochemistry parameters, anti-CII IgG antibody reactivity, and histopathology. Our results indicated clearly that at the maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg, the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine was safe and well-tolerated. No abnormal clinical signs or deaths occurred in the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 group compared with the NS group. Furthermore, no major alterations were observed in hematology, biochemistry, and histopathology, even at the maximum dose. In particularly, no anti-CII IgG antibodies were detected in vaccinated normal rats at 14 d after vaccination; this was relevant because we previously demonstrated that the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine, when administered at the therapeutic dosage of 300 μg/kg alone, did not induce anti-CII IgG antibody production and significantly reduced levels of anti-CII IgG antibodies in the plasma of rats with established collagen-induced arthritis

  17. STR and mitochondrial DNA SNP typing of a bone marrow transplant recipient after death in a fire.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yasuhisa; Uchiyama, Daisuke; Kuroki, Kohji; Kishida, Tetsuko

    2012-11-01

    Personal identification of a house fire victim is described. About 5 years prior to death, the victim had been underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with a graft from an unrelated donor as treatment for acute myelogenous leukemia. Clinically, the victim had been in remission at the time of death. Typing of STRs and sequencing of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were performed using blood from the heart as well as several soft (psoas major muscle, uterine muscle and mucous membrane of the urinary bladder) and hard (costal cartilage and nail) tissues. STR genotypes and amelogenin from each of the tissue samples were successfully typed, and the parentage was identified. The blood STR types demonstrated no relationship with those from other tissues. None of the blood STR loci showed extra peaks arising from those of the recipient. Therefore, the blood stem cells were assumed to have been altered to those of the donor. The genotypes of mtDNA control regions were also examined. The electropherogram of hypervariable region II (nucleotide positions 29-408) obtained from the blood revealed a similar length heteroplasmy, suggesting microchimerism of the blood. Sequence analysis of mtDNA might be applicable as a more sensitive method for determination of chimerisms after BMT.

  18. An insight into the active site of a type I DNA topoisomerase from the kinetoplastid protozoan Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Das, Aditi; Mandal, Chhabinath; Dasgupta, Arindam; Sengupta, Tanushri; Majumder, Hemanta K.

    2002-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are ubiquitous enzymes that govern the topological interconversions of DNA thereby playing a key role in many aspects of nucleic acid metabolism. Recently determined crystal structures of topoisomerase fragments, representing nearly all the known subclasses, have been solved. The type IB enzymes are structurally distinct from other known topoisomerases but are similar to a class of enzymes referred to as tyrosine recombinases. A putative topoisomerase I open reading frame from the kinetoplastid Leishmania donovani was reported which shared a substantial degree of homology with type IB topoisomerases but having a variable C-terminus. Here we present a molecular model of the above parasite gene product, using the human topoisomerase I crystal structure in complex with a 22 bp oligonucleotide as a template. Our studies indicate that the overall structure of the parasite protein is similar to the human enzyme; however, major differences occur in the C-terminal loop, which harbors a serine in place of the usual catalytic tyrosine. Most other structural themes common to type IB topoisomerases, including secondary structural folds, hinged clamps that open and close to bind DNA, nucleophilic attack on the scissile DNA strand and formation of a ternary complex with the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin could be visualized in our homology model. The validity of serine acting as the nucleophile in the case of the parasite protein model was corroborated with our biochemical mapping of the active site with topoisomerase I enzyme purified from L.donovani promastigotes. PMID:11809893

  19. A sandwich-type DNA electrochemical biosensor for hairpin-stem-loop structure based on multistep temperature-controlling method

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Guolin; Liu, Yinhuan; Chen, Wei; Weng, Shaohuang; Liu, Qicai; Liu, Ailin; Zheng, Daoxin; Lin, Xinhua

    2012-01-01

    A highly sensitive and selective method for amplified electrochemical detection for hairpin-stem-loop structured target sequences was developed based on the temperature regulation of DNA hybrids on a sandwich-type electrochemical DNA sensor. Multistep hybridization was applied to promote the hybridization efficiency of each section of sandwich structure. The results showed that both multistep and temperature-controlling hybridization techniques were both especially made to fabricate the sensor for the tendency of internal hybridization of target gene sequences. This strategy provides significantly enhanced hybridization efficiency and sequence specificity of electrochemical detection. PMID:23028223

  20. Immunological inter-strain crossreactivity correlated to 18S rDNA sequence types in Acanthamoeba spp.

    PubMed

    Walochnik, J; Obwaller, A; Aspöck, H

    2001-02-01

    Various species of the genus Acanthamoeba have been described as potential pathogens; however, differentiation of acanthamoebae remains problematic. The genus has been divided into 12 18S rDNA sequence types, most keratitis causing strains exhibiting sequence type T4. We recently isolated a keratitis causing Acanthamoeba strain showing sequence type T6, but being morphologically identical to a T4 strain. The aim of our study was to find out, whether the 18S rDNA sequence based identification correlates to immunological differentiation. The protein and antigen profiles of the T6 isolate and three reference Acanthamoeba strains were investigated using two sera from Acanthamoeba keratitis patients and one serum from an asymptomatic individual. It was shown, that the T6 strain produces a distinctly different immunological pattern, while patterns within T4 were identical. Affinity purified antibodies were used to further explore immunological cross-reactivity between sequence types. Altogether, the results of our study support the Acanthamoeba 18S rDNA sequence type classification in the investigated strains.

  1. The Vaccine Adjuvant Chitosan Promotes Cellular Immunity via DNA Sensor cGAS-STING-Dependent Induction of Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jin, Lei; Mori, Andres; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Oleszycka, Ewa; Moran, Hannah B T; Mansouri, Samira; McEntee, Craig P; Lambe, Eimear; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter; Cunningham, Colm; Hertzog, Paul; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Bowie, Andrew G; Lavelle, Ed C

    2016-03-15

    The cationic polysaccharide chitosan is an attractive candidate adjuvant capable of driving potent cell-mediated immunity, but the mechanism by which it acts is not clear. We show that chitosan promotes dendritic cell maturation by inducing type I interferons (IFNs) and enhances antigen-specific T helper 1 (Th1) responses in a type I IFN receptor-dependent manner. The induction of type I IFNs, IFN-stimulated genes and dendritic cell maturation by chitosan required the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS and STING, implicating this pathway in dendritic cell activation. Additionally, this process was dependent on mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and the presence of cytoplasmic DNA. Chitosan-mediated enhancement of antigen specific Th1 and immunoglobulin G2c responses following vaccination was dependent on both cGAS and STING. These findings demonstrate that a cationic polymer can engage the STING-cGAS pathway to trigger innate and adaptive immune responses.

  2. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  3. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  4. Cell type specific DNA methylation in cord blood: A 450K-reference data set and cell count-based validation of estimated cell type composition.

    PubMed

    Gervin, Kristina; Page, Christian Magnus; Aass, Hans Christian D; Jansen, Michelle A; Fjeldstad, Heidi Elisabeth; Andreassen, Bettina Kulle; Duijts, Liesbeth; van Meurs, Joyce B; van Zelm, Menno C; Jaddoe, Vincent W; Nordeng, Hedvig; Knudsen, Gunn Peggy; Magnus, Per; Nystad, Wenche; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Felix, Janine F; Lyle, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Epigenome-wide association studies of prenatal exposure to different environmental factors are becoming increasingly common. These studies are usually performed in umbilical cord blood. Since blood comprises multiple cell types with specific DNA methylation patterns, confounding caused by cellular heterogeneity is a major concern. This can be adjusted for using reference data consisting of DNA methylation signatures in cell types isolated from blood. However, the most commonly used reference data set is based on blood samples from adult males and is not representative of the cell type composition in neonatal cord blood. The aim of this study was to generate a reference data set from cord blood to enable correct adjustment of the cell type composition in samples collected at birth. The purity of the isolated cell types was very high for all samples (>97.1%), and clustering analyses showed distinct grouping of the cell types according to hematopoietic lineage. We explored whether this cord blood and the adult peripheral blood reference data sets impact the estimation of cell type composition in cord blood samples from an independent birth cohort (MoBa, n = 1092). This revealed significant differences for all cell types. Importantly, comparison of the cell type estimates against matched cell counts both in the cord blood reference samples (n = 11) and in another independent birth cohort (Generation R, n = 195), demonstrated moderate to high correlation of the data. This is the first cord blood reference data set with a comprehensive examination of the downstream application of the data through validation of estimated cell types against matched cell counts.

  5. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA-induced malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasumoto, S.; Burkhardt, A.L.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    A biological function for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) DNA was demonstrated by transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. HPV 16 DNA has been found frequently in genital cancer and has been classified as a papillomavirus on the basis of DNA homology. A recombinant HPV 16 DNA (pSHPV16d), which contains a head-to-tail dimer of the full-length HPV 16 genome, induced morphologic transformation; the transformed cells were tumorigenic in nude mice. Expression of transforming activity was unique because of the long latency period (more than 4 weeks) required for induction of morphologic transformation and because the transfected DNA existed primarily in a multimeric form with some rearrangement. Furthermore, virus-specific RNAs were expressed in the transformants. The transformation of NIH 3T3 cells provides a model for analyzing the functions of HPV 16, which is associated with cervical carcinomas.

  6. Parallel-pipeline 2-D DCT/IDCT processor chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, G. A.; Michell, J. A.; Buron, A.

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes the architecture of an 8x8 2-D DCT/IDCT processor with high throughput and a cost-effective architecture. The 2D DCT/IDCT is calculated using the separability property, so that its architecture is made up of two 1-D processors and a transpose buffer (TB) as intermediate memory. This transpose buffer presents a regular structure based on D-type flip-flops with a double serial input/output data-flow very adequate for pipeline architectures. The processor has been designed with parallel and pipeline architecture to attain high throughput, reduced hardware and maximum efficiency in all arithmetic elements. This architecture allows that the processing elements and arithmetic units work in parallel at half the frequency of the data input rate, except for normalization of transform which it is done in a multiplier operating at maximum frequency. Moreover, it has been verified that the precision analysis of the proposed processor meets the demands of IEEE Std. 1180-1990 used in video codecs ITU-T H.261 and ITU-T H.263. This processor has been conceived using a standard cell design methodology and manufactured in a 0.35-μm CMOS CSD 3M/2P 3.3V process. It has an area of 6.25 mm2 (the core is 3mm2) and contains a total of 11.7k gates, of which 5.8k gates are flip-flops. A data input rate frequency of 300MHz has been established with a latency of 172 cycles for the 2-D DCT and 178 cycles for the 2-D IDCT. The computing time of a block is close to 580ns. Its performances in computing speed as well as hardware complexity indicate that the proposed design is suitable for HDTV applications.

  7. Two novel Krebs-type polyoxoanions [Cu I2(WO 2) 2(β-XW 9O 33) 2] 12- (X = Sb III, Bi III) resulting in 2D layer structures linked by copper(I) ions and copper(II) complex groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Shuxia; Feng, Dan; Zhang, Chundan; Sun, Ping; Ma, Fengji

    2009-11-01

    Two sandwich-type organic-inorganic hybrid polyoxotungstates [enH 2] 5[Cu II(en) 2][Cu I2(WO 2) 2(β-SbW 9O 33) 2]·16H 2O ( 1) and [enH 2] 5[Cu II(en) 2][Cu I2(WO 2) 2(β-BiW 9O 33) 2]·22H 2O ( 2) (en = ethylenediamine) have been synthesized hydrothermally and structurally characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, thermal stability analyses, X-ray powder diffraction, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The polyoxoanions in 1 and 2 are composed of two trivacant (B-β-XW 9O 33) 9- (X = Sb III ( 1), Bi III ( 2)) subunits joined together by two Cu(I) ions and two W(VI) ions resulting in two novel Krebs-type sandwich structures. These polyoxoanions are further connected by Cu(I) ions and [Cu II(en) 2] 2+ coordination cations, and afford the first copper(I)-linked 2D layer structure constructed from Krebs-type polyoxotungstates. Additionally, the electrochemical behavior and electrocatalysis of 1 and 2 modified carbon paste electrodes (CPEs) have been studied. The results indicate that they have good electrocatalytic activities toward the reduction of nitrite.

  8. Probabilistic Cellular Automata for Low-Temperature 2-d Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procacci, Aldo; Scoppola, Benedetto; Scoppola, Elisabetta

    2016-12-01

    We construct a parallel stochastic dynamics with invariant measure converging to the Gibbs measure of the 2-d low-temperature Ising model. The proof of such convergence requires a polymer expansion based on suitably defined Peierls-type contours.

  9. Effects of 22 CYP2D6 Genetic Variations Newly Identified in Chinese Population on Olanzapine Metabolism in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong-Yu; Gu, Er-Min; Chen, Qiu-Lei; Zhan, Yun-Yun; Wang, Shuang-Hu; Liang, Bing-Qing; Dai, Da-Peng; Cai, Jian-Ping; Hu, Guo-Xin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the catalytic activity of 22 novel CYP2D6 allelic variants (2D6*87-*98, R25Q, F164L, E215K, F219S, V327M, D336N, V342M, R344Q, R440C and R497C) to olanzapine in vitro. Their protein products expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda 21 (Sf21) insect cells were incubated with olanzapine 100-2,000 μmol/l for 30 min. The kinetic parameters of Km, Vmax and intrinsic clearance were determined by 2-hydroxymethylolanzapine, the metabolite of olanzapine mediated by CYP2D6, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that the kinetic parameters of 2 alleles, CYP2D6*92 and 2D6*96, could not be detected; 17 allelic variants, CYP2D6*87-*88, 2D6*90-*91, 2D6*93-*95, 2D6*97, R25Q, F164L, E215K, F219S, V327M, V342M, R344Q, R440C and R497C, significantly reduced the intrinsic clearance of olanzapine; 2 variants, CYP2D6*89 and 2D6*98, increased the intrinsic clearance of olanzapine; no difference was found in intrinsic clearance of D336N. Furthermore, 6 alleles, CYP2D6*87, 2D6*88, 2D6*91, 2D6*93, 2D6*97 and R497C, exhibited higher Km values in a range of 120.80-217.56% relative to wild-type CYP2D6*1. The research demonstrated the metabolic phenotype of the 22 novel CYP2D6 variants for olanzapine that were different from probe drugs we used previously and might provide beneficial information to the personalized medicine of olanzapine.

  10. Remarks on thermalization in 2D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Engelhardt, Dalit

    2016-12-01

    We revisit certain aspects of thermalization in 2D conformal field theory (CFT). In particular, we consider similarities and differences between the time dependence of correlation functions in various states in rational and non-rational CFTs. We also consider the distinction between global and local thermalization and explain how states obtained by acting with a diffeomorphism on the ground state can appear locally thermal, and we review why the time-dependent expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor is generally a poor diagnostic of global thermalization. Since all 2D CFTs have an infinite set of commuting conserved charges, generic initial states might be expected to give rise to a generalized Gibbs ensemble rather than a pure thermal ensemble at late times. We construct the holographic dual of the generalized Gibbs ensemble and show that, to leading order, it is still described by a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole. The extra conserved charges, while rendering c <1 theories essentially integrable, therefore seem to have little effect on large-c conformal field theories.

  11. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  12. A selective role of NKG2D in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Nadia; Pestal, Kathleen; Juarez, Tiffany; Beck, Jennifer; Tkach, Karen; Wang, Lin; Raulet, David H

    2013-12-01

    The NKG2D activating receptor has been implicated in numerous autoimmune diseases. We tested the role of NKG2D in models of autoimmunity and inflammation using NKG2D knockout mice and antibody blockade experiments. The severity of experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) was decreased in NKG2D-deficient mice when the disease was induced with a limiting antigen dose, but unchanged with an optimal antigen dose. Surprisingly, however, NKG2D deficiency had no detectable effect in several other models, including two models of type 1 diabetes, and a model of intestinal inflammation induced by poly(I:C). NKG2D antibody blockade in normal mice also failed to inhibit disease in the NOD diabetes model or the intestinal inflammation model. Published evidence using NKG2D knockout mice demonstrated a role for NKG2D in mouse models of atherosclerosis and liver inflammation, as well as in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Therefore, our results suggest that NKG2D plays selective roles in inflammatory diseases.

  13. Impact of HIV type 1 DNA levels on spontaneous disease progression: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsiara, Chrissa G; Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Bagos, Pantelis G; Goujard, Cecile; Katzenstein, Terese L; Minga, Albert K; Rouzioux, Christine; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2012-04-01

    Several studies have reported the prognostic strength of HIV-1 DNA with variable results however. The aims of the current study were to estimate more accurately the ability of HIV-1 DNA to predict progression of HIV-1 disease toward acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death, and to compare the prognostic information obtained by HIV-1 DNA with that derived from plasma HIV-1 RNA. Eligible articles were identified through a comprehensive search of Medline, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. The analysis included univariate and bivariate random-effects models. The univariate meta-analysis of six studies involving 1074 participants showed that HIV-1 DNA was a strong predictive marker of AIDS [relative risk (RR): 3.01, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.88-4.82] and of all-cause mortality (RR: 3.49, 95% CI: 2.06-5.89). The bivariate model using the crude estimates of primary studies indicated that HIV-1 DNA was a significantly better predictor than HIV-1 RNA of either AIDS alone (ratio of RRs=1.47, 95% CI: 1.05-2.07) or of combined (AIDS or death) progression outcomes (ratio of RRs=1.51, 95% CI: 1.11-2.05). HIV-1 DNA is a strong predictor of HIV-1 disease progression. Moreover, there is some evidence that HIV-1 DNA might have better predictive value than plasma HIV-1 RNA.

  14. Quantitative keratinocyte assay detects two biological activities of human papillomavirus DNA and identifies viral types associated with cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, R; Phelps, W C; Zhang, Y L; Barbosa, M

    1988-01-01

    Keratinocytes electroporated with human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA (HPV-6, 11, 16 and 18) exhibited an increased cellular proliferation which was quantitated as microcolony and macrocolony formation. However, only macrocolonies induced by HPV-16 or HPV-18 DNA (the two viral types most commonly found in human cervical carcinomas) gave rise to proliferating, poorly-stratified colonies when grown in the presence of serum and calcium. Hydrocortisone increased the frequency of these differentiation-resistant colonies, and studies showed that they were immortalized, contained one copy of viral DNA per cell, expressed three discrete species of viral RNA and synthesized the viral E7 protein. HPV-induced cellular proliferation and altered differentiation are therefore separable events and may represent the activity of different viral genes. Images PMID:2460337

  15. Impact of DNA typing on standards and practice in the forensic community.

    PubMed

    Reeder, D J

    1999-11-01

    This article reviews the history of DNA-based human identification from its inception in 1985. Since the development of the technology, experts called for setting of standards and use of proficiency tests for quality assurance measures. The response of the National Institute of Standards and Technology to DNA forensic standards needs was catalyzed by the Technical Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods, sponsored by the Federal Bureau of Investigation with funding provided by the National Institute of Justice. Standard reference materials were developed for the original technologies used in DNA identification and for the newer polymerase chain reaction-based technologies. Adoption of recommended standards developed through the Federal Bureau of Investigation-commissioned DNA Advisory Board show the acceptance of National Institute of Standards and Technology standards for calibration of laboratory protocols. New technologies will require a process of validation and continued testing through the use of proficiency tests, such as those provided through the College of American Pathologists. Robotics and parallel processing of samples will lead to increased efficiency in DNA testing. The use of DNA data banks of convicted felons will increase dramatically with the the Federal Bureau of Investigation's national implementation of a computerized identification system known as the Combined DNA Index System. This system that will make major use of short, tandem, repeat genetic systems and will be the major driver of technology for the next 5 to 10 years. Finally, sample collection and training are of major concern for those who look at the long-term impact of DNA testing in forensic laboratories.

  16. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  17. Comparative typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by random amplification of polymorphic DNA or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of DNA macrorestriction fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Renders, N; Römling, Y; Verbrugh, H; van Belkum, A

    1996-01-01

    Eighty-seven strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were typed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of macrorestriction fragments. Stains were clustered on the basis of interpretative criteria as presented previously for the PFGE analysis. Clusters of strains were also defined on the basis of epidemiological data and subsequently reanalyzed by RAPD. It was found that in an RAPD assay employing the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence ERIC2 as a primer, single band differences can be ignored; in this case, clonally related strains could be grouped as effectively and reliably as with PFGE. These data could be corroborated by the use of other primer species. However, some primers either showed reduced resolution or, in contrast, identified DNA polymorphisms beyond epidemiologically and PFGE-defined limits. Apparently, different primers define different windows of genetic variation. It is suggested that criteria for interpretation of the ERIC2 PCR fingerprints can be simple and straightforward: when single band differences are ignored, RAPD-determined grouping of P. aeruginosa is congruent with that obtained by PFGE. Consequently, this implies that RAPD can be used with trust as a first screen in epidemiological characterization of P. aeruginosa. The ability to measure the rate of molecular evolution of the P. aeruginosa genome clearly depends on the choice of restriction enzyme or primer when RAPD or PFGE, respectively, is applied for the detection of DNA polymorphisms. PMID:8940470

  18. A novel approach for HLA-A typing in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded-derived DNA.

    PubMed

    Villabona, Lisa; Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Andersson, Emilia K; Seliger, Barbara; Dalianis, Tina; Masucci, Giuseppe V

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a novel approach for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded-derived DNA. HLAs can be a prognostic factor in cancer and have an extensive polymorphism. This polymorphism is predominantly restricted to exons, which encode the peptide-binding domain of the protein. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material is routinely collected in the clinic and therefore a great source of DNA for genetic analyses. However, its low quality due to fragmentation and nucleotide changes has often created obstacles in designing genetic assays. In this study, we amplified the most polymorphic exons of the HLA-A gene, exons 2, 3, and 4, in 16 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples >10 years old. These tissue samples belonged to patients already HLA-typed by peripheral blood samples at the routine laboratory. Acquired amplification products were used for sequencing, which provided enough information to establish an HLA allele. The same method was applied to DNA extracted from peripheral blood from a healthy volunteer with known HLA type. Of the samples, 14/16 (88%) were successfully typed, in one sample only one of the alleles could be determined, and in one sample no allele could be determined. The amplification of the most polymorphic exons of HLA-A was a successful alternative when DNA quality prevented positive results with previously described methods. The method is usable when an HLA type is needed but the patients are deceased and/or no whole blood samples can be collected. It has thus potential to be used in several fields such as the clinic, research, and forensic science.

  19. Blood-based profiles of DNA methylation predict the underlying distribution of cell types: a validation analysis.

    PubMed

    Koestler, Devin C; Christensen, Brock; Karagas, Margaret R; Marsit, Carmen J; Langevin, Scott M; Kelsey, Karl T; Wiencke, John K; Houseman, E Andres

    2013-08-01

    The potential influence of underlying differences in relative leukocyte distributions in studies involving blood-based profiling of DNA methylation is well recognized and has prompted development of a set of statistical methods for inferring changes in the distribution of white blood cells using DNA methylation signatures. However, the extent to which this methodology can accurately predict cell-type proportions based on blood-derived DNA methylation data in a large-scale epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) has yet to be examined. We used publicly available data deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database (accession number GSE37008), which consisted of both blood-derived epigenome-wide DNA methylation data assayed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadArray and complete blood cell (CBC) counts among a community cohort of 94 non-diseased individuals. Constrained projection (CP) was used to obtain predictions of the proportions of lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes for each of the study samples based on their DNA methylation signatures. Our findings demonstrated high consistency between the average CBC-derived and predicted percentage of monocytes and lymphocytes (17.9% and 17.6% for monocytes and 82.1% and 81.4% for lymphocytes), with root mean squared error (rMSE) of 5% and 6%, for monocytes and lymphocytes, respectively. Similarly, there was moderate-high correlation between the CP-predicted and CBC-derived percentages of monocytes and lymphocytes (0.60 and 0.61, respectively), and these results were robust to the number of leukocyte differentially methylated regions (L-DMRs) used for CP prediction. These results serve as further validation of the CP approach and highlight the promise of this technique for EWAS where DNA methylation is profiled using whole-blood genomic DNA.

  20. Prolonged ethanol administration depletes mitochondrial DNA in MnSOD-overexpressing transgenic mice, but not in their wild type littermates

    SciTech Connect

    Larosche, Isabelle; Choumar, Amal; Fromenty, Bernard; Letteron, Philippe; Abbey-Toby, Adje; Van Remmen, Holly; Epstein, Charles J.; Richardson, Arlan; Feldmann, Gerard; Pessayre, Dominique; Mansouri, Abdellah

    2009-02-01

    Alcohol consumption increases reactive oxygen species formation and lipid peroxidation, whose products can damage mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and alter mitochondrial function. A possible role of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) on these effects has not been investigated. To test whether MnSOD overexpression modulates alcohol-induced mitochondrial alterations, we added ethanol to the drinking water of transgenic MnSOD-overexpressing (TgMnSOD) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates for 7 weeks. In TgMnSOD mice, alcohol administration further increased the activity of MnSOD, but decreased cytosolic glutathione as well as cytosolic glutathione peroxidase activity and peroxisomal catalase activity. Whereas ethanol increased cytochrome P-450 2E1 and mitochondrial ROS generation in both WT and TgMnSOD mice, hepatic iron, lipid peroxidation products and respiratory complex I protein carbonyls were only increased in ethanol-treated TgMnSOD mice but not in WT mice. In ethanol-fed TgMnSOD mice, but not ethanol-fed WT mice, mtDNA was depleted, and mtDNA lesions blocked the progress of polymerases. The iron chelator, DFO prevented hepatic iron accumulation, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation and mtDNA depletion in alcohol-treated TgMnSOD mice. Alcohol markedly decreased the activities of complexes I, IV and V of the respiratory chain in TgMnSOD, with absent or lesser effects in WT mice. There was no inflammation, apoptosis or necrosis, and steatosis was similar in ethanol-treated WT and TgMnSOD mice. In conclusion, prolonged alcohol administration selectively triggers iron accumulation, lipid peroxidation, respiratory complex I protein carbonylation, mtDNA lesions blocking the progress of polymerases, mtDNA depletion and respiratory complex dysfunction in TgMnSOD mice but not in WT mice.

  1. Two dimensional molecular electronics spectroscopy for molecular fingerprinting, DNA sequencing, and cancerous DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Arunkumar Chitteth; Rezapour, Mohammad Reza; Yun, Jeonghun; Cho, Yeonchoo; Cho, Woo Jong; Min, Seung Kyu; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-02-25

    Laser-driven molecular spectroscopy of low spatial resolution is widely used, while electronic current-driven molecular spectroscopy of atomic scale resolution has been limited because currents provide only minimal information. However, electron transmission of a graphene nanoribbon on which a molecule is adsorbed shows molecular fingerprints of Fano resonances, i.e., characteristic features of frontier orbitals and conformations of physisorbed molecules. Utilizing these resonance profiles, here we demonstrate two-dimensional molecular electronics spectroscopy (2D MES). The differential conductance with respect to bias and gate voltages not only distinguishes different types of nucleobases for DNA sequencing but also recognizes methylated nucleobases which could be related to cancerous cell growth. This 2D MES could open an exciting field to recognize single molecule signatures at atomic resolution. The advantages of the 2D MES over the one-dimensional (1D) current analysis can be comparable to those of 2D NMR over 1D NMR analysis.

  2. Polymerase chain reaction-free variable-number tandem repeat typing using gold nanoparticle-DNA monoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Young; Kim, Yong Tae; Seo, Tae Seok

    2013-03-26

    In this work, we report a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-free variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing method using a T-shaped gold nanoparticle-DNA monoconjugate, called the "watching-gene assay". The T-shaped DNA probe was synthesized by "click" chemistry and linked with the gold nanoparticle to form the gold nanoparticle-DNA monoconjugate (a VNTR probe). Through a simple annealing and ligation reaction of the VNTR probe on a synthetic DNA template mimicking the human D1S80 VNTR locus, the number of tandem repeat units could be deciphered by counting the self-assembled gold nanoparticles. The number of tandem repeat units could be identified with more than 50% yield if the repeat number was less than four. In the case of the real human genomic DNA, the 18 repeat unit number could be successfully revealed by observing the 18-gold-nanoparticle cluster, which exactly corresponded to the number of tandem repeats of the real sample. Our "watching-gene assay" is rapid, simple, and direct for data interpretation, thereby providing an advanced PCR-free genetic polymorphism analysis platform.

  3. In vitro functional assessment of 22 newly identified CYP2D6 allelic variants in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Dai, Da-Peng; Geng, Pei-Wu; Wang, Shuang-Hu; Cai, Jie; Hu, Li-Ming; Nie, Jing-Jing; Hu, Ji-Hong; Hu, Guo-Xin; Cai, Jian-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is one of the most widely investigated CYPs related to genetic polymorphisms and is responsible for one-quarter of the currently used clinical drugs. We previously detected 22 novel, non-synonymous, mutated sites in the Chinese population, but nothing is known about the functional effects of these mutations in terms of specific CYP2D6 substrates. In this study, wild-type CYP2D6, two common allelic variants and 22 newly reported CYP2D6 isoforms were transiently expressed in 293FT cells, and the enzymatic activities of these variants were systematically assessed using dextromethorphan and bufuralol as the probing substrates. Consequently, 19 and 21 allelic variants were found to exhibit significantly decreased enzymatic activities for dextromethorphan and bufuralol, respectively. Of 22 novel CYP2D6 variants, six allelic isoforms (CYP2D6.89, CYP2D6.92, CYP2D6.93, CYP2D6.96, E215K and R440C) exhibited absent or extremely reduced metabolic activities compared with those observed for the wild-type enzyme. Our in vitro functional data can be useful for CYP2D6 phenotype prediction and provide valuable information for the study of clinical impact of these newly found CYP2D6 variants in China.

  4. Knowledge-based image processing for on-off type DNA microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong D.; Kim, Seo K.; Cho, Jeong S.; Kim, Jongwon

    2002-06-01

    This paper addresses the image processing technique for discriminating whether the probes are hybrized with target DNA in the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) DNA Chip designed for genotyping HPV. In addition to the probes, the HPV DNA chip has markers that always react with the sample DNA. The positions of probe-dots in the final scanned image are fixed relative to the marker-dot locations with a small variation according to the accuracy of the dotter and the scanner. The probes are duplicated 4 times for the diagnostic stability. The prior knowledges such as the maker relative distance and the duplication information of probes is integrated into the template matching technique with the normalized correlation measure. Results show that the employment of both of the prior knowledges is to simply average the template matching measures over the positions of the markers and probes. The eventual proposed scheme yields stable marker locating and probe classification.

  5. The Cytosolic Sensor cGAS Detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA to Induce Type I Interferons and Activate Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robert O; Bell, Samantha L; MacDuff, Donna A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Diner, Elie J; Olivas, Joanna; Vance, Russell E; Stallings, Christina L; Virgin, Herbert W; Cox, Jeffery S

    2015-06-10

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are critical mediators of antiviral defense, but their elicitation by bacterial pathogens can be detrimental to hosts. Many intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, induce type I IFNs following phagosomal membrane perturbations. Cytosolic M. tuberculosis DNA has been implicated as a trigger for IFN production, but the mechanisms remain obscure. We report that the cytosolic DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), is required for activating IFN production via the STING/TBK1/IRF3 pathway during M. tuberculosis and L. pneumophila infection of macrophages, whereas L. monocytogenes short-circuits this pathway by producing the STING agonist, c-di-AMP. Upon sensing cytosolic DNA, cGAS also activates cell-intrinsic antibacterial defenses, promoting autophagic targeting of M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we show that cGAS binds M. tuberculosis DNA during infection, providing direct evidence that this unique host-pathogen interaction occurs in vivo. These data uncover a mechanism by which IFN is likely elicited during active human infections.

  6. Activation of DNA strand exchange by cationic comb-type copolymers: effect of cationic moieties of the copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Won; Kano, Arihiro; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    We have previously reported that poly(l-lysine)-graft-dextran cationic comb-type copolymers accelerate strand exchange reaction between duplex DNA and its complementary single strand by >4 orders of magnitude, while stabilizing duplex. However, the stabilization of the duplex is considered principally unfavourable for the accelerating activity since the strand exchange reaction requires, at least, partial melting of the initial duplex. Here we report the effects of different cationic moieties of cationic comb-type copolymers on the accelerating activity. The copolymer having guanidino groups exhibited markedly higher accelerating effect on strand exchange reactions than that having primary amino groups. The high accelerating effect of the former is considered to be due to its lower stabilizing effect on duplex DNA, resulting from its increased affinity to single-stranded DNA. The difference in affinity was clearly demonstrated by a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study; the interaction of the former with single-stranded DNA still remained high even at 1 M NaCl, while that of the latter completely disappeared. These results suggest that some modes of interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, other than electrostatic interactions between the copolymers having guanidino groups and DNAs may be involved in strand exchange activation. PMID:18033803

  7. Evaluation of DNA typing as a positive identification method for soft and hard tissues immersed in strong acids.

    PubMed

    Robino, C; Pazzi, M; Di Vella, G; Martinelli, D; Mazzola, L; Ricci, U; Testi, R; Vincenti, M

    2015-11-01

    Identification of human remains can be hindered by several factors (e.g., traumatic mutilation, carbonization or decomposition). Moreover, in some criminal cases, offenders may purposely adopt various expedients to thwart the victim's identification, including the dissolution of body tissues by the use of corrosive reagents, as repeatedly reported in the past for Mafia-related murders. By means of an animal model, namely porcine samples, we evaluated standard DNA typing as a method for identifying soft (muscle) and hard (bone and teeth) tissues immersed in strong acids (hydrochloric, nitric and sulfuric acid) or in mixtures of acids (aqua regia). Samples were tested at different time intervals, ranging between 2 and 6h (soft tissues) and 2-28 days (hard tissues). It was shown that, in every type of acid, complete degradation of the DNA extracted from soft tissues preceded tissue dissolution and could be observed within 4h of immersion. Conversely, high molecular weight DNA amenable to STR analysis could be isolated from hard tissues as long as cortical bone fragments were still present (28 days for sulfuric acid, 7 days for nitric acid, 2 days for hydrochloric acid and aqua regia), or the integrity of the dental pulp chamber was preserved (7 days, in sulfuric acid only). The results indicate that DNA profiling of acid-treated body parts (in particular, cortical bone) is still feasible at advanced stages of corrosion, even when the morphological methods used in forensic anthropology and odontology can no longer be applied for identification purposes.

  8. Versatile types of polysaccharide-based supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Zhao, Nana; Yu, Bingran; Liu, Fusheng; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2014-06-01

    Different polysaccharide-based supramolecular polycations were readily synthesized by assembling multiple β-cyclodextrin-cored star polycations with an adamantane-functionalized dextran via host-guest interaction in the absence or presence of bioreducible linkages. Compared with nanoplexes of the starting star polycation and pDNA, the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes exhibited similarly low cytotoxicity, improved cellular internalization and significantly higher gene transfection efficiencies. The incorporation of disulfide linkages imparted the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes with the advantage of intracellular bioreducibility, resulting in better gene delivery properties. In addition, the antitumor properties of supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes were also investigated using a suicide gene therapy system. The present study demonstrates that the proper assembly of cyclodextrin-cored polycations with adamantane-functionalized polysaccharides is an effective strategy for the production of new nanoplex delivery systems.Different polysaccharide-based supramolecular polycations were readily synthesized by assembling multiple β-cyclodextrin-cored star polycations with an adamantane-functionalized dextran via host-guest interaction in the absence or presence of bioreducible linkages. Compared with nanoplexes of the starting star polycation and pDNA, the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes exhibited similarly low cytotoxicity, improved cellular internalization and significantly higher gene transfection efficiencies. The incorporation of disulfide linkages imparted the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes with the advantage of intracellular bioreducibility, resulting in better gene delivery properties. In addition, the antitumor properties of supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes were also investigated using a suicide gene therapy system. The present study demonstrates that the proper assembly of cyclodextrin-cored polycations

  9. DNA typing methods for differentiation of yeasts related to dry-cured meat products.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M J; Rodríguez, M; Sánchez, B; Aranda, E; Córdoba, J J

    2006-03-01

    RFLP analysis of the ITS and 18S rDNA, RAPD-PCR using mini- and microsatellite primers and RFLP analysis of mitochondrial DNA were examined to discriminate yeasts related to dry-cured meat products at species and strain level. Seven species and 35 strains of yeasts usually found in dry-cured meat products were tested. RFLP analysis of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 and 18S rDNA did not allow the separation at species level of all of the species tested. RAPD with a M13 primer was found to be useful for differentiation of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Candida zeylanoides, Yarrowia lipolytica, Debaryomyces hansenii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, no differences were observed between Debaryomyces polymorphus and Pichia carsonii. RAPD analysis with microsatellite primers (GACA)(4), (GTG)(5) and (GAC)(5) enabled discrimination at species and strain level. However, the degree of discrimination by means of RAPD-PCR depends highly on the primers used. Thus, the PCR fingerprinting with primer (GACA)(4) enabled a higher level of discrimination than primers (GAC)(5) and (GTG)(5). The RFLP analysis of mtDNA allowed the discrimination at the species and strain level except for R. mucilaginosa, where no polymorphisms were observed in the strains tested. RAPD analysis with primer (GACA)(4) and the restriction analysis of mtDNA used in the present work are useful for the differentiation at species and strain level of yeasts related to dry-cured meat products.

  10. Transition to turbulence: 2D directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantry, Matthew; Tuckerman, Laurette; Barkley, Dwight

    2016-11-01

    The transition to turbulence in simple shear flows has been studied for well over a century, yet in the last few years has seen major leaps forward. In pipe flow, this transition shows the hallmarks of (1 + 1) D directed percolation, a universality class of continuous phase transitions. In spanwisely confined Taylor-Couette flow the same class is found, suggesting the phenomenon is generic to shear flows. However in plane Couette flow the largest simulations and experiments to-date find evidence for a discrete transition. Here we study a planar shear flow, called Waleffe flow, devoid of walls yet showing the fundamentals of planar transition to turbulence. Working with a quasi-2D yet Navier-Stokes derived model of this flow we are able to attack the (2 + 1) D transition problem. Going beyond the system sizes previously possible we find all of the required scalings of directed percolation and thus establish planar shears flow in this class.

  11. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  12. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  13. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  14. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  15. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  16. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  17. The Xis2d protein of CTnDOT binds to the intergenic region between the mob and tra operons

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Crystal M.; Gardner, Jeffrey F.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2015-01-01

    CTnDOT is a 65kbp integrative and conjugative element (ICE) that carries genes encoding both tetracycline and erythromycin resistances. The Excision operon of this element encodes Xis2c, Xis2d, and Exc proteins involved in the excision of CTnDOT from host chromosomes. These proteins are also required in the complex transcriptional regulation of the divergently transcribed transfer (tra) and mobilization (mob) operons of CTnDOT. Transcription of the tra operon is positively regulated by Xis2c and Xis2d, whereas, transcription of the mob operon is positively regulated by Xis2d and Exc. Xis2d is the only protein that is involved in the excision reaction, as well as the transcriptional regulation of both the mob and tra operons. This paper helps establish how Xis2d binds the DNA in the mob and tra region. Unlike other excisionase proteins, Xis2d binds a region of dyad symmetry. The binding site is located in the intergenic region between the mob and tra promoters, and once bound Xis2d induces a bend in the DNA. Xis2d binding to this region could be the preliminary step for the activation of both operons. Then the other proteins, like Exc, can interact with Xis2d and form higher order complexes. PMID:26212728

  18. Epitope spreading of the anti-CYP2D6 antibody response in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and in the CYP2D6 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hintermann, Edith; Holdener, Martin; Bayer, Monika; Loges, Stephanie; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Granier, Claude; Manns, Michael P; Christen, Urs

    2011-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a serious chronic inflammatory disease of the liver with yet unknown etiology and largely uncertain immunopathology. The hallmark of type 2 AIH is the generation of liver kidney microsomal-1 (LKM-1) autoantibodies, which predominantly react to cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). The identification of disease initiating factors has been hampered in the past, since antibody epitope mapping was mostly performed using serum samples collected late during disease resulting in the identification of immunodominant epitopes not necessarily representing those involved in disease initiation. In order to identify possible environmental triggers for AIH, we analyzed for the first time the spreading of the anti-CYP2D6 antibody response over a prolonged period of time in AIH patients and in the CYP2D6 mouse model, in which mice infected with Adenovirus-human CYP2D6 (Ad-h2D6) develop antibodies with a similar specificity than AIH patients. Epitope spreading was analyzed in six AIH-2-patients and in the CYP2D6 mouse model using SPOTs membranes containing peptides covering the entire CYP2D6 protein. Despite of a considerable variation, both mice and AIH patients largely focus their humoral immune response on an immunodominant epitope early after infection (mice) or diagnosis (patients). The CYP2D6 mouse model revealed that epitope spreading is initiated at the immunodominant epitope and later expands to neighboring and remote regions. Sequence homologies to human pathogens have been detected for all identified epitopes. Our study demonstrates that epitope spreading does indeed occur during the pathogenesis of AIH and supports the concept of molecular mimicry as a possible initiating mechanism for AIH.

  19. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA detected in pulmonary metastases from a penile squamous cell carcinoma: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lorenzon, Laura; Benevolo, Maria; Visca, Paolo; Venturo, Irene; Filippetti, Massimo; Piro, Francesca Romana; Rollo, Francesca; Vocaturo, Amina

    2013-02-01

    This report describe the case of a patient presenting with pulmonary metastases from a penile cancer, where the presence of the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA both in the primary tumor and in the distant metastases confirmed the spreading of the disease, ruling out a possible primary lung squamous cell carcinoma. Indeed, according to the findings, the HPV genotyping test might help in the identification of metastatic disease from anogenital malignancies or other HPV-related cancers.

  20. Glucocorticoid coordinate regulation of type I procollagen gene expression and procollagen DNA-binding proteins in chick skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Cockayne, D.; Cutroneo, K.R.

    1988-04-19

    Nuclei were isolated from control and dexamethasone-treated (2 h) embryonic chick skin fibroblasts and transcribed in vitro. Nuclei isolated from dexamethasone-treated fibroblasts transcribed less pro..cap alpha..1(I) and pro..cap alpha..2(I) mRNAs but not ..beta..-actin mRNA. Fibroblasts receiving dexamethasone and (5,6-/sup 3/H)uridine also demonstrated decreased synthesis of nuclear type I procollagen mRNAs but not ..beta..-actin mRNA. In fibroblasts treated with cycloheximide the newly synthesized nuclear type I procollagen mRNA species were markedly decreased. An enhanced inhibitory effect was observed when fibroblasts were treated with cycloheximide plus dexamethasone. Since the studies above demonstrate that active protein synthesis is required to maintain the constitutive expression of the type I procollagen genes, the authors determined if glucocorticoids regulate DNA-binding proteins with sequence specificity for the ..cap alpha..2(I) procollagen gene. Nuclear protein blots were probed with the /sup 32/P-end-labeled pBR322 vector DNA and /sup 32/P-end-labeled ..cap alpha..2(I) procollagen promoter containing DNA. Nonhistone proteins remained bound to labeled DNA at stringency washes of 0.05 and 0.1 M NaCl. As the ionic strength was increased to 0.2 and 0.3 M NaCl, the nonhistone-protein DNA binding was preferentially lost. Only the low molecular weight proteins remained bound to labeled DNA at the highest ionic strength, indicating nonspecific binding of these nuclear proteins. Dexamethasone treatment resulted in an increase of binding of nonhistone proteins to vector- and promoter-labeled DNAs over that observed in control fibroblasts at stringency washes of 0.05 and 0.1 M NaCl and to a lesser extent at 0.2 M NaCl. The binding specificities of nonhistone proteins for the ..cap alpha..2(I) procollagen promoter containing DNA were calculated.

  1. Completeness of the classical 2D Ising model and universal quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Van den Nest, M; Dür, W; Briegel, H J

    2008-03-21

    We prove that the 2D Ising model is complete in the sense that the partition function of any classical q-state spin model (on an arbitrary graph) can be expressed as a special instance of the partition function of a 2D Ising model with complex inhomogeneous couplings and external fields. In the case where the original model is an Ising or Potts-type model, we find that the corresponding 2D square lattice requires only polynomially more spins with respect to the original one, and we give a constructive method to map such models to the 2D Ising model. For more general models the overhead in system size may be exponential. The results are established by connecting classical spin models with measurement-based quantum computation and invoking the universality of the 2D cluster states.

  2. A novel hybrid motion detection algorithm based on 2D histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaomeng; Wang, Haiying

    2015-03-01

    This article proposes a novel hybrid motion detection algorithm based on 2-D (2-Dimensional) spatio-temporal states histogram. The new algorithm combines the idea of image change detection based on 2-D histogram and spatio-temporal entropy image segmentation. It quantifies the continuity of pixel state in time and space domain which are called TDF (Time Domain Filter) and SDF (Space Domain Filter) respectively. After this, put both channels of output data from TDF and SDF into a 2-D histogram. In the 2-D histogram, a curve division method helps to separate the foreground state points and the background ones more accurately. Innovatively, the new algorithm converts the video sequence to its histogram sequence, and transforms the difference of pixel's value in the video sequence into the difference of pixel's position in the 2-D histogram. Experimental results on different types of scenes added Gaussian noise shows that the proposed technique has strong ability of detecting moving objects.

  3. New type of SSUrDNA sequence was detected from both Plasmodium ovale curtisi and Plasmodium ovale wallikeri samples

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    present in imported malaria cases of China. New type of partial SSU rDNA sequence which assumed to express in a certain life stage of P. ovale was obtained from both P. ovale wallikeri and P. ovale curtisi samples. This discovery would supply information and clues to identify and understand P. ovale parasites more accurately. PMID:24893846

  4. An improved SELEX technique for selection of DNA aptamers binding to M-type 11 of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Hamula, Camille L A; Peng, Hanyong; Wang, Zhixin; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X Chris

    2016-03-15

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a clinically important pathogen consisting of various serotypes determined by different M proteins expressed on the cell surface. The M type is therefore a useful marker to monitor the spread of invasive S. pyogenes in a population. Serotyping and nucleic acid amplification/sequencing methods for the identification of M types are laborious, inconsistent, and usually confined to reference laboratories. The primary objective of this work is to develop a technique that enables generation of aptamers binding to specific M-types of S. pyogenes. We describe here an in vitro technique that directly used live bacterial cells and the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) strategy. Live S. pyogenes cells were incubated with DNA libraries consisting of 40-nucleotides randomized sequences. Those sequences that bound to the cells were separated, amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), purified using gel electrophoresis, and served as the input DNA pool for the next round of SELEX selection. A specially designed forward primer containing extended polyA20/5Sp9 facilitated gel electrophoresis purification of ssDNA after PCR amplification. A counter-selection step using non-target cells was introduced to improve selectivity. DNA libraries of different starting sequence diversity (10(16) and 10(14)) were compared. Aptamer pools from each round of selection were tested for their binding to the target and non-target cells using flow cytometry. Selected aptamer pools were then cloned and sequenced. Individual aptamer sequences were screened on the basis of their binding to the 10 M-types that were used as targets. Aptamer pools obtained from SELEX rounds 5-8 showed high affinity to the target S. pyogenes cells. Tests against non-target Streptococcus bovis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Enterococcus species demonstrated selectivity of these aptamers for binding to S. pyogenes. Several aptamer sequences were found to bind

  5. Reduced sleep duration mediates decreases in striatal D2/D3 receptor availability in cocaine abusers

    PubMed Central

    Wiers, C E; Shumay, E; Cabrera, E; Shokri-Kojori, E; Gladwin, T E; Skarda, E; Cunningham, S I; Kim, S W; Wong, T C; Tomasi, D; Wang, G-J; Volkow, N D

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have documented reduced striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2/D3R) availability in cocaine abusers, which has been associated with impaired prefrontal activity and vulnerability for relapse. However, the mechanism(s) underlying the decreases in D2/D3R remain poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that sleep deprivation is associated with a downregulation of striatal D2/D3R in healthy volunteers. As cocaine abusers have disrupted sleep patterns, here we investigated whether reduced sleep duration mediates the relationship between cocaine abuse and low striatal D2/D3R availability. We used positron emission tomography with [11C]raclopride to measure striatal D2/D3R availability in 24 active cocaine abusers and 21 matched healthy controls, and interviewed them about their daily sleep patterns. Compared with controls, cocaine abusers had shorter sleep duration, went to bed later and reported longer periods of sleep disturbances. In addition, cocaine abusers had reduced striatal D2/D3R availability. Sleep duration predicted striatal D2/D3R availability and statistically mediated the relationship between cocaine abuse and striatal D2/D3R availability. These findings suggest that impaired sleep patterns contribute to the low striatal D2/D3R availability in cocaine abusers. As sleep impairments are similarly observed in other types of substance abusers (for example, alcohol and methamphetamine), this mechanism may also underlie reductions in D2/D3R availability in these groups. The current findings have clinical implications suggesting that interventions to improve sleep patterns in cocaine abusers undergoing detoxification might be beneficial in improving their clinical outcomes. PMID:26954979

  6. Three types of human CpG motifs differentially modulate and augment immunogenicity of nonviral and viral replicon DNA vaccines as built-in adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Li, Na; Ma, Yao; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2013-01-01

    NakedDNA vaccines given by intramuscular injection are efficient in mouse models, but they require improvement for human use. As the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines depends, to a large extent, on the presence of CpG motifs as built-in adjuvants, we addressed this issue by inserting three types of human CpG motifs (A-type, B-type, and C-type) into the backbone of nonviral DNA and viral DNA replicon vectors with distinct immunostimulatory activities on human PBMCs. The adjuvant effects of CpG modifications in DNA vaccines expressing three types of antigens (β-Gal, AHc, or PA4) were then characterized in mice and found to significantly enhance antigen-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. The three types of CpG motifs also differentially affected and modulated immune responses and protective potency against botulinum neurotoxin serotype A and Bacillus anthracis A16R challenge. Taken together, these results demonstrate that insertion of human CpG motifs can differentially modulate the immunogenicity of nonviral DNA vaccines as well as viral DNA replicon vaccines. Our study provides not only a better understanding of the in vivo activities of CpG motif adjuvants but implications for the rational design of such motifs as built-in adjuvants for DNA vectors targeting specific antigens.

  7. Recovery of genomic DNA from archived PCR product mixes for subsequent multiplex amplification and typing of additional loci: forensic significance for older unsolved criminal cases.

    PubMed

    Patchett, Kylie L; Cox, Ken J; Burns, Dennis M

    2002-07-01

    A method for genomic DNA recovery from different types of PCR product mixes suitable for multiplex amplification and typing using the Profiler Plus STR typing system has been investigated. The application of this method is of significance in cases where the original DNA samples have been exhausted due to repeated typing analyses in an effort to maximize their evidentiary value. Such cases typically involve samples analyzed using the available DNA typing systems of the time which gave a markedly lower power of discrimination, either alone or in combination, compared to that of modern multiplex STR typing systems. It was found that an effective method for recovering genomic DNA from HLA-DQA1 +PM and CTT triplex amplification mixes, suitable for reproducible achievement of the complete Profiler Plus profile, involved the use of Amicon Microcon-100 microconcentrators. Interestingly, this method was not required to achieve the complete nine STR profile using D1S80 amplification mixes.

  8. DNA methylation and mRNA expression of HLA-DQA1 alleles in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cepek, Pavel; Zajacova, Marta; Kotrbova-Kozak, Anna; Silhova, Elena; Cerna, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) belongs among polygenic multifactorial autoimmune diseases. The highest risk is associated with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, including HLA-DQA1 gene. Our aim was to investigate DNA methylation of HLA-DQA1 promoter alleles (QAP) and correlate methylation status with individual HLA-DQA1 allele expression of patients with T1D and healthy controls. DNA methylation is one of the epigenetic modifications that regulate gene expression and is known to be shaped by the environment.Sixty one patients with T1D and 39 healthy controls were involved in this study. Isolated DNA was treated with sodium bisulphite and HLA-DQA1 promoter sequence was amplified using nested PCR. After sequencing, DNA methylation of HLA-DQA1 promoter alleles was analysed. Individual mRNA HLA-DQA1 relative allele expression was assessed using two different endogenous controls (PPIA, DRA). We have found statistically significant differences in HLA-DQA1 allele 02:01 expression (PPIA normalization, Pcorr = 0·041; DRA normalization, Pcorr = 0·052) between healthy controls and patients with T1D. The complete methylation profile of the HLA-DQA1 promoter was gained with the most methylated allele DQA1*02:01 and the least methylated DQA1*05:01 in both studied groups. Methylation profile observed in patients with T1D and healthy controls was similar, and no correlation between HLA-DQA1 allele expression and DNA methylation was found. Although we have not proved significant methylation differences between the two groups, detailed DNA methylation status and its correlation with expression of each HLA-DQA1 allele in patients with T1D have been described for the first time.

  9. An integrated epigenomic analysis for type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci in monozygotic twins

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; Xia, Yudong; Bell, Christopher G.; Yet, Idil; Ferreira, Teresa; Ward, Kirsten J.; Gao, Fei; Loomis, A. Katrina; Hyde, Craig L.; Wu, Honglong; Lu, Hanlin; Liu, Yuan; Small, Kerrin S.; Viñuela, Ana; Morris, Andrew P.; Berdasco, María; Esteller, Manel; Brosnan, M. Julia; Deloukas, Panos; McCarthy, Mark I.; John, Sally L.; Bell, Jordana T.; Wang, Jun; Spector, Tim D.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation has a great potential for understanding the aetiology of common complex traits such as Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Here we perform genome-wide methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-seq) in whole-blood-derived DNA from 27 monozygotic twin pairs and follow up results with replication and integrated omics analyses. We identify predominately hypermethylated T2D-related differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and replicate the top signals in 42 unrelated T2D cases and 221 controls. The strongest signal is in the promoter of the MALT1 gene, involved in insulin and glycaemic pathways, and related to taurocholate levels in blood. Integrating the DNA methylome findings with T2D GWAS meta-analysis results reveals a strong enrichment for DMRs in T2D-susceptibility loci. We also detect signals specific to T2D-discordant twins in the GPR61 and PRKCB genes. These replicated T2D associations reflect both likely causal and consequential pathways of the disease. The analysis indicates how an integrated genomics and epigenomics approach, utilizing an MZ twin design, can provide pathogenic insights as well as potential drug targets and biomarkers for T2D and other complex traits. PMID:25502755

  10. An integrated epigenomic analysis for type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Xia, Yudong; Bell, Christopher G; Yet, Idil; Ferreira, Teresa; Ward, Kirsten J; Gao, Fei; Loomis, A Katrina; Hyde, Craig L; Wu, Honglong; Lu, Hanlin; Liu, Yuan; Small, Kerrin S; Viñuela, Ana; Morris, Andrew P; Berdasco, María; Esteller, Manel; Brosnan, M Julia; Deloukas, Panos; McCarthy, Mark I; John, Sally L; Bell, Jordana T; Wang, Jun; Spector, Tim D

    2014-12-12

    DNA methylation has a great potential for understanding the aetiology of common complex traits such as Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Here we perform genome-wide methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-seq) in whole-blood-derived DNA from 27 monozygotic twin pairs and follow up results with replication and integrated omics analyses. We identify predominately hypermethylated T2D-related differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and replicate the top signals in 42 unrelated T2D cases and 221 controls. The strongest signal is in the promoter of the MALT1 gene, involved in insulin and glycaemic pathways, and related to taurocholate levels in blood. Integrating the DNA methylome findings with T2D GWAS meta-analysis results reveals a strong enrichment for DMRs in T2D-susceptibility loci. We also detect signals specific to T2D-discordant twins in the GPR61 and PRKCB genes. These replicated T2D associations reflect both likely causal and consequential pathways of the disease. The analysis indicates how an integrated genomics and epigenomics approach, utilizing an MZ twin design, can provide pathogenic insights as well as potential drug targets and biomarkers for T2D and other complex traits.