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Sample records for 2-d finite difference

  1. A Cartesian grid finite-difference method for 2D incompressible viscous flows in irregular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmiguel-Rojas, Enrique; Ortega-Casanova, Joaquin; del Pino, Carlos; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2004-11-01

    A method for generating a non-uniform cartesian grid for irregular two-dimensional (2D) geometries such that all the boundary points are regular mesh points is given. The resulting non-uniform grid is used to discretize the Navier-Stokes equations for 2D incompressible viscous flows using finite difference approximations. To that end, finite-difference approximations of the derivatives on a non-uniform mesh are given. We test the method with two different examples: the shallow water flow on a lake with irregular contour, and the pressure driven flow through an irregular array of circular cylinders.

  2. 2D numerical simulation of the MEP energy-transport model with a finite difference scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, V. . E-mail: romano@dmi.unict.it

    2007-02-10

    A finite difference scheme of Scharfetter-Gummel type is used to simulate a consistent energy-transport model for electron transport in semiconductors devices, free of any fitting parameters, formulated on the basis of the maximum entropy principle. Simulations of silicon n{sup +}-n-n{sup +} diodes, 2D-MESFET and 2D-MOSFET and comparisons with the results obtained by a direct simulation of the Boltzmann transport equation and with other energy-transport models, known in the literature, show the validity of the model and the robustness of the numerical scheme.

  3. Global synthetic seismograms using a 2-D finite-difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dunzhu; Helmberger, Don; Clayton, Robert W.; Sun, Daoyuan

    2014-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference (FD) synthetics, which fill the gap between fast 1-D analytic synthetics and time-consuming full 3-D synthetics in our ability to model seismograms, have been used in many studies. We address several issues involving 2-D FD methods in generating global synthetic seismograms. These include: (1) interfacing point source excitation for earthquakes with 2-D FD methods; (2) out-of-plane spreading corrections and (3) reducing the spherical Earth to the flattened models. The first issue is tackled using two methods, a `transparent source box' approach and a moment tensor excitation approach, where each has its own advantages. Moreover, our `source box' excitation does not have the late-time drift problem that occurred in previous studies. The out-of-plane geometric spreading correction is accounted for by estimating the ray parameter and applying a post-simulation filter to 2-D synthetics. Finally, parameters of the Earth-flattening transformation are discussed and validated. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated by comparing our synthetics with frequency-wavenumber summation, normal-mode and 3-D spectral-element synthetics.

  4. Optimal implicit 2-D finite differences to model wave propagation in poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzá, Reymundo; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous reservoir rocks is an important tool for the interpretation of seismic surveys in reservoir engineering. We apply globally optimal implicit staggered-grid finite-differences to model 2-D wave propagation in heterogeneous poroelastic media at a low-frequency range (<10kHz). We validate the numerical solution by comparing it to an analytical-transient solution obtaining clear seismic wavefields including fast P, slow P and S waves (for a porous media saturated with fluid). The numerical dispersion and stability conditions are derived using von Neumann analysis, showing that over a wide range of porous materials the Courant condition governs the stability and this optimal implicit scheme improves the stability of explicit schemes. High order explicit finite-differences (FD) can be replaced by some lower order optimal implicit FD so computational cost will not be as expensive while maintaining the accuracy. Here we compute weights for the optimal implicit FD scheme to attain an accuracy of γ = 10-8. The implicit spatial differentiation involves solving tridiagonal linear systems of equations through Thomas' algorithm.

  5. 2D time-domain finite-difference modeling for viscoelastic seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Na; Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Ge, Zengxi; Yao, Zhen-Xing

    2016-07-01

    Real Earth media are not perfectly elastic. Instead, they attenuate propagating mechanical waves. This anelastic phenomenon in wave propagation can be modeled by a viscoelastic mechanical model consisting of several standard linear solids. Using this viscoelastic model, we approximate a constant Q over a frequency band of interest. We use a four-element viscoelastic model with a tradeoff between accuracy and computational costs to incorporate Q into 2D time-domain first-order velocity-stress wave equations. To improve the computational efficiency, we limit the Q in the model to a list of discrete values between 2 and 1000. The related stress and strain relaxation times that characterize the viscoelastic model are pre-calculated and stored in a database for use by the finite-difference calculation. A viscoelastic finite-difference scheme that is second-order in time and fourth-order in space is developed based on the MacCormack algorithm. The new method is validated by comparing the numerical result with analytical solutions that are calculated using the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method. The synthetic seismograms exhibit greater than 95 per cent consistency in a two-layer viscoelastic model. The dispersion generated from the simulation is consistent with the Kolsky-Futterman dispersion relationship.

  6. 2-D Finite Difference Modeling of the D'' Structure Beneath the Eastern Cocos Plate: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, D. V.; Song, T. A.; Sun, D.

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of phase transition from Perovskite (Pv) to Post-Perovskite (PPv) at depth nears the lowermost mantle has revealed a new view of the earth's D'' layer (Oganov et al. 2004; Murakami et al. 2004). Hernlund et al. (2004) recently pusposed that, depending on the geotherm at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), a double-crossing of the phase boundary by the geotherm at two different depths may also occur. To explore these new findings, we adopt 2-D finite difference scheme (Helmberger and Vidale, 1988) to model wave propagation in rapidly varying structure. We collect broadband waveform data recorded by several Passcal experiments, such as La Ristra transect and CDROM transect in the southwest US to constrain the lateral variations in D'' structure. These data provide fairly dense sampling (~ 20 km) in the lowermost mantle beneath the eastern Cocos plate. Since the source-receiver paths are mostly in the same azimuth, we make 2-D cross-sections from global tomography model (Grand, 2002) and compute finite difference synthetics. We modify the lowermost mantle below 2500 km with constraints from transverse-component waveform data at epicentral distances of 70-82 degrees in the time window between S and ScS, essentially foward modeling waveforms. Assuming a velocity jump of 3 % at D'', our preferred model shows that the D'' topography deepens from the north to the south by about 120 km over a lateral distance of 300 km. Such large topography jumps have been proposed by Thomas et al. (2004) using data recorded by TriNet. In addition, there is a negative velocity jump (-3 %) 100 km above the CMB in the south. This simple model compare favorably with results from a study by Sun, Song and Helmberger (2005), who follow Sidorin et al. (1999) approach and produce a thermodynamically consistent velocity model with Pv-PPv phase boundary. It appears that much of this complexity exists in Grand's tomographic maps with rapid variation in velocities just above the D''. We also

  7. Optimal implicit 2-D finite differences to model wave propagation in poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzá, Reymundo; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2016-08-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous reservoir rocks is an important tool for the interpretation of seismic surveys in reservoir engineering. We apply globally optimal implicit staggered-grid finite differences (FD) to model 2-D wave propagation in heterogeneous poroelastic media at a low-frequency range (<10 kHz). We validate the numerical solution by comparing it to an analytical-transient solution obtaining clear seismic wavefields including fast P and slow P and S waves (for a porous media saturated with fluid). The numerical dispersion and stability conditions are derived using von Neumann analysis, showing that over a wide range of porous materials the Courant condition governs the stability and this optimal implicit scheme improves the stability of explicit schemes. High-order explicit FD can be replaced by some lower order optimal implicit FD so computational cost will not be as expensive while maintaining the accuracy. Here, we compute weights for the optimal implicit FD scheme to attain an accuracy of γ = 10-8. The implicit spatial differentiation involves solving tridiagonal linear systems of equations through Thomas' algorithm.

  8. Verification of a non-hydrostatic dynamical core using horizontally spectral element vertically finite difference method: 2-D aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.-J.; Giraldo, F. X.; Kim, J.; Shin, S.

    2014-06-01

    The non-hydrostatic (NH) compressible Euler equations of dry atmosphere are solved in a simplified two dimensional (2-D) slice framework employing a spectral element method (SEM) for the horizontal discretization and a finite difference method (FDM) for the vertical discretization. The SEM uses high-order nodal basis functions associated with Lagrange polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre (GLL) quadrature points. The FDM employs a third-order upwind biased scheme for the vertical flux terms and a centered finite difference scheme for the vertical derivative terms and quadrature. The Euler equations used here are in a flux form based on the hydrostatic pressure vertical coordinate, which are the same as those used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, but a hybrid sigma-pressure vertical coordinate is implemented in this model. We verified the model by conducting widely used standard benchmark tests: the inertia-gravity wave, rising thermal bubble, density current wave, and linear hydrostatic mountain wave. The results from those tests demonstrate that the horizontally spectral element vertically finite difference model is accurate and robust. By using the 2-D slice model, we effectively show that the combined spatial discretization method of the spectral element and finite difference method in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, offers a viable method for the development of a NH dynamical core.

  9. Modeling of 2D photonic bandgap structures using a triangular mesh finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, G. Ronald

    2001-10-01

    A numerical model is presented for computing the out-of- plane losses of a general class of row-defect waveguides formed by the superposition of a 2D photonic crystal onto a slab confinement structure. The usefulness of this model is demonstrated here by calculating the propagation loss of a single-row-defect waveguide composed of hexagonal air holes etched into two different slab structures. The results are interpreted in terms of a simple coupled-mode-theory picture in which loss is due to coupling by the waveguide corrugation between the fundamental and certain radiative slab modes. These calculations show that low-loss photonic crystal waveguides should be possible by carefully engineering the radiation modes of the slab waveguide.

  10. An energy stable, hexagonal finite difference scheme for the 2D phase field crystal amplitude equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Zhen; Heinonen, Vili; Lowengrub, John; Wang, Cheng; Wise, Steven M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we construct an energy stable finite difference scheme for the amplitude expansion equations for the two-dimensional phase field crystal (PFC) model. The equations are formulated in a periodic hexagonal domain with respect to the reciprocal lattice vectors to achieve a provably unconditionally energy stable and solvable scheme. To our knowledge, this is the first such energy stable scheme for the PFC amplitude equations. The convexity of each part in the amplitude equations is analyzed, in both the semi-discrete and fully-discrete cases. Energy stability is based on a careful convexity analysis for the energy (in both the spatially continuous and discrete cases). As a result, unique solvability and unconditional energy stability are available for the resulting scheme. Moreover, we show that the scheme is point-wise stable for any time and space step sizes. An efficient multigrid solver is devised to solve the scheme, and a few numerical experiments are presented, including grain rotation and shrinkage and grain growth studies, as examples of the strength and robustness of the proposed scheme and solver.

  11. High Order Finite Difference Methods with Subcell Resolution for 2D Detonation Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Shu, C. W.; Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2012-01-01

    In simulating hyperbolic conservation laws in conjunction with an inhomogeneous stiff source term, if the solution is discontinuous, spurious numerical results may be produced due to different time scales of the transport part and the source term. This numerical issue often arises in combustion and high speed chemical reacting flows.

  12. 2-D finite difference time domain model of ultrasound reflection from normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage surface.

    PubMed

    Kaleva, Erna; Liukkonen, Jukka; Toyras, Juha; Saarakkala, Simo; Kiviranta, Panu; Jurvelin, Jukka

    2010-04-01

    Quantitative high-frequency ultrasonic evaluation of articular cartilage has shown a potential for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis, where the roughness of the surface, collagen and proteoglycan contents, and the density and mechanical properties of cartilage change concurrently. Experimentally, these factors are difficult to investigate individually and thus a numerical model is needed. The present study is the first one to use finite difference time domain modeling of pulse-echo measurements of articular cartilage. Ultrasound reflection from the surface was investigated with varying surface roughness, material parameters (Young's modulus, density, longitudinal, and transversal velocities) and inclination of the samples. The 2-D simulation results were compared with the results from experimental measurements of the same samples in an identical geometry. Both the roughness and the material parameters contributed significantly to the ultrasound reflection. The angular dependence of the ultrasound reflection was strong for a smooth cartilage surface but disappeared for the samples with a rougher surface. These results support the findings of previous experimental studies and indicate that ultrasound detects changes in the cartilage that are characteristic of osteoarthritis. In the present study there are differences between the results of the simulations and the experimental measurements. However, the systematic patterns in the experimental behavior are correctly reproduced by the model. In the future, our goal is to develop more realistic acoustic models incorporating inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the cartilage. PMID:20378451

  13. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  14. Effective finite-difference modelling methods with 2-D acoustic wave equation using a combination of cross and rhombus stencils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enjiang; Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2016-09-01

    The 2-D acoustic wave equation is commonly solved numerically by finite-difference (FD) methods in which the accuracy of solution is significantly affected by the FD stencils. The commonly used cross stencil can reach either only second-order accuracy for space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method or (2M)th-order accuracy along eight specific propagation directions for time-space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method, if the conventional (2M)th-order spatial FD and second-order temporal FD are used to discretize the equation. One other newly developed rhombus stencil can reach arbitrary even-order accuracy. However, this stencil adds significantly to computational cost when the operator length is large. To achieve a balance between the solution accuracy and efficiency, we develop a new FD stencil to solve the 2-D acoustic wave equation. This stencil is a combination of the cross stencil and rhombus stencil. A cross stencil with an operator length parameter M is used to approximate the spatial partial derivatives while a rhombus stencil with an operator length parameter N together with the conventional second-order temporal FD is employed in approximating the temporal partial derivatives. Using this stencil, a new FD scheme is developed; we demonstrate that this scheme can reach (2M)th-order accuracy in space and (2N)th-order accuracy in time when spatial FD coefficients and temporal FD coefficients are derived from respective dispersion relation using Taylor-series expansion (TE) method. To further increase the accuracy, we derive the FD coefficients by employing the time-space domain dispersion relation of this FD scheme using TE. We also use least-squares (LS) optimization method to reduce dispersion at high wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis, stability analysis and modelling examples demonstrate that our new scheme has greater accuracy and better stability than conventional FD schemes, and thus can adopt large time steps. To reduce the extra

  15. Effective finite-difference modelling methods with 2D acoustic wave equation using a combination of cross and rhombus stencils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enjiang; Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2016-07-01

    The 2D acoustic wave equation is commonly solved numerically by finite-difference (FD) methods in which the accuracy of solution is significantly affected by the FD stencils. The commonly used cross stencil can reach either only second-order accuracy for space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method or (2 M)th-order accuracy along eight specific propagation directions for time-space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method, if the conventional (2 M)th-order spatial FD and second-order temporal FD are used to discretize the equation. One other newly developed rhombus stencil can reach arbitrary even-order accuracy. However, this stencil adds significantly computational cost when the operator length is large. To achieve a balance between the solution accuracy and efficiency, we develop a new FD stencil to solve the 2D acoustic wave equation. This stencil is a combination of the cross stencil and rhombus stencil. A cross stencil with an operator length parameter M is used to approximate the spatial partial derivatives while a rhombus stencil with an operator length parameter N together with the conventional 2nd-order temporal FD is employed in approximating the temporal partial derivatives. Using this stencil, a new FD scheme is developed; we demonstrate that this scheme can reach (2 M)th-order accuracy in space and (2 N)th-order accuracy in time when spatial FD coefficients and temporal FD coefficients are derived from respective dispersion relation using Taylor-series expansion (TE) method. To further increase the accuracy, we derive the FD coefficients by employing the time-space domain dispersion relation of this FD scheme using TE. We also use least-squares (LS) optimization method to reduce dispersion at high wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis, stability analysis and modelling examples demonstrate that our new scheme has greater accuracy and better stability than conventional FD schemes, and thus can adopt large time steps. To reduce the extra computational

  16. Verification of a non-hydrostatic dynamical core using the horizontal spectral element method and vertical finite difference method: 2-D aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.-J.; Giraldo, F. X.; Kim, J.; Shin, S.

    2014-11-01

    The non-hydrostatic (NH) compressible Euler equations for dry atmosphere were solved in a simplified two-dimensional (2-D) slice framework employing a spectral element method (SEM) for the horizontal discretization and a finite difference method (FDM) for the vertical discretization. By using horizontal SEM, which decomposes the physical domain into smaller pieces with a small communication stencil, a high level of scalability can be achieved. By using vertical FDM, an easy method for coupling the dynamics and existing physics packages can be provided. The SEM uses high-order nodal basis functions associated with Lagrange polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre (GLL) quadrature points. The FDM employs a third-order upwind-biased scheme for the vertical flux terms and a centered finite difference scheme for the vertical derivative and integral terms. For temporal integration, a time-split, third-order Runge-Kutta (RK3) integration technique was applied. The Euler equations that were used here are in flux form based on the hydrostatic pressure vertical coordinate. The equations are the same as those used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, but a hybrid sigma-pressure vertical coordinate was implemented in this model. We validated the model by conducting the widely used standard tests: linear hydrostatic mountain wave, tracer advection, and gravity wave over the Schär-type mountain, as well as density current, inertia-gravity wave, and rising thermal bubble. The results from these tests demonstrated that the model using the horizontal SEM and the vertical FDM is accurate and robust provided sufficient diffusion is applied. The results with various horizontal resolutions also showed convergence of second-order accuracy due to the accuracy of the time integration scheme and that of the vertical direction, although high-order basis functions were used in the horizontal. By using the 2-D slice model, we effectively showed that the combined spatial

  17. 2-D Finite Element Heat Conduction

    1989-10-30

    AYER is a finite element program which implicitly solves the general two-dimensional equation of thermal conduction for plane or axisymmetric bodies. AYER takes into account the effects of time (transient problems), in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity, a three-dimensional velocity distribution, and interface thermal contact resistance. Geometry and material distributions are arbitrary, and input is via subroutines provided by the user. As a result, boundary conditions, material properties, velocity distributions, and internal power generation may be mademore » functions of, e.g., time, temperature, location, and heat flux.« less

  18. Moving finite elements in 2-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K.; Vajk, J. P.; Djomehri, J.; Miller, K.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical background regarding the moving finite element (MFE) method of Miller and Miller (1981) is discussed, taking into account a general system of partial differential equations (PDE) and the amenability of the MFE method in two dimensions to code modularization and to semiautomatic user-construction of numerous PDE systems for both Dirichlet and zero-Neumann boundary conditions. A description of test problem results is presented, giving attention to aspects of single square wave propagation, and a solution of the heat equation.

  19. Finite Element Analysis of 2-D Elastic Contacts Involving FGMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhilash, M. N.; Murthy, H.

    2014-05-01

    The response of elastic indenters in contact with Functionally Graded Material (FGM) coated homogeneous elastic half space has been presented in the current paper. Finite element analysis has been used due to its ability to handle complex geometry, material, and boundary conditions. Indenters of different typical surface profiles have been considered and the problem has been idealized as a two-dimensional (2D) plane strain problem considering only normal loads. Initially, indenters were considered to be rigid and the results were validated with the solutions presented in the literature. The analysis has then been extended to the case of elastic indenters on FGM-coated half spaces and the results are discussed.

  20. ORION96. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.A.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-02

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  1. Finite temperature corrections in 2d integrable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselle, M.; Hasenbusch, M.

    2002-09-01

    We study the finite size corrections for the magnetization and the internal energy of the 2d Ising model in a magnetic field by using transfer matrix techniques. We compare these corrections with the functional form recently proposed by Delfino and LeClair-Mussardo for the finite temperature behaviour of one-point functions in integrable 2d quantum field theories. We find a perfect agreement between theoretical expectations and numerical results. Assuming the proposed functional form as an input in our analysis we obtain a relevant improvement in the precision of the continuum limit estimates of both quantities.

  2. Finite difference time domain method for calculating the band structure of a 2D photonic crystal and simulating the lensing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee Dastjerdi, S.; Ghanaatshoar, M.

    2013-08-01

    A finite difference time domain method based on regular Yee's algorithm in an orthogonal coordinate system is utilized to calculate the band structure of a two-dimensional square-lattice photonic crystal comprising dielectric cylinders in air background and to simulate the image formation of mentioned structure incorporating the perfectly matched layer boundary condition. By analyzing the photonic band diagram of this system, we find that the frequency region of effective negative refraction exists in the second band in near-infrared domain. In this case, electromagnetic wave propagates with a negative phase velocity and the evanescent waves can be supported to perform higher image resolution.

  3. Simulation of seismic wave propagation in 2D poroelastic media using weighted-averaging finite difference stencils in the frequency-space domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingjie; Mao, Weijian

    2016-10-01

    The poroelastodynamic equations are used to describe the dynamic solid-fluid interaction in the reservoir. To obtain the intrinsic properties of reservoir rocks from geophysical data measured in both laboratory and field, we need an accurate solution of the wave propagation in porous media. At present, the poroelastic wave equations are mostly solved in the time domain, which involves a difficult and complicated time convolution. In order to avoid the issues caused by the time convolution, we propose a frequency-space domain method. The poroelastic wave equations are composed of a linear system in the frequency domain, which easily takes into account the effects of all frequencies on the dispersion and attenuation of seismic wave. A 25-point weighted-averaging finite different scheme is proposed to discretize the equations. For the finite model, the perfectly matched layer technique is applied at the model boundaries. We validated the proposed algorithm by testing three numerical examples of poroelastic models, which are homogenous, two-layered and heterogeneous with different fluids, respectively. The testing results are encouraging in the aspects of both computational accuracy and efficiency.

  4. ELLIPT2D: A Flexible Finite Element Code Written Python

    SciTech Connect

    Pletzer, A.; Mollis, J.C.

    2001-03-22

    The use of the Python scripting language for scientific applications and in particular to solve partial differential equations is explored. It is shown that Python's rich data structure and object-oriented features can be exploited to write programs that are not only significantly more concise than their counter parts written in Fortran, C or C++, but are also numerically efficient. To illustrate this, a two-dimensional finite element code (ELLIPT2D) has been written. ELLIPT2D provides a flexible and easy-to-use framework for solving a large class of second-order elliptic problems. The program allows for structured or unstructured meshes. All functions defining the elliptic operator are user supplied and so are the boundary conditions, which can be of Dirichlet, Neumann or Robbins type. ELLIPT2D makes extensive use of dictionaries (hash tables) as a way to represent sparse matrices.Other key features of the Python language that have been widely used include: operator over loading, error handling, array slicing, and the Tkinter module for building graphical use interfaces. As an example of the utility of ELLIPT2D, a nonlinear solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation is computed using a Newton iterative scheme. A second application focuses on a solution of the toroidal Laplace equation coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic stability code, a problem arising in the context of magnetic fusion research.

  5. 2D resistivity inversion using conjugate gradients for a finite element discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozo, C. A.; Santos, F. M.; Porsani, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we present a DC 2D inversion algorithm using conjugate gradients relaxation to solve the maximum likelihood inverse equations. We apply, according to Zhang (1995), the maximum likelihood inverse theory developed by Tarantola and Valette (1982) to our 2D resistivity inversion. This algorithm was chosen to this research because it doesn't need to calculate the field's derivatives. Since conjugate gradient techniques only need the results of the sensitivity matrix à or its transpose ÃT multiplying a vector, the actual computation of the sensitivity matrix are not performed, according to the methodology described in Zhang (1995). In Zhang (1995), the terms Ãx and ÃTy, are dependent of the stiffness matrix K and its partial derivative ∂K⁄∂ρ. The inversion methodology described in Zhang (1995) is for the case of 3D electrical resistivity by finite differences discretization. So it was necessary to make a series of adjustments to obtain a satisfactory result for 2D electrical inversion using finite element method. The difference between the modeling of 3D resistivity with finite difference and the 2D finite element method are in the integration variable, used in the 2D case. In the 2D case the electrical potential are initially calculated in the transformed domain, including the stiffness matrix, and only in the end is transformed in Cartesian domain. In the case of 3D, described by Zhang (1995) this is done differently, the calculation is done directly in the Cartesian domain. In the literature was not found any work describing how to deal with this problem. Because the calculations of Ãx and ÃTy must be done without having the real stiffness matrix, the adaptation consist in calculate the stiffness matrix and its partial derivative using a set of integration variables. We transform those matrix in the same form has in the potential case, but with different sets of variables. The results will be presented and are very promising.

  6. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  7. A framework for grand scale parallelization of the combined finite discrete element method in 2d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Z.; Rougier, E.; Knight, E. E.; Munjiza, A.

    2014-09-01

    Within the context of rock mechanics, the Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method (FDEM) has been applied to many complex industrial problems such as block caving, deep mining techniques (tunneling, pillar strength, etc.), rock blasting, seismic wave propagation, packing problems, dam stability, rock slope stability, rock mass strength characterization problems, etc. The reality is that most of these were accomplished in a 2D and/or single processor realm. In this work a hardware independent FDEM parallelization framework has been developed using the Virtual Parallel Machine for FDEM, (V-FDEM). With V-FDEM, a parallel FDEM software can be adapted to different parallel architecture systems ranging from just a few to thousands of cores.

  8. Numerical method of crack analysis in 2D finite magnetoelectroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minghao; Xu, Guangtao; Fan, Cuiying

    2010-04-01

    The present paper extends the hybrid extended displacement discontinuity fundamental solution method (HEDD-FSM) (Eng Anal Bound Elem 33:592-600, 2009) to analysis of cracks in 2D finite magnetoelectroelastic media. The solution of the crack is expressed approximately by a linear combination of fundamental solutions of the governing equations, which includes the extended point force fundamental solutions with sources placed at chosen points outside the domain of the problem under consideration, and the extended Crouch fundamental solutions with extended displacement discontinuities placed on the crack. The coefficients of the fundamental solutions are determined by letting the approximated solution satisfy the prescribed boundary conditions on the boundary of the domain and on the crack face. The Crouch fundamental solution for a parabolic element at the crack tip is derived to model the square root variations of near tip fields. The extended stress intensity factors are calculated under different electric and magnetic boundary conditions.

  9. STEALTH - a Lagrange explicit finite-difference code for solid, structural, and thermohydraulic analysis. Volume 8A: STEALTH/WHAMSE - a 2-D fluid-structure interaction code. Computer code manual

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.B.

    1984-10-01

    STEALTH is a family of computer codes that can be used to calculate a variety of physical processes in which the dynamic behavior of a continuum is involved. The version of STEALTH described in this volume is designed for calculations of fluid-structure interaction. This version of the program consists of a hydrodynamic version of STEALTH which has been coupled to a finite-element code, WHAMSE. STEALTH computes the transient response of the fluid continuum, while WHAMSE computes the transient response of shell and beam structures under external fluid loadings. The coupling between STEALTH and WHAMSE is performed during each cycle or step of a calculation. Separate calculations of fluid response and structural response are avoided, thereby giving a more accurate model of the dynamic coupling between fluid and structure. This volume provides the theoretical background, the finite-difference equations, the finite-element equations, a discussion of several sample problems, a listing of the input decks for the sample problems, a programmer's manual and a description of the input records for the STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program.

  10. NIKE2D: a vectorized, implicit, finite-deformation, finite-element code for analyzing the static and dynamic response of 2-D solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1983-02-01

    This report provides a user's manual for NIKE2D and a brief description of the implicit algorithm. Sample applications are presented including a simulation of the necking of a uniaxial tension specimen, a static analysis of an O-ring seal, and a cylindrical bar impacting a rigid wall. NIKE2D is a fully vectorized, implicit, finite-deformation, large-strain, finite-element code for analyzing the response of two-dimensional axisymmetric and plane-strain solids. A variety of loading conditions can be handled including traction boundary conditions, displacement boundary conditions, concentrated nodal point laods, body force loads due to base accelerations, and body-force loads due to spinning. Slide-lines with interface friction are available. Elastic, orthotropic-elastic-plastic, thermo-elastic-plactic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, thermo-orthotropic elastic, and elastic-creep materials models are implemented. Nearly incompressible behavior that arises in plasticity problems and elasticity problems with Poisson's ratio approaching 0.5 is accounted for in the element formulation to preclude mesh lock-ups and associated anomalous stress states. Four-node isoparametric elements are used for the spatial discretization, and profile (bandwidth) minimization is optional.

  11. CAST2D: A finite element computer code for casting process modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1991-10-01

    CAST2D is a coupled thermal-stress finite element computer code for casting process modeling. This code can be used to predict the final shape and stress state of cast parts. CAST2D couples the heat transfer code TOPAZ2D and solid mechanics code NIKE2D. CAST2D has the following features in addition to all the features contained in the TOPAZ2D and NIKE2D codes: (1) a general purpose thermal-mechanical interface algorithm (i.e., slide line) that calculates the thermal contact resistance across the part-mold interface as a function of interface pressure and gap opening; (2) a new phase change algorithm, the delta function method, that is a robust method for materials undergoing isothermal phase change; (3) a constitutive model that transitions between fluid behavior and solid behavior, and accounts for material volume change on phase change; and (4) a modified plot file data base that allows plotting of thermal variables (e.g., temperature, heat flux) on the deformed geometry. Although the code is specialized for casting modeling, it can be used for other thermal stress problems (e.g., metal forming).

  12. 2D-3D hybrid stabilized finite element method for tsunami runup simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, S.; Moriguchi, S.; Terada, K.; Kato, J.; Kyoya, T.; Kashiyama, K.; Kotani, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) hybrid stabilized finite element method that enables us to predict a propagation process of tsunami generated in a hypocentral region, which ranges from offshore propagation to runup to urban areas, with high accuracy and relatively low computational costs. To be more specific, the 2D shallow water equation is employed to simulate the propagation of offshore waves, while the 3D Navier-Stokes equation is employed for the runup in urban areas. The stabilized finite element method is utilized for numerical simulations for both of the 2D and 3D domains that are independently discretized with unstructured meshes. The multi-point constraint and transmission methods are applied to satisfy the continuity of flow velocities and pressures at the interface between the resulting 2D and 3D meshes, since neither their spatial dimensions nor node arrangements are consistent. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed hybrid method to simulate tsunami behavior, including offshore propagation and runup to urban areas, with substantially lower computation costs in comparison with full 3D computations.

  13. Adaptive finite element modeling of direct current resistivity in 2-D generally anisotropic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Yuguo; Liu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite element (FE) algorithm for direct current (DC) resistivity modeling in 2-D generally anisotropic conductivity structures. Our algorithm is implemented on an unstructured triangular mesh that readily accommodates complex structures such as topography and dipping layers and so on. We implement a self-adaptive, goal-oriented grid refinement algorithm in which the finite element analysis is performed on a sequence of refined grids. The grid refinement process is guided by an a posteriori error estimator. The problem is formulated in terms of total potentials where mixed boundary conditions are incorporated. This type of boundary condition is superior to the Dirichlet type of conditions and improves numerical accuracy considerably according to model calculations. We have verified the adaptive finite element algorithm using a two-layered earth with azimuthal anisotropy. The FE algorithm with incorporation of mixed boundary conditions achieves high accuracy. The relative error between the numerical and analytical solutions is less than 1% except in the vicinity of the current source location, where the relative error is up to 2.4%. A 2-D anisotropic model is used to demonstrate the effects of anisotropy upon the apparent resistivity in DC soundings.

  14. Simulation of 2D Brain's Potential Distribution Based on Two Electrodes ECVT Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirait, S. H.; Edison, R. E.; Baidillah, M. R.; Taruno, W. P.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to simulate the potential distribution of 2D brain geometry based on two electrodes ECVT. ECVT (electrical capacitance tomography) is a tomography modality which produces dielectric distribution image of a subject from several capacitance electrodes measurements. This study begins by producing the geometry of 2D brain based on MRI image and then setting the boundary conditions on the boundaries of the geometry. The values of boundary conditions follow the potential values used in two electrodes brain ECVT, and for this reason the first boundary is set to 20 volt and 2.5 MHz signal and another boundary is set to ground. Poisson equation is implemented as the governing equation in the 2D brain geometry and finite element method is used to solve the equation. Simulated Hodgkin-Huxley action potential is applied as disturbance potential in the geometry. We divide this study into two which comprises simulation without disturbance potential and simulation with disturbance potential. From this study, each of time dependent potential distributions from non-disturbance and disturbance potential of the 2D brain geometry has been generated.

  15. Justification for a 2D versus 3D fingertip finite element model during static contact simulations.

    PubMed

    Harih, Gregor; Tada, Mitsunori; Dolšak, Bojan

    2016-10-01

    The biomechanical response of a human hand during contact with various products has not been investigated in details yet. It has been shown that excessive contact pressure on the soft tissue can result in discomfort, pain and also cumulative traumatic disorders. This manuscript explores the benefits and limitations of a simplified two-dimensional vs. an anatomically correct three-dimensional finite element model of a human fingertip. Most authors still use 2D FE fingertip models due to their simplicity and reduced computational costs. However we show that an anatomically correct 3D FE fingertip model can provide additional insight into the biomechanical behaviour. The use of 2D fingertip FE models is justified when observing peak contact pressure values as well as displacement during the contact for the given studied cross-section. On the other hand, an anatomically correct 3D FE fingertip model provides a contact pressure distribution, which reflects the fingertip's anatomy.

  16. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near {{e}2}/π h .

  17. Finite-size scaling in a 2D disordered electron gas with spectral nodes.

    PubMed

    Sinner, Andreas; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We study the DC conductivity of a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and spectral nodes, employing the field theoretical version of the Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula. Disorder scattering is treated within the standard perturbation theory by summing up ladder and maximally crossed diagrams. The emergent gapless (diffusion) modes determine the behavior of the conductivity on large scales. We find a finite conductivity with an intermediate logarithmic finite-size scaling towards smaller conductivities but do not obtain the logarithmic divergence of the weak-localization approach. Our results agree with the experimentally observed logarithmic scaling of the conductivity in graphene with the formation of a plateau near [Formula: see text]. PMID:27270084

  18. 2D to 3D conversion implemented in different hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Diaz, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Huitron, Victor; Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Hernandez-Fragoso, Araceli

    2015-02-01

    Conversion of available 2D data for release in 3D content is a hot topic for providers and for success of the 3D applications, in general. It naturally completely relies on virtual view synthesis of a second view given by original 2D video. Disparity map (DM) estimation is a central task in 3D generation but still follows a very difficult problem for rendering novel images precisely. There exist different approaches in DM reconstruction, among them manually and semiautomatic methods that can produce high quality DMs but they demonstrate hard time consuming and are computationally expensive. In this paper, several hardware implementations of designed frameworks for an automatic 3D color video generation based on 2D real video sequence are proposed. The novel framework includes simultaneous processing of stereo pairs using the following blocks: CIE L*a*b* color space conversions, stereo matching via pyramidal scheme, color segmentation by k-means on an a*b* color plane, and adaptive post-filtering, DM estimation using stereo matching between left and right images (or neighboring frames in a video), adaptive post-filtering, and finally, the anaglyph 3D scene generation. Novel technique has been implemented on DSP TMS320DM648, Matlab's Simulink module over a PC with Windows 7, and using graphic card (NVIDIA Quadro K2000) demonstrating that the proposed approach can be applied in real-time processing mode. The time values needed, mean Similarity Structural Index Measure (SSIM) and Bad Matching Pixels (B) values for different hardware implementations (GPU, Single CPU, and DSP) are exposed in this paper.

  19. Use of finite volume radiation for predicting the Knudsen minimum in 2D channel flow

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, Chetan P.; Mahajan, Roop L.

    2014-12-09

    In an earlier paper we employed an analogy between surface-to-surface radiation and free-molecular flow to model Knudsen flow through tubes and onto planes. In the current paper we extend the analogy between thermal radiation and molecular flow to model the flow of a gas in a 2D channel across all regimes of rarefaction. To accomplish this, we break down the problem of gaseous flow into three sub-problems (self-diffusion, mass-motion and generation of pressure gradient) and use the finite volume method for modeling radiation through participating media to model the transport in each sub-problem as a radiation problem. We first model molecular self-diffusion in the stationary gas by modeling the transport of the molecular number density through the gas starting from the analytical asymptote for free-molecular flow to the kinetic theory limit of gaseous self-diffusion. We then model the transport of momentum through the gas at unit pressure gradient to predict Poiseuille flow and slip flow in the 2D gas. Lastly, we predict the generation of pressure gradient within the gas due to molecular collisions by modeling the transport of the forces generated due to collisions per unit volume of gas. We then proceed to combine the three radiation problems to predict flow of the gas over the entire Knudsen number regime from free-molecular to transition to continuum flow and successfully capture the Knudsen minimum at Kn ∼ 1.

  20. Upwind Compact Finite Difference Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, I.

    1985-07-01

    It was shown by Ciment, Leventhal, and Weinberg ( J. Comput. Phys.28 (1978), 135) that the standard compact finite difference scheme may break down in convection dominated problems. An upwinding of the method, which maintains the fourth order accuracy, is suggested and favorable numerical results are found for a number of test problems.

  1. Diverse Geological Applications For Basil: A 2d Finite-deformation Computational Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houseman, Gregory A.; Barr, Terence D.; Evans, Lynn

    Geological processes are often characterised by large finite-deformation continuum strains, on the order of 100% or greater. Microstructural processes cause deformation that may be represented by a viscous constitutive mechanism, with viscosity that may depend on temperature, pressure, or strain-rate. We have developed an effective com- putational algorithm for the evaluation of 2D deformation fields produced by Newto- nian or non-Newtonian viscous flow. With the implementation of this algorithm as a computer program, Basil, we have applied it to a range of diverse applications in Earth Sciences. Viscous flow fields in 2D may be defined for the thin-sheet case or, using a velocity-pressure formulation, for the plane-strain case. Flow fields are represented using 2D triangular elements with quadratic interpolation for velocity components and linear for pressure. The main matrix equation is solved by an efficient and compact conjugate gradient algorithm with iteration for non-Newtonian viscosity. Regular grids may be used, or grids based on a random distribution of points. Definition of the prob- lem requires that velocities, tractions, or some combination of the two, are specified on all external boundary nodes. Compliant boundaries may also be defined, based on the idea that traction is opposed to and proportional to boundary displacement rate. In- ternal boundary segments, allowing fault-like displacements within a viscous medium have also been developed, and we find that the computed displacement field around the fault tip is accurately represented for Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosities, in spite of the stress singularity at the fault tip. Basil has been applied by us and colleagues to problems that include: thin sheet calculations of continental collision, Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the continental mantle lithosphere, deformation fields around fault terminations at the outcrop scale, stress and deformation fields in and around porphyroblasts, and

  2. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  3. User's manual for DYNA2D: an explicit two-dimensional hydrodynamic finite-element code with interactive rezoning

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1982-02-01

    This revised report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA2D, an explicit two-dimensional axisymmetric and plane strain finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 4-node solid elements, and the equations-of motion are integrated by the central difference method. An interactive rezoner eliminates the need to terminate the calculation when the mesh becomes too distorted. Rather, the mesh can be rezoned and the calculation continued. The command structure for the rezoner is described and illustrated by an example.

  4. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  5. Mixed-RKDG Finite Element Methods for the 2-D Hydrodynamic Model for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Zhangxin; Cockburn, Bernardo; Jerome, Joseph W.; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new method for numerically solving the equations of the hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices in two space dimensions. The method combines a standard mixed finite element method, used to obtain directly an approximation to the electric field, with the so-called Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) method, originally devised for numerically solving multi-dimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, which is applied here to the convective part of the equations. Numerical simulations showing the performance of the new method are displayed, and the results compared with those obtained by using Essentially Nonoscillatory (ENO) finite difference schemes. Frommore » the perspective of device modeling, these methods are robust, since they are capable of encompassing broad parameter ranges, including those for which shock formation is possible. The simulations presented here are for Gallium Arsenide at room temperature, but we have tested them much more generally with considerable success.« less

  6. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  7. AC Loss Calculation of REBCO Cables by the Combination of Electric Circuit Model and 2D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noji, H.

    This study investigates the losses in a two conducting-layer REBCO cable fabricated by researchers at Furukawa Electric Co. Ltd. The losses were calculated using a combination of my electric circuit (EC) model with a two-dimensional finite element method (2D FEM). The helical pitches of the tapes in each layer, P1 and P2, were adjusted to equalize the current in both cable layers, although the loss calculation assumed infinite helical pitches and the same current in each layer at first. The results showed that the losses depended on the relative tape-position angle between the layers (θ/θ'), because the vertical field between adjacent tapes in the same layer varied with θ/θ'. When simulating the real cable, the helical pitches were adjusted and the layer currents were calculated by the EC model. These currents were input to the 2D FEM to compute the losses. The losses changed along the cable length because the difference between P1 and P2 altered the θ/θ' along this direction. The average angle-dependent and position-dependent losses were equal and closely approximated the measured losses. As an example to reduce the loss in this cable, the angle and the helical pitches were fixed at θ/θ' = 0.5 and P1 = P2 = 100 mm (S-direction). The calculation with these conditions indicated that the loss is about one order of magnitude lower than the measurement.

  8. 2D Global Rayleigh Wave Attenuation Model Using Finite Frequency Focusing and Defocusing Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z.; Masters, G.; Dalton, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed an efficient technique to process and measure surface-wave amplitude and phase from a large collection of seismic waveforms. These amplitude and phase data sets are used to jointly invert for 2D phase velocity and attenuation maps. As demonstrated by Dalton and Ekstrom (2006), correcting for the effects of focusing and defocusing by elastic structure is crucial in order to obtain reliable attenuation structures. A robust theory that can reliably predict focusing-defocusing effects and is insensitive to the details of making the phase velocity maps is preferred. Great circle ray theory can give useful predictions for the focusing-defocusing effects if careful attention is paid to how the phase velocity model is smoothed. However, the predictions of the finite frequency kernels are more robust at the low-intermediate frequency range (below 25mHz) and suggest that they are better suited as a basis for inversion.We invert for the phase velocity, attenuation, source, and receiver terms simultaneously. Our models provide 60-70% variance reduction to the raw data though the source terms are the biggest contribution to the fit of the data. The attenuation maps show structures that correlate well with surface tectonics and the age-dependent trend of attenuation is clearly seen in the ocean basins. We have also identified problematic stations and earthquake sources as a by-product of our data selection process. Although our approach was developed for a global study, it can be extended to regional studies. Our first regional-scale application of this approach is to the Atlantic upper mantle.

  9. Using Multi-threading for the Automatic Load Balancing of 2D Adaptive Finite Element Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heber, Gerd; Biswas, Rupak; Thulasiraman, Parimala; Gao, Guang R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-threaded approach for the automatic load balancing of adaptive finite element (FE) meshes The platform of our choice is the EARTH multi-threaded system which offers sufficient capabilities to tackle this problem. We implement the adaption phase of FE applications oil triangular meshes and exploit the EARTH token mechanism to automatically balance the resulting irregular and highly nonuniform workload. We discuss the results of our experiments oil EARTH-SP2, on implementation of EARTH on the IBM SP2 with different load balancing strategies that are built into the runtime system.

  10. CLFE2D: A generalized plane strain finite element program laminated composites subject to mechanical and hygrothermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buczek, M. B.; Gregory, M. A.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    CLFE2D is a two dimensional generalized plane strain finite element code, using a linear, four node, general quadrilateral, isoparametric element. The program is developed to calculate the displacements, strains, stresses, and strain energy densities in a finite width composite laminate. CLFE2D offers any combination of the following load types: nodal displacements, nodal forces, uniform normal strain, or hygrothermal. The program allows the user to input one set of three dimensional orthotropic material properties. The user can then specify the angle of material principal orientation for each element in the mesh. Output includes displacements, stresses, strains and strain densities at points selected by the user. An option is also available to plot the underformed and deformed finite element meshes.

  11. Finite-size effects for anisotropic 2D Ising model with various boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailian, N. Sh

    2012-12-01

    We analyze the exact partition function of the anisotropic Ising model on finite M × N rectangular lattices under four different boundary conditions (periodic-periodic (pp), periodic-antiperiodic (pa), antiperiodic-periodic (ap) and antiperiodic-antiperiodic (aa)) obtained by Kaufman (1949 Phys. Rev. 76 1232), Wu and Hu (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 5189) and Kastening (2002 Phys. Rev. E 66 057103)). We express the partition functions in terms of the partition functions Zα, β(J, k) with (α, β) = (0, 0), (1/2, 0), (0, 1/2) and (1/2, 1/2), J is an interaction coupling and k is an anisotropy parameter. Based on such expressions, we then extend the algorithm of Ivashkevich et al (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 5543) to derive the exact asymptotic expansion of the logarithm of the partition function for all boundary conditions mentioned above. Our result is f = fbulk + ∑∞p = 0fp(ρ, k)S-p - 1, where f is the free energy of the system, fbulk is the free energy of the bulk, S = MN is the area of the lattice and ρ = M/N is the aspect ratio. All coefficients in this expansion are expressed through analytical functions. We have introduced the effective aspect ratio ρeff = ρ/sinh 2Jc and show that for pp and aa boundary conditions all finite size correction terms are invariant under the transformation ρeff → 1/ρeff. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  12. Finite elements and finite differences for transonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Murman, E. M.; Wellford, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews the chief finite difference and finite element techniques used for numerical solution of nonlinear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic equations governing transonic flow. The forms of the governing equations for unsteady two-dimensional transonic flow considered are the Euler equation, the full potential equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, the transonic small-disturbance equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, and the hodograph equations for the small-disturbance case and the full-potential case. Finite difference methods considered include time-dependent methods, relaxation methods, semidirect methods, and hybrid methods. Finite element methods include finite element Lax-Wendroff schemes, implicit Galerkin method, mixed variational principles, dual iterative procedures, optimal control methods and least squares.

  13. A 2D finite element simulation of liquid coupled ultrasonic NDT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgunde, Prathamesh N.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this work is to improve modelling capabilities and reliability of wave propagation models using a commercial finite element package (COMSOL). The current model focusses on investigating the error and accuracy with the change in spatial and temporal discretization. To increase the reliability and inclusiveness of the finite element method, wave propagation has been modelled in solid medium with a cylindrical defect (side drilled hole), in a fluid medium and in a fluid-solid immersion model. The numerical predictions are validated through comparisons with available analytical solutions and experimental data. The model is being developed to incorporate additional complexity and ranges of properties, including operation at elevated temperature.

  14. Avalanches, loading and finite size effects in 2D amorphous plasticity: results from a finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandfeld, Stefan; Budrikis, Zoe; Zapperi, Stefano; Fernandez Castellanos, David

    2015-02-01

    Crystalline plasticity is strongly interlinked with dislocation mechanics and nowadays is relatively well understood. Concepts and physical models of plastic deformation in amorphous materials on the other hand—where the concept of linear lattice defects is not applicable—still are lagging behind. We introduce an eigenstrain-based finite element lattice model for simulations of shear band formation and strain avalanches. Our model allows us to study the influence of surfaces and finite size effects on the statistics of avalanches. We find that even with relatively complex loading conditions and open boundary conditions, critical exponents describing avalanche statistics are unchanged, which validates the use of simpler scalar lattice-based models to study these phenomena.

  15. Extreme value statistics of 2D Gaussian free field: effect of finite domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Rosso, A.; Santachiara, R.

    2016-01-01

    We study minima statistics of the 2D Gaussian free field (GFF) on circles in the unit disk with Dirichlet boundary condition. Free energy distributions of the associated random energy models are exactly calculated in the high temperature phase, and shown to satisfy the duality property, which enables us to predict the minima distribution by assuming the freezing scenario. Numerical tests are provided. Related questions concerning the GFF on a sphere are also considered.

  16. TOPAZ - a finite element heat conduction code for analyzing 2-D solids

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1984-03-01

    TOPAZ is a two-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat conduction analysis. This report provides a user's manual for TOPAZ and a description of the numerical algorithms used. Sample problems with analytical solutions are presented. TOPAZ has been implemented on the CRAY and VAX computers.

  17. CYP2D6 Genetic Polymorphisms and Phenotypes in Different Ethnicities of Malaysian Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Chin, Fee Wai; Chan, Soon Choy; Abdul Rahman, Sabariah; Noor Akmal, Sharifah; Rosli, Rozita

    2016-01-01

    The cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily D, polypeptide 6 (CYP2D6) is an enzyme that is predominantly involved in the metabolism of tamoxifen. Genetic polymorphisms of the CYP2D6 gene may contribute to inter-individual variability in tamoxifen metabolism, which leads to the differences in clinical response to tamoxifen among breast cancer patients. In Malaysia, the knowledge on CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms as well as metabolizer status in Malaysian breast cancer patients remains unknown. Hence, this study aimed to comprehensively identify CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms among 80 Malaysian breast cancer patients. The genetic polymorphisms of all the 9 exons of CYP2D6 gene were identified using high-resolution melting analysis and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Seven CYP2D6 alleles consisting of CYP2D6*1, CYP2D6*2, CYP2D6*4, CYP2D6*10, CYP2D6*39, CYP2D6*49, and CYP2D6*75 were identified in this study. Among these alleles, CYP2D6*10 is the most common allele in both Malaysian Malay (54.8%) and Chinese (71.4%) breast cancer patients, whereas CYP2D6*4 in Malaysian Indian (28.6%) breast cancer patients. In relation to CYP2D6 genotype, CYP2D6*10/*10 is more frequently observed in both Malaysian Malay (28.9%) and Chinese (57.1%) breast cancer patients, whereas CYP2D6*4/*10 is more frequently observed in Malaysian Indian (42.8%) breast cancer patients. In terms of CYP2D6 phenotype, 61.5% of Malaysian Malay breast cancer patients are predicted as extensive metabolizers in which they are most likely to respond well to tamoxifen therapy. However, 57.1% of Chinese as well as Indian breast cancer patients are predicted as intermediate metabolizers and they are less likely to gain optimal benefit from the tamoxifen therapy. This is the first report of CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms and phenotypes in Malaysian breast cancer patients for different ethnicities. These data may aid clinicians in selecting an optimal drug therapy for Malaysian breast cancer patients, hence improve the

  18. VARSAT2D: Finite-element analysis of variably saturated two-dimensional flow. Information circular/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Nieber, J.L.; Friedel, M.J.; Munir, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    This information circular describes a computer program called VARSAT2D, a comprehensive unsaturated fluid flow simulator developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines. VARSAT2D solves for either a vertical or horizontal, transient or steady-state solution in variably saturated, heterogeneous, anisotropic porous media using the Galerkin finite-element approach. Simplex triangular elements are used. Moisture retention characteristics are described by specifying either the Brooks and Corey, Brutsaert, or Van Genuchten power functions, with hysteresis described using the Maulem independent domain model. Boundary conditions may include any combination of time-varying seepage, pressure along solution domain boundaries and/or at internal node points, unit hydraulic gradient at the lower boundary, and a uniform source and/or sink. The program should be a welcome addition for mining and environmental hydrologists, researchers, and engineers interested in modeling unsaturated fluid flow.

  19. Coupling finite and boundary element methods for 2-D elasticity problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Raju, I. S.; Sistla, R.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element-boundary element (FE-BE) coupling method for two-dimensional elasticity problems is developed based on a weighted residual variational method in which a portion of the domain of interest is modeled by FEs and the remainder of the region by BEs. The performance of the FE-BE coupling method is demonstrated via applications to a simple 'patch test' problem and three-crack problems. The method passed the patch tests for various modeling configurations and yielded accurate strain energy release rates for the crack problems studied.

  20. Electromagnetic induction by finite wavenumber source fields in 2-D lateral heterogeneities - The transverse electric mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction in a laterally homogeneous earth is analyzed in terms of a source field with finite dimensions. Attention is focused on a time-varying two-dimensional current source directed parallel to the strike of a two-dimensional anomalous structure within the earth, i.e., the E-parallel mode. The spatially harmonic source field is expressed as discontinuities in the magnetic (or electric) field of the current in the source. The model is applied to describing the magnetic gradients across megatectonic features, and may be used to predict the magnetic fields encountered by a satellite orbiting above the ionosphere.

  1. Finite-volume component-wise TVD schemes for 2D shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gwo-Fong; Lai, Jihn-Sung; Guo, Wen-Dar

    Four finite-volume component-wise total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes are proposed for solving the two-dimensional shallow water equations. In the framework of the finite volume method, a proposed algorithm using the flux-splitting technique is established by modifying the MacCormack scheme to preserve second-order accuracy in both space and time. Based on this algorithm, four component-wise TVD schemes, including the Liou-Steffen splitting (LSS), van Leer splitting, Steger-Warming splitting and local Lax-Friedrichs splitting schemes, are developed. These schemes are verified through the simulations of the 1D dam-break, the oblique hydraulic jump, the partial dam-break and circular dam-break problems. It is demonstrated that the proposed schemes are accurate, efficient and robust to capture the discontinuous shock waves without any spurious oscillations in the complex flow domains with dry-bed situation, bottom slope or friction. The simulated results also show that the LSS scheme has the best numerical accuracy among the schemes tested.

  2. Solution of the 2D shallow water equations using the finite volume method on unstructured triangular meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, K.; Chan, C. T.

    1997-06-01

    A 2D, depth-integrated, free surface flow solver for the shallow water equations is developed and tested. The solver is implemented on unstructured triangular meshes and the solution methodology is based upon a Godunov-type second-order upwind finite volume formulation, whereby the inviscid fluxes of the system of equations are obtained using Roes flux function. The eigensystem of the 2D shallow water equations is derived and is used for the construction of Roes matrix on an unstructured mesh. The viscous terms of the shallow water equations are computed using a finite volume formulation which is second-order-accurate. Verification of the solution technique for the inviscid form of the governing equations as well as for the full system of equations is carried out by comparing the model output with documented published results and very good agreement is obtained. A numerical experiment is also conducted in order to evaluate the performance of the solution technique as applied to linear convection problems. The presented results show that the solution technique is robust.

  3. Finite-size limitations on Quality factor of guided resonance modes in 2D photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Grepstad, Jon Olav; Greve, Martin M; Holst, Bodil; Johansen, Ib-Rune; Solgaard, Olav; Sudbø, Aasmund

    2013-10-01

    High-Q guided resonance modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals, enable high field intensity in small volumes that can be exploited to realize high performance sensors. We show through simulations and experiments how the Q-factor of guided resonance modes varies with the size of the photonic crystal, and that this variation is due to loss caused by scattering of in-plane propagating modes at the lattice boundary and coupling of incident light to fully guided modes that exist in the homogeneous slab outside the lattice boundary. A photonic crystal with reflecting boundaries, realized by Bragg mirrors with a band gap for in-plane propagating modes, has been designed to suppress these edge effects. The new design represents a way around the fundamental limitation on Q-factors for guided resonances in finite photonic crystals. Results are presented for both simulated and fabricated structures.

  4. Cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2, PAP2d, with two different transcripts PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyun; Gu, Shaohua; Sun, Yaqiong; Zheng, Dan; Wu, Qihan; Li, Xin; Dai, Jianfeng; Dai, Jianliang; Ji, Chaoneng; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    This study reports the cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 isoform cDNAs (PAP2d) from the foetal brain cDNA library. The PAP2d gene is localized on chromosome 1p21.3. It contains six exons and spans 112 kb of the genomic DNA. By large-scale cDNA sequencing we found two splice variants of PAP2d, PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 1722 bp in length and spans an open reading frame from nucleotide 56 to 1021, encoding a 321aa protein. The PAP2d_v2 cDNA is 1707 bp in length encoding a 316aa protein from nucleotide 56-1006. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 15 bp longer than the PAP2d_v2 cDNA in the terminal of the fifth exon and it creates different ORF. Both of the proteins contain a well-conserved PAP2 motif. The PAP2d_v1 is mainly expressed in human brain, lung, kidney, testis and colon, while PAP2d_v2 is restricted to human placenta, skeletal muscle, and kidney. The two splice variants are co-expressed only in kidney. PMID:16010976

  5. Cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2, PAP2d, with two different transcripts PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyun; Gu, Shaohua; Sun, Yaqiong; Zheng, Dan; Wu, Qihan; Li, Xin; Dai, Jianfeng; Dai, Jianliang; Ji, Chaoneng; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    This study reports the cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 isoform cDNAs (PAP2d) from the foetal brain cDNA library. The PAP2d gene is localized on chromosome 1p21.3. It contains six exons and spans 112 kb of the genomic DNA. By large-scale cDNA sequencing we found two splice variants of PAP2d, PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 1722 bp in length and spans an open reading frame from nucleotide 56 to 1021, encoding a 321aa protein. The PAP2d_v2 cDNA is 1707 bp in length encoding a 316aa protein from nucleotide 56-1006. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 15 bp longer than the PAP2d_v2 cDNA in the terminal of the fifth exon and it creates different ORF. Both of the proteins contain a well-conserved PAP2 motif. The PAP2d_v1 is mainly expressed in human brain, lung, kidney, testis and colon, while PAP2d_v2 is restricted to human placenta, skeletal muscle, and kidney. The two splice variants are co-expressed only in kidney.

  6. Study of the electrical conductivity at finite temperature in 2D Si- MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Limouny, L. Kaaouachi, A. El Tata, O.; Daoudi, E.; Errai, M.; Dlimi, S.; Idrissi, H. El; Zatni, A.

    2014-01-27

    We investigate the low temperature density dependent conductivity of two dimensional electron systems in zero magnetic field for sample Si-15 MOSFETs. The first purpose of this paper is to establish that the knee of the conductivity σ{sub 0} (σ{sub 0} is the T = 0.3 conductivity obtained by linear extrapolation of the curves of σ (T) for different values of electron density, n{sub s}) as a function of the carrier densities n{sub s} for T = 0.3 K, observed by Lai et al. and Limouny et al. in previous work for two different samples, is independent of temperature. The second aim is the determination of the critical density, n{sub c}, of the metal-insulator transition. Many methods are used in this investigation of n{sub c} which have been already used for other samples. The motivation behind this last study is the observation of many values of n{sub c} that have been obtained from different methods and that are slightly different. We will use in this study three methods with the intention to infer which one is more appropriate to obtain n{sub c}.

  7. Finite-difference computations of rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the current and future potential of finite-difference methods for solving real rotor problems which now rely largely on empiricism. The demonstration consists of a simple means of combining existing finite-difference, integral, and comprehensive loads codes to predict real transonic rotor flows. These computations are performed for hover and high-advance-ratio flight. Comparisons are made with experimental pressure data.

  8. Finite-difference computations of rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1985-01-01

    The current and future potential of finite difference methods for solving real rotor problems which now rely largely on empiricism are demonstrated. The demonstration consists of a simple means of combining existing finite-difference, integral, and comprehensive loads codes to predict real transonic rotor flows. These computations are performed for hover and high-advanced-ratio flight. Comparisons are made with experimental pressure data.

  9. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  10. Computation of self-field hysteresis losses in conductors with helicoidal structure using a 2D finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenvall, A.; Siahrang, M.; Grilli, F.; Sirois, F.

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that twisting current-carrying conductors helps to reduce their coupling losses. However, the impact of twisting on self-field hysteresis losses has not been as extensively investigated as that on the reduction of coupling losses. This is mostly because the reduction of coupling losses has been an important issue to tackle in the past, and it is not possible to consider twisting within the classical two-dimensional (2D) approaches for the computation of self-field hysteresis losses. Recently, numerical codes considering the effect of twisting in continuous symmetries have appeared. For general three-dimensional (3D) simulations, one issue is that no robust, widely accepted and easy to obtain model for expressing the relationship between the current density and the electric field is available. On the other hand, we can consider that in these helicoidal structures currents flow only along the helicoidal trajectories. This approach allows one to use the scalar power-law for superconductor resistivity and makes the eddy current approach to a solution of a hysteresis loss problem feasible. In this paper we use the finite element method to solve the eddy current model in helicoidal structures in 2D domains utilizing the helicoidal symmetry. The developed tool uses the full 3D geometry but allows discretization which takes advantage of the helicoidal symmetry to reduce the computational domain to a 2D one. We utilize in this tool the non-linear power law for modelling the resistivity in the superconducting regions and study how the self-field losses are influenced by the twisting of a 10-filament wire. Additionally, in the case of high aspect ratio tapes, we compare the results computed with the new tool and a one-dimensional program based on the integral equation method and developed for simulating single layer power cables made of ReBCO coated conductors. Finally, we discuss modelling issues and present open questions related to helicoidal structures

  11. New finite difference formulas for numerical differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ishtiaq Rasool; Ohba, Ryoji

    2000-12-01

    Conventional numerical differentiation formulas based on interpolating polynomials, operators and lozenge diagrams can be simplified to one of the finite difference approximations based on Taylor series, and closed-form expressions of these finite difference formulas have already been presented. In this paper, we present new finite difference formulas, which are more accurate than the available ones, especially for the oscillating functions having frequency components near the Nyquist frequency. Closed-form expressions of the new formulas are given for arbitrary order. A comparison of the previously available three types of approximations is given with the presented formulas. A computer program written in MATHEMATICA, based on new formulas is given in the appendix for numerical differentiation of a function at a specified mesh point.

  12. Applications of an exponential finite difference technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An exponential finite difference scheme first presented by Bhattacharya for one dimensional unsteady heat conduction problems in Cartesian coordinates was extended. The finite difference algorithm developed was used to solve the unsteady diffusion equation in one dimensional cylindrical coordinates and was applied to two and three dimensional conduction problems in Cartesian coordinates. Heat conduction involving variable thermal conductivity was also investigated. The method was used to solve nonlinear partial differential equations in one and two dimensional Cartesian coordinates. Predicted results are compared to exact solutions where available or to results obtained by other numerical methods.

  13. Finite difference computation of blast diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, R.; Graham, J. M. R.

    1985-07-01

    This paper discusses the use of numerical finite difference methods for predicting flow fields in which a shock or blast wave is diffracted at a sharp edge. Three different types of method are studied: Donor Cell differencing with and without Flux Corrected Transport, a Finite Volume method with an explicit artificial viscosity and Runge-Kutta time stepping, and a second order upwind method based on the solution of a Riemann wave problem at cell interfaces. In the case of weak shock waves a comparison is made with the flow field predicted by acoustic theory including flow separation. Results for stronger shocks are also presented.

  14. Elucidating the origin of spurious modes in aluminum nitride microresonators using a 2-D finite-element model.

    PubMed

    Branch, Darren W; Wojciechowski, Kenneth E; Olsson, Roy H

    2014-05-01

    In this work, an approach has been developed to predict the location of large spurious modes in the resonant response of aluminum nitride (AlN) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonators over a wide range of desired operating frequencies. This addresses significant challenges in the design of more complex AlN devices, namely the prediction and elimination of spurious modes in the resonance response. Using the finite element method (FEM), the dispersion curves at wavelengths ranging from 8 to 20 μm were computed. It was determined that the velocities of symmetric Lamb (S0) and high-order antisymmetric (A) modes overlap at specific wavelengths. A 2-D FEM analysis showed that both the S0 and higher order A modes are mutually excited at a common operating wavelength. From this analysis, the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters were extracted and used to compute the P-matrix and S-parameters using a 6-port transmission matrix. The P-matrix simulation was able to predict the electrical response of the S0 and nearby spurious modes. This work identified specific wavelength regions where COM has limited accuracy because of mode conversion. In these regions, the reflection (κ(p)) and transduction (ζ(p)) parameters change rapidly.

  15. Finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling with phase cycling for 2D 1H/1H correlation at ultrafast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Yusuke; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-06-01

    The first-order recoupling sequence radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) is commonly used in single-quantum/single-quantum homonuclear correlation 2D experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS) to determine homonuclear proximities. From previously reported analysis of the use of XY-based super-cycling schemes to enhance the efficiency of the finite-pulse-RFDR (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence, XY814 phase cycling was found to provide the optimum performance for 2D correlation experiments on low-γ nuclei. In this study, we analyze the efficiency of different phase cycling schemes for proton-based fp-RFDR experiments. We demonstrate the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle XY414 that only recouples the zero-quantum homonuclear dipolar coupling, for the fp-RFDR sequence in 2D 1H/1H correlation experiments at ultrafast MAS frequencies. The dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY414 and XY814 phase cycling schemes are compared based on results obtained from 2D 1H/1H correlation experiments, utilizing the fp-RFDR pulse sequence, on powder samples of U-13C,15N-L-alanine, N-acetyl-15N-L-valyl-15N-L-leucine, and glycine. Experimental results and spin dynamics simulations show that XY414 performs the best when a high RF power is used for the 180° pulse, whereas XY4 renders the best performance when a low RF power is used. The effects of RF field inhomogeneity and chemical shift offsets are also examined. Overall, our results suggest that a combination of fp-RFDR-XY414 employed in the recycle delay with a large RF-field to decrease the recycle delay, and fp-RFDR-XY4 in the mixing period with a moderate RF-field, is a robust and efficient method for 2D single-quantum/single-quantum 1H/1H correlation experiments at ultrafast MAS frequencies.

  16. Interpreting digit ratio (2D:4D)-behavior correlations: 2D:4D sex difference, stability, and behavioral correlates and their replicability in young children.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wang I; Hines, Melissa

    2016-02-01

    The popularity of using the ratio of the second to the fourth digit (2D:4D) to study influences of early androgen exposure on human behavior relies, in part, on a report that the ratio is sex-dimorphic and stable from age 2 years (Manning etal., 1998). However, subsequent research has rarely replicated this finding. Moreover, although 2D:4D has been correlated with many behaviors, these correlations are often inconsistent. Young children's 2D:4D-behavior correlations may be more consistent than those of older individuals, because young children have experienced fewer postnatal influences. To evaluate the usefulness of 2D:4D as a biomarker of prenatal androgen exposure in studies of 2D:4D-behavior correlations, we assessed its sex difference, temporal stability, and behavioral correlates over a 6- to 8-month period in 126, 2- to 3-year-old children, providing a rare same-sample replicability test. We found a moderate sex difference on both hands and high temporal stability. However, between-sex overlap and within-sex variability were also large. Only 3 of 24 correlations with sex-typed behaviors-scores on the Preschool Activities Inventory (PSAI), preference for a boy-typical toy, preference for a girl-typical toy, were significant and in the predicted direction, all of which involved the PSAI, partially confirming findings from another study. Correlation coefficients were larger for behaviors that showed larger sex differences. But, as in older samples, the overall pattern showed inconsistency across time, sex, and hand. Therefore, although sex-dimorphic and stable, 2D:4D-behavior correlations are no more consistent for young children than for older samples. Theoretical and methodological implications are discussed.

  17. On nonstandard finite difference schemes in biosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguelov, R.; Dumont, Y.; Lubuma, J. M.-S.

    2012-10-01

    We design, analyze and implement nonstandard finite difference (NSFD) schemes for some differential models in biosciences. The NSFD schemes are reliable in three directions. They are topologically dynamically consistent for onedimensional models. They can replicate the global asymptotic stability of the disease-free equilibrium of the MSEIR model in epidemiology whenever the basic reproduction number is less than 1. They preserve the positivity and boundedness property of solutions of advection-reaction and reaction-diffusion equations.

  18. Comparison of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions with Results From 3D Analysis for Composite Skin-Stiffener Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isbelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane-strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with delamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  19. Cancellous bone lamellae strongly affect microcrack propagation and apparent mechanical properties: Separation of patients with osteoporotic fracture from normal controls using a 2D nonlinear finite element method (biomechanical stereology)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang; Zauel, Roger R.; Rao, D. Sudhaker; Fyhrie, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Biomechanical stereology is proposed as a two-dimensional (2D) finite element (FE) method to estimate the ability of bone tissue to sustain damage and to separate patients with osteoporotic fracture from normal controls. Briefly, 2D nonlinear compact tension FE models were created from quantitative back scattered electron images taken of iliac crest bone specimens collected from the individuals with or without osteoporotic fracture history. The effects of bone mineral microstructure on predicted bone fracture toughness and microcrack propagation were examined. The 2D FE models were used as surrogates for the real bone tissues. The calculated microcrack propagation results and bone mechanical properties were examined as surrogates for measurements from mechanical testing of actual specimens. The results for the 2D FE simulation separated patients with osteoporotic fracture from normal controls even though only the variability in tissue mineral microstructure was used to build the models. The models were deliberately created to ignore all differences in mean mineralization. Hence, the current results support the following hypotheses: (1) that material heterogeneity is important to the separation of patients with osteoporotic fracture from normal controls and; and (2) that 2D nonlinear finite element modeling can produce surrogate mechanical parameters that separate patients with fracture from normal controls. PMID:18378204

  20. Domain decomposition finite element/finite difference method for the conductivity reconstruction in a hyperbolic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilina, Larisa

    2016-08-01

    We present domain decomposition finite element/finite difference method for the solution of hyperbolic equation. The domain decomposition is performed such that finite elements and finite differences are used in different subdomains of the computational domain: finite difference method is used on the structured part of the computational domain and finite elements on the unstructured part of the domain. Explicit discretizations for both methods are constructed such that the finite element and the finite difference schemes coincide on the common structured overlapping layer between computational subdomains. Then the resulting approach can be considered as a pure finite element scheme which avoids instabilities at the interfaces. We derive an energy estimate for the underlying hyperbolic equation with absorbing boundary conditions and illustrate efficiency of the domain decomposition method on the reconstruction of the conductivity function in three dimensions.

  1. TVD finite difference schemes and artificial viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    The total variation diminishing (TVD) finite difference scheme can be interpreted as a Lax-Wendroff scheme plus an upwind weighted artificial dissipation term. If a particular flux limiter is chosen and the requirement for upwind weighting is removed, an artificial dissipation term which is based on the theory of TVD schemes is obtained which does not contain any problem dependent parameters and which can be added to existing MacCormack method codes. Numerical experiments to examine the performance of this new method are discussed.

  2. Software suite for finite difference method models.

    PubMed

    Arola, T; Hannula, M; Narra, N; Malmivuo, J; Hyttinen, J

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a software suite for finite difference method (FDM) model construction, visualization and quasi-static simulation to be used in bioelectric field modeling. The aim of the software is to provide a full path from medical image data to simulation of bioelectric phenomena and results visualization. It is written in Java and can be run on various platforms while still supporting all features included. The software can be distributed across a network utilizing dedicated servers for calculation intensive tasks. Supported visualization modes are both two- and three-dimensional modes. PMID:17946057

  3. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  4. Users manual for AUTOMESH-2D: A program of automatic mesh generation for two-dimensional scattering analysis by the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Chongyu; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    AUTOMESH-2D is a computer program specifically designed as a preprocessor for the scattering analysis of two dimensional bodies by the finite element method. This program was developed due to a need for reproducing the effort required to define and check the geometry data, element topology, and material properties. There are six modules in the program: (1) Parameter Specification; (2) Data Input; (3) Node Generation; (4) Element Generation; (5) Mesh Smoothing; and (5) Data File Generation.

  5. Finite difference grid generation by multivariate blending function interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Spradley, L. W.

    1980-01-01

    The General Interpolants Method (GIM) code which solves the multidimensional Navier-Stokes equations for arbitrary geometric domains is described. The geometry module in the GIM code generates two and three dimensional grids over specified flow regimes, establishes boundary condition information and computes finite difference analogs for use in the GIM code numerical solution module. The technique can be classified as an algebraic equation approach. The geometry package uses multivariate blending function interpolation of vector-values functions which define the shapes of the edges and surfaces bounding the flow domain. By employing blending functions which conform to the cardinality conditions the flow domain may be mapped onto a unit square (2-D) or unit cube (3-D), thus producing an intrinsic coordinate system for the region of interest. The intrinsic coordinate system facilitates grid spacing control to allow for optimum distribution of nodes in the flow domain.

  6. Visualization of elastic wavefields computed with a finite difference code

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, S.; Harris, D.

    1994-11-15

    The authors have developed a finite difference elastic propagation model to simulate seismic wave propagation through geophysically complex regions. To facilitate debugging and to assist seismologists in interpreting the seismograms generated by the code, they have developed an X Windows interface that permits viewing of successive temporal snapshots of the (2D) wavefield as they are calculated. The authors present a brief video displaying the generation of seismic waves by an explosive source on a continent, which propagate to the edge of the continent then convert to two types of acoustic waves. This sample calculation was part of an effort to study the potential of offshore hydroacoustic systems to monitor seismic events occurring onshore.

  7. TUNED FINITE-DIFFERENCE DIFFUSION OPERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, Jason; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org

    2009-05-15

    Finite-difference simulations of fluid dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics generally require an explicit diffusion operator, either to maintain stability by attenuating grid-scale structure, or to implement physical diffusivities such as viscosity or resistivity. If the goal is stability only, the diffusion must act at the grid scale, but should affect structure at larger scales as little as possible. For physical diffusivities the diffusion scale depends on the problem, and diffusion may act at larger scales as well. Diffusivity can undesirably limit the computational time step in both cases. We construct tuned finite-difference diffusion operators that minimally limit the time step while acting as desired near the diffusion scale. Such operators reach peak values at the diffusion scale rather than at the grid scale, but behave as standard operators at larger scales. These operators will be useful for simulations with high magnetic diffusivity or kinematic viscosity such as in the simulation of astrophysical dynamos with magnetic Prandtl number far from unity, or for numerical stabilization using hyperdiffusivity.

  8. Contrast enhancement based on layered difference representation of 2D histograms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chulwoo; Lee, Chul; Kim, Chang-Su

    2013-12-01

    A novel contrast enhancement algorithm based on the layered difference representation of 2D histograms is proposed in this paper. We attempt to enhance image contrast by amplifying the gray-level differences between adjacent pixels. To this end, we obtain the 2D histogram h(k, k + l ) from an input image, which counts the pairs of adjacent pixels with gray-levels k and k + l , and represent the gray-level differences in a tree-like layered structure. Then, we formulate a constrained optimization problem based on the observation that the gray-level differences, occurring more frequently in the input image, should be more emphasized in the output image. We first solve the optimization problem to derive the transformation function at each layer. We then combine the transformation functions at all layers into the unified transformation function, which is used to map input gray-levels to output gray-levels. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm enhances images efficiently in terms of both objective quality and subjective quality.

  9. Lowrank finite-differences and lowrank Fourier finite-differences for seismic wave extrapolation in the acoustic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaolei; Fomel, Sergey; Ying, Lexing

    2013-05-01

    We introduce a novel finite-difference (FD) approach for seismic wave extrapolation in time. We derive the coefficients of the finite-difference operator from a lowrank approximation of the space-wavenumber, wave-propagator matrix. Applying the technique of lowrank finite-differences, we also improve the finite difference scheme of the two-way Fourier finite differences (FFD). We call the new operator lowrank Fourier finite differences (LFFD). Both the lowrank FD and lowrank FFD methods can be applied to enhance accuracy in seismic imaging by reverse-time migration. Numerical examples confirm the validity of the proposed technique.

  10. Interfractional trend analysis of dose differences based on 2D transit portal dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persoon, L. C. G. G.; Nijsten, S. M. J. J. G.; Wilbrink, F. J.; Podesta, M.; Snaith, J. A. D.; Lustberg, T.; van Elmpt, W. J. C.; van Gils, F.; Verhaegen, F.

    2012-10-01

    Dose delivery of a radiotherapy treatment can be influenced by a number of factors. It has been demonstrated that the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is valuable for transit portal dosimetry verification. Patient related dose differences can emerge at any time during treatment and can be categorized in two types: (1) systematic—appearing repeatedly, (2) random—appearing sporadically during treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate how systematic and random information appears in 2D transit dose distributions measured in the EPID plane over the entire course of a treatment and how this information can be used to examine interfractional trends, building toward a methodology to support adaptive radiotherapy. To create a trend overview of the interfractional changes in transit dose, the predicted portal dose for the different beams is compared to a measured portal dose using a γ evaluation. For each beam of the delivered fraction, information is extracted from the γ images to differentiate systematic from random dose delivery errors. From the systematic differences of a fraction for a projected anatomical structures, several metrics are extracted like percentage pixels with |γ| > 1. We demonstrate for four example cases the trends and dose difference causes which can be detected with this method. Two sample prostate cases show the occurrence of a random and systematic difference and identify the organ that causes the difference. In a lung cancer case a trend is shown of a rapidly diminishing atelectasis (lung fluid) during the course of treatment, which was detected with this trend analysis method. The final example is a breast cancer case where we show the influence of set-up differences on the 2D transit dose. A method is presented based on 2D portal transit dosimetry to record dose changes throughout the course of treatment, and to allow trend analysis of dose discrepancies. We show in example cases that this method can identify the causes of

  11. A comparative study of finite element and finite difference methods for Cauchy-Riemann type equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G. J.; Rose, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    A least squares formulation of the system divu = rho, curlu = zeta is surveyed from the viewpoint of both finite element and finite difference methods. Closely related arguments are shown to establish convergence estimates.

  12. 2D:4D asymmetry and gender differences in academic performance.

    PubMed

    Nye, John V C; Androuschak, Gregory; Desierto, Desirée; Jones, Garett; Yudkevich, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to prenatal androgens affects both future behavior and life choices. However, there is still relatively limited evidence on its effects on academic performance. Moreover, the predicted effect of exposure to prenatal testosterone (T)-which is inversely correlated with the relative length of the second to fourth finger lengths (2D:4D)-would seem to have ambiguous effects on academic achievement since traits like aggressiveness or risk-taking are not uniformly positive for success in school. We provide the first evidence of a non-linear, quadratic, relationship between 2D:4D and academic achievement using samples from Moscow and Manila. We also find that there is a gender differentiated link between various measures of academic achievement and measured digit ratios. These effects are different depending on the field of study, choice of achievement measure, and use of the right hand or left digit ratios. The results seem to be asymmetric between Moscow and Manila where the right (left) hand generates inverted-U (U-shaped) curves in Moscow while the pattern for hands reverses in Manila. Drawing from unusually large and detailed samples of university students in two countries not studied in the digit literature, our work is the first to have a large cross country comparison that includes two groups with very different ethnic compositions.

  13. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  14. A positive finite-difference advection scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Hundsdorfer, W.; Koren, B.; Loon, M. van

    1995-03-01

    This paper examines a class of explicit finite-difference advection schemes derived along the method of lines. An important application field is large-scale atmospheric transport. The paper therefore focuses on the demand of positivity. For the spatial discretization, attention is confined to conservative schemes using five points per direction. The fourth-order central scheme and the family of {kappa}-schemes, comprising the second-order central, the second-order upwind, and the third-order upwind biased, are studied. Positivity is enforced through flux limiting. It is concluded that the limited third-order upwind discretization is the best candidate from the four examined. For the time integration attention is confined to a number of explicit Runge-Kutta methods of orders two to four. With regard to the demand of positivity, these integration methods turn out to behave almost equally and no best method could be identified. 16 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. A Piecewise Linear Discontinuous Finite Element Spatial Discretization of the Transport Equation in 2D Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Adams, M L; Chang, J H

    2008-10-01

    We present a new spatial discretization of the discrete-ordinates transport equation in two-dimensional cylindrical (RZ) geometry for arbitrary polygonal meshes. This discretization is a discontinuous finite element method that utilizes the piecewise linear basis functions developed by Stone and Adams. We describe an asymptotic analysis that shows this method to be accurate for many problems in the thick diffusion limit on arbitrary polygons, allowing this method to be applied to radiative transfer problems with these types of meshes. We also present numerical results for multiple problems on quadrilateral grids and compare these results to the well-known bi-linear discontinuous finite element method.

  16. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  17. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme.

  18. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  19. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-05

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme.

  20. Methods for Solving Gas Damping Problems in Perforated Microstructures Using a 2D Finite-Element Solver

    PubMed Central

    Veijola, Timo; Råback, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We present a straightforward method to solve gas damping problems for perforated structures in two dimensions (2D) utilising a Perforation Profile Reynolds (PPR) solver. The PPR equation is an extended Reynolds equation that includes additional terms modelling the leakage flow through the perforations, and variable diffusivity and compressibility profiles. The solution method consists of two phases: 1) determination of the specific admittance profile and relative diffusivity (and relative compressibility) profiles due to the perforation, and 2) solution of the PPR equation with a FEM solver in 2D. Rarefied gas corrections in the slip-flow region are also included. Analytic profiles for circular and square holes with slip conditions are presented in the paper. To verify the method, square perforated dampers with 16–64 holes were simulated with a three-dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes solver, a homogenised extended Reynolds solver, and a 2D PPR solver. Cases for both translational (in normal to the surfaces) and torsional motion were simulated. The presented method extends the region of accurate simulation of perforated structures to cases where the homogenisation method is inaccurate and the full 3D Navier-Stokes simulation is too time-consuming.

  1. Finite difference computation of Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    In this Invited paper, we begin by a historical introduction to provide a motivation for the classical problems of interatomic force computation and associated challenges. This analysis will lead us from early theoretical and experimental accomplishments to the integration of these fascinating interactions into the operation of realistic, next-generation micro- and nanodevices both for the advanced metrology of fundamental physical processes and in breakthrough industrial applications. Among several powerful strategies enabling vastly enhanced performance and entirely novel technological capabilities, we shall specifically consider Casimir force time-modulation and the adoption of non-trivial geometries. As to the former, the ability to alter the magnitude and sign of the Casimir force will be recognized as a crucial principle to implement thermodynamical nano-engines. As to the latter, we shall first briefly review various reported computational approaches. We shall then discuss the game-changing discovery, in the last decade, that standard methods of numerical classical electromagnetism can be retooled to formulate the problem of Casimir force computation in arbitrary geometries. This remarkable development will be practically illustrated by showing that such an apparently elementary method as standard finite-differencing can be successfully employed to numerically recover results known from the Lifshitz theory of dispersion forces in the case of interacting parallel-plane slabs. Other geometries will be also be explored and consideration given to the potential of non-standard finite-difference methods. Finally, we shall introduce problems at the computational frontier, such as those including membranes deformed by Casimir forces and the effects of anisotropic materials. Conclusions will highlight the dramatic transition from the enduring perception of this field as an exotic application of quantum electrodynamics to the recent demonstration of a human climbing

  2. Calibration and simulation of ASM2d at different temperatures in a phosphorus removal pilot plant.

    PubMed

    García-Usach, F; Ferrer, J; Bouzas, A; Seco, A

    2006-01-01

    In this work, an organic and nutrient removal pilot plant was used to study the temperature influence on phosphorus accumulating organisms. Three experiments were carried out at 13, 20 and 24.5 degrees C, achieving a high phosphorus removal percentage in all cases. The ASM2d model was calibrated at 13 and 20 degrees C and the Arrhenius equation constant was obtained for phosphorus removal processes showing that the temperature influences on the biological phosphorus removal subprocesses in a different degree. The 24.5 degrees C experiment was simulated using the model parameters obtained by means of the Arrhenius equation. The simulation results for the three experiments showed good correspondence with the experimental data, demonstrating that the model and the calibrated parameters were able to predict the pilot plant behaviour.

  3. Finite Element Method for Analysis of Band Structures of 2D Phononic Crystals with Archimedean-like tilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianbao; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, a finite element method based on the ABAQUS code and user subroutine is presented to evaluate the propagation of acoustic waves in the two-dimensional phononic crystals with Archimedean-like tilings. Two systems composed of cylinder scatters embedded in a host in Ladybug and Bathroom lattices are considered. Complete and accurate band structures and transmission spectra are obtained to identify the band gaps and eigenmodes. We found that Archimedean-like structures can have some advantages over the traditional square lattice regarding the completeness of the gap and its position and width. Also, due to the same square primitive unit cell and the first Brillouin zone, the two square-like lattices have similar acoustic response in lower bands. The results indicate that the finite element method is precise for the band structure computation of the complex phononic crystals with Archimedean tilings.

  4. Meshing Preprocessor for the Mesoscopic 3D Finite Element Simulation of 2D and Interlock Fabric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendling, A.; Daniel, J. L.; Hivet, G.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Boisse, P.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior and the feasibility of composite parts. Among the available numerical approaches, as far as woven reinforced composites are concerned, 3D finite element simulation at the mesoscopic scale leads to a good compromise between realism and complexity. At this scale, the fibrous reinforcement is modeled by an interlacement of yarns assumed to be homogeneous that have to be accurately represented. Among the numerous issues induced by these simulations, the first one consists in providing a representative meshed geometrical model of the unit cell at the mesoscopic scale. The second one consists in enabling a fast data input in the finite element software (contacts definition, boundary conditions, elements reorientation, etc.) so as to obtain results within reasonable time. Based on parameterized 3D CAD modeling tool of unit-cells of dry fabrics already developed, this paper presents an efficient strategy which permits an automated meshing of the models with 3D hexahedral elements and to accelerate of several orders of magnitude the simulation data input. Finally, the overall modeling strategy is illustrated by examples of finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of fabrics.

  5. Solution of the 2-D steady-state radiative transfer equation in participating media with specular reflections using SUPG and DG finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hardy, D.; Favennec, Y.; Rousseau, B.

    2016-08-01

    The 2D radiative transfer equation coupled with specular reflection boundary conditions is solved using finite element schemes. Both Discontinuous Galerkin and Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin variational formulations are fully developed. These two schemes are validated step-by-step for all involved operators (transport, scattering, reflection) using analytical formulations. Numerical comparisons of the two schemes, in terms of convergence rate, reveal that the quadratic SUPG scheme proves efficient for solving such problems. This comparison constitutes the main issue of the paper. Moreover, the solution process is accelerated using block SOR-type iterative methods, for which the determination of the optimal parameter is found in a very cheap way.

  6. Coupled 2D-3D finite element method for analysis of a skin panel with a discontinuous stiffener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. T.; Lotts, C. G.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Krishnamurthy, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a computationally efficient analysis method which was used to predict detailed stress states in a typical composite compression panel with a discontinuous hat stiffener. A global-local approach was used. The global model incorporated both 2D shell and 3D brick elements connected by newly developed transition elements. Most of the panel was modeled with 2D elements, while 3D elements were employed to model the stiffener flange and the adjacent skin. Both linear and geometrically nonlinear analyses were performed on the global model. The effect of geometric nonlinearity induced by the eccentric load path due to the discontinuous hat stiffener was significant. The local model used a fine mesh of 3D brick elements to model the region at the end of the stiffener. Boundary conditions of the local 3D model were obtained by spline interpolation of the nodal displacements from the global analysis. Detailed in-plane and through-the-thickness stresses were calculated in the flange-skin interface near the end of the stiffener.

  7. High-order entropy stable finite difference schemes for nonlinear conservation laws: Finite domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference operators including boundary closure stencils, for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A comparison technique is used to derive a new Entropy Stable Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (SSWENO) finite difference method, appropriate for simulations of problems with shocks. Viscous terms are approximated using conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference operators. The efficacy of the new discrete operators is demonstrated using both smooth and discontinuous test cases.

  8. Finite Mathematics and Discrete Mathematics: Is There a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marvin L.

    Discrete mathematics and finite mathematics differ in a number of ways. First, finite mathematics has a longer history and is therefore more stable in terms of course content. Finite mathematics courses emphasize certain particular mathematical tools which are useful in solving the problems of business and the social sciences. Discrete mathematics…

  9. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  10. Viscoelastic Finite Difference Modeling Using Graphics Processing Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabien-Ouellet, G.; Gloaguen, E.; Giroux, B.

    2014-12-01

    Full waveform seismic modeling requires a huge amount of computing power that still challenges today's technology. This limits the applicability of powerful processing approaches in seismic exploration like full-waveform inversion. This paper explores the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPU) to compute a time based finite-difference solution to the viscoelastic wave equation. The aim is to investigate whether the adoption of the GPU technology is susceptible to reduce significantly the computing time of simulations. The code presented herein is based on the freely accessible software of Bohlen (2002) in 2D provided under a General Public License (GNU) licence. This implementation is based on a second order centred differences scheme to approximate time differences and staggered grid schemes with centred difference of order 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 for spatial derivatives. The code is fully parallel and is written using the Message Passing Interface (MPI), and it thus supports simulations of vast seismic models on a cluster of CPUs. To port the code from Bohlen (2002) on GPUs, the OpenCl framework was chosen for its ability to work on both CPUs and GPUs and its adoption by most of GPU manufacturers. In our implementation, OpenCL works in conjunction with MPI, which allows computations on a cluster of GPU for large-scale model simulations. We tested our code for model sizes between 1002 and 60002 elements. Comparison shows a decrease in computation time of more than two orders of magnitude between the GPU implementation run on a AMD Radeon HD 7950 and the CPU implementation run on a 2.26 GHz Intel Xeon Quad-Core. The speed-up varies depending on the order of the finite difference approximation and generally increases for higher orders. Increasing speed-ups are also obtained for increasing model size, which can be explained by kernel overheads and delays introduced by memory transfers to and from the GPU through the PCI-E bus. Those tests indicate that the GPU memory size

  11. Stochastic finite-difference time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven Michael

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation presents the derivation of an approximate method to determine the mean and the variance of electro-magnetic fields in the body using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method. Unlike Monte Carlo analysis, which requires repeated FDTD simulations, this method directly computes the variance of the fields at every point in space at every sample of time in the simulation. This Stochastic FDTD simulation (S-FDTD) has at its root a new wave called the Variance wave, which is computed in the time domain along with the mean properties of the model space in the FDTD simulation. The Variance wave depends on the electro-magnetic fields, the reflections and transmission though the different dielectrics, and the variances of the electrical properties of the surrounding materials. Like the electro-magnetic fields, the Variance wave begins at zero (there is no variance before the source is turned on) and is computed in the time domain until all fields reach steady state. This process is performed in a fraction of the time of a Monte Carlo simulation and yields the first two statistical parameters (mean and variance). The mean of the field is computed using the traditional FDTD equations. Variance is computed by approximating the correlation coefficients between the constituitive properties and the use of the S-FDTD equations. The impetus for this work was the simulation time it takes to perform 3D Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) FDTD analysis of the human head model for cell phone power absorption in the human head due to the proximity of a cell phone being used. In many instances, Monte Carlo analysis is not performed due to the lengthy simulation times required. With the development of S-FDTD, these statistical analyses could be performed providing valuable statistical information with this information being provided in a small fraction of the time it would take to perform a Monte Carlo analysis.

  12. A finite analytic method for solving the 2-D time-dependent advection diffusion equation with time-invariant coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Thomas; Li, Shu-Guang

    2005-02-01

    Difficulty in solving the transient advection-diffusion equation (ADE) stems from the relationship between the advection derivatives and the time derivative. For a solution method to be viable, it must account for this relationship by being accurate in both space and time. This research presents a unique method for solving the time-dependent ADE that does not discretize the derivative terms but rather solves the equation analytically in the space-time domain. The method is computationally efficient and numerically accurate and addresses the common limitations of numerical dispersion and spurious oscillations that can be prevalent in other solution methods. The method is based on the improved finite analytic (IFA) solution method [Lowry TS, Li S-G. A characteristic based finite analytic method for solving the two-dimensional steady-state advection-diffusion equation. Water Resour Res 38 (7), 10.1029/2001WR000518] in space coupled with a Laplace transformation in time. In this way, the method has no Courant condition and maintains accuracy in space and time, performing well even at high Peclet numbers. The method is compared to a hybrid method of characteristics, a random walk particle tracking method, and an Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method using various degrees of flow-field heterogeneity across multiple Peclet numbers. Results show the IFALT method to be computationally more efficient while producing similar or better accuracy than the other methods.

  13. Full 2D observation of water surface elevation from SWOT under different flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Schumann, Guy; Rui, Wei; Durand, Michael; Pavelsky, Tamlin

    2016-04-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission is a joint project of NASA, Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES, France), the Canadian Space Agency, and the Space Agency of the UK that will provide a first global, high-resolution observation of ocean and terrestrial water surface heights. Characterized by an observation swath of 120 km and an orbit repeat interval of about 21 days, SWOT will provide unprecedented bi-dimensional observations of rivers wider than 50-100 m. Despite many research activities that have investigated potential uses of remotely sensed data from SWOT, potentials and limitations of the spatial observations provided by the satellite mission for flood modeling still remain poorly understood and investigated. In this study we present a first analysis of the spatial observation of water surface elevation that is expected from SWOT for a 140 km reach of the middle-lower portion of the Po River, in Northern Italy. The river stretch is characterized by a main channel varying from 200-500 m in width and a floodplain that can be as wide as 5 km and that is delimited by a system of major embankments. The reconstruction of the hydraulic behavior of the Po River is performed by means of a quasi-2d model built with detailed topographic and bathymetric information (LiDAR, 2 m resolution), while the simulation of the spatial observation sensed by SWOT is performed with a SWOT simulator that mimics the satellite sensor characteristics. Referring to water surface elevations associated with different flow conditions (maximum, minimum and average flow reproduced by means of the quasi-2d numerical model) this work provides a first characterization of the spatial observations provided by SWOT and highlights the strengths and limitations of the expected products. By referring to a real river reach the analysis provides a credible example of the type of spatial observations that will be available after launch of SWOT and offers a first

  14. Local finite element enrichment strategies for 2D contact computations and a corresponding post-processing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Roger A.

    2013-08-01

    Recently an enriched contact finite element formulation has been developed that substantially increases the accuracy of contact computations while keeping the additional numerical effort at a minimum reported by Sauer (Int J Numer Meth Eng, 87: 593-616, 2011). Two enrich-ment strategies were proposed, one based on local p-refinement using Lagrange interpolation and one based on Hermite interpolation that produces C 1-smoothness on the contact surface. Both classes, which were initially considered for the frictionless Signorini problem, are extended here to friction and contact between deformable bodies. For this, a symmetric contact formulation is used that allows the unbiased treatment of both contact partners. This paper also proposes a post-processing scheme for contact quantities like the contact pressure. The scheme, which provides a more accurate representation than the raw data, is based on an averaging procedure that is inspired by mortar formulations. The properties of the enrichment strategies and the corresponding post-processing scheme are illustrated by several numerical examples considering sliding and peeling contact in the presence of large deformations.

  15. Computer-Oriented Calculus Courses Using Finite Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    The so-called discrete approach in calculus instruction involves introducing topics from the calculus of finite differences and finite sums, both for motivation and as useful tools for applications of the calculus. In particular, it provides an ideal setting in which to incorporate computers into calculus courses. This approach has been…

  16. Hybrid finite element-finite difference method for thermal analysis of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C H; Gutierrez, G; White, J A; Roemer, R B

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid finite-difference/finite-element technique for the thermal analysis of blood vessels embedded in perfused tissue has been developed and evaluated. This method provides efficient and accurate solutions to the conjugated heat transfer problem of convection by blood coupled to conduction in the tissue. The technique uses a previously developed 3D automatic meshing method for creating a finite element mesh in the tissue surrounding the vessels, coupled iteratively with a 1-D marching finite difference method for the interior of the vessels. This hybrid technique retains the flexibility and ease of automated finite-element meshing techniques for modelling the complex geometry of blood vessels and irregularly shaped tissues, and speeds the solution time by using a simple finite-difference method to calculate the bulk mean temperatures within all blood vessels. The use of the 1D finite-difference technique in the blood vessels also eliminates the large computer memory requirements needed to accurately solve large vessel network problems when fine FE meshes are used in the interior of vessels. The accuracy of the hybrid technique has been verified against previously verified numerical solutions. In summary, the hybrid technique combines the accuracy and flexibility found in automated finite-element techniques, with the speed and reduction of computational memory requirements associated with the 1D finite-difference technique, something which has not been done before. This method, thus, has the potential to provide accurate, flexible and relatively fast solutions for the thermal analysis of coupled perfusion/blood vessel problems, and large vessel network problems.

  17. Seismic-acoustic finite-difference wave propagation algorithm.

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Leiph; Aldridge, David Franklin

    2010-10-01

    An efficient numerical algorithm for treating earth models composed of fluid and solid portions is obtained via straightforward modifications to a 3D time-domain finite-difference algorithm for simulating isotropic elastic wave propagation.

  18. Conservative properties of finite difference schemes for incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morinishi, Youhei

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to construct accurate finite difference schemes for incompressible unsteady flow simulations such as LES (large-eddy simulation) or DNS (direct numerical simulation). In this report, conservation properties of the continuity, momentum, and kinetic energy equations for incompressible flow are specified as analytical requirements for a proper set of discretized equations. Existing finite difference schemes in staggered grid systems are checked for satisfaction of the requirements. Proper higher order accurate finite difference schemes in a staggered grid system are then proposed. Plane channel flow is simulated using the proposed fourth order accurate finite difference scheme and the results compared with those of the second order accurate Harlow and Welch algorithm.

  19. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  20. Numerical techniques in linear duct acoustics. [finite difference and finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    Both finite difference and finite element analyses of small amplitude (linear) sound propagation in straight and variable area ducts with flow, as might be found in a typical turboject engine duct, muffler, or industrial ventilation system, are reviewed. Both steady state and transient theories are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advantages and limitations associated with the various numerical techniques. Examples of practical problems are given for which the numerical techniques have been applied.

  1. Numerical models of diapiric structures: comparison of the 2D finite deformation field between Rayleigh-Taylor like and down-built like diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Lukas; Schmeling, Harro; Koyi, Hemin

    2013-04-01

    Magmatic and salt diapirs are common structures in different tectonic regimes. Salt diapirs can act as possible hydrocarbon traps and, moreover, they could be used as repositories for nuclear waste disposal. Understanding the evolution and the dynamics of diapirs as well as their driving mechanisms has fundamental and applied significance. In general, salt diapirs seem to be driven by differential loading of sediments creating an uneven load that drives the salt from high to low pressure areas, e.g. a down-built diapir. Magmatic diapirs, instead, seem to be driven by buoyancy where lighter material rises vertically through a heavier overburden, i.e. a classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability [RTI]. These different driving mechanisms and dynamics strongly govern the internal deformation of the diapirs. In this study, we use a two-dimensional finite difference code (FDCON) in combination with a marker and cell method to calculate the finite deformation within diapiric structures. Thereby, we distinguish between the two different driving mechanisms, i.e. the differential loading and the buoyancy. We calculate the different finite deformation patterns during the evolution of RTI's and down-built diapirs for different viscosity ratios m = -?buoyant- ?overburden. The deformation pattern in the buoyant layer shows similarities for both diapiric structures, like high shear deformation at the bottom, a high finite deformation within the middle of the stem, and an increasing maximum finite deformation for a decreasing m. However, the strain partitioning between the overburden and the source layer is different within down-built diapirs compared to the RTI's, even for down-built diapirs with m = 1. Thus a higher amount of the total strain induced by down-building is concentrated within the buoyant layer. Moreover, in the case of viscosity ratios of m = 0.1 or 1 the sinking overburden units create an internal rotation within the diapiric bulb. This rotation depends indirectly on

  2. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A comparison of 2D and 3D finite element calculations with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. Four axial impact tests were performed on 4 in-diameter, 8 in-long, 304 L stainless steel cylinders with a 3/16 in wall thickness. The cylinders were struck by a 597 lb mass with an impact velocity ranging from 42.2 to 45.1 ft/sec. During the impact event, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. The instability occurred at the top of the cylinder in three tests and at the bottom in one test. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using the following codes and element types: PRONTO2D with axisymmetric four-node quadrilaterals; PRONTO3D with both four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons; and ABAQUS/Explicit with axisymmetric two-node shells and four-node quadrilaterals, and 3D four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons. All of the calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history. As in the tests, the location of the instability is not consistent in all of the calculations. However, the calculations show good agreement with impact load measurements with the exception of an initial load spike which is proven to be the dynamic response of the load cell to the impact. Finally, the PRONIT02D calculation is compared to the tests with respect to strain and acceleration histories. Accelerometer data exhibited good qualitative agreement with the calculations. The strain comparisons show that measurements are very sensitive to gage placement.

  3. Comparison of 2D transmon coherence for different capacitive shunt fabrication methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Jonilyn; Kamal, Archana; Yan, Fei; Gudmundsen, Theodore; Welander, Paul; Gustavsson, Simon; Hover, David; Kerman, Andrew; Sears, Adam; Oliver, William

    2015-03-01

    Improvements in superconducting qubit coherence times and reproducibility have been demonstrated using capacitive shunting. In this study, we present a side-by-side comparison of two distinct methods for preparing the aluminum shunt capacitor material for 2D transmon superconducting qubit devices. The first method involved in situ wafer outgassing prior to molecular beam epitaxy aluminum evaporation. The second method involved ex situ wafer annealing prior to electron gun aluminum evaporation. Materials analysis for each process will be detailed. Experimental results, including qubit coherence times and superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator internal quality factors, will be presented for representative devices prepared using both methods. This work is sponsored by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering under Air Force Contract FA8721-05-0002. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government.

  4. Differences in the Toxicological Potential of 2D versus Aggregated Molybdenum Disulfide in the Lung.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Mansukhani, Nikhita D; Guiney, Linda M; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Wang, Meiying; Liao, Yu-Pei; Song, Tze-Bin; Sun, Bingbing; Li, Ruibin; Xia, Tian; Hersam, Mark C; Nel, André E

    2015-10-01

    2D molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 ) has distinct optical and electronic properties compared to aggregated MoS2 , enabling wide use of these materials for electronic and biomedical applications. However, the hazard potential of MoS2 has not been studied extensively. Here, a comprehensive analysis of the pulmonary hazard potential of three aqueous suspended forms of MoS2 -aggregated MoS2 (Agg-MoS2 ), MoS2 exfoliated by lithiation (Lit-MoS2 ), and MoS2 dispersed by Pluronic F87 (PF87-MoS2 )-is presented. No cytotoxicity is detected in THP-1 and BEAS-2B cell lines. However, Agg-MoS2 induces strong proinflammatory and profibrogenic responses in vitro. In contrast, Lit- and PF87-MoS2 have little or no effect. In an acute toxicity study in mice, Agg-MoS2 induces acute lung inflammation, while Lit-MoS2 and PF87-MoS2 have little or no effect. In a subchronic study, there is no evidence of pulmonary fibrosis in response to all forms of MoS2 . These data suggest that exfoliation attenuates the toxicity of Agg-MoS2 , which is an important consideration toward the safety evaluation and use of nanoscale MoS2 materials for industrial and biological applications.

  5. Improved finite-difference vibration analysis of pretwisted, tapered beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1984-01-01

    An improved finite difference procedure based upon second order central differences is developed. Several difficulties encountered in earlier works with fictitious stations that arise in using second order central differences, are eliminated by developing certain recursive relations. The need for forward or backward differences at the beam boundaries or other similar procedures is eliminated in the present theory. By using this improved theory, the vibration characteristics of pretwisted and tapered blades are calculated. Results of the second order theory are compared with published theoretical and experimental results and are found to be in good agreement. The present method generally produces close lower bound solutions and shows fast convergence. Thus, extrapolation procedures that are customary with first order finite-difference methods are unnecessary. Furthermore, the computational time and effort needed for this improved method are almost the same as required for the conventional first order finite-difference approach.

  6. Finite-difference schemes for anisotropic diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Es, Bram van; Koren, Barry; Blank, Hugo J. de

    2014-09-01

    In fusion plasmas diffusion tensors are extremely anisotropic due to the high temperature and large magnetic field strength. This causes diffusion, heat conduction, and viscous momentum loss, to effectively be aligned with the magnetic field lines. This alignment leads to different values for the respective diffusive coefficients in the magnetic field direction and in the perpendicular direction, to the extent that heat diffusion coefficients can be up to 10{sup 12} times larger in the parallel direction than in the perpendicular direction. This anisotropy puts stringent requirements on the numerical methods used to approximate the MHD-equations since any misalignment of the grid may cause the perpendicular diffusion to be polluted by the numerical error in approximating the parallel diffusion. Currently the common approach is to apply magnetic field-aligned coordinates, an approach that automatically takes care of the directionality of the diffusive coefficients. This approach runs into problems at x-points and at points where there is magnetic re-connection, since this causes local non-alignment. It is therefore useful to consider numerical schemes that are tolerant to the misalignment of the grid with the magnetic field lines, both to improve existing methods and to help open the possibility of applying regular non-aligned grids. To investigate this, in this paper several discretization schemes are developed and applied to the anisotropic heat diffusion equation on a non-aligned grid.

  7. Direct simulations of turbulent flow using finite-difference schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Moin, Parviz

    1989-01-01

    A high-order accurate finite-difference approach is presented for calculating incompressible turbulent flow. The methods used include a kinetic energy conserving central difference scheme and an upwind difference scheme. The methods are evaluated in test cases for the evolution of small-amplitude disturbances and fully developed turbulent channel flow. It is suggested that the finite-difference approach can be applied to complex geometries more easilty than highly accurate spectral methods. It is concluded that the upwind scheme is a good candidate for direct simulations of turbulent flows over complex geometries.

  8. Asymptotic analysis of numerical wave propagation in finite difference equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, M.; Thompkins, W. T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An asymptotic technique is developed for analyzing the propagation and dissipation of wave-like solutions to finite difference equations. It is shown that for each fixed complex frequency there are usually several wave solutions with different wavenumbers and the slowly varying amplitude of each satisfies an asymptotic amplitude equation which includes the effects of smoothly varying coefficients in the finite difference equations. The local group velocity appears in this equation as the velocity of convection of the amplitude. Asymptotic boundary conditions coupling the amplitudes of the different wave solutions are also derived. A wavepacket theory is developed which predicts the motion, and interaction at boundaries, of wavepackets, wave-like disturbances of finite length. Comparison with numerical experiments demonstrates the success and limitations of the theory. Finally an asymptotic global stability analysis is developed.

  9. Stochastic rank correlation: A robust merit function for 2D/3D registration of image data obtained at different energies

    PubMed Central

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Stock, Markus; Figl, Michael; Gendrin, Christelle; Hummel, Johann; Dong, Shuo; Kettenbach, Joachim; Georg, Dietmar; Bergmann, Helmar

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors evaluate a merit function for 2D/3D registration called stochastic rank correlation (SRC). SRC is characterized by the fact that differences in image intensity do not influence the registration result; it therefore combines the numerical advantages of cross correlation (CC)-type merit functions with the flexibility of mutual-information-type merit functions. The basic idea is that registration is achieved on a random subset of the image, which allows for an efficient computation of Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. This measure is, by nature, invariant to monotonic intensity transforms in the images under comparison, which renders it an ideal solution for intramodal images acquired at different energy levels as encountered in intrafractional kV imaging in image-guided radiotherapy. Initial evaluation was undertaken using a 2D/3D registration reference image dataset of a cadaver spine. Even with no radiometric calibration, SRC shows a significant improvement in robustness and stability compared to CC. Pattern intensity, another merit function that was evaluated for comparison, gave rather poor results due to its limited convergence range. The time required for SRC with 5% image content compares well to the other merit functions; increasing the image content does not significantly influence the algorithm accuracy. The authors conclude that SRC is a promising measure for 2D/3D registration in IGRT and image-guided therapy in general. PMID:19746775

  10. Plasmonic spectrum on 1D and 2D periodic arrays of rod-shape metal nanoparticle pairs with different core patterns for biosensor and solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumara, N. T. R. N.; Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Huang, Jin-Wei; Huang, Hung Ji; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the near field intensity and absorption spectra of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) periodic arrays of rod-shape metal nanoparticle (MNP) pairs using the finite element method (FEM) and taking into account the different core patterns for biosensor and solar cell applications are investigated. A tunable optical spectrum corresponding to the transverse SPR modes is observed. The peak resonance wavelength (λ res) can be shifted to red as the core patterns in rod-shape MNPs have been changed. We find that the 2D periodic array of core–shell MNP pairs (case 2) exhibit a red shifted SPR that can be tuned the gap enhancement and absorption efficiency simultaneously over an extended wavelength range. The tunable optical performances give us a qualitative idea of the geometrical properties of the periodic array of rod-shape MNP pairs on SPRs that can be as a promising candidate for plasmonic biosensor and solar cell applications.

  11. ALL-CERAMIC AND PORCELAIN-FUSED-TO-METAL FIXED PARTIAL DENTURES: A COMPARATIVE STUDY BY 2D FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSES

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Andréia Barreira; Pereira, Luiz Carlos; da Cunha, Andréia R.C.C

    2007-01-01

    All-ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPDs) have an esthetic approach for oral rehabilitation. However, metal-ceramic FPDs are best indicated in the posterior area where the follow-up studies found a lower failure rate. This 2D finite element study compared the stress distribution on 3-unit all-ceramic and metal-ceramic FPDs and identified the areas of major risk of failure. Three FPD models were designed: (1) metal-ceramic FPD; (2) All-ceramic FPD with the veneering porcelain on the occlusal and cervical surface of the abutment tooth; (3) All-ceramic FPD with the veneering porcelain only on the occlusal surface. A 100 N load was applied in an area of 0.5 mm2 on the working cusps, following these simulations: (1) on the abutment teeth and the pontic; (2) only on the abutment teeth; and (3) only on the pontic. Relative to the maximum stress values found for the physiological load, all-ceramic FPD with only occlusal veneering porcelain produced the lowest stress value (220 MPa), followed by all-ceramic FPD with cervical veneering porcelain (322 MPa) and metal-ceramic FPD (387 MPa). The stress distribution of the load applied on the abutments was significantly better compared to the other two load simulations. The highest principal stress values were low and limited in a small area for the three types of models under this load. When the load was applied on the pontic, the highest stress values appeared on the connector areas between the abutments and pontic. In conclusion, the best stress values and distribution were found for the all-ceramic FPD with the veneering porcelain only on the occlusal surface. However, in under clinical conditions, fatigue conditions and restoration defects must be considered. PMID:19089168

  12. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  13. Finite-Difference Algorithms For Computing Sound Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    Governing equations considered as matrix system. Method variant of method described in "Scheme for Finite-Difference Computations of Waves" (ARC-12970). Present method begins with matrix-vector formulation of fundamental equations, involving first-order partial derivatives of primitive variables with respect to space and time. Particular matrix formulation places time and spatial coordinates on equal footing, so governing equations considered as matrix system and treated as unit. Spatial and temporal discretizations not treated separately as in other finite-difference methods, instead treated together by linking spatial-grid interval and time step via common scale factor related to speed of sound.

  14. Selecting step sizes in sensitivity analysis by finite differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iott, J.; Haftka, R. T.; Adelman, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with methods for obtaining near-optimum step sizes for finite difference approximations to first derivatives with particular application to sensitivity analysis. A technique denoted the finite difference (FD) algorithm, previously described in the literature and applicable to one derivative at a time, is extended to the calculation of several simultaneously. Both the original and extended FD algorithms are applied to sensitivity analysis for a data-fitting problem in which derivatives of the coefficients of an interpolation polynomial are calculated with respect to uncertainties in the data. The methods are also applied to sensitivity analysis of the structural response of a finite-element-modeled swept wing. In a previous study, this sensitivity analysis of the swept wing required a time-consuming trial-and-error effort to obtain a suitable step size, but it proved to be a routine application for the extended FD algorithm herein.

  15. Digit ratio (2D:4D), sex differences, allometry, and finger length of 12-30-year olds: evidence from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) Internet study.

    PubMed

    Manning, John T

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have reported digit ratio (2D:4D) to be sexually dimorphic, (males lower 2D:4D than females). However, Kratochvíl and Flegr ([2009]: Biol Lett 5:643-646) have suggested that 2D regressed on 4D has an allometric regression line with nonzero Y-intercept that is shared by males and females. Thus, 2D is shorter than expected when 4D is long, and males have lower 2D:4D than females because they have longer fingers. In this study, it is shown that this suggestion may be incorrect because sex differences in slope were not considered. Participants were recruited in an Internet study and had an age range of 12-30 years. The expected sex difference in 2D:4D was found, and the regression of 2D on 4D showed a significant sex difference in slope (males lower than females). A comparison of 10 age groups (12 years, 13 years..., 21-30 years) showed that sexual dimorphism for fingers was age dependent, varying from monomorphic to very dimorphic. Changes in sexual dimorphism of 2D:4D were much less marked, but there was a significant reduction in mean 2D:4D with age. The tendency for slopes of 2D regressed on 4D to be lower in males compared with females was significant in eight age groups. Sex difference in 2D:4D varied across the age groups and was positively related to the magnitude of the difference in female and male slopes. In contrast to the report of Kratochvíl and Flegr, it was found that the regression of 2D on 4D showed sex differences in slope, and such differences gave rise to the sexual dimorphism in 2D:4D.

  16. A new finite element and finite difference hybrid method for computing electrostatics of ionic solvated biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Jinyong; Xie, Dexuan

    2015-10-01

    The Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) is one widely-used implicit solvent continuum model for calculating electrostatics of ionic solvated biomolecule. In this paper, a new finite element and finite difference hybrid method is presented to solve PBE efficiently based on a special seven-overlapped box partition with one central box containing the solute region and surrounded by six neighboring boxes. In particular, an efficient finite element solver is applied to the central box while a fast preconditioned conjugate gradient method using a multigrid V-cycle preconditioning is constructed for solving a system of finite difference equations defined on a uniform mesh of each neighboring box. Moreover, the PBE domain, the box partition, and an interface fitted tetrahedral mesh of the central box can be generated adaptively for a given PQR file of a biomolecule. This new hybrid PBE solver is programmed in C, Fortran, and Python as a software tool for predicting electrostatics of a biomolecule in a symmetric 1:1 ionic solvent. Numerical results on two test models with analytical solutions and 12 proteins validate this new software tool, and demonstrate its high performance in terms of CPU time and memory usage.

  17. 2D-PAGE protein analysis of dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum based on three different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latib, Norhidayu Abdul; Norshaha, Safida Anira; Usup, Gires; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Harmful algae bloom or red tide seems to be considered as threat to ecosystem, especially to human consumption because of the production of neurotoxin by dinoflagellates species such as Alexandrium minutum which can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning. The aim of this study is to determine the most suitable method for protein extraction of A. minutum followed by determination of differential protein expression of A. minutum on three different temperatures (15°C, 26°C and 31.5°C). After the optimization, the protein extract was subjected to two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to compare the intensity and distribution of the protein spots. Based on quantitative and qualitative protein assessment, use of Trizol reagent is the most suitable method to extract protein from A. minutum. 2-DE analysis of the samples results in different distribution and intensity of the protein spots were compared between 15°C, 26°C and 31.5°C.

  18. A Pedestrian Detection Scheme Using a Coherent Phase Difference Method Based on 2D Range-Doppler FMCW Radar

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Eugin; Jin, Young-Seok; Lee, Jong-Hun

    2016-01-01

    For an automotive pedestrian detection radar system, fast-ramp based 2D range-Doppler Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar is effective for distinguishing between moving targets and unwanted clutter. However, when a weak moving target such as a pedestrian exists together with strong clutter, the pedestrian may be masked by the side-lobe of the clutter even though they are notably separated in the Doppler dimension. To prevent this problem, one popular solution is the use of a windowing scheme with a weighting function. However, this method leads to a spread spectrum, so the pedestrian with weak signal power and slow Doppler may also be masked by the main-lobe of clutter. With a fast-ramp based FMCW radar, if the target is moving, the complex spectrum of the range- Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is changed with a constant phase difference over ramps. In contrast, the clutter exhibits constant phase irrespective of the ramps. Based on this fact, in this paper we propose a pedestrian detection for highly cluttered environments using a coherent phase difference method. By detecting the coherent phase difference from the complex spectrum of the range-FFT, we first extract the range profile of the moving pedestrians. Then, through the Doppler FFT, we obtain the 2D range-Doppler map for only the pedestrian. To test the proposed detection scheme, we have developed a real-time data logging system with a 24 GHz FMCW transceiver. In laboratory tests, we verified that the signal processing results from the proposed method were much better than those expected from the conventional 2D FFT-based detection method. PMID:26805835

  19. A Pedestrian Detection Scheme Using a Coherent Phase Difference Method Based on 2D Range-Doppler FMCW Radar.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Eugin; Jin, Young-Seok; Lee, Jong-Hun

    2016-01-20

    For an automotive pedestrian detection radar system, fast-ramp based 2D range-Doppler Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar is effective for distinguishing between moving targets and unwanted clutter. However, when a weak moving target such as a pedestrian exists together with strong clutter, the pedestrian may be masked by the side-lobe of the clutter even though they are notably separated in the Doppler dimension. To prevent this problem, one popular solution is the use of a windowing scheme with a weighting function. However, this method leads to a spread spectrum, so the pedestrian with weak signal power and slow Doppler may also be masked by the main-lobe of clutter. With a fast-ramp based FMCW radar, if the target is moving, the complex spectrum of the range- Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is changed with a constant phase difference over ramps. In contrast, the clutter exhibits constant phase irrespective of the ramps. Based on this fact, in this paper we propose a pedestrian detection for highly cluttered environments using a coherent phase difference method. By detecting the coherent phase difference from the complex spectrum of the range-FFT, we first extract the range profile of the moving pedestrians. Then, through the Doppler FFT, we obtain the 2D range-Doppler map for only the pedestrian. To test the proposed detection scheme, we have developed a real-time data logging system with a 24 GHz FMCW transceiver. In laboratory tests, we verified that the signal processing results from the proposed method were much better than those expected from the conventional 2D FFT-based detection method.

  20. A Pedestrian Detection Scheme Using a Coherent Phase Difference Method Based on 2D Range-Doppler FMCW Radar.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Eugin; Jin, Young-Seok; Lee, Jong-Hun

    2016-01-01

    For an automotive pedestrian detection radar system, fast-ramp based 2D range-Doppler Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar is effective for distinguishing between moving targets and unwanted clutter. However, when a weak moving target such as a pedestrian exists together with strong clutter, the pedestrian may be masked by the side-lobe of the clutter even though they are notably separated in the Doppler dimension. To prevent this problem, one popular solution is the use of a windowing scheme with a weighting function. However, this method leads to a spread spectrum, so the pedestrian with weak signal power and slow Doppler may also be masked by the main-lobe of clutter. With a fast-ramp based FMCW radar, if the target is moving, the complex spectrum of the range- Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is changed with a constant phase difference over ramps. In contrast, the clutter exhibits constant phase irrespective of the ramps. Based on this fact, in this paper we propose a pedestrian detection for highly cluttered environments using a coherent phase difference method. By detecting the coherent phase difference from the complex spectrum of the range-FFT, we first extract the range profile of the moving pedestrians. Then, through the Doppler FFT, we obtain the 2D range-Doppler map for only the pedestrian. To test the proposed detection scheme, we have developed a real-time data logging system with a 24 GHz FMCW transceiver. In laboratory tests, we verified that the signal processing results from the proposed method were much better than those expected from the conventional 2D FFT-based detection method. PMID:26805835

  1. Assessing HYDRUS-2D model to estimate soil water contents and olive tree transpiration fluxes under different water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autovino, Dario; Negm, Amro; Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In Mediterranean countries characterized by limited water resources for agricultural and societal sectors, irrigation management plays a major role to improve water use efficiency at farm scale, mainly where irrigation systems are correctly designed to guarantee a suitable application efficiency and the uniform water distribution throughout the field. In the last two decades, physically-based agro-hydrological models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system. Mechanistic models like HYDRUS 2D/3D (Šimunek et al., 2011) have been proposed to simulate all the components of water balance, including actual crop transpiration fluxes estimated according to a soil potential-dependent sink term. Even though the suitability of these models to simulate the temporal dynamics of soil and crop water status has been reported in the literature for different horticultural crops, a few researches have been considering arboreal crops where the higher gradients of root water uptake are the combination between the localized irrigation supply and the three dimensional root system distribution. The main objective of the paper was to assess the performance of HYDRUS-2D model to evaluate soil water contents and transpiration fluxes of an olive orchard irrigated with two different water distribution systems. Experiments were carried out in Castelvetrano (Sicily) during irrigation seasons 2011 and 2012, in a commercial farm specialized in the production of table olives (Olea europaea L., var. Nocellara del Belice), representing the typical variety of the surrounding area. During the first season, irrigation water was provided by a single lateral placed along the plant row with four emitters per plant (ordinary irrigation), whereas during the second season a grid of emitters laid on the soil was installed in order to irrigate the whole soil surface around the selected trees. The model performance was assessed based on the

  2. Recording different geometries of 2D hexagonal photonic crystals by choosing the phase between two-beam interference exposures.

    PubMed

    Menezes, J W; Cescato, L; de Carvalho, E J; Braga, E S

    2006-09-18

    2D hexagonal patterns can be generated by the superimposition of two or three fringe patterns that have been formed by two-wave interference and that have rotations of 60 degrees between them. Superimposing three exposures solves the problem of asymmetry in the cross section of structures, which is caused by double exposure. The resulting structure, however, depends on the phase shift of the third fringe pattern in relation to the previous two. We propose a method for controlling the phase shift, and we demonstrate that three different lattice geometries of hexagonal photonic crystals can be recorded when the phase is chosen.

  3. Influence of 2D Finite Element Modeling Assumptions on Debonding Prediction for Composite Skin-stiffener Specimens Subjected to Tension and Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional finite element modeling assumptions on the debonding prediction for skin-stiffener specimens was investigated. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses using two-dimensional plane-stress and plane strain elements as well as three different generalized plane strain type approaches were performed. The computed deflections, skin and flange strains, transverse tensile stresses and energy release rates were compared to results obtained from three-dimensional simulations. The study showed that for strains and energy release rate computations the generalized plane strain assumptions yielded results closest to the full three-dimensional analysis. For computed transverse tensile stresses the plane stress assumption gave the best agreement. Based on this study it is recommended that results from plane stress and plane strain models be used as upper and lower bounds. The results from generalized plane strain models fall between the results obtained from plane stress and plane strain models. Two-dimensional models may also be used to qualitatively evaluate the stress distribution in a ply and the variation of energy release rates and mixed mode ratios with lamination length. For more accurate predictions, however, a three-dimensional analysis is required.

  4. Analysis of the high Reynolds number 2D tests on a wind turbine airfoil performed at two different wind tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, O.; Munduate, X.; Ceyhan, O.; Jacobs, M.; Madsen, J.; Schepers, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    2D wind tunnel tests at high Reynolds numbers have been done within the EU FP7 AVATAR project (Advanced Aerodynamic Tools of lArge Rotors) on the DU00-W-212 airfoil and at two different test facilities: the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG) and the LM Wind Power in-house wind tunnel. Two conditions of Reynolds numbers have been performed in both tests: 3 and 6 million. The Mach number and turbulence intensity values are similar in both wind tunnels at the 3 million Reynolds number test, while they are significantly different at 6 million Reynolds number. The paper presents a comparison of the data obtained from the two wind tunnels, showing good repeatability at 3 million Reynolds number and differences at 6 million Reynolds number that are consistent with the different Mach number and turbulence intensity values.

  5. Time dependent wave envelope finite difference analysis of sound propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A transient finite difference wave envelope formulation is presented for sound propagation, without steady flow. Before the finite difference equations are formulated, the governing wave equation is first transformed to a form whose solution tends not to oscillate along the propagation direction. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. The derivation for the wave envelope transient wave equation and appropriate boundary conditions are presented as well as the difference equations and stability requirements. To illustrate the method, example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a straight hard wall duct and in a two dimensional straight soft wall duct. The numerical results are in good agreement with exact analytical results.

  6. Finite-difference lattice-Boltzmann methods for binary fluids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aiguo

    2005-06-01

    We investigate two-fluid Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) kinetic methods for binary fluids. The developed theory works for asymmetric as well as symmetric systems. For symmetric systems it recovers Sirovich's theory and is summarized in models A and B. For asymmetric systems it contributes models C, D, and E which are especially useful when the total masses and/or local temperatures of the two components are greatly different. The kinetic models are discretized based on an octagonal discrete velocity model. The discrete-velocity kinetic models and the continuous ones are required to describe the same hydrodynamic equations. The combination of a discrete-velocity kinetic model and an appropriate finite-difference scheme composes a finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method. The validity of the formulated methods is verified by investigating (i) uniform relaxation processes, (ii) isothermal Couette flow, and (iii) diffusion behavior. PMID:16089910

  7. Finite element-finite difference thermal/structural analysis of large space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Andrew H.; Arelt, Joseph E.; Eskew, William F.; Rogers, Karen M.

    1992-01-01

    A technique of automated and efficient thermal-structural processing of truss structures that interfaces the finite element and finite difference method was developed. The thermal-structural analysis tasks include development of the thermal and structural math models, thermal analysis, development of an interface and data transfer between the models, and finally an evaluation of the thermal stresses and displacements in the structure. Consequently, the objective of the developed technique was to minimize the model development time, in order to assure an automatic transfer of data between the thermal and structural models as well as to minimize the computer resources needed for the analysis itself. The method and techniques described are illustrated on the thermal/structural analysis of the Space Station Freedom main truss.

  8. Form finding and analysis of extensible membranes attached to 2-D and 3-D frames intended for micro air vehicles via experimentally validated finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudaram, Yaakov Jack

    This work is concerned with a new method to apply consistent and known pretension to silicone rubber membranes intended for micro air vehicles as well as an understanding in the science of developed pre-tension in membranes constrained by 2- D and 3-D frames and structures. Pre-tension has a marked effect on the static and dynamic response of membrane wings and controls the overall deflections, as such control and measurement of the membrane pre-tension is important. Two different 2-D frame geometries were fabricated to evaluate the technique. For open-cell frames, the pretension was not uniform, whereas it was for closed-cell frames. Results show developed full-field stress and strain fields as a function of membrane attachment temperature and frame geometry along with experimental iterations to prove repeatability. The membranes can be stretched to a specific pretension according to the temperature at which it adheres to frames. Strain fields in membranes attached to 3-D frames at various temperatures are modeled through FEA utilizing Abaqus to be able to predict the developed membrane deformations, stresses, and strains. Rigid frames with various curvatures are built via appropriate molds and then adhered to silicone rubber membranes and elevated to various temperatures to achieve different pre-strains for experimental validation. Additional experiments are conducted for more complex frame geometries involving both convex and concave topologies embedded within frames. Results are then compared with the Abaqus outputs to validate the accuracy of the FEA model. Highly compliant wings have been used for MAV platforms, where the wing structure is determined by some combination of carbon fiber composites and a membrane skin, adhered in between the layers of composite material. Another new technique of attaching membranes firmly on wing structures is introduced, which involves the application of a technology known as corona treatment coupled with another method of

  9. Algorithmic vs. finite difference Jacobians for infrared atmospheric radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Jacobians, i.e. partial derivatives of the radiance and transmission spectrum with respect to the atmospheric state parameters to be retrieved from remote sensing observations, are important for the iterative solution of the nonlinear inverse problem. Finite difference Jacobians are easy to implement, but computationally expensive and possibly of dubious quality; on the other hand, analytical Jacobians are accurate and efficient, but the implementation can be quite demanding. GARLIC, our "Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code", utilizes algorithmic differentiation (AD) techniques to implement derivatives w.r.t. atmospheric temperature and molecular concentrations. In this paper, we describe our approach for differentiation of the high resolution infrared and microwave spectra and provide an in-depth assessment of finite difference approximations using "exact" AD Jacobians as a reference. The results indicate that the "standard" two-point finite differences with 1 K and 1% perturbation for temperature and volume mixing ratio, respectively, can exhibit substantial errors, and central differences are significantly better. However, these deviations do not transfer into the truncated singular value decomposition solution of a least squares problem. Nevertheless, AD Jacobians are clearly recommended because of the superior speed and accuracy.

  10. Finite difference seismic modeling of axial magma chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, S.A.; Dougherty, M.E.; Stephen, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The authors tested the feasibility of using finite difference methods to model seismic propagation at {approximately}10 Hx through a two-dimensional representation of an axial magma chamber with a thin, liquid lid. This technique produces time series of displacement or pressure at seafloor receivers to mimic a seismic refraction experiment and snapshots of P and S energy propagation. The results indicate that the implementation is stable for models with sharp velocity contrasts and complex geometries. The authors observe a high-energy, downward-traveling shear phase, observable only with borehole receivers, that would be useful in studying the nature and shape of magma chambers. The ability of finite difference methods to model high-order wave phenomena makes this method ideal for testing velocity models of spreading axes and for planning near-axis drilling of the East Pacific Rise in order to optimize the benefits from shear wave imaging of sub-axis structure.

  11. Semianalytical computation of path lines for finite-difference models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollock, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    A semianalytical particle tracking method was developed for use with velocities generated from block-centered finite-difference ground-water flow models. Based on the assumption that each directional velocity component varies linearly within a grid cell in its own coordinate directions, the method allows an analytical expression to be obtained describing the flow path within an individual grid cell. Given the intitial position of a particle anywhere in a cell, the coordinates of any other point along its path line within the cell, and the time of travel between them, can be computed directly. For steady-state systems, the exit point for a particle entering a cell at any arbitrary location can be computed in a single step. By following the particle as it moves from cell to cell, this method can be used to trace the path of a particle through any multidimensional flow field generated from a block-centered finite-difference flow model. -Author

  12. SWAT and River-2D Modelling of Pinder River for Analysing Snow Trout Habitat under Different Flow Abstraction Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nale, J. P.; Gosain, A. K.; Khosa, R.

    2015-12-01

    Pinder River, one of major headstreams of River Ganga, originates in Pindari Glaciers of Kumaon Himalayas and after passing through rugged gorges meets Alaknanda at Karanprayag forming one of the five celestial confluences of Upper Ganga region. While other sub-basins of Upper Ganga are facing severe ecological losses, Pinder basin is still in its virginal state and is well known for its beautiful valleys besides being host to unique and rare biodiversity. A proposed 252 MW run-of-river hydroelectric project at Devsari on this river has been a major concern on account of its perceived potential for egregious environmental and social impacts. In this context, the study presented tries to analyse the expected changes in aquatic habitat conditions after this project is operational (with different operation policies). SWAT hydrological modelling platform has been used to derive stream flow simulations under various scenarios ranging from the present to the likely future conditions. To analyse the habitat conditions, a two dimensional hydraulic-habitat model 'River-2D', a module of iRIC software, is used. Snow trout has been identified as the target keystone species and its habitat preferences, in the form of flow depths, flow velocity and substrate condition, are obtained from diverse sources of related literature and are provided as Habitat Suitability Indices to River-2D. Bed morphology constitutes an important River-2D input and has been obtained, for the designated 1 km long study reach of Pinder upto Karanprayag, from a combination of actual field observations and supplemented by SRTM 1 Arc-Second Global digital elevation data. Monthly Weighted Usable Area for three different life stages (Spawning, Juvenile and Adult) of Snow Trout are obtained corresponding to seven different flow discharges ranging from 10 cumec to 1000 cumec. Comparing the present and proposed future river flow conditions obtained from SWAT modelling, losses in Weighted Usable Area, for the

  13. Fuzzy logic to improve efficiency of finite element and finite difference schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.D.; Heger, A.S.

    1994-05-01

    This paper explores possible applications of logic in the areas of finite element and finite difference methods applied to engineering design problems. The application of fuzzy logic to both front-end selection of computational options and within the numerical computation itself are proposed. Further, possible methods of overcoming these limitations through the application of methods are explored. Decision strategy is a fundamental limitation in performing finite element calculations, such as selecting the optimum coarseness of the grid, numerical integration algorithm, element type, implicit versus explicit schemes, and the like. This is particularly true of novice analysts who are confronted with a myriad of choices in performing a calculation. The advantage of having the myriad of options available to the analyst is, however, that it improves and optimizes the design process if the appropriate ones are selected. Unfortunately, the optimum choices are not always apparent and only through the process of elimination or prior extensive experience can the optimum choices or combination of choices be selected. The knowledge of expert analysts could be integrated into a fuzzy ``front-end`` rule-based package to optimize the design process. The use of logic to capture the heuristic and human knowledge for selecting optimum solution strategies sets the framework for these proposed strategies.

  14. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  15. Finite difference discretisation of a model for biological nerve conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aderogba, A. A.; Chapwanya, M.; Jejeniwa, O. A.

    2016-06-01

    A nonstandard finite difference method is proposed for the discretisation of the semilinear FitzHugh-Nagumo reaction diffusion equation. The equation has been useful in describing, for example, population models, biological models, heat and mass transfer models, and many other applications. The proposed approach involves splitting the equation into the space independent and the time independent sub equation. Numerical simulations for the full equation are presented.

  16. Calculating rotordynamic coefficients of seals by finite-difference techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietzen, F. J.; Nordmann, R.

    1987-01-01

    For modelling the turbulent flow in a seal the Navier-Stokes equations in connection with a turbulence (kappa-epsilon) model are solved by a finite-difference method. A motion of the shaft round the centered position is assumed. After calculating the corresponding flow field and the pressure distribution, the rotor-dynamic coefficients of the seal can be determined. These coefficients are compared with results obtained by using the bulk flow theory of Childs and with experimental results.

  17. A comparative investigation on recurrence formulae in finite difference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, Christoph; Lahrmann, Andreas

    1988-06-01

    To solve the transient heat conduction equation, the Pade approximation is introduced into the finite-difference method. But if the time step is chosen too large relative to the element size, the Euler method and the Crank-Nicolson solution lead to significant oscillations. In contrast, the full implicit scheme does not show this oscillatory behavior, but is more inaccurate. Compared to these time-stepping algorithms the weighted-time-step method presented here is seen to offer definite advantages.

  18. Finite difference time domain grid generation from AMC helicopter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin L.

    1992-01-01

    A simple technique is presented which forms a cubic grid model of a helicopter from an Aircraft Modeling Code (AMC) input file. The AMC input file defines the helicopter fuselage as a series of polygonal cross sections. The cubic grid model is used as an input to a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) code to obtain predictions of antenna performance on a generic helicopter model. The predictions compare reasonably well with measured data.

  19. Optimized Finite-Difference Coefficients for Hydroacoustic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Responsible utilization of marine renewable energy sources through the use of current energy converter (CEC) and wave energy converter (WEC) devices requires an understanding of the noise generation and propagation from these systems in the marine environment. Acoustic noise produced by rotating turbines, for example, could adversely affect marine animals and human-related marine activities if not properly understood and mitigated. We are utilizing a 3-D finite-difference acoustic simulation code developed at Sandia that can accurately propagate noise in the complex bathymetry in the near-shore to open ocean environment. As part of our efforts to improve computation efficiency in the large, high-resolution domains required in this project, we investigate the effects of using optimized finite-difference coefficients on the accuracy of the simulations. We compare accuracy and runtime of various finite-difference coefficients optimized via criteria such as maximum numerical phase speed error, maximum numerical group speed error, and L-1 and L-2 norms of weighted numerical group and phase speed errors over a given spectral bandwidth. We find that those coefficients optimized for L-1 and L-2 norms are superior in accuracy to those based on maximal error and can produce runtimes of 10% of the baseline case, which uses Taylor Series finite-difference coefficients at the Courant time step limit. We will present comparisons of the results for the various cases evaluated as well as recommendations for utilization of the cases studied. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. An analysis of finite-difference and finite-volume formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1986-01-01

    Finite-difference and finite-volume formulations are analyzed in order to clear up the confusion concerning their application to the numerical solution of conservation laws. A new coordinate-free formulation of systems of conservation laws is developed, which clearly distinguishes the role of physical vectors from that of algebraic vectors which characterize the system. The analysis considers general types of equations--potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes. Three-dimensional unsteady flows with time-varying grids are described using a single, consistent nomeclature for both formulations. Grid motion due to a non-inertial reference frame as well as flow adaptation is covered. In comparing the two formulations, it is found useful to distinguish between differences in numerical methods and differences in grid definition. The former plays a role for non-Cartesian grids, and results in only cosmetic differences in the manner in which geometric terms are handled. The differences in grid definition for the two formulations is found to be more important, since it affects the manner in which boundary conditions, zonal procedures, and grid singularities are handled at computational boundaries. The proper interpretation of strong and weak conservation-law forms for quasi-one-dimensional and axisymmetric flows is brought out.

  1. An analysis of finite-difference and finite-volume formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1989-01-01

    Finite-difference and finite-volume formulations are analyzed in order to clear up the confusion concerning their application to the numerical solution of conservation laws. A new coordinate-free formulation of systems of conservation laws is developed, which clearly distinguishes the role of physical vectors from that of algebraic vectors which characterize the system. The analysis considers general types of equations: potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes. Three-dimensional unsteady flows with time-varying grids are described using a single, consistent nomenclature for both formulations. Grid motion due to a non-inertial reference frame as well as flow adaptation is covered. In comparing the two formulations, it is found useful to distinguish between differences in numerical methods and differences in grid definition. The former plays a role for non-Cartesian grids, and results in only cosmetic differences in the manner in which geometric terms are handled. The differences in grid definition for the two formulations is found to be more important, since it affects the manner in which boundary conditions, zonal procedures, and grid singularities are handled at computational boundaries. The proper interpretation of strong and weak conservation-law forms for quasi-one-dimensional and axisymmetric flows is brought out.

  2. Introduction to finite-difference methods for numerical fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, E.; Harlow, F.H.

    1995-09-01

    This work is intended to be a beginner`s exercise book for the study of basic finite-difference techniques in computational fluid dynamics. It is written for a student level ranging from high-school senior to university senior. Equations are derived from basic principles using algebra. Some discussion of partial-differential equations is included, but knowledge of calculus is not essential. The student is expected, however, to have some familiarity with the FORTRAN computer language, as the syntax of the computer codes themselves is not discussed. Topics examined in this work include: one-dimensional heat flow, one-dimensional compressible fluid flow, two-dimensional compressible fluid flow, and two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow with additions of the equations of heat flow and the {Kappa}-{epsilon} model for turbulence transport. Emphasis is placed on numerical instabilities and methods by which they can be avoided, techniques that can be used to evaluate the accuracy of finite-difference approximations, and the writing of the finite-difference codes themselves. Concepts introduced in this work include: flux and conservation, implicit and explicit methods, Lagrangian and Eulerian methods, shocks and rarefactions, donor-cell and cell-centered advective fluxes, compressible and incompressible fluids, the Boussinesq approximation for heat flow, Cartesian tensor notation, the Boussinesq approximation for the Reynolds stress tensor, and the modeling of transport equations. A glossary is provided which defines these and other terms.

  3. Finite difference program for calculating hydride bed wall temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-10-29

    A QuickBASIC finite difference program was written for calculating one dimensional temperature profiles in up to two media with flat, cylindrical, or spherical geometries. The development of the program was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the Tritium metal hydrides beds for thermal fatigue analysis. The purpose of this report is to document the equations and the computer program used to calculate transient wall temperatures in stainless steel hydride vessels. The development of the computer code was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydrides beds in the Tritium Facility for thermal fatigue analysis.

  4. SU-E-T-422: Correlation Between 2D Passing Rates and 3D Dose Differences for Pretreatment VMAT QA

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, X; Xie, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA) is typically using QA methods and action levels taken from fixedbeam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) QA methods. However, recent studies demonstrated that there is no correlation between the percent gamma passing rate (%GP) and the magnitude of dose discrepancy between the planned dose and the actual delivered dose for IMRT. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether %GP is correlated with clinical dosimetric difference for VMAT. Methods: Twenty nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with dual-arc simultaneous integrated boost VMAT and 20 esophageal cancer patients treated with one-arc VMAT were enrolled in this study. Pretreatment VMAT QA was performed by a 3D diode array ArcCheck. Acceptance criteria of 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 4%/4mm were applied for 2D %GP. Dose values below 10% of the per-measured normalization maximum dose were ignored.Mean DVH values obtained from 3DVH software and TPS were calculated and percentage dose differences were calculated. Statistical correlation between %GP and percent dose difference was studied by using Pearson correlation. Results: The %GP for criteria 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 4%/4mm were 82.33±4.45, 93.47±2.31, 97.13±2.41, respectively. Dose differences calculated from 3DVH and TPS for beam isocenter, mean dose of PTV, maximum dose of PTV, D2 of PTV and D98 of PTV were -1.04±3.24, -0.74±1.71, 2.92±3.62, 0.89±3.29, -1.46±1.97, respectively. No correction were found between %GP and dose differences. Conclusion: There are weak correlations between the 2D %GP and dose differences calculated from 3DVH. The %GP acceptance criteria of 3%/3mm usually applied for pretreatment QA of IMRT and VMAT is not indicating strong clinical correlation with 3D dose difference. 3D dose reconstructions on patient anatomy may be necessary for physicist to predict the accuracy of delivered dose for VMAT QA.

  5. Macroscopic traffic modeling with the finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.; Azarm, A.; Stock, D.

    1996-03-15

    A traffic congestion forecasting model (ATOP), developed in the present investigation, is described briefly. Several macroscopic models, based on the solution of the partial differential equation of conservation of vehicles by the finite difference method, were tested using actual traffic data. The functional form, as well as the parameters, of the equation of state which describes the relation between traffic speed and traffic density, were determined for a section of the Long Island Expressway. The Lax method and the forward difference technique were applied. The results of extensive tests showed that the Lax method, in addition to giving very good agreement with the traffic data, produces stable solutions.

  6. Numerical Study Of The Heat Transfer Phenomenon Of A Rectangular Plate Including Void, Notch Using Finite Difference Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb Nath, S. K.; Peyada, N. K.

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we have developed a code using Matlab software for solving a rectangular aluminum plate having void, notch, at different boundary conditions discretizing a two dimensional (2D) heat conduction equation by the finite difference technique. We have solved a 2D mixed boundary heat conduction problem analytically using Fourier integrals (Deb Nath et al., 2006; 2007; 2007; Deb Nath and Ahmed, 2008; Deb Nath, 2008; Deb Nath and Afsar, 2009; Deb Nath and Ahmed, 2009; 2009; Deb Nath et al., 2010; Deb Nath, 2013) and the same problem is also solved using the present code developed by the finite difference technique (Ahmed et al., 2005; Deb Nath, 2002; Deb Nath et al., 2008; Ahmed and Deb Nath, 2009; Deb Nath et al., 2011; Mohiuddin et al., 2012). To verify the soundness of the present heat conduction code results using the finite difference method, the distribution of temperature at some sections of a 2D heated plate obtained by the analytical method is compared with those of the plate obtained by the present finite difference method. Interpolation technique is used as an example when the boundary of the plate does not pass through the discretized grid points of the plate. Sometimes hot and cold fluids are passed through rectangular channels in industries and many types of technical equipment. The distribution of temperature of plates including notches, slots with different temperature boundary conditions are studied. Transient heat transfer in several pure metallic plates is also studied to find out the required time to reach equilibrium temperature. So, this study will help find design parameters of such structures.

  7. Verification and benchmarking of MAGNUM-2D: a finite element computer code for flow and heat transfer in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Budden, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    The objective of this work is to assess prediction capabilities and features of the MAGNUM-2D computer code in relation to its intended use in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). This objective is accomplished through a code verification and benchmarking task. Results are documented which support correctness of prediction capabilities in areas of intended model application. 10 references, 43 figures, 11 tables.

  8. Dispersion-relation-preserving finit difference schemes for computational acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, C.K.W.; Webb, J.C. )

    1993-08-01

    Acoustics problems are governed by the linearized Euler equations. According to wave propagation theory, the number of wave modes and their wave propagation characteristics are all encoded in the dispersion relation of the governing equations. Thus one is assured that the numerical solutions of high order finite difference scheme will have the same number of wave modes (namely, the acoustic, vorticity, and entropy waves), the same wave propagation characteristics (namely, nondispersive, nondissipative, and isotropic) and the same wave speeds as those of the solutions of the Euler equations if both systems of equations have the same dispersion relations. Finite difference schemes which have the same dispersion relations as the original partial differential equations are referred to as dispersion-relation-preserving (DRP) schemes. A way to construct time marching DRP schemes by optimizing the finite difference approximations of the space and time derivatives in the wave number and frequency space is proposed. The stability of these schemes is analyzed and a sufficient condition for numerical stability is established. A set of radiation and outflow boundary conditions compatible with the DRP schemes is constructed. These conditions are derived from the asymptotic solutions of the governing equations. The asymptotic solutions are found by the use of Fourier-Laplace transforms and the method of stationary phase. A sequence of numerical simulations has been carried out. These simulation are designed to test the effectiveness of the DRP schemes and the radiation and outflow boundary conditions. The computed solutions agree very favorably with the exact solutions. The radiation boundary conditions perform satisfactorily causing little acoustic reflections. The outflow boundary conditions are found to be quite transparent to outgoing disturbances even when the disturbances are made up of a combination of acoustic, vorticity, and entropy waves. 26 refs., 14 figs.

  9. Seismic imaging using finite-differences and parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    A key to reducing the risks and costs of associated with oil and gas exploration is the fast, accurate imaging of complex geologies, such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and overthrust regions in US onshore regions. Prestack depth migration generally yields the most accurate images, and one approach to this is to solve the scalar wave equation using finite differences. As part of an ongoing ACTI project funded by the US Department of Energy, a finite difference, 3-D prestack, depth migration code has been developed. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that massively parallel computers can be used efficiently for seismic imaging, and that sufficient computing power exists (or soon will exist) to make finite difference, prestack, depth migration practical for oil and gas exploration. Several problems had to be addressed to get an efficient code for the Intel Paragon. These include efficient I/O, efficient parallel tridiagonal solves, and high single-node performance. Furthermore, to provide portable code the author has been restricted to the use of high-level programming languages (C and Fortran) and interprocessor communications using MPI. He has been using the SUNMOS operating system, which has affected many of his programming decisions. He will present images created from two verification datasets (the Marmousi Model and the SEG/EAEG 3D Salt Model). Also, he will show recent images from real datasets, and point out locations of improved imaging. Finally, he will discuss areas of current research which will hopefully improve the image quality and reduce computational costs.

  10. Compact finite difference schemes with spectral-like resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lele, Sanjiva K.

    1992-01-01

    The present finite-difference schemes for the evaluation of first-order, second-order, and higher-order derivatives yield improved representation of a range of scales and may be used on nonuniform meshes. Various boundary conditions may be invoked, and both accurate interpolation and spectral-like filtering can be accomplished by means of schemes for derivatives at mid-cell locations. This family of schemes reduces to the Pade schemes when the maximal formal accuracy constraint is imposed with a specific computational stencil. Attention is given to illustrative applications of these schemes in fluid dynamics.

  11. Finite difference time domain modeling of spiral antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penney, Christopher W.; Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives outlined in the original proposal for this project were to create a well-documented computer analysis model based on the finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) method that would be capable of computing antenna impedance, far-zone radiation patterns, and radar cross-section (RCS). The ability to model a variety of penetrable materials in addition to conductors is also desired. The spiral antennas under study by this project meet these requirements since they are constructed of slots cut into conducting surfaces which are backed by dielectric materials.

  12. A finite difference approach to microstrip antenna design

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, M.J.; Bevensee, R.M.; Pennock, S.T.

    1986-12-01

    Microstrip antennas have received increased attention in recent years, due to their size and cost advantages. Analysis of the microstrip structure has proved difficult due to the presence of the dielectric substrate, particularly for complex geometries. One possible approach to a solution is the use of a finite difference computer code to model a proposed microstrip antenna design. The models are easily constructed and altered, and code versions are available which allow input impedance or far-field patterns to be calculated. Results for some simple antenna geometries will be presented.

  13. FDIPS: Finite Difference Iterative Potential-field Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Gabor; van der Holst, Bartholomeus; Huang, Zhenguang

    2016-06-01

    FDIPS is a finite difference iterative potential-field solver that can generate the 3D potential magnetic field solution based on a magnetogram. It is offered as an alternative to the spherical harmonics approach, as when the number of spherical harmonics is increased, using the raw magnetogram data given on a grid that is uniform in the sine of the latitude coordinate can result in inaccurate and unreliable results, especially in the polar regions close to the Sun. FDIPS is written in Fortran 90 and uses the MPI library for parallel execution.

  14. Proteomic analysis of ovomucoid hypersensitivity in mice by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE).

    PubMed

    Hobson, D J; Rupa, P; Diaz, G J; Zhang, H; Yang, M; Mine, Y; Turner, P V; Kirby, G M

    2007-12-01

    There is a need to develop reliable methods to assess the safety of genetically modified and other novel foods. The aim of this study was to identify protein biomarkers of food allergy in mice exposed to ovomucoid (OVM), a major food allergen found in chicken egg white. BALB/c mice were repeatedly sensitized by gavage with OVM and cholera toxin (CT) and control mice were exposed to a mixture of amino acids with CT. At the endpoint, all mice were challenged intraperitoneally with OVM and alum. Type-1 hypersensitivity was confirmed in OVM-sensitized mice by observation of clinical signs of anaphylaxis and elevated levels of plasma histamine, OVM-specific IgE and OVM-specific IgG by ELISA. Differential protein expression was assessed in albumin-depleted plasma as well as in mesenteric lymph node, liver, spleen, and ileum by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Differentially expressed proteins were identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Plasma proteins overexpressed in OVM-sensitized mice included haptoglobin (41-fold), serum amyloid A (19-fold) and peroxiredoxin-2 (1.9-fold). Further validation of these plasma proteins in other animal models of food allergy with different food allergens is required to assess their potential as candidate biomarkers for use in evaluating the allergenicity of novel foods.

  15. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  16. Seismic Analysis of a Rockfill Dam by FLAC Finite Difference Code

    SciTech Connect

    Miglio, Livia; Pagliaroli, Alessandro; Lanzo, Giuseppe; Miliziano, Salvatore

    2008-07-08

    The paper presents the results of numerical analyses carried out with FLAC finite difference code aiming at investigating the seismic response of rockfill dams. In particular the hysteretic damping model, recently incorporated within the code, coupled with a perfectly plastic yield criterion, was employed. As first step, 1D and 2D calibration analyses were performed and comparisons with the results supplied by well known linear equivalent and fully non linear codes were carried out. Then the seismic response of E1 Infiernillo rockfill dam was investigated during two weak and strong seismic events. Benefits and shortcomings of using the hysteretic damping model are discussed in the light of the results obtained from calibration studies and field-scale analyses.

  17. The analysis of reactively loaded microstrip antennas by finite difference time domain modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, G. S.; Beach, M. A.; Railton, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    In recent years, much interest has been shown in the use of printed circuit antennas in mobile satellite and communications terminals at microwave frequencies. Although such antennas have many advantages in weight and profile size over more conventional reflector/horn configurations, they do, however, suffer from an inherently narrow bandwidth. A way of optimizing the bandwidth of such antennas by an electronic tuning technique using a loaded probe mounted within the antenna structure is examined, and the resulting far-field radiation patterns are shown. Simulation results from a 2D finite difference time domain (FDTD) model for a rectangular microstrip antenna loaded with shorting pins are given and compared to results obtained with an actual antenna. It is hoped that this work will result in a design package for the analysis of microstrip patch antenna elements.

  18. Enhancing finite differences with radial basis functions: Experiments on the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyer, Natasha; Barnett, Gregory A.; Wicker, Louis J.

    2016-07-01

    Polynomials are used together with polyharmonic spline (PHS) radial basis functions (RBFs) to create local RBF-finite-difference (RBF-FD) weights on different node layouts for spatial discretizations that can be viewed as enhancements of the classical finite differences (FD). The presented method replicates the convergence properties of FD but for arbitrary node layouts. It is tested on the 2D compressible Navier-Stokes equations at low Mach number, relevant to atmospheric flows. Test cases are taken from the numerical weather prediction community and solved on bounded domains. Thus, attention is given on how to handle boundaries with the RBF-FD method, as well as a novel implementation for hyperviscosity. Comparisons are done on Cartesian, hexagonal, and quasi-uniform node layouts. Consideration and guidelines are given on PHS order, polynomial degree and stencil size. The main advantages of the present method are: 1) capturing the basic physics of the problem surprisingly well, even at very coarse resolutions, 2) high-order accuracy without the need of tuning a shape parameter, and 3) the inclusion of polynomials eliminates stagnation (saturation) errors. A MATLAB code is given to calculate the differentiation weights for this novel approach.

  19. Finite Difference Elastic Wave Field Simulation On GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2011-12-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation is considered as a basic and important aspect in investigation of the Earth's structure, and earthquake phenomenon. Among various numerical methods, the finite-difference method is considered one of the most efficient tools for the wave field simulation. However, with the increment of computing scale, the power of computing has becoming a bottleneck. With the development of hardware, in recent years, GPU shows powerful computational ability and bright application prospects in scientific computing. Many works using GPU demonstrate that GPU is powerful . Recently, GPU has not be used widely in the simulation of wave field. In this work, we present forward finite difference simulation of acoustic and elastic seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous media on NVIDIA graphics cards with the CUDA programming language. We also implement perfectly matched layers on the graphics cards to efficiently absorb outgoing waves on the fictitious edges of the grid Simulations compared with the results on CPU platform shows reliable accuracy and remarkable efficiency. This work proves that GPU can be an effective platform for wave field simulation, and it can also be used as a practical tool for real-time strong ground motion simulation.

  20. Prevalence of the CYP2D6*10 (C100T), *4 (G1846A), and *14 (G1758A) alleles among Iranians of different ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Ali; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Haghshenas, Maryam; Azadfar, Parisa; Akbari, Leila; Sangtarash, Mohammad Hossein; Vejdandoust, Faramarz; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh; Meng, Goh Yong; Houshmand, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    The presence of polymorphisms in the CYP2D6 gene may modulate enzyme level and activity, thereby affecting individual responses to pharmacological treatment. Here, we compared the prevalence of the CYP2D6*10, *4, and 14* alleles in an Iranian population of different ethnicities with those of other populations. Allele and genotype frequency distributions of CYP2D6*10 variants and predicted phenotypes including extensive metabolizers, intermediate metabolizers, and poor metabolizers were analysed in blood samples of 300 unrelated healthy individuals in an Iranian population using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism, PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism, and direct genomic DNA sequencing. The CYP2D6*4 (G1846A) and *14 (G1758A) allelic frequencies were not detected in different ethnicities, demonstrating the absence of a significant contribution of these alleles in Iranian populations. However, the T/T, C/T, and C/C genotype frequencies of the CYP2D6*10 allele were significantly different (P<0.01) in all Iranian ethnic groups. Additionally, the frequency of the homozygous T/T variant of the CYP2D6*10 allele was significantly high in the Lure (P<0.017) and low in the Kurd (P<0.002) ethnicities. The frequency of the T/T variant of the CYP2D6*10 allele in central Iran was the highest (P<0.001), while the south of Iran had the lowest frequency (P<0.001). The frequency of the C/T variant of the CYP2D6*10 allele was significantly a bit high (P<0.001) in females compare to males, while the frequencies of the T/T variant in females is similar to males, which are 24.4% and 24.3%, respectively. In contrast to absence of the CYP2D6*4 (G1846A) and *14 (G1758A) alleles in Iranian populations of different ethnicities, the prediction of the CYP2D6*10 allele is required in drug research and routine treatment, where the information would be helpful for clinicians to optimize therapy or identify persons at risk of adverse drug reactions before

  1. Sex differences in college students' free drawings and their relationship to 2D:4D ratio and recalled childhood play behavior.

    PubMed

    Rothkopf, Ian; Turgeon, Sarah M

    2014-02-01

    In a prior study, we observed that female-typical characteristics in elementary school girls' drawings were correlated with a feminized digit ratio (2D:4D), a marker for prenatal androgen exposure. However, this observation was limited to older girls, suggesting that social factors mediate the relationship between 2D:4D and drawing. To examine the hypothesis that the influence of prenatal androgen on girls' drawing is mediated by an effect of early androgens on sex-typical behavior, we examined 2D:4D, free drawings, and scores on the Recalled Childhood Gender Identity (RCGI) Questionnaire in a population of college students. Characteristics of participants' free drawings were assessed and those that showed sex differences were compared with 2D:4D and RCGI scores. Men had smaller 2D:4D ratios than women, used fewer total colors, used fewer pinks, purples, and blues, and had higher gender-typical scores on the RCGI. Women's drawings were more likely to contain flowers and animals and men's drawings were more likely to represent sports. Within-sex RCGI and 2D:4D scores were not significantly correlated. Significant within-sex relationships between 2D:4D and RCGI and drawing behavior were observed but the effects appeared to be independent; the hypothesis that gender-typical childhood behavior mediates the effect of prenatal androgen on drawing characteristics was not supported.

  2. Weighted average finite difference methods for fractional diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuste, S. B.

    2006-07-01

    A class of finite difference methods for solving fractional diffusion equations is considered. These methods are an extension of the weighted average methods for ordinary (non-fractional) diffusion equations. Their accuracy is of order (Δ x) 2 and Δ t, except for the fractional version of the Crank-Nicholson method, where the accuracy with respect to the timestep is of order (Δ t) 2 if a second-order approximation to the fractional time-derivative is used. Their stability is analyzed by means of a recently proposed procedure akin to the standard von Neumann stability analysis. A simple and accurate stability criterion valid for different discretization schemes of the fractional derivative, arbitrary weight factor, and arbitrary order of the fractional derivative, is found and checked numerically. Some examples are provided in which the new methods' numerical solutions are obtained and compared against exact solutions.

  3. Numerical stability for finite difference approximations of Einstein's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, G. . E-mail: G.Calabrese@soton.ac.uk; Hinder, I.; Husa, S.

    2006-11-01

    We extend the notion of numerical stability of finite difference approximations to include hyperbolic systems that are first order in time and second order in space, such as those that appear in numerical relativity and, more generally, in Hamiltonian formulations of field theories. By analyzing the symbol of the second order system, we obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for stability in a discrete norm containing one-sided difference operators. We prove stability for certain toy models and the linearized Nagy-Ortiz-Reula formulation of Einstein's equations. We also find that, unlike in the fully first order case, standard discretizations of some well-posed problems lead to unstable schemes and that the Courant limits are not always simply related to the characteristic speeds of the continuum problem. Finally, we propose methods for testing stability for second order in space hyperbolic systems.

  4. Elastic finite-difference method for irregular grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oprsal, I.; Zahradnik, J.

    1999-01-01

    Finite-difference (FD) modeling of complicated structures requires simple algorithms. This paper presents a new elastic FD method for spatially irregular grids that is simple and, at the same time, saves considerable memory and computing time. Features like faults, low-velocity layers, cavities, and/or nonplanar surfaces are treated on a fine grid, while the remaining parts of the model are, with equal accuracy, represented on a coarse grid. No interpolation is needed between the fine and coarse parts due to the rectangular grid cells. Relatively abrupt transitions between the small and large grid steps produce no numerical artifacts in the present method. Planar or nonplanar free surfaces, including underground cavities, are treated in a way similar to internal grid points but with consideration of the zero-valued elastic parameters and density outside the free surface (vacuum formalism). A theoretical proof that vacuum formalism fulfills the free-surface conditions is given. Numerical validation is performed through comparison with independent methods, comparing FD with explicitly prescribed boundary conditions and finite elements. Memory and computing time needed in the studied models was only about 10 to 40% of that employing regular square grids of equal accuracy. A practical example of a synthetic seismic section, showing clear signatures of a coal seam and cavity, is presented. The method can be extended to three dimensions.

  5. Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for the Convective Wave Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Kreider, K. L.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in ducts. To reduce storage requirements for large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing equation in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential equation, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  6. Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for Aircraft Acoustic Nacelle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Kreider, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in aircraft engine nacelles. To reduce storage requirements for large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing equation in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential equation, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  7. High order finite difference methods with subcell resolution for advection equations with stiff source terms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Shu, Chi-Wang; Yee, H.C.; Sjögreen, Björn

    2012-01-01

    A new high order finite-difference method utilizing the idea of Harten ENO subcell resolution method is proposed for chemical reactive flows and combustion. In reaction problems, when the reaction time scale is very small, e.g., orders of magnitude smaller than the fluid dynamics time scales, the governing equations will become very stiff. Wrong propagation speed of discontinuity may occur due to the underresolved numerical solution in both space and time. The present proposed method is a modified fractional step method which solves the convection step and reaction step separately. In the convection step, any high order shock-capturing method can be used. In the reaction step, an ODE solver is applied but with the computed flow variables in the shock region modified by the Harten subcell resolution idea. For numerical experiments, a fifth-order finite-difference WENO scheme and its anti-diffusion WENO variant are considered. A wide range of 1D and 2D scalar and Euler system test cases are investigated. Studies indicate that for the considered test cases, the new method maintains high order accuracy in space for smooth flows, and for stiff source terms with discontinuities, it can capture the correct propagation speed of discontinuities in very coarse meshes with reasonable CFL numbers.

  8. Two-dimensional time-domain finite-difference modeling for viscoelastic seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Na; Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Ge, Zengxi; Yao, Zhen-Xing

    2016-09-01

    Real Earth media are not perfectly elastic. Instead, they attenuate propagating mechanical waves. This anelastic phenomenon in wave propagation can be modeled by a viscoelastic mechanical model consisting of several standard linear solids. Using this viscoelastic model, we approximate a constant Q over a frequency band of interest. We use a four-element viscoelastic model with a trade-off between accuracy and computational costs to incorporate Q into 2-D time-domain first-order velocity-stress wave equations. To improve the computational efficiency, we limit the Q in the model to a list of discrete values between 2 and 1000. The related stress and strain relaxation times that characterize the viscoelastic model are pre-calculated and stored in a database for use by the finite-difference calculation. A viscoelastic finite-difference scheme that is second order in time and fourth order in space is developed based on the MacCormack algorithm. The new method is validated by comparing the numerical result with analytical solutions that are calculated using the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method. The synthetic seismograms exhibit greater than 95 per cent consistency in a two-layer viscoelastic model. The dispersion generated from the simulation is consistent with the Kolsky-Futterman dispersion relationship.

  9. Comparison of Different 2D and 3D-QSAR Methods on Activity Prediction of Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Asadpour-Zeynali, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Histamine H3 receptor subtype has been the target of several recent drug development programs. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods are used to predict the pharmaceutically relevant properties of drug candidates whenever it is applicable. The aim of this study was to compare the predictive powers of three different QSAR techniques, namely, multiple linear regression (MLR), artificial neural network (ANN), and HASL as a 3D QSAR method, in predicting the receptor binding affinities of arylbenzofuran histamine H3 receptor antagonists. Genetic algorithm coupled partial least square as well as stepwise multiple regression methods were used to select a number of calculated molecular descriptors to be used in MLR and ANN-based QSAR studies. Using the leave-group-out cross-validation technique, the performances of the MLR and ANN methods were evaluated. The calculated values for the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), ranging from 2.9 to 3.6, and standard deviation of error of prediction (SDEP), ranging from 0.31 to 0.36, for both MLR and ANN methods were statistically comparable, indicating that both methods perform equally well in predicting the binding affinities of the studied compounds toward the H3 receptors. On the other hand, the results from 3D-QSAR studies using HASL method were not as good as those obtained by 2D methods. It can be concluded that simple traditional approaches such as MLR method can be as reliable as those of more advanced and sophisticated methods like ANN and 3D-QSAR analyses. PMID:25317190

  10. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of heterostructures with inclusion of arbitrarily complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejdoubi, Abdelilah; Brosseau, Christian

    2006-03-01

    Currently, there is a great interest in tailoring the polarization properties of composite materials with the goal of controlling the dielectric behavior. This paper reports finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling of the dielectric behavior of two-dimensional (2D) lossless two-phase heterostructures. More specifically, we present extensive results of 2D FDTD computations on the quasistatic effective permittivity of a single inclusion, with arbitrarily complex geometry (regular polygons and fractals), embedded in a plane. The uniaxial perfectly matched layer-absorbing boundary condition is found adequate for truncating the boundary of the 2D space because it leads to only very small backreflections. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by the variety of geometries modeled, i.e., regular polygons and fractals, and permittivity contrast ratios which allows us to distinguish between effects of surface fraction and effects of morphology. Our calculations show that geometrical effects can give rise to significant modifications of the surface fraction dependence of the permittivity. The results are compared with Maxwell-Garnett (MG) and symmetric Bruggeman (SBG) formulas. As expected the effective permittivity in the situations considered here deviates from the MG and SBG results at high surface fractions and/or high permittivity ratios between the inclusion and the host medium. In addition, the results show that a two-phase composite containing a fractal-boundary inclusion, e.g., Koch's snowflake, can have a permittivity which is several tens of percent lower between the first and the fourth iteration of the structure at a fixed perimeter-to-surface ratio. This feature is consistent with the fact that as the surface fraction becomes higher, the inclusion rough boundaries dominate the overall geometry. We believe that simplified modeling such as the modeling done here can serve as a useful purpose in understanding the interplay between the structure and

  11. Application of a new finite difference algorithm for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic problems have become extremely important in recent years because of research efforts such as the High Speed Civil Transport program. Computational aeroacoustics (CAA) requires a faithful representation of wave propagation over long distances, and needs algorithms that are accurate and boundary conditions that are unobtrusive. This paper applies a new finite difference method and boundary algorithm to the Linearized Euler Equations (LEE). The results demonstrate the ability of a new fourth order propagation algorithm to accurately simulate the genuinely multidimensional wave dynamics of acoustic propagation in two space dimensions with the LEE. The results also show the ability of a new outflow boundary condition and fourth order algorithm to pass the evolving solution from the computational domain with no perceptible degradation of the solution remaining within the domain.

  12. Effects of sources on time-domain finite difference models.

    PubMed

    Botts, Jonathan; Savioja, Lauri

    2014-07-01

    Recent work on excitation mechanisms in acoustic finite difference models focuses primarily on physical interpretations of observed phenomena. This paper offers an alternative view by examining the properties of models from the perspectives of linear algebra and signal processing. Interpretation of a simulation as matrix exponentiation clarifies the separate roles of sources as boundaries and signals. Boundary conditions modify the matrix and thus its modal structure, and initial conditions or source signals shape the solution, but not the modal structure. Low-frequency artifacts are shown to follow from eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrix, and previously reported artifacts are predicted from eigenvalue estimates. The role of source signals is also briefly discussed. PMID:24993210

  13. Finite difference modeling of Biot's poroelastic equations atseismic frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, Y.J.; Pride, S.R.; Nihei, K.T.

    2006-02-24

    Across the seismic band of frequencies (loosely defined as<10 kHz), a seismic wave propagating through a porous material willcreate flow in the pore space that is laminar; that is, in thislow-frequency "seismic limit," the development of viscous boundary layersin the pores need not be modeled. An explicit time steppingstaggered-grid finite difference scheme is presented for solving Biot'sequations of poroelasticity in this low-frequency limit. A key part ofthis work is the establishment of rigorous stability conditions. It isdemonstrated that over a wide range of porous material properties typicalof sedimentary rock and despite the presenceof fluid pressure diffusion(Biot slow waves), the usual Courant condition governs the stability asif the problem involved purely elastic waves. The accuracy of the methodis demonstrated by comparing to exact analytical solutions for both fastcompressional waves and slow waves. Additional numerical modelingexamples are also presented.

  14. Accurate finite difference methods for time-harmonic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harari, Isaac; Turkel, Eli

    1994-01-01

    Finite difference methods for solving problems of time-harmonic acoustics are developed and analyzed. Multidimensional inhomogeneous problems with variable, possibly discontinuous, coefficients are considered, accounting for the effects of employing nonuniform grids. A weighted-average representation is less sensitive to transition in wave resolution (due to variable wave numbers or nonuniform grids) than the standard pointwise representation. Further enhancement in method performance is obtained by basing the stencils on generalizations of Pade approximation, or generalized definitions of the derivative, reducing spurious dispersion, anisotropy and reflection, and by improving the representation of source terms. The resulting schemes have fourth-order accurate local truncation error on uniform grids and third order in the nonuniform case. Guidelines for discretization pertaining to grid orientation and resolution are presented.

  15. Finite-difference modeling of commercial aircraft using TSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Pennock, S.T.; Poggio, A.J.

    1994-11-15

    Future aircraft may have systems controlled by fiber optic cables, to reduce susceptibility to electromagnetic interference. However, the digital systems associated with the fiber optic network could still experience upset due to powerful radio stations, radars, and other electromagnetic sources, with potentially serious consequences. We are modeling the electromagnetic behavior of commercial transport aircraft in support of the NASA Fly-by-Light/Power-by-Wire program, using the TSAR finite-difference time-domain code initially developed for the military. By comparing results obtained from TSAR with data taken on a Boeing 757 at the Air Force Phillips Lab., we hope to show that FDTD codes can serve as an important tool in the design and certification of U.S. commercial aircraft, helping American companies to produce safe, reliable air transportation.

  16. Modeling pulse driven antenna systems with finite differences

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, M.; Pennock, S.; Ziolkowski, R.; McLeod, R.

    1990-03-01

    We have developed a capability of modeling the performance of general, pulse driven, antenna systems. Our approach is to use TSAR, a three dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) code, to model the antenna structure and the surrounding near field environment. We then use a far field projection algorithm to obtain its far field response. Specifically, this algorithm utilizes the tangential electric and magnetic fields at a specified surface of the TSAR FDTD computational volume and calculates the resulting fields far from the equivalent magnetic and electric sources. This approach will be illustrated by considering the TEB antenna system. The system is modeled with the code and the results are compared with anechoic chamber data. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A parallel finite-difference method for computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swisshelm, Julie M.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme for solving complex three-dimensional aerodynamic flow on parallel-processing supercomputers is presented. The method consists of a basic flow solver with multigrid convergence acceleration, embedded grid refinements, and a zonal equation scheme. Multitasking and vectorization have been incorporated into the algorithm. Results obtained include multiprocessed flow simulations from the Cray X-MP and Cray-2. Speedups as high as 3.3 for the two-dimensional case and 3.5 for segments of the three-dimensional case have been achieved on the Cray-2. The entire solver attained a factor of 2.7 improvement over its unitasked version on the Cray-2. The performance of the parallel algorithm on each machine is analyzed.

  18. Justification of the Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation for the Evolution of Gravity Driven 2D Surface Water Waves in a Canal of Finite Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düll, Wolf-Patrick; Schneider, Guido; Wayne, C. Eugene

    2016-05-01

    In 1968 V.E. Zakharov derived the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the two-dimensional water wave problem in the absence of surface tension, that is, for the evolution of gravity driven surface water waves, in order to describe slow temporal and spatial modulations of a spatially and temporarily oscillating wave packet. In this paper we give a rigorous proof that the wave packets in the two-dimensional water wave problem in a canal of finite depth can be approximated over a physically relevant timespan by solutions of the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  19. A comparison of finite-difference and finite-element methods for calculating free edge stresses in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauld, N. R., Jr.; Goree, J. G.; Tzeng, L.-S.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that edge delamination is a serious failure mechanism for laminated composite materials. Various numerical methods have been utilized in attempts to calculate the interlaminar stress components which precede delamination in a laminate. There are, however, discrepancies regarding the results provided by different methods, taking into account a finite-difference procedure, a perturbation procedure, and finite element approaches. The present investigation has the objective to assess the capacity of a finite difference method to predict the character and magnitude of the interlaminar stress distributions near an interface corner. A second purpose of the investigation is to determine if predictions by finite element method in-plane, interlaminar stress components near an interface corner represent actual laminate behavior.

  20. Modal analysis of delaminated composite plates using the finite element method and damage detection via combined Ritz/2D-wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, A.; Moreno-García, P.; Casanova, Cesar F.

    2013-06-01

    Structural studies to find defects (in particular delaminations) in composite plates have been very prevalent in the Structural Health Monitoring field. The present work develops a new method to detect delaminations in CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer) plates. In this paper the method is validated with numerical simulations, which come to support its adequacy for use with real acquisition data. This is done firstly through the implementation of a delaminated plate finite element. Using the classical lamination plate theory, delamination is considered in the kinematic equations through jump functions and additional degrees of freedom. The element allows the introduction of nd delaminations through its thickness. Classical QMITC (Quadrilateral Mixed Interpolation Tensorial Components) and DKQ (Discrete Kirchhoff Quadrilateral) elements are used for the membrane and bending FEM (Finite Element Method) formulation. Second, using the vibration modes obtained with the FEM, a damage location technique based on the variational Ritz method and Wavelet Analysis is proposed. The approach has the advantage of requiring only damaged modes and not the healthy ones. Both FEM simulations and Ritz/Wavelet damage detection schemes are applied in an orthotropic CFRP plate with the stacking sequence [0/90]3S. In addition, the influence of delamination thickness position, boundary conditions and added noise (in order to simulate experimental measures) was studied.

  1. Individual Recognition in Domestic Cattle (Bos taurus): Evidence from 2D-Images of Heads from Different Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, Marjorie; Deputte, Bertrand L.; Heyman, Yvan; Baudoin, Claude

    2009-01-01

    Background In order to maintain cohesion of groups, social animals need to process social information efficiently. Visual individual recognition, which is distinguished from mere visual discrimination, has been studied in only few mammalian species. In addition, most previous studies used either a small number of subjects or a few various views as test stimuli. Dairy cattle, as a domestic species allow the testing of a good sample size and provide a large variety of test stimuli due to the morphological diversity of breeds. Hence cattle are a suitable model for studying individual visual recognition. This study demonstrates that cattle display visual individual recognition and shows the effect of both familiarity and coat diversity in discrimination. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether 8 Prim'Holstein heifers could recognize 2D-images of heads of one cow (face, profiles, ¾ views) from those of other cows. Experiments were based on a simultaneous discrimination paradigm through instrumental conditioning using food rewards. In Experiment 1, all images represented familiar cows (belonging to the same social group) from the Prim'Holstein breed. In Experiments 2, 3 and 4, images were from unfamiliar (unknown) individuals either from the same breed or other breeds. All heifers displayed individual recognition of familiar and unfamiliar individuals from their own breed. Subjects reached criterion sooner when recognizing a familiar individual than when recognizing an unfamiliar one (Exp 1: 3.1±0.7 vs. Exp 2: 5.2±1.2 sessions; Z = 1.99, N = 8, P = 0.046). In addition almost all subjects recognized unknown individuals from different breeds, however with greater difficulty. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrated that cattle have efficient individual recognition based on categorization capacities. Social familiarity improved their performance. The recognition of individuals with very different coat characteristics from the subjects was

  2. Thermo-mechanically coupled deformation with the finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, Thibault; Raess, Ludovic; Podladchikov, Yury; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Numerous geological observations are the result of thermo-mechanical processes. In particular, tectonic processes such as ductile shear localization can be induced by the intrinsic coupling that exists between deformation, energy and rheology. In order to study these processes, we have designed two-dimensional implicit and explicit finite difference models. These models take into account a temperature-dependent power-law rheology as well as diffusion, advection, and conversion of mechanical work into heat. For implicit models, different non-linear solving strategies were implemented (implicit/explicit thermo-mechanical coupling, Picard/Newton linearisations). We model thermo-mechanically activated shear localization in lower crustal conditions using these different numerical methods. We show that all methods capture the thermo-mechanical instability and exhibit similar temporal evolution. We perform quantitative comparisons with specifically designed tests (conservation of energy, analytical solution, scaling law). For implicit approaches, we discuss the treatment of thermo-mechanical coupling (implicit/explicit) and the impact of the imposed accuracy (tolerance) of the non-linear solvers. We compare the accuracy of the explicit method with the one of the implicit methods. Numerical algorithms based on explicit methods to study thermo-mechanical shear localisation are attractive because they are easy to program and very comprehensible.

  3. Differences in growth properties of endometrial cancer in three dimensional (3D) culture and 2D cell monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Chitcholtan, Kenny; Asselin, Eric; Parent, Sophie; Sykes, Peter H.; Evans, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have an invaluable role in understanding the behaviour of tumour cells in a well defined microenvironment. This is because some aspects of tumour characteristics cannot be fully recapitulated in a cell monolayer (2D). In the present study, we compared growth patterns, expression of signalling molecules, and metabolism-associated proteins of endometrial cancer cell lines in 3D and 2D cell cultures. Cancer cells formed spherical structures in 3D reconstituted basement membrane (3D rBM), and the morphological appearance was cell line dependent. Cell differentiation was observed after 8 days in the 3D rBM. There was reduced proliferation, detected by less expression of PCNA in 3D rBM than in 2D cell monolayers. The addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) to cancer cells induced phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt in both cell culture conditions. The uptake of glucose was selectively altered in the 3D rBM, but there was a lack of association with Glut-1 expression. The secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) was selectively altered in 3D rBM, and it was cell line dependent. Our data demonstrated that 3D rBM as an in vitro model can influence proliferation and metabolism of endometrial cancer cell behaviour compared to 2D cell monolayer. Changes are specific to individual cell types. The use of 3D rBM is, therefore, important in the in vitro study of targeted anticancer therapies.

  4. 2D-QSAR study of some 2,5-diaminobenzophenone farnesyltransferase inhibitors by different chemometric methods

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Ghasemi, Saeed; Shayanfar, Ali; Ebrahimi-Najafabadi, Heshmatollah

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models can be used to predict the activity of new drug candidates in early stages of drug discovery. In the present study, the information of the ninety two 2,5-diaminobenzophenone-containing farnesyltranaferase inhibitors (FTIs) were taken from the literature. Subsequently, the structures of the molecules were optimized using Hyperchem software and molecular descriptors were obtained using Dragon software. The most suitable descriptors were selected using genetic algorithms-partial least squares and stepwise regression, where exhibited that the volume, shape and polarity of the FTIs are important for their activities. The two-dimensional QSAR models (2D-QSAR) were obtained using both linear methods (multiple linear regression) and non-linear methods (artificial neural networks and support vector machines). The proposed QSAR models were validated using internal validation method. The results showed that the proposed 2D-QSAR models were valid and they can be used for prediction of the activities of the 2,5-diaminobenzophenone-containing FTIs. In conclusion, the 2D-QSAR models (both linear and non-linear) showed good prediction capability and the non-linear models were exhibited more accuracy than the linear models. PMID:26600747

  5. Nonlinear wave propagation using three different finite difference schemes (category 2 application)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, D. Stuart; Hardin, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Three common finite difference schemes are used to examine the computation of one-dimensional nonlinear wave propagation. The schemes are studied for their responses to numerical parameters such as time step selection, boundary condition implementation, and discretization of governing equations. The performance of the schemes is compared and various numerical phenomena peculiar to each is discussed.

  6. Gidas-Ni-Nirenberg results for finite difference equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, P. J.; Reichel, W.

    2007-10-01

    Are positive solutions of finite difference boundary value problems [Delta]hu=f(u) in [Omega]h, u=0 on [not partial differential][Omega]h as symmetric as the domain? To answer this question we first show by examples that almost arbitrary non-symmetric solutions can be constructed. This is in striking difference to the continuous case, where by the famous Gidas-Ni-Nirenberg theorem [B. Gidas, Wei-Ming Ni, L. Nirenberg, Symmetry and related problems via the maximum principle, Comm. Math. Phys. 68 (1979) 209-243] positive solutions inherit the symmetry of the underlying domain. Then we prove approximate symmetry theorems for solutions on equidistantly meshed n-dimensional cubes: explicit estimates depending on the data are given which show that the solutions become more symmetric as the discretization gets finer. The quality of the estimates depends on whether or not f(0)<0. The one-dimensional case stands out in two ways: the proofs are elementary and the estimates for the defect of symmetry are O(h) compared to O(1/log(h)) in the higher-dimensional case.

  7. A finite difference model for free surface gravity drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Couri, F.R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    The unconfined gravity flow of liquid with a free surface into a well is a classical well test problem which has not been well understood by either hydrologists or petroleum engineers. Paradigms have led many authors to treat an incompressible flow as compressible flow to justify the delayed yield behavior of a time-drawdown test. A finite-difference model has been developed to simulate the free surface gravity flow of an unconfined single phase, infinitely large reservoir into a well. The model was verified with experimental results in sandbox models in the literature and with classical methods applied to observation wells in the Groundwater literature. The simulator response was also compared with analytical Theis (1935) and Ramey et al. (1989) approaches for wellbore pressure at late producing times. The seepage face in the sandface and the delayed yield behavior were reproduced by the model considering a small liquid compressibility and incompressible porous medium. The potential buildup (recovery) simulated by the model evidenced a different- phenomenon from the drawdown, contrary to statements found in the Groundwater literature. Graphs of buildup potential vs time, buildup seepage face length vs time, and free surface head and sand bottom head radial profiles evidenced that the liquid refills the desaturating cone as a flat moving surface. The late time pseudo radial behavior was only approached after exaggerated long times.

  8. Finite difference time domain analysis of chirped dielectric gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochmuth, Diane H.; Johnson, Eric G.

    1993-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method for solving Maxwell's time-dependent curl equations is accurate, computationally efficient, and straight-forward to implement. Since both time and space derivatives are employed, the propagation of an electromagnetic wave can be treated as an initial-value problem. Second-order central-difference approximations are applied to the space and time derivatives of the electric and magnetic fields providing a discretization of the fields in a volume of space, for a period of time. The solution to this system of equations is stepped through time, thus, simulating the propagation of the incident wave. If the simulation is continued until a steady-state is reached, an appropriate far-field transformation can be applied to the time-domain scattered fields to obtain reflected and transmitted powers. From this information diffraction efficiencies can also be determined. In analyzing the chirped structure, a mesh is applied only to the area immediately around the grating. The size of the mesh is then proportional to the electric size of the grating. Doing this, however, imposes an artificial boundary around the area of interest. An absorbing boundary condition must be applied along the artificial boundary so that the outgoing waves are absorbed as if the boundary were absent. Many such boundary conditions have been developed that give near-perfect absorption. In this analysis, the Mur absorbing boundary conditions are employed. Several grating structures were analyzed using the FDTD method.

  9. A study of infrasound propagation based on high-order finite difference solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Marsden, O; Bogey, C; Bailly, C

    2014-03-01

    The feasibility of using numerical simulation of fluid dynamics equations for the detailed description of long-range infrasound propagation in the atmosphere is investigated. The two dimensional (2D) Navier Stokes equations are solved via high fidelity spatial finite differences and Runge-Kutta time integration, coupled with a shock-capturing filter procedure allowing large amplitudes to be studied. The accuracy of acoustic prediction over long distances with this approach is first assessed in the linear regime thanks to two test cases featuring an acoustic source placed above a reflective ground in a homogeneous and weakly inhomogeneous medium, solved for a range of grid resolutions. An atmospheric model which can account for realistic features affecting acoustic propagation is then described. A 2D study of the effect of source amplitude on signals recorded at ground level at varying distances from the source is carried out. Modifications both in terms of waveforms and arrival times are described. PMID:24606252

  10. A MacCormack-TVD finite difference method to simulate the mass flow in mountainous terrain with variable computational domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Chaojun; He, Siming; Xu, Qiang; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Wencheng

    2013-03-01

    A two-dimensional mountainous mass flow dynamic procedure solver (Massflow-2D) using the MacCormack-TVD finite difference scheme is proposed. The solver is implemented in Matlab on structured meshes with variable computational domain. To verify the model, a variety of numerical test scenarios, namely, the classical one-dimensional and two-dimensional dam break, the landslide in Hong Kong in 1993 and the Nora debris flow in the Italian Alps in 2000, are executed, and the model outputs are compared with published results. It is established that the model predictions agree well with both the analytical solution as well as the field observations.

  11. SEX DIFFERENCES IN DIGIT RATIO (2D:4D) AMONG MILITARY AND CIVIL COHORTS AT A MILITARY ACADEMY IN WROCŁAW, POLAND.

    PubMed

    Kociuba, Marek; Kozieł, Slawomir; Chakraborty, Raja

    2016-09-01

    The ratio of second-to-fourth digit length (2D:4D), which is generally higher in women compared with men, is a putative marker of prenatal testosterone (PT) exposure. Lower 2D:4D is linked with greater physical ability and strength, better sporting performance and a propensity towards jobs demanding greater physical ability. The objectives of this paper were to examine the sexual dimorphism in 2D:4D in both hands 1and compare this dimorphism in the students of military and civil courses at the General Kuściuszko Military Academy of Land Forces in Wrocław. The cross-sectional study compared 59 female and 118 male students from the military courses and 53 females and 64 male students from the civil courses. Besides calculating 2D:4D (2D/4D) for each hand, height and weight were also recorded. Physical fitness and endurance were assessed using Eurofit tests. Handgrip strength was measured using a standardized isometric dynamometer. In almost all physical tests, students in the military cohort showed highly significant greater physical ability and strength (e.g. handgrip strength) when compared with the civil cohort. Male participants had a significantly lower 2D:4D than females for each hand, as well as for the average value for both hands. The sexual dimorphism was, however, a little more pronounced in the right hand than in the left. Both sex and course type were significant predictors of 2D:4D. There were significant interactions between sex and the student type. Among females, but not in males, the military cohort had a significantly lower, i.e. more 'masculine', 2D:4D for the left hand and right hand and average for both hands (t=3.290, p<0.001) than the civil cohort. This was not the case in males. However, the sex difference in 2D:4D was only significant among the civil students, and not among the military cadets. In conclusion, higher PT exposure, as represented by a lower 2D:4D, among the Polish females might be an indicator of relatively increased physical

  12. Regional subsidence modelling in Murcia city (SE Spain) using 1-D vertical finite element analysis and 2-D interpolation of ground surface displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessitore, S.; Fernández-Merodo, J. A.; Herrera, G.; Tomás, R.; Ramondini, M.; Sanabria, M.; Duro, J.; Mulas, J.; Calcaterra, D.

    2015-11-01

    Subsidence is a hazard that may have natural or anthropogenic origin causing important economic losses. The area of Murcia city (SE Spain) has been affected by subsidence due to groundwater overexploitation since the year 1992. The main observed historical piezometric level declines occurred in the periods 1982-1984, 1992-1995 and 2004-2008 and showed a close correlation with the temporal evolution of ground displacements. Since 2008, the pressure recovery in the aquifer has led to an uplift of the ground surface that has been detected by the extensometers. In the present work an elastic hydro-mechanical finite element code has been used to compute the subsidence time series for 24 geotechnical boreholes, prescribing the measured groundwater table evolution. The achieved results have been compared with the displacements estimated through an advanced DInSAR technique and measured by the extensometers. These spatio-temporal comparisons have showed that, in spite of the limited geomechanical data available, the model has turned out to satisfactorily reproduce the subsidence phenomenon affecting Murcia City. The model will allow the prediction of future induced deformations and the consequences of any piezometric level variation in the study area.

  13. 2004: Finite-Difference Time Domain Solution of Light Scattering by an Infinite Dielectric Column Immersed in an Absorbing Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Tanev, S.; Videen, G.

    2004-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method is applied to calculate light scattering and absorption by an arbitrarily shaped infinite column embedded in an absorbing dielectric medium. A uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is used to truncate the computational domain. The single-scattering properties of the infinite column embedded in the absorbing medium, including scattering phase functions, extinction and absorption efficiencies, are derived using an area integration of the internal field. An exact solution for light scattering and absorption by a circular cylinder in an absorbing medium is used to examine the accuracy of the 2-D UPML FDTD code. With use of a cell size of 1/120 incident wavelength in the FDTD calculations, the errors in the extinction and absorption efficiencies and asymmetry factors from the 2-D UPML FDTD are generally smaller than approx .1%. The errors in the scattering phase functions are typically smaller than approx .4%. Using the 2-D UPML FDTD technique, light scattering and absorption by long noncircular columns embedded in absorbing media can be accurately solved.

  14. Finite-difference numerical simulations of underground explosion cavity decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Preston, L. A.; Jensen, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    Earth models containing a significant portion of ideal fluid (e.g., air and/or water) are of increasing interest in seismic wave propagation simulations. Examples include a marine model with a thick water layer, and a land model with air overlying a rugged topographic surface. The atmospheric infrasound community is currently interested in coupled seismic-acoustic propagation of low-frequency signals over long ranges (~tens to ~hundreds of kilometers). Also, accurate and efficient numerical treatment of models containing underground air-filled voids (caves, caverns, tunnels, subterranean man-made facilities) is essential. In support of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), we are developing a numerical algorithm for simulating coupled seismic and acoustic wave propagation in mixed solid/fluid media. Solution methodology involves explicit, time-domain, finite-differencing of the elastodynamic velocity-stress partial differential system on a three-dimensional staggered spatial grid. Conditional logic is used to avoid shear stress updating within the fluid zones; this approach leads to computational efficiency gains for models containing a significant proportion of ideal fluid. Numerical stability and accuracy are maintained at air/rock interfaces (where the contrast in mass density is on the order of 1 to 2000) via a finite-difference operator "order switching" formalism. The fourth-order spatial FD operator used throughout the bulk of the earth model is reduced to second-order in the immediate vicinity of a high-contrast interface. Current modeling efforts are oriented toward quantifying the amount of atmospheric infrasound energy generated by various underground seismic sources (explosions and earthquakes). Source depth and orientation, and surface topography play obvious roles. The cavity decoupling problem, where an explosion is detonated within an air-filled void, is of special interest. A point explosion

  15. Asymptotically Correct Finite Difference Schemes for Highly Oscillatory ODEs

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Anton; Geier, Jens

    2010-09-30

    We are concerned with the numerical integration of ODE-initial value problems of the form {epsilon}{sup 2{phi}}{sub xx}+a(x){phi} = 0 with given a(x){>=}a{sub 0}>0 in the highly oscillatory regime 0<{epsilon}(appearing as a stationary Schroedinger equation, e.g.). In two steps we derive an accurate finite difference scheme that does not need to resolve each oscillation: With a WKB-ansatz the dominant oscillations are ''transformed out'', yielding a much smoother ODE. For the resulting oscillatory integrals we devise an asymptotic expansion both in {epsilon} and h. The resulting scheme typically has a step size restriction of h = o({radical}({epsilon})). If the phase of the WKB-transformation can be computed explicitly, then the scheme is asymptotically correct with an error bound of the order o({epsilon}{sup 3}h{sup 2}). As an application we present simulations of a 1D-model for ballistic quantum transport in a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor).

  16. Contraction pre-conditioner in finite-difference electromagnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavich, Nikolay; Zhdanov, Michael S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to constructing an effective pre-conditioner for finite-difference (FD) electromagnetic modelling in geophysical applications. This approach is based on introducing an FD contraction operator, similar to one developed for integral equation formulation of Maxwell's equation. The properties of the FD contraction operator were established using an FD analogue of the energy equality for the anomalous electromagnetic field. A new pre-conditioner uses a discrete Green's function of a 1-D layered background conductivity. We also developed the formulae for an estimation of the condition number of the system of FD equations pre-conditioned with the introduced FD contraction operator. Based on this estimation, we have established that the condition number is bounded by the maximum conductivity contrast between the background conductivity and actual conductivity. When there are both resistive and conductive anomalies relative to the background, the new pre-conditioner is advantageous over using the 1-D discrete Green's function directly. In our numerical experiments with both resistive and conductive anomalies, for a land geoelectrical model with 1:10 contrast, the method accelerates convergence of an iterative method (BiCGStab) by factors of 2-2.5, and in a marine example with 1:50 contrast, by a factor of 4.6, compared to direct use of the discrete 1-D Green's function as a pre-conditioner.

  17. QED multi-dimensional vacuum polarization finite-difference solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Pedro; Grismayer, Thomas; Silva, Luís; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is expected to deliver peak intensities of 1023 - 1024 W/cm2 allowing to probe nonlinear Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) phenomena in an unprecedented regime. Within the framework of QED, the second order process of photon-photon scattering leads to a set of extended Maxwell's equations [W. Heisenberg and H. Euler, Z. Physik 98, 714] effectively creating nonlinear polarization and magnetization terms that account for the nonlinear response of the vacuum. To model this in a self-consistent way, we present a multi dimensional generalized Maxwell equation finite difference solver with significantly enhanced dispersive properties, which was implemented in the OSIRIS particle-in-cell code [R.A. Fonseca et al. LNCS 2331, pp. 342-351, 2002]. We present a detailed numerical analysis of this electromagnetic solver. As an illustration of the properties of the solver, we explore several examples in extreme conditions. We confirm the theoretical prediction of vacuum birefringence of a pulse propagating in the presence of an intense static background field [arXiv:1301.4918 [quant-ph

  18. Nonlinear triggered lightning models for use in finite difference calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Terence; Perala, Rodney A.; Ng, Poh H.

    1989-01-01

    Two nonlinear triggered lightning models have been developed for use in finite difference calculations. Both are based on three species of air chemistry physics and couple nonlinearly calculated air conductivity to Maxwell's equations. The first model is suitable for use in three-dimensional modeling and has been applied to the analysis of triggered lightning on the NASA F106B Thunderstorm Research Aircraft. The model calculates number densities of positive ions, negative ions, and electrons as a function of time and space through continuity equations, including convective derivative terms. The set of equations is closed by using experimentally determined mobilities, and the mobilities are also used to determine the air conductivity. Results from the model's application to the F106B are shown. The second model is two-dimensional and incorporates an enhanced air chemistry formulation. Momentum conservation equations replace the mobility assumption of the first model. Energy conservation equations for neutrals, heavy ions, and electrons are also used. Energy transfer into molecular vibrational modes is accounted for. The purpose for the enhanced model is to include the effects of temperature into the air breakdown, a necessary step if the model is to simulate more than the very earliest stages of breakdown. Therefore, the model also incorporates a temperature-dependent electron avalanche rate. Results from the model's application to breakdown around a conducting ellipsoid placed in an electric field are shown.

  19. Finite difference algorithm in real-time optical CD applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opsal, Jon L.; Chu, Hanyou; Leng, Jingmin

    2004-05-01

    In real-time optical CD applications of shallow trench isolation (STI), shallow trench removal (STR), deep trench isolation (DTI), and deep trench removal (DTR), a single recipe is required for each type of application to accommodate wide ranges of process windows by monitoring parameters such as bottom CD (BCD), middle CD (MCD), top CD (TCD) and side wall angle (SWA). The modeling of the grating profiles of silicon trenches with nitride caps requires a large number of slices (> 10) to generate smooth shapes for top rounding of the nitride, curvature of the silicon trench waist, and the silicon trench footing or undercut. The number of orders for Fourier expansion is also high (larger than 13 in the best case). With these requirements we found that the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) algorithm is generally too slow to calculate the CD profiles from the raw scatterometry spectra. In this paper we present a finite difference (FD) algorithm and its applications to real-time CD scatterometry. The mathematical analysis of the FD algorithm was published elsewhere. We demonstrate that the FD algorithm has an advantage over RCWA in terms of calculation speed (up to a factor of 10 improvement), better capture of profile shapes in comparison with cross sectional SEM (X-SEM) and more robust in terms of numerical stability. Details of comparisons between FD and RCWA will be shown for the applications of STR and DTR.

  20. Contraction preconditioner in finite-difference electromagnetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavich, Nikolay; Zhdanov, Michael S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to constructing an effective preconditioner for finite-difference (FD) electromagnetic modeling in geophysical applications. This approach is based on introducing an FD contraction operator, similar to one developed for integral equation formulation of Maxwell's equation. The properties of the FD contraction operator were established using an FD analog of the energy equality for the anomalous electromagnetic field. A new preconditioner uses a discrete Green's function of a 1D layered background conductivity. We also developed the formulas for an estimation of the condition number of the system of FD equations preconditioned with the introduced FD contraction operator. Based on this estimation, we have established that for high contrasts, the condition number is bounded by the maximum conductivity contrast between the background conductivity and actual conductivity. When there are both resistive and conductive anomalies relative to the background, the new preconditioner is advantageous over using the 1D discrete Green's function directly. In our numerical experiments with both resistive and conductive anomalies, for a land geoelectrical model with 1:10 contrast, the method accelerates convergence of an iterative method (BiCGStab) by factors of 2 to 2.5, and in a marine example with 1:50 contrast, by a factor of 4.6, compared to direct use of the discrete 1D Green's function as a preconditioner.

  1. A staggered-grid finite-difference scheme optimized in the time-space domain for modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sirui; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-11-01

    For modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems using finite-difference schemes, optimizing the coefficients of the finite-difference operators can reduce numerical dispersion. Most optimized finite-difference schemes for modeling seismic-wave propagation suppress only spatial but not temporal dispersion errors. We develop a novel optimized finite-difference scheme for numerical scalar-wave modeling to control dispersion errors not only in space but also in time. Our optimized scheme is based on a new stencil that contains a few more grid points than the standard stencil. We design an objective function for minimizing relative errors of phase velocities of waves propagating in all directions within a given range of wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis and numerical examples demonstrate that our optimized finite-difference scheme is computationally up to 2.5 times faster than the optimized schemes using the standard stencil to achieve the similar modeling accuracy for a given 2D or 3D problem. Compared with the high-order finite-difference scheme using the same new stencil, our optimized scheme reduces 50 percent of the computational cost to achieve the similar modeling accuracy. This new optimized finite-difference scheme is particularly useful for large-scale 3D scalar-wave modeling and inversion.

  2. A staggered-grid finite-difference scheme optimized in the time–space domain for modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Sirui; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-11-01

    For modeling scalar-wave propagation in geophysical problems using finite-difference schemes, optimizing the coefficients of the finite-difference operators can reduce numerical dispersion. Most optimized finite-difference schemes for modeling seismic-wave propagation suppress only spatial but not temporal dispersion errors. We develop a novel optimized finite-difference scheme for numerical scalar-wave modeling to control dispersion errors not only in space but also in time. Our optimized scheme is based on a new stencil that contains a few more grid points than the standard stencil. We design an objective function for minimizing relative errors of phase velocities of waves propagating in all directions within a given range of wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis and numerical examples demonstrate that our optimized finite-difference scheme is computationally up to 2.5 times faster than the optimized schemes using the standard stencil to achieve the similar modeling accuracy for a given 2D or 3D problem. Compared with the high-order finite-difference scheme using the same new stencil, our optimized scheme reduces 50 percent of the computational cost to achieve the similar modeling accuracy. This new optimized finite-difference scheme is particularly useful for large-scale 3D scalar-wave modeling and inversion.

  3. A 2D magnetic and 3D mechanical coupled finite element model for the study of the dynamic vibrations in the stator of induction motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J.; Belahcen, A.; Detoni, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled Finite Element Model in order to study the vibrations in induction motors under steady-state. The model utilizes a weak coupling strategy between both magnetic and elastodynamic fields on the structure. Firstly, the problem solves the magnetic vector potential in an axial cut and secondly the former solution is coupled to a three dimensional model of the stator. The coupling is performed using projection based algorithms between the computed magnetic solution and the three-dimensional mesh. The three-dimensional model of the stator includes both end-windings and end-shields in order to give a realistic picture of the motor. The present model is validated using two steps. Firstly, a modal analysis hammer test is used to validate the material characteristic of this complex structure and secondly an array of accelerometer sensors is used in order to study the rotating waves using multi-dimensional spectral techniques. The analysis of the radial vibrations presented in this paper firstly concludes that slot harmonic components are visible when the motor is loaded. Secondly, the multidimensional spectrum presents the most relevant mechanical waves on the stator such as the ones produced by the space harmonics or the saturation of the iron core. The direct retrieval of the wave-number in a multi-dimensional spectrum is able to show the internal current distribution in a non-intrusive way. Experimental results for healthy induction motors are showing mechanical imbalances in a multi-dimensional spectrum in a more straightforward form.

  4. Effects of Spatial Ability, Gender Differences, and Pictorial Training on Children Using 2-D and 3-D Environments to Recall Landmark Locations from Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopcha, Theodore J.; Otumfuor, Beryl A.; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of spatial ability, gender differences, and pictorial training on fourth grade students' ability to recall landmark locations from memory. Ninety-six students used Google Earth over a 3-week period to locate landmarks (3-D) and mark their location on a 2-D topographical map. Analysis of covariance on posttest scores…

  5. JAC2D: A two-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biffle, J.H.; Blanford, M.L.

    1994-05-01

    JAC2D is a two-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equations. The method is implemented in a two-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. A four-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic/plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  6. Finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory schemes with constrained transport for ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christlieb, Andrew J.; Rossmanith, James A.; Tang, Qi

    2014-07-01

    In this work we develop a class of high-order finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (FD-WENO) schemes for solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in 2D and 3D. The philosophy of this work is to use efficient high-order WENO spatial discretizations with high-order strong stability-preserving Runge-Kutta (SSP-RK) time-stepping schemes. Numerical results have shown that with such methods we are able to resolve solution structures that are only visible at much higher grid resolutions with lower-order schemes. The key challenge in applying such methods to ideal MHD is to control divergence errors in the magnetic field. We achieve this by augmenting the base scheme with a novel high-order constrained transport approach that updates the magnetic vector potential. The predicted magnetic field from the base scheme is replaced by a divergence-free magnetic field that is obtained from the curl of this magnetic potential. The non-conservative weakly hyperbolic system that the magnetic vector potential satisfies is solved using a version of FD-WENO developed for Hamilton-Jacobi equations. The resulting numerical method is endowed with several important properties: (1) all quantities, including all components of the magnetic field and magnetic potential, are treated as point values on the same mesh (i.e., there is no mesh staggering); (2) both the spatial and temporal orders of accuracy are fourth-order; (3) no spatial integration or multidimensional reconstructions are needed in any step; and (4) special limiters in the magnetic vector potential update are used to control unphysical oscillations in the magnetic field. Several 2D and 3D numerical examples are presented to verify the order of accuracy on smooth test problems and to show high-resolution on test problems that involve shocks.

  7. Three dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution around implant with straight and angled abutments in different bone qualities.

    PubMed

    Arun Kumar, G; Mahesh, B; George, Dadu

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the stress distribution around implant in different bone qualities of D1, D2, D3, and D4 with straight and angled abutments using three dimensional finite element analysis. A three dimensional finite element model of the premaxilla region, and two solid 4.3 × 10 mm implant, one with a straight abutment and the other with an angled abutment was done. Four distinctly different bone qualities of D1, D2, D3, and D4 were made. A static load of 178 N was applied at the centre of incisal edge along the long axis of each abutment. The maximum equivalent von Misses stress values around the implants were recorded. The distribution of stresses changed considerably with abutment angulation. As angulation increased from 0° to 15° the concentration of Von Misses stresses shifted to the cortical layer of bone on the facial side of the fixture. Although Von Misses stress increased in straight abutment as the bone quality changed from D1 to D4, it was more noticeable under the loading side of the angulated abutments. The high stresses induced through angled abutments at the cervical zone of the implant due to forces and moments could be a dominant factor that may aggravate the peri-implant bone loss or changes the existing peri-implantitis direction.

  8. A Multifunctional Interface Method for Coupling Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods: Two-Dimensional Scalar-Field Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.

    2002-01-01

    A multifunctional interface method with capabilities for variable-fidelity modeling and multiple method analysis is presented. The methodology provides an effective capability by which domains with diverse idealizations can be modeled independently to exploit the advantages of one approach over another. The multifunctional method is used to couple independently discretized subdomains, and it is used to couple the finite element and the finite difference methods. The method is based on a weighted residual variational method and is presented for two-dimensional scalar-field problems. A verification test problem and a benchmark application are presented, and the computational implications are discussed.

  9. The use of the Finite Element method for the earthquakes modelling in different geodynamic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, Raffaele; Tizzani, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Many numerical models have been developed to simulate the deformation and stress changes associated to the faulting process. This aspect is an important topic in fracture mechanism. In the proposed study, we investigate the impact of the deep fault geometry and tectonic setting on the co-seismic ground deformation pattern associated to different earthquake phenomena. We exploit the impact of the structural-geological data in Finite Element environment through an optimization procedure. In this framework, we model the failure processes in a physical mechanical scenario to evaluate the kinematics associated to the Mw 6.1 L'Aquila 2009 earthquake (Italy), the Mw 5.9 Ferrara and Mw 5.8 Mirandola 2012 earthquake (Italy) and the Mw 8.3 Gorkha 2015 earthquake (Nepal). These seismic events are representative of different tectonic scenario: the normal, the reverse and thrust faulting processes, respectively. In order to simulate the kinematic of the analyzed natural phenomena, we assume, under the plane stress approximation (is defined to be a state of stress in which the normal stress, sz, and the shear stress sxz and syz, directed perpendicular to x-y plane are assumed to be zero), the linear elastic behavior of the involved media. The performed finite element procedure consist of through two stages: (i) compacting under the weight of the rock successions (gravity loading), the deformation model reaches a stable equilibrium; (ii) the co-seismic stage simulates, through a distributed slip along the active fault, the released stresses. To constrain the models solution, we exploit the DInSAR deformation velocity maps retrieved by satellite data acquired by old and new generation sensors, as ENVISAT, RADARSAT-2 and SENTINEL 1A, encompassing the studied earthquakes. More specifically, we first generate 2D several forward mechanical models, then, we compare these with the recorded ground deformation fields, in order to select the best boundaries setting and parameters. Finally

  10. Rapid authentication of different ages of tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobium huoshanense as well as wild Dendrobium henanense using FTIR and 2D-COS IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nai-Dong; Chen, Nai-Fu; Li, Jun; Cao, Cai-Yun; Wang, Jin-Mei

    2015-12-01

    The accumulating of pharmaceutical chemicals in medicinal plants would greatly be affected by their ages and establishing a fast quality-identification method to evaluate the similarity of medicinal herbs at different cultivated ages is a critical step for assurance of quality and safety in the TCM industry. In this work, tri-step IR macro-fingerprinting and 2D-COS IR spectrum techniques combined with statistical pattern recognition were applied for discrimination and similarity evaluation of different ages of tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobium huoshanense C. Z. Tang et S. J. Cheng as well as Dendrobium henanense J.L.Lu et L.X Gao. Both tissue-cultured and wild D. huoshanense were easily differentiated from D. henanense by FTIR and SD-IR spectra, while it's quite difficult to discriminate different cultivated years of the three investigated Dendrobiums. In 2D-COS IR spectra, 1-5 auto-peaks with different indensity and positions were located in the region 1160-1030 cm-1 of the twelve Dendrobium samples and thus could be used to identify Dendrobium samples at different ages. Principle component analysis (PCA) of synchronous 2D-COS data showed that the twelve samples were effectively identified and evaluated. The results indicated that the tri-step infrared macro-fingerprinting combined with PCA method was suitable to differentiate the cultivated ages of Dendrobiums with species and orgins rapidly and nondestructively.

  11. 2D photonic-crystal optomechanical nanoresonator.

    PubMed

    Makles, K; Antoni, T; Kuhn, A G; Deléglise, S; Briant, T; Cohadon, P-F; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Pinard, L; Michel, C; Dolique, V; Flaminio, R; Cagnoli, G; Robert-Philip, I; Heidmann, A

    2015-01-15

    We present the optical optimization of an optomechanical device based on a suspended InP membrane patterned with a 2D near-wavelength grating (NWG) based on a 2D photonic-crystal geometry. We first identify by numerical simulation a set of geometrical parameters providing a reflectivity higher than 99.8% over a 50-nm span. We then study the limitations induced by the finite value of the optical waist and lateral size of the NWG pattern using different numerical approaches. The NWG grating, pierced in a suspended InP 265-nm thick membrane, is used to form a compact microcavity involving the suspended nanomembrane as an end mirror. The resulting cavity has a waist size smaller than 10 μm and a finesse in the 200 range. It is used to probe the Brownian motion of the mechanical modes of the nanomembrane. PMID:25679837

  12. Finite Difference Numerical Modeling of Gravito-Acoustic Wave Propagation in a Windy and Attenuating Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic and gravity waves propagating in the planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to the atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physic behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, In order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or the global scale a high order finite difference time domain (FDTD) approach is proposed that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations (Landau 1959) with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). One significant benefit from this code is its versatility. Indeed, it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation that enables one to observe correlations between the two. Simulations will also be performed on 2D/3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere and gravity-wave generation through atmospheric explosions. Computations are validated by comparison to well-known analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases (atmospheric explosion and bottom displacement forcing).

  13. Verification of a non-hydrostatic dynamical core using horizontally spectral element vertically finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. J.; Kim, J.; Shin, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this presentation, a new non-hydrostatic (NH) dynamical core using the spectral element method (SEM) in the horizontal discretization and the finite difference method (FDM) in the vertical discretization will be presented. By using horizontal SEM, which decomposes the physical domain into smaller pieces with a small communication stencil, we can achieve a high level of scalability. Also by using vertical FDM, we provide an easy way for coupling the dynamics and existing physics packages. The Euler equations used here are in a flux form based on the hybrid sigma hydrostatic pressure vertical coordinate, which are similar to those used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Within these Euler equations, we use a time-split third-order Runge-Kutta (RK3) for the time discretization. In order to establish robustness, firstly the NH dynamical core is verified in a simplified two dimensional (2D) slice framework by conducting widely used standard benchmark tests, and then we verify the global three dimensional (3D) dynamical core on the cubed-sphere grid with several test cases introduced by Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP).

  14. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravitoacoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Martin, Roland; Garcia, Raphaël F.; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3-D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale, we introduce a finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a background flow (wind). One significant benefit of such a method is its versatility because it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation, which enables one to observe interactions between them. Simulations can be performed for 2-D or 3-D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere or gravity-wave generation by atmospheric explosions. We validate the computations by comparing them to analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases: an atmospheric explosion, and a ground displacement forcing.

  15. Nonlinear waves in deforming porous media with the finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räss, Ludovic; Duretz, Thibault; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    The actual trend in computational geodynamics tends toward the development of coupled multi-physics models. The resulting models involve various types of nonlinear processes such as non-Newtonian rheologies and multi-physics coupling. One of the main challenge is to treat these nonlinearities in order to preserve the predictive power of these forward models. In this framework, we designed two dimensional (2D) finite difference models using both implicit and explicit discretisations. We apply the models to study the initiation and the propagation of nonlinear waves in deforming porous media (porosity waves). A strong coupling of a Stokes solver to a nonlinear Darcy flow is required to describe the complex evolution of permeability and porosity in space and in time. In our models, we also take into account porosity-dependant permeability and rheologies that are representative of major reservoir rock type (i.e. tight shales). We conduct numerical simulations and show that both implicit and explicit approaches capture the channeling instabilities and the development of focused flow. We perform quantitative comparison of the two methods and discuss the treatment of multi-physics coupling and rheological nonlinearities. We show that implicit and explicit discretisations converge to similar solutions only if the nonlinearities are accurately resolved. Explicit numerical algorithms can therefore be attractive because they are very comprehensible and well suited for HPC while implicit models are performing well on desktop computations.

  16. Volatility-dependent 2D IR correlation analysis of traditional Chinese medicine ‘Red Flower Oil’ preparation from different manufacturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan-Wen; Sun, Su-Qin; Zhou, Qun; Tao, Jia-Xun; Noda, Isao

    2008-06-01

    As a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), 'Red Flower Oil' preparation is widely used as a household remedy in China and Southeast Asia. Usually, the preparation is a mixture of several plant essential oils with different volatile features, such as wintergreen oil, turpentine oil and clove oil. The proportions of these plant essential oils in 'Red Flower Oil' vary from different manufacturers. Thus, it is important to develop a simple and rapid evaluation method for quality assurance of the preparations. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) was applied and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) based on the volatile characteristic of samples was used to enhance the resolution of FT-IR spectra. 2D IR technique could, not only easily provide the composition and their volatile sequences in 'Red flower Oil' preparations, but also rapidly discriminate the subtle differences in products from different manufacturers. Therefore, FT-IR combined with volatility-dependent 2D IR correlation analysis provides a very fast and effective method for the quality control of essential oil mixtures in TCM.

  17. Simulating three-dimensional seismograms in 2.5-dimensional structures by combining two-dimensional finite difference modelling and ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksat, J.; Müller, T. M.; Wenzel, F.

    2008-07-01

    Finite difference (FD) simulation of elastic wave propagation is an important tool in geophysical research. As large-scale 3-D simulations are only feasible on supercomputers or clusters, and even then the simulations are limited to long periods compared to the model size, 2-D FD simulations are widespread. Whereas in generally 3-D heterogeneous structures it is not possible to infer the correct amplitude and waveform from 2-D simulations, in 2.5-D heterogeneous structures some inferences are possible. In particular, Vidale & Helmberger developed an approach that simulates 3-D waveforms using 2-D FD experiments only. However, their method requires a special FD source implementation technique that is based on a source definition which is not any longer used in nowadays FD codes. In this paper, we derive a conversion between 2-D and 3-D Green tensors that allows us to simulate 3-D displacement seismograms using 2-D FD simulations and the actual ray path determined in the geometrical optic limit. We give the conversion for a source of a certain seismic moment that is implemented by incrementing the components of the stress tensor. Therefore, we present a hybrid modelling procedure involving 2-D FD and kinematic ray-tracing techniques. The applicability is demonstrated by numerical experiments of elastic wave propagation for models of different complexity.

  18. Atomic and electronic structure of germanium clusters at finite temperature using finite difference methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chelikowsky, J.R.; Oeguet, S.; Jing, X.; Wu, K.; Stathopoulos, A.; Saad, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Determining the electronic and structural properties of semiconductor clusters is one of the outstanding problems in materials science. The existence of numerous structures with nearly identical energies makes it very difficult to determine a realistic ground state structure. Moreover, even if an effective procedure can be devised to predict the ground state structure, questions can arise about the relevancy of the structure at finite temperatures. Kinetic effects and non-equilibrium structures may dominate the structural configurations present in clusters created under laboratory conditions. The authors illustrate theoretical techniques for predicting the structure and electronic properties of small germanium clusters. Specifically, they illustrate that the detailed agreement between theoretical and experimental features can be exploited to identify the relevant isomers present under experimental conditions.

  19. A two dimensional finite difference time domain analysis of the quiet zone fields of an anechoic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Deirdre A.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Kunz, Karl S.; Steich, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Prediction of anechoic chamber performance is a difficult problem. Electromagnetic anechoic chambers exist for a wide range of frequencies but are typically very large when measured in wavelengths. Three dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of anechoic chambers is possible with current computers but at frequencies lower than most chamber design frequencies. However, two dimensional FDTD (2D-FTD) modeling enables much greater detail at higher frequencies and offers significant insight into compact anechoic chamber design and performance. A major subsystem of an anechoic chamber for which computational electromagnetic analyses exist is the reflector. First, an analysis of the quiet zone fields of a low frequency anechoic chamber produced by a uniform source and a reflector in two dimensions using the FDTD method is presented. The 2D-FDTD results are compared with results from a three dimensional corrected physical optics calculation and show good agreement. Next, a directional source is substituted for the uniform radiator. Finally, a two dimensional anechoic chamber geometry, including absorbing materials, is considered, and the 2D-FDTD results for these geometries appear reasonable.

  20. Dynamic Rupture Simulation of Bent Faults with a New Finite Difference Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Virieux, J.; Operto, S.

    2003-04-01

    Many questions about physical parameters governing the rupture propagation of earthquakes find their answers within realistic dynamic considerations. For instance, sophisticated constitutive relations based on laboratory experiments have led to a better understanding of rupture evolution from its very beginning to its arrest. In fact, large amount of field observations as well as recent simulations have shown the importance of considering more reasonable geological settings (e.g., bent and step-over fault geometries; heterogeneous surrounding media). However, despite the development of powerful numerical tools, one important question remains unanswered. How important is in rupture process the feedback coming from a heterogeneous structure if the fault geometry is complex? To start answering this question, we propose a numerical approach based in a new staggered-grid finite-difference technique. In this work, we use a recently proposed four-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme to dynamically model in-plane (mode II) shear fracturing propagation in faults with any pre-established geometry. In contrast with the classical 2-D staggered grid elementary cell in which all the elastic fields are defined in different positions (except the normal stresses), the stencil used here considers the velocity and stress fields separately in only two staggered grids. Such an elementary structure is a straightforward consequence of a new definition of the four-order spatial differential operators: they are decoupled into two 45-degree rotated operators. This approach permits efficient treatment of boundary conditions to impose the shear stress drop in the nodes where the entire stress tensor is located. Furthermore, this procedure reduces numerical anisotropy along preferred directions and provides stable solutions for any fault orientation. The fault is defined as a set of point sources placed in the middle of the grid without using any ad hoc numerical ghost plane often

  1. The Benard problem: A comparison of finite difference and spectral collocation eigen value solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee; Mccaughan, Frances E.; Fitzmaurice, Nessan

    1995-01-01

    The application of spectral methods, using a Chebyshev collocation scheme, to solve hydrodynamic stability problems is demonstrated on the Benard problem. Implementation of the Chebyshev collocation formulation is described. The performance of the spectral scheme is compared with that of a 2nd order finite difference scheme. An exact solution to the Marangoni-Benard problem is used to evaluate the performance of both schemes. The error of the spectral scheme is at least seven orders of magnitude smaller than finite difference error for a grid resolution of N = 15 (number of points used). The performance of the spectral formulation far exceeded the performance of the finite difference formulation for this problem. The spectral scheme required only slightly more effort to set up than the 2nd order finite difference scheme. This suggests that the spectral scheme may actually be faster to implement than higher order finite difference schemes.

  2. An investigation of the accuracy of finite difference methods in the solution of linear elasticity problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauld, N. R., Jr.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    The accuracy of the finite difference method in the solution of linear elasticity problems that involve either a stress discontinuity or a stress singularity is considered. Solutions to three elasticity problems are discussed in detail: a semi-infinite plane subjected to a uniform load over a portion of its boundary; a bimetallic plate under uniform tensile stress; and a long, midplane symmetric, fiber reinforced laminate subjected to uniform axial strain. Finite difference solutions to the three problems are compared with finite element solutions to corresponding problems. For the first problem a comparison with the exact solution is also made. The finite difference formulations for the three problems are based on second order finite difference formulas that provide for variable spacings in two perpendicular directions. Forward and backward difference formulas are used near boundaries where their use eliminates the need for fictitious grid points.

  3. True Concurrent Thermal Engineering Integrating CAD Model Building with Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panczak, Tim; Ring, Steve; Welch, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Thermal engineering has long been left out of the concurrent engineering environment dominated by CAD (computer aided design) and FEM (finite element method) software. Current tools attempt to force the thermal design process into an environment primarily created to support structural analysis, which results in inappropriate thermal models. As a result, many thermal engineers either build models "by hand" or use geometric user interfaces that are separate from and have little useful connection, if any, to CAD and FEM systems. This paper describes the development of a new thermal design environment called the Thermal Desktop. This system, while fully integrated into a neutral, low cost CAD system, and which utilizes both FEM and FD methods, does not compromise the needs of the thermal engineer. Rather, the features needed for concurrent thermal analysis are specifically addressed by combining traditional parametric surface based radiation and FD based conduction modeling with CAD and FEM methods. The use of flexible and familiar temperature solvers such as SINDA/FLUINT (Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Fluid Integrator) is retained.

  4. [Analysis and identification of Poria cocos peels harvested from different producing areas by FTIR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang; Zhang, Fang; Tang, Jin; Chen, Ping; Chen, Jian-Bo; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Su-Qin

    2014-02-01

    Different geographical regions of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), its chemical composition is different, the accumulation of drug and medicinal properties is different. The accurate identification and analysis of different production area of medicinal herbs is critical for the quality control and pharmacological research of TCM. In this paper, a tri-step infrared spectroscopy (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) combined with second derivative spectra and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-COS) were employed to identify and analyze the main components of Hubei (HB), Anhui (AH), Yun-nan (YN) genuine Poria Cocos peels. The emergence of several characteristic absorption peaks of carbohydrates including 1149, 1079 1036 cm(-1), peaks around 1619, 1315, 780 cm(-1) belonged to calcium oxalate suggested that HB and AH Poria Cocos peels contained calcium oxalate, but peaks around 797, 779, 537, 470 cm(-1) belonged to kaoline suggested that YN Poria Cocos peels contained kaoline. Their carbohydrates were different by comparing the second derivative infrared spectra in the range of 1640-450 cm(-1) and Yongping come from YN contains both calcium oxalate and kaoline. Furthermore, the above differences were visually validated by two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS). It was demonstrated that the Tri-step infrared spectroscopy were successfully applied to fast analyze and identify Poria Cocos peels from different geographical regions and subsequently would be applicable to explain the relevance of geographical regions and medicinal properties for the TCM.

  5. A comparative method for protein extraction and 2-D gel electrophoresis from different tissues of Cajanus cajan.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nisha; Jain, Neha; Kumar, Ram; Jain, Ajay; Singh, Nagendra K; Rai, Vandna

    2015-01-01

    Pigeonpea is an important legume crop with high protein content. However, it is often subjected to various abiotic and biotic stresses. Proteomics is a state-of-the-art technique used to analyze the protein profiling of a tissue for deciphering the molecular entities that could be manipulated for developing crops resistant to these stresses. In this context, developing a comprehensive proteome profile from different vegetative and reproductive tissues has become mandatory. Although several protein extraction protocols from different tissues of diverse plant species have been reported, there is no report for pigeonpea. Here, we report tissue-specific protein extraction protocols representing vegetative (young leaves), and reproductive (flowers and seeds) organs and their subsequent analysis on 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The study explicitly demonstrated that the efficacy of a particular protein extraction protocol is dependent on the different tissues, such as leaves, flowers and seeds that differ in their structure and metabolic constituents. For instance, phenol-based protocol showed an efficacy toward higher protein yield, better spot resolution and a minimal streaking on 2-DE gel for both leaves and flowers. Protein extraction from seeds was best achieved by employing phosphate-TCA-acetone protocol. PMID:26300903

  6. Differences in serum protein 2D gel electrophoresis patterns of Przewalski's (Mongolian wild horse) and thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Barsuren, Enkhbolor; Namkhai, Bandi; Kong, Hong Sik

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess differences in serum protein expression profiles of Przewalski's (Mongolian wild horse) and thoroughbred horses using proteome analysis. The serum proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and five different gene products were identified. Proteins represented by the five spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS)/MS technology. The identities of all proteins were deduced based on their similarity to proteins in the human plasma protein database. Three proteins (a haptoglobin-2 alpha glycoprotein and two haptoglobin-2beta glycoproteins with different accession numbers) were downregulated in Przewalski's horse sera compared to thoroughbred horse sera. Moreover, two proteins (tetraspanin-18 and pM5) were upregulated in Przewalski's horses compared to thoroughbred horses. Haptoglobin-2 alpha and haptoglobin-2beta may serve as candidate molecules in future studies of inflammation, coagulation, immune modulation and pro-oxidant and antioxidant activity with consequential effects on the entire metabolism of the horse.

  7. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity Using Finite-Difference Fluid/Finite-Element Structural Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for computing the aeroelasticity of wing-body configurations on multiple-instruction, multiple-data (MIMD) parallel computers. In this procedure, fluids are modeled using Euler equations discretized by a finite difference method, and structures are modeled using finite element equations. The procedure is designed in such a way that each discipline can be developed and maintained independently by using a domain decomposition approach. A parallel integration scheme is used to compute aeroelastic responses by solving the coupled fluid and structural equations concurrently while keeping modularity of each discipline. The present procedure is validated by computing the aeroelastic response of a wing and comparing with experiment. Aeroelastic computations are illustrated for a High Speed Civil Transport type wing-body configuration.

  8. EM 2dV1.0.F

    2012-01-05

    Code is for a layered electric medium with 2d structure. Includes air-earth interface at node z=2.. The electric ex and ez fields are calculated on edges of elemental grid and magnetic field hy is calculated on the face of the elemental grid. The code allows for a layered earth with 2d structures. Solutions of coupled first order Maxwell's equations are solved in the two dimensional environment using a finite- difference scheme on a staggered spationamore » and temporal grid.« less

  9. DYNA2D96. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    DYNA2D is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  10. Time-Dependent Parabolic Finite Difference Formulation for Harmonic Sound Propagation in a Two-Dimensional Duct with Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreider, Kevin L.; Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference real time iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in aircraft engine nacelles. To reduce storage requirements for future large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable for a harmonic monochromatic sound field, a parabolic (in time) approximation is introduced to reduce the order of the governing equation. The analysis begins with a harmonic sound source radiating into a quiescent duct. This fully explicit iteration method then calculates stepwise in time to obtain the 'steady state' harmonic solutions of the acoustic field. For stability, applications of conventional impedance boundary conditions requires coupling to explicit hyperbolic difference equations at the boundary. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  11. Finite-number-of-periods holographic gratings with finite-width incident beams: analysis using the finite-difference frequency-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shun-Der; Glytsis, Elias N.

    2002-10-01

    The effects of finite number of periods (FNP) and finite incident beams on the diffraction efficiencies of holographic gratings are investigated by the finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method. Gratings comprising 20, 15, 10, 5, and 3 periods illuminated by TE and TM incident light with various beam sizes are analyzed with the FDFD method and compared with the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Both unslanted and slanted gratings are treated in transmission as well as in reflection configurations. In general, the effect of the FNP is a decrease in the diffraction efficiency with a decrease in the number of periods of the grating. Similarly, a decrease in incident-beam width causes a decrease in the diffraction efficiency. Exceptions appear in off-Bragg incidence in which a smaller beam width could result in higher diffraction efficiency. For beam widths greater than 10 grating periods and for gratings with more than 20 periods in width, the diffraction efficiencies slowly converge to the values predicted by the RCWA (infinite incident beam and infinite-number-of-periods grating) for both TE and TM polarizations. Furthermore, the effects of FNP holographic gratings on their diffraction performance are found to be comparable to their counterparts of FNP surface-relief gratings. 2002 Optical Society of America

  12. Finite-difference evolution of a scattered laser pulse in ocean water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessendorf, J.; Piotrowski, C.; Kelly, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of absorption and scattering on the propagation of a finite-size laser pulse through ocean water are investigated theoretically, applying a finite-difference model based on the time-dependent radiative-transfer equation. The derivation of the finite-difference evolution algorithm is outlined; its FORTRAN numerical implementation is explained; and simulation results for simple test problems are presented in graphs. The method is shown to provide unconditional stability and physically correct propagation velocities in all directions. The need to eliminate or compensate for ray effects is indicated.

  13. Application of a novel finite difference method to dynamic crack problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. M.; Wilkins, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A versatile finite difference method (HEMP and HEMP 3D computer programs) was developed originally for solving dynamic problems in continuum mechanics. It was extended to analyze the stress field around cracks in a solid with finite geometry subjected to dynamic loads and to simulate numerically the dynamic fracture phenomena with success. This method is an explicit finite difference method applied to the Lagrangian formulation of the equations of continuum mechanics in two and three space dimensions and time. The calculational grid moves with the material and in this way it gives a more detailed description of the physics of the problem than the Eulerian formulation.

  14. Finite-key security analyses on passive decoy-state QKD protocols with different unstable sources.

    PubMed

    Song, Ting-Ting; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Wang, Yu-Kun; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2015-01-01

    In quantum communication, passive decoy-state QKD protocols can eliminate many side channels, but the protocols without any finite-key analyses are not suitable for in practice. The finite-key securities of passive decoy-state (PDS) QKD protocols with two different unstable sources, type-II parametric down-convention (PDC) and phase randomized weak coherent pulses (WCPs), are analyzed in our paper. According to the PDS QKD protocols, we establish an optimizing programming respectively and obtain the lower bounds of finite-key rates. Under some reasonable values of quantum setup parameters, the lower bounds of finite-key rates are simulated. The simulation results show that at different transmission distances, the affections of different fluctuations on key rates are different. Moreover, the PDS QKD protocol with an unstable PDC source can resist more intensity fluctuations and more statistical fluctuation. PMID:26471947

  15. Finite-difference scheme for the numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.; Ramadhani, Issa

    1992-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme for numerical integration of the Schroedinger equation is constructed. Asymptotically (r goes to infinity), the method gives the exact solution correct to terms of order r exp -2.

  16. Finite-key security analyses on passive decoy-state QKD protocols with different unstable sources

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ting-Ting; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Wang, Yu-Kun; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2015-01-01

    In quantum communication, passive decoy-state QKD protocols can eliminate many side channels, but the protocols without any finite-key analyses are not suitable for in practice. The finite-key securities of passive decoy-state (PDS) QKD protocols with two different unstable sources, type-II parametric down-convention (PDC) and phase randomized weak coherent pulses (WCPs), are analyzed in our paper. According to the PDS QKD protocols, we establish an optimizing programming respectively and obtain the lower bounds of finite-key rates. Under some reasonable values of quantum setup parameters, the lower bounds of finite-key rates are simulated. The simulation results show that at different transmission distances, the affections of different fluctuations on key rates are different. Moreover, the PDS QKD protocol with an unstable PDC source can resist more intensity fluctuations and more statistical fluctuation. PMID:26471947

  17. A non-linear constrained optimization technique for the mimetic finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Manzini, Gianmarco; Svyatskiy, Daniil; Bertolazzi, Enrico; Frego, Marco

    2014-09-30

    This is a strategy for the construction of monotone schemes in the framework of the mimetic finite difference method for the approximation of diffusion problems on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes.

  18. Finite-key security analyses on passive decoy-state QKD protocols with different unstable sources.

    PubMed

    Song, Ting-Ting; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Wang, Yu-Kun; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2015-10-16

    In quantum communication, passive decoy-state QKD protocols can eliminate many side channels, but the protocols without any finite-key analyses are not suitable for in practice. The finite-key securities of passive decoy-state (PDS) QKD protocols with two different unstable sources, type-II parametric down-convention (PDC) and phase randomized weak coherent pulses (WCPs), are analyzed in our paper. According to the PDS QKD protocols, we establish an optimizing programming respectively and obtain the lower bounds of finite-key rates. Under some reasonable values of quantum setup parameters, the lower bounds of finite-key rates are simulated. The simulation results show that at different transmission distances, the affections of different fluctuations on key rates are different. Moreover, the PDS QKD protocol with an unstable PDC source can resist more intensity fluctuations and more statistical fluctuation.

  19. Construction of stable explicit finite-difference schemes for Schroedinger type differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    A family of conditionally stable, forward Euler finite difference equations can be constructed for the simplest equation of Schroedinger type, namely u sub t - iu sub xx. Generalization of this result to physically realistic Schroedinger type equations is presented.

  20. 2-D difference gel electrophoresis approach to assess protein expression profiles in Bathymodiolus azoricus from Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Company, Rui; Antúnez, Oreto; Bebianno, Maria João; Cajaraville, Miren P; Torreblanca, Amparo

    2011-11-18

    Hydrothermal vent mussels Bathymodiolus azoricus are naturally exposed to toxic chemical species originated directly from vent chimneys. The amount of toxic elements varies significantly among vent sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and B. azoricus must be able to adapt to changes in hydrothermal fluid composition, temperature and pressure. The aim of this work was to study changes in the proteome in the "gill-bacteria complex" of mussels B. azoricus from three hydrothermal vent sites with distinct environmental characteristics using 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE). Results showed that 31 proteins had different expression profiles among vent sites and both cluster and principal component analysis confirm a clear separation of mussels between sites. This suggests the existence of specific parameters grouping individuals from the same hydrothermal site. Protein spots of the more abundant differentially expressed proteins were excised, digested with trypsin and identified by mass spectrometry. All identified proteins (actin, ubiquinone, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase, cysteine peptidases, chaperonin and catalase) have been related previously with oxidative stress conditions and are known to be affected by ROS inducing stressors, including metals. Results point out to specific adaptations at the proteome level of B. azoricus depending on the level of toxicants present in their environment.

  1. 2D and 3D Stem Cell Models of Primate Cortical Development Identify Species-Specific Differences in Progenitor Behavior Contributing to Brain Size

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Tomoki; Marchetto, Maria C.; Gage, Fred H.; Simons, Benjamin D.; Livesey, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Variation in cerebral cortex size and complexity is thought to contribute to differences in cognitive ability between humans and other animals. Here we compare cortical progenitor cell output in humans and three nonhuman primates using directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in adherent two-dimensional (2D) and organoid three-dimensional (3D) culture systems. Clonal lineage analysis showed that primate cortical progenitors proliferate for a protracted period of time, during which they generate early-born neurons, in contrast to rodents, where this expansion phase largely ceases before neurogenesis begins. The extent of this additional cortical progenitor expansion differs among primates, leading to differences in the number of neurons generated by each progenitor cell. We found that this mechanism for controlling cortical size is regulated cell autonomously in culture, suggesting that primate cerebral cortex size is regulated at least in part at the level of individual cortical progenitor cell clonal output. PMID:27049876

  2. On the monotonicity of multidimensional finite difference schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovyrkina, O.; Ostapenko, V.

    2016-10-01

    The classical concept of monotonicity, introduced by Godunov for linear one-dimensional difference schemes, is extended to multidimensional case. Necessary and sufficient conditions of monotonicity are obtained for linear multidimensional difference schemes of first order. The constraints on the numerical viscosity are given that ensure the monotonicity of a difference scheme in the multidimensional case. It is proposed a modification of the second order multidimensional CABARET scheme that preserves the monotonicity of one-dimensional discrete solutions and, as a result, ensures higher smoothness in the computation of multidimensional discontinuous solutions. The results of two-dimensional test computations illustrating the advantages of the modified CABARET scheme are presented.

  3. Minimum divergence viscous flow simulation through finite difference and regularization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, Rodolfo A.; Mirabolghasemi, Maryam; Bryant, Steven L.; Prodanović, Maša

    2016-09-01

    We develop a new algorithm to simulate single- and two-phase viscous flow through a three-dimensional Cartesian representation of the porous space, such as those available through X-ray microtomography. We use the finite difference method to discretize the governing equations and also propose a new method to enforce the incompressible flow constraint under zero Neumann boundary conditions for the velocity components. Finite difference formulation leads to fast parallel implementation through linear solvers for sparse matrices, allowing relatively fast simulations, while regularization techniques used on solving inverse problems lead to the desired incompressible fluid flow. Tests performed using benchmark samples show good agreement with experimental/theoretical values. Additional tests are run on Bentheimer and Buff Berea sandstone samples with available laboratory measurements. We compare the results from our new method, based on finite differences, with an open source finite volume implementation as well as experimental results, specifically to evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of each method. Finally, we calculate relative permeability by using this modified finite difference technique together with a level set based algorithm for multi-phase fluid distribution in the pore space. To our knowledge this is the first time regularization techniques are used in combination with finite difference fluid flow simulations.

  4. Application of steady state finite element and transient finite difference theory to sound propagation in a variable area duct: A comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.; White, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Sound propagation without flow in a rectangular duct with a converging-diverging area variation was studied experimentally and theoretically. The area variation was of sufficient magnitude to produce large reflections and induce modal scattering. The rms (root-mean-squared) pressure and phase angle on both the flat and curved surface were measured and tabulated. The steady state finite element theory and the transient finite difference theory are in good agreement with the data. It is concluded that numerical finite difference and finite element theories appear ideally suited for handling duct propagation problems which encounter large area variations.

  5. Storm Water Infiltration and Focused Groundwater Recharge in a Rain Garden: Finite Volume Model and Numerical Simulations for Different Configurations and Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravena, J.; Dussaillant, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    Source control is the fundamental principle behind sustainable management of stormwater. Rain gardens are an infiltration practice that provides volume and water quality control, recharge, and multiple landscape, ecological and economic potential benefits. The fulfillment of these objectives requires understanding their behavior during events as well as long term, and tools for their design. We have developed a model based on Richards equation coupled to a surface water balance, solved with a 2D finite volume Fortran code which allows alternating upper boundary conditions, including ponding, which is not present in available 2D models. Also, it can simulate non homogeneous water input, heterogeneous soil (layered or more complex geometries), and surface irregularities -e.g. terracing-, so as to estimate infiltration and recharge. The algorithm is conservative; being an advantage compared to available finite difference and finite element methods. We will present performance comparisons to known models, to experimental data from a bioretention cell, which receives roof water to its surface depression planted with native species in an organic-rich root zone soil layer (underlain by a high conductivity lower layer that, while providing inter-event storage, percolates water readily), as well as long term simulations for different rain garden configurations. Recharge predictions for different climates show significant increases from natural recharge, and that the optimal area ratio (raingarden vs. contributing impervious area) reduces from 20% (humid) to 5% (dry).

  6. Exploring the Effectiveness of Different Approaches to Teaching Finite Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeal, Mary; Walker, Sandra; Carter, Jamye; Simmons-Johnson, Carolyn; Balam, Esenc

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, mathematics has been taught using a very direct approach which the teacher explains the procedure to solve a problem and the students use pencil and paper to solve the problem. However, a variety of alternative approaches to mathematics have surfaced from a number of different directions. The purpose of this study was to examine the…

  7. Dynamic Rupture Simulation of Bending Faults With a Finite Difference Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Virieux, J.; Operto, S.

    2002-12-01

    Many questions about physical parameters governing the rupture propagation of earthquakes seem to find their answers within realistic dynamic considerations. Sophisticated constitutive relations based in laboratory experiments have lead to a better understanding of rupture evolution from its very beginning to its arrest. On the other hand, large amount of field observations as well as recent numerical simulations have also demonstrated the importance, in rupture growing, of considering more reasonable geological settings (e.g., bending and step-over fault geometries; heterogeneous surrounding media). So far, despite the development of powerful numerical tools, there still exist some numerical considerations that overstep their possibilities. Authors have solved the dynamic problem by applying the boundary integral equations method (BIEM) in order to explore the influence of fault geometry. This can be possible because of the fact that only the rupture path must be discretized, reducing the impact of numerical discretization. However, the BIEM needs the analytical solution of Green functions that can only be computed for a homogeneous space. Up to date, no interaction with heterogeneous structures can be taken in to account. In contrast, finite difference (FD) approaches have been widely used. In this case, due to the specific discretization of the elastodynamic equations through the entire domain, and the azimuthal anisotropy intrinsic to differential operators, only planar faults have been considered and numerical artefacts have to be carefully checked. In this work, we have used a recently proposed four-order staggered grid finite difference scheme to model in-plane (mode II) dynamic shear fracturing propagation with any pre-established geometry. In contrast with the classical 2-D staggered grid elementary cell in which all the elastic fields are defined in different positions (except the normal stresses), the stencil used here consider the velocity and stress

  8. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity Using Finite-Difference Fluid/Finite-Element Structural Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In recent years significant advances have been made for parallel computers in both hardware and software. Now parallel computers have become viable tools in computational mechanics. Many application codes developed on conventional computers have been modified to benefit from parallel computers. Significant speedups in some areas have been achieved by parallel computations. For single-discipline use of both fluid dynamics and structural dynamics, computations have been made on wing-body configurations using parallel computers. However, only a limited amount of work has been completed in combining these two disciplines for multidisciplinary applications. The prime reason is the increased level of complication associated with a multidisciplinary approach. In this work, procedures to compute aeroelasticity on parallel computers using direct coupling of fluid and structural equations will be investigated for wing-body configurations. The parallel computer selected for computations is an Intel iPSC/860 computer which is a distributed-memory, multiple-instruction, multiple data (MIMD) computer with 128 processors. In this study, the computational efficiency issues of parallel integration of both fluid and structural equations will be investigated in detail. The fluid and structural domains will be modeled using finite-difference and finite-element approaches, respectively. Results from the parallel computer will be compared with those from the conventional computers using a single processor. This study will provide an efficient computational tool for the aeroelastic analysis of wing-body structures on MIMD type parallel computers.

  9. Lie group invariant finite difference schemes for the neutron diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Jaegers, P.J.

    1994-06-01

    Finite difference techniques are used to solve a variety of differential equations. For the neutron diffusion equation, the typical local truncation error for standard finite difference approximation is on the order of the mesh spacing squared. To improve the accuracy of the finite difference approximation of the diffusion equation, the invariance properties of the original differential equation have been incorporated into the finite difference equations. Using the concept of an invariant difference operator, the invariant difference approximations of the multi-group neutron diffusion equation were determined in one-dimensional slab and two-dimensional Cartesian coordinates, for multiple region problems. These invariant difference equations were defined to lie upon a cell edged mesh as opposed to the standard difference equations, which lie upon a cell centered mesh. Results for a variety of source approximations showed that the invariant difference equations were able to determine the eigenvalue with greater accuracy, for a given mesh spacing, than the standard difference approximation. The local truncation errors for these invariant difference schemes were found to be highly dependent upon the source approximation used, and the type of source distribution played a greater role in determining the accuracy of the invariant difference scheme than the local truncation error.

  10. SOME NEW FINITE DIFFERENCE METHODS FOR HELMHOLTZ EQUATIONS ON IRREGULAR DOMAINS OR WITH INTERFACES.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaohai; Li, Zhilin

    2012-06-01

    Solving a Helmholtz equation Δu + λu = f efficiently is a challenge for many applications. For example, the core part of many efficient solvers for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is to solve one or several Helmholtz equations. In this paper, two new finite difference methods are proposed for solving Helmholtz equations on irregular domains, or with interfaces. For Helmholtz equations on irregular domains, the accuracy of the numerical solution obtained using the existing augmented immersed interface method (AIIM) may deteriorate when the magnitude of λ is large. In our new method, we use a level set function to extend the source term and the PDE to a larger domain before we apply the AIIM. For Helmholtz equations with interfaces, a new maximum principle preserving finite difference method is developed. The new method still uses the standard five-point stencil with modifications of the finite difference scheme at irregular grid points. The resulting coefficient matrix of the linear system of finite difference equations satisfies the sign property of the discrete maximum principle and can be solved efficiently using a multigrid solver. The finite difference method is also extended to handle temporal discretized equations where the solution coefficient λ is inversely proportional to the mesh size. PMID:22701346

  11. Elimination of numerical dispersion in finite-difference modeling and migration by flux-corrected transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Tong; Larner, K.

    1993-11-01

    Finite-difference acoustic-wave modeling and reverse-time depth migration based on the full wave equation are general approaches that can take into account arbitary variations in velocity and density, and can handle turning waves well. However, conventional finite-difference methods for solving the acousticwave equation suffer from numerical dispersion when too few samples per wavelength are used. Here, we present two flux-corrected transport (FCT) algorithms, one based the second-order equation and the other based on first-order wave equations derived from the second-order one. Combining the FCT technique with conventional finite-difference modeling or reverse-time wave extrapolation can ensure finite-difference solutions without numerical dispersion even for shock waves and impulsive sources. Computed two-dimensional migration images show accurate positioning of reflectors with greater than 90-degree dip. Moreover, application to real data shows no indication of numerical dispersion. The FCT correction, which can be applied to finite-difference approximations of any order in space and time, is an efficient alternative to use of approximations of increasing order.

  12. Improving sub-grid scale accuracy of boundary features in regional finite-difference models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panday, Sorab; Langevin, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    As an alternative to grid refinement, the concept of a ghost node, which was developed for nested grid applications, has been extended towards improving sub-grid scale accuracy of flow to conduits, wells, rivers or other boundary features that interact with a finite-difference groundwater flow model. The formulation is presented for correcting the regular finite-difference groundwater flow equations for confined and unconfined cases, with or without Newton Raphson linearization of the nonlinearities, to include the Ghost Node Correction (GNC) for location displacement. The correction may be applied on the right-hand side vector for a symmetric finite-difference Picard implementation, or on the left-hand side matrix for an implicit but asymmetric implementation. The finite-difference matrix connectivity structure may be maintained for an implicit implementation by only selecting contributing nodes that are a part of the finite-difference connectivity. Proof of concept example problems are provided to demonstrate the improved accuracy that may be achieved through sub-grid scale corrections using the GNC schemes.

  13. Strong scintillations in astrophysics. 4. Cross-correlation between different frequencies and finite bandwidth effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    The cross correlation of the intensity fluctuations between different frequencies and finite bandwidth effects on the intensity correlations based on the Markov approximation were calculated. Results may be applied to quite general turbulence spectra for an extended turbulent medium. Calculations of the cross-correlation function and of finite bandwidth effects are explicitly carried out for both Gaussian and Kolmogorov turbulence spectra. The increases of the correlation scale of intensity fluctuations are different for these two spectra and the difference can be used to determine whether the interstellar turbulent medium has a Gaussian or a Kolmogorov spectrum.

  14. Efficacy of very fast simulated annealing global optimization method for interpretation of self-potential anomaly by different forward formulation over 2D inclined sheet type structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, A.; Sharma, S. P.

    2012-12-01

    best result without any ambiguity and smaller uncertainty. Keywords: SP anomaly, inclined sheet, 2D structure, forward problems, VFSA Optimization,

  15. Ontology analysis of global gene expression differences of human bone marrow stromal cells cultured on 3D scaffolds or 2D films.

    PubMed

    Baker, Bryan A; Pine, P Scott; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Kumar, Girish; Lin, Nancy J; McDaniel, Jennifer H; Salit, Marc L; Simon, Carl G

    2014-08-01

    Differences in gene expression of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) during culture in three-dimensional (3D) nanofiber scaffolds or on two-dimensional (2D) films were investigated via pathway analysis of microarray mRNA expression profiles. Previous work has shown that hBMSC culture in nanofiber scaffolds can induce osteogenic differentiation in the absence of osteogenic supplements (OS). Analysis using ontology databases revealed that nanofibers and OS regulated similar pathways and that both were enriched for TGF-β and cell-adhesion/ECM-receptor pathways. The most notable difference between the two was that nanofibers had stronger enrichment for cell-adhesion/ECM-receptor pathways. Comparison of nanofibers scaffolds with flat films yielded stronger differences in gene expression than comparison of nanofibers made from different polymers, suggesting that substrate structure had stronger effects on cell function than substrate polymer composition. These results demonstrate that physical (nanofibers) and biochemical (OS) signals regulate similar ontological pathways, suggesting that these cues use similar molecular mechanisms to control hBMSC differentiation. PMID:24840613

  16. Finite-Difference Seismic Modeling of Discrete Fractures in a San Juan Basin Gas Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, T. M.; Nihei, K. T.; Myer, L. R.; Majer, E. L.; Queen, J. H.; Fortuna, M. A.; Murphy, J. O.; Coates, R. T.

    2001-12-01

    As part of a Dept. of Energy sponsored program in fractured gas production, we are conducting numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation in fractured media. The current modeling algorithm is a 2-D, anisotropic, elastic, finite-difference implementation. Fractures are discrete (one grid point wide), vertical, and are described by two parameters, the normal and tangential fracture stiffness, which are converted to anisotropic, elastic constants and placed in an isotropic background. A five-layer, 2250 m2 model with 3 m grid point spacing is used study the effects of fracturing on two scales: long, compliant fractures (i.e. joints) at wide spacing (650 m) and short, stiff fractures at narrower spacing (21 m). The fracture spacing is approximately equal to bed thickness. The fracture stiffness value for the stiff, short fractures was derived from a conceptual model of regularly spaced, infinitely thin openings which are 30 % of the fracture length. The joints were arbitrarily assigned a stiffness 10 times lower (more compliant). The normal and tangential stiffness were assumed equal (for a model of gas-filled fractures). The layer properties (P- and S-velocity and density) and the model's scale are based on well information from the San Juan basin, focusing on the Mesa Verde unit and its Cliffhouse sandstone member. Surface seismic (including CMP gathers) and VSP geometries, as modeled, were based on field data acquired in the basin. The model results (including wavefield time snapshots, and two-component seismograms) show discrete P- and S-wave scattered events from the compliant joints which have large amplitude P-to-S converted phases. These converted waves can be observed in surface seismic acquisition geometry when they are reflected by the horizontal velocity interfaces. In VSP geometry the downgoing fracture-scattered phases can be directly observed. The closely spaced, stiffer fractures generate multiple scattering which is observed as lower amplitude

  17. Radiation boundary condition and anisotropy correction for finite difference solutions of the Helmholtz equation

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, C.K.W.; Webb, J.C. )

    1994-07-01

    In this paper finite-difference solutions of the Helmholtz equation in an open domain are considered. By using a second-order central difference scheme and the Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition, reasonably accurate solutions can be obtained when the number of grid points per acoustic wavelength used is large. However, when a smaller number of grid points per wavelength is used excessive reflections occur which tend to overwhelm the computed solutions. Excessive reflections are due to the incompatibility between the governing finite difference equation and the Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition. The Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition was developed from the asymptotic solution of the partial differential equation. To obtain compatibility, the radiation boundary condition should be constructed from the asymptotic solution of the finite difference equation instead. Examples are provided using the improved radiation boundary condition based on the asymptotic solution of the governing finite difference equation. The computed results are free of reflections even when only five grid points per wavelength are used. The improved radiation boundary condition has also been tested for problems with complex acoustic sources and sources embedded in a uniform mean flow. The present method of developing a radiation boundary condition is also applicable to higher order finite difference schemes. In all these cases no reflected waves could be detected. The use of finite difference approximation inevitably introduces anisotropy into the governing field equation. The effect of anisotropy is to distort the directional distribution of the amplitude and phase of the computed solution. It can be quite large when the number of grid points per wavelength used in the computation is small. A way to correct this effect is proposed. 15 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Effects of finite volume on the KL – KS mass difference

    DOE PAGES

    Christ, N.  H.; Feng, X.; Martinelli, G.; Sachrajda, C.  T.

    2015-06-24

    Phenomena that involve two or more on-shell particles are particularly sensitive to the effects of finite volume and require special treatment when computed using lattice QCD. In this paper we generalize the results of Lüscher and Lellouch and Lüscher, which determine the leading-order effects of finite volume on the two-particle spectrum and two-particle decay amplitudes to determine the finite-volume effects in the second-order mixing of the K⁰ and K⁰⁻ states. We extend the methods of Kim, Sachrajda, and Sharpe to provide a direct, uniform treatment of these three, related, finite-volume corrections. In particular, the leading, finite-volume corrections to the KLmore » – KS mass difference ΔMK and the CP-violating parameter εK are determined, including the potentially large effects which can arise from the near degeneracy of the kaon mass and the energy of a finite-volume, two-pion state.« less

  19. STEALTH: a Lagrange explicit finite difference code for solids, structural, and thermohydraulic analysis. Volume 1B: user's manual - input instructions. Computer code manual. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.

    1981-11-01

    A useful computer simulation method based on the explicit finite difference technique can be used to address transient dynamic situations associated with nuclear reactor design and analysis. This volume is divided into two parts. Part A contains the theoretical background (physical and numerical) and the numerical equations for the STEALTH 1D, 2D, and 3D computer codes. Part B contains input instructions for all three codes. The STEALTH codes are based entirely on the published technology of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, and Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  20. STEALTH: a Lagrange explicit finite difference code for solids, structural, and thermohydraulic analysis. Volume 1A: user's manual - theoretical background and numerical equations. Computer code manual. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.

    1981-11-01

    A useful computer simulation method based on the explicit finite difference technique can be used to address transient dynamic situations associated with nuclear reactor design and analysis. This volume is divided into two parts. Part A contains the theoretical background (physical and numerical) and the numerical equations for the STEALTH 1D, 2D, and 3D computer codes. Part B contains input instructions for all three codes. The STEALTH codes are based entirely on the published technology of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, and Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  1. Relative and Absolute Error Control in a Finite-Difference Method Solution of Poisson's Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm for error control (absolute and relative) in the five-point finite-difference method applied to Poisson's equation is described. The algorithm is based on discretization of the domain of the problem by means of three rectilinear grids, each of different resolution. We discuss some hardware limitations associated with the algorithm,…

  2. A 2D-DIGE-based proteomic analysis reveals differences in the platelet releasate composition when comparing thrombin and collagen stimulations

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Paula; Izquierdo, Irene; Rosa, Isaac; García, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Upon stimulation, platelets release a high number of proteins (the releasate). There are clear indications that these proteins are involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases, such as atherosclerosis. In the present study we compared the platelet releasate following platelet activation with two major endogenous agonists: thrombin and collagen. Proteome analysis was based on 2D-DIGE and LC-MS/MS. Firstly, we showed the primary role of thrombin and collagen receptors in platelet secretion by these agonists; moreover, we demonstrated that GPVI is the primary responsible for collagen-induced platelet activation/aggregation. Proteomic analysis allowed the detection of 122 protein spots differentially regulated between both conditions. After excluding fibrinogen spots, down-regulated in the releasate of thrombin-activated platelets, 84 differences remained. From those, we successfully identified 42, corresponding to 37 open-reading frames. Many of the differences identified correspond to post-translational modifications, primarily, proteolysis induced by thrombin. Among others, we show vitamin K-dependent protein S, an anticoagulant plasma protein, is up-regulated in thrombin samples. Our results could have pathological implications given that platelets might be playing a differential role in various diseases and biological processes through the secretion of different subsets of granule proteins and microvesicles following a predominant activation of certain receptors. PMID:25645904

  3. Fast solvers for finite difference approximations for the Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, D.

    1992-01-01

    The authors consider several methods for solving the linear equations arising from finite difference discretizations of the Stokes equations. The pressure equation method presented here for the first time, apparently, and the method, presented by Bramble and Pasciak, are shown to have computational effort that grows slowly with the number of grid points. The methods work with second-order accurate discretizations. Computational results are shown for both the Stokes and incompressible Navier-Stokes at low Reynolds number. The inf-sup conditions resulting from three finite difference approximations of the Stokes equations are proven. These conditions are used to prove that the Schur complement Q[sub h] of the linear system generated by each of these approximations is bounded uniformly away from zero. For the pressure equation method, this guarantees that the conjugate gradient method applied to Q[sub h] converges in a finite number of iterations which is independent of mesh size. The fact that Q[sub h] is bounded below is used to prove convergence estimates for the solutions generated by these finite difference approximations. One of the estimates is for a staggered grid and the estimate of the scheme shows that both the pressure and the velocity parts of the solution are second-order accurate. Iterative methods are compared by the use of the regularized central differencing introduced by Strikwerda. Several finite difference approximations of the Stokes equations by the SOR method are compared and the excellence of the approximations by the regularized central differencing over the other finite difference approximation is mentioned. This difference gives rise to a linear equation with a matrix which is slightly non-symmetric. The convergence of the typical steepest descent method and conjugate gradient method, which is almost as same as the typical conjugate gradient method, applied to slightly non-symmetric positive definite matrices are proven.

  4. Fracture flow simulation using a finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Kim, I; Lindquist, W B; Durham, W B

    2003-04-01

    We present numerical computations for single phase flow through three-dimensional digitized rock fractures under varied simulated confining pressures appropriate to midcrustal depths. The computations are performed using a finite difference, lattice Boltzmann method and thus simulate Navier-Stokes flow. The digitized fracture data sets come from profiled elevations taken on tensile induced fractures in Harcourt granite. Numerical predictions of fracture permeability are compared with laboratory measurements performed on the same fractures. Use of the finite difference lattice Boltzmann method allows computation on nonuniform grid spacing, enabling accurate resolution across the aperture width without extensive refinement in the other two directions.

  5. Finite difference solutions of the Euler equations in the vicinity of sharp edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwich, P.-M.

    1985-01-01

    Attempts have been made to explain why finite difference solutions of the Euler equations can describe flows with large vortical structures around sharp-edged bodies. The present paper is concerned with the influence of a singular sharp edge on the truncation error for a set of discretized Euler equations. An analysis is conducted of the distribution of the truncation error of one finite difference approximation of the Euler equations near a sharp edge of a thin plate. The analysis leads to a determination of the size of the region of the neighborhood of such a singularity. Attention is given to the consistency of a discretization of the Euler equations, and numerical experiments.

  6. Locally conformal finite-difference time-domain techniques for particle-in-cell plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Miller, C. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Price, D. W.; Martin, P. N.; Short, D. J.; Jones, A. W. P.; Threadgold, J. R.

    2011-02-01

    The Dey-Mittra [S. Dey, R. Mitra, A locally conformal finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for modeling three-dimensional perfectly conducting objects, IEEE Microwave Guided Wave Lett. 7 (273) 1997] finite-difference time-domain partial cell method enables the modeling of irregularly shaped conducting surfaces while retaining second-order accuracy. We present an algorithm to extend this method to include charged particle emission and absorption in particle-in-cell codes. Several examples are presented that illustrate the possible improvements that can be realized using the new algorithm for problems relevant to plasma simulation.

  7. Finite difference time domain modeling of finite-sized electromagnetic source over periodic structure via a plane wave spectral expansion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Rui; Chen, Ji; Yang, Fan

    2010-10-01

    A novel three-dimensional time domain method is developed to study interactions between finite-sized electromagnetic sources and infinite periodic structures. The method is based on a periodic finite difference time domain method combined with the spectral expansion of electromagnetic sources. Using this method, only a single periodic cell needs to be modeled in finite difference time domain simulations. The convergence, guidelines on using the algorithm, and the acceleration scheme for the algorithm are discussed. Several periodic structures are simulated by this proposed method. It is shown that this method can significantly reduce the required computer memory and computational time.

  8. A guide to differences between stochastic point-source and stochastic finite-fault simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, G.M.; Assatourians, K.; Boore, D.M.; Campbell, K.; Motazedian, D.

    2009-01-01

    Why do stochastic point-source and finite-fault simulation models not agree on the predicted ground motions for moderate earthquakes at large distances? This question was posed by Ken Campbell, who attempted to reproduce the Atkinson and Boore (2006) ground-motion prediction equations for eastern North America using the stochastic point-source program SMSIM (Boore, 2005) in place of the finite-source stochastic program EXSIM (Motazedian and Atkinson, 2005) that was used by Atkinson and Boore (2006) in their model. His comparisons suggested that a higher stress drop is needed in the context of SMSIM to produce an average match, at larger distances, with the model predictions of Atkinson and Boore (2006) based on EXSIM; this is so even for moderate magnitudes, which should be well-represented by a point-source model. Why? The answer to this question is rooted in significant differences between point-source and finite-source stochastic simulation methodologies, specifically as implemented in SMSIM (Boore, 2005) and EXSIM (Motazedian and Atkinson, 2005) to date. Point-source and finite-fault methodologies differ in general in several important ways: (1) the geometry of the source; (2) the definition and application of duration; and (3) the normalization of finite-source subsource summations. Furthermore, the specific implementation of the methods may differ in their details. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of these differences, their origins, and implications. This sets the stage for a more detailed companion article, "Comparing Stochastic Point-Source and Finite-Source Ground-Motion Simulations: SMSIM and EXSIM," in which Boore (2009) provides modifications and improvements in the implementations of both programs that narrow the gap and result in closer agreement. These issues are important because both SMSIM and EXSIM have been widely used in the development of ground-motion prediction equations and in modeling the parameters that control

  9. Finite difference methods for transient signal propagation in stratified dispersive media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Explicit difference equations are presented for the solution of a signal of arbitrary waveform propagating in an ohmic dielectric, a cold plasma, a Debye model dielectric, and a Lorentz model dielectric. These difference equations are derived from the governing time-dependent integro-differential equations for the electric fields by a finite difference method. A special difference equation is derived for the grid point at the boundary of two different media. Employing this difference equation, transient signal propagation in an inhomogeneous media can be solved provided that the medium is approximated in a step-wise fashion. The solutions are generated simply by marching on in time. It is concluded that while the classical transform methods will remain useful in certain cases, with the development of the finite difference methods described, an extensive class of problems of transient signal propagating in stratified dispersive media can be effectively solved by numerical methods.

  10. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Predictions of Tramadol Exposure Throughout Pediatric Life: an Analysis of the Different Clearance Contributors with Emphasis on CYP2D6 Maturation.

    PubMed

    T'jollyn, Huybrecht; Snoeys, Jan; Vermeulen, An; Michelet, Robin; Cuyckens, Filip; Mannens, Geert; Van Peer, Achiel; Annaert, Pieter; Allegaert, Karel; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; Boussery, Koen

    2015-11-01

    This paper focuses on the retrospective evaluation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) techniques used to mechanistically predict clearance throughout pediatric life. An intravenous tramadol retrograde PBPK model was set up in Simcyp® using adult clearance values, qualified for CYP2D6, CYP3A4, CYP2B6, and renal contributions. Subsequently, the model was evaluated for mechanistic prediction of total, CYP2D6-related, and renal clearance predictions in very early life. In two in vitro pediatric human liver microsomal (HLM) batches (1 and 3 months), O-desmethyltramadol and N-desmethyltramadol formation rates were compared with CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 activity, respectively. O-desmethyltramadol formation was mediated only by CYP2D6, while N-desmethyltramadol was mediated in part by CYP3A4. Additionally, the clearance maturation of the PBPK model predictions was compared to two in vivo maturation models (Hill and exponential) based on plasma concentration data, and to clearance estimations from a WinNonlin® fit of plasma concentration and urinary excretion data. Maturation of renal and CYP2D6 clearance is captured well in the PBPK model predictions, but total tramadol clearance is underpredicted. The most pronounced underprediction of total and CYP2D6-mediated clearance was observed in the age range of 2-13 years. In conclusion, the PBPK technique showed to be a powerful mechanistic tool capable of predicting maturation of CYP2D6 and renal tramadol clearance in early infancy, although some underprediction occurs between 2 and 13 years for total and CYP2D6-mediated tramadol clearance. PMID:26209290

  11. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  12. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  13. Implementation of a high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method in generalized curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Ezzatneshan, Eslam

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the implementation of a high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (CFDLBM) is performed in the generalized curvilinear coordinates to improve the computational efficiency of the solution algorithm to handle curved geometries with non-uniform grids. The incompressible form of the discrete Boltzmann equation with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation with the pressure as the independent dynamic variable is transformed into the generalized curvilinear coordinates. Herein, the spatial derivatives in the resulting lattice Boltzmann (LB) equation in the computational plane are discretized by using the fourth-order compact finite-difference scheme and the temporal term is discretized with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme to provide an accurate and efficient incompressible flow solver. A high-order spectral-type low-pass compact filter is used to regularize the numerical solution and remove spurious waves generated by boundary conditions, flow non-linearities and grid non-uniformity. All boundary conditions are implemented based on the solution of governing equations in the generalized curvilinear coordinates. The accuracy and efficiency of the solution methodology presented are demonstrated by computing different benchmark steady and unsteady incompressible flow problems. A sensitivity study is also conducted to evaluate the effects of grid size and filtering on the accuracy and convergence rate of the solution. Four test cases considered herein for validating the present computations and demonstrating the accuracy and robustness of the solution algorithm are: unsteady Couette flow and steady flow in a 2-D cavity with non-uniform grid and steady and unsteady flows over a circular cylinder and the NACA0012 hydrofoil at different flow conditions. Results obtained for the above test cases are in good agreement with the existing numerical and experimental results. The study shows the present solution methodology based on the

  14. Determine the Dispersion Relation of an A6 Magnetron Using Conformal Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Nieter, C.; Stoltz, P. H.; Smithe, D. N.

    2009-05-01

    This work introduces a conformal finite difference time domain (CFDTD) method to accurately determine the dispersion relation of an A6 relativistic magnetron. The accuracy is measured by comparing with accurate SUPERFISH calculations based on finite element method. The results show that an accuracy of 99.4% can be achieved by using only 10,000 mesh points with Dey-Mittra algorithm. By comparison, a mesh number of 360,000 is needed to preserve 99% accuracy using conventional FDTD method. This suggests one can efficiently and accurately study the hot tests of microwave tubes using CFDTD particle-in-cell method instead of conventional FDTD one.

  15. Finite difference analysis of rotordynamic seal coefficients for an eccentric shaft position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordmann, R.; Dietzen, F. J.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic coefficients of seals are calculated for shaft movements around an eccentric position. The turbulent flow is described by the Navier-Stokes equations in connection with a turbulence model. The equations are solved by a finite-difference procedure.

  16. Finite-difference, spectral and Galerkin methods for time-dependent problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, E.

    1983-01-01

    Finite difference, spectral and Galerkin methods for the approximate solution of time dependent problems are surveyed. A unified discussion on their accuracy, stability and convergence is given. In particular, the dilemma of high accuracy versus stability is studied in some detail.

  17. FWAVE V1.0 a framework for finite difference wave equation modeling

    2002-07-01

    FWAVE provides a computation framework for the rapid prototyping and efficient use of finite difference wave equation solutions. The user provides single grid Fortran solver components that are integrated using opaque handles to C++ distributed data structures. Permits the scientific researcher to make of clusters and parallel computers by concentrating only on the numerical schemes.

  18. Computational procedure for finite difference solution of one-dimensional heat conduction problems reduces computer time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iida, H. T.

    1966-01-01

    Computational procedure reduces the numerical effort whenever the method of finite differences is used to solve ablation problems for which the surface recession is large relative to the initial slab thickness. The number of numerical operations required for a given maximum space mesh size is reduced.

  19. Rupture Dynamics Simulation for Non-Planar fault by a Curved Grid Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhu, G.; Chen, X.

    2011-12-01

    We first implement the non-staggered finite difference method to solve the dynamic rupture problem, with split-node, for non-planar fault. Split-node method for dynamic simulation has been used widely, because of that it's more precise to represent the fault plane than other methods, for example, thick fault, stress glut and so on. The finite difference method is also a popular numeric method to solve kinematic and dynamic problem in seismology. However, previous works focus most of theirs eyes on the staggered-grid method, because of its simplicity and computational efficiency. However this method has its own disadvantage comparing to non-staggered finite difference method at some fact for example describing the boundary condition, especially the irregular boundary, or non-planar fault. Zhang and Chen (2006) proposed the MacCormack high order non-staggered finite difference method based on curved grids to precisely solve irregular boundary problem. Based upon on this non-staggered grid method, we make success of simulating the spontaneous rupture problem. The fault plane is a kind of boundary condition, which could be irregular of course. So it's convinced that we could simulate rupture process in the case of any kind of bending fault plane. We will prove this method is valid in the case of Cartesian coordinate first. In the case of bending fault, the curvilinear grids will be used.

  20. High Order Finite Difference Methods, Multidimensional Linear Problems and Curvilinear Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordstrom, Jan; Carpenter, Mark H.

    1999-01-01

    Boundary and interface conditions are derived for high order finite difference methods applied to multidimensional linear problems in curvilinear coordinates. The boundary and interface conditions lead to conservative schemes and strict and strong stability provided that certain metric conditions are met.

  1. Finite difference micromagnetic simulation with self-consistent currents and smooth surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C; Gibbons, M R; Hewett, D W; Parker, G

    1999-05-27

    A micromagnetic algorithm has been developed using the finite difference method (FDM). Elliptic field equations are solved on the mesh using the efficient Dynamic Alternating Direction Implicit method. Smooth surfaces have been included in the FDM formulation so structures of irregular shape can be modeled. The current distribution and temperature of devices are also calculated. Keywords: Micromagnetic simulation, Magnetic dots, Read heads, Thermal Effects

  2. A FINITE-DIFFERENCE, DISCRETE-WAVENUMBER METHOD FOR CALCULATING RADAR TRACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid of the finite-difference method and the discrete-wavenumber method is developed to calculate radar traces. The method is based on a three-dimensional model defined in the Cartesian coordinate system; the electromagnetic properties of the model are symmetric with respect ...

  3. A FINITE-DIFFERENCE, DISCRETE-WAVENUMBER METHOD FOR CALCULATING RADAR TRACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid of the finite-difference method and the discrete-wavenumber method is developed to calculate radar traces. The method is based on a three-dimensional model defined in the Cartesian coordinate system; the electromag-netic properties of the model are symmetric with respect...

  4. An Eigenvalue Analysis of finite-difference approximations for hyperbolic IBVPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warming, Robert F.; Beam, Richard M.

    1989-01-01

    The eigenvalue spectrum associated with a linear finite-difference approximation plays a crucial role in the stability analysis and in the actual computational performance of the discrete approximation. The eigenvalue spectrum associated with the Lax-Wendroff scheme applied to a model hyperbolic equation was investigated. For an initial-boundary-value problem (IBVP) on a finite domain, the eigenvalue or normal mode analysis is analytically intractable. A study of auxiliary problems (Dirichlet and quarter-plane) leads to asymptotic estimates of the eigenvalue spectrum and to an identification of individual modes as either benign or unstable. The asymptotic analysis establishes an intuitive as well as quantitative connection between the algebraic tests in the theory of Gustafsson, Kreiss, and Sundstrom and Lax-Richtmyer L(sub 2) stability on a finite domain.

  5. An eigenvalue analysis of finite-difference approximations for hyperbolic IBVPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warming, Robert F.; Beam, Richard M.

    1990-01-01

    The eigenvalue spectrum associated with a linear finite-difference approximation plays a crucial role in the stability analysis and in the actual computational performance of the discrete approximation. The eigenvalue spectrum associated with the Lax-Wendroff scheme applied to a model hyperbolic equation was investigated. For an initial-boundary-value problem (IBVP) on a finite domain, the eigenvalue or normal mode analysis is analytically intractable. A study of auxiliary problems (Dirichlet and quarter-plane) leads to asymptotic estimates of the eigenvalue spectrum and to an identification of individual modes as either benign or unstable. The asymptotic analysis establishes an intuitive as well as quantitative connection between the algebraic tests in the theory of Gustafsson, Kreiss, and Sundstrom and Lax-Richtmyer L (sub 2) stability on a finite domain.

  6. An improved finite-difference analysis of uncoupled vibrations of tapered cantilever beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1983-01-01

    An improved finite difference procedure for determining the natural frequencies and mode shapes of tapered cantilever beams undergoing uncoupled vibrations is presented. Boundary conditions are derived in the form of simple recursive relations involving the second order central differences. Results obtained by using the conventional first order central differences and the present second order central differences are compared, and it is observed that the present second order scheme is more efficient than the conventional approach. An important advantage offered by the present approach is that the results converge to exact values rapidly, and thus the extrapolation of the results is not necessary. Consequently, the basic handicap with the classical finite difference method of solution that requires the Richardson's extrapolation procedure is eliminated. Furthermore, for the cases considered herein, the present approach produces consistent lower bound solutions.

  7. Material Modeling of 6000 Series Aluminum Alloy Sheets with Different Density Cube Textures and Effect on the Accuracy of Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanaga, Daisaku; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Uema, Naoyuki; Asano, Mineo

    2011-08-01

    Biaxial tensile tests of 6000 series aluminum alloy sheet with different density cube textures were carried out using cruciform specimens similar to that developed by one of the authors [Kuwabara, T. et al., J. Material Process. Technol., 80/81(1998), 517-523.]. The specimens are loaded under linear stress paths in a servo-controlled biaxial tensile testing machine. Plastic orthotropy remained coaxial with the principal stresses throughout every experiment. Successive contours of plastic work in stress space and the directions of plastic strain rates were precisely measured and compared with those calculated using selected yield functions. The Yld2000-2d yield functions with exponents of 12 and 6 [Barlat, F. et al., Int. J. Plasticity 19 (2003), 1297-1319] are capable of reproducing the general trends of the work contours and the directions of plastic strain rates observed for test materials with high and low cube textures, respectively. Hydraulic bulge tests were also conducted and the variation of thickness strain along the meridian direction of the bulged specimen was compared with that calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) based on the Yld2000-2d yield functions with exponents of 12 and 6. The differences of cube texture cause significant differences in the strain distributions of the bulged specimens, and the FEA results calculated using the Yld2000-2d yield functions show good agreement with the measurement results.

  8. Modeling anisotropic flow and heat transport by using mimetic finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Clauser, Christoph; Marquart, Gabriele; Willbrand, Karen; Büsing, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    Modeling anisotropic flow in porous or fractured rock often assumes that the permeability tensor is diagonal, which means that its principle directions are always aligned with the coordinate axes. However, the permeability of a heterogeneous anisotropic medium usually is a full tensor. For overcoming this shortcoming, we use the mimetic finite difference method (mFD) for discretizing the flow equation in a hydrothermal reservoir simulation code, SHEMAT-Suite, which couples this equation with the heat transport equation. We verify SHEMAT-Suite-mFD against analytical solutions of pumping tests, using both diagonal and full permeability tensors. We compare results from three benchmarks for testing the capability of SHEMAT-Suite-mFD to handle anisotropic flow in porous and fractured media. The benchmarks include coupled flow and heat transport problems, three-dimensional problems and flow through a fractured porous medium with full equivalent permeability tensor. It shows firstly that the mimetic finite difference method can model anisotropic flow both in porous and in fractured media accurately and its results are better than those obtained by the multi-point flux approximation method in highly anisotropic models, secondly that the asymmetric permeability tensor can be included and leads to improved results compared the symmetric permeability tensor in the equivalent fracture models, and thirdly that the method can be easily implemented in existing finite volume or finite difference codes, which has been demonstrated successfully for SHEMAT-Suite.

  9. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  10. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  11. Application of 'steady' state finite element and transient finite difference theory to sound propagation in a variable duct - A comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.; White, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for sound propagation in a simulated infinite hard wall duct with a large change in duct cross sectional area. The data are conveniently tabulated for further use. The 'steady' state finite element theory of Astley and Eversman (1981) and the transient finite difference theory of White (1981) are in good agreement with the data for both the axial and transverse pressure profiles and the axial phase angle. Therefore, numerical finite difference and finite element theories appear to be ideally suited for handling duct propagation problems which encounter large axial gradients in acoustic parameters. The measured energy reflection coefficient agrees with the values from the Astley-Eversman modal coupling model.

  12. Unidirectional transparent signal injection in finite-difference time-domain electromagnetic codes -application to reflectometry simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, F. da; Hacquin, S.

    2005-03-01

    We present a novel numerical signal injection technique allowing unidirectional injection of a wave in a wave-guiding structure, applicable to 2D finite-difference time-domain electromagnetic codes, both Maxwell and wave-equation. It is particularly suited to continuous wave radar-like simulations. The scheme gives an unidirectional injection of a signal while being transparent to waves propagating in the opposite direction (directional coupling). The reflected or backscattered waves (returned) are separated from the probing waves allowing direct access to the information on amplitude and phase of the returned wave. It also facilitates the signal processing used to extract the phase derivative (or group delay) when simulating radar systems. Although general, the technique is particularly suited to swept frequency sources (frequency modulated) in the context of reflectometry, a fusion plasma diagnostic. The UTS applications presented here are restricted to fusion plasma reflectometry simulations for different physical situations. This method can, nevertheless, also be used in other dispersive media such as dielectrics, being useful, for example, in the simulation of plasma filled waveguides or directional couplers.

  13. Analysis of vegetation effect on waves using a vertical 2-D RANS model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vertical two-dimensional (2-D) model has been applied in the simulation of wave propagation through vegetated water bodies. The model is based on an existing model SOLA-VOF which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the finite difference method on a staggered rectangula...

  14. A conservative implicit finite difference algorithm for the unsteady transonic full potential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steger, J. L.; Caradonna, F. X.

    1980-01-01

    An implicit finite difference procedure is developed to solve the unsteady full potential equation in conservation law form. Computational efficiency is maintained by use of approximate factorization techniques. The numerical algorithm is first order in time and second order in space. A circulation model and difference equations are developed for lifting airfoils in unsteady flow; however, thin airfoil body boundary conditions have been used with stretching functions to simplify the development of the numerical algorithm.

  15. Finite difference numerical methods for boundary control problems governed by hyperbolic partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.; Zheng, Q.; Coleman, M.; Weerakoon, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews convergent finite difference schemes for hyperbolic initial boundary value problems and their applications to boundary control systems of hyperbolic type which arise in the modelling of vibrations. These difference schemes are combined with the primal and the dual approaches to compute the optimal control in the unconstrained case, as well as the case when the control is subject to inequality constraints. Some of the preliminary numerical results are also presented.

  16. Improving a complex finite-difference ground water flow model through the use of an analytic element screening model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, R.J.; Anderson, M.P.; Kelson, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that analytic element models have potential as powerful screening tools that can facilitate or improve calibration of more complicated finite-difference and finite-element models. We demonstrate how a two-dimensional analytic element model was used to identify errors in a complex three-dimensional finite-difference model caused by incorrect specification of boundary conditions. An improved finite-difference model was developed using boundary conditions developed from a far-field analytic element model. Calibration of a revised finite-difference model was achieved using fewer zones of hydraulic conductivity and lake bed conductance than the original finite-difference model. Calibration statistics were also improved in that simulated base-flows were much closer to measured values. The improved calibration is due mainly to improved specification of the boundary conditions made possible by first solving the far-field problem with an analytic element model.This paper demonstrates that analytic element models have potential as powerful screening tools that can facilitate or improve calibration of more complicated finite-difference and finite-element models. We demonstrate how a two-dimensional analytic element model was used to identify errors in a complex three-dimensional finite-difference model caused by incorrect specification of boundary conditions. An improved finite-difference model was developed using boundary conditions developed from a far-field analytic element model. Calibration of a revised finite-difference model was achieved using fewer zones of hydraulic conductivity and lake bed conductance than the original finite-difference model. Calibration statistics were also improved in that simulated base-flows were much closer to measured values. The improved calibration is due mainly to improved specification of the boundary conditions made possible by first solving the far-field problem with an analytic element model.

  17. Numerical solution of nonlinear partial differential equations of mixed type. [finite difference approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A.

    1976-01-01

    A review is presented of some recently developed numerical methods for the solution of nonlinear equations of mixed type. The methods considered use finite difference approximations to the differential equation. Central difference formulas are employed in the subsonic zone and upwind difference formulas are used in the supersonic zone. The relaxation method for the small disturbance equation is discussed and a description is given of difference schemes for the potential flow equation in quasi-linear form. Attention is also given to difference schemes for the potential flow equation in conservation form, the analysis of relaxation schemes by the time dependent analogy, the accelerated iterative method, and three-dimensional calculations.

  18. Finite difference analysis of torsional vibrations of pretwisted, rotating, cantilever beams with effects of warping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical natural frequencies of the first three modes of torsional vibration of pretwisted, rotating cantilever beams are determined for various thickness and aspect ratios. Conclusions concerning individual and collective effects of warping, pretwist, tension-torsion coupling and tennis racket effect (twist-rotational coupling) terms on the natural frequencies are drawn from numerical results obtained by using a finite difference procedure with first order central differences. The relative importance of structural warping, inertial warping, pretwist, tension-torsion and twist-rotational coupling terms is discussed for various rotational speeds. The accuracy of results obtained by using the finite difference approach is verified by a comparison with the exact solution for specialized simple cases of the equation of motion used in this paper.

  19. Projection methods for incompressible flow problems with WENO finite difference schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Frutos, Javier; John, Volker; Novo, Julia

    2016-03-01

    Weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) finite difference schemes have been recommended in a competitive study of discretizations for scalar evolutionary convection-diffusion equations [20]. This paper explores the applicability of these schemes for the simulation of incompressible flows. To this end, WENO schemes are used in several non-incremental and incremental projection methods for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Velocity and pressure are discretized on the same grid. A pressure stabilization Petrov-Galerkin (PSPG) type of stabilization is introduced in the incremental schemes to account for the violation of the discrete inf-sup condition. Algorithmic aspects of the proposed schemes are discussed. The schemes are studied on several examples with different features. It is shown that the WENO finite difference idea can be transferred to the simulation of incompressible flows. Some shortcomings of the methods, which are due to the splitting in projection schemes, become also obvious.

  20. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  1. An Incompressible 2D Didactic Model with Singularity and Explicit Solutions of the 2D Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Dongho; Constantin, Peter; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-09-01

    We give an example of a well posed, finite energy, 2D incompressible active scalar equation with the same scaling as the surface quasi-geostrophic equation and prove that it can produce finite time singularities. In spite of its simplicity, this seems to be the first such example. Further, we construct explicit solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations whose gradients grow exponentially in time for all time. In addition, we introduce a variant of the 2D Boussinesq equations which is perhaps a more faithful companion of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations than the usual 2D Boussinesq equations.

  2. A semi-implicit finite difference model for three-dimensional tidal circulation,

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casulli, V.; Cheng, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    A semi-implicit finite difference formulation for the numerical solution of three-dimensional tidal circulation is presented. The governing equations are the three-dimensional Reynolds equations in which the pressure is assumed to be hydrostatic. A minimal degree of implicitness has been introduced in the finite difference formula so that in the absence of horizontal viscosity the resulting algorithm is unconditionally stable at a minimal computational cost. When only one vertical layer is specified this method reduces, as a particular case, to a semi-implicit scheme for the solutions of the corresponding two-dimensional shallow water equations. The resulting two- and three-dimensional algorithm is fast, accurate and mass conservative. This formulation includes the simulation of flooding and drying of tidal flats, and is fully vectorizable for an efficient implementation on modern vector computers.

  3. Analysis of Finite Difference Discretization Schemes for Diffusion in Spheres with Variable Diffusivity

    PubMed Central

    Versypt, Ashlee N. Ford; Braatz, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Two finite difference discretization schemes for approximating the spatial derivatives in the diffusion equation in spherical coordinates with variable diffusivity are presented and analyzed. The numerical solutions obtained by the discretization schemes are compared for five cases of the functional form for the variable diffusivity: (I) constant diffusivity, (II) temporally-dependent diffusivity, (III) spatially-dependent diffusivity, (IV) concentration-dependent diffusivity, and (V) implicitly-defined, temporally- and spatially-dependent diffusivity. Although the schemes have similar agreement to known analytical or semi-analytical solutions in the first four cases, in the fifth case for the variable diffusivity, one scheme produces a stable, physically reasonable solution, while the other diverges. We recommend the adoption of the more accurate and stable of these finite difference discretization schemes to numerically approximate the spatial derivatives of the diffusion equation in spherical coordinates for any functional form of variable diffusivity, especially cases where the diffusivity is a function of position. PMID:25642003

  4. Convergence rates of finite difference stochastic approximation algorithms part I: general sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liyi

    2016-05-01

    Stochastic optimization is a fundamental problem that finds applications in many areas including biological and cognitive sciences. The classical stochastic approximation algorithm for iterative stochastic optimization requires gradient information of the sample object function that is typically difficult to obtain in practice. Recently there has been renewed interests in derivative free approaches to stochastic optimization. In this paper, we examine the rates of convergence for the Kiefer-Wolfowitz algorithm and the mirror descent algorithm, under various updating schemes using finite differences as gradient approximations. The analysis is carried out under a general framework covering a wide range of updating scenarios. It is shown that the convergence of these algorithms can be accelerated by controlling the implementation of the finite differences.

  5. Convergence rates of finite difference stochastic approximation algorithms part II: implementation via common random numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liyi

    2016-05-01

    Stochastic optimization is a fundamental problem that finds applications in many areas including biological and cognitive sciences. The classical stochastic approximation algorithm for iterative stochastic optimization requires gradient information of the sample object function that is typically difficult to obtain in practice. Recently there has been renewed interests in derivative free approaches to stochastic optimization. In this paper, we examine the rates of convergence for the Kiefer-Wolfowitz algorithm and the mirror descent algorithm, by approximating gradient using finite differences generated through common random numbers. It is shown that the convergence of these algorithms can be accelerated by controlling the implementation of the finite differences. Particularly, it is shown that the rate can be increased to n-2/5 in general and to n-1/2, the best possible rate of stochastic approximation, in Monte Carlo optimization for a broad class of problems, in the iteration number n.

  6. On One-Dimensional Stretching Functions for Finite-Difference Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1980-01-01

    The class of one dimensional stretching function used in finite difference calculations is studied. For solutions containing a highly localized region of rapid variation, simple criteria for a stretching function are derived using a truncation error analysis. These criteria are used to investigate two types of stretching functions. One is an interior stretching function, for which the location and slope of an interior clustering region are specified. The simplest such function satisfying the criteria is found to be one based on the inverse hyperbolic sine. The other type of function is a two sided stretching function, for which the arbitrary slopes at the two ends of the one dimensional interval are specified. The simplest such general function is found to be one based on the inverse tangent. The general two sided function has many applications in the construction of finite difference grids.

  7. On the effective accuracy of spectral-like optimized finite-difference schemes for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, G.; Redonnet, S.

    2014-04-01

    The present article aims at highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of the so-called spectral-like optimized (explicit central) finite-difference schemes, when the latter are used for numerically approximating spatial derivatives in aeroacoustics evolution problems. With that view, we first remind how differential operators can be approximated using explicit central finite-difference schemes. The possible spectral-like optimization of the latter is then discussed, the advantages and drawbacks of such an optimization being theoretically studied, before they are numerically quantified. For doing so, two popular spectral-like optimized schemes are assessed via a direct comparison against their standard counterparts, such a comparative exercise being conducted for several academic test cases. At the end, general conclusions are drawn, which allows us discussing the way spectral-like optimized schemes shall be preferred (or not) to standard ones, when it comes to simulate real-life aeroacoustics problems.

  8. A perturbational h[sup 4] exponential finite difference scheme for the convective diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Q.; Gao, Z. ); Yang, Z.F. )

    1993-01-01

    A perturbational h[sup 4] compact exponential finite difference scheme with diagonally dominant coefficient matrix and upwind effect is developed for the convective diffusion equation. Perturbations of second order are exerted on the convective coefficients and source term of an h[sup 2] exponential finite difference scheme proposed in this paper based on a transformation to eliminate the upwind effect of the convective diffusion equation. Four numerical examples including one- to three-dimensional model equations of fluid flow and a problem of natural convective heat transfer are given to illustrate the excellent behavior of the present exponential schemes. Besides, the h[sup 4] accuracy of the perturbational scheme is verified using double precision arithmetic.

  9. Mixed finite-difference/integral transform approach for parabolic-hyperbolic problems in transient forced convection

    SciTech Connect

    Cotta, R.M.; Gerk, J.E.V. . Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica)

    1994-06-01

    The integral transform method is employed in conjunction with second-order-accurate explicit finite-differences schemes, to handle accurately a class of parabolic-hyperbolic problems that appear in connection with transient forced convection inside ducts. The integral transformation process eliminates the independent variables in which the diffusion phenomena predominate. A system of coupled hyperbolic equations then results, involving time and the space coordinates in which convection is dominant, which is solved numerically through a modified upwind second-order finite-difference scheme. Stability and convergence characteristics of the proposed mixed approach are also examined. Typical applications in two- and three-dimensional geometries are considered, for both slug and laminar flow situations.

  10. TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Edwards, A.L.

    1990-05-01

    TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available. The material thermal property data base, Chapter 4, included in this manual was originally published in 1969 by Art Edwards for use with his TRUMP finite difference heat transfer code. The format of the data has been altered to be compatible with TOPAZ2D. Bob Bailey is responsible for adding the high explosive thermal property data.

  11. Properties of finite difference models of non-linear conservative oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    Finite-difference (FD) approaches to the numerical solution of the differential equations describing the motion of a nonlinear conservative oscillator are investigated analytically. A generalized formulation of the Duffing and modified Duffing equations is derived and analyzed using several FD techniques, and it is concluded that, although it is always possible to contstruct FD models of conservative oscillators which are themselves conservative, caution is required to avoid numerical solutions which do not accurately reflect the properties of the original equation.

  12. Transport and dispersion of pollutants in surface impoundments: a finite difference model

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1980-07-01

    A surface impoundment model by finite-difference (SIMFD) has been developed. SIMFD computes the flow rate, velocity field, and the concentration distribution of pollutants in surface impoundments with any number of islands located within the region of interest. Theoretical derivations and numerical algorithm are described in detail. Instructions for the application of SIMFD and listings of the FORTRAN IV source program are provided. Two sample problems are given to illustrate the application and validity of the model.

  13. Simulation of realistic rotor blade-vortex interactions using a finite-difference technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, Ahmed A.; Charles, Bruce D.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical finite-difference code has been used to predict helicopter blade loads during realistic self-generated three-dimensional blade-vortex interactions. The velocity field is determined via a nonlinear superposition of the rotor flowfield. Data obtained from a lifting-line helicopter/rotor trim code are used to determine the instantaneous position of the interaction vortex elements with respect to the blade. Data obtained for three rotor advance ratios show a reasonable correlation with wind tunnel data.

  14. Finite-difference, time-domain analysis of a folded acoustic transmission line.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Charles M

    2005-03-01

    Recently designed, modern versions of renais sance woodwind instruments such as the recorder and serpent use square cross sections and a folded acoustic transmission line. Conventional microwave techniques would expect that this bend would cause unwanted reflections and impedance discontinuities. This paper analyses the folded acoustic transmission line using finite-difference, time-domain techniques and shows that the discontinuity can be compensated with by the use of a manufacturable method. PMID:15857045

  15. Finite-difference model for 3-D flow in bays and estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Peter E.; Larock, Bruce E.; ,

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a semi-implicit finite-difference model for the numerical solution of three-dimensional flow in bays and estuaries. The model treats the gravity wave and vertical diffusion terms in the governing equations implicitly, and other terms explicitly. The model achieves essentially second-order accurate and stable solutions in strongly nonlinear problems by using a three-time-level leapfrog-trapezoidal scheme for the time integration.

  16. Generalized energy and potential enstrophy conserving finite difference schemes for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramopoulos, Frank

    1988-01-01

    The conditions under which finite difference schemes for the shallow water equations can conserve both total energy and potential enstrophy are considered. A method of deriving such schemes using operator formalism is developed. Several such schemes are derived for the A-, B- and C-grids. The derived schemes include second-order schemes and pseudo-fourth-order schemes. The simplest B-grid pseudo-fourth-order schemes are presented.

  17. Finite difference solutions of heat conduction problems in multi-layered bodies with complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masiulaniec, K. C.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Dewitt, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical procedure is presented for analyzing a wide variety of heat conduction problems in multilayered bodies having complex geometry. The method is based on a finite difference solution of the heat conduction equation using a body fitted coordinate system transformation. Solution techniques are described for steady and transient problems with and without internal energy generation. Results are found to compare favorably with several well known solutions.

  18. Finite-difference models of ordinary differential equations - Influence of denominator functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.; Smith, Arthur

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence on the solutions of finite-difference schemes of using a variety of denominator functions in the discrete modeling of the derivative for any ordinary differential equation. The results obtained are a consequence of using a generalized definition of the first derivative. A particular example of the linear decay equation is used to illustrate in detail the various solution possibilities that can occur.

  19. Finite difference solution for graded-index cylindrical dielectric waveguides: a scalar wave approximation.

    PubMed

    Tamil, L S; Mitra, S S; Dutta, R; Pereira, J M

    1991-03-20

    A simple numerical method based on finite differences to solve the scalar wave equation encountered in optical fibers is presented. The method uses the Ricatti transformation to the scalar wave equation and is capable of analyzing fibers of arbitrary refractive index profiles. Achieving errors as low as 0.005% for propagation constants is possible for lower-order modes. However, the error seems to increase for frequencies closer to cutoff.

  20. Double absorbing boundaries for finite-difference time-domain electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaGrone, John; Hagstrom, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We describe the implementation of optimal local radiation boundary condition sequences for second order finite difference approximations to Maxwell's equations and the scalar wave equation using the double absorbing boundary formulation. Numerical experiments are presented which demonstrate that the design accuracy of the boundary conditions is achieved and, for comparable effort, exceeds that of a convolution perfectly matched layer with reasonably chosen parameters. An advantage of the proposed approach is that parameters can be chosen using an accurate a priori error bound.

  1. Full Wave Analysis of Passive Microwave Monolithic Integrated Circuit Devices Using a Generalized Finite Difference Time Domain (GFDTD) Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Faiza S.; Rascoe, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a modified Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique using a generalized conformed orthogonal grid. The use of the Conformed Orthogonal Grid, Finite Difference Time Domain (GFDTD) enables the designer to match all the circuit dimensions, hence eliminating a major source o error in the analysis.

  2. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  3. Modelling migration in multilayer systems by a finite difference method: the spherical symmetry case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojbotǎ, C. I.; Toşa, V.; Mercea, P. V.

    2013-08-01

    We present a numerical model based on finite differences to solve the problem of chemical impurity migration within a multilayer spherical system. Migration here means diffusion of chemical species in conditions of concentration partitioning at layer interfaces due to different solubilities of the migrant in different layers. We detail here the numerical model and discuss the results of its implementation. To validate the method we compare it with cases where an analytic solution exists. We also present an application of our model to a practical problem in which we compute the migration of caprolactam from the packaging multilayer foil into the food.

  4. Finite difference time domain analysis of microwave ferrite devices and mobile antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Bahadir Suleyman

    This dissertation presents analysis and design of shielded mobile antenna systems and microwave ferrite devices using a finite-difference time-domain method. Novel shielded antenna structures suitable for cellular communications have been analyzed and designed with emphasize on reducing excessive radiated energy absorbed in user's head and hand, while keeping the antenna performance at its peak in the presence of user. These novel antennas include a magnetically shielded antenna, a dual-resonance shielded antenna and, a shorted and truncated microstrip antenna. The effect of magnetic coating on the performance of a shielded monopole antenna is studied extensively. A parametric study is performed to analyze the dual-resonance phenomenon observed in the dual-resonance shielded antenna, optimize the antenna design within the cellular communications band, and improve the antenna performance. Input impedance, near and far fields of the dual-resonance shielded antenna are calculated using the finite-difference time-domain method. Experimental validation is also presented. In addition, performance of a shorted and truncated microstrip antenna has been investigated over a wide range of substrate parameters and dimensions. Objectives of the research work also include development of a finite-difference time-domain technique to accurately model magnetically anisotropic media, including the effect of non-uniform magnetization within the finite-size ferrite material due to demagnetizing fields. A slow wave thin film isolator and a stripline disc junction circulator are analyzed. An extensive parametric study calculates wide-band frequency-dependent parameters of these devices for various device dimensions and material parameters. Finally, a ferrite-filled stripline configuration is analyzed to study the non- linear behaviour of ferrite by introducing a modified damping factor.

  5. Generating meshes for finite-difference analysis using a solid modeler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguna, G. W.; White, W. T.; Cabral, B. K.

    1987-09-01

    One tool used by the Engineering Research Division of LLNL to help analyze the behavior of electronic systems in hostile environments is 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computation. FDTD codes solve Maxwell's equations,the differential equations of electromagnetism, on a uniform lattice of points. It is this uniform lattice, or mesh, that distinguishes finite-difference codes from other codes. The simple mesh makes FDTD codes computationally more efficient than other codes, which enables them to run larger problems and to run faster (up to thirty times faster than finite-element codes, for example). Therefore, within the Engineering Department at LLNL, Electronics Engineering (EE) has initiated a project to develop a mesh generator that will provide meshes suitable for FDTD analysis. This report describes the results of the first year of EE's FDTD Mesh Generation Project. During this year a preliminary version of an automated mesh generator was built and used to create a mesh of an object of interest to the High-Power Microwave Program, namely an electrically detonatable land mine. The code was verified by meshing basic solids such as spheres and cylinders. Because of the design of the code, there is no software limitation to the size of meshes that can be accommodated. The algorithm with a mesh space of approximately 500,000 cells has been demonstrated. The mesh generator can detect certain objects with walls that are thinner than the width of a cell. The code has internal graphics for viewing objects as they appear prior to being converted to a finite-difference representation. Additionally, via data files, the code is coupled to two external graphics packages for visually checking the meshes, namely TAURUS on the Cray and a new code, IMAGE, on the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  6. A parallel splitting wavelet method for 2D conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Alex A.; Kozakevicius, Alice J.; Jakobsson, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The current work presents a parallel formulation using the MPI protocol for an adaptive high order finite difference scheme to solve 2D conservation laws. Adaptivity is achieved at each time iteration by the application of an interpolating wavelet transform in each space dimension. High order approximations for the numerical fluxes are computed by ENO and WENO schemes. Since time evolution is made by a TVD Runge-Kutta space splitting scheme, the problem is naturally suitable for parallelization. Numerical simulations and speedup results are presented for Euler equations in gas dynamics problems.

  7. Experiments with explicit filtering for LES using a finite-difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, T. S.; Kaltenbach, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The equations for large-eddy simulation (LES) are derived formally by applying a spatial filter to the Navier-Stokes equations. The filter width as well as the details of the filter shape are free parameters in LES, and these can be used both to control the effective resolution of the simulation and to establish the relative importance of different portions of the resolved spectrum. An analogous, but less well justified, approach to filtering is more or less universally used in conjunction with LES using finite-difference methods. In this approach, the finite support provided by the computational mesh as well as the wavenumber-dependent truncation errors associated with the finite-difference operators are assumed to define the filter operation. This approach has the advantage that it is also 'automatic' in the sense that no explicit filtering: operations need to be performed. While it is certainly convenient to avoid the explicit filtering operation, there are some practical considerations associated with finite-difference methods that favor the use of an explicit filter. Foremost among these considerations is the issue of truncation error. All finite-difference approximations have an associated truncation error that increases with increasing wavenumber. These errors can be quite severe for the smallest resolved scales, and these errors will interfere with the dynamics of the small eddies if no corrective action is taken. Years of experience at CTR with a second-order finite-difference scheme for high Reynolds number LES has repeatedly indicated that truncation errors must be minimized in order to obtain acceptable simulation results. While the potential advantages of explicit filtering are rather clear, there is a significant cost associated with its implementation. In particular, explicit filtering reduces the effective resolution of the simulation compared with that afforded by the mesh. The resolution requirements for LES are usually set by the need to capture

  8. Mimetic finite difference method for the stokes problem on polygonal meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, K; Beirao Da Veiga, L; Gyrya, V; Manzini, G

    2009-01-01

    Various approaches to extend the finite element methods to non-traditional elements (pyramids, polyhedra, etc.) have been developed over the last decade. Building of basis functions for such elements is a challenging task and may require extensive geometry analysis. The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method has many similarities with low-order finite element methods. Both methods try to preserve fundamental properties of physical and mathematical models. The essential difference is that the MFD method uses only the surface representation of discrete unknowns to build stiffness and mass matrices. Since no extension inside the mesh element is required, practical implementation of the MFD method is simple for polygonal meshes that may include degenerate and non-convex elements. In this article, we develop a MFD method for the Stokes problem on arbitrary polygonal meshes. The method is constructed for tensor coefficients, which will allow to apply it to the linear elasticity problem. The numerical experiments show the second-order convergence for the velocity variable and the first-order for the pressure.

  9. A mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem with elected edge bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, K; Berirao, L

    2009-01-01

    A new mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem is proposed and analyzed. The unstable P{sub 1}-P{sub 0} discretization is stabilized by adding a small number of bubble functions to selected mesh edges. A simple strategy for selecting such edges is proposed and verified with numerical experiments. The discretizations schemes for Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations must satisfy the celebrated inf-sup (or the LBB) stability condition. The stability condition implies a balance between discrete spaces for velocity and pressure. In finite elements, this balance is frequently achieved by adding bubble functions to the velocity space. The goal of this article is to show that the stabilizing edge bubble functions can be added only to a small set of mesh edges. This results in a smaller algebraic system and potentially in a faster calculations. We employ the mimetic finite difference (MFD) discretization technique that works for general polyhedral meshes and can accomodate non-uniform distribution of stabilizing bubbles.

  10. Finite difference approximations for measure-valued solutions of a hierarchically size-structured population model.

    PubMed

    Ackleh, Azmy S; Chellamuthu, Vinodh K; Ito, Kazufumi

    2015-04-01

    We study a quasilinear hierarchically size-structured population model presented in [4]. In this model the growth, mortality and reproduction rates are assumed to depend on a function of the population density. In [4] we showed that solutions to this model can become singular (measure-valued) in finite time even if all the individual parameters are smooth. Therefore, in this paper we develop a first order finite difference scheme to compute these measure-valued solutions. Convergence analysis for this method is provided. We also develop a high resolution second order scheme to compute the measure-valued solution of the model and perform a comparative study between the two schemes. PMID:25811433

  11. Numerical analysis of polarization gratings using the finite-difference time-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Chulwoo; Escuti, Michael J.

    2007-10-15

    We report the first full numerical analysis of polarization gratings (PGs), and study their most general properties and limits by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. In this way, we avoid limiting assumptions on material properties or grating dimensions (e.g., no paraxial approximations) and provide a more complete understanding of PG diffraction behavior. We identify the fundamental delineation between diffraction regimes (thin versus thick) for anisotropic gratings and determine the conditions for {approx_equal}100% diffraction efficiency in the framework of the coupled-wave {rho} and Q parameters. Diffraction characteristics including the efficiency, spectral response, and polarization sensitivity are investigated for the two primary types of PGs with linear and circular birefringence. The angular response and finite-grating behavior (i.e., pixelation) are also examined. Comparisons with previous analytic approximations, where applicable, show good agreement.

  12. Finite Element Modeling of the Different Failure Mechanisms of a Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar-Far, M.; Absi, J.; Mariaux, G.

    2012-12-01

    A new finite element model is used to investigate catastrophic failures of a thermal barrier coatings system due to crack propagation along the interfaces between the ceramic top-coat, thermally grown oxide, and bond-coat layers, as well as between the lamellas structure of the ceramic layer. The thermo-mechanical model is designed to take into account a non-homogenous temperature distribution and the effects of the residual stresses generated during the coating process. Crack propagation is simulated using the contact tool "Debond" present in the ABAQUS finite element code. Simulations are performed with a geometry corresponding to similar or dissimilar amplitudes of asperity, and for different thicknesses of the oxide layer. The numerical results have shown that crack evolution depends crucially on the ratio of the loading rate caused by growth and swelling of the oxide layer and also on the interface roughness obtained during the spraying of coatings.

  13. A study of the efficiency of various Navier-Stokes solvers. [finite difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atias, M.; Wolfshtein, M.; Israeli, M.

    1975-01-01

    A comparative study of the efficiency of some finite difference methods for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations was conducted. The study was restricted to the two-dimensional steady, uniform property vorticity-stream function equations. The comparisons were drawn by recording the CPU time required to obtain a solution as well as the accuracy of this solution using five numerical methods: central differences, first order upwind differences, second order upwind differences, exponential differences, and an ADI solution of the central difference equations. Solutions were obtained for two test cases: a recirculating eddy inside a square cavity with a moving top, and an impinging jet flow. The results show that whenever the central difference method is stable it generates results with a given accuracy for less CPU time than any other method.

  14. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  15. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  16. Composite scheme using localized relaxation with non-standard finite difference method for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vivek; Raghurama Rao, S. V.

    2008-04-01

    Non-standard finite difference methods (NSFDM) introduced by Mickens [ Non-standard Finite Difference Models of Differential Equations, World Scientific, Singapore, 1994] are interesting alternatives to the traditional finite difference and finite volume methods. When applied to linear hyperbolic conservation laws, these methods reproduce exact solutions. In this paper, the NSFDM is first extended to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, by a novel utilization of the decoupled equations using characteristic variables. In the second part of this paper, the NSFDM is studied for its efficacy in application to nonlinear scalar hyperbolic conservation laws. The original NSFDMs introduced by Mickens (1994) were not in conservation form, which is an important feature in capturing discontinuities at the right locations. Mickens [Construction and analysis of a non-standard finite difference scheme for the Burgers-Fisher equations, Journal of Sound and Vibration 257 (4) (2002) 791-797] recently introduced a NSFDM in conservative form. This method captures the shock waves exactly, without any numerical dissipation. In this paper, this algorithm is tested for the case of expansion waves with sonic points and is found to generate unphysical expansion shocks. As a remedy to this defect, we use the strategy of composite schemes [R. Liska, B. Wendroff, Composite schemes for conservation laws, SIAM Journal of Numerical Analysis 35 (6) (1998) 2250-2271] in which the accurate NSFDM is used as the basic scheme and localized relaxation NSFDM is used as the supporting scheme which acts like a filter. Relaxation schemes introduced by Jin and Xin [The relaxation schemes for systems of conservation laws in arbitrary space dimensions, Communications in Pure and Applied Mathematics 48 (1995) 235-276] are based on relaxation systems which replace the nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws by a semi-linear system with a stiff relaxation term. The relaxation parameter ( λ) is chosen locally

  17. A fast Cauchy-Riemann solver. [differential equation solution for boundary conditions by finite difference approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghil, M.; Balgovind, R.

    1979-01-01

    The inhomogeneous Cauchy-Riemann equations in a rectangle are discretized by a finite difference approximation. Several different boundary conditions are treated explicitly, leading to algorithms which have overall second-order accuracy. All boundary conditions with either u or v prescribed along a side of the rectangle can be treated by similar methods. The algorithms presented here have nearly minimal time and storage requirements and seem suitable for development into a general-purpose direct Cauchy-Riemann solver for arbitrary boundary conditions.

  18. Flux vector splitting of the inviscid equations with application to finite difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steger, J. L.; Warming, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The conservation-law form of the inviscid gasdynamic equations has the remarkable property that the nonlinear flux vectors are homogeneous functions of degree one. This property readily permits the splitting of flux vectors into subvectors by similarity transformations so that each subvector has associated with it a specified eigenvalue spectrum. As a consequence of flux vector splitting, new explicit and implicit dissipative finite-difference schemes are developed for first-order hyperbolic systems of equations. Appropriate one-sided spatial differences for each split flux vector are used throughout the computational field even if the flow is locally subsonic. The results of some preliminary numerical computations are included.

  19. Dispersion and stability analysis for a finite difference beam propagation method.

    PubMed

    de-Oliva-Rubio, J; Molina-Fernández, I; Godoy-Rubio, R

    2008-06-01

    Applying continuous and discrete transformation techniques, new analytical expressions to calculate dispersion and stability of a Runge- Kutta Finite Difference Beam Propagation Method (RK-FDBPM) are obtained. These expressions give immediate insight about the discretization errors introduced by the numerical method in the plane-wave spectrum domain. From these expressions a novel strategy to adequately set the mesh steps sizes of the RK-FDBPM is presented. Assessment of the method is performed by studying the propagation in several linear and nonlinear photonic devices for different spatial discretizations.

  20. Comparison of finite-difference schemes for analysis of shells of revolution. [stress and free vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Stephens, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    Several finite difference schemes are applied to the stress and free vibration analysis of homogeneous isotropic and layered orthotropic shells of revolution. The study is based on a form of the Sanders-Budiansky first-approximation linear shell theory modified such that the effects of shear deformation and rotary inertia are included. A Fourier approach is used in which all the shell stress resultants and displacements are expanded in a Fourier series in the circumferential direction, and the governing equations reduce to ordinary differential equations in the meridional direction. While primary attention is given to finite difference schemes used in conjunction with first order differential equation formulation, comparison is made with finite difference schemes used with other formulations. These finite difference discretization models are compared with respect to simplicity of application, convergence characteristics, and computational efficiency. Numerical studies are presented for the effects of variations in shell geometry and lamination parameters on the accuracy and convergence of the solutions obtained by the different finite difference schemes. On the basis of the present study it is shown that the mixed finite difference scheme based on the first order differential equation formulation and two interlacing grids for the different fundamental unknowns combines a number of advantages over other finite difference schemes previously reported in the literature.

  1. A generalized finite-difference formulation for the U.S. Geological Survey modular three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harbaugh, Arlen W.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Modular Ground-Water Flow Model assumes that model nodes are in the center of cells and that transmissivity is constant within a cell. Based on these assumptions, the model calculates coefficients, called conductance, that are multiplied by head difference to determine flow between cells. Although these are common assumptions in finite-difference models, other assumptions are possible. A new option to the model program reads conductance as input data rather than calculating it. This optional lows the user to calculate conductance outside of the model. The user thus has the flexibility to define conductance using any desired assumptions. For a water-table condition, horizontal conductance must change as water level varies. To handle this situation, the new option reads conductance divided by thickness (CDT) as input data. The model calculates saturated thickness and multiplies it by CDT to obtain conductance. Thus, the user is still free from the assumptions of centered nodes and constant transmissivity in cells. The model option is written in FORTRAN77 and is fully compatible with the existing model. This report documents the new model option; it includes a description of the concepts, detailed input instructions, and a listing of the code.

  2. An overlapped grid method for multigrid, finite volume/difference flow solvers: MaGGiE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Lessard, Victor R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to develop a domain decomposition method via overlapping/embedding the component grids, which is to be used by upwind, multi-grid, finite volume solution algorithms. A computer code, given the name MaGGiE (Multi-Geometry Grid Embedder) is developed to meet this objective. MaGGiE takes independently generated component grids as input, and automatically constructs the composite mesh and interpolation data, which can be used by the finite volume solution methods with or without multigrid convergence acceleration. Six demonstrative examples showing various aspects of the overlap technique are presented and discussed. These cases are used for developing the procedure for overlapping grids of different topologies, and to evaluate the grid connection and interpolation data for finite volume calculations on a composite mesh. Time fluxes are transferred between mesh interfaces using a trilinear interpolation procedure. Conservation losses are minimal at the interfaces using this method. The multi-grid solution algorithm, using the coaser grid connections, improves the convergence time history as compared to the solution on composite mesh without multi-gridding.

  3. Development of a S{sub n} transport code based on discontinuous finite element method and coarse mesh finite difference formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D. W.; Joo, H. G.

    2013-07-01

    The methods and performance of a three-dimensional S{sub n} transport code employing the Discontinuous Finite Element Method (DFEM) and the Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) formulation are presented. The mesh generator GMSH and a post processing visualization tool Visit are combined with the code for flexible geometry processing and versatile visualization. The CMFD method for DFEM Sn applications is formulated and the performance of the CMFD acceleration of eigenvalue calculations is demonstrated for a simple set of neutron transport problems. (authors)

  4. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  5. A time-space domain stereo finite difference method for 3D scalar wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yushu; Yang, Guangwen; Ma, Xiao; He, Conghui; Song, Guojie

    2016-11-01

    The time-space domain finite difference methods reduce numerical dispersion effectively by minimizing the error in the joint time-space domain. However, their interpolating coefficients are related with the Courant numbers, leading to significantly extra time costs for loading the coefficients consecutively according to velocity in heterogeneous models. In the present study, we develop a time-space domain stereo finite difference (TSSFD) method for 3D scalar wave equation. The method propagates both the displacements and their gradients simultaneously to keep more information of the wavefields, and minimizes the maximum phase velocity error directly using constant interpolation coefficients for different Courant numbers. We obtain the optimal constant coefficients by combining the truncated Taylor series approximation and the time-space domain optimization, and adjust the coefficients to improve the stability condition. Subsequent investigation shows that the TSSFD can suppress numerical dispersion effectively with high computational efficiency. The maximum phase velocity error of the TSSFD is just 3.09% even with only 2 sampling points per minimum wavelength when the Courant number is 0.4. Numerical experiments show that to generate wavefields with no visible numerical dispersion, the computational efficiency of the TSSFD is 576.9%, 193.5%, 699.0%, and 191.6% of those of the 4th-order and 8th-order Lax-Wendroff correction (LWC) method, the 4th-order staggered grid method (SG), and the 8th-order optimal finite difference method (OFD), respectively. Meanwhile, the TSSFD is compatible to the unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) boundary condition for absorbing artificial boundaries. The efficiency and capability to handle complex velocity models make it an attractive tool in imaging methods such as acoustic reverse time migration (RTM).

  6. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  7. 2d PDE Linear Asymmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ILUCG2 (Incomplete LU factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d problems) was developed to solve a linear asymmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as plasma diffusion, equilibria, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These equations share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized with finite-difference or finite-elementmore » methods, the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ILUCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. A generalization of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For problems having a symmetric matrix ICCG2 should be used since it runs up to four times faster and uses approximately 30% less storage. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source, containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  8. Variable-temperature Fourier-transform infrared studies of poly(L-lactic acid) in different states of order: A 2DCOS and PCMW2D analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pudun; Unger, Miriam; Pfeifer, Frank; Siesler, Heinz W.

    2016-11-01

    Variable-temperature Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra of a predominantly amorphous and a semi-crystalline poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) film were measured between 30 °C and 170 °C in order to investigate their temperature-dependent structural changes as a function of the initial state of order. For an in-depth analysis of the spectral variations in the carbonyl stretching band region (1803-1722 cm-1) two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and perturbation-correlation moving-window two-dimensional (PCMW2D) analyses were applied. Significant spectral changes were observed during heating of the amorphous PLLA sample whereas the semi-crystalline specimen showed only slight band shifts as a function of the external perturbation. The PCMW2D results suggested that for efficient 2DCOS analyses the heating process should be split up in two temperature intervals. These analyses then provided information on the recrystallization of the amorphous regions, the presence of an intermediate state of order and a sequence scenario for the observed spectral changes.

  9. Comparison of numerical methods for 2D crystals under anisotropic surface free energy and through evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolla, Madhuri Udayanjani

    In this dissertation first, we compute the equilibrium shapes of 2D crystals under anisotropic surface free energies. An equilibrium shape minimizes the total surface free energy. The governing equation in polar coordinates is a nonlinear ordinary differential equation. Two numerical methods, finite difference and the finite element are used and compared. We investigate the accuracy, order of convergence and efficiency of the two methods in computing the equilibrium shapes. Secondly, we consider the surface of the crystal evolving under surface diffusion and compute the final shape in the evolution which is the equilibrium shape. The surface diffusion equation in polar coordinates is a time-dependent nonlinear 4th order partial differential equation. Again we apply the two methods finite difference and finite element. The results are observed at different stages of evolution of the crystal for the isotropy case. Then we compare the accuracy, order of convergence and efficiency of the two methods.

  10. A modular three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, Michael G.; Harbaugh, Arlen W.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents a finite-difference model and its associated modular computer program. The model simulates flow in three dimensions. The report includes detailed explanations of physical and mathematical concepts on which the model is based and an explanation of how those concepts are incorporated in the modular structure of the computer program. The modular structure consists of a Main Program and a series of highly independent subroutines called 'modules.' The modules are grouped into 'packages.' Each package deals with a specific feature of the hydrologic system which is to be simulated, such as flow from rivers or flow into drains, or with a specific method of solving linear equations which describe the flow system, such as the Strongly Implicit Procedure or Slice-Successive Overrelaxation. The division of the program into modules permits the user to examine specific hydrologic features of the model independently. This also facilita development of additional capabilities because new packages can be added to the program without modifying the existing packages. The input and output systems of the computer program are also designed to permit maximum flexibility. Ground-water flow within the aquifer is simulated using a block-centered finite-difference approach. Layers can be simulated as confined, unconfined, or a combination of confined and unconfined. Flow associated with external stresses, such as wells, areal recharge, evapotranspiration, drains, and streams, can also be simulated. The finite-difference equations can be solved using either the Strongly Implicit Procedure or Slice-Successive Overrelaxation. The program is written in FORTRAN 77 and will run without modification on most computers that have a FORTRAN 77 compiler. For each program ,module, this report includes a narrative description, a flow chart, a list of variables, and a module listing.

  11. A Modular Three-Dimensional Finite-Difference Ground-Water Flow Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, Michael G.; Harbaugh, Arlen W.; Guo, Weixing; Lu, Guoping

    1988-01-01

    This report presents a finite-difference model and its associated modular computer program. The model simulates flow in three dimensions. The report includes detailed explanations of physical and mathematical concepts on which the model is based and an explanation of how those concepts are incorporated in the modular structure of the computer program. The modular structure consists of a Main Program and a series of highly independent subroutines called 'modules.' The modules are grouped into 'packages.' Each package deals with a specific feature of the hydrologic system which is to be simulated, such as flow from rivers or flow into drains, or with a specific method of solving linear equations which describe the flow system, such as the Strongly Implicit Procedure or Slice-Successive Overrelaxation. The division of the program into modules permits the user to examine specific hydrologic features of the model independently. This also facilita development of additional capabilities because new packages can be added to the program without modifying the existing packages. The input and output systems of the computer program are also designed to permit maximum flexibility. Ground-water flow within the aquifer is simulated using a block-centered finite-difference approach. Layers can be simulated as confined, unconfined, or a combination of confined and unconfined. Flow associated with external stresses, such as wells, areal recharge, evapotranspiration, drains, and streams, can also be simulated. The finite-difference equations can be solved using either the Strongly Implicit Procedure or Slice-Successive Overrelaxation. The program is written in FORTRAN 77 and will run without modification on most computers that have a FORTRAN 77 compiler. For each program ,module, this report includes a narrative description, a flow chart, a list of variables, and a module listing.

  12. A modular three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, M.G.; Harbaugh, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a finite-difference model and its associated modular computer program. The model simulates flow in three dimensions. The report includes detailed explanations of physical and mathematical concepts on which the model is based and an explanation of how those concepts were incorporated in the modular structure of the computer program. The modular structure consists of a Main Program and a series of highly independent subroutines called 'modules.' The modules are grouped into 'packages.' Each package deals with a specific feature of the hydrologic system which is to be simulated, such as flow from rivers or flow into drains, or with a specific method of solving linear equations which describe the flow system, such as the Strongly Implicit Procedure or Slice-Successive Overrelaxation. The division of the program into modules permits the user to examine specific hydrologic features of the model independently. This also facilitates development of additional capabilities because new modules or packages can be added to the program without modifying the existing modules or packages. The input and output systems of the computer program are also designed to permit maximum flexibility. Ground-water flow within the aquifer is simulated using a block-centered finite-difference approach. Layers can be simulated as confined, unconfined, or a combination of confined and unconfined. Flow from external stresses, such as flow to wells, areal recharge, evapotranspiration, flow to drains, and flow through riverbeds, can also be simulated. The finite-difference equations can be solved using either the Strongly Implicit Procedure or Slice-Successive Overrelaxation. The program is written in FORTRAN '66 and will run without modification on most computers which have a FORTRAN '66 compiler. It will also run, without modification, with most extended FORTRAN '77 compilers and with minor modifications on standard FORTRAN '77 compilers. Documentation presented in this report

  13. Rotordynamic coefficients for labyrinth seals calculated by means of a finite difference technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordmann, R.; Weiser, P.

    1989-01-01

    The compressible, turbulent, time dependent and three dimensional flow in a labyrinth seal can be described by the Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with a turbulence model. Additionally, equations for mass and energy conservation and an equation of state are required. To solve these equations, a perturbation analysis is performed yielding zeroth order equations for centric shaft position and first order equations describing the flow field for small motions around the seal center. For numerical solution a finite difference method is applied to the zeroth and first order equations resulting in leakage and dynamic seal coefficients respectively.

  14. A finite-difference program for stresses in anisotropic, layered plates in bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salamon, N. J.

    1975-01-01

    The interlaminar stresses induced in a layered laminate that is bent into a cylindrical surface are studied. The laminate is modeled as a continuum, and the resulting elasticity equations are solved using the finite difference method. The report sets forth the mathematical framework, presents some preliminary results, and provides a listing and explanation of the computer program. Significant among the results are apparent symmetry relationships that will reduce the numerical size of certain problems and an interlaminar stress behavior having a sharp rise at the free edges.

  15. Polarization-current-based, finite-difference time-domain, near-to-far-field transformation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yong; Moloney, Jerome V

    2009-05-15

    A near-to-far-field transformation algorithm for three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain is presented in this Letter. This approach is based directly on the polarization current of the scatterer, not the scattered near fields. It therefore eliminates the numerical errors originating from the spatial offset of the E and H fields, inherent in the standard near-to-far-field transformation. The proposed method is validated via direct comparisons with the analytical Lorentz-Mie solutions of plane waves scattered by large dielectric and metallic spheres with strong forward-scattering lobes. PMID:19448834

  16. Shock capturing finite difference algorithms for supersonic flow past fighter and missile type configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osher, S.

    1984-01-01

    The construction of a reliable, shock capturing finite difference method to solve the Euler equations for inviscid, supersonic flow past fighter and missile type configurations is highly desirable. The numerical method must have a firm theoretical foundation and must be robust and efficient. It should be able to treat subsonic pockets in a predominantly supersonic flow. The method must also be easily applicable to the complex topologies of the aerodynamic configuration under consideration. The ongoing approach to this task is described and for steady supersonic flows is presented. This scheme is the basic numerical method. Results of work obtained during previous years are presented.

  17. A staggered mesh finite difference scheme for the computation of hypersonic Euler flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A shock capturing finite difference method for systems of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented which avoids the need to solve Riemann problems while being competitive in performance with other current methods. A staggered spatial mesh is employed, so that complicated nonlinear waves generated at cell interfaces are averaged over cell interiors at the next time level. The full method combines to form a conservative version of the modified method of characteristics. The advantages of the method are discussed, and numerical results are presented for the two-dimensional double ellipse problem.

  18. A truncated implicit high-order finite-difference scheme combined with boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Suo-Liang; Liu, Yang

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, first we calculate finite-difference coefficients of implicit finitedifference methods (IFDM) for the first- and second-order derivatives on normal grids and firstorder derivatives on staggered grids and find that small coefficients of high-order IFDMs exist. Dispersion analysis demonstrates that omitting these small coefficients can retain approximately the same order accuracy but greatly reduce computational costs. Then, we introduce a mirrorimage symmetric boundary condition to improve IFDMs accuracy and stability and adopt the hybrid absorbing boundary condition (ABC) to reduce unwanted reflections from the model boundary. Last, we give elastic wave modeling examples for homogeneous and heterogeneous models to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed scheme.

  19. Finite Differences and Collocation Methods for the Solution of the Two Dimensional Heat Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouatchou, Jules

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we combine finite difference approximations (for spatial derivatives) and collocation techniques (for the time component) to numerically solve the two dimensional heat equation. We employ respectively a second-order and a fourth-order schemes for the spatial derivatives and the discretization method gives rise to a linear system of equations. We show that the matrix of the system is non-singular. Numerical experiments carried out on serial computers, show the unconditional stability of the proposed method and the high accuracy achieved by the fourth-order scheme.

  20. Two-dimensional finite difference program for thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Naraghi, M.H.

    1987-09-01

    A two-dimensional finite difference computer model for thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers has been developed. The model uses an iterative scheme for calculating the temperature distribution within the chamber wall and implements a successive overrelaxation formula for a quick convergence. The inputs of the models are the dimensions of the thrust chamber wall, types of materials used, heat transfer coefficients and temperatures of the hot gas and the coolant. The resulting output of the program consists of the nodal temperature distribution, heat transfer to the coolant and heat transfer from the hot gas.

  1. The electromagnetic modeling of thin apertures using the finite-difference time-domain technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarest, Kenneth R.

    1987-01-01

    A technique which computes transient electromagnetic responses of narrow apertures in complex conducting scatterers was implemented as an extension of previously developed Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) computer codes. Although these apertures are narrow with respect to the wavelengths contained within the power spectrum of excitation, this technique does not require significantly more computer resources to attain the increased resolution at the apertures. In the report, an analytical technique which utilizes Babinet's principle to model the apertures is developed, and an FDTD computer code which utilizes this technique is described.

  2. WONDY V: a one-dimensional finite-difference wave-propagation code

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, M.E.; Lawrence, R.J.

    1982-06-01

    WONDY V solves the finite difference analogs to the Lagrangian equations of motion in one spatial dimension (planar, cylindrical, or spherical). Simulations of explosive detonation, energy deposition, plate impact, and dynamic fracture are possible, using a variety of existing material models. In addition, WONDY has proven to be a powerful tool in the evaluation of new constitutive models. A preprocessor is available to allocate storage arrays commensurate with problem size, and automatic rezoning may be employed to improve resolution. This document provides a description of the equations solved, available material models, operating instructions, and sample problems.

  3. One-dimensional transient finite difference model of an operational salinity gradient solar pond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Golding, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling approach used to simulate the transient behavior of a salinity gradient solar pond. A system of finite difference equations are used to generate the time dependent temperature and salinity profiles within the pond. The stability of the pond, as determined by the capacity of the resulting salinity profile to suppress thermal convection within the primary gradient region of the pond, is continually monitored and when necessary adjustments are made to the thickness of the gradient zone. Results of the model are then compared to measurements taken during two representative seasonal periods at the University of Texas at El Paso's (UTEP's) research solar pond.

  4. HEMP 3D -- a finite difference program for calculating elastic-plastic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.L.

    1993-05-26

    The HEMP 3D program can be used to solve problems in solid mechanics involving dynamic plasticity and time dependent material behavior and problems in gas dynamics. The equations of motion, the conservation equations, and the constitutive relations are solved by finite difference methods following the format of the HEMP computer simulation program formulated in two space dimensions and time. Presented here is an update of the 1975 report on the HEMP 3D numerical technique. The present report includes the sliding surface routines programmed by Robert Gulliford.

  5. A multigrid algorithm for the cell-centered finite difference scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Richard E.; Shen, Jian

    1993-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a non-variational V-cycle multigrid algorithm based on the cell-centered finite difference scheme for solving a second-order elliptic problem with discontinuous coefficients. Due to the poor approximation property of piecewise constant spaces and the non-variational nature of our scheme, one step of symmetric linear smoothing in our V-cycle multigrid scheme may fail to be a contraction. Again, because of the simple structure of the piecewise constant spaces, prolongation and restriction are trivial; we save significant computation time with very promising computational results.

  6. Finite-difference time-domain analysis of light propagation in cholesteric liquid crystalline droplet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kaho; Iwai, Yosuke; Uchida, Yoshiaki; Nishiyama, Norikazu

    2016-08-01

    We numerically analyzed the light propagation in cholesteric liquid crystalline (CLC) droplet array by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The FDTD method successfully reproduced the experimental light path observed in the complicated photonic structure of the CLC droplet array more accurately than the analysis of CLC droplets by geometric optics with Bragg condition, and this method help us understand the polarization of the propagating light waves. The FDTD method holds great promise for the design of various photonic devices composed of curved photonic materials like CLC droplets and microcapsules.

  7. Accelerated direct semiclassical molecular dynamics using a compact finite difference Hessian scheme.

    PubMed

    Ceotto, Michele; Zhuang, Yu; Hase, William L

    2013-02-01

    This paper shows how a compact finite difference Hessian approximation scheme can be proficiently implemented into semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics. Effects of the approximation on the monodromy matrix calculation are tested by propagating initial sampling distributions to determine power spectra for analytic potential energy surfaces and for "on the fly" carbon dioxide direct dynamics. With the approximation scheme the computational cost is significantly reduced, making ab initio direct semiclassical dynamics computationally more feasible and, at the same time, properly reproducing important quantum effects inherent in the monodromy matrix and the pre-exponential factor of the semiclassical propagator. PMID:23406107

  8. Accelerated direct semiclassical molecular dynamics using a compact finite difference Hessian scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceotto, Michele; Zhuang, Yu; Hase, William L.

    2013-02-01

    This paper shows how a compact finite difference Hessian approximation scheme can be proficiently implemented into semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics. Effects of the approximation on the monodromy matrix calculation are tested by propagating initial sampling distributions to determine power spectra for analytic potential energy surfaces and for "on the fly" carbon dioxide direct dynamics. With the approximation scheme the computational cost is significantly reduced, making ab initio direct semiclassical dynamics computationally more feasible and, at the same time, properly reproducing important quantum effects inherent in the monodromy matrix and the pre-exponential factor of the semiclassical propagator.

  9. Varieties of operator manipulation. [for solving differential equations and calculating finite differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doohovskoy, A.

    1977-01-01

    A change in MACSYMA syntax is proposed to accommodate the operator manipulators necessary to implement direct and indirect methods for the solution of differential equations, calculus of finite differences, and the fractional calculus, as well as their modern counterparts. To illustrate the benefits and convenience of this syntax extension, an example is given to show how MACSYMA's pattern-matching capability can be used to implement a particular set of operator identities which can then be used to obtain exact solutions to nonlinear differential equations.

  10. An adaptive-mesh finite-difference solution method for the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchini, Paolo

    1987-02-01

    An adjustable variable-spacing grid is presented which permits the addition or deletion of single points during iterative solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations by finite difference methods. The grid is designed for application to two-dimensional steady-flow problems which can be described by partial differential equations whose second derivatives are constrained to the Laplacian operator. An explicit Navier-Stokes equations solution technique defined for use with the grid incorporates a hybrid form of the convective terms. Three methods are developed for automatic modifications of the mesh during calculations.

  11. Subwavelength metrological chracterization by Mueller matrix polarimeter and finite difference time domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Achyut; Dev, Kapil; Asundi, Anand

    2016-11-01

    Wire grid polarizers (WGP), are sub-wavelength gratings with applications in display projection system due to their compact size, wide field of view and long-term stability. Measurement and testing of these structures are important to optimize their use. This is done by first measuring the Mueller matrix of the WGP using a Mueller matrix polarimeter. Next the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to simulate a similar Mueller matrix thus providing the period and step height of the WGP. This approach may lead to more generic determination of sub-wavelength structures including diffractive optical structures.

  12. A two-dimensional finite difference program for thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naraghi, Mohammad H.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite difference computer model for thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers has been developed. The model uses an iterative scheme for calculating the temperature distribution within the chamber wall and implements a successive overrelaxation formula for a quick convergence. The inputs of the models are the dimensions of the thrust chamber wall, types of materials used, heat transfer coefficients and temperatures of the hot gas and the coolant. The resulting output of the program consists of the nodal temperature distribution, heat transfer to the coolant and heat transfer from the hot gas.

  13. Computing interaural differences through finite element modeling of idealized human heads

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tingli; Rakerd, Brad; Hartmann, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical interaural differences were computed for a succession of idealized shapes approximating the human head-related anatomy: sphere, ellipsoid, and ellipsoid with neck and torso. Calculations were done as a function of frequency (100–2500 Hz) and for source azimuths from 10 to 90 degrees using finite element models. The computations were compared to free-field measurements made with a manikin. Compared to a spherical head, the ellipsoid produced greater large-scale variation with frequency in both interaural time differences and interaural level differences, resulting in better agreement with the measurements. Adding a torso, represented either as a large plate or as a rectangular box below the neck, further improved the agreement by adding smaller-scale frequency variation. The comparisons permitted conjectures about the relationship between details of interaural differences and gross features of the human anatomy, such as the height of the head, and length of the neck. PMID:26428792

  14. Transient analysis of printed lines using finite-difference time-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Shahid

    2012-03-29

    Comprehensive studies of ultra-wideband pulses and electromagnetic coupling on printed coupled lines have been performed using full-wave 3D finite-difference time-domain analysis. Effects of unequal phase velocities of coupled modes, coupling between line traces, and the frequency dispersion on the waveform fidelity and crosstalk have been investigated in detail. To discriminate the contributions of different mechanisms into pulse evolution, single and coupled microstrip lines without (ϵr = 1) and with (ϵr > 1) dielectric substrates have been examined. To consistently compare the performance of the coupled lines with substrates of different permittivities and transients of different characteristic times, a generic metric similar to the electrical wavelength has been introduced. The features of pulse propagation on coupled lines with layered and pedestal substrates and on the irregular traces have been explored. Finally, physical interpretations of the simulation results are discussed in the paper.

  15. Phase-field-based lattice Boltzmann finite-difference model for simulating thermocapillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J.; Zhang, Yonghao; Kang, Qinjun

    2013-01-01

    A phase-field-based hybrid model that combines the lattice Boltzmann method with the finite difference method is proposed for simulating immiscible thermocapillary flows with variable fluid-property ratios. Using a phase field methodology, an interfacial force formula is analytically derived to model the interfacial tension force and the Marangoni stress. We present an improved lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method to capture the interface between different phases and solve the pressure and velocity fields, which can recover the correct Cahn-Hilliard equation (CHE) and Navier-Stokes equations. The LBE method allows not only use of variable mobility in the CHE, but also simulation of multiphase flows with high density ratio because a stable discretization scheme is used for calculating the derivative terms in forcing terms. An additional convection-diffusion equation is solved by the finite difference method for spatial discretization and the Runge-Kutta method for time marching to obtain the temperature field, which is coupled to the interfacial tension through an equation of state. The model is first validated against analytical solutions for the thermocapillary driven convection in two superimposed fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. It is then used to simulate thermocapillary migration of a three-dimensional deformable droplet and bubble at various Marangoni numbers and density ratios, and satisfactory agreement is obtained between numerical results and theoretical predictions.

  16. Evaluation on mass sensitivity of SAW sensors for different piezoelectric materials using finite-element analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Amir; Jiang, Zhongwei; Arabshahi, Sayyed Alireza

    2007-12-01

    The mass sensitivity of the piezoelectric surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors is an important factor in the selection of the best gravimetric sensors for different applications. To determine this value without facing the practical problems and the long theoretical calculation time, we have shown that the mass sensitivity of SAW sensors can be calculated by a simple three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element analysis (FEA) using a commercial finite-element platform. The FEA data are used to calculate the wave propagation speed, surface particle displacements, and wave energy distribution on different cuts of various piezoelectric materials. The results are used to provide a simple method for evaluation of their mass sensitivities. Meanwhile, to calculate more accurate results from FEA data, surface and bulk wave reflection problems are considered in the analyses. In this research, different cuts of lithium niobate, quartz, lithium tantalate, and langasite piezoelectric materials are applied to investigate their acoustic wave properties. Our analyses results for these materials have a good agreement with other researchers' results. Also, the mass sensitivity value for the novel cut of langasite was calculated through these analyses. It was found that its mass sensitivity is higher than that of the conventional Rayleigh mode quartz sensor.

  17. On the Definition of Surface Potentials for Finite-Difference Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, S. V.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For a class of linear constant-coefficient finite-difference operators of the second order, we introduce the concepts similar to those of conventional single- and double-layer potentials for differential operators. The discrete potentials are defined completely independently of any notion related to the approximation of the continuous potentials on the grid. We rather use all approach based on differentiating, and then inverting the differentiation of a function with surface discontinuity of a particular kind, which is the most general way of introducing surface potentials in the theory of distributions. The resulting finite-difference "surface" potentials appear to be solutions of the corresponding continuous potentials. Primarily, this pertains to the possibility of representing a given solution to the homogeneous equation on the domain as a variety of surface potentials, with the density defined on the domain's boundary. At the same time the discrete surface potentials can be interpreted as one specific realization of the generalized potentials of Calderon's type, and consequently, their approximation properties can be studied independently in the framework of the difference potentials method by Ryaben'kii. The motivation for introducing and analyzing the discrete surface potentials was provided by the problems of active shielding and control of sound, in which the aforementioned source terms that drive the potentials are interpreted as the acoustic control sources that cancel out the unwanted noise on a predetermined region of interest.

  18. Phase-field-based lattice Boltzmann finite-difference model for simulating thermocapillary flows.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J; Zhang, Yonghao; Kang, Qinjun

    2013-01-01

    A phase-field-based hybrid model that combines the lattice Boltzmann method with the finite difference method is proposed for simulating immiscible thermocapillary flows with variable fluid-property ratios. Using a phase field methodology, an interfacial force formula is analytically derived to model the interfacial tension force and the Marangoni stress. We present an improved lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method to capture the interface between different phases and solve the pressure and velocity fields, which can recover the correct Cahn-Hilliard equation (CHE) and Navier-Stokes equations. The LBE method allows not only use of variable mobility in the CHE, but also simulation of multiphase flows with high density ratio because a stable discretization scheme is used for calculating the derivative terms in forcing terms. An additional convection-diffusion equation is solved by the finite difference method for spatial discretization and the Runge-Kutta method for time marching to obtain the temperature field, which is coupled to the interfacial tension through an equation of state. The model is first validated against analytical solutions for the thermocapillary driven convection in two superimposed fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. It is then used to simulate thermocapillary migration of a three-dimensional deformable droplet and bubble at various Marangoni numbers and density ratios, and satisfactory agreement is obtained between numerical results and theoretical predictions. PMID:23410429

  19. Ground motion simulations in Marmara (Turkey) region from 3D finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Ulrich, Thomas; Douglas, John

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European project MARSite (2012-2016), one of the main contributions from our research team was to provide ground-motion simulations for the Marmara region from various earthquake source scenarios. We adopted a 3D finite difference code, taking into account the 3D structure around the Sea of Marmara (including the bathymetry) and the sea layer. We simulated two moderate earthquakes (about Mw4.5) and found that the 3D structure improves significantly the waveforms compared to the 1D layer model. Simulations were carried out for different earthquakes (moderate point sources and large finite sources) in order to provide shake maps (Aochi and Ulrich, BSSA, 2015), to study the variability of ground-motion parameters (Douglas & Aochi, BSSA, 2016) as well as to provide synthetic seismograms for the blind inversion tests (Diao et al., GJI, 2016). The results are also planned to be integrated in broadband ground-motion simulations, tsunamis generation and simulations of triggered landslides (in progress by different partners). The simulations are freely shared among the partners via the internet and the visualization of the results is diffused on the project's homepage. All these simulations should be seen as a reference for this region, as they are based on the latest knowledge that obtained during the MARSite project, although their refinement and validation of the model parameters and the simulations are a continuing research task relying on continuing observations. The numerical code used, the models and the simulations are available on demand.

  20. Comparison of the polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities obtained from finite basis set and finite difference Hartree-Fock calculations for diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobus, J.; Moncrieff, D.; Wilson, S.

    2001-12-01

    A comparison is made of the accuracy by which the electric dipole polarizability αzz and hyperpolarizability βzzz can be calculated by using the finite basis set approach (the algebraic approximation) and finite difference method in calculations employing the Hartree-Fock model. The numerical and algebraic methods were tested on the ground states of H2, LiH, BH and FH molecules at their respective experimental equilibrium geometries. For the FH molecule at its experimental equilibrium geometry, a sequence of distributed universal even-tempered basis sets have been used to explore the convergence pattern of the total energy, dipole moment and polarizabilities. The comparison of finite difference and finite basis set methods is extended to geometries for which the nuclear separation, RFH, lies in the range 1.5-2.2 b. The methods give consistent results to within 1% or better. In the case of the FH molecule the dependence of truncation errors of the total energy, dipole moment and polarizabilities on the geometry have been studied and are shown to be negligible.

  1. An unconditionally energy stable finite difference scheme for a stochastic Cahn-Hilliard equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Qiao, ZhongHua; Zhang, Hui

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the MMC-TDGL equation, a stochastic Cahn-Hilliard equation is solved numerically by using the finite difference method in combination with a convex splitting technique of the energy functional. For the non-stochastic case, we develop an unconditionally energy stable difference scheme which is proved to be uniquely solvable. For the stochastic case, by adopting the same splitting of the energy functional, we construct a similar and uniquely solvable difference scheme with the discretized stochastic term. The resulted schemes are nonlinear and solved by Newton iteration. For the long time simulation, an adaptive time stepping strategy is developed based on both first- and second-order derivatives of the energy. Numerical experiments are carried out to verify the energy stability, the efficiency of the adaptive time stepping and the effect of the stochastic term.

  2. Collocated approximations on unstructured grids: a comparison between General Finite Differences (GFD), Moving Least Squares (MLS), and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Yaroslav; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    In the meshfree family of methods, partial differential equations are solved on unstructured grids where a search radius establishes an implicit nodal connectivity used to determine whether to include or exclude neighboring nodes in the constructed approximation. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is widely attributed to be the eldest of the meshfree methods dating back to an astrophysics paper published in 1977 by Gingold and Monaghan. However, beating them by five years was Jensen when he published Finite Differences for Arbitrary Grids (FIDAG) in 1972. Ultimately this work and others were generalized by Liszka and Orkisz in 1979 as a weighted least squares formulation solving for the Taylor coefficients and is now commonly known as General Finite Differences (GFD). Shortly after in 1981, Lancaster and Salkauskas introduced the Moving Least Squares (MLS) approximation for surface reconstruction using a weighted least squares formulation where the unknown coefficients are treated as functions varying from node to node in the support domain. Here we examine important differences, similarities and limitations of each method by solving the 2D Poisson equation on unstructured grids. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1148903.

  3. Finite Difference Methods for Option Pricing under Lévy Processes: Wiener-Hopf Factorization Approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the paper, we consider the problem of pricing options in wide classes of Lévy processes. We propose a general approach to the numerical methods based on a finite difference approximation for the generalized Black-Scholes equation. The goal of the paper is to incorporate the Wiener-Hopf factorization into finite difference methods for pricing options in Lévy models with jumps. The method is applicable for pricing barrier and American options. The pricing problem is reduced to the sequence of linear algebraic systems with a dense Toeplitz matrix; then the Wiener-Hopf factorization method is applied. We give an important probabilistic interpretation based on the infinitely divisible distributions theory to the Laurent operators in the correspondent factorization identity. Notice that our algorithm has the same complexity as the ones which use the explicit-implicit scheme, with a tridiagonal matrix. However, our method is more accurate. We support the advantage of the new method in terms of accuracy and convergence by using numerical experiments. PMID:24489518

  4. A moving mesh finite difference method for equilibrium radiation diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weizhang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2015-10-01

    An efficient moving mesh finite difference method is developed for the numerical solution of equilibrium radiation diffusion equations in two dimensions. The method is based on the moving mesh partial differential equation approach and moves the mesh continuously in time using a system of meshing partial differential equations. The mesh adaptation is controlled through a Hessian-based monitor function and the so-called equidistribution and alignment principles. Several challenging issues in the numerical solution are addressed. Particularly, the radiation diffusion coefficient depends on the energy density highly nonlinearly. This nonlinearity is treated using a predictor-corrector and lagged diffusion strategy. Moreover, the nonnegativity of the energy density is maintained using a cutoff method which has been known in literature to retain the accuracy and convergence order of finite difference approximation for parabolic equations. Numerical examples with multi-material, multiple spot concentration situations are presented. Numerical results show that the method works well for radiation diffusion equations and can produce numerical solutions of good accuracy. It is also shown that a two-level mesh movement strategy can significantly improve the efficiency of the computation.

  5. Fast quasi-explicit finite difference simulation of electrochemical responses initiated by a discontinuous perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Feldberg, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    Commencing in the early 60s the application of explicit finite difference (EFD) methods to the analysis of electrochemical problems paralleled the development and availability of fast, main-frame, digital computers. The appeal of the EFD method has been its simplicity of principle and of application. EFD algorithms, however, are notoriously inefficient for solving certain types of stiff problems (e.g., problems involving a wide dynamic range of time constants). In this presentation the author discusses the principles and some applications of a fast quasi-explicit finite difference (FQEFD) method in which the computational speed is enhanced, by many orders of magnitude in some cases, without compromising the user friendliness which has popularized the EFD method. The method is designed to treat electrochemical responses to a discontinuous (e.g, chronoamperometric) perturbation and utilizes the DuFort-Frankel algorithm (1) with exponentially expanding space (2) and exponentially expanding time grids. (A previously published version of the FQEFD method (3,4) was designed to treat electrochemical responses to a continuous (e.g., cyclic voltammetric) perturbation and utilizes the DuFort-Frankel (3) algorithm in conjunction with an exponentially expanding space grid and a uniform time grid. The development of the basic FQEFD equations was presented there). The protocol for introducing the expanding time grid is straightforward and is discussed. 7 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  6. A coarse-mesh nodal method-diffusive-mesh finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, H.; Nichols, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    Modern nodal methods have been successfully used for conventional light water reactor core analyses where the homogenized, node average cross sections (XSs) and the flux discontinuity factors (DFs) based on equivalence theory can reliably predict core behavior. For other types of cores and other geometries characterized by tightly-coupled, heterogeneous core configurations, the intranodal flux shapes obtained from a homogenized nodal problem may not accurately portray steep flux gradients near fuel assembly interfaces or various reactivity control elements. This may require extreme values of DFs (either very large, very small, or even negative) to achieve a desired solution accuracy. Extreme values of DFs, however, can disrupt the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node average fluxes, and can lead to a difficulty in interpolating adjacent DF values. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made, but nothing has been satisfactory. A new coarse-mesh nodal scheme called the Diffusive-Mesh Finite Difference (DMFD) technique, as contrasted with the coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD) technique, has been developed to resolve this problem. This new technique and the development of a few-group, multidimensional kinetics computer program are described in this paper.

  7. A semi-Lagrangian finite difference WENO scheme for scalar nonlinear conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chieh-Sen; Arbogast, Todd; Hung, Chen-Hui

    2016-10-01

    For a nonlinear scalar conservation law in one-space dimension, we develop a locally conservative semi-Lagrangian finite difference scheme based on weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstructions (SL-WENO). This scheme has the advantages of both WENO and semi-Lagrangian schemes. It is a locally mass conservative finite difference scheme, it is formally high-order accurate in space, it has small time truncation error, and it is essentially non-oscillatory. The scheme is nearly free of a CFL time step stability restriction for linear problems, and it has a relaxed CFL condition for nonlinear problems. The scheme can be considered as an extension of the SL-WENO scheme of Qiu and Shu (2011) [2] developed for linear problems. The new scheme is based on a standard sliding average formulation with the flux function defined using WENO reconstructions of (semi-Lagrangian) characteristic tracings of grid points. To handle nonlinear problems, we use an approximate, locally frozen trace velocity and a flux correction step. A special two-stage WENO reconstruction procedure is developed that is biased to the upstream direction. A Strang splitting algorithm is used for higher-dimensional problems. Numerical results are provided to illustrate the performance of the scheme and verify its formal accuracy. Included are applications to the Vlasov-Poisson and guiding-center models of plasma flow.

  8. A fifth-order finite difference scheme for hyperbolic equations on block-adaptive curvilinear grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuxi; Tóth, Gábor; Gombosi, Tamas I.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new fifth-order accurate finite difference method for hyperbolic equations on block-adaptive curvilinear grids. The scheme employs the 5th order accurate monotonicity preserving limiter MP5 to construct high order accurate face fluxes. The fifth-order accuracy of the spatial derivatives is ensured by a flux correction step. The method is generalized to curvilinear grids with a free-stream preserving discretization. It is also extended to block-adaptive grids using carefully designed ghost cell interpolation algorithms. Only three layers of ghost cells are required, and the grid blocks can be as small as 6 × 6 × 6 cells. Dynamic grid refinement and coarsening are also fifth-order accurate. All interpolation algorithms employ a general limiter based on the principles of the MP5 limiter. The finite difference scheme is fully conservative on static uniform grids. Conservation is only maintained at the truncation error level at grid resolution changes and during grid adaptation, but our numerical tests indicate that the results are still very accurate. We demonstrate the capabilities of the new method on a number of numerical tests, including smooth but non-linear problems as well as simulations involving discontinuities.

  9. High-order accurate physical-constraints-preserving finite difference WENO schemes for special relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kailiang; Tang, Huazhong

    2015-10-01

    The paper develops high-order accurate physical-constraints-preserving finite difference WENO schemes for special relativistic hydrodynamical (RHD) equations, built on the local Lax-Friedrichs splitting, the WENO reconstruction, the physical-constraints-preserving flux limiter, and the high-order strong stability preserving time discretization. They are extensions of the positivity-preserving finite difference WENO schemes for the non-relativistic Euler equations [20]. However, developing physical-constraints-preserving methods for the RHD system becomes much more difficult than the non-relativistic case because of the strongly coupling between the RHD equations, no explicit formulas of the primitive variables and the flux vectors with respect to the conservative vector, and one more physical constraint for the fluid velocity in addition to the positivity of the rest-mass density and the pressure. The key is to prove the convexity and other properties of the admissible state set and discover a concave function with respect to the conservative vector instead of the pressure which is an important ingredient to enforce the positivity-preserving property for the non-relativistic case. Several one- and two-dimensional numerical examples are used to demonstrate accuracy, robustness, and effectiveness of the proposed physical-constraints-preserving schemes in solving RHD problems with large Lorentz factor, or strong discontinuities, or low rest-mass density or pressure etc.

  10. Rasterizing geological models for parallel finite difference simulation using seismic simulation as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehner, Björn; Hellwig, Olaf; Linke, Maik; Görz, Ines; Buske, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    3D geological underground models are often presented by vector data, such as triangulated networks representing boundaries of geological bodies and geological structures. Since models are to be used for numerical simulations based on the finite difference method, they have to be converted into a representation discretizing the full volume of the model into hexahedral cells. Often the simulations require a high grid resolution and are done using parallel computing. The storage of such a high-resolution raster model would require a large amount of storage space and it is difficult to create such a model using the standard geomodelling packages. Since the raster representation is only required for the calculation, but not for the geometry description, we present an algorithm and concept for rasterizing geological models on the fly for the use in finite difference codes that are parallelized by domain decomposition. As a proof of concept we implemented a rasterizer library and integrated it into seismic simulation software that is run as parallel code on a UNIX cluster using the Message Passing Interface. We can thus run the simulation with realistic and complicated surface-based geological models that are created using 3D geomodelling software, instead of using a simplified representation of the geological subsurface using mathematical functions or geometric primitives. We tested this set-up using an example model that we provide along with the implemented library.

  11. Development of an advanced finite-difference atmospheric general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.A.

    1992-03-01

    We have proposed to provide and further develop an advanced finite-difference climate model for use in CHAMMP. The model includes advanced parameterizations of cumulus convection, boundary-layer processes, cloud formation, and land-surface vegetation, as well as parameterizations of radiative transfer and gravity wave drag. Postprocessing codes and a user's guide will also be provided. This research is being conducted in collaboration with Professors C.R. Mechoso and A. Arakawa at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). The following research tasks are being carried out in support of CHAMMP: (1) Provide to CHAMMP a base-line finite-difference model and postprocessing codes for further development by the CHAMMP Science Team; (2) Provide to CHAMMP improved model physics to be developed in the course of our research project; (3) Provide to CHAMMP improved computational methods for use in the model; and, (4) Investigate the performance of current and to-be-developed physical parameterizations and computational methods at very high resolution.

  12. A Finite Difference-Based Modeling Approach for Prediction of Steel Hardenability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushanthi, Neethi; Maity, Joydeep

    2014-06-01

    In this research work an independent finite difference-based modeling approach was adopted for determination of the hardenability of steels. In this model, at first, cooling curves were generated by solving transient heat transfer equation through discretization with pure explicit finite difference scheme coupled with MATLAB-based programing in view of variable thermo-physical properties of 1080 steel. The cooling curves were solved against 50% transformation nose of TTT diagram in order to predict hardening behavior of 1080 steel in terms of hardenability parameters (Grossmann critical diameter, D C; and ideal critical diameter, D I) and the variation of the unhardened core diameter ( D u) to diameter of steel bar ( D) ratio with diameter of steel bar ( D). The experiments were also performed to determine actual D C value of 1080 steel for still water quenching. The D C value obtained by the developed model was found to match the experimental D C value with only 6% deviation. Therefore, the model developed in the present work can be used for direct determination of D I, D C, and D u without resorting to any rigorous experimentation.

  13. Physical and numerical constraints in source modeling for finite difference simulation of room acoustics.

    PubMed

    Sheaffer, Jonathan; van Walstijn, Maarten; Fazenda, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    In finite difference time domain simulation of room acoustics, source functions are subject to various constraints. These depend on the way sources are injected into the grid and on the chosen parameters of the numerical scheme being used. This paper addresses the issue of selecting and designing sources for finite difference simulation, by first reviewing associated aims and constraints, and evaluating existing source models against these criteria. The process of exciting a model is generalized by introducing a system of three cascaded filters, respectively, characterizing the driving pulse, the source mechanics, and the injection of the resulting source function into the grid. It is shown that hard, soft, and transparent sources can be seen as special cases within this unified approach. Starting from the mechanics of a small pulsating sphere, a parametric source model is formulated by specifying suitable filters. This physically constrained source model is numerically consistent, does not scatter incoming waves, and is free from zero- and low-frequency artifacts. Simulation results are employed for comparison with existing source formulations in terms of meeting the spectral and temporal requirements on the outward propagating wave.

  14. A moving mesh finite difference method for equilibrium radiation diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weizhang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2015-10-01

    An efficient moving mesh finite difference method is developed for the numerical solution of equilibrium radiation diffusion equations in two dimensions. The method is based on the moving mesh partial differential equation approach and moves the mesh continuously in time using a system of meshing partial differential equations. The mesh adaptation is controlled through a Hessian-based monitor function and the so-called equidistribution and alignment principles. Several challenging issues in the numerical solution are addressed. Particularly, the radiation diffusion coefficient depends on the energy density highly nonlinearly. This nonlinearity is treated using a predictor–corrector and lagged diffusion strategy. Moreover, the nonnegativity of the energy density is maintained using a cutoff method which has been known in literature to retain the accuracy and convergence order of finite difference approximation for parabolic equations. Numerical examples with multi-material, multiple spot concentration situations are presented. Numerical results show that the method works well for radiation diffusion equations and can produce numerical solutions of good accuracy. It is also shown that a two-level mesh movement strategy can significantly improve the efficiency of the computation.

  15. Real-space finite difference scheme for the von Neumann equation with the Dirac Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreilechner, Magdalena; Pötz, Walter

    2016-07-01

    A finite difference scheme for the numerical treatment of the von Neumann equation for the (2+1)D Dirac Hamiltonian is presented. It is based on a sequential left-right (ket-bra) application of a staggered space-time scheme for the pure-state Dirac equation and offers a numerical treatment of the general mixed-state dynamics of an isolated quantum system within the von Neumann equation. Thereby this direct scheme inherits all the favorable features of the finite-difference scheme for the pure-state Dirac equation, such as the single-cone energy-momentum dispersion, convergence conditions, and scaling behavior. A conserved functional is identified. Moreover this scheme is shown to conserve both Hermiticity and positivity. Numerical tests comprise a numerical analysis of stability, as well as the simulation of a mixed-state time-evolution of Gaussian wave functions, illustrating Zitterbewegung and transverse current oscillations. Imaginary-potential absorbing boundary conditions and parameters which pertain to topological insulator surface states were used in the numerical simulations.

  16. A coarse-mesh nodal method, the diffusive-mesh finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, H.; Nichols, W.R.

    1994-12-31

    Modern nodal methods have been successfully used for conventional light water reactor core analyses where the homogenized, node average cross section (XSs) and the flux discontinuity factors (DFs) based on equivalence theory can reliably predict core behavior. For other types of cores and other geometries characterized by tightly coupled, heterogeneous core configurations, the intranodal flux shapes obtained from a homogenized nodal problem may not accurately portray steep flux gradients near fuel assembly interfaces or various reactivity control elements. This may require extreme values of DFs (either very large, very small, or even negative) to achieve a desired solution accuracy. Extreme values of DFs, however, can disrupt the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node average fluxes and can lead to difficulty in interpolating adjacent DF values. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made, but nothing has been satisfactory. A new coarse-mesh nodal scheme called the diffusive-mesh finite difference (DMFD) technique, as contrasted with the coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD) technique, has been developed to resolve this problem. This new technique and the development of a few-group, multidimensional kinetics computer program are described in this paper.

  17. Converged accelerated finite difference scheme for the multigroup neutron diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Terranova, N.; Mostacci, D.; Ganapol, B. D.

    2013-07-01

    Computer codes involving neutron transport theory for nuclear engineering applications always require verification to assess improvement. Generally, analytical and semi-analytical benchmarks are desirable, since they are capable of high precision solutions to provide accurate standards of comparison. However, these benchmarks often involve relatively simple problems, usually assuming a certain degree of abstract modeling. In the present work, we show how semi-analytical equivalent benchmarks can be numerically generated using convergence acceleration. Specifically, we investigate the error behavior of a 1D spatial finite difference scheme for the multigroup (MG) steady-state neutron diffusion equation in plane geometry. Since solutions depending on subsequent discretization can be envisioned as terms of an infinite sequence converging to the true solution, extrapolation methods can accelerate an iterative process to obtain the limit before numerical instability sets in. The obtained results have been compared to the analytical solution to the 1D multigroup diffusion equation when available, using FORTRAN as the computational language. Finally, a slowing down problem has been solved using a cascading source update, showing how a finite difference scheme performs for ultra-fine groups (104 groups) in a reasonable computational time using convergence acceleration. (authors)

  18. ATLAS: A real-space finite-difference implementation of orbital-free density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Wenhui; Shao, Xuecheng; Su, Chuanxun; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shoutao; Li, Quan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Lijun; Miao, Maosheng; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2016-03-01

    Orbital-free density functional theory (OF-DFT) is a promising method for large-scale quantum mechanics simulation as it provides a good balance of accuracy and computational cost. Its applicability to large-scale simulations has been aided by progress in constructing kinetic energy functionals and local pseudopotentials. However, the widespread adoption of OF-DFT requires further improvement in its efficiency and robustly implemented software. Here we develop a real-space finite-difference (FD) method for the numerical solution of OF-DFT in periodic systems. Instead of the traditional self-consistent method, a powerful scheme for energy minimization is introduced to solve the Euler-Lagrange equation. Our approach engages both the real-space finite-difference method and a direct energy-minimization scheme for the OF-DFT calculations. The method is coded into the ATLAS software package and benchmarked using periodic systems of solid Mg, Al, and Al3Mg. The test results show that our implementation can achieve high accuracy, efficiency, and numerical stability for large-scale simulations.

  19. Robust and efficient upwind finite-difference traveltime calculations in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.A. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    First-arrival traveltimes in complicated 3-D geologic media may be computed robustly and efficiently using an upwind finite-difference solution of the 3-D eikonal equation. An important application of this technique is computing traveltimes for imaging seismic data with 3-D prestack Kirchhoff depth migration. The method performs radial extrapolation of the three components of the slowness vector in spherical coordinates. Traveltimes are computed by numerically integrating the radial component of the slowness vector. The original finite-difference equations are recast into unitless forms that are more stable to numerical errors. A stability condition adaptively determines the radial steps that are used to extrapolate. Computations are done in a rotated spherical coordinate system that places the small arc-length regions of the spherical grid at the earth`s surface (z = 0 plane). This improves efficiency by placing large grid cells in the central regions of the grid where wavefields are complicated, thereby maximizing the radial steps. Adaptive gridding allows the angular grid spacings to vary with radius. The computation grid is also adaptively truncated so that it does not extend beyond the predefined Cartesian traveltime grid. This grid handling improves efficiency. The method cannot compute traveltimes corresponding to wavefronts that have ``turned`` so that they propagate in the negative radial direction. Such wavefronts usually represent headwaves and are not needed to image seismic data. An adaptive angular normalization prevent this turning, while allowing lower-angle wavefront components to accurately propagate.

  20. Biomechanical three-dimensional finite element analysis of monolithic zirconia crown with different cement type

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of various cement types on the stress distribution in monolithic zirconia crowns under maximum bite force using the finite element analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS The models of the prepared #46 crown (deep chamfer margin) were scanned and solid models composed of the monolithic zirconia crown, cement layer, and prepared tooth were produced using the computer-aided design technology and were subsequently translated into 3-dimensional finite element models. Four models were prepared according to different cement types (zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer, and resin). A load of 700 N was applied vertically on the crowns (8 loading points). Maximum principal stress was determined. RESULTS Zinc phosphate cement had a greater stress concentration in the cement layer, while polycarboxylate cement had a greater stress concentration on the distal surface of the monolithic zirconia crown and abutment tooth. Resin cement and glass ionomer cement showed similar patterns, but resin cement showed a lower stress distribution on the lingual and mesial surface of the cement layer. CONCLUSION The test results indicate that the use of different luting agents that have various elastic moduli has an impact on the stress distribution of the monolithic zirconia crowns, cement layers, and abutment tooth. Resin cement is recommended for the luting agent of the monolithic zirconia crowns. PMID:26816578

  1. An Exponential Finite Difference Technique for Solving Partial Differential Equations. M.S. Thesis - Toledo Univ., Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    An exponential finite difference algorithm, as first presented by Bhattacharya for one-dimensianal steady-state, heat conduction in Cartesian coordinates, has been extended. The finite difference algorithm developed was used to solve the diffusion equation in one-dimensional cylindrical coordinates and applied to two- and three-dimensional problems in Cartesian coordinates. The method was also used to solve nonlinear partial differential equations in one (Burger's equation) and two (Boundary Layer equations) dimensional Cartesian coordinates. Predicted results were compared to exact solutions where available, or to results obtained by other numerical methods. It was found that the exponential finite difference method produced results that were more accurate than those obtained by other numerical methods, especially during the initial transient portion of the solution. Other applications made using the exponential finite difference technique included unsteady one-dimensional heat transfer with temperature varying thermal conductivity and the development of the temperature field in a laminar Couette flow.

  2. Biomechanical Evaluation of Different Fixation Methods for Mandibular Anterior Segmental Osteotomy Using Finite Element Analysis, Part One: Superior Repositioning Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kilinç, Yeliz; Erkmen, Erkan; Kurt, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to comparatively evaluate the mechanical behavior of 3 different fixation methods following various amounts of superior repositioning of mandibular anterior segment. In this study, 3 different rigid fixation configurations comprising double right L, double left L, or double I miniplates with monocortical screws were compared under vertical, horizontal, and oblique load conditions by means of finite element analysis. A three-dimensional finite element model of a fully dentate mandible was generated. A 3 and 5 mm superior repositioning of mandibular anterior segmental osteotomy were simulated. Three different finite element models corresponding to different fixation configurations were created for each superior repositioning. The von Mises stress values on fixation appliances and principal maximum stresses (Pmax) on bony structures were predicted by finite element analysis. The results have demonstrated that double right L configuration provides better stability with less stress fields in comparison with other fixation configurations used in this study.

  3. The Rate of Convergence of Finite-Difference Approximations for Parabolic Bellman Equations with Lipschitz Coefficients in Cylindrical Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Hongjie Krylov, Nicolai V.

    2007-06-15

    We consider degenerate parabolic and elliptic fully nonlinear Bellman equations with Lipschitz coefficients in domains. Error bounds of order h{sup 1/2} in the sup norm for certain types of finite-difference schemes are obtained.

  4. Comparison of nonhydrostatic and hydrostatic dynamical cores in two regional models using the spectral and finite difference methods: dry atmosphere simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jihyeon; Hong, Song-You

    2016-04-01

    The spectral method is generally assumed to provide better numerical accuracy than the finite difference method. However, the majority of regional models use finite discretization methods due to the difficulty of specifying time-dependent lateral boundary conditions in spectral models. This study evaluates the behavior of nonhydrostatic dynamics with a spectral discretization. To this end, Juang's nonhydrostatic dynamical core for the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) regional spectral model has been implemented into the Regional Model Program (RMP) of the Global/Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMs). The behavior of the nonhydrostatic RMP is validated, and compared with that of the hydrostatic core in 2-D idealized experiments: the mountain wave, rising thermal bubble, and density current experiments. The nonhydrostatic effect in the RMP is further validated in comparison with the results from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which uses a finite difference method. The analyses of the experimental results from the RMP generally follow the characteristics found in previous studies without any discernible difference. For example, in both the RMP and the WRF model, the eastward-tilted propagation of mountain waves is very similar in the nonhydrostatic core experiments. Both nonhydrostatic models also efficiently reproduce the motion and deformation of the warm and cold bubbles, but the RMP results contain more small-scale noise. In a 1-km real-case simulation testbed, the lee waves that originate over the eastern flank of the Korean peninsula travel further eastward in the WRF model than in the RMP. It is found that differences of small-scale wave characteristics between the RMP and WRF model are mainly from the numerical techniques used, such as the accuracy of the advection scheme and the magnitude of the numerical diffusion, rather than from discrepancies in the spatial discretization.

  5. An efficient method of 3-D elastic full waveform inversion using a finite-difference injection method for time-lapse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Dmitry; Singh, Satish C.; Fuji, Nobuaki

    2015-09-01

    Seismic full waveform inversion is an objective method to estimate elastic properties of the subsurface and is an important area of research, particularly in seismic exploration community. It is a data-fitting approach, where the difference between observed and synthetic data is minimized iteratively. Due to a very high computational cost, the practical implementation of waveform inversion has so far been restricted to a 2-D geometry with different levels of physics incorporated in it (e.g. elasticity/viscoelasticity) or to a 3-D geometry but using an acoustic approximation. However, the earth is three-dimensional, elastic and heterogeneous and therefore a full 3-D elastic inversion is required in order to obtain more accurate and valuable models of the subsurface. Despite the recent increase in computing power, the application of 3-D elastic full waveform inversion to real-scale problems remains quite challenging on the current computer architecture. Here, we present an efficient method to perform 3-D elastic full waveform inversion for time-lapse seismic data using a finite-difference injection method. In this method, the wavefield is computed in the whole model and is stored on a surface above a finite volume where the model is perturbed and localized inversion is performed. Comparison of the final results using the 3-D finite-difference injection method and conventional 3-D inversion performed within the whole volume shows that our new method provides significant reductions in computational time and memory requirements without any notable loss in accuracy. Our approach shows a big potential for efficient reservoir monitoring in real time-lapse experiments.

  6. Boundary and Interface Conditions for High Order Finite Difference Methods Applied to the Euler and Navier-Strokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordstrom, Jan; Carpenter, Mark H.

    1998-01-01

    Boundary and interface conditions for high order finite difference methods applied to the constant coefficient Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are derived. The boundary conditions lead to strict and strong stability. The interface conditions are stable and conservative even if the finite difference operators and mesh sizes vary from domain to domain. Numerical experiments show that the new conditions also lead to good results for the corresponding nonlinear problems.

  7. A two-dimensional finite difference solution for the transient thermal behavior of tubular solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical procedure was established using the finite-difference technique in the determination of the time-varying temperature distribution of a tubular solar collector under changing solar radiancy and ambient temperature. Three types of spatial discretization processes were considered and compared for their accuracy of computations and for selection of the shortest computer time and cost. The stability criteria of this technique was analyzed in detail to give the critical time increment to ensure stable computations. The results of the numerical analysis were in good agreement with the analytical solution previously reported. The numerical method proved to be a powerful tool in the investigation of the collector sensitivity to two different flow patterns and several flow control mechanisms.

  8. Comprehensive Numerical Analysis of Finite Difference Time Domain Methods for Improving Optical Waveguide Sensor Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Samak, M. Mosleh E. Abu; Bakar, A. Ashrif A.; Kashif, Muhammad; Zan, Mohd Saiful Dzulkifly

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses numerical analysis methods for different geometrical features that have limited interval values for typically used sensor wavelengths. Compared with existing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods, the alternating direction implicit (ADI)-FDTD method reduces the number of sub-steps by a factor of two to three, which represents a 33% time savings in each single run. The local one-dimensional (LOD)-FDTD method has similar numerical equation properties, which should be calculated as in the previous method. Generally, a small number of arithmetic processes, which result in a shorter simulation time, are desired. The alternating direction implicit technique can be considered a significant step forward for improving the efficiency of unconditionally stable FDTD schemes. This comparative study shows that the local one-dimensional method had minimum relative error ranges of less than 40% for analytical frequencies above 42.85 GHz, and the same accuracy was generated by both methods.

  9. Development of the Finite Difference Time Domain Method on a Lebedev Grid for Anisotropic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauta, Marcel D.

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is derived on a Lebedev grid, instead of the standard Yee grid, to better represent the constitutive relations in anisotropic materials. The Lebedev grid extends the Yee grid by approximating Maxwell's equations with tensor constitutive relations using only central differences. A dispersion relation with stability criteria is derived and it is proven that the Lebedev grid has a consistent calculus. An integral derivation of the update equations illustrates how to appropriately excite the grid. This approach is also used to derive the update equations at planar material interfaces and domain edge PEC. Lebedev grid results are compared with analytical and Yee grid solutions using an equal memory comparison. Numerical results show that the Lebedev grid suffers greater dispersion error but better represents material interfaces. Focus is given to generalizing the concepts that make the Yee grid robust for isotropic materials. Keywords: FDTD, anisotropic materials, Lebedev grid, collocated grids.

  10. Improved finite-difference computation of the van der Waals force: One-dimensional case

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2009-10-15

    We present an improved demonstration of the calculation of Casimir forces in one-dimensional systems based on the recently proposed numerical imaginary frequency Green's function computation approach. The dispersion force on two thick lossy dielectric slabs separated by an empty gap and placed within a perfectly conducting cavity is obtained from the Green's function of the modified Helmholtz equation by means of an ordinary finite-difference method. In order to demonstrate the possibility to develop algorithms to explore complex geometries in two and three dimensions to higher order in the mesh spacing, we generalize existing classical electromagnetism algebraic methods to generate the difference equations for dielectric boundaries not coinciding with any grid points. Diagnostic tests are presented to monitor the accuracy of our implementation of the method and follow-up applications in higher dimensions are introduced.

  11. Finite Difference Time Domain Electromagnetic Scattering from Frequency-Dependent Lossy Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Beggs, John H.

    1991-01-01

    During this effort the tasks specified in the Statement of Work have been successfully completed. The extension of Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) to more complicated materials has been made. A three-dimensional FDTD code capable of modeling interactions with both dispersive dielectric and magnetic materials has been written, validated, and documented. This code is efficient and is capable of modeling interesting targets using a modest computer work station platform. However, in addition to the tasks in the Statement of Work, a significant number of other FDTD extensions and calculations have been made. RCS results for two different plate geometries have been reported. The FDTD method has been extended to computing far zone time domain results in two dimensions. Finally, the capability to model nonlinear materials has been incorporated into FDTD and validated. The FDTD computer codes developed have been supplied, along with documentation, and preprints describing the other FDTD advances have been included with this report as attachments.

  12. Preliminary evidence for white matter metabolite differences in marijuana dependent young men using 2D J-resolved magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging at 4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Silveri, Marisa M.; Jensen, J. Eric; Rosso, Isabelle M.; Sneider, Jennifer T.; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic marijuana (MRJ) use is associated with altered cognition and mood state, altered brain metabolites, functional and structural brain changes. The objective of this study was to apply proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to compare proton metabolite levels in 15 young men with MRJ-dependence and 11 healthy non-using (NU) young men. Spectra were acquired at 4.0 Tesla using 2D J-resolved MRSI to resolve coupled resonances in J-space and to quantify the entire J-coupled spectral surface of metabolites from voxels containing basal ganglia and thalamus, temporal and parietal lobe, and occipital white and gray matter. This method permitted investigation of high-quality spectra for regression analyses to examine metabolites relative to tissue type. Distribution of myo-inositol (mI)/creatine (Cr) was altered in the MRJ group whereas the NU group exhibited higher mI/Cr in WM than GM, this pattern was not observed in MRJ subjects. Significant relationships observed between global mI/Cr and distribution in WM, and self-reported impulsivity and mood symptoms were also unique between MRJ and NU groups. These preliminary findings suggest that mI, and distribution of this glial metabolite in WM, is altered by MRJ use and is associated with behavioral and affective features reported by young MRJ-dependent men. PMID:21334181

  13. Different scenarios for inverse estimation of soil hydraulic parameters from double-ring infiltrometer data using HYDRUS-2D/3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, Parisa; Ghorbani-Dashtaki, Shoja; Mosaddeghi, Mohammad Reza; Shirani, Hossein; Nodoushan, Ali Reza Mohammadi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, HYDRUS-2D/3D was used to simulate ponded infiltration through double-ring infiltrometers into a hypothetical loamy soil profile. Twelve scenarios of inverse modelling (divided into three groups) were considered for estimation of Mualem-van Genuchten hydraulic parameters. In the first group, simulation was carried out solely using cumulative infiltration data. In the second group, cumulative infiltration data plus water content at h = -330 cm (field capacity) were used as inputs. In the third group, cumulative infiltration data plus water contents at h = -330 cm (field capacity) and h = -15 000 cm (permanent wilting point) were used simultaneously as predictors. The results showed that numerical inverse modelling of the double-ring infiltrometer data provided a reliable alternative method for determining soil hydraulic parameters. The results also indicated that by reducing the number of hydraulic parameters involved in the optimization process, the simulation error is reduced. The best one in infiltration simulation which parameters α, n, and Ks were optimized using the infiltration data and field capacity as inputs. Including field capacity as additional data was important for better optimization/definition of soil hydraulic functions, but using field capacity and permanent wilting point simultaneously as additional data increased the simulation error.

  14. Transfer-matrix approach for finite-difference time-domain simulation of periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Deinega, Alexei; Belousov, Sergei; Valuev, Ilya

    2013-11-01

    Optical properties of periodic structures can be calculated using the transfer-matrix approach, which establishes a relation between amplitudes of the wave incident on a structure with transmitted or reflected waves. The transfer matrix can be used to obtain transmittance and reflectance spectra of finite periodic structures as well as eigenmodes of infinite structures. Traditionally, calculation of the transfer matrix is performed in the frequency domain and involves linear algebra. In this work, we present a technique for calculation of the transfer matrix using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and show the way of its implementation in FDTD code. To illustrate the performance of our technique we calculate the transmittance spectra for opal photonic crystal slabs consisting of multiple layers of spherical scatterers. Our technique can be used for photonic band structure calculations. It can also be combined with existing FDTD methods for the analysis of periodic structures at an oblique incidence, as well as for modeling point sources in a periodic environment. PMID:24329377

  15. A finite element study on stress distribution of two different attachment designs under implant supported overdenture

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohamed I.; Yousief, Salah A.; Soliman, Tarek A.; Saleh, Mahmoud M.; Omar, Wael S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate stress patterns generated within implant-supported mandibular overdentures retained by two different attachment types: ball and socket and locator attachments. Materials and methods Commercial CAD/CAM and finite element analysis software packages were utilized to construct two 3D finite element models for the two attachment types. Unilateral masticatory compressive loads of 50, 100, and 150 N were applied vertically to the overdentures, parallel to the longitudinal axes of the implants. Loads were directed toward the central fossa in the molar region of each overdenture, that linear static analysis was carried out to find the generated stresses and deformation on each part of the studied model. Results According to FEA results the ball attachment neck is highly stressed in comparison to the locator one. On the other hand mucosa and cortical bone received less stresses under ball and socket attachment. Conclusions Locator and ball and socket attachments induce equivalent stresses on bone surrounding implants. Locator attachment performance was superior to that of the ball and socket attachment in the implants, nylon caps, and overdenture. Locator attachments are highly recommended and can increase the interval between successive maintenance sessions. PMID:26644755

  16. Comparison of Retention of Clasps Made of Different Materials Using Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Jaggari Chandrakanth; Srikakula, Naveen Kumar; Juturu, Rajesh Kumar Reddy; Paidi, Shameen Kumar; Tedlapu, Satyendra Kumar; Mannava, Padmakanth; Khatoon, Rukhaiya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Retention and esthetics are believed to play a crucial role in deciding the success of removable partial dentures. Aim To compare retention of acetal resin and cobalt–chromium clasps. Materials and Methods A finite element model was designed with an edentulous space between mandibular right second premolar and second molar. Occlusal rests were placed on distal fossa of the second premolar and mesial fossa of second molar. An undercut depth of 0.01inch was created on the mesiobuccal surface of the premolar and distobuccal surface of second molar. Three dimensional finite element model of clasp assembly was designed and assigned with the properties of two different materials namely acetal resin and cobalt–chromium in successive steps. A horizontal bar was constructed between the occlusal rests of the prosthesis. Later, variable amount of dislodging force, in increasing order, was applied at the centre of the horizontal bar and the force at which the clasp arm gets dislodged was noted with respect to each of the material. The obtained values were noted and then subsequently analyzed. Results The amount of force required to dislodge acetal resin and cobalt–chromium clasps was found to be 0.02N and 2N respectively. Conclusion The results obtained suggested that acetal resin clasp exhibited less retentive force than cobalt–chromium clasps. PMID:27437346

  17. Solution to PDEs using radial basis function finite-differences (RBF-FD) on multiple GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Bollig, Evan F.; Flyer, Natasha; Erlebacher, Gordon

    2012-08-30

    This paper presents parallelization strategies for the radial basis function-finite difference (RBF-FD) method. As a generalized finite differencing scheme, the RBF-FD method functions without the need for underlying meshes to structure nodes. It offers high-order accuracy approximation and scales as O(N) per time step, with N being with the total number of nodes. To our knowledge, this is the first implementation of the RBF-FD method to leverage GPU accelerators for the solution of PDEs. Additionally, this implementation is the first to span both multiple CPUs and multiple GPUs. OpenCL kernels target the GPUs and inter-processor communication and synchronization is managed by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). We verify our implementation of the RBF-FD method with two hyperbolic PDEs on the sphere, and demonstrate up to 9x speedup on a commodity GPU with unoptimized kernel implementations. On a high performance cluster, the method achieves up to 7x speedup for the maximum problem size of 27,556 nodes.

  18. Extending geometric conservation law to cell-centered finite difference methods on stationary grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fei; Ye, Zhengyin; Zhang, Lingxia

    2015-03-01

    In a wide range of high-order high-resolution schemes, the finite difference method (FDM) is a suitable selection for accurate numerical calculations because it efficiently reduces dispersion and dissipation errors. FDM is easier to perform to obtain high-order capabilities than the finite volume method (FVM). Most FDMs are node-centered; such techniques include weighted essentially non-oscillatory schemes (WENO) [1], weighted compact nonlinear schemes (WCNS) [2,3], dissipative compact schemes (DCS) [4], and compact central schemes [5,6]. WENO represents a class of nonlinear high-order high-resolution shock-capture schemes derived by Shu [1]; this technique can be successfully used in multiscale flow simulation problems. WCNS is another nonlinear high-order shock-capture scheme derived by Deng and Zhang. WCNS uses interpolation and not reconstruction to obtain half-node values and features a better spectral resolution than WENO. Deng et al. [4] further developed linear DCS with a free parameter to control upwind tendency and thus decrease the dissipation of upwind schemes. Furthermore, compact central scheme proposed by Lele [5] and developed by Visbal and Gaitonde [6] plays a dominant role for research on large eddy simulation and direct numerical simulation because of its ultra-high-order and spectral-like resolution.

  19. Transfer-matrix approach for finite-difference time-domain simulation of periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Deinega, Alexei; Belousov, Sergei; Valuev, Ilya

    2013-11-01

    Optical properties of periodic structures can be calculated using the transfer-matrix approach, which establishes a relation between amplitudes of the wave incident on a structure with transmitted or reflected waves. The transfer matrix can be used to obtain transmittance and reflectance spectra of finite periodic structures as well as eigenmodes of infinite structures. Traditionally, calculation of the transfer matrix is performed in the frequency domain and involves linear algebra. In this work, we present a technique for calculation of the transfer matrix using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and show the way of its implementation in FDTD code. To illustrate the performance of our technique we calculate the transmittance spectra for opal photonic crystal slabs consisting of multiple layers of spherical scatterers. Our technique can be used for photonic band structure calculations. It can also be combined with existing FDTD methods for the analysis of periodic structures at an oblique incidence, as well as for modeling point sources in a periodic environment.

  20. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. GEO2D - Two-Dimensional Computer Model of a Ground Source Heat Pump System

    DOE Data Explorer

    James Menart

    2013-06-07

    This file contains a zipped file that contains many files required to run GEO2D. GEO2D is a computer code for simulating ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems in two-dimensions. GEO2D performs a detailed finite difference simulation of the heat transfer occurring within the working fluid, the tube wall, the grout, and the ground. Both horizontal and vertical wells can be simulated with this program, but it should be noted that the vertical wall is modeled as a single tube. This program also models the heat pump in conjunction with the heat transfer occurring. GEO2D simulates the heat pump and ground loop as a system. Many results are produced by GEO2D as a function of time and position, such as heat transfer rates, temperatures and heat pump performance. On top of this information from an economic comparison between the geothermal system simulated and a comparable air heat pump systems or a comparable gas, oil or propane heating systems with a vapor compression air conditioner. The version of GEO2D in the attached file has been coupled to the DOE heating and cooling load software called ENERGYPLUS. This is a great convenience for the user because heating and cooling loads are an input to GEO2D. GEO2D is a user friendly program that uses a graphical user interface for inputs and outputs. These make entering data simple and they produce many plotted results that are easy to understand. In order to run GEO2D access to MATLAB is required. If this program is not available on your computer you can download the program MCRInstaller.exe, the 64 bit version, from the MATLAB website or from this geothermal depository. This is a free download which will enable you to run GEO2D..

  2. 3-D geoelectrical modelling using finite-difference: a new boundary conditions improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maineult, A.; Schott, J.-J.; Ardiot, A.

    2003-04-01

    Geoelectrical prospecting is a well-known and frequently used method for quantitative and non-destructive subsurface exploration until depths of a few hundreds metres. Thus archeological objects can be efficiently detected as their resistivities often contrast with those of the surrounding media. Nevertheless using the geoelectrical prospecting method has long been restricted due to inhability to model correctly arbitrarily-shaped structures. The one-dimensional modelling and inversion have long been classical, but are of no interest for the majority of field data, since the natural distribution of resistivity is rarely homogeneous or tabular. Since the 1970's some authors developed discrete methods in order to solve the two and three-dimensional problem, using mathematical tools such as finite-element or finite-difference. The finite-difference approach is quite simple, easily understandable and programmable. Since the work of Dey and Morrison (1979), this approach has become quite popular. Nevertheless, one of its major drawbacks is the difficulty to establish satisfying boundary conditions. Recently Lowry et al. (1989) and Zhao and Yedlin (1996) suggested some refinements on the improvement of the boundary problem. We propose a new betterment, based on the splitting of the potential into two terms, the potential due to a reference tabular medium and a secondary potential caused by a disturbance of this medium. The surface response of a tabular medium has long been known (see for example Koefoed 1979). Here we developed the analytical solution for the electrical tabular potential everywhere in the medium, in order to establish more satisfying boundary conditions. The response of the perturbation, that is to say the object of interest, is then solved using volume-difference and preconditioned conjugate gradient. Finally the grid is refined one or more times in the perturbed domain in order to ameliorate the precision. This method of modelling is easy to implement

  3. GPU-accelerated 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Yu, G.; Wang, K.

    2012-07-01

    Finite difference method, as a traditional numerical solution to neutron diffusion equation, although considered simpler and more precise than the coarse mesh nodal methods, has a bottle neck to be widely applied caused by the huge memory and unendurable computation time it requires. In recent years, the concept of General-Purpose computation on GPUs has provided us with a powerful computational engine for scientific research. In this study, a GPU-Accelerated multi-group 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method was developed. First, a clean-sheet neutron diffusion code (3DFD-CPU) was written in C++ on the CPU architecture, and later ported to GPUs under NVIDIA's CUDA platform (3DFD-GPU). The IAEA 3D PWR benchmark problem was calculated in the numerical test, where three different codes, including the original CPU-based sequential code, the HYPRE (High Performance Pre-conditioners)-based diffusion code and CITATION, were used as counterpoints to test the efficiency and accuracy of the GPU-based program. The results demonstrate both high efficiency and adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for neutron diffusion equation. A speedup factor of about 46 times was obtained, using NVIDIA's Geforce GTX470 GPU card against a 2.50 GHz Intel Quad Q9300 CPU processor. Compared with the HYPRE-based code performing in parallel on an 8-core tower server, the speedup of about 2 still could be observed. More encouragingly, without any mathematical acceleration technology, the GPU implementation ran about 5 times faster than CITATION which was speeded up by using the SOR method and Chebyshev extrapolation technique. (authors)

  4. 2D materials: to graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2011-01-01

    This review is an attempt to illustrate the different alternatives in the field of 2D materials. Graphene seems to be just the tip of the iceberg and we show how the discovery of alternative 2D materials is starting to show the rest of this iceberg. The review comprises the current state-of-the-art of the vast literature in concepts and methods already known for isolation and characterization of graphene, and rationalizes the quite disperse literature in other 2D materials such as metal oxides, hydroxides and chalcogenides, and metal-organic frameworks.

  5. CUDA Fortran acceleration for the finite-difference time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Mohammed F.; Esmaeili, Seyed A.

    2013-05-01

    A detailed description of programming the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to run on graphical processing units (GPUs) using CUDA Fortran is presented. Two FDTD-to-CUDA thread-block mapping designs are investigated and their performances compared. Comparative assessment of trade-offs between GPU's shared memory and L1 cache is also discussed. This presentation is for the benefit of FDTD programmers who work exclusively with Fortran and are reluctant to port their codes to C in order to utilize GPU computing. The derived CUDA Fortran code is compared with an optimized CPU version that runs on a workstation-class CPU to present a realistic GPU to CPU run time comparison and thus help in making better informed investment decisions on FDTD code redesigns and equipment upgrades. All analyses are mirrored with CUDA C simulations to put in perspective the present state of CUDA Fortran development.

  6. Full-wave finite-difference time-domain simulation of electromagnetic cloaking structures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Argyropoulos, Christos; Hao, Yang

    2008-04-28

    This paper proposes a radial dependent dispersive finite-difference time-domain method for the modeling of electromagnetic cloaking structures. The permittivity and permeability of the cloak are mapped to the Drude dispersion model and taken into account in dispersive FDTD simulations. Numerical simulations demonstrate that under ideal conditions, objects placed inside the cloak are 'invisible' to external electromagnetic fields. However for the simplified cloak based on linear transformations, the back scattering has a similar level to the case of a PEC cylinder without any cloak, rendering the object still being 'visible'. It is also demonstrated numerically that the simplified cloak based on high-order transformations can indeed improve the cloaking performance.

  7. Inclusion of lumped elements in finite difference time domain electromagnetic calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.A.; Jones, M.E.; Mason, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    A general approach for including lumped circuit elements in a finite difference, time domain (FD-TD) solution of Maxwell`s equations is presented. The methodology allows the direct access to SPICE to model the lumped circuits, while the full 3-Dimensional solution to Maxwell`s equations provides the electromagnetic field evolution. This type of approach could be used to mode a pulsed power machine by using a SPICE model for the driver and using an electromagnetic PIC code for the plasma/electromagnetics calculation. The evolution of the driver can be made self consistent with the behavior of the plasma load. Other applications are also possible, including modeling of nonlinear microwave circuits (as long as the non-linearities may be expressed in terms of a lumped element) and self-consistent calculation of very high speed computer interconnections and digital circuits.

  8. Finite difference method for calculating three-dimensional incompressible boundary layer in curvilinear semiorthogonal coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Yulin; Mei, Zuyan

    1991-06-01

    A finite difference method for computing 3D incompressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers is presented. The curvilinear semiorthogonal coordinate system is used to express the 3D boundary layer equations. Reynolds stresses are assumed zero for the laminar boundary layer. For the turbulent boundary layer, the Reynolds stresses are expressed through an algebraic turbulence model taking into account nonisotropic eddy viscosity based on the Cebeci-Smith turbulence model and Rotta's turbulent stress formulas. The numerical solution method is described and carried out for a 3D boundary layer of a wing. The results are in good agreement with measured data. The method and its program have high accuracy, require less computer storage, are computationally fast and flexible in use.

  9. Finite-difference simulation and visualization of elastodynamics in time-evolving generalized curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of free and forced structural vibrations is essential to an overall structural health monitoring capability. In the various embodiments, a first principles finite-difference approach is adopted in modeling a structural subsystem such as a mechanical gear by solving elastodynamic equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. Such a capability to generate a dynamic structural response is widely applicable in a variety of structural health monitoring systems. This capability (1) will lead to an understanding of the dynamic behavior of a structural system and hence its improved design, (2) will generate a sufficiently large space of normal and damage solutions that can be used by machine learning algorithms to detect anomalous system behavior and achieve a system design optimization and (3) will lead to an optimal sensor placement strategy, based on the identification of local stress maxima all over the domain.

  10. An improved finite-difference calculation of downhole dynamometer cards for sucker-rod pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Everitt, T.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Sucker-rod pumping is the most widely used means of artificial lift. About 85% to 90% of all producing wells in the U.S. are rod-pumped. Thus, a reliable method of analyzing these pumping system is a necessity. For many years, the surface dynamometer has been used to analyze sucker-rod systems. Interpretation of actual pump conditions from surface dynamometer cards is often difficult, if not impossible. Results obtained from surface cards are strictly qualitative and are dependent on the analyzer's expertise. The ideal analysis procedure would be to measure the actual pump conditions with a downhole dynamometer. However, this situation is not economically feasible. Therefore, an accurate method of calculating downhole pump cards form measured surface cards is needed. This paper presents a method for calculating these downhole cards that uses a finite-difference representation of the wave equation. First, a brief description of previous calculation techniques is given.

  11. Finite Difference Time Domain Analysis of Underwater Acoustic Lens System for Ambient Noise Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Miyazaki, Ayano; Ogasawara, Hanako; Yokoyama, Tomoki; Nakamura, Toshiaki

    2006-05-01

    Much attention has been paid to the new idea of detecting objects using ocean ambient noise. This concept is called ambient noise imaging (ANI). In this study, sound fields focused by an acoustic lens system constructed with a single biconcave lens were analyzed using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method for realizing an ANI system. The size of the lens aperture that would have sufficient resolution—for example, the beam width is 1° at 60 kHz—was roughly determined by comparing the image points and -3 dB areas of sound pressure fields generated by lenses with various apertures. Then, in another FDTD analysis, we successfully used a lens with a determined aperture to detect rigid target objects in an acoustic noise field generated by a large number of point sources.

  12. Parallel finite-difference time-domain modeling of an opal photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccari, Alessandro; Cristoforetti, Luca; Lesina, Antonino Calà; Ramunno, Lora; Chiappini, Andrea; Prudenzano, Francesco; Bozzoli, Alessandro; Calliari, Lucia

    2014-07-01

    This work describes a computational approach for the optical characterization of an opal photonic crystal (PC). We intend, in particular, to validate our approach by comparing the transmittance of a crystal model, as obtained by numerical simulation, with the transmittance of the same crystal, as measured over 400- to 700-nm wavelength range. We consider an opal PC with a face-centered cubic lattice structure of spherical particles made of polystyrene (a nonabsorptive material with constant relative dielectric permittivity). Light-crystal interaction is simulated by numerically solving Maxwell's equations via the finite-difference time-domain method and by using the Kirchhoff formula to calculate the far field. A method to study the propagating Bloch modes inside the crystal bulk is also sketched.

  13. A free surface capturing discretization for the staggered grid finite difference scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, T.; May, D. A.; Yamato, P.

    2016-03-01

    The coupling that exists between surface processes and deformation within both the shallow crust and the deeper mantle-lithosphere has stimulated the development of computational geodynamic models that incorporate a free surface boundary condition. We introduce a treatment of this boundary condition that is suitable for staggered grid, finite difference schemes employing a structured Eulerian mesh. Our interface capturing treatment discretizes the free surface boundary condition via an interface that conforms with the edges of control volumes (e.g. a `staircase' representation) and requires only local stencil modifications to be performed. Comparisons with analytic solutions verify that the method is first-order accurate. Additional intermodel comparisons are performed between known reference models to further validate our free surface approximation. Lastly, we demonstrate the applicability of a multigrid solver to our free surface methodology and demonstrate that the local stencil modifications do not strongly influence the convergence of the iterative solver.

  14. FIDDLE: A Computer Code for Finite Difference Development of Linear Elasticity in Generalized Curvilinear Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical solver based on finite-difference solution of three-dimensional elastodynamic equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates has been developed and used to generate data such as radial and tangential stresses over various gear component geometries under rotation. The geometries considered are an annulus, a thin annular disk, and a thin solid disk. The solution is based on first principles and does not involve lumped parameter or distributed parameter systems approach. The elastodynamic equations in the velocity-stress formulation that are considered here have been used in the solution of problems of geophysics where non-rotating Cartesian grids are considered. For arbitrary geometries, these equations along with the appropriate boundary conditions have been cast in generalized curvilinear coordinates in the present study.

  15. Finite Difference Time Domain Analysis for a Sound Field Including a Plate in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hideaki; Naoi, Jun; Kikuchi, Toshiaki

    2004-05-01

    In marine research, measures against self-noise of an observatory ship are important. Generally, the self-noise is measured after the completion of ships. It is difficult to predict this noise level beforehand. Then, an attempt is made to determine the noise emitted from various elements of a structure. The finite difference time domain method is applied to obtain sound fields, including that of a plate in water. The time behavior of the sound wave emitted from a sound source placed near the upper part of a plate is investigated. As a result, the reflected and re-radiated waves from the plate including the head wave resulting from the longitudinal and traverse waves in the plate are able to be visualized. In the case of the plate with a branch plate, the suppression of the wave which propagates at the inside of the plate with the length of the branch plate is shown.

  16. Finite difference method accelerated with sparse solvers for structural analysis of the metal-organic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guda, A. A.; Guda, S. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Bugaev, A. L.; Lamberti, C.; Gawelda, W.; Bressler, C.; Smolentsev, G.; Soldatov, A. V.; Joly, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Finite difference method (FDM) implemented in the FDMNES software [Phys. Rev. B, 2001, 63, 125120] was revised. Thorough analysis shows, that the calculated diagonal in the FDM matrix consists of about 96% zero elements. Thus a sparse solver would be more suitable for the problem instead of traditional Gaussian elimination for the diagonal neighbourhood. We have tried several iterative sparse solvers and the direct one MUMPS solver with METIS ordering turned out to be the best. Compared to the Gaussian solver present method is up to 40 times faster and allows XANES simulations for complex systems already on personal computers. We show applicability of the software for metal-organic [Fe(bpy)3]2+ complex both for low spin and high spin states populated after laser excitation.

  17. Effect of increase in intraperitoneal pressure on fluid distribution in tissue using finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Selmi; Arif, Idam; Khotimah, Siti Nurul

    2015-04-01

    In this study, peritoneal dialysis transport system was numerically simulated using finite difference method. The increase in the intraperitoneal pressure due to coughing has a high value outside the working area of the void volume fraction of the hydrostatic pressure θ(P). Therefore to illustrate the effects of the pressure increment, the pressure of working area is chosen between 1 and 3 mmHg. The effects of increased pressure in peritoneal tissue cause more fluid to flow into the blood vessels and lymph. Furthermore, the increased pressure in peritoneal tissue makes the volumetric flux jv and solute flux js across the tissue also increase. The more fluid flow into the blood vessels and lymph causes the fluid to flow into tissue qv and the glucose flow qs to have more negative value and also decreases the glucose concentration CG in the tissue.

  18. On one-dimensional stretching functions for finite-difference calculations. [computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1983-01-01

    The class of one-dimensional stretching functions used in finite-difference calculations is studied. For solutions containing a highly localized region of rapid variation, simple criteria for a stretching function are derived using a truncation error analysis. These criteria are used to investigate two types of stretching functions. One an interior stretching function, for which the location and slope of an interior clustering region are specified. The simplest such function satisfying the criteria is found to be one based on the inverse hyperbolic sine. The other type of function is a two-sided stretching function, for which the arbitrary slopes at the two ends of the one-dimensional interval are specified. The simplest such general function is found to be one based on the inverse tangent. Previously announced in STAR as N80-25055

  19. On one-dimensional stretching functions for finite-difference calculations. [computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1979-01-01

    The class of one-dimensional stretching functions used in finite-difference calculations is studied. For solutions containing a highly localized region of rapid variation, simple criteria for a stretching function are derived using a truncation error analysis. These criteria are used to investigate two types of stretching functions. One is an interior stretching function, for which the location and slope of an interior clustering region are specified. The simplest such function satisfying the criteria is found to be one based on the inverse hyperbolic sine. The other type of function is a two-sided stretching function, for which the arbitrary slopes at the two ends of the one-dimensional interval are specified. The simplest such general function is found to be one based on the inverse tangent.

  20. Multi-Dimensional High Order Essentially Non-Oscillatory Finite Difference Methods in Generalized Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang

    1998-01-01

    This project is about the development of high order, non-oscillatory type schemes for computational fluid dynamics. Algorithm analysis, implementation, and applications are performed. Collaborations with NASA scientists have been carried out to ensure that the research is relevant to NASA objectives. The combination of ENO finite difference method with spectral method in two space dimension is considered, jointly with Cai [3]. The resulting scheme behaves nicely for the two dimensional test problems with or without shocks. Jointly with Cai and Gottlieb, we have also considered one-sided filters for spectral approximations to discontinuous functions [2]. We proved theoretically the existence of filters to recover spectral accuracy up to the discontinuity. We also constructed such filters for practical calculations.

  1. Boundary Closures for Fourth-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Finite Difference Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Yamaleev, Nail K.; Frankel, Steven H.

    2009-01-01

    A general strategy exists for constructing Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non Oscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference schemes up to eighth-order on periodic domains. These ESWENO schemes satisfy an energy norm stability proof for both continuous and discontinuous solutions of systems of linear hyperbolic equations. Herein, boundary closures are developed for the fourth-order ESWENO scheme that maintain wherever possible the WENO stencil biasing properties, while satisfying the summation-by-parts (SBP) operator convention, thereby ensuring stability in an L2 norm. Second-order, and third-order boundary closures are developed that achieve stability in diagonal and block norms, respectively. The global accuracy for the second-order closures is three, and for the third-order closures is four. A novel set of non-uniform flux interpolation points is necessary near the boundaries to simultaneously achieve 1) accuracy, 2) the SBP convention, and 3) WENO stencil biasing mechanics.

  2. Full-wave finite-difference time-domain simulation of electromagnetic cloaking structures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Argyropoulos, Christos; Hao, Yang

    2008-04-28

    This paper proposes a radial dependent dispersive finite-difference time-domain method for the modeling of electromagnetic cloaking structures. The permittivity and permeability of the cloak are mapped to the Drude dispersion model and taken into account in dispersive FDTD simulations. Numerical simulations demonstrate that under ideal conditions, objects placed inside the cloak are 'invisible' to external electromagnetic fields. However for the simplified cloak based on linear transformations, the back scattering has a similar level to the case of a PEC cylinder without any cloak, rendering the object still being 'visible'. It is also demonstrated numerically that the simplified cloak based on high-order transformations can indeed improve the cloaking performance. PMID:18545374

  3. A fourth order accurate finite difference scheme for the computation of elastic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Jordan, K. E.; Lemesurier, B. J.; Turkel, E.

    1986-01-01

    A finite difference for elastic waves is introduced. The model is based on the first order system of equations for the velocities and stresses. The differencing is fourth order accurate on the spatial derivatives and second order accurate in time. The model is tested on a series of examples including the Lamb problem, scattering from plane interf aces and scattering from a fluid-elastic interface. The scheme is shown to be effective for these problems. The accuracy and stability is insensitive to the Poisson ratio. For the class of problems considered here it is found that the fourth order scheme requires for two-thirds to one-half the resolution of a typical second order scheme to give comparable accuracy.

  4. The arbitrary order mixed mimetic finite difference method for the diffusion equation

    DOE PAGES

    Gyrya, Vitaliy; Lipnikov, Konstantin; Manzini, Gianmarco

    2016-05-01

    Here, we propose an arbitrary-order accurate mimetic finite difference (MFD) method for the approximation of diffusion problems in mixed form on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes. As usual in the mimetic numerical technology, the method satisfies local consistency and stability conditions, which determines the accuracy and the well-posedness of the resulting approximation. The method also requires the definition of a high-order discrete divergence operator that is the discrete analog of the divergence operator and is acting on the degrees of freedom. The new family of mimetic methods is proved theoretically to be convergent and optimal error estimates for flux andmore » scalar variable are derived from the convergence analysis. A numerical experiment confirms the high-order accuracy of the method in solving diffusion problems with variable diffusion tensor. It is worth mentioning that the approximation of the scalar variable presents a superconvergence effect.« less

  5. Application of the symplectic finite-difference time-domain scheme to electromagnetic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, Wei . E-mail: ws108@ahu.edu.cn; Huang, Zhixiang; Wu, Xianliang; Chen, Mingsheng

    2007-07-01

    An explicit fourth-order finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme using the symplectic integrator is applied to electromagnetic simulation. A feasible numerical implementation of the symplectic FDTD (SFDTD) scheme is specified. In particular, new strategies for the air-dielectric interface treatment and the near-to-far-field (NFF) transformation are presented. By using the SFDTD scheme, both the radiation and the scattering of three-dimensional objects are computed. Furthermore, the energy-conserving characteristic hold for the SFDTD scheme is verified under long-term simulation. Numerical results suggest that the SFDTD scheme is more efficient than the traditional FDTD method and other high-order methods, and can save computational resources.

  6. Finite-difference time-domain analysis for the dynamics and diffraction of exciton-polaritons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minfeng; Chang, Yia-Chung; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2015-10-01

    We adopted a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme to simulate the dynamics and diffraction of exciton-polaritons, governed by the coupling of polarization waves with electromagnetic waves. The polarization wave, an approximate solution to the Schrödinger's equation at low frequencies, essentially captures the exciton behavior. Numerical stability of the scheme is analyzed and simple examples are provided to prove its validity. The system considered is both temporally and spatially dispersive, for which the FDTD analysis has attracted less attention in the literature. Here, we demonstrate that the FDTD scheme could be useful for studying the optical response of the exciton-polariton and its dynamics. The diffraction of a polariton wave from a polaritonic grating is also considered, and many sharp resonances are found, which manifest the interference effect of polariton waves. This illustrates that the measurement of transmittance or reflectance near polariton resonance can reveal subwavelength features in semiconductors, which are sensitive to polariton scattering.

  7. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of thermal noise in open cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Andreasen, Jonathan; Cao Hui; Taflove, Allen; Kumar, Prem |; Cao Changqi

    2008-02-15

    A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is developed to simulate thermal noise in open cavities owing to output coupling. The absorbing boundary of the FDTD grid is treated as a blackbody, whose thermal radiation penetrates the cavity in the grid. The calculated amount of thermal noise in a one-dimensional dielectric cavity recovers the standard result of the quantum Langevin equation in the Markovian regime. Our FDTD simulation also demonstrates that in the non-Markovian regime the buildup of the intracavity noise field depends on the ratio of the cavity photon lifetime to the coherence time of thermal radiation. The advantage of our numerical method is that the thermal noise is introduced in the time domain without prior knowledge of cavity modes.

  8. Finite difference method to find period-one gait cycles of simple passive walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dardel, Morteza; Safartoobi, Masoumeh; Pashaei, Mohammad Hadi; Ghasemi, Mohammad Hassan; Navaei, Mostafa Kazemi

    2015-01-01

    Passive dynamic walking refers to a class of bipedal robots that can walk down an incline with no actuation or control input. These bipeds are sensitive to initial conditions due to their style of walking. According to small basin of attraction of passive limit cycles, it is important to start with an initial condition in the basin of attraction of stable walking (limit cycle). This paper presents a study of the simplest passive walker with point and curved feet. A new approach is proposed to find proper initial conditions for a pair of stable and unstable period-one gait limit cycles. This methodology is based on finite difference method which can solve the nonlinear differential equations of motion on a discrete time. Also, to investigate the physical configurations of the walkers and the environmental influence such as the slope angle, the parameter analysis is applied. Numerical simulations reveal the performance of the presented method in finding two stable and unstable gait patterns.

  9. The simulation of piano string vibration: from physical models to finite difference schemes and digital waveguides.

    PubMed

    Bensa, Julien; Bilbao, Stefan; Kronland-Martinet, Richard; Smith, Julius O

    2003-08-01

    A model of transverse piano string vibration, second order in time, which models frequency-dependent loss and dispersion effects is presented here. This model has many desirable properties, in particular that it can be written as a well-posed initial-boundary value problem (permitting stable finite difference schemes) and that it may be directly related to a digital waveguide model, a digital filter-based algorithm which can be used for musical sound synthesis. Techniques for the extraction of model parameters from experimental data over the full range of the grand piano are discussed, as is the link between the model parameters and the filter responses in a digital waveguide. Simulations are performed. Finally, the waveguide model is extended to the case of several coupled strings. PMID:12942987

  10. Numerical simulation of Stokes flow around particles via a hybrid Finite Difference-Boundary Integral scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh

    2013-11-01

    An efficient algorithm for simulating Stokes flow around particles is presented here, in which a second order Finite Difference method (FDM) is coupled to a Boundary Integral method (BIM). This method utilizes the strong points of FDM (i.e. localized stencil) and BIM (i.e. accurate representation of particle surface). Specifically, in each iteration, the flow field away from the particles is solved on a Cartesian FDM grid, while the traction on the particle surface (given the the velocity of the particle) is solved using BIM. The two schemes are coupled by matching the solution in an intermediate region between the particle and surrounding fluid. We validate this method by solving for flow around an array of cylinders, and find good agreement with Hasimoto's (J. Fluid Mech. 1959) analytical results.

  11. 3-D thermal analysis using finite difference technique with finite element model for improved design of components of rocket engine turbomachines for Space Shuttle Main Engine SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Kiho D.; Ip, Shek-Se P.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite element models were generated and transferred into three-dimensional finite difference models to perform transient thermal analyses for the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump's first stage nozzles and rotor blades. STANCOOL was chosen to calculate the heat transfer characteristics (HTCs) around the airfoils, and endwall effects were included at the intersections of the airfoils and platforms for the steady-state boundary conditions. Free and forced convection due to rotation effects were also considered in hollow cores. Transient HTCs were calculated by taking ratios of the steady-state values based on the flow rates and fluid properties calculated at each time slice. Results are presented for both transient plots and three-dimensional color contour isotherm plots; they were also converted into universal files to be used for FEM stress analyses.

  12. Comparison of the electric moments obtained from finite basis set and finite-difference Hartree-Fock calculations for diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kobus, J.; Moncrieff, D.; Wilson, S.

    2000-12-01

    A comparison is made of the accuracy with which the electric moments {mu}, {Theta}, {Omega}, and {Phi} can be calculated by using the finite basis set approach (the algebraic approximation) and finite-difference method in calculations employing the Hartree-Fock model for the ground states of 16 diatomic molecules at their experimental equilibrium geometries. Specifically, the 2{sup n}-pole moments n=1,2,3,4, for the N{sub 2}, CO, BF, CN{sup -}, NO{sup +}, BeF, BO, CN, N{sub 2}{sup +}, AlF, GaF, InF, TlF, MgF, CaF, and SrF molecules are determined using basis sets and grids that have been employed in previous studies of the Hartree-Fock energy.

  13. An Analysis on 3d Marine Csem Responses Based on a Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, N.; Nam, M.; Kim, H.

    2010-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data are analyzed using a modeling algorithm based on a finite difference method. The algorithm employs the secondary-field formulation of a vector Helmholtz equation for electric fields to avoid singularity problems. Primary fields are calculated analytically using a numerical filter for the Hankel transform for a three-layered 1D background model, that consists of air, sea and sub-seafloor; the model includes the air layer to consider air waves. Several numerical filters for the Hankel transform are compared in terms of their accuracy and computation time. Using the analytically-calculated primary fields, we compute secondary fields using a finite difference method with a staggered grid. The grid defines electric fields along cell edges while magnetic fields at cell faces. We verified the developed modeling algorithm using not only 1D analytic solutions but also responses for a 3D model, that are computed by other algorithms. Using disk models, this study analyzes marine CSEM data for horizontal and vertical electric and magnetic dipole sources to determine the most effective source-receiver configuration for the exploration of 3D thin and resistive hydrocarbon targets. Numerical results show that marine CSEM has exciting potential for oilfield characterization. Further, air waves should be properly considered in modeling and interpretation of marine CSEM data because they have great effects on marine CSEM data. For an analysis on bathymetry effects, a stepwise-bathymetry model was constructed. Bathymetry causes significant effects on marine CSEM data because transmitter and receivers are located very far each other. We propose a bathymetry correction method for a proper interpretation of marine CSEM data distorted by bathymetry.

  14. Resistance and Stress Finite Element Analysis of Different Types of Fixation for Mandibular Orthognathic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Stringhini, Diego José; Sommerfeld, Ricardo; Uetanabaro, Lucas Caetano; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Araújo, Melissa Rodrigues; Rebellato, Nelson Luís Barbosa; Costa, Delson João da; Scariot, Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress and dislodgement resistance by finite element analysis of different types of fixation in mandibular orthognathic surgery. A 3D solid finite element model of a hemi-mandible was obtained. A bilateral sagittal split osteotomy was simulated and the distal segment was advanced 5 mm forward. After the adjustment and superimposing of segments, 9 different types of osteosynthesis with 2.0 miniplates and screws were simulated: A, one 4-hole conventional straight miniplate; B, one 4-hole locking straight miniplate; C, one 4-hole conventional miniplate and one bicortical screw; D, one 4-hole locking miniplate and 1 bicortical screws; E, one 6-hole conventional straight miniplate; F, one 6-hole locking miniplate; G, two 4-hole conventional straight miniplates; H, two 4-hole locking straight miniplates; and I, 3 bicortical screws in an inverted-L pattern. In each model, forces simulating the masticatory muscles were applied. The values of stress in the plates and screws were checked. The dislodgement resistance was checked at the proximal segment since the distal segment was stable because of the screen at the occlusal tooth. The regions with the lowest and highest displacement were measured. The offset between the osteotomized segments was verified by millimeter intervals. Inverted-L with bicortical screws was the model that had the lowest dislodgment and the model with the lowest tension was the one with two conventional plates. The results suggest that the tension was better distributed in the locking miniplates, but the locking screws presented higher concentration of tension.

  15. Shock compression modeling of metallic single crystals: comparison of finite difference, steady wave, and analytical solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Lloyd, Jeffrey T.; Clayton, John D.; Austin, Ryan A.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-07-10

    Background: The shock response of metallic single crystals can be captured using a micro-mechanical description of the thermoelastic-viscoplastic material response; however, using a such a description within the context of traditional numerical methods may introduce a physical artifacts. Advantages and disadvantages of complex material descriptions, in particular the viscoplastic response, must be framed within approximations introduced by numerical methods. Methods: Three methods of modeling the shock response of metallic single crystals are summarized: finite difference simulations, steady wave simulations, and algebraic solutions of the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. For the former two numerical techniques, a dislocation density based framework describes themore » rate- and temperature-dependent shear strength on each slip system. For the latter analytical technique, a simple (two-parameter) rate- and temperature-independent linear hardening description is necessarily invoked to enable simultaneous solution of the governing equations. For all models, the same nonlinear thermoelastic energy potential incorporating elastic constants of up to order 3 is applied. Results: Solutions are compared for plate impact of highly symmetric orientations (all three methods) and low symmetry orientations (numerical methods only) of aluminum single crystals shocked to 5 GPa (weak shock regime) and 25 GPa (overdriven regime). Conclusions: For weak shocks, results of the two numerical methods are very similar, regardless of crystallographic orientation. For strong shocks, artificial viscosity affects the finite difference solution, and effects of transverse waves for the lower symmetry orientations not captured by the steady wave method become important. The analytical solution, which can only be applied to highly symmetric orientations, provides reasonable accuracy with regards to prediction of most variables in the final shocked state but, by construction, does not provide

  16. Field Test of a Hybrid Finite-Difference and Analytic Element Regional Model.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D B; Haitjema, H M; Feinstein, D T; Hunt, R J

    2016-01-01

    Regional finite-difference models often have cell sizes that are too large to sufficiently model well-stream interactions. Here, a steady-state hybrid model is applied whereby the upper layer or layers of a coarse MODFLOW model are replaced by the analytic element model GFLOW, which represents surface waters and wells as line and point sinks. The two models are coupled by transferring cell-by-cell leakage obtained from the original MODFLOW model to the bottom of the GFLOW model. A real-world test of the hybrid model approach is applied on a subdomain of an existing model of the Lake Michigan Basin. The original (coarse) MODFLOW model consists of six layers, the top four of which are aggregated into GFLOW as a single layer, while the bottom two layers remain part of MODFLOW in the hybrid model. The hybrid model and a refined "benchmark" MODFLOW model simulate similar baseflows. The hybrid and benchmark models also simulate similar baseflow reductions due to nearby pumping when the well is located within the layers represented by GFLOW. However, the benchmark model requires refinement of the model grid in the local area of interest, while the hybrid approach uses a gridless top layer and is thus unaffected by grid discretization errors. The hybrid approach is well suited to facilitate cost-effective retrofitting of existing coarse grid MODFLOW models commonly used for regional studies because it leverages the strengths of both finite-difference and analytic element methods for predictions in mildly heterogeneous systems that can be simulated with steady-state conditions.

  17. Resistance and Stress Finite Element Analysis of Different Types of Fixation for Mandibular Orthognathic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Stringhini, Diego José; Sommerfeld, Ricardo; Uetanabaro, Lucas Caetano; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Araújo, Melissa Rodrigues; Rebellato, Nelson Luís Barbosa; Costa, Delson João da; Scariot, Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress and dislodgement resistance by finite element analysis of different types of fixation in mandibular orthognathic surgery. A 3D solid finite element model of a hemi-mandible was obtained. A bilateral sagittal split osteotomy was simulated and the distal segment was advanced 5 mm forward. After the adjustment and superimposing of segments, 9 different types of osteosynthesis with 2.0 miniplates and screws were simulated: A, one 4-hole conventional straight miniplate; B, one 4-hole locking straight miniplate; C, one 4-hole conventional miniplate and one bicortical screw; D, one 4-hole locking miniplate and 1 bicortical screws; E, one 6-hole conventional straight miniplate; F, one 6-hole locking miniplate; G, two 4-hole conventional straight miniplates; H, two 4-hole locking straight miniplates; and I, 3 bicortical screws in an inverted-L pattern. In each model, forces simulating the masticatory muscles were applied. The values of stress in the plates and screws were checked. The dislodgement resistance was checked at the proximal segment since the distal segment was stable because of the screen at the occlusal tooth. The regions with the lowest and highest displacement were measured. The offset between the osteotomized segments was verified by millimeter intervals. Inverted-L with bicortical screws was the model that had the lowest dislodgment and the model with the lowest tension was the one with two conventional plates. The results suggest that the tension was better distributed in the locking miniplates, but the locking screws presented higher concentration of tension. PMID:27224561

  18. An iterative finite difference method for solving the quantum hydrodynamic equations of motion

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian K

    2010-01-01

    The quantum hydrodynamic equations of motion associated with the de Broglie-Bohm description of quantum mechanics describe a time evolving probability density whose 'fluid' elements evolve as a correlated ensemble of particle trajectories. These equations are intuitively appealing due to their similarities with classical fluid dynamics and the appearance of a generalized Newton's equation of motion in which the total force contains both a classical and quantum contribution. However, the direct numerical solution of the quantum hydrodynamic equations (QHE) is fraught with challenges: the probability 'fluid' is highly-compressible, it has zero viscosity, the quantum potential ('pressure') is non-linear, and if that weren't enough the quantum potential can also become singular during the course of the calculations. Collectively these properties are responsible for the notorious numerical instabilities associated with a direct numerical solution of the QHE. The most successful and stable numerical approach that has been used to date is based on the Moving Least Squares (MLS) algorithm. The improved stability of this approach is due to the repeated local least squares fitting which effectively filters or reduces the numerical noise which tends to accumulate with time. However, this method is also subject to instabilities if it is pushed too hard. In addition, the stability of the MLS approach often comes at the expense of reduced resolution or fidelity of the calculation (i.e., the MLS filtering eliminates the higher-frequency components of the solution which may be of interest). Recently, a promising new solution method has been developed which is based on an iterative solution of the QHE using finite differences. This method (referred to as the Iterative Finite Difference Method or IFDM) is straightforward to implement, computationally efficient, stable, and its accuracy and convergence properties are well understood. A brief overview of the IFDM will be presented

  19. Overview of finite difference Hartree-Fock method algorithm, implementation and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobus, J.

    2012-12-01

    Two-dimensional, finite difference Hartree-Fock method has been in constant usage and development over the last two decades. The method has proved stable and efficient enough to be applied to dozens of diatomic molecules, even to systems as large as the thorium fluoride. Its latest version is presented and the dependence of its accuracy on the grid size and efficiency on the overrelaxation parameters are discussed. The method has been mainly used to develop and calibrate sequences of universal even-tempered and polarization-consistent basis sets and assess basis set truncation and superposition errors. Its modified version has proved useful in testing various exchange-correlation potentials within the density functional theory. The method has turned out to be a valuable source of reference values of total energies, multipole moments, static polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities (αzz, βzzz, γzzzz, Az,zz and Bzz,zz) for atoms, diatomic molecules and their ions. Recently, it has been modified to allow to calculate the electrical properties of homonuclear molecules and the results for the Li2, N2, F2 and O2 systems are presented. Electrical properties of the AlF, CS, KCl diatomics and of highly ionized krypton atom (Kr+32) are reported as well. Accuracy of both the matrix Hartree-Fock employing universal even-tempered basis sets and the finite difference Hartree-Fock methods is discussed and the basis set superposition errors of the dipole polarizability and the first hyperpolarizability of the FH molecule is reexamined. Basis set superposition errors are also discussed in case of the dipole polarizability and the second hyperpolarizability of the F2 system.

  20. Implicit predictor-corrector central finite difference scheme for the equations of magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, T. C.; Yu, H.-S.; Hsieh, M.-S.; Lai, S. H.; Yang, Y.-H.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays most of supercomputers are based on the frame of PC cluster; therefore, the efficiency of parallel computing is of importance especially with the increasing computing scale. This paper proposes a high-order implicit predictor-corrector central finite difference (iPCCFD) scheme and demonstrates its high efficiency in parallel computing. Of special interests are the large scale numerical studies such as the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations in the planetary magnetosphere. An iPCCFD scheme is developed based on fifth-order central finite difference method and fourth-order implicit predictor-corrector method in combination with elimination-of-the-round-off-errors (ERE) technique. We examine several numerical studies such as one-dimensional Brio-Wu shock tube problem, two-dimensional Orszag-Tang vortex system, vortex type K-H instability, kink type K-H instability, field loop advection, and blast wave. All the simulation results are consistent with many literatures. iPCCFD can minimize the numerical instabilities and noises along with the additional diffusion terms. All of our studies present relatively small numerical errors without employing any divergence-free reconstruction. In particular, we obtain fairly stable results in the two-dimensional Brio-Wu shock tube problem which well conserves ∇ ṡ B = 0 throughout the simulation. The ERE technique removes the accumulation of roundoff errors in the uniform or non-disturbed system. We have also shown that iPCCFD is characterized by the high order of accuracy and the low numerical dissipation in the circularly polarized Alfvén wave tests. The proposed iPCCFD scheme is a parallel-efficient and high precision numerical scheme for solving the MHD equations in hyperbolic conservation systems.

  1. Shock compression modeling of metallic single crystals: comparison of finite difference, steady wave, and analytical solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Jeffrey T.; Clayton, John D.; Austin, Ryan A.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-07-10

    Background: The shock response of metallic single crystals can be captured using a micro-mechanical description of the thermoelastic-viscoplastic material response; however, using a such a description within the context of traditional numerical methods may introduce a physical artifacts. Advantages and disadvantages of complex material descriptions, in particular the viscoplastic response, must be framed within approximations introduced by numerical methods. Methods: Three methods of modeling the shock response of metallic single crystals are summarized: finite difference simulations, steady wave simulations, and algebraic solutions of the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. For the former two numerical techniques, a dislocation density based framework describes the rate- and temperature-dependent shear strength on each slip system. For the latter analytical technique, a simple (two-parameter) rate- and temperature-independent linear hardening description is necessarily invoked to enable simultaneous solution of the governing equations. For all models, the same nonlinear thermoelastic energy potential incorporating elastic constants of up to order 3 is applied. Results: Solutions are compared for plate impact of highly symmetric orientations (all three methods) and low symmetry orientations (numerical methods only) of aluminum single crystals shocked to 5 GPa (weak shock regime) and 25 GPa (overdriven regime). Conclusions: For weak shocks, results of the two numerical methods are very similar, regardless of crystallographic orientation. For strong shocks, artificial viscosity affects the finite difference solution, and effects of transverse waves for the lower symmetry orientations not captured by the steady wave method become important. The analytical solution, which can only be applied to highly symmetric orientations, provides reasonable accuracy with regards to prediction of most variables in the final shocked state but, by construction, does not provide insight

  2. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  3. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  4. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  5. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  6. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  7. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  8. Analysis of the monotonicity conditions in the mimetic finite difference method for elliptic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipnikov, K.; Manzini, G.; Svyatskiy, D.

    2011-04-01

    The maximum principle is one of the most important properties of solutions of partial differential equations. Its numerical analog, the discrete maximum principle (DMP), is one of the most difficult properties to achieve in numerical methods, especially when the computational mesh is distorted to adapt and conform to the physical domain or the problem coefficients are highly heterogeneous and anisotropic. Violation of the DMP may lead to numerical instabilities such as oscillations and to unphysical solutions such as heat flow from a cold material to a hot one. In this work, we investigate sufficient conditions to ensure the monotonicity of the mimetic finite difference (MFD) method on two- and three-dimensional meshes. These conditions result in a set of general inequalities for the elements of the mass matrix of every mesh element. Efficient solutions are devised for meshes consisting of simplexes, parallelograms and parallelepipeds, and orthogonal locally refined elements as those used in the AMR methodology. On simplicial meshes, it turns out that the MFD method coincides with the mixed-hybrid finite element methods based on the low-order Raviart-Thomas vector space. Thus, in this case we recover the well-established conventional angle conditions of such approximations. Instead, in the other cases a suitable design of the MFD method allows us to formulate a monotone discretization for which the existence of a DMP can be theoretically proved. Moreover, on meshes of parallelograms we establish a connection with a similar monotonicity condition proposed for the Multi-Point Flux Approximation (MPFA) methods. Numerical experiments confirm the effectiveness of the considered monotonicity conditions.

  9. Stochastic finite difference lattice Boltzmann method for steady incompressible viscous flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, S.C.; So, R.M.C.; Leung, W.W.F.

    2010-08-20

    With the advent of state-of-the-art computers and their rapid availability, the time is ripe for the development of efficient uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods to reduce the complexity of numerical models used to simulate complicated systems with incomplete knowledge and data. The spectral stochastic finite element method (SSFEM) which is one of the widely used UQ methods, regards uncertainty as generating a new dimension and the solution as dependent on this dimension. A convergent expansion along the new dimension is then sought in terms of the polynomial chaos system, and the coefficients in this representation are determined through a Galerkin approach. This approach provides an accurate representation even when only a small number of terms are used in the spectral expansion; consequently, saving in computational resource can be realized compared to the Monte Carlo (MC) scheme. Recent development of a finite difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) that provides a convenient algorithm for setting the boundary condition allows the flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, with and without external body forces to be simulated with ease. Also, the inherent compressibility effect in the conventional lattice Boltzmann method, which might produce significant errors in some incompressible flow simulations, is eliminated. As such, the FDLBM together with an efficient UQ method can be used to treat incompressible flows with built in uncertainty, such as blood flow in stenosed arteries. The objective of this paper is to develop a stochastic numerical solver for steady incompressible viscous flows by combining the FDLBM with a SSFEM. Validation against MC solutions of channel/Couette, driven cavity, and sudden expansion flows are carried out.

  10. Three-dimensional finite-difference modeling of non-linear ground notion

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1997-08-01

    We present a hybrid finite-difference technique capable of modeling non-linear soil amplification from the 3-D finite-fault radiation pattern for earthquakes in arbitrary earth models. The method is applied to model non-linear effects in the soils of the San Fernando Valley (SFV) from the 17 January 1994 M 6.7 Northridge earthquake. 0-7 Hz particle velocities are computed for an area of 17 km by 19 km immediately above the causative fault and 5 km below the surface where peak strike-parallel, strike-perpendicular, vertical, and total velocities reach values of 71 cm/s, 145 cm/s, 152 cm/s, and 180 cm/s, respectively. Selected Green`s functions and a soil model for the SFV are used to compute the approximate stress level during the earthquake, and comparison to the values for near-surface alluvium at the U.S. Nevada Test Site suggests that the non-linear regime may have been entered. We use selected values from the simulated particle velocity distribution at 5 km depth to compute the non-linear response in a soil column below a site within the Van Norman Complex in SFV, where the strongest ground motion was recorded. Since site-specific non- linear material parameters from the SFV are currently unavailable, values are taken from analyses of observed Test Site ground motions. Preliminary results show significant reduction of spectral velocities at the surface normalized to the peak source velocity due to non-linear effects when the peak velocity increases from 32 cm/s (approximately linear case) to 64 cm/s (30-92%), 93 cm/s (7-83%), and 124 cm/s (2-70%). The largest reduction occurs for frequencies above 1 Hz.

  11. Effects of different abutment connection designs on the stress distribution around five different implants: a 3-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Balik, Ali; Karatas, Meltem Ozdemir; Keskin, Haluk

    2012-09-01

    The stability of the bone-implant interface is required for the long-term favorable clinical outcome of implant-supported prosthetic rehabilitation. The implant failures that occur after the functional loading are mainly related to biomechanical factors. Micro movements and vibrations due to occlusal forces can lead to mechanical complications such as loosening of the screw and fractures of the abutment or implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the strain distributions in the connection areas of different implant-abutment connection systems under similar loading conditions. Five different implant-abutment connection designs from 5 different manufacturers were evaluated in this study. The investigation was performed with software using the finite element method. The geometrical modeling of the implant systems was done with CATIA virtual design software. The MSC NASTRAN solver and PATRAN postprocessing program were used to perform the linear static solution. According to the analysis, the implant-abutment connection system with external hexagonal connection showed the highest strain values, and the internal hexagonal implant-abutment connection system showed the lowest strain values. Conical + internal hexagonal and screw-in implant abutment connection interface is more successful than other systems in cases with increased vertical dimension, particularly in the posterior region.

  12. 3D Finite-Difference Modeling of Scattered Teleseismic Wavefields in a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, I. B.; Zheng, H.

    2005-12-01

    For a teleseismic array targeting subducting crust in a zone of active subduction, scattering from the zone underlying the trench result in subhorizontally-propagating waves that could be difficult to distinguish from converted P- and S- wave backscattered from the surface. Because back-scattered modes often provide the most spectacular images of subducting slabs, it is important to understand their differences from the arrivals scattered from the trench zone. To investigate the detailed teleseismic wavefield in a subduction zone environment, we performed a full-waveform, 3-D visco-elastic finite-difference modeling of teleseismic wave propagation using a Beowulf cluster. The synthetics show strong scattering from the trench zone, dominated by the mantle and crustal P-waves propagating at 6.2-8.1.km/s and slower. These scattered waves occupy the same time and moveout intervals as the backscattered modes, and also have similar amplitudes. Although their amplitude decay characters are different, with the uncertainties in the velocity and density structure of the subduction zone, unambiguous distinguishing of these modes appears difficult. However, under minimal assumptions (in particular, without invoking slab dehydration), recent observations of receiver function amplitudes decreasing away from the trench favor the interpretation of trench-zone scattering.

  13. Finite difference method and algebraic polynomial interpolation for numerically solving Poisson's equation over arbitrary domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Tsugio

    2014-06-01

    The finite difference method (FDM) based on Cartesian coordinate systems can be applied to numerical analyses over any complex domain. A complex domain is usually taken to mean that the geometry of an immersed body in a fluid is complex; here, it means simply an analytical domain of arbitrary configuration. In such an approach, we do not need to treat the outer and inner boundaries differently in numerical calculations; both are treated in the same way. Using a method that adopts algebraic polynomial interpolations in the calculation around near-wall elements, all the calculations over irregular domains reduce to those over regular domains. Discretization of the space differential in the FDM is usually derived using the Taylor series expansion; however, if we use the polynomial interpolation systematically, exceptional advantages are gained in deriving high-order differences. In using the polynomial interpolations, we can numerically solve the Poisson equation freely over any complex domain. Only a particular type of partial differential equation, Poisson's equations, is treated; however, the arguments put forward have wider generality in numerical calculations using the FDM.

  14. Finite-difference modeling with variable grid-size and adaptive time-step in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinxin; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2014-04-01

    Forward modeling of elastic wave propagation in porous media has great importance for understanding and interpreting the influences of rock properties on characteristics of seismic wavefield. However, the finite-difference forward-modeling method is usually implemented with global spatial grid-size and time-step; it consumes large amounts of computational cost when small-scaled oil/gas-bearing structures or large velocity-contrast exist underground. To overcome this handicap, combined with variable grid-size and time-step, this paper developed a staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for elastic wave modeling in porous media. Variable finite-difference coefficients and wavefield interpolation were used to realize the transition of wave propagation between regions of different grid-size. The accuracy and efficiency of the algorithm were shown by numerical examples. The proposed method is advanced with low computational cost in elastic wave simulation for heterogeneous oil/gas reservoirs.

  15. Finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method with a block-structured adaptive-mesh-refinement technique.

    PubMed

    Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2014-03-01

    An adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) algorithm for the finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) is presented in this study. The idea behind the proposed AMR is to remove the need for a tree-type data structure. Instead, pointer attributes are used to determine the neighbors of a certain block via appropriate adjustment of its children identifications. As a result, the memory and time required for tree traversal are completely eliminated, leaving us with an efficient algorithm that is easier to implement and use on parallel machines. To allow different mesh sizes at separate parts of the computational domain, the Eulerian formulation of the streaming process is invoked. As a result, there is no need for rescaling the distribution functions or using a temporal interpolation at the fine-coarse grid boundaries. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed FDLBM AMR are extensively assessed by investigating a variety of vorticity-dominated flow fields, including Taylor-Green vortex flow, lid-driven cavity flow, thin shear layer flow, and the flow past a square cylinder.

  16. Forensic GPR: finite-difference simulations of responses from buried human remains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammon, William S.; McMechan, George A.; Zeng, Xiaoxian

    2000-10-01

    Time domain 2.5-D finite-difference simulations of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) responses from models of buried human remains suggest the potential of GPR for detailed non-destructive forensic site investigation. Extraction of information beyond simple detection of cadavers in forensic investigations should be possible with current GPR technology. GPR responses are simulated for various body cross-sections with different depths of burial, soil types, soil moisture contents, survey frequencies and antenna separations. Biological tissues have high electrical conductivity so diagnostic features for the imaging of human bodies are restricted to the soil/skin interface and shallow tissue interfaces. A low amplitude reflection shadow zone occurs beneath a body because of high GPR attenuation within the body. Resolution of diagnostic features of a human target requires a survey frequency of 900 MHz or greater and an increment between recording stations of 10 cm or less. Depth migration focuses field GPR data into an image that reveals accurate information on the number, dimensions, locations and orientations of body elements. The main limitation on image quality is attenuation in the surrounding soil and within the body. 3-D imaging is also feasible.

  17. Light Scattering by Gaussian Particles: A Solution with Finite-Difference Time Domain Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Nousiainen, T.; Fu, Q.; Loeb, N. G.; Videen, G.; Muinonen, K.

    2003-01-01

    The understanding of single-scattering properties of complex ice crystals has significance in atmospheric radiative transfer and remote-sensing applications. In this work, light scattering by irregularly shaped Gaussian ice crystals is studied with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. For given sample particle shapes and size parameters in the resonance region, the scattering phase matrices and asymmetry factors are calculated. It is found that the deformation of the particle surface can significantly smooth the scattering phase functions and slightly reduce the asymmetry factors. The polarization properties of irregular ice crystals are also significantly different from those of spherical cloud particles. These FDTD results could provide a reference for approximate light-scattering models developed for irregular particle shapes and can have potential applications in developing a much simpler practical light scattering model for ice clouds angular-distribution models and for remote sensing of ice clouds and aerosols using polarized light. (copyright) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulation of optical devices using parallel finite-difference time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kang; Kong, Fanmin; Mei, Liangmo; Liu, Xin

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a new parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical method in a low-cost network environment to stimulate optical waveguide characteristics. The PC motherboard based cluster is used, as it is relatively low-cost, reliable and has high computing performance. Four clusters are networked by fast Ethernet technology. Due to the simplicity nature of FDTD algorithm, a native Ethernet packet communication mechanism is used to reduce the overhead of the communication between the adjacent clusters. To validate the method, a microcavity ring resonator based on semiconductor waveguides is chosen as an instance of FDTD parallel computation. Speed-up rate under different division density is calculated. From the result we can conclude that when the decomposing size reaches a certain point, a good parallel computing speed up will be maintained. This simulation shows that through the overlapping of computation and communication method and controlling the decomposing size, the overhead of the communication of the shared data will be conquered. The result indicates that the implementation can achieve significant speed up for the FDTD algorithm. This will enable us to tackle the larger real electromagnetic problem by the low-cost PC clusters.

  19. A High Order Finite Difference Scheme with Sharp Shock Resolution for the Euler Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerritsen, Margot; Olsson, Pelle

    1996-01-01

    We derive a high-order finite difference scheme for the Euler equations that satisfies a semi-discrete energy estimate, and present an efficient strategy for the treatment of discontinuities that leads to sharp shock resolution. The formulation of the semi-discrete energy estimate is based on a symmetrization of the Euler equations that preserves the homogeneity of the flux vector, a canonical splitting of the flux derivative vector, and the use of difference operators that satisfy a discrete analogue to the integration by parts procedure used in the continuous energy estimate. Around discontinuities or sharp gradients, refined grids are created on which the discrete equations are solved after adding a newly constructed artificial viscosity. The positioning of the sub-grids and computation of the viscosity are aided by a detection algorithm which is based on a multi-scale wavelet analysis of the pressure grid function. The wavelet theory provides easy to implement mathematical criteria to detect discontinuities, sharp gradients and spurious oscillations quickly and efficiently.

  20. High-order conservative finite difference GLM-MHD schemes for cell-centered MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, Andrea; Tzeferacos, Petros; Bodo, Gianluigi

    2010-08-01

    We present and compare third- as well as fifth-order accurate finite difference schemes for the numerical solution of the compressible ideal MHD equations in multiple spatial dimensions. The selected methods lean on four different reconstruction techniques based on recently improved versions of the weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes, monotonicity preserving (MP) schemes as well as slope-limited polynomial reconstruction. The proposed numerical methods are highly accurate in smooth regions of the flow, avoid loss of accuracy in proximity of smooth extrema and provide sharp non-oscillatory transitions at discontinuities. We suggest a numerical formulation based on a cell-centered approach where all of the primary flow variables are discretized at the zone center. The divergence-free condition is enforced by augmenting the MHD equations with a generalized Lagrange multiplier yielding a mixed hyperbolic/parabolic correction, as in Dedner et al. [J. Comput. Phys. 175 (2002) 645-673]. The resulting family of schemes is robust, cost-effective and straightforward to implement. Compared to previous existing approaches, it completely avoids the CPU intensive workload associated with an elliptic divergence cleaning step and the additional complexities required by staggered mesh algorithms. Extensive numerical testing demonstrate the robustness and reliability of the proposed framework for computations involving both smooth and discontinuous features.