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Sample records for 2-d fluid flow

  1. A discrete simulation of 2-D fluid flow on TERASYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, P.G.; Krolak, P.D.

    1995-12-01

    A discrete simulation of two-dimensional (2-D) fluid flow, on a recently designed novel architecture called TERASYS is presented. The simulation uses a cellular automaton approach, implemented in a new language called data-parallel bit C (dbC). A performance comparison between our implementation on TERASYS and an implementation on the Connection Machine is discussed. We comment briefly on the suitability of the TERASYS system for modeling fluid flow using cellular automata.

  2. An Integrative Model of Excitation Driven Fluid Flow in a 2D Uterine Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggio, Charles; Fauci, Lisa; Chrispell, John

    2009-11-01

    We present a model of intra-uterine fluid flow in a sagittal cross-section of the uterus by inducing peristalsis in a 2D channel. This is an integrative multiscale computational model that takes as input fluid viscosity, passive tissue properties of the uterine channel and a prescribed wave of membrane depolarization. This voltage pulse is coupled to a model of calcium dynamics inside a uterine smooth muscle cell, which in turn drives a kinetic model of myosin phosphorylation governing contractile muscle forces. Using the immersed boundary method, these muscle forces are communicated to a fluid domain to simulate the contractions which occur in a human uterus. An analysis of the effects of model parameters on the flow properties and emergent geometry of the peristaltic channel will be presented.

  3. A case study of fluid flow in fractured rock mass based on 2-D DFN modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jisu; Noh, Young-Hwan; Um, Jeong-Gi; Choi, Yosoon

    2014-05-01

    A two dimensional steady-state fluid flow through fractured rock mass of an abandoned copper mine in Korea is addressed based on discrete fracture network modeling. An injection well and three observation wells were installed at the field site to monitor the variations of total heads induced by injection of fresh water. A series of packer tests were performed to estimate the rock mass permeability. First, the two dimensional stochastic fracture network model was built and validated for a granitic rock mass using the geometrical and statistical data obtained from surface exposures and borehole logs. This validated fracture network model was combined with the fracture data observed on boreholes to generate a stochastic-deterministic fracture network system. Estimated apertures for each of the fracture sets using permeability data obtained from borehole packer tests were discussed next. Finally, a systematic procedure for fluid flow modeling in fractured rock mass in two dimensional domain was presented to estimate the conductance, flow quantity and nodal head in 2-D conceptual linear pipe channel network. The results obtained in this study clearly show that fracture geometry parameters (orientation, density and size) play an important role in the hydraulic behavior of fractured rock masses.

  4. Analysis on oscillating actuator frequency influence of the fluid flow characterization for 2D contractile water jet thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaari, M. F.; Abu Bakar, H.; Nordin, N.; Saw, S. K.; Samad, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Contractile body is an alternative mechanism instead of rotating blade propeller to generate water jet for locomotion. The oscillating motion of the actuator at different frequencies varies the pressure and volume of the pressure chamber in time to draw in and jet out the water at a certain mass flow rate. The aim of this research was to analyze the influence of the actuating frequency of the fluid flow in the pressure chamber of the thruster during this inflation-deflation process. A 70mm × 70mm × 18mm (L × W × T) 2D water jet thruster was fabricated for this purpose. The contractile function was driven using two lateral pneumatic actuators where the fluid flow analysis was focused on the X-Y plane vector. Observation was carried out using a video camera and Matlab image measurement technique to determine the volume of the flowing mass. The result demonstrated that the greater actuating frequency decreases the fluid flow rate and the Reynolds number. This observation shows that the higher frequency would give a higher mass flow rate during water jet generation.

  5. Two-Phase Acto-Cytosolic Fluid Flow in a Moving Keratocyte: A 2D Continuum Model.

    PubMed

    Nikmaneshi, M R; Firoozabadi, B; Saidi, M S

    2015-09-01

    The F-actin network and cytosol in the lamellipodia of crawling cells flow in a centripetal pattern and spout-like form, respectively. We have numerically studied this two-phase flow in the realistic geometry of a moving keratocyte. Cytosol has been treated as a low viscosity Newtonian fluid flowing through the high viscosity porous medium of F-actin network. Other involved phenomena including myosin activity, adhesion friction, and interphase interaction are also discussed to provide an overall view of this problem. Adopting a two-phase coupled model by myosin concentration, we have found new accurate perspectives of acto-cytosolic flow and pressure fields, myosin distribution, as well as the distribution of effective forces across the lamellipodia of a keratocyte with stationary shape. The order of magnitude method is also used to determine the contribution of forces in the internal dynamics of lamellipodia. PMID:26403420

  6. 2D fluid model analysis for the effect of 3D gas flow on a capacitively coupled plasma deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The wide applicability of capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) deposition has increased the interest in developing comprehensive numerical models, but CCP imposes a tremendous computational cost when conducting a transient analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) model which reflects the real geometry of reactors. In particular, the detailed flow features of reactive gases induced by 3D geometric effects need to be considered for the precise calculation of radical distribution of reactive species. Thus, an alternative inclusive method for the numerical simulation of CCP deposition is proposed to simulate a two-dimensional (2D) CCP model based on the 3D gas flow results by simulating flow, temperature, and species fields in a 3D space at first without calculating the plasma chemistry. A numerical study of a cylindrical showerhead-electrode CCP reactor was conducted for particular cases of SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film. The proposed methodology produces numerical results for a 300 mm wafer deposition reactor which agree very well with the deposition rate profile measured experimentally along the wafer radius.

  7. Effects of fluid flow and calcium phosphate coating on human bone marrow stromal cells cultured in a defined 2D model system.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, S; Wendt, D; Miggino, S; Papadimitropoulos, A; Fato, M; Quarto, R; Martin, I

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the long-term (10 days) application of a defined and uniform level of fluid flow (uniform shear stress of 1.2 x 10(-3) N/m(2)) on human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) cultured on different substrates (i.e., uncoated glass or calcium phosphate coated glass, Osteologictrade mark) in a 2D parallel plate model. Both exposure to flow and culture on Osteologic significantly reduced the number of cell doublings. BMSC cultured under flow were more intensely stained for collagen type I and by von Kossa for mineralized matrix. BMSC exposed to flow displayed an increased osteogenic commitment (i.e., higher mRNA expression of cbfa-1 and osterix), although phenotype changes in response to flow (i.e., mRNA expression of osteopontin, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein) were dependent on the substrate used. These findings highlight the importance of the combination of physical forces and culture substrate to determine the functional state of differentiating osteoblastic cells. The results obtained using a simple and controlled 2D model system may help to interpret the long-term effects of BMSC culture under perfusion within 3D porous scaffolds, where multiple experimental variables cannot be easily studied independently, and shear stresses cannot be precisely computed. PMID:17969030

  8. An IPOT meshless method using DC PSE approximation for fluid flow equations in 2D and 3D geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourantas, G. C.; Loukopoulos, V. C.; Skouras, E. D.; Burganos, V. N.; Nikiforidis, G. C.

    2016-06-01

    Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations, in their primitive variable (u-v-p) formulation, are numerically solved using the Implicit Potential (IPOT) numerical scheme in the context of strong form Meshless Point Collocation (MPC) method. The unknown field functions are computed using the Discretization Correction Particle Strength Exchange (DC PSE) approximation method. The latter makes use of discrete moment conditions to derive the operator kernels, which leads to low condition number for the moment matrix compared to other meshless interpolation methods and increased stability for the numerical solution. The proposed meshless scheme is applied on 2D and 3D spatial domains, using uniform or irregular set of nodes to represent the domain. The numerical results obtained are compared against those obtained using well-established methods.

  9. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  10. Rheological Properties of Quasi-2D Fluids in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; Trittel, Torsten; Eremin, Alexey; Harth, Kirsten; Clark, Noel; Maclennan, Joseph; Glaser, Matthew; Park, Cheol; Hall, Nancy; Tin, Padetha

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, research on complex fluids and fluids in restricted geometries has attracted much attention in the scientific community. This can be attributed not only to the development of novel materials based on complex fluids but also to a variety of important physical phenomena which have barely been explored. One example is the behavior of membranes and thin fluid films, which can be described by two-dimensional (2D) rheology behavior that is quite different from 3D fluids. In this study, we have investigated the rheological properties of freely suspended films of a thermotropic liquid crystal in microgravity experiments. This model system mimics isotropic and anisotropic quasi 2D fluids [46]. We use inkjet printing technology to dispense small droplets (inclusions) onto the film surface. The motion of these inclusions provides information on the rheological properties of the films and allows the study of a variety of flow instabilities. Flat films have been investigated on a sub-orbital rocket flight and curved films (bubbles) have been studied in the ISS project OASIS. Microgravity is essential when the films are curved in order to avoid sedimentation. The experiments yield the mobility of the droplets in the films as well as the mutual mobility of pairs of particles. Experimental results will be presented for 2D-isotropic (smectic-A) and 2D-nematic (smectic-C) phases.

  11. Documentation of computer program VS2D to solve the equations of fluid flow in variably saturated porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lappala, E.G.; Healy, R.W.; Weeks, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    This report documents FORTRAN computer code for solving problems involving variably saturated single-phase flow in porous media. The flow equation is written with total hydraulic potential as the dependent variable, which allows straightforward treatment of both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The spatial derivatives in the flow equation are approximated by central differences, and time derivatives are approximated either by a fully implicit backward or by a centered-difference scheme. Nonlinear conductance and storage terms may be linearized using either an explicit method or an implicit Newton-Raphson method. Relative hydraulic conductivity is evaluated at cell boundaries by using either full upstream weighting, the arithmetic mean, or the geometric mean of values from adjacent cells. Nonlinear boundary conditions treated by the code include infiltration, evaporation, and seepage faces. Extraction by plant roots that is caused by atmospheric demand is included as a nonlinear sink term. These nonlinear boundary and sink terms are linearized implicitly. The code has been verified for several one-dimensional linear problems for which analytical solutions exist and against two nonlinear problems that have been simulated with other numerical models. A complete listing of data-entry requirements and data entry and results for three example problems are provided. (USGS)

  12. Focused fluid-flow processes through high-quality bathymetric, 2D seismic and Chirp data from the southern parts of the Bay of Biscay, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudon, Catherine; Gillet, Hervé; Cremer, Michel

    2013-04-01

    High-quality bathymetric, 2D seismic and Chirp data located in the southern parts of the Bay of Biscay, France, collected by the University of Bordeaux 1 (Cruises ITSAS 2, 2001; PROSECAN 3, 2006 and SARGASS, 2010) have recently been compiled. The survey area widely covers the Capbreton Canyon, which lies on the boundary between two major structural zones: the Aquitanian passive margin to the North, and the Basque-Cantabrian margin to the South which corresponds to the offshore Pyrenean front. The dataset revealed a large number of key seafloor features potentially associated with focused fluid-flow processes and subsurface sediment-remobilization. Focused fluid migration through sub-seabed sediments is a common phenomenon on continental margins worldwide and has widespread implications from both industrial and fundamental perspectives, from seafloor marine environmental issues to petroleum exploration and hazard assessments. Our study analyses the relationships between seafloor features, deeper structures and fluid migration through the Plio-Quaternary sedimentary pile. The geometrical characteristics, mechanisms of formation and kinematics of four main groups of seabed features have been investigated. (i) A 150km2 field of pockmarks can be observed on the Basque margin. These features are cone-shaped circular or elliptical depressions that are either randomly distributed as small pockmarks (diameter < 20m) or aligned in trains of large pockmarks (ranging from 200 to 600m in diameter) along shallow troughs leading downstream to the Capbreton Canyon. Seismic data show that most pockmarks reach the seabed through vertically staked V-shaped features but some are buried and show evidence of lateral migration through time. (ii) A second field of widely-spaced groups of pockmarks pierce the upper slope of the Aquitanian margin. These depressions are typically a few hundred meters in diameter and seem to be preferentially located in the troughs or on the stoss sides of

  13. A 2D electrohydrodynamic model for electrorotation of fluid drops.

    PubMed

    Feng, James Q

    2002-02-01

    A theoretical analysis of spontaneous electrorotation of deformable fluid drops in a DC electric field is presented with a 2D electrohydrodynamic model. The fluids in the system are assumed to be leaky dielectric and Newtonian. If the rotating flow is dominant over the cellular convection type of electrohydrodynamic flow, closed-form solutions for drops of small deformations can be obtained. Because the governing equations are in general nonlinear even when drop deformations are ignored, the general solution for even undeformed drop takes a form of infinite series and can only be evaluated by numerical means. Both closed-form solutions for special cases and numerical solutions for more general cases are obtained here to describe steady-state field variables and first-order drop deformations. In a DC electric field of strength beyond the threshold value, spontaneous electrorotation of a drop is shown to occur when charge relaxation in the surrounding fluid is faster than the fluid inside the drop. With increasing the strength of the applied electric field from the threshold for onset of electrorotation, the axis of drop contraction deviates from from that of the applied electric field in the direction of the rotating flow with an angle increasing with the field strength. PMID:16290391

  14. Collective excitations in 2D hard-disc fluid.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Adrian; Bryk, Taras; Trokhymchuk, Andrij

    2015-07-01

    Collective dynamics of a two-dimensional (2D) hard-disc fluid was studied by molecular dynamics simulations in the range of packing fractions that covers states up to the freezing. Some striking features concerning collective excitations in this system were observed. In particular, the short-wavelength shear waves while being absent at low packing fractions were observed in the range of high packing fractions, just before the freezing transition in a 2D hard-disc fluid. In contrast, the so-called "positive sound dispersion" typically observed in dense Lennard-Jones-like fluids, was not detected for the 2D hard-disc fluid. The ratio of specific heats in the 2D hard-disc fluid shows a monotonic increase with density approaching the freezing, resembling in this way the similar behavior in the vicinity of the Widom line in the case of supercritical fluids. PMID:25595625

  15. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  16. Flow past 2-D Hemispherical Rigid Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel

    2013-11-01

    The flow past a 2-dimensional rigid hemispherical shape is investigated using PIV. Flow field measurements and images were generated with the use of a Thermoflow® apparatus. Results of this study are compared to prior work (APS DFD 2012 Session E9.00003) which employed CFD to investigate the flow in the near wake of hemispherical parachutes. The various sized gaps/open areas were positioned at distinct locations. The work presented here is part of a larger research project to investigate flow fields in deceleration devices and parachutes. Understanding the pitch-stability of parachutes is essential for accurate design and implementation of these deceleration devices but they present a difficult system to analyze. The flexibility of the parachute fabric results in large variations in the parachute geometry leading to complex fluid-structure interactions. Such flow, combined with flow through gaps and open areas, has been postulated to shed alternating vortices causing pitching/oscillations of the canopy. The results presented provide some insight into which geometric features affect vortex shedding and may enable the redesign of the baseline parachute to minimize instabilities.

  17. Topological phase transition in 2D porous media flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waisbord, Nicolas; Stoop, Norbert; Kantsler, Vasily; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Dunkel, Jorn; Guasto Team; Dunkel Team; Kantsler Team

    2015-11-01

    Since the establishment of Darcy's law, analysis of porous-media flows has focused primarily on linking macroscopic transport properties, such as mean flow rate and dispersion, to the pore statistics of the material matrix. Despite intense efforts to understand the fluid velocity statistics from the porous-media structure, a qualitative and quantitative connection remains elusive. Here, we combine precisely controlled experiments with theory to quantify how geometric disorder in the matrix affects the flow statistics and transport in a quasi-2D microfluidic channel. Experimentally measured velocity fields for a range of different microstructure configurations are found to be in excellent agreement with large-scale numerical simulations. By successively increasing the matrix disorder, we study the transition from periodic flow structures to transport networks consisting of extended high-velocity channels. Morse-Smale complex analysis of the flow patterns reveals a topological phase transition that is linked to a qualitative change in the physical transport properties. This work demonstrates that topological flow analysis provides a mathematically well-defined, broadly applicable framework for understanding and quantifying fluid transport in complex geometries.

  18. Advecting Procedural Textures for 2D Flow Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of specially generated 3D procedural textures for visualizing steady state 2D flow fields. We use the flow field to advect and animate the texture over time. However, using standard texture advection techniques and arbitrary textures will introduce some undesirable effects such as: (a) expanding texture from a critical source point, (b) streaking pattern from the boundary of the flowfield, (c) crowding of advected textures near an attracting spiral or sink, and (d) absent or lack of textures in some regions of the flow. This paper proposes a number of strategies to solve these problems. We demonstrate how the technique works using both synthetic data and computational fluid dynamics data.

  19. 2D dry granular free-surface transient flow over complex topography with obstacles. Part II: Numerical predictions of fluid structures and benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juez, C.; Caviedes-Voullième, D.; Murillo, J.; García-Navarro, P.

    2014-12-01

    Dense granular flows are present in geophysics and in several industrial processes, which has lead to an increasing interest for the knowledge and understanding of the physics which govern their propagation. For this reason, a wide range of laboratory experiments on gravity-driven flows have been carried out during the last two decades. The present work is focused on geomorphological processes and, following previous work, a series of laboratory studies which constitute a further step in mimicking natural phenomena are described and simulated. Three situations are considered with some common properties: a two-dimensional configuration, variable slope of the topography and the presence of obstacles. The setup and measurement technique employed during the development of these experiments are deeply explained in the companion work. The first experiment is based on a single obstacle, the second one is performed against multiple obstacles and the third one studies the influence of a dike on which overtopping occurs. Due to the impact of the flow against the obstacles, fast moving shocks appear, and a variety of secondary waves emerge. In order to delve into the physics of these types of phenomena, a shock-capturing numerical scheme is used to simulate the cases. The suitability of the mathematical models employed in this work has been previously validated. Comparisons between computed and experimental data are presented for the three cases. The computed results show that the numerical tool is able to predict faithfully the overall behavior of this type of complex dense granular flow.

  20. Comparison of 2D and 3D Computational Multiphase Fluid Flow Models of Oxygen Lancing of Pyrometallurgical Furnace Tap-Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwee, M. W.; Reynolds, Q. G.; Zietsman, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Furnace tap-holes vary in design depending on the type of furnace and process involved, but they share one common trait: The tap-hole must be opened and closed periodically. In general, tap-holes are plugged with refractory clay after tapping, thereby stopping the flow of molten material. Once a furnace is ready to be tapped, drilling and/or lancing with oxygen are typically used to remove tap-hole clay from the tap-hole. Lancing with oxygen is an energy-intensive, mostly manual process, which affects the performance and longevity of the tap-hole refractory material as well as the processes inside the furnace. Computational modeling offers an opportunity to gain insight into the possible effects of oxygen lancing on various aspects of furnace operation.

  1. Comparison of 2D and 3D Computational Multiphase Fluid Flow Models of Oxygen Lancing of Pyrometallurgical Furnace Tap-Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwee, M. W.; Reynolds, Q. G.; Zietsman, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Furnace tap-holes vary in design depending on the type of furnace and process involved, but they share one common trait: The tap-hole must be opened and closed periodically. In general, tap-holes are plugged with refractory clay after tapping, thereby stopping the flow of molten material. Once a furnace is ready to be tapped, drilling and/or lancing with oxygen are typically used to remove tap-hole clay from the tap-hole. Lancing with oxygen is an energy-intensive, mostly manual process, which affects the performance and longevity of the tap-hole refractory material as well as the processes inside the furnace. Computational modeling offers an opportunity to gain insight into the possible effects of oxygen lancing on various aspects of furnace operation.

  2. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  3. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  4. Geophysical fluid flow experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broome, B. G.; Fichtl, G.; Fowlis, W.

    1979-01-01

    The essential fluid flow processes associated with the solar and Jovian atmospheres will be examined in a laboratory experiment scheduled for performance on Spacelab Missions One and Three. The experimental instrumentation required to generate and to record convective fluid flow is described. Details of the optical system configuration, the lens design, and the optical coatings are described. Measurement of thermal gradient fields by schlieren techniques and measurement of fluid flow velocity fields by photochromic dye tracers is achieved with a common optical system which utilizes photographic film for data recording. Generation of the photochromic dye tracers is described, and data annotation of experimental parameters on the film record is discussed.

  5. Validation of a 2-D semi-coupled numerical model for fluid-structure-seabed interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jianhong; Jeng, Dongsheng; Wang, Ren; Zhu, Changqi

    2013-10-01

    A 2-D semi-coupled model PORO-WSSI 2D (also be referred as FSSI-CAS 2D) for the Fluid-Structure-Seabed Interaction (FSSI) has been developed by employing RANS equations for wave motion in fluid domain, VARANS equations for porous flow in porous structures; and taking the dynamic Biot's equations (known as "u - p" approximation) for soil as the governing equations. The finite difference two-step projection method and the forward time difference method are adopted to solve the RANS, VARANS equations; and the finite element method is adopted to solve the "u - p" approximation. A data exchange port is developed to couple the RANS, VARANS equations and the dynamic Biot's equations together. The analytical solution proposed by Hsu and Jeng (1994) and some experiments conducted in wave flume or geotechnical centrifuge in which various waves involved are used to validate the developed semi-coupled numerical model. The sandy bed involved in these experiments is poro-elastic or poro-elastoplastic. The inclusion of the interaction between fluid, marine structures and poro-elastoplastic seabed foundation is a special point and highlight in this paper, which is essentially different with other previous coupled models The excellent agreement between the numerical results and the experiment data indicates that the developed coupled model is highly reliablefor the FSSI problem.

  6. 2D vortex interaction in a non-uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Xavier; Carton, X.

    2010-03-01

    In a two-dimensional incompressible fluid, we study the interaction of two like-signed Rankine vortices embedded in a steady shear/strain flow. The numerical results of vortex evolutions are compared with the analytical results for point vortices. We show the existence of vortex equilibria, and of merger for initial distances larger than those without external flow. The evolutions depend on the initial orientation of the vortices in the external flow.

  7. Hierarchical streamline bundles for visualizing 2D flow fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Shene, Ching-Kuang; Wang, Chaoli; Yu, Hongfeng; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2010-08-01

    We present hierarchical streamline bundles, a new approach to simplifying and visualizing 2D flow fields. Our method first densely seeds a flow field and produces a large number of streamlines that capture important flow features such as critical points. Then, we group spatially neighboring and geometrically similar streamlines to construct a hierarchy from which we extract streamline bundles at different levels of detail. Streamline bundles highlight multiscale flow features and patterns through a clustered yet non-cluttered display. This selective visualization strategy effectively accentuates visual foci and therefore is able to convey the desired insight into the flow fields. The hierarchical streamline bundles we have introduced offer a new way to characterize and visualize the flow structure and patterns in multiscale fashion. Streamline bundles highlight critical points clearly and concisely. Exploring the hierarchy allows a complete visualization of important flow features. Thanks to selective streamline display and flexible LOD refinement, our multiresolution technique is scalable and is promising for viewing large and complex flow fields. In the future, we would like to seek a cost-effective way to generate streamlines without enforcing the dense seeding condition. We will also extend this approach to handle real-world 3D complex flow fields.

  8. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-08-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  9. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  10. General Transient Fluid Flow Algorithm

    1992-03-12

    SALE2D calculates two-dimensional fluid flows at all speeds, from the incompressible limit to highly supersonic. An implicit treatment of the pressure calculation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique provides this flow speed flexibility. In addition, the computing mesh may move with the fluid in a typical Lagrangian fashion, be held fixed in an Eulerian manner, or move in some arbitrarily specified way to provide a continuous rezoning capability. This latitude resultsmore » from use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) treatment of the mesh. The partial differential equations solved are the Navier-Stokes equations and the mass and internal energy equations. The fluid pressure is determined from an equation of state and supplemented with an artificial viscous pressure for the computation of shock waves. The computing mesh consists of a two-dimensional network of quadrilateral cells for either cylindrical or Cartesian coordinates, and a variety of user-selectable boundary conditions are provided in the program.« less

  11. 2D Mixed Convection Thermal Incompressible Viscous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, Blanca; Nicolas, Alfredo

    2005-11-01

    Mixed convection thermal incomprressible viscous fluid flows in rectangular cavities are presented. These kind of flows may be governed by the time-dependent Boussinesq approximation in terms of the stream function-vorticity variables formulation. The results are obtained with a simple numerical scheme based mainly on a fixed point iterative process applied to the non-linear system of elliptic equations that is obtained after a second order time discretization. Numerical experiments are reported for the problem of a cavity with fluid boundary motion on the top. Some results correspond to validation examples and others, to the best of our knowledge, correspond to new results. To show that the new results are correct, a mesh size and time independence studies are carried out, and the acceptable errors are measured point-wise. For the optimal mesh size and time step the final times when the steady state is reached, as solution from the unsteady problem, are reported; it should be seen that they are larger than the ones for natural convection which, physically speaking, show the agreement that mixed convection flows are more active than those of natural convection due to the fluid boundary motion on the top of the cavity. The flow parameters are: the Reynolds number, the Grashof number and the aspect ratio.

  12. CAS2D- NONROTATING BLADE-TO-BLADE, STEADY, POTENTIAL TRANSONIC CASCADE FLOW ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    An exact, full-potential-equation model for the steady, irrotational, homoentropic, and homoenergetic flow of a compressible, inviscid fluid through a two-dimensional planar cascade together with its appropriate boundary conditions has been derived. The CAS2D computer program numerically solves an artificially time-dependent form of the actual full-potential-equation, providing a nonrotating blade-to-blade, steady, potential transonic cascade flow analysis code. Comparisons of results with test data and theoretical solutions indicate very good agreement. In CAS2D, the governing equation is discretized by using type-dependent, rotated finite differencing and the finite area technique. The flow field is discretized by providing a boundary-fitted, nonuniform computational mesh. This mesh is generated by using a sequence of conformal mapping, nonorthogonal coordinate stretching, and local, isoparametric, bilinear mapping functions. The discretized form of the full-potential equation is solved iteratively by using successive line over relaxation. Possible isentropic shocks are captured by the explicit addition of an artificial viscosity in a conservative form. In addition, a four-level, consecutive, mesh refinement feature makes CAS2D a reliable and fast algorithm for the analysis of transonic, two-dimensional cascade flows. The results from CAS2D are not directly applicable to three-dimensional, potential, rotating flows through a cascade of blades because CAS2D does not consider the effects of the Coriolis force that would be present in the three-dimensional case. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 200K of 8 bit bytes. The CAS2D program was developed in 1980.

  13. 2-D traveling-wave patterns in binary fluid convection

    SciTech Connect

    Surko, C.M.; Porta, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    An overview is presented of recent experiments designed to study two-dimensional traveling-wave convection in binary fluid convection in a large aspect ratio container. Disordered patterns are observed when convection is initiated. As time proceeds, they evolve to more ordered patterns, consisting of several domains of traveling-waves separated by well-defined domain boundaries. The detailed character of the patterns depends sensitively on the Rayleigh number. Numerical techniques are described which were developed to provide a quantitative characterization of the traveling-wave patterns. Applications of complex demodulation techniques are also described, which make a detailed study of the structure and dynamics of the domain boundaries possible.

  14. Improvement of a 2D numerical model of lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimine, Y.

    2013-12-01

    I propose an improved procedure that reduces an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in two-dimensional simulations based on Ishihara et al. (in Lava Flows and Domes, Fink, JH eds., 1990). The numerical model for lava flow simulations proposed by Ishihara et al. (1990) is based on two-dimensional shallow water model combined with a constitutive equation for a Bingham fluid. It is simple but useful because it properly reproduces distributions of actual lava flows. Thus, it has been regarded as one of pioneer work of numerical simulations of lava flows and it is still now widely used in practical hazard prediction map for civil defense officials in Japan. However, the model include an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of DEM because the model separately assigns the condition for the lava flow to stop due to yield stress for each of two orthogonal axes of rectangular calculating grid based on DEM. This procedure brings a diamond-shaped distribution as shown in Fig. 1 when calculating a lava flow supplied from a point source on a virtual flat plane although the distribution should be circle-shaped. To improve the drawback, I proposed a modified procedure that uses the absolute value of yield stress derived from both components of two orthogonal directions of the slope steepness to assign the condition for lava flows to stop. This brings a better result as shown in Fig. 2. Fig. 1. (a) Contour plots calculated with the original model of Ishihara et al. (1990). (b) Contour plots calculated with a proposed model.

  15. Gradient-Driven Vortex Motion in Nonneutral Plasmas and Ideal 2D Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schecter, David A.

    2000-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) turbulent flows can relax to metastable patterns without dissipation of kinetic energy. This ``rapid'' relaxation has been observed in computer simulations of ideal 2D fluids, and more recently in experiments with pure electron plasmas, which can obey similar dynamics. The late stage of relaxation often involves small vortices moving in a larger ``background'' shear-flow.(X.P. Huang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74), 4424 (1995). In time, positive vortices (rotating counter-clockwise) move to peaks in background vorticity, whereas negative vortices (rotating clockwise) move to minima.(C.G. Rossby, J. Mar. Res. 7), 175 (1948); C.H. Liu and L. Ting, Comp. & Fluids 15, 77 (1987). In general, the rate of this migration increases with the magnitude of the background vorticity gradient, whereas it decreases as the background shear intensifies.\\vspace12pt Positive and negative vortices can also be classified as either prograde or retrograde, depending on whether they rotate with or against the local background shear. Surprisingly, a retrograde vortex moves up or down a background vorticity gradient orders of magnitude faster than a prograde vortex of equal strength.(D.A. Schecter and D.H.E. Dubin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83), 2191 (1999). An accurate expression for the velocity of a weak retrograde vortex is obtained from an analytic calculation, in which the response of the background flow to the vortex is linearized. However, this linear theory fails for prograde vortices of any strength. Interestingly, the velocity of a prograde vortex can be obtained from a simple estimate, which accounts for the nonlinear ``trapping'' of background fluid around the vortex. The analytic expressions for the velocities of both prograde and retrograde vortices are in good quantitative agreement with vortex-in-cell simulations, and with electron plasma experiments, when the background shear is below a critical level. When the ratio of background shear to background vorticity

  16. Experimental and Computational Study of Multiphase Flow Hydrodynamics in 2D Trickle Bed Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, H.; Ben Salem, I.; Kurnia, J. C.; Rabbani, S.; Shamim, T.; Sassi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Trickle bed reactors are largely used in the refining processes. Co-current heavy oil and hydrogen gas flow downward on catalytic particle bed. Fine particles in the heavy oil and/or soot formed by the exothermic catalytic reactions deposit on the bed and clog the flow channels. This work is funded by the refining company of Abu Dhabi and aims at mitigating pressure buildup due to fine deposition in the TBR. In this work, we focus on meso-scale experimental and computational investigations of the interplay between flow regimes and the various parameters that affect them. A 2D experimental apparatus has been built to investigate the flow regimes with an average pore diameter close to the values encountered in trickle beds. A parametric study is done for the development of flow regimes and the transition between them when the geometry and arrangement of the particles within the porous medium are varied. Liquid and gas flow velocities have also been varied to capture the different flow regimes. Real time images of the multiphase flow are captured using a high speed camera, which were then used to characterize the transition between the different flow regimes. A diffused light source was used behind the 2D Trickle Bed Reactor to enhance visualizations. Experimental data shows very good agreement with the published literature. The computational study focuses on the hydrodynamics of multiphase flow and to identify the flow regime developed inside TBRs using the ANSYS Fluent Software package. Multiphase flow inside TBRs is investigated using the "discrete particle" approach together with Volume of Fluid (VoF) multiphase flow modeling. The effect of the bed particle diameter, spacing, and arrangement are presented that may be used to provide guidelines for designing trickle bed reactors.

  17. Lagrangian statistics and flow topology in forced 2-D turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoch, B.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Bos, W.J.T.; Schneider, Kai

    2011-01-01

    A study of the relationship between Lagrangian statistics and flow topology in fluid turbulence is presented. The topology is characterized using the Weiss criterion, which provides a conceptually simple tool to partition the flow into topologically different regions: elliptic (vortex dominated), hyperbolic (deformation dominated), and intermediate (turbulent background). The flow corresponds to forced two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in doubly periodic and circular bounded domains, the latter with no-slip boundary conditions. In the double periodic domain, the probability density function (pdf) of the Weiss field exhibits a negative skewness consistent with the fact that in periodic domains the flow is dominated by coherent vortex structures. On the other hand, in the circular domain, the elliptic and hyperbolic regions seem to be statistically similar. We follow a Lagrangian approach and obtain the statistics by tracking large ensembles of passively advected tracers. The pdfs of residence time in the topologically different regions are computed introducing the Lagrangian Weiss field, i.e., the Weiss field computed along the particles' trajectories. In elliptic and hyperbolic regions, the pdfs of the residence time have self-similar algebraic decaying tails. In contrast, in the intermediate regions the pdf has exponential decaying tails. The conditional pdfs (with respect to the flow topology) of the Lagrangian velocity exhibit Gaussian-like behavior in the periodic and in the bounded domains. In contrast to the freely decaying turbulence case, the conditional pdfs of the Lagrangian acceleration in forced turbulence show a comparable level of intermittency in both the periodic and the bounded domains. The conditional pdfs of the Lagrangian curvature are characterized, in all cases, by self-similar power-law behavior with a decay exponent of order - 2.

  18. In situ fluid typing and quantification with 1D and 2D NMR logging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boqin

    2007-05-01

    In situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fluid typing has recently gained momentum due to data acquisition and inversion algorithm enhancement of NMR logging tools. T(2) distributions derived from NMR logging contain information on bulk fluids and pore size distributions. However, the accuracy of fluid typing is greatly overshadowed by the overlap between T(2) peaks arising from different fluids with similar apparent T(2) relaxation times. Nevertheless, the shapes of T(2) distributions from different fluid components are often different and can be predetermined. Inversion with predetermined T(2) distributions allows us to perform fluid component decomposition to yield individual fluid volume ratios. Another effective method for in situ fluid typing is two-dimensional (2D) NMR logging, which results in proton population distribution as a function of T(2) relaxation time and fluid diffusion coefficient (or T(1) relaxation time). Since diffusion coefficients (or T(1) relaxation time) for different fluid components can be very different, it is relatively easy to separate oil (especially heavy oil) from water signal in a 2D NMR map and to perform accurate fluid typing. Combining NMR logging with resistivity and/or neutron/density logs provides a third method for in situ fluid typing. We shall describe these techniques with field examples. PMID:17466778

  19. Turbulent flow over a surface-mounted 2-D block in thermally-stratified boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Markfort, C. D.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2013-12-01

    Turbulent boundary-layer flows over complex topography have been of great interest in the atmospheric sciences and wind engineering communities. The geometry of the topography, surface characteristics and atmospheric thermal stability play important roles in determining momentum and scalar flux distribution. Studies of turbulent flow over simplified topography, such as 2-D or 3-D blocks and 2-D or 3-D sinusoidal hills, conducted under neutrally stratified boundary-layer conditions have provided insightful information of fluid dynamics. However, atmospheric thermal stability has rarely been incorporated into laboratory simulations, in particular, wind-tunnel experiments. Extension of such studies in thermally-stratified wind tunnels will fill this gap and advance our understanding of the underlying physics of flow over complex topography. Additionally, experimental data are useful for the development of new parameterizations for surface fluxes and validation of numerical models such as Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). A series of experiments involving neutral and thermally-stratified boundary-layer flows over a surface-mounted 2-D block, conducted at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory boundary-layer wind tunnel, will be presented. The 2-D block, with a width to height ratio of 2:1, occupied the lowest 25% of the turbulent boundary layer. Thermal stratification of the boundary layer was achieved by independently controlling the temperature of both the airflow, the test section floor and block surfaces. Measurements using high-resolution PIV, x-wire/cold-wire anemometry, thermal-couples and surface heat flux sensors were made to identify and quantify the turbulent flow properties, including the size of the recirculation zone, coherent vortex structures and the subsequent boundary layer recovery. Emphasis will be put on addressing thermal stability effects on momentum and scalar flux distribution.

  20. Numerical simulation of ( T 2, T 1) 2D NMR and fluid responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Mao-Jin; Zou, You-Long; Zhang, Jin-Yan; Zhao, Xin

    2012-12-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology is limited for fluid typing, while two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) logging can provide more parameters including longitudinal relaxation time ( T 1) and transverse relaxation time ( T 2) relative to fluid types in porous media. Based on the 2D NMR relaxation mechanism in a gradient magnetic field, echo train simulation and 2D NMR inversion are discussed in detail. For 2D NMR inversion, a hybrid inversion method is proposed based on the damping least squares method (LSQR) and an improved truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) algorithm. A series of spin echoes are first simulated with multiple waiting times ( T W s) in a gradient magnetic field for given fluid models and these synthesized echo trains are inverted by the hybrid method. The inversion results are consistent with given models. Moreover, the numerical simulation of various fluid models such as the gas-water, light oil-water, and vicious oil-water models were carried out with different echo spacings ( T E s) and T W s by this hybrid method. Finally, the influences of different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) on inversion results in various fluid models are studied. The numerical simulations show that the hybrid method and optimized observation parameters are applicable to fluid typing of gas-water and oil-water models.

  1. Eulerian and Lagrangian methods for vortex tracking in 2D and 3D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yangzi; Green, Melissa

    2014-11-01

    Coherent structures are a key component of unsteady flows in shear layers. Improvement of experimental techniques has led to larger amounts of data and requires of automated procedures for vortex tracking. Many vortex criteria are Eulerian, and identify the structures by an instantaneous local swirling motion in the field, which are indicated by closed or spiral streamlines or pathlines in a reference frame. Alternatively, a Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) analysis is a Lagrangian method based on the quantities calculated along fluid particle trajectories. In the current work, vortex detection is demonstrated on data from the simulation of two cases: a 2D flow with a flat plate undergoing a 45 ° pitch-up maneuver and a 3D wall-bounded turbulence channel flow. Vortices are visualized and tracked by their centers and boundaries using Γ1, the Q criterion, and LCS saddle points. In the cases of 2D flow, saddle points trace showed a rapid acceleration of the structure which indicates the shedding from the plate. For channel flow, saddle points trace shows that average structure convection speed exhibits a similar trend as a function of wall-normal distance as the mean velocity profile, and leads to statistical quantities of vortex dynamics. Dr. Jeff Eldredge and his research group at UCLA are gratefully acknowledged for sharing the database of simulation for the current research. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1-0210.

  2. 2-D Three Fluid Simulation of Upstreaming Ions Above Auroral Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielides, M. A.; Lummerzheim, D.; Otto, A.; Stevens, R. J.

    2006-12-01

    The ionosphere is a rich reservoir of charged particles from which a variable fraction is transported to the magnetosphere. An important transport phenomena is the formation of upward ion flow above auroral structure. A primary region of the outflow is not known, but contributions come from polar cap, dayside cusp/cleft region, auroral oval, or even from mid-latitudes. In the past global magnetospheric models and fluid codes were used to simulate large scale ion outflow above, e.g., the polar-cap aurora. However, satellites orbiting at low- altitudes have repeatingly detected localized ion outflow above the auroral oval. Ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling simulations gave first insides into the small-scale dynamics of aurora. The aim of this study is the investigation of coupled plasma and neutral dynamics in smaller scale aurora to explain the generation, structure, and dynamics of vertical ion upstream. We consider auroral electron precipitation at ionospheric heights in a 2-D three fluid ionospheric-magnetospheric coupling code (Otto and Zhu, 2003). Specially we examine the effects of the electron precipitation, heat conduction and heating in field- aligned current through coulomb collisions or turbulence causing: i) electron heating, ii) electron pressure gradients, and iii) upstreaming of ions through a resulting ambipolar electric field. Our first case studies are performed for different boundary conditions and for different auroral electron precipitation parameters (variation in characteristic auroral energy, auroral energy flux and horizontal scale). The results shall clarify how auroral precipitation can drive ions upwards. Finally we discuss the effect of ion drag and the interaction of the upstreaming ions with a stable neutral constituent. Otto, O. and H. Zhu, Fluid plasma simulation of coupled systems: Ionosphere and magnetosphere, Space Plasma Simulation. Edited by J. Buechner, C. Dum, and M. Scholer., Lecture Notes in Physics, vol. 615, p.193

  3. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

    1993-11-30

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

  4. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    McKay, Mark D.; Sweeney, Chad E.; Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel

    1993-01-01

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  5. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael D.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  6. Foam flows in 2D porous media: intermittency and bubble fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; Géraud, B.; Jones, S. A.; Dollet, B.; Cantat, I.

    2014-12-01

    Flowing foams are used in many engineering and technical applications. A well-known application is oil recovery. Another one is the remediation of polluted soils: the foam is injected into the ground in order to mobilize chemical species present in the medium. Apart from potential interesting physico-chemical and biochemical properties, foams have peculiar flow properties that applications might benefit of. In particular, viscous dissipation arises mostly from the contact zones between the soap films and the walls, which results in peculiar friction laws allowing the foam to invade narrow pores more efficiently than Newtonian fluids would. In most experimental studies no local information of the foam structure is possible, and only global quantities such as the effective viscosity can be measured. Using two-dimensional transparent flow cells, we have previously shown that foam structural [1] and elastic [2] effects significantly impact the flow of foams in porous media. We now present an investigation of foam flow through a two-dimensional (2D) porous medium consisting of circular obstacles positioned randomly in a Hele-Shaw cell (see figure). The foam structure is recorded in time by a video camera and subsequently analyzed by image processing, which provides us with the velocity field and spatial distribution of bubble sizes. The flow exhibits a rich phenomenology, including flow irreversibility, preferential flow paths, local flow intermittency/non-stationarity (despite the imposed permanent global flow rate). Moreover, the medium impacts the nature of the flowing fluid by selecting the bubble size through bubble fragmentation. We investigate how preferential flow paths and intermittency depend on the imposed global flow rate and foam quality (the water content), and show that the spatial distribution of bubble sizes is to some extent correlated with the velocity field. We furthermore measure the evolution, along the flow direction, of the probability density

  7. Integrated Coupling of Surface and Subsurface Flow with HYDRUS-2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Anne; Šimůnek, Jirka; Wöhling, Thomas; Schütze, Niels

    2016-04-01

    of various model parameters on simulated overland flow (while considering or neglecting the effects of subsurface flow) was carried out to verify the applicability of the model to different problems. The model produced reasonable results in describing the diffusion wave approximation and its interactions with subsurface flow processes. The model could handle coupled surface-subsurface processes for conditions involving runoff generated by infiltration excess, saturation excess, or run-on, as well as a combination of these runoff generating processes. Several standard features of the HYDRUS 2D model, such as root water uptake and evaporation from the soil surface, as well as evaporation from runoff layer, can still be considered by the new model. The code required relatively small time steps when overland flow was active, resulting in long simulation times, and sometimes produced poor mass balance. The model nevertheless showed potential to be a useful tool for addressing various issues related to irrigation research and to natural generation of overland flow at the hillslope scale. Maxwell, R., Putti, M., Meyerhoff, S., Delf, J., Ferguson, I., Ivanov, V., Kim, J., Kolditz, O., Kollet, S., Kumar, M., Lopez, S., Niu, J., Paniconi, C., Park, Y.-J., Phanikumar, M., Shen, C., Sudicky, E., and Sulis, M. (2014). Surface-subsurface model intercomparison: A first set of benchmark results to diagnose integrated hydrology and feedbacks. Water Resourc. Res., 50:1531-1549. Šimůnek, J., van Genuchten, M. T., and Šejna, M. (2011). The HYDRUS Software Package for Simulating Two- and Three-Dimensional Movement of Water, Heat, and Multiple Solutes in Variably-Saturated Media. Technical Manual, Version 2.0, PC Progress, Prague, Czech Republic. Takizawa, K., Bazilevs Y., Tezduyar, T. E., Long, C.C., Marsden, A. L. and Schjodt.K., Patient-Specific Cardiovascular Fluid Mechanics Analysis with the ST and ALE-VMS Method in Idelsohn, S. R. (2014). Numerical Simulations of Coupled Problems

  8. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Computer simulation of atmospheric flow corresponds well to imges taken during the second Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (BFFC) mission. The top shows a view from the pole, while the bottom shows a view from the equator. Red corresponds to hot fluid rising while blue shows cold fluid falling. This simulation was developed by Anil Deane of the University of Maryland, College Park and Paul Fischer of Argorne National Laboratory. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

  9. Template Matching Using a Fluid Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, William Curtis

    Template matching is successfully used in machine recognition of isolated spoken words. In these systems a word is broken into frames (20 millisecond time slices) and the spectral characteristics of each frame are found. Thus, each word is represented as a 2-dimensional (2-D) function of spectral characteristic and frame number. An unknown word is recognized by matching its 2-D representation to previously stored example words, or templates, also in this 2-D form. A new model for this matching step will be introduced. The 2-D representations of the template and unknown are used to determine the shape of a volume of viscous fluid. This volume is broken up into many small elements. The unknown is changed into the template by allowing flows between the element boundaries. Finally the match between the template and unknown is determined by calculating a weighted squared sum of the flow values. The model also allows the relative flow resistance between the element boundaries to be changed. This is useful for characterizing the important features of a given template. The flow resistances are changed according to the gradient of a simple performance function. This performance function is evaluated using a set of training samples provided by the user. The model is applied to isolated word and single character recognition tasks. Results indicate the applications where this model works best.

  10. Simulation of abrasive flow machining process for 2D and 3D mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Rupalika; Maity, Kalipada

    2015-12-01

    Improvement of surface finish and material removal has been quite a challenge in a finishing operation such as abrasive flow machining (AFM). Factors that affect the surface finish and material removal are media viscosity, extrusion pressure, piston velocity, and particle size in abrasive flow machining process. Performing experiments for all the parameters and accurately obtaining an optimized parameter in a short time are difficult to accomplish because the operation requires a precise finish. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was employed to accurately determine optimum parameters. In the current work, a 2D model was designed, and the flow analysis, force calculation, and material removal prediction were performed and compared with the available experimental data. Another 3D model for a swaging die finishing using AFM was simulated at different viscosities of the media to study the effects on the controlling parameters. A CFD simulation was performed by using commercially available ANSYS FLUENT. Two phases were considered for the flow analysis, and multiphase mixture model was taken into account. The fluid was considered to be a

  11. CAS2D: FORTRAN program for nonrotating blade-to-blade, steady, potential transonic cascade flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    An exact, full-potential-equation (FPE) model for the steady, irrotational, homentropic and homoenergetic flow of a compressible, homocompositional, inviscid fluid through two dimensional planar cascades of airfoils was derived, together with its appropriate boundary conditions. A computer program, CAS2D, was developed that numerically solves an artificially time-dependent form of the actual FPE. The governing equation was discretized by using type-dependent, rotated finite differencing and the finite area technique. The flow field was discretized by providing a boundary-fitted, nonuniform computational mesh. The mesh was generated by using a sequence of conforming mapping, nonorthogonal coordinate stretching, and local, isoparametric, bilinear mapping functions. The discretized form of the FPE was solved iteratively by using successive line overrelaxation. The possible isentropic shocks were correctly captured by adding explicitly an artificial viscosity in a conservative form. In addition, a three-level consecutive, mesh refinement feature makes CAS2D a reliable and fast algorithm for the analysis of transonic, two dimensional cascade flows.

  12. Programming fluid flow with microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Hamed; Masaeli, Mahdokht; di Carlo, Dino

    2011-11-01

    Flow control and fluid interface manipulation in microfluidic platforms are of great importance in a variety of applications. Current approaches to manipulate fluids generally rely on complex designs, difficult-to-fabricate 3D platforms or use of active methods. Here we show that in the presence of simple cylindrical obstacles (i.e. pillars) in a microchannel, at moderate to high flow rates, streamlines tend to turn and stretch in a manner that, unlike intuition for Stokes flow, does not precisely reverse after passing the pillar. The asymmetric flow behavior up- and down-stream of the pillar due to fluid inertia manifests itself as a total deformation of the topology of streamlines that effectively creates a net secondary flow which resembles the recirculating Dean flow in curving channels. Confocal images were taken to investigate the secondary flow for a variety of microstructure settings. We also developed a numerical technique to map the fluid motion in the channel which is utilized to characterize the secondary flow as well as to engineer the fluid patterns within the channel. This passive method creates the possibility of exceptional control of the 3D structure of the fluid within a microfluidic platform which can significantly advance applications requiring fluid interface control (e.g. optofluidics), ultrafast mixing and solution control around cells.

  13. Relaminarization of fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimha, R.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms of the relaminarization of turbulent flows are investigated with a view to establishing any general principles that might govern them. Three basic archetypes of reverting flows are considered: the dissipative type, the absorptive type, and the Richardson type exemplified by a turbulent boundary layer subjected to severe acceleration. A number of other different reverting flows are then considered in the light of the analysis of these archetypes, including radial Poiseuille flow, convex boundary layers, flows reverting by rotation, injection, and suction, as well as heated horizontal and vertical gas flows. Magnetohydrodynamic duct flows are also examined. Applications of flow reversion for turbulence control are discussed.

  14. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    MOLTEN WELD POOLS are dynamic. Liquid in the weld pool in acted on by several strong forces, which can result in high-velocity fluid motion. Fluid flow velocities exceeding 1 m/s (3.3 ft/s) have been observed in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds under ordinary welding conditions, and higher velocities have been measured in submerged arc welds. Fluid flow is important because it affects weld shape and is related to the formation of a variety of weld defects. Moving liquid transports heat and often dominates heat transport in the weld pool. Because heat transport by mass flow depends on the direction and speed of fluid motion, weld pool shape can differ dramatically from that predicted by conductive heat flow. Temperature gradients are also altered by fluid flow, which can affect weld microstructure. A number of defects in GTA welds have been attributed to fluid flow or changes in fluid flow, including lack of penetration, top bead roughness, humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven penetration (spiking) characteristic of these types of welds.

  15. A 2D pendulum submitted to an incoming flow: drag acting like gravity and new instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fani, Andrea; Gallaire, Francois

    2013-11-01

    Flow induced oscillations of slender bodies facing an incoming flow are relevant in a large number of engineering applications, such as the design of tubular structures of offshore platforms, heat exchangers and energy harvesting. Numerical simulations and experiments available in literature often consider a circular cylinder in an uniform flow which can move only transversally with respect to the flow direction. In a recent work Semin et al. (JFM, 2011) studied a tethered 2D cylinder strongly confined between two parallel plane walls. It is shown that confinement alters significantly the flow dynamics, with a new instability, denoted confinement induced vibration (CIV), which occur at a Reynolds number much lower than the vortex induced vibration (VIV) critical one. In the present work we characterize the instability scenario of a confined tethered cylinder by means of a global stability analysis of the fluid-structure problem. In strongly confined channels, a periodic unstable mode, related to CIV vibrations, is observed, while for moderated confinement a new steady diverging instability is founded.

  16. Insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece and method

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid flow passage bridgepiece for insertion into an open-face fluid flow channel of a fluid flow plate is provided. The bridgepiece provides a sealed passage from a columnar fluid flow manifold to the flow channel, thereby preventing undesirable leakage into and out of the columnar fluid flow manifold. When deployed in the various fluid flow plates that are used in a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, bridgepieces of this invention prevent mixing of reactant gases, leakage of coolant or humidification water, and occlusion of the fluid flow channel by gasket material. The invention also provides a fluid flow plate assembly including an insertable bridgepiece, a fluid flow plate adapted for use with an insertable bridgepiece, and a method of manufacturing a fluid flow plate with an insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece.

  17. COYOTE: A computer program for 2-D reactive flow simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1990-04-01

    We describe the numerical algorithm used in the COYOTE two- dimensional, transient, Eulerian hydrodynamics program for reactive flows. The program has a variety of options that provide capabilities for a wide range of applications, and it is designed to be robust and relatively easy to use while maintaining adequate accuracy and efficiency to solve realistic problems. It is based on the ICE method, and it includes a general species and chemical reaction network for simulating reactive flows. It also includes swirl, turbulence transport models, and a nonuniform mesh capability. We describe several applications of the program. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  18. 2D VARIABLY SATURATED FLOWS: PHYSICAL SCALING AND BAYESIAN ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel dimensionless formulation for water flow in two-dimensional variably saturated media is presented. It shows that scaling physical systems requires conservation of the ratio between capillary forces and gravity forces. A direct result of this finding is that for two phys...

  19. LOCA hydroloads calculations with multidimensional nonlinear fluid/structure interaction. Volume 2: STEALTH 2D/WHAMSE 2D single-phse fluid and elastic structure studies. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.H.; Santee, G.E. Jr.; Mortensen, G.A.; Brockett, G.F.; Gross, M.B.; Silling, S.A.; Belytschko, T.

    1981-03-01

    This report, the second in a series of reports for RP-1065, describes the second step in the stepwise approach for developing the three-dimensional, nonlinear, fluid/structure interaction methodology to assess the hydroloads on a large PWR during the subcooled portions of a hypothetical LOCA. The second step in the methodology considers enhancements and special modifications to the 2D STEALTH-HYDRO computer program and the 2D WHAMSE computer program. The 2D STEALTH-HYDRO enhancements consist of a fluid-fluid coupling control-volume model and an orifice control-volume model. The enhancements to 2D WHAMSE include elimination of the implicit integration routines, material models, and structural elements not required for the hydroloads application. In addition the logic for coupling the 2D STEALTH-HYDRO computer program to the 2D WHAMSE computer program is discussed.

  20. Fluid Physics of Foam Evolution and Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aref, H.; Thoroddsen, S. T.; Sullivan, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    The grant supported theoretical, numerical and experimental work focused on the elucidation of the fluid physics of foam structure, evolution and flow. The experimental work concentrated on these subject areas: (a) Measurements of the speed of reconnections within a foam; (b) statistics of bubble rearrangements; and (c) three-dimensional reconstruction of the foam structure. On the numerical simulation and theory side our efforts concentrated on the subjects: (a) simulation techniques for 2D and 3D foams; (b) phase transition in a compressible foam; and (c) TCP structures.

  1. Roton Excitations and the Fluid-Solid Phase Transition in Superfluid 2D Yukawa Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinelli, S.; Galli, D. E.; Reatto, L.; Motta, M.

    2016-05-01

    We compute several ground-state properties and the dynamical structure factor of a zero-temperature system of Bosons interacting with the 2D screened Coulomb (2D-SC) potential. We resort to the exact shadow path integral ground state (SPIGS) quantum Monte Carlo method to compute the imaginary-time correlation function of the model, and to the genetic algorithm via falsification of theories (GIFT) to retrieve the dynamical structure factor. We provide a detailed comparison of ground-state properties and collective excitations of 2D-SC and ^4 He atoms. The roton energy of the 2D-SC system is an increasing function of density, and not a decreasing one as in ^4 He. This result is in contrast with the view that the roton is the soft mode of the fluid-solid transition. We uncover a remarkable quasi-universality of backflow and of other properties when expressed in terms of the amount of short-range order as quantified by the height of the first peak of the static structure factor.

  2. Rotational fluid flow experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This project which began in 1986 as part of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) Advanced Space Design Program focuses on the design and implementation of an electromechanical system for studying vortex behavior in a microgravity environment. Most of the existing equipment was revised and redesigned by this project team, as necessary. Emphasis was placed on documentation and integration of the electrical and mechanical subsystems. Project results include reconfiguration and thorough testing of all hardware subsystems, implementation of an infrared gas entrainment detector, new signal processing circuitry for the ultrasonic fluid circulation device, improved prototype interface circuits, and software for overall control of experiment operation.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Compression Corners and Hypersonic Inlet Flows Using the RPLUS2D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational code, PRLUS2D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for two-dimensional shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions. The problem of compression corners at supersonic speeds was solved using the RPLUS2D code. To validate the RPLUS2D code for hypersonic speeds, it was applied to a realistic hypersonic inlet geometry. Both the Baldwin-Lomax and the Chien two-equation turbulence models were used. Computational results showed that the RPLUS2D code compared very well with experimentally obtained data for supersonic compression corner flows, except in the case of large separated flows resulting from the interactions between the shock wave and turbulent boundary layer. The computational results compared well with the experiment results in a hypersonic NASA P8 inlet case, with the Chien two-equation turbulence model performing better than the Baldwin-Lomax model.

  4. ZEUS-2D: A radiation magnetohydrodynamics code for astrophysical flows in two space dimensions. I - The hydrodynamic algorithms and tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1992-06-01

    A detailed description of ZEUS-2D, a numerical code for the simulation of fluid dynamical flows including a self-consistent treatment of the effects of magnetic fields and radiation transfer is presented. Attention is given to the hydrodynamic (HD) algorithms which form the foundation for the more complex MHD and radiation HD algorithms. The effect of self-gravity on the flow dynamics is accounted for by an iterative solution of the sparse-banded matrix resulting from discretizing the Poisson equation in multidimensions. The results of an extensive series of HD test problems are presented. A detailed description of the MHD algorithms in ZEUS-2D is presented. A new method of computing the electromotive force is developed using the method of characteristics (MOC). It is demonstrated through the results of an extensive series of MHD test problems that the resulting hybrid MOC-constrained transport method provides for the accurate evolution of all modes of MHD wave families.

  5. 2D numerical modelling of fluid percolation in the subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymkova, D.; Gerya, T.; Podladchikov, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Subducting slab dehydration and resulting aqueous fluid percolation triggers partial melting in the mantle wedge and is accompanied with the further melt percolation through the porous space to the region above the slab. This problem is a complex coupled chemical, thermal and mechanical process responsible for the magmatic arcs formation and change of the mantle wedge properties. We have created a two-dimensional model of a two-phase flow in a porous media solving a coupled Darcy-Stokes system of equations for two incompressible media for the case of nonlinear visco-plastic rheology of solid matrix. Our system of equation is expanded for the high-porosity limits and stabilized for the case of high porosity contrasts. We use a finite-difference method with fully staggered grid in a combination with marker-in-cell technique for advection of fluid and solid phase. We performed a comparison with a benchmark of a thermal convection in a porous media in a bottom-heated box to verify the interdependency of Rayleigh and Nusselt numbers with earlier obtained ones (Cherkaoui & Wilcock, 1999). We have demonstrated the stability and robustness of the algorithm in case of strongly non-linear visco-plastic rheology of solid including cases with localization of both deformation and porous flow along spontaneously forming shear bands. We have checked our model for the forming of localized porous channels under a simple shear stress (Katz et al, 2006). We have developed a setup of a self-initiating due to gravitational instability subduction. With our coupled fluid-solid flow we have achieved a self-consistent water downward suction by a slab bending predicted by the other models with a simplified fluid kinematical motion implementation (Faccenda et al, 2009). With this setup we have obtained a self-consistent upper crust weakening by a porous fluid pressure which was theoretically assumed in the previously existing subduction models (Gerya & Meilick, 2011; Faccenda et al, 2009

  6. A multispeed Discrete Boltzmann Model for transcritical 2D shallow water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rocca, Michele; Montessori, Andrea; Prestininzi, Pietro; Succi, Sauro

    2015-03-01

    In this work a Discrete Boltzmann Model for the solution of transcritical 2D shallow water flows is presented and validated. In order to provide the model with transcritical capabilities, a particular multispeed velocity set has been employed for the discretization of the Boltzmann equation. It is shown that this particular set naturally yields a simple and closed procedure to determine higher order equilibrium distribution functions needed to simulate transcritical flow. The model is validated through several classical benchmarks and is proven to correctly and accurately simulate both 1D and 2D transitions between the two flow regimes.

  7. Flow-assisted 2D polymorph selection: stabilizing metastable monolayers at the liquid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shern-Long; Yuan, Zhongyi; Chen, Long; Mali, Kunal S; Müllen, Klaus; De Feyter, Steven

    2014-05-28

    Controlling crystal polymorphism constitutes a formidable challenge in contemporary chemistry. Two-dimensional (2D) crystals often provide model systems to decipher the complications in 3D crystals. In this contribution, we explore a unique way of governing 2D polymorphism at the organic liquid-solid interface. We demonstrate that a directional solvent flow could be used to stabilize crystalline monolayers of a metastable polymorph. Furthermore, flow fields active within the applied flow generate millimeter-sized domains of either polymorph in a controlled and reproducible fashion. PMID:24867142

  8. 2D-simulation of wet steam flow in a steam turbine with spontaneous condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lan-Xin; Zheng, Qun; Liu, Shun-Long

    2007-06-01

    Removal of condensates from wet steam flow in the last stages of steam turbines significantly promotes stage efficiency and prevents erosion of rotors. In this paper, homogeneous spontaneous condensation in transonic steam flow in the 2-D rotor-tip section of a stage turbine is investigated. Calculated results agree with experimental data reasonably well. On the basis of the above work, a 2-D numerical simulation of wet steam flow in adjacent root sections of a complex steam turbine stage was carried out. Computational results were analyzed and provide insights into effective removal of humidity.

  9. Fluctuating Pressure Data from 2-D Nozzle Cold Flow Tests (Dual Bell)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.

    2001-01-01

    Rocket engines nozzle performance changes as a vehicle climbs through the atmosphere. An altitude compensating nozzle, ACN, is intended to improve on a fixed geometry bell nozzle that performs at optimum at only one trajectory point. In addition to nozzle performance, nozzle transient loads are an important consideration. Any nozzle experiences large transient toads when shocks pass through the nozzle at start and shutdown. Additional transient toads will occur at transitional flow conditions. The objectives of cold flow nozzle testing at MSFC are CFD benchmark / calibration and Unsteady flow / sideloads. Initial testing performed with 2-D inserts to 14" transonic wind tunnel. Recent review of 2-D data in preparation for nozzle test facility 3-D testing. This presentation shows fluctuating pressure data and some observations from 2-D dual-bell nozzle cold flow tests.

  10. Turbulence modeling for subsonic separated flows over 2-D airfoils and 3-D wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Aaron M.

    Accurate predictions of turbulent boundary layers and flow separation through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are becoming more and more essential for the prediction of loads in the design of aerodynamic flight components. Standard eddy viscosity models used in many commercial codes today do not capture the nonequilibrium effects seen in a separated flow and thus do not generally make accurate separation predictions. Part of the reason for this is that under nonequilibrium conditions such as a strong adverse pressure gradient, the history effects of the flow play an important role in the growth and decay of turbulence. More recent turbulence models such as Olsen and Coakley's Lag model and Lillard's lagRST model seek to simulate these effects by lagging the turbulent variables when nonequilibrium effects become important. The purpose of the current research is to assess how these nonequilibrium turbulence models capture the separated regions on various 2-D airfoils and 3-D wings. Nonequilibrium models including the Lag model and the lagRST model are evaluated in comparison with three baseline models (Spalart-Allmaras, Wilcox's k-omega, and Menter's SST) using a modified version of the OVERFLOW code. Tuning the model coefficients of the Lag and lagRST models is also explored. Results show that the various lagRST formulations display an improvement in velocity profile predictions over the standard RANS models, but have trouble capturing the edge of the boundary layer. Experimental separation location measurements were not available, but several trends are noted which may be useful to tuning the model coefficients in the future.

  11. Effect of River Training Project on Hydrodynamics Flow Circumstances by 2D Finite Element Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, B.; Li, D. F.; Hu, H. J.; Zhang, H. W.; Lou, L. H.; Chen, M.; Lv, Z. Y.

    Based on the verified two dimensional(2D) finite element model for river flow simulation, the effect of estuary training levees on the water flow and sediment movement in the Yellow River estuary is analyzed. For disclosing the effect of setting the two training levees on the flow and sediment motion, the calculation and analysis for the two projects, (one is no levees, the other is setting up two no levees) are given. The results show that when setting up two training levees, water flow is bound by levees and the water flows become more concentrated. As a result, velocity increases in the main channel, sediment carrying capacity of water flow increases correspondingly.

  12. Fluid flow electrophoresis in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, R. N.

    1975-01-01

    Four areas relating to free-flow electrophoresis in space were investigated. The first was the degree of improvement over earthbound operations that might be expected. The second area of investigation covered the problems in developing a flowing buffer electrophoresis apparatus. The third area of investigation was the problem of testing on the ground equipment designed for use in space. The fourth area of investigation was the improvement to be expected in space for purification of biologicals. The results of some ground-based experiments are described. Other studies included cooling requirements in space, fluid sealing techniques, and measurement of voltage drop across membranes.

  13. Ferroelectric Fluid Flow Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An active valve is controlled and driven by external electrical actuation of a ferroelectric actuator to provide for improved passage of the fluid during certain time periods and to provide positive closure of the valve during other time periods. The valve provides improved passage in the direction of flow and positive closure in the direction against the flow. The actuator is a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature, said dome shaped actuator having a rim and an apex. and a dome height measured from a plane through said rim said apex that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and an outside surface of said dome shaped actuator.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid flow in adults.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G; Haughton, Victor; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    2016-01-01

    This chapter uses magnetic resonance imaging phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow measurements to predict which clinical normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) patients will respond to shunting as well as which patients with Chiari I are likely to develop symptoms of syringomyelia. Symptomatic NPH patients with CSF flow (measured as the aqueductal CSF stroke volume) which is shown to be hyperdynamic (defined as twice normal) are quite likely to respond to ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The hyperdynamic CSF flow results from normal systolic brain expansion compressing the enlarged ventricles. When atrophy occurs, there is less brain expansion, decreased aqueductal CSF flow, and less likelihood of responding to shunting. It appears that NPH is a "two-hit" disease, starting as benign external hydrocephalus in infancy, followed by deep white-matter ischemia in late adulthood, which causes increased resistance to CSF outflow through the extracellular space of the brain. Using computational flow dynamics (CFD), CSF flow can be modeled at the foramen magnum and in the upper cervical spine. As in the case of NPH, hyperdynamic CSF flow appears to cause the signs and symptoms in Chiari I and can provide an additional indication for surgical decompression. CFD can also predict CSF pressures over the cardiac cycle. It has been hypothesized that elevated pressure pulses may be a significant etiologic factor in some cases of syringomyelia. PMID:27432684

  15. An F2D analysis of the Flow Instability Test (FIT) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-10-01

    The F2D code was used to analyze the Flow-Instability-Test (FIT) experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratories. A one-dimensional analysis of the experiment indicated that at the higher temperature levels the element should be unstable. The experimental data corroborated this theory. The two-dimensional simulation behaved in a manner that was very similar to the experimentally measured behavior. In conclusion, the FIT experimental analysis yields partial code validation of F2D, and it also validates the methodology that is used in analyzing thermal flow stability.

  16. Extension and application of the Preissmann slot model to 2D transient mixed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranzoni, Andrea; Dazzi, Susanna; Aureli, Francesca; Mignosa, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an extension of the Preissmann slot concept for the modeling of highly transient two-dimensional (2D) mixed flows. The classic conservative formulation of the 2D shallow water equations for free surface flows is adapted by assuming that two fictitious vertical slots, aligned along the two Cartesian plane directions and normally intersecting, are added on the ceiling of each integration element. Accordingly, transitions between free surface and pressurized flow can be handled in a natural and straightforward way by using the same set of governing equations. The opportunity of coupling free surface and pressurized flows is actually useful not only in one-dimensional (1D) problems concerning sewer systems but also for modeling 2D flooding phenomena in which the pressurization of bridges, culverts, or other crossing hydraulic structures can be expected. Numerical simulations are performed by using a shock-capturing MUSCL-Hancock finite volume scheme combined with the FORCE (First-Order Centred) solver for the evaluation of the numerical fluxes. The validation of the mathematical model is accomplished on the basis of both exact solutions of 1D discontinuous initial value problems and reference radial solutions of idealized test cases with cylindrical symmetry. Furthermore, the capability of the model to deal with practical field-scale applications is assessed by simulating the transit of a bore under an arch bridge. Numerical results show that the proposed model is suitable for the prediction of highly transient 2D mixed flows.

  17. Combination 3D TOP with 2D PC MRA Techique for cerebral blood flow volume measurement.

    PubMed

    Guo, G; Wu, R H; Zhang, Y P; Guan, J T; Guo, Y L; Cheng, Y; terBrugge, K; Mikulis, D J

    2006-01-01

    To demonstrate the discrepancy of cerebral blood flow volume (BFV) estimation with 2D phase-contrast (2D PC) MRA guided with 3D time-of-flight (3D TOF) MR localization by using an "internal" standard. 20 groups of the common (CCA), internal (ICA), and external (ECA) carotid arteries in 10 healthy subjects were examined with 2D PC MRA guided by 3D TOF MR angiograms. The sum BFV of the internal and external carotid arteries was then compared with the ipsilateral common carotid artery flow. An accurate technique would demonstrate no difference. The difference was therefore a measure of accuracy of the method. 3D TOF MRA localization is presented to allow the determination of a slice orientation to improve the accuracy of 2D PC MRA in estimate the BFV. By using the combined protocols, there was better correlation in BFV estimate between the sum of ICA+ECA with the ipsilateral CCA (R2=0.729, P=0.000). The inconsistency (mean +/- SD) was found to be 6.95 +/- 5.95% for estimate the BFV in ICA+ECA and ipsilateral CCA. The main inconsistency was contributed to the ECA and its branches. Guided with 3D TOF MRA localization, 2D PC MRA is more accurate in the determination of blood flow volume in the carotid arteries. PMID:17946401

  18. Transient Wellbore Fluid Flow Model

    1982-04-06

    WELBORE is a code to solve transient, one-dimensional two-phase or single-phase non-isothermal fluid flow in a wellbore. The primary thermodynamic variables used in solving the equations are the pressure and specific energy. An equation of state subroutine provides the density, quality, and temperature. The heat loss out of the wellbore is calculated by solving a radial diffusion equation for the temperature changes outside the bore. The calculation is done at each node point in themore » wellbore.« less

  19. Use of finite volume radiation for predicting the Knudsen minimum in 2D channel flow

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, Chetan P.; Mahajan, Roop L.

    2014-12-09

    In an earlier paper we employed an analogy between surface-to-surface radiation and free-molecular flow to model Knudsen flow through tubes and onto planes. In the current paper we extend the analogy between thermal radiation and molecular flow to model the flow of a gas in a 2D channel across all regimes of rarefaction. To accomplish this, we break down the problem of gaseous flow into three sub-problems (self-diffusion, mass-motion and generation of pressure gradient) and use the finite volume method for modeling radiation through participating media to model the transport in each sub-problem as a radiation problem. We first model molecular self-diffusion in the stationary gas by modeling the transport of the molecular number density through the gas starting from the analytical asymptote for free-molecular flow to the kinetic theory limit of gaseous self-diffusion. We then model the transport of momentum through the gas at unit pressure gradient to predict Poiseuille flow and slip flow in the 2D gas. Lastly, we predict the generation of pressure gradient within the gas due to molecular collisions by modeling the transport of the forces generated due to collisions per unit volume of gas. We then proceed to combine the three radiation problems to predict flow of the gas over the entire Knudsen number regime from free-molecular to transition to continuum flow and successfully capture the Knudsen minimum at Kn ∼ 1.

  20. Evaluation of 2D shallow-water model for spillway flow with a complex geometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the two-dimensional (2D) shallow water model is formulated based on several assumptions such as hydrostatic pressure distribution and vertical velocity is negligible, as a simple alternative to the complex 3D model, it has been used to compute water flows in which these assumptions may be ...

  1. Parallelized CCHE2D flow model with CUDA Fortran on Graphics Process Units

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents the CCHE2D implicit flow model parallelized using CUDA Fortran programming technique on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). A parallelized implicit Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) solver using Parallel Cyclic Reduction (PCR) algorithm on GPU is developed and tested. This solve...

  2. Application of a generalized minimal residual method to 2D unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, Ray; Sankar, L. N.

    1992-01-01

    A generalized minimum residual scheme (GMRES), previously developed for solving nonlinear and linear systems of equations, has been applied to the numerical solution of 2D unsteady compressible flows. It is found that the use of GMRES significantly increases the time step that may be used, compared to noniterative implicit schemes. The feasibility of reducing the memory requirements of the GMRES scheme using a multigrid strategy has also been explored. Several sample steady and unsteady viscous flow applications are presented.

  3. 2D fluid simulations of acoustic waves in pulsed ICP discharges: Comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Cunge, Gilles; Sadeghi, Nader; Braithwaite, N. St. J.

    2012-10-01

    Neutral depletion, which is mostly caused by gas heating under typical material processing conditions, is an important phenomenon in high-density plasmas. In low pressure pulsed discharges, experiments show that additional depletion due to electron pressure (Pe) may have a non-negligible influence on radical transport [1]. To evaluate this effect, comparisons between 2D fluid simulations and measurements of gas convection in Ar/Cl2 pulsed ICP plasmas are reported. In the afterglow, Pe drops rapidly by electron cooling which generates a neutral pressure gradient between the plasma bulk and the reactor walls. This in turn forces the cold surrounding gas to move rapidly towards the center, thus launching an acoustic wave in the reactor. Time-resolved measurements of atoms drift velocity and gas temperature by LIF and LAS in the early afterglow are consistent with gas drifting at acoustic wave velocity followed by rapid gas cooling. Similar results are predicted by the model. The ion flux at the reactor walls is also shown to oscillate in phase with the acoustic wave due to ion-neutral friction forces. Finally, during plasma ignition, experiments show opposite phenomena when Pe rises.[4pt] [1] Cunge et al, APL 96, 131501 (2010)

  4. Fluid flows around nanoelectromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svitelskiy, O.; Sauer, V.; Liu, N.; Vick, D.; Cheng, K. M.; Freeman, M. R.; Hiebert, W. K.

    2012-02-01

    To explore properties of fluids on a nanosize scale, we fabricated by a standard top down technique a series of nanoelectromechanical resonators (cantilevers and bridges) with widths w and thicknesses t from 100 to 500 nm; lengths l from 0.5 to 12 micron; and resonant frequencies f from 10 to 400 MHz. For the sake of purity of the experiment, the undercut in the widest (w=500 nm) devices was eliminated using the focused ion beam. To model the fluidic environment the devices were placed in the atmosphere of compressed gases (He, N2, CO2, Ar, H2) at pressures from vacuum up to 20 MPa, and in liquid CO2; their properties were studied by the real time stroboscopic optical interferometry. Thus, we fully explored the Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow damping models. Observing free molecular flow extending above atmospheric pressure, we find the fluid relaxation time model to be the best approximation throughout, but not beyond, the non-Newtonian regime, and both, vibrating spheres model and the model based on Knudsen number, to be valid in the viscous limit.

  5. Simulation of the flow and mass transfer for KDP crystals undergoing 2D translation during growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Li, Mingwei; Hu, Zhitao; Yin, Huawei; Wang, Bangguo; Cui, Qidong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a novel motion mode for crystals during growth, i.e., 2D translation, is proposed. Numerical simulations of flow and mass transfer are conducted for the growth of large-scale potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals subjected to the new motion mode. Surface supersaturation and shear stress are obtained as functions of the translational velocity, distance, size, orientation of crystals. The dependence of these two parameters on the flow fields around the crystals is also discussed. The thicknesses of the solute boundary layer varied with translational velocity are described. The characteristics of solution flow and surface supersaturation distribution are summarized, where it suggests that the morphological stability of a crystal surface can be enhanced if the proposed 2D translation is applied to crystal growth.

  6. Approximate analytic solutions to 3D unconfined groundwater flow within regional 2D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, K.; Haitjema, H. M.

    2000-04-01

    We present methods for finding approximate analytic solutions to three-dimensional (3D) unconfined steady state groundwater flow near partially penetrating and horizontal wells, and for combining those solutions with regional two-dimensional (2D) models. The 3D solutions use distributed singularities (analytic elements) to enforce boundary conditions on the phreatic surface and seepage faces at vertical wells, and to maintain fixed-head boundary conditions, obtained from the 2D model, at the perimeter of the 3D model. The approximate 3D solutions are analytic (continuous and differentiable) everywhere, including on the phreatic surface itself. While continuity of flow is satisfied exactly in the infinite 3D flow domain, water balance errors can occur across the phreatic surface.

  7. Investigation of flow rate in a quasi-2D hopper with two symmetric outlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Zhang, Sheng; Yang, Guanghui; Lin, Ping; Tian, Yuan; Wan, Jiang-Feng; Yang, Lei

    2016-03-01

    In this study the flow rate in a quasi-2D hopper with two symmetric outlets was investigated numerically. When two outlets merge into one, the flow rate is obviously bigger than that with a large enough distance between them. To explain the influence of the interaction between these two outlets, it was found that the velocity field above one outlet will be affected by the neighboring outlet by reducing the stagnant zone. With increasing distance, this interaction becomes weaker. Finally the formula of flow rate considering various outlet sizes and distances is fitted to the simulation data.

  8. Fluid Flow Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilimpochapornkul, Viroj; Obot, Nsima T.

    1986-01-01

    The undergraduate fluid mechanics laboratory at Clarkson University consists of three experiments: mixing; drag measurements; and fluid flow and pressure drop measurements. The latter experiment is described, considering equipment needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained. (JN)

  9. Fluid flow, mineral reactions, and metasomatism

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, J.M.; Dipple, G.M. )

    1991-03-01

    A general model that relates fluid flow along a temnperature gradient to chemical reaction in rocks can be used to quantitatively interpret petrologic and geochemical data on metasomatism from ancient flow systems in terms of flow direction and time-integrated fluid flux. The model is applied to regional metamorphism, quartz veins, and a metasomatized ductile fault zone.

  10. Anomalous diffusion of an ellipsoid in quasi-2D active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yi; Yang, Ou; Tang, Chao; Cheng, Xiang

    Enhanced diffusion of a tracer particle is a unique feature in active fluids. Here, we studied the diffusion of an ellipsoid in a free-standing film of E. coli. Particle diffusion is linearly enhanced at low bacterial concentrations, whereas a non-linear enhancement is observed at high bacterial concentrations due to the giant fluctuation. More importantly, we uncover an anomalous coupling between the translational and rotational degrees of freedom that is strictly prohibited in the classical Brownian diffusion. Combining experiments with theoretical modeling, we show that such an anomaly arises from the stretching flow induced by the force dipole of swimming bacteria. Our work illustrates a novel universal feature of active matter and transforms the understanding of fundamental transport processes in microbiological systems. ACS Petroleum Research Fund #54168-DNI9, NSF Faculty Early Career Development Program, DMR-1452180.

  11. Reconfiguration of a flexible fiber immersed in a 2D dense granular flow close to the jamming transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Evelyne; Algarra, Nicolas; Vandembroucq, Damien; Lazarus, Arnaud

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new fluid/structure interaction in the unusual case of a dense granular medium flowing against an elastic fibre acting as a flexible intruder. We experimentally studied the deflection of a mylar flexible beam clamped at one side, the other free side facing a 2D granular flow in a horizontal cell moving at a constant velocity. We investigated the reconfiguration of the fibre as a function of the fibre's rigidity and of the granular packing fraction close but below the jamming in 2D. Imposing the fibre geometry like its length or thickness sets the critical buckling force the fibre is able to resist if it was not supported by lateral grains, while increasing the granular packing fraction might laterally consolidate the fibre and prevent it from buckling. But on the other side, the approach to jamming transition by increasing the granular packing fraction will be characterized by a dramatically increasing size of the cluster of connected grains forming a solid block acting against the fibre, which might promote the fibre's deflection. Thus, we investigated the granular flow fields, the fibre's deflexion as well as the forces experienced by the fibre and compared them with theoretical predictions from elastica for different loadings along the fibre. PMMH, CNRS UMR 7636, UPMC, ESPCI-ParisTech, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France.

  12. Investigation of the effect of wall friction on the flow rate in 2D and 3D Granular Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballo-Ramirez, Brenda; Pleau, Mollie; Easwar, Nalini; Birwa, Sumit; Shah, Neil; Tewari, Shubha

    We have measured the mass flow rate of spherical steel spheres under gravity in vertical, straight-walled 2 and 3-dimensional hoppers, where the flow velocity is controlled by the opening size. Our measurements focus on the role of friction and its placement along the walls of the hopper. In the 2D case, an increase in the coefficient of static friction from μ = 0.2 to 0.6 is seen to decrease the flow rate significantly. We have changed the placement of frictional boundaries/regions from the front and back walls of the 2D hopper to the side walls and floor to investigate the relative importance of the different regions in determining the flow rate. Fits to the Beverloo equation show significant departure from the expected exponent of 1.5 in the case of 2D flow. In contrast, 3D flow rates do not show much dependence on wall friction and its placement. We compare the experimental data to numerical simulations of gravity driven hopper granular flow with varying frictional walls constructed using LAMMPS*. *http://lammps.sandia.gov Supported by NSF MRSEC DMR 0820506.

  13. Moment Invariants for 2D Flow Fields via Normalization in Detail.

    PubMed

    Bujack, Roxana; Hotz, Ingrid; Scheuermann, Gerik; Hitzer, Eckhard

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of 2D flow data is often guided by the search for characteristic structures with semantic meaning. One way to approach this question is to identify structures of interest by a human observer, with the goal of finding similar structures in the same or other datasets. The major challenges related to this task are to specify the notion of similarity and define respective pattern descriptors. While the descriptors should be invariant to certain transformations, such as rotation and scaling, they should provide a similarity measure with respect to other transformations, such as deformations. In this paper, we propose to use moment invariants as pattern descriptors for flow fields. Moment invariants are one of the most popular techniques for the description of objects in the field of image recognition. They have recently also been applied to identify 2D vector patterns limited to the directional properties of flow fields. Moreover, we discuss which transformations should be considered for the application to flow analysis. In contrast to previous work, we follow the intuitive approach of moment normalization, which results in a complete and independent set of translation, rotation, and scaling invariant flow field descriptors. They also allow to distinguish flow features with different velocity profiles. We apply the moment invariants in a pattern recognition algorithm to a real world dataset and show that the theoretical results can be extended to discrete functions in a robust way. PMID:26357255

  14. Flow Quantification from 2D Phase Contrast MRI in Renal Arteries Using Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöllner, Frank G.; Monnsen, Jan Ankar; Lundervold, Arvid; Rørvik, Jarle

    We present an approach based on clustering to segment renal arteries from 2D PC Cine MR images to measure blood velocity and flow. Such information are important in grading renal artery stenosis and support the decision on surgical interventions like percutan transluminal angioplasty. Results show that the renal arteries could be extracted automatically and the corresponding velocity profiles could be calculated. Furthermore, the clustering could detect possible phase wrap effects automatically as well as differences in the blood flow patterns within the vessel.

  15. Thermal stability effects on the separated flow over a steep 2-D hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2012-12-01

    Transport of momentum and scalars in turbulent boundary-layer flows over complex topography has been of great interest in the atmospheric sciences and wind engineering communities. Applications include but are not limited to weather forecasting, air pollution dispersion, aviation safety control, and wind energy project planning. Linear models have been well accepted to predict boundary-layer flows over topography with gentle slope. However, once the slope of the topography is sufficientlyo steep that flow separation occurs, linear models are not applicable. Modeling the turbulent transport of momentum and scalars in such flows has to be achieved through non-linear models, such as Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solvers and large-eddy simulations (LES). Dynamics of the separated boundary-layer flows over steep topography is affected by the shape and size of the topography, surface characteristics (e.g., roughness and temperature) and atmospheric thermal stability. Most wind-tunnel experiments of boundary-layer flows over idealized topography (e.g. 2-D or 3-D hills, axisymmetric bumps) do not take thermal stability effects into account due to difficulty of physical simulation. We conducted comprehensive experimental investigation of stably- and unstably- stratified boundary layers over a steep 2-D hill in the thermally-controlled boundary-layer wind tunnel at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory. The 2-D model hill has a steepest slope of 0.73 and its shape follows a cosine square function: h=Hcos^2 (πx/L) for -L/2 ≤ x ≤ L/2 , where the maximum height H is 7 cm and the total width L is 15 cm. High-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) provides dynamic information of the separated shear layer, the recirculation zone and flow reattachment. Turbulent momentum and scalar (heat) fluxes were characterized up to the top of the thermal boundary layer using a triple-wire (cross-wire and cold-wire) anemometer. Results indicate that promoted and suppressed turbulence

  16. Development of models for the two-dimensional, two-fluid code for sodium boiling NATOF-2D. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.G.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1981-09-01

    Several features were incorporated into NATOF-2D, a two-dimensional, two fluid code developed at MIT for the purpose of analysis of sodium boiling transients under LMFBR conditions. They include improved interfacial mass, momentum and energy exchange rate models, and a cell-to-cell radial heat conduction mechanism which was calibrated by simulation of Westinghouse Blanket Heat Transfer Test Program Runs 544 and 545. Finally, a direct method of pressure field solution was implemented into a direct method of pressure field solution was implemented into NATOF-2D, replacing the iterative technique previously available, and resulted in substantially reduced computational costs.

  17. Fluid dynamics and vibration of tube banks in fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Zukauskas, A.; Ulinskas, R.; Katinas, V.

    1988-01-01

    This work presents results derived in fluid dynamics, hydraulic drag and flow-induced vibrations within transverse and yawed tube banks. The studies encompass banks of smooth, rough and finned tubes at Reynolds numbers from 1 to 2x10/sup 6/. Highlighted in the text are fluid dynamic parameters of tube banks measured at inter-tube spaces and tube surfaces.

  18. Value for controlling flow of cryogenic fluid

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Philip A.

    1996-01-01

    A valve is provided for accurately controlling the flow of cryogenic fluids such as liquid nitrogen. The valve comprises a combination of disc and needle valves affixed to a valve stem in such a manner that the disc and needle are free to rotate about the stem, but are constrained in lateral and vertical movements. This arrangement provides accurate and precise fluid flow control and positive fluid isolation.

  19. Instability of plasma waves during relaxation of 2D turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabantsev, A. A.; Drsicoll, C. F.

    2015-11-01

    We observe strong excitation of novel low-frequency z-dependent plasma waves (mθ = 0 ,kz = 1) , occurring during the nominally 2D relaxation of turbulent initial conditions (10 -100 interacting vortices) in strongly magnetized electron columns. This initial relaxation often results in ``2D vortex crystal'' states. Here we describe experiments showing the concomitant growth of ill-understood low-frequency plasma waves, probably due to ``leakage'' of 2D turbulent potential energy into z-dependent fluctuations. With plasma injection, the lowest regular Trivelpiece- Gould mode (mθ = 0 ,kz = 1) is observed at fTG (t) ~ 2 . 8 MHz and exponential decay time τTG ~ 1 msec. Also, we observe rapid exponential growth of a novel low-frequency mode with fLF (t) ~ 0 . 3 MHz, nominally also with mθ = 0 ,kz = 1 . In a few milliseconds (several tens of rotation times at B = 10kG), the LF-mode becomes highly nonlinear, developing up to a dozen temporal harmonics. When a LF-harmonic resonates with the decaying TG-mode, LF-mode energy is transferred into the TG-mode, and both modes remain at moderate amplitudes until the 2D turbulent relaxation abates (hundreds of rotation times). The ill-understood fLF is independent of B, even though the growth and duration times follow scale as B1 from the 2D flows. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1414570, Department of Energy Grants DE-SC0008693.

  20. Fluid Flow Control with Transformation Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav A.; Smith, David R.

    2011-08-01

    We introduce a new concept for the manipulation of fluid flow around three-dimensional bodies. Inspired by transformation optics, the concept is based on a mathematical idea of coordinate transformations and physically implemented with anisotropic porous media permeable to the flow of fluids. In two situations—for an impermeable object placed either in a free-flowing fluid or in a fluid-filled porous medium—we show that the object can be coated with an inhomogeneous, anisotropic permeable medium, such as to preserve the flow that would have existed in the absence of the object. The proposed fluid flow cloak eliminates downstream wake and compensates viscous drag, hinting at the possibility of novel propulsion techniques.

  1. TRENT2D WG: a smart web infrastructure for debris-flow modelling and hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorzi, Nadia; Rosatti, Giorgio; Zugliani, Daniel; Rizzi, Alessandro; Piffer, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Mountain regions are naturally exposed to geomorphic flows, which involve large amounts of sediments and induce significant morphological modifications. The physical complexity of this class of phenomena represents a challenging issue for modelling, leading to elaborate theoretical frameworks and sophisticated numerical techniques. In general, geomorphic-flows models proved to be valid tools in hazard assessment and management. However, model complexity seems to represent one of the main obstacles to the diffusion of advanced modelling tools between practitioners and stakeholders, although the UE Flood Directive (2007/60/EC) requires risk management and assessment to be based on "best practices and best available technologies". Furthermore, several cutting-edge models are not particularly user-friendly and multiple stand-alone software are needed to pre- and post-process modelling data. For all these reasons, users often resort to quicker and rougher approaches, leading possibly to unreliable results. Therefore, some effort seems to be necessary to overcome these drawbacks, with the purpose of supporting and encouraging a widespread diffusion of the most reliable, although sophisticated, modelling tools. With this aim, this work presents TRENT2D WG, a new smart modelling solution for the state-of-the-art model TRENT2D (Armanini et al., 2009, Rosatti and Begnudelli, 2013), which simulates debris flows and hyperconcentrated flows adopting a two-phase description over a mobile bed. TRENT2D WG is a web infrastructure joining advantages offered by the software-delivering model SaaS (Software as a Service) and by WebGIS technology and hosting a complete and user-friendly working environment for modelling. In order to develop TRENT2D WG, the model TRENT2D was converted into a service and exposed on a cloud server, transferring computational burdens from the user hardware to a high-performing server and reducing computational time. Then, the system was equipped with an

  2. A fast and accurate method to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2014-12-01

    A quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic flows. This method is suitable for offshore wind turbine design software as it is a very accurate and computationally reasonably cheap method. This study shows the results for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The two applied solvers converge to the experimental values when the grid is refined. We also show that in separation the eigenvalues remain positive thus avoiding the Goldstein singularity at separation. In 3D we show a flow over a dent in which separation occurs. A rotating flat plat is used to show the applicability of the method for rotating flows. The shown capabilities of the method indicate that the quasi-simultaneous interaction method is suitable for design methods for offshore wind turbine blades.

  3. Field Evaluation of a Novel 2D Preferential Flow Snowpack Hydrology Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, N.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Kinar, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate estimation of snowmelt flux is of primary importance for runoff hydrograph prediction, which is used for water management and flood forecasting. Lateral flows and preferential flow pathways in porous media flow have proven critical for improving soil and groundwater flow models, but though many physically-based layered snowmelt models have been developed, only 1D matrix flow is accounted for in these models. Therefore, there is a need for snowmelt models that include these processes so as to examine the potential to improve snowmelt hydrological modelling. A 2D model is proposed that enables an improved understanding of energy and water flows within deep heterogeneous snowpacks, including those on slopes. A dual pathway theory is presented that simulates the formation of preferential flow paths, vertical and lateral water flows through the snow matrix and flow fingers, internal energy fluxes, melt, wet snow metamorphism, and internal refreezing. The dual pathway model utilizes an explicit finite volume method to solve for the energy and water flux equations over a non-orthogonal grid. It was run and evaluated using in-situ data collected from snowpit - accessed gravimetric, thermometric, photographic, and dielectric observations and novel non-invasive acoustic observations of layering, temperature, flowpath geometry, density and wetness at the Fortress Mountain Snow Laboratory, Alberta, Canada. The melt of a natural snowpack was artificially generated after detailed observation of snowpack initial conditions such as snow layer properties, temperature, and liquid water content. Snowpack ablation and liquid water content distribution over time were then measured and used for model parameterization and validation. Energy available at the snow surface and soil slope angle were set as mondel inputs. Model verification was based on snowpack property evolution. The heterogeneous flow model can be an important tool to help understand snowmelt flow processes, how

  4. VISCOPLASTIC FLUID MODEL FOR DEBRIS FLOW ROUTING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes how a generalized viscoplastic fluid model, which was developed based on non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, can be successfully applied to routing a debris flow down a channel. The one-dimensional dynamic equations developed for unsteady clear-water flow can be used for debris flow routing if the flow parameters, such as the momentum (or energy) correction factor and the resistance coefficient, can be accurately evaluated. The writer's generalized viscoplastic fluid model can be used to express such flow parameters in terms of the rheological parameters for debris flow in wide channels. A preliminary analysis of the theoretical solutions reveals the importance of the flow behavior index and the so-called modified Froude number for uniformly progressive flow in snout profile modeling.

  5. Frictional flow characteristics of microconvective flow for variable fluid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajan; Mahulikar, Shripad P.

    2015-12-01

    The present work investigates the frictional flow characteristics of water flowing through a circular microchannel with variable fluid properties. The computational analysis reveals the importance of physical mechanisms due to variations in thermophysical fluid properties such as viscosity μ(T), thermal conductivity k(T) and density ρ(T) and also their contribution in the characteristics of frictional flow. Various combinations of thermophysical fluid properties have been used to find their effects on fluid friction. It is observed that the fluid friction attains the maximum value in the vicinity of the inlet and diminishes along the flow. The main reasons are attributed to this, (1) near the inlet, there is a flow undevelopment (the reverse process of flow development) due to μ(T) variation. (2) The viscosity of the water decreases with increasing temperature, which reduces fluid friction along the flow. It is noted that the skin friction coefficient (cf) reduces with increasing fluid mean velocity for a same value of constant wall heat flux ({q}{{w}}\\prime\\prime ). In the vicinity of the inlet, the deviation of Poiseuille number (Po) from 64 (constant properties solution) is also investigated in this paper. Additionally, the relationship between Reynolds number (Re) and cf, Po and Re have been proposed for different combinations of thermophysical fluid properties. This investigation also shows that the effect of fluid property variations on pressure drop is highly significant for microconvective water flow.

  6. A mathematical model for 2D heat transfer dynamics in fluid systems with localized sink of magmatic fluid into local fractured zones above the top of crystallizing intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, V. N.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Popov, V. N.; Bykova, V. G.

    2012-11-01

    A model describing two-dimensional (2D) dynamics of heat transfer in the fluid systems with a localized sink of a magmatic fluid into local fractured zones above the roof of crystallizing crustal intrusions is suggested. Numerical modeling of the migration of the phase boundaries in 2D intrusive chambers under retrograde boiling of magma with relatively high initial water content in the melt shows that, depending on the character of heat dissipation from a magmatic fluid into the host rock, two types of fluid magmatic systems can arise. (1) At high heat losses, the zoning of fluidogenic ore formation is determined by the changes in temperature of the rocks within the contact aureole of the intrusive bodies. These temperature variations are controlled by the migration of the phase boundaries in the cooling melt towards the center of the magmatic bodies from their contacts. (2) In the case of a localized sink of the magmatic fluid in different parts of the top of the intrusive chambers, a specific characteristic scenario of cooling of the magmatic bodies is probably implemented. In 2D systems with a heat transfer coefficient α k < 5 × 104 W/m2 K, an area with quasi-stationary phase boundaries develops close to the region of fluid drainage through the fractured zone in the intrusion. Therefore, as the phase boundaries contract to the sink zone of a fluid, specific thermal tubes arise, whose characteristics depend on the width of the fluid-conductive zone and the heat losses into the side rocks. (3) The time required for the intrusion to solidify varies depending on the particular position of the fluid conductor above the top of the magmatic body.

  7. SAGE 2D and 3D Simulations of the Explosive Venting of Supercritical Fluids Through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, R.; Gisler, G.; Svensen, H.; Mazzini, A.

    2008-12-01

    Magmatic intrusive events in large igneous provinces heat sedimentary country rock leading to the eventual release of volatiles. This has been proposed as a contributor to climate change and other environmental impacts. By means of numerical simulations, we examine ways in which these volatiles can be released explosively from depth. Gases and fluids cooked out of country rock by metamorphic heating may be confined for a time by impermeable clays or other barriers, developing high pressures and supercritical fluids. If confinement is suddenly breached (by an earthquake for example) in such a way that the fluid has access to porous sediments, a violent eruption of a non-magmatic mixture of fluid and sediment may result. Surface manifestations of these events could be hydrothermal vent complexes, kimberlite pipes, pockmarks, or mud volcanoes. These are widespread on Earth, especially in large igneous provinces, as in the Karoo Basin of South Africa, the North Sea off the Norwegian margin, and the Siberian Traps. We have performed 2D and 3D simulations with the Sage hydrocode (from Los Alamos and Science Applications International) of supercritical venting in a variety of geometries and configurations. The simulations show several different patterns of propagation and fracturing in porous or otherwise weakened overburden, dependent on depth, source conditions (fluid availability, temperature, and pressure), and manner of confinement breach. Results will be given for a variety of 2D and 3D simulations of these events exploring the release of volatiles into the atmosphere.

  8. Measurement of Diffusion in Flowing Complex Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Edward F.; Aucoin, Christian P.; Nanne, Edgar E.

    2006-01-01

    A microfluidic device for the measurement of solute diffusion as well as particle diffusion and migration in flowing complex fluids is described. The device is particularly suited to obtaining diffusivities in such fluids, which require a desired flow state to be maintained during measurement. A method based on the Loschmidt diffusion theory and short times of exposure is presented to allow calculation of diffusivities from concentration differences in the flow streams leaving the cell. PMID:18560469

  9. Two Dimensional Fluid Flow Models Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. W.; Wu, S. K.; Chi, W. C.; Liu, C. S.; Shyu, C. T.; Wang, Y. S.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid migration rates are important parameters for understanding the structural characteristics and evolution of the crustal tectonics and hydrocarbon exploration. However, they are difficult to measure on the seafloor. Dense distribution of bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) as the index of fluid existence to shed light on our study of the fluid migration. In this study, We acquired 2D fluid flow patterns in two potential gas hydrate prospect sites offshore southwestern Taiwan, and respectively modeled across Yung-An and Formosa ridge in N-S and E-W direction southwestern Taiwan. Temperature field in the shallow crust is used as a tracer to examine the fluid flow patterns. We use thermal information directly measured by thermal probes and topography data to develop the theoretical 2D temperature field using a thermal conduction model, which was derived from a finite element method. The discrepancy between the observed temperature data and the conductive model is attributed to advection heat transfer due to fluid migration. For Yung-An Ridge, we found the BSR-based temperatures are about 2oC higher than the conduction model in the following zones: (1) near a fault zone, (2) on the eastern flank where there are strong seismic reflectors in a pseudo 3D seismic dataset, (3) a seismic chimney zone. We interpret that there is possible active dewatering inside the accretionary prism to allow fluid to migrate upward here. For Formosa Ridge in the passive margin, the BSR-based temperatures are about 2oC colder than the theoretical model, especially on the flanks. We interpret that cold seawater is moving into the ridge from the flanks, cooling the ridge, and then some of the fluid is expelled at the ridge top. The shallow temperature fields are strongly affected by 2D or even 3D bathymetry effects. But we can still gain much information regarding fluid flow patterns through modeling. In the near future, we will extend such study into 3D. Keywords: fluid migration

  10. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of 2D laminar flows past two tandem cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussa, Alberto; Asinari, Pietro; Luo, Li-Shi

    2009-03-01

    We apply the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision model to simulate laminar flows in two-dimensions (2D). In order to simulate flows in an unbounded domain with the LBE method, we need to address two issues: stretched non-uniform mesh and inflow and outflow boundary conditions. We use the interpolated grid stretching method to address the need of non-uniform mesh. We demonstrate that various inflow and outflow boundary conditions can be easily and consistently realized with the MRT-LBE. The MRT-LBE with non-uniform stretched grids is first validated with a number of test cases: the Poiseuille flow, the flow past a cylinder asymmetrically placed in a channel, and the flow past a cylinder in an unbounded domain. We use the LBE method to simulate the flow past two tandem cylinders in an unbounded domain with Re = 100. Our results agree well with existing ones. Through this work we demonstrate the effectiveness of the MRT-LBE method with grid stretching.

  11. Assessment of the Impacts of Compensation Flow Changes Upon Instream Habitat Using 2D Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, D. C.; Lane, S. N.; Christmas, M.

    2004-05-01

    Many millstone-grit rivers in northern England are impounded. In such cases the water company in the area has to release compensation flows from the reservoirs, traditionally to meet industrial needs: these flows are rarely set with ecology in mind; and have commonly involved constant flow. Dam overtopping may create spates, but spawning in many fish species is prompted by a spate flow in the early autumn when dams are rarely full enough to overtop. Such flows are important for fine sediment flushing and controlling the wetted useable area for spawning. Classical physical habitat modelling for instream habitat has been largely reliant upon 1D approaches, such as the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM). Here we use a 2D finite element model (FESWMS), to simulate changes in instream habitat with variations in the compensation flow regimes. The spatial resolution of 2D models can be adapted to the scale of fish habitats so providing better representation of the reach-scale flow processes (such as slack water in the margins, wetting and drying) than the 1D case. The model is applied to the Rivers Rivelin and Loxley in Sheffield, Northern England. At the confluence of the two rivers, the compensation flow level is set at 30.6 Thousand Cubic Metres per Day (TCMD). Due to historical reasons, the compensation is not divided equally, as the Loxley receives 28 TCMD whilst the Rivelin receives only 2.6 TCMD. The model is used to simulate a transfer of 6 TCMD from the Loxley to the Rivelin. After validation, model predictions are combined with available habitat requirement data (e.g. velocity and depth needs) to develop an index of change in habitat suitability in terms of first order variables (e.g. velocity, depth and wetted useable area). This suggests that the change in compensation may significantly improve instream ecology in relation to macroinvertebrates, brown trout (Salmo trutta) and bullhead (Cottus gobio) in the Rivelin without causing detrimental impacts

  12. ZEUS-2D: A Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics Code for Astrophysical Flows in Two Space Dimensions. II. The Magnetohydrodynamic Algorithms and Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1992-06-01

    In this, the second of a series of three papers, we continue a detailed description of ZEUS-2D, a numerical code for the simulation of fluid dynamical flows in astrophysics including a self-consistent treatment of the effects of magnetic fields and radiation transfer. In this paper, we give a detailed description of the magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) algorithms in ZEUS-2D. The recently developed constrained transport (CT) algorithm is implemented for the numerical evolution of the components of the magnetic field for MHD simulations. This formalism guarantees the numerically evolved field components will satisfy the divergence-free constraint at all times. We find, however, that the method used to compute the electromotive forces must be chosen carefully to propagate accurately all modes of MHD wave families (in particular shear Alfvén waves). A new method of computing the electromotive force is developed using the method of characteristics (MOC). It is demonstrated through the results of an extensive series of MHD test problems that the resulting hybrid MOC-CT method provides for the accurate evolution of all modes of MHD wave families.

  13. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    Methods of automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general and flow topology in particular are discussed. Two-dimensional vector field topology is reviewed as the basis for the examination of topology in three-dimensional separated flows. The use of tangent surfaces and clipping in visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows is addressed.

  14. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids related to their complex permeability are disclosed. A microwave probe is provided for exposure to the fluids. The probe can be non-intrusive or can also be positioned at the location where measurements are to be made. The impedance of the probe is determined. in part. by the complex dielectric constant of the fluids at the probe. A radio frequency signal is transmitted to the probe and the reflected signal is phase and amplitude detected at a rapid rate for the purpose of identifying the fluids. Multiple probes may be selectively positioned to monitor the behavior of the fluids including their flow rate. Fluids may be identified as between two or more different fluids as well as multiple phases of the same fluid based on differences between their complex permittivities.

  15. Untangling tracer trajectories and clarifying coherence in 2D flows using braid theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, Margaux; Atis, Séverine; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Budišić, Marko; Allshouse, Michael; Peacock, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Interpreting ocean surface transport is crucial to many areas of oceanography, ranging from marine ecology to pollution management. To better understand surface mixing, we investigate a braid theory method to detect transport barriers bounding coherent structures in two-dimensional fluid flows. Whereas most existing techniques rely on an extensive spatiotemporal knowledge of the flow field, we seek to identify these structures from sparse data sets involving trajectories of a few tracer particles or floats. We present the results of model and laboratory experimental studies to test the robustness and applicability of the braid theory method, and discuss the potential applicability to oceanic data sets.

  16. Magnetic field applied to thermochemical non-equilibrium reentry flows in 2D - five species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sávio de Góes Maciel, Edisson

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a study involving magnetic field actuation over reentry flows in thermochemical non-equilibrium is performed. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are studied. The proposed numerical algorithm is centred and second-order accurate. The hypersonic flow around a blunt body is simulated. Three time integration methods are tested. The reactive simulations involve Earth atmosphere of five species. The work of Gaitonde is the reference to couple the fluid dynamics and Maxwell equations of electromagnetism. The results have indicated that the Maciel scheme, using the Mavriplis dissipation model, yields the best prediction of the stagnation pressure.

  17. Wavelet diagnostics of the flow control of unsteady separation on a 2D Wind Turbine Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhe; Lewalle, Jacques; Wang, Guannan; Glauser, Mark

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic characteristics of a 2D wind turbine airfoil. Unsteadiness was associated with the wake of a cylinder upstream of the airfoil. The experiments were conducted in both the baseline case, and with active closed-loop control on the suction surface of the airfoil. The data consisted of surface pressure time series. Continuous wavelet analysis gave the phase, band-pass filtered signals and envelope of harmonics of the fundamental shedding frequency. Coherence of pairs of signals was also used to map the flow characteristics. For the baseline and controlled case, we will report on the relation between phase of the leading edge fluctuations, unsteady flow separation and lift and drag coefficients. Our goal is to develop a more effective controller. The experiment was funded by DoE through University of Minnesota Wind Energy Consortium. Thanks for the support from the MAE department of Syracuse University.

  18. Quasi-simultaneous interaction method for solving 2D boundary layer flows over plates and airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2012-11-01

    This paper studies unsteady 2D boundary layer flows over dented plates and a NACA 0012 airfoil. An inviscid flow is assumed to exist outside the boundary layer and is solved iteratively with the boundary layer flow together with the interaction method until a matching solution is achieved. Hereto a quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied, in which the integral boundary layer equations are solved together with an interaction-law equation. The interaction-law equation is an approximation of the external flow and based on thin-airfoil theory. It is an algebraic relation between the velocity and displacement thickness. The interaction-law equation ensures that the eigenvalues of the system of equations do not have a sign change and that no singularities occur. Three numerical schemes are used to solve the boundary layer flow with the interaction method. These are: a standard scheme, a splitting method and a characteristics solver. All schemes use a finite difference discretization. The three schemes yield comparable results for the simulations carried out. The standard scheme is deviating most from the splitting and characteristics solvers. The results show that the eigenvalues remain positive, even in separation. As expected, the addition of the interaction-law equation prevents a sign change of the eigenvalues. The quasi-simultaneous interaction scheme is applicable to the three numerical schemes tested.

  19. Self-Organization in 2D Traffic Flow Model with Jam-Avoiding Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    1995-04-01

    A stochastic cellular automaton (CA) model is presented to investigate the traffic jam by self-organization in the two-dimensional (2D) traffic flow. The CA model is the extended version of the 2D asymmetric exclusion model to take into account jam-avoiding drive. Each site contains either a car moving to the up, a car moving to the right, or is empty. A up car can shift right with probability p ja if it is blocked ahead by other cars. It is shown that the three phases (the low-density phase, the intermediate-density phase and the high-density phase) appear in the traffic flow. The intermediate-density phase is characterized by the right moving of up cars. The jamming transition to the high-density jamming phase occurs with higher density of cars than that without jam-avoiding drive. The jamming transition point p 2c increases with the shifting probability p ja. In the deterministic limit of p ja=1, it is found that a new jamming transition occurs from the low-density synchronized-shifting phase to the high-density moving phase with increasing density of cars. In the synchronized-shifting phase, all up cars do not move to the up but shift to the right by synchronizing with the move of right cars. We show that the jam-avoiding drive has an important effect on the dynamical jamming transition.

  20. Comparison of 2D and 3D Numerical Models with Experiments of Tsunami Flow through a Built Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeVeque, R. J.; Motley, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    A series of tsunami wave basin experiments of flow through a scale model of Seaside, Oregon have been used as validation data for a 2015 benchmarking workshop hosted by the National Tsunami Mitigation Program, which focused on better understanding the ability of tsunami models to predict flow velocities and inundation depths following a coastal inundation event. As researchers begin to assess the safety of coastal infrastructures, proper assessment of tsunami-induced forces on coastal structures is critical. Hydrodynamic forces on these structures are fundamentally proportional to the local momentum flux of the fluid, and experimental data included momentum flux measurements at many instrumented gauge locations. The GeoClaw tsunami model, which solves the two-dimensional shallow water equations, was compared against other codes during the benchmarking workshop, and more recently a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model using the open-source OpenFOAM software has been developed and results from this model are being compared with both the experimental data and the 2D GeoClaw results. In addition, the 3D model allows for computation of fluid forces on the faces of structures, permitting an investigation of the common use of momentum flux as a proxy for these forces. This work aims to assess the potential to apply these momentum flux predictions locally within the model to determine tsunami-induced forces on critical structures. Difficulties in working with these data sets and cross-model comparisons will be discussed. Ultimately, application of the more computationally efficient GeoClaw model, informed by the 3D OpenFOAM models, to predict forces on structures at the community scale can be expected to improve the safety and resilience of coastal communities.

  1. 2D steady-state general solution and fundamental solution for fluid-saturated, orthotropic, poroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Li-Hua; Hou, Peng-Fei; Chen, Jia-Yun

    2016-08-01

    The 2D steady-state solutions regarding the expressions of stress and strain for fluid-saturated, orthotropic, poroelastic plane are derived in this paper. For this object, the general solutions of the corresponding governing equation are first obtained and expressed in harmonic functions. Based on these compact general solutions, the suitable harmonic functions with undetermined constants for line fluid source in the interior of infinite poroelastic body and a line fluid source on the surface of semi-infinite poroelastic body are presented, respectively. The fundamental solutions can be obtained by substituting these functions into the general solution, and the undetermined constants can be obtained by the continuous conditions, equilibrium conditions and boundary conditions.

  2. Viscoelastic fluid flow in inhomogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Siginer, D.A.; Bakhtiyarov, S.I.

    1996-09-01

    The flow of inelastic and viscoelastic fluids in two porous media of different permeabilities and same priority arranged in series has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The fluids are an oil field spacer fluid and aqueous solutions of polyacrylamide. The porous medium is represented by a cylindrical tube randomly packed with glass spheres. Expressions for the friction factor and the resistance coefficient as a function of the Reynolds number have been developed both for shear thinning and viscoelastic fluids based on the linear fluidity and eight constant Oldroyd models, respectively. The authors show that the energy loss is higher if the viscoelastic fluid flows first through the porous medium with the smaller permeability rather than through the section of the cylinder with the larger permeability. This effect is not observed for Newtonian and shear thinning fluids flowing through the same configuration. Energy requirements for the same volume flow rate are much higher than a Newtonian fluid of the same zero shear viscosity as the polymeric solution. Energy loss increases with increasing Reynolds number at a fixed concentration. At a fixed Reynolds number, the loss is a strong function of the concentration and increases with increasing concentration. The behavior of all fluids is predicted qualitatively except the difference in energy requirements.

  3. Method and device for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Atherton, Richard; Marinkovich, Phillip S.; Spadaro, Peter R.; Stout, J. Wilson

    1976-11-23

    This invention is a fluid flow measuring device for determining the coolant flow at the entrance to a specific nuclear reactor fuel region. The device comprises a plurality of venturis having the upstream inlet and throat pressure of each respectively manifolded together to provide one static pressure signal for each region monitored. The device provides accurate flow measurement with low pressure losses and uniform entrance and discharge flow distribution.

  4. Debris Flow Hazard Map Simulation using FLO-2D For Selected Areas in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khallil Ferrer, Peter; Llanes, Francesca; dela Resma, Marvee; Realino, Victoriano, II; Obrique, Julius; Ortiz, Iris Jill; Aquino, Dakila; Narod Eco, Rodrigo; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    On December 4, 2012, Super Typhoon Bopha wreaked havoc in the southern region of Mindanao, leaving 1,067 people dead and causing USD 800 million worth of damage. Classified as a Category 5 typhoon by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), Bopha brought intense rainfall and strong winds that triggered landslides and debris flows, particularly in Barangay (village) Andap, New Bataan municipality, in the southern Philippine province of Compostela Valley. The debris flow destroyed school buildings and covered courts and an evacuation center. Compostela Valley also suffered the most casualties of any province: 612 out of a total of 1,067. In light of the disaster in Compostela, measures were immediately devised to improve available geohazard maps to raise public awareness about landslides and debris flows. A debris flow is a very rapid to extremely rapid flow of saturated non-plastic debris in a steep channel. They are generated when heavy rainfall saturates sediments, causing them to flow down river channels within an alluvial fan situated at the base of the slope of a mountain drainage network. Many rural communities in the Philippines, such as Barangay Andap, are situated at the apex of alluvial fans and in the path of potential debris flows. In this study, we conducted simulations of debris flows to assess the risks in inhabited areas throughout the Philippines and validated the results in the field, focusing on the provinces of Pangasinan and Aurora as primary examples. Watersheds that drain in an alluvial fan using a 10-m resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)-derived Digital Elevation Model (DEM) was first delineated, and then a 1 in 100-year rain return rainfall scenario for the watershed was used to simulate debris flows using FLO-2D, a flood-routing software. The resulting simulations were used to generate debris flow hazard maps which are consistent with danger zones in alluvial fans delineated previously from satellite imagery and available DEMs. The

  5. Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-D plasma with a linear magnetic field null

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-dimensional plasma near an O type magnetic null is investigated. Specifically, an elongated Z-pinch is considered, and applied to Field Reversed Configurations at Los Alamos National Laboratory by making a cylindrical approximation of the compact torus. The orbits near an elliptical O type null are found to be very complicated; the orbits are large and some are stochastic. The kinetic corrections to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated by evaluating the expectation values of the growth rates of a Vlasov Fluid dispersion functional by using a set of trial functions based on ideal MHD. The dispersion functional involves fluid parts and orbit dependent parts. The latter involves phase integral of two time correlations. The phase integral is replaced by the time integral both for the regular and for the stochastic orbits. Two trial functions are used; one has a large displacement near the null and the other away from the null.

  6. Engineering fluid flow using sequenced microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Hamed; Sollier, Elodie; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Xie, Yu; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Stone, Howard A.; di Carlo, Dino

    2013-05-01

    Controlling the shape of fluid streams is important across scales: from industrial processing to control of biomolecular interactions. Previous approaches to control fluid streams have focused mainly on creating chaotic flows to enhance mixing. Here we develop an approach to apply order using sequences of fluid transformations rather than enhancing chaos. We investigate the inertial flow deformations around a library of single cylindrical pillars within a microfluidic channel and assemble these net fluid transformations to engineer fluid streams. As these transformations provide a deterministic mapping of fluid elements from upstream to downstream of a pillar, we can sequentially arrange pillars to apply the associated nested maps and, therefore, create complex fluid structures without additional numerical simulation. To show the range of capabilities, we present sequences that sculpt the cross-sectional shape of a stream into complex geometries, move and split a fluid stream, perform solution exchange and achieve particle separation. A general strategy to engineer fluid streams into a broad class of defined configurations in which the complexity of the nonlinear equations of fluid motion are abstracted from the user is a first step to programming streams of any desired shape, which would be useful for biological, chemical and materials automation.

  7. Comparative Simulations of 2D and 3D Mixed Convection Flow in a Faulted Basin: an Example from the Yarmouk Gorge, Israel and Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, F.; Inbar, N.; Raggad, M.; Möller, S.; Siebert, C.; Möller, P.; Kuehn, M.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Kinneret (Lake Tiberias or Sea of Galilee) is the most important freshwater reservoir in the Northern Jordan Valley. Simulations that couple fluid flow, heat and mass transport are built to understand the mechanisms responsible for the salinization of this important resource. Here the effects of permeability distribution on 2D and 3D convective patterns are compared. 2D simulations indicate that thermal brine in Haon and some springs in the Yamourk Gorge (YG) are the result of mixed convection, i.e. the interaction between the regional flow from the bordering heights and thermally-driven flow (Magri et al., 2014). Calibration of the calculated temperature profiles suggests that the faults in Haon and the YG provides paths for ascending hot waters, whereas the fault in the Golan recirculates water between 1 and 2 km depths. At higher depths, faults induce 2D layered convection in the surrounding units. The 2D assumption for a faulted basin can oversimplify the system, and the conclusions might not be fully correct. The 3D results also point to mixed convection as the main mechanism for the thermal anomalies. However, in 3D the convective structures are more complex allowing for longer flow paths and residence times. In the fault planes, hydrothermal convection develops in a finger regime enhancing inflow and outflow of heat in the system. Hot springs can form locally at the surface along the fault trace. By contrast, the layered cells extending from the faults into the surrounding sediments are preserved and are similar to those simulated in 2D. The results are consistent with the theory from Zhao et al. (2003), which predicts that 2D and 3D patterns have the same probability to develop given the permeability and temperature ranges encountered in geothermal fields. The 3D approach has to be preferred to the 2D in order to capture all patterns of convective flow, particularly in the case of planar high permeability regions such as faults. Magri, F., et al., 2014

  8. Fluid/structure interactions. Internal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, D. S.

    1991-05-01

    Flow-induced vibrations are found wherever structures are exposed to high velocity fluid flows. Internal flows are usually characterized by the close proximity of solid boundaries. There are surfaces against which separated flows may reattach, or from which pressure disturbances may be reflected resulting in acoustic resonance. When the fluid is a liquid, the close proximity of solid boundaries to a vibrating component can produce very high added mass effects. This paper presents three different experimental studies of flow-induced vibration problems associated with internal flows. The emphasis was on experimental techniques developed for understanding excitation mechanisms. In difficult flow-induced vibration problems, a useful experimental technique is flow visualization using a large scale model and strobe light triggered by the phenomenon being observed. This should be supported by point measurements of velocity and frequency spectra. When the flow excitation is associated with acoustic resonance, the sound can be fed back to enhance or eliminate the instability. This is potentially a very useful tool for studying and controlling fluid-structure interaction problems. Some flow-induced vibration problems involve a number of different excitation mechanisms and care must be taken to ensure that the mechanisms are properly identified. Artificially imposing structural vibrations or acoustic fields may induce flow structures not naturally present in the system.

  9. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.; Thomas, D.G.

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  10. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jack E.; Thomas, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  11. Directed flow fluid rinse trough

    DOEpatents

    Kempka, Steven N.; Walters, Robert N.

    1996-01-01

    Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The tanks are suitable for one or more essentially planar items having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs also require less rinse fluid to accomplish a thorough rinse than prior art troughs.

  12. Directed flow fluid rinse trough

    DOEpatents

    Kempka, S.N.; Walters, R.N.

    1996-07-02

    Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The tanks are suitable for one or more essentially planar items having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs also require less rinse fluid to accomplish a thorough rinse than prior art troughs. 9 figs.

  13. Fluid Flow Within Fractured Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, D.M.; Ahmadi, G.; Smith, D.H.; Bromhal, G.S.

    2006-10-01

    Fractures provide preferential flow paths to subterranean fluid flows. In reservoir scale modeling of geologic flows fractures must be approximated by fairly simple formulations. Often this is accomplished by assuming fractures are parallel plates subjected to an applied pressure gradient. This is known as the cubic law. An induced fracture in Berea sandstone has been digitized to perform numerical flow simulations. A commercially available computational fluid dynamics software package has been used to solve the flow through this model. Single phase flows have been compared to experimental works in the literature to evaluate the accuracy with which this model can be applied. Common methods of fracture geometry classification are also calculated and compared to experimentally obtained values. Flow through regions of the fracture where the upper and lower fracture walls meet (zero aperture) are shown to induce a strong channeling effect on the flow. This model is expanded to include a domain of surrounding porous media through which the flow can travel. The inclusion of a realistic permeability in this media shows that the regions of small and zero apertures contribute to the greatest pressure losses over the fracture length and flow through the porous media is most prevalent in these regions. The flow through the fracture is shown to be the largest contributor to the net flow through the media. From this work, a novel flow relationship is proposed for flow through fractured media.

  14. MAST solution of irrotational flow problems in 2D domains with strongly unstructured triangular meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucciarelli, T.

    2012-12-01

    A new methodology for the solution of irrotational 2D flow problems in domains with strongly unstructured meshes is presented. A fractional time step procedure is applied to the original governing equations, solving consecutively a convective prediction system and a diffusive corrective system. The non linear components of the problem are concentrated in the prediction step, while the correction step leads to the solution of a linear system, of the order of the number of computational cells. A MArching in Space and Time (MAST) approach is applied for the solution of the convective prediction step. The major advantages of the model, as well as its ability to maintain the solution monotonicity even in strongly irregular meshes, are briefly described. The algorithm is applied to the solution of diffusive shallow water equations in a simple domain.

  15. An Experimental Study of Flow Separation over 2D Transverse Grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Emily; Lang, Amy; Afroz, Farhana; Wheelus, Jennifer; Smith, Drew

    2011-11-01

    A shark's scales help to reduce drag over its body by controlling boundary layer separation over its skin. It is theorized that the scales bristle when encountering a reversing flow, thereby trapping vortices between the scales, creating a partial slip condition over the surface and inducing turbulence augmentation in the boundary layer. In an attempt to replicate and study these effects, a spinning cylinder was used in a water tunnel to induce separation over a flat plate with 2 millimeter square 2D transverse grooves. The results were compared to separation occurring over a flat plate without grooves using DPIV. The angular speed of the cylinder was varied. The observed delays in separation, changes in separation bubble shedding frequency and other effects upon the boundary layer are discussed.

  16. Flow-induced protein crystallization: Macroscopic effects on 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, James; Posada, David; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2012-11-01

    Proteins must first be crystallized before their molecular structure can be studied in detail. However, crystallizing protein is a challenging task which is often met with limited success. Although 2-D protein crystals at the air/water interface are usually obtained under quiescent conditions, it was recently shown that crystallization can be enhanced by a shearing flow. Here we examine the relationship between Reynolds number and the crystal growth process using the deep-channel surface viscometer geometry. It consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders and driven by a constant rotation of the floor. The interfacial velocity measurements are compared to Navier-Stokes computations with the Boussinesq-Scriven surface model. The interfacial film is lifted onto a solid substrate, and the protein crystals are observed via optical and atomic force microscopy. For a particular protein surface concentration, a Reynolds number threshold has been identified for flow-induced crystallization. This flow geometry also allows for the determination of the surface shear viscosity, which provides a quantitative measure of the mesoscale interactions associated with protein crystallization.

  17. Micro PIV measurements of turbulent flow over 2D structured roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartenberger, Joel; Perlin, Marc

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the turbulent boundary layer over surfaces with 2D spanwise square and triangular protrusions having nominal heights of 100 - 300 microns for Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ ~ 1500 through Reτ ~ 4500 using a high speed, high magnification imaging system. Micro PIV analysis gives finely resolved velocity fields of the flow (on the order of 10 microns between vectors) enabling a detailed look at the inner region as well as the flow in the immediate vicinity of the roughness elements. Additionally, planar PIV with lower resolution is performed to capture the remainder of the boundary layer to the freestream flow. Varying the streamwise distance between individual roughness elements from one to ten times the nominal heights allows investigation of k-type and d-type roughness in both the transitionally rough and fully rough regimes. Preliminary results show a shift in the mean velocity profile similar to the results of previous studies. Turbulent statistics will be presented also. The authors would like to acknowledge the support of NAVSEA which funded this project through the Naval Engineering Education Center (NEEC).

  18. Analysis of High-Speed Rotating Flow in 2D Polar (r - θ)Coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, S.

    2016-03-01

    The generalized analytical model for the radial boundary layer in a high-speed rotating cylinder is formulated for studying the gas flow field due to insertion of mass, momentum and energy into the rotating cylinder in the polar (r - θ) plane. The analytical solution includes the sixth order differential equation for the radial boundary layer at the cylindrical curved surface in terms of master potential (χ) , which is derived from the equations of motion in a polar (r - θ) plane. The linearization approximation (Wood & Morton, J. Fluid Mech-1980; Pradhan & Kumaran, J. Fluid Mech-2011; Kumaran & Pradhan, J. Fluid Mech-2014) is used, where the equations of motion are truncated at linear order in the velocity and pressure disturbances to the base flow, which is a solid-body rotation. Additional assumptions in the analytical model include constant temperature in the base state (isothermal condition), and high Reynolds number, but there is no limitation on the stratification parameter. In this limit, the gas flow is restricted to a boundary layer of thickness (Re (1 / 3) R) at the wall of the cylinder. Here, the stratification parameter A = √ ((mΩ 2R2) / (2kB T)) . This parameter Ais the ratio of the peripheral speed, ΩR , to the most probable molecular speed, √(2 k_B T/m), the Reynolds number Re = (ρ _w ΩR2 / μ) , where m is the molecular mass, Ω and R are the rotational speed and radius of the cylinder, k_B is the Boltzmann constant, T is the gas temperature, ρ_w is the gas density at wall, and μ is the gas viscosity. The analytical solutions are then compared with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations.

  19. Pattern formation in flowing electrorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    von Pfeil, Karl; Graham, Michael D; Klingenberg, Daniel J; Morris, Jeffrey F

    2002-05-01

    A two-fluid continuum model is developed to describe mass transport in electro- and magnetorheological suspensions. The particle flux is related to the field-induced stresses. Solutions of the resulting mass balance show column formation in the absence of flow, and stripe formation when a suspension is subjected simultaneously to an applied electric field and shear flow. PMID:12005727

  20. Instrument continuously measures density of flowing fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, R. B.; Macinko, J.; Miller, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Electromechanical densitometer continuously measures the densities of either single-phase or two-phase flowing cryogenic fluids. Measurement is made on actual flow. The instrument operates on the principle that the mass of any vibrating system is a primary factor in determining the dynamic characteristics of the system.

  1. Electromagnetic probe technique for fluid flow measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Carl, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The probes described herein, in various configurations, permit the measurement of the volume fraction of two or more fluids flowing through a pipe. Each probe measures the instantaneous relative dielectric constant of the fluid in immediate proximity. As long as separation of the relative dielectric constant of the fluid is possible, several or even many fluids can be measured in the same flow stream. By using multiple probes, the velocity of each fluid can generally be determined as well as the distribution of each constituent in the pipe. The values are determined by statistical computation. There are many potential applications for probes of this type in industry and government. Possible NASA applications include measurements of helium/hydrazine flow during rocket tests at White Sands, liquid/gas flow in hydrogen or oxygen lines in Orbiter engines, and liquid/gaseous Freon flow in zero gravity tests with the KS135 aircraft at JSC. Much interest has been shown recently by the oil industry. In this a good method is needed to measure the fractions of oil, water, and natural gas flowing in a pipeline and the velocity of each. This particular problem involves an extension of what has been developed to date and our plans to solve this problem will be discussed herein.

  2. Fundamental Processes of Atomization in Fluid-Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCready, M. J.; Chang, H.-C.; Leighton, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines the major results of the grant "Fundamental Processes of Atomization in Fluid-Fluid Flows." These include: 1) the demonstration that atomization in liquid/liquid shear flow is driven by a viscous shear instability that triggers the formation of a long thin sheet; 2) discovery of a new mode of interfacial instability for oscillatory two-layer systems whereby a mode that originates within the less viscous liquid phase causes interfacial deformation as the oscillation proceeds; 3) the demonstration that rivulet formation from gravity front occurs because the local front shape specified by gravity and surface tension changes from a nose to a wedge geometry, thus triggering a large increase in viscous resistance; and 4) extension of the studies on nonlinear wave evolution on falling films and in stratified flow, particularly the evolution towards large-amplitude solitary waves that tend to generate drops.

  3. Manifest: A computer program for 2-D flow modeling in Stirling machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedeon, David

    1989-01-01

    A computer program named Manifest is discussed. Manifest is a program one might want to use to model the fluid dynamics in the manifolds commonly found between the heat exchangers and regenerators of Stirling machines; but not just in the manifolds - in the regenerators as well. And in all sorts of other places too, such as: in heaters or coolers, or perhaps even in cylinder spaces. There are probably nonStirling uses for Manifest also. In broad strokes, Manifest will: (1) model oscillating internal compressible laminar fluid flow in a wide range of two-dimensional regions, either filled with porous materials or empty; (2) present a graphics-based user-friendly interface, allowing easy selection and modification of region shape and boundary condition specification; (3) run on a personal computer, or optionally (in the case of its number-crunching module) on a supercomputer; and (4) allow interactive examination of the solution output so the user can view vector plots of flow velocity, contour plots of pressure and temperature at various locations and tabulate energy-related integrals of interest.

  4. Comparing a 2D fluid model of the DC planar magnetron cathode to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1996-05-01

    Planar magnetron cathodes have arching magnetic field lines which concentrate plasma density near the electrode surface. This enhances the ion bombardment of the surface and the yield of sputtered atoms. Magnetron cathodes are used in the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) devices of the Laser Program because they provide for significantly higher conduction than do glow discharges. An essential feature of magnetron cathodes is that the vector product of the perpendicular electric field, E[sub y], with the parallel component of the magnetic field, B[sub x], forms a closed track with a circulating current along the cathode surface. An analytical, 2D, two component, quasi-neutral, continuum model yields formulas for the plasma density, the total and component current densities, the electric field, and the positive electrical potential, between the cathode surface and a distant, uniform plasma. For a specific gas, the free parameters are electron temperature, gas number density, and total current. The model is applied to the interpretation of experimental data from the PEPC device, as well as a small vacuum facility for testing magnetron cathodes. Finally, the model has been applied to generate cross sectional views of a PEPC magnetron cathode track.

  5. Thermochemical Nonequilibrium 2D Modeling of Nitrogen Inductively Coupled Plasma Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minghao; Yusuke, Takahashi; Hisashi, Kihara; Ken-ichi, Abe; Kazuhiko, Yamada; Takashi, Abe; Satoshi, Miyatani

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulations of thermochemical nonequilibrium inductively coupled plasma (ICP) flows inside a 10-kW inductively coupled plasma wind tunnel (ICPWT) were carried out with nitrogen as the working gas. Compressible axisymmetric Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations coupled with magnetic vector potential equations were solved. A four-temperature model including an improved electron-vibration relaxation time was used to model the internal energy exchange between electron and heavy particles. The third-order accuracy electron transport properties (3rd AETP) were applied to the simulations. A hybrid chemical kinetic model was adopted to model the chemical nonequilibrium process. The flow characteristics such as thermal nonequilibrium, inductive discharge, effects of Lorentz force were made clear through the present study. It was clarified that the thermal nonequilibrium model played an important role in properly predicting the temperature field. The prediction accuracy can be improved by applying the 3rd AETP to the simulation for this ICPWT. supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 23560954), sponsored by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

  6. Hydrodynamics of embedded planets' first atmospheres - I. A centrifugal growth barrier for 2D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormel, Chris W.; Kuiper, Rolf; Shi, Ji-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In the core accretion paradigm of planet formation, gas giants only form a massive atmosphere after their progenitors exceeded a threshold mass: the critical core mass. Most (exo)planets, being smaller and rock/ice-dominated, never crossed this line. Nevertheless, they were massive enough to attract substantial amounts of gas from the disc, while their atmospheres remained in pressure-equilibrium with the disc. Our goal is to characterize the hydrodynamical properties of the atmospheres of such embedded planets and the implications for their (long-term) evolution. In this paper - the first in series - we start to investigate the properties of an isothermal and inviscid flow past a small, embedded planet by conducting local, 2D hydrodynamical simulations. Using the PLUTO code, we confirm that the flow is steady and bound. This steady outcome is most apparent for the log-polar grid (with the grid spacing proportional to the distance from the planet). For low-mass planets, Cartesian grids are somewhat less efficient as they have difficulty to follow the circular, large speeds in the deep atmosphere. Relating the amount of rotation to the gas fraction of the atmosphere, we find that more massive atmospheres rotate faster - a finding consistent with Kelvin's circulation theorem. Rotation therefore limits the amount of gas that planets can acquire from the nebula. Dependent on the Toomre-Q parameter of the circumstellar disc, the planet's atmosphere will reach Keplerian rotation before self-gravity starts to become important.

  7. Accurate Angle Estimator for High-Frame-Rate 2-D Vector Flow Imaging.

    PubMed

    Villagomez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jorgen Arendt

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for estimating 2-D flow angles using a high-frame-rate ultrasound method. The angle estimator features high accuracy and low standard deviation (SD) over the full 360° range. The method is validated on Field II simulations and phantom measurements using the experimental ultrasound scanner SARUS and a flow rig before being tested in vivo. An 8-MHz linear array transducer is used with defocused beam emissions. In the simulations of a spinning disk phantom, a 360° uniform behavior on the angle estimation is observed with a median angle bias of 1.01° and a median angle SD of 1.8°. Similar results are obtained on a straight vessel for both simulations and measurements, where the obtained angle biases are below 1.5° with SDs around 1°. Estimated velocity magnitudes are also kept under 10% bias and 5% relative SD in both simulations and measurements. An in vivo measurement is performed on a carotid bifurcation of a healthy individual. A 3-s acquisition during three heart cycles is captured. A consistent and repetitive vortex is observed in the carotid bulb during systoles. PMID:27093598

  8. Fluid flow nozzle energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Winn, Tyler; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Power generation schemes that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce about 1 Watt average power with long-life (decades) are actively being developed. A variety of proposed energy harvesting schemes could be used to extract energy from this environment but each of these has their own limitations that limit their practical use. Since vibrating piezoelectric structures are solid state and can be driven below their fatigue limit, harvesters based on these structures are capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades); thereby, possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. An initial survey [1] identified that spline nozzle configurations can be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to convert the abundant flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. This paper presents current flow energy harvesting designs and experimental results of specific spline nozzle/ bimorph design configurations which have generated suitable power per nozzle at or above well production analogous flow rates. Theoretical models for non-dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical model are also presented in this paper to optimize the flow harvesting system.

  9. Heat Flow Partitioning Between Continents and Oceans - from 2D to 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Cooper, C. M.; Lenardic, A.

    2010-12-01

    Scalings derived from thermal network theory explain how the presence of continents can influence the Earth’s overall heat loss. Intuitively, it may seem that increasing the proportion of a planet’s surface area covered by continents would decrease the efficiency of heat transfer given that continents do not participate in convective overturn. However, this ignores the potential feedback between the insulating effect of continents and the temperature-dependent viscosity of the mantle (Lenardic et al, 2005, Cooper et al, 2007). When this feedback is considered, a clear regime exists in which the partial stagnation and insulation of the surface by buoyant continental crust can lead to an increase in heat flow compared to the uninsulated case. The numerical results used to verify the scalings have mostly been conducted in two dimensions in order to cover a very wide range of Rayleigh number, fraction of continental coverage, and continental thickness. However as more recent results show that the configuration of the crust also plays a role in determining the heat flow partitioning and global heat flow (See Lenardic et al, “Continents, Super-Continents, Mantle Thermal Mixing, and Mantle Thermal Isolation” in this session), we have begun to repeat this exhaustive and exhausting 2D study in 3D. Cooper, C.M., A. Lenardic, and L.-N. Moresi "Effects of continental insulation and the partioning of heat producing elements on the Earth's heat loss." Geophys. Res. Lett., 33 ,10.1029, 2006. Lenardic, A., L.-N. Moresi, A.M. Jellinek, and M. Manga "Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents." Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 234 ,317-333, 2005.

  10. MEANS FOR VISUALIZING FLUID FLOW PATTERNS

    DOEpatents

    Lynch, F.E.; Palmer, L.D.; Poppendick, H.F.; Winn, G.M.

    1961-05-16

    An apparatus is given for determining both the absolute and relative velocities of a phosphorescent fluid flowing through a transparent conduit. The apparatus includes a source for exciting a narrow trsnsverse band of the fluid to phosphorescence, detecting means such as a camera located downstream from the exciting source to record the shape of the phosphorescent band as it passes, and a timer to measure the time elapsed between operation of the exciting source and operation of the camera.

  11. Two-fluid equilibrium with flow: FLOW2

    SciTech Connect

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.

    2015-09-15

    The effects of finite macroscopic velocities on axisymmetric ideal equilibria are examined using the two-fluid (ions and electrons) model. A new equilibrium solver, the code FLOW2, is introduced for the two-fluid model and used to investigate the importance of various flow patterns on the equilibrium of tight aspect ratio (NSTX) and regular tokamak (DIII-D) configurations. Several improvements to the understanding and calculation of two-fluid equilibria are presented, including an analytical and numerical proof of the single-fluid and static limits of the two-fluid model, a discussion of boundary conditions, a user-friendly free-function formulation, and the explicit evaluation of velocity components normal to magnetic surfaces.

  12. Electro-osmotic flow in bicomponent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarenko, Andrei; Sega, Marcello

    The electroosmotic flow (EOF) is a widely used technique that uses the action of external electric fields on solvated ions to move fluids around in microfluidics devices. For homogeneous fluids, the characteristics of the flow can be well approximated by simple analytical models, but in multicomponent systems such as oil-in-water droplets one has to rely to numerical simulations. The purpose of this study is to investigate physical properties of the EOF in a bicomponent fluid by solving the coupled equations of motions of explicit ions in interaction with a continuous model of the flow. To do so we couple the hydrodynamics equations as solved by a Shan-Chen Lattice-Boltzmann method to the molecular dynamics of the ions. The presence of explicit ions allows us to go beyond the simple Poisson-Boltzmann approximations, and investigate a variety of EOF regimes. ETN-COLLDENSE (H2020-MCSA-ITN-2014, Grant No. 642774).

  13. Tomographic reconstruction of stratified fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Winters, K B; Rouseff, D

    1993-01-01

    A method for imaging a moving fluid is proposed and evaluated by numerical simulation. A cross-section of a three-dimensional fluid is probed by high-frequency acoustic waves from several different directions. Assuming straight-ray geometric acoustics, the time of flight depends on both the scaler sound speed and the vector fluid velocity. By appropriately combining travel times, projections of both the sound speed and the velocity are isolated. The sound speed is reconstructed using the standard filtered backprojection algorithm. Though complete inversion of velocity is not possible, sufficient information is available to recover the component of fluid vorticity transverse to the plane of insonification. A new filtered backprojection algorithm for vorticity is developed and implemented. To demonstrate the inversion procedure, a 3-D stratified fluid is simulated and travel time data are calculated by path integration. These data are then inverted to recover both the scaler sound speed and the vorticity of the evolving flow. PMID:18263153

  14. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Gabbour, Maya; Schnell, Susanne; Jarvis, Kelly; Robinson, Joshua D.; Markl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. Objectives The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Materials and methods Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1±6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Results Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r=0.97, P<0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r= 0.88, P<0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P= 0.032) and MPA (P<0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P=0

  15. Full 2D observation of water surface elevation from SWOT under different flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Schumann, Guy; Rui, Wei; Durand, Michael; Pavelsky, Tamlin

    2016-04-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission is a joint project of NASA, Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES, France), the Canadian Space Agency, and the Space Agency of the UK that will provide a first global, high-resolution observation of ocean and terrestrial water surface heights. Characterized by an observation swath of 120 km and an orbit repeat interval of about 21 days, SWOT will provide unprecedented bi-dimensional observations of rivers wider than 50-100 m. Despite many research activities that have investigated potential uses of remotely sensed data from SWOT, potentials and limitations of the spatial observations provided by the satellite mission for flood modeling still remain poorly understood and investigated. In this study we present a first analysis of the spatial observation of water surface elevation that is expected from SWOT for a 140 km reach of the middle-lower portion of the Po River, in Northern Italy. The river stretch is characterized by a main channel varying from 200-500 m in width and a floodplain that can be as wide as 5 km and that is delimited by a system of major embankments. The reconstruction of the hydraulic behavior of the Po River is performed by means of a quasi-2d model built with detailed topographic and bathymetric information (LiDAR, 2 m resolution), while the simulation of the spatial observation sensed by SWOT is performed with a SWOT simulator that mimics the satellite sensor characteristics. Referring to water surface elevations associated with different flow conditions (maximum, minimum and average flow reproduced by means of the quasi-2d numerical model) this work provides a first characterization of the spatial observations provided by SWOT and highlights the strengths and limitations of the expected products. By referring to a real river reach the analysis provides a credible example of the type of spatial observations that will be available after launch of SWOT and offers a first

  16. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Than X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for monitoring the presence, concentration, and the movement of fluids. It is based on utilizing electromagnetic measurements of the complex permittivity of the fluids for detecting and monitoring the fluid. More particularly the apparatus uses one or more microwave probes which are placed at the locations where the measurements are to be made. A radio frequency signal is transmitted to the probe and the reflected signal is phase and amplitude detected at a rapid rate for the purpose of identifying the fluids, based on their dielectric constant at the probe. The apparatus can be used for multiple purposes including measures of flow rates, turbulence, dispersion, fluid identification, and changes in flow conditions of multiple fluids or multiple states of a single fluid in a flowline or a holding container. The apparatus includes a probe consisting of two electrical conductors separated by an insulator. A radio frequency signal is communicated to the probe and is reflected back from the portion of the probe exposed to the fluid. The radio frequency signal also provides a reference signal. An oscillator generates a second signal which combined with each of the reference signal and the reflected signal to produce signals of lower frequencies to facilitate filtering and amplifying those signals. The two signals are then mixed in a detector to produce an output signal that is representative of the phase and amplitude change caused by the reflection of the signal at the probe exposed to the fluid. The detector may be a dual phase detector that provides two such output signals that are in phase quadrature. A phase shifter may be provided for selectively changing the phase of the reference signal to improve the sensitivity of at least one of the output signals for more accurate readings and/or for calibration purposes. The two outputs that are in quadrature with respect to each other may be simultaneously monitored to account for

  17. The inviscid, compressible and rotational, 2D isotropic Burgers and pressureless Euler-Coriolis fluids: Solvable models with illustrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquard, Ph.; Vuffray, M.

    2014-10-01

    The coupling between dilatation and vorticity, two coexisting and fundamental processes in fluid dynamics (Wu et al., 2006, pp. 3, 6) is investigated here, in the simplest cases of inviscid 2D isotropic Burgers and pressureless Euler-Coriolis fluids respectively modeled by single vortices confined in compressible, local, inertial and global, rotating, environments. The field equations are established, inductively, starting from the equations of the characteristics solved with an initial Helmholtz decomposition of the velocity fields namely a vorticity free and a divergence free part (Wu et al., 2006, Sects. 2.3.2, 2.3.3) and, deductively, by means of a canonical Hamiltonian Clebsch like formalism (Clebsch, 1857, 1859), implying two pairs of conjugate variables. Two vector valued fields are constants of the motion: the velocity field in the Burgers case and the momentum field per unit mass in the Euler-Coriolis one. Taking advantage of this property, a class of solutions for the mass densities of the fluids is given by the Jacobian of their sum with respect to the actual coordinates. Implementation of the isotropy hypothesis entails a radial dependence of the velocity potentials and of the stream functions associated to the compressible and to the rotational part of the fluids and results in the cancellation of the dilatation-rotational cross terms in the Jacobian. A simple expression is obtained for all the radially symmetric Jacobians occurring in the theory. Representative examples of regular and singular solutions are shown and the competition between dilatation and vorticity is illustrated. Inspired by thermodynamical, mean field theoretical analogies, a genuine variational formula is proposed which yields unique measure solutions for the radially symmetric fluid densities investigated. We stress that this variational formula, unlike the Hopf-Lax formula, enables us to treat systems which are both compressible and rotational. Moreover in the one

  18. Fluid Flow in An Evaporating Droplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, H.; Larson, R.

    1999-01-01

    Droplet evaporation is a common phenomenon in everyday life. For example, when a droplet of coffee or salt solution is dropped onto a surface and the droplet dries out, a ring of coffee or salt particles is left on the surface. This phenomenon exists not only in everyday life, but also in many practical industrial processes and scientific research and could also be used to assist in DNA sequence analysis, if the flow field in the droplet produced by the evaporation could be understood and predicted in detail. In order to measure the fluid flow in a droplet, small particles can be suspended into the fluid as tracers. From the ratio of gravitational force to Brownian force a(exp 4)(delta rho)(g)/k(sub B)T, we find that particle's tendency to settle is proportional to a(exp 4) (a is particle radius). So, to keep the particles from settling, the droplet size should be chosen to be in a range 0.1 -1.0 microns in experiments. For such small particles, the Brownian force will affect the motion of the particle preventing accurate measurement of the flow field. This problem could be overcome by using larger particles as tracers to measure fluid flow under microgravity since the gravitational acceleration g is then very small. For larger particles, Brownian force would hardly affect the motion of the particles. Therefore, accurate flow field could be determined from experiments in microgravity. In this paper, we will investigate the fluid flow in an evaporating droplet under normal gravity, and compare experiments to theories. Then, we will present our ideas about the experimental measurement of fluid flow in an evaporating droplet under microgravity.

  19. Messinian Salinity Crisis and basin fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, Claudia; Cartwight, Joe

    2014-05-01

    Syn- and post-depositional movement of fluids through sediments is one of the least understood aspects in the evolution of a basin. The conventional hydrostratigraphic view on marine sedimentary basins assumes that compactional and meteoric groundwater fluid circulation drives fluid movement and defines its timing. However, in the past few years, several examples of instantaneous and catastrophic release of fluids have been observed even through low-permeability sediments. A particularly complex case-study involves the presence of giant salt bodies in the depocentres of marine basins. Evaporites dramatically change the hydrostratigraphy and fluid-dynamics of the basin, and influence the P/T regimes, e.g. through changes in the geothermal gradient and in the compaction of underlying sediments. Our paper reviews the impact of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) and evaporites on fluid flow in the Mediterranean sub-basins. The analysis of geological and geophysical sub-surface data provides examples from this basin, and the comparison with analogues in other well-known evaporitic provinces. During the MSC, massive sea-level changes occurred in a relatively limited time interval, and affected the balance of fluid dynamics, e.g. with sudden release or unusual trapping of fluids. Fluid expulsion events are here analysed and classified in relation to the long and short-term effects of the MSC. Our main aim is to build a framework for the correct identification of the fluid flow-related events, and their genetic mechanisms. On basin margins, where evaporites are thin or absent, the sea-level changes associated with the MSC force a rapid basinward shift of the mixing zone of meteoric/gravity flow and saline/compactional flow, 100s-km away from its pre-MSC position. This phenomenon changes the geometry of converging flows, creates hydraulic traps for fluids, and triggers specific diagenetic reactions in pre-MSC deep marine sediments. In basin-centre settings, unloading and

  20. Fluid flow meter for measuring the rate of fluid flow in a conduit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A tube fluid flow rate meter consists of a reservoir divided by flexible diaphragm into two separate isolated compartments. The incoming and outgoing tubes open into the compartments. The orifice is sized to allow maximum tube fluid flow. Opposing compression springs are secured within the two compartments on opposite sides of the orifice to maintain orifice position when the tube fluid pressure is zero. A tapered element is centered in, and extends through the orifice into the compartment, leaving an annular opening between the element and the perimeter of the oriface. The size varies as the diaphragm flexes with changes in the tube fluid pressure to change the fluid flow through the opening. The light source directs light upon the element which in turn scatters the light through the opening into the compartment. The light detector in the compartment senses the scattered light to generate a signal indicating the amount of fluid.

  1. Time-Dependent 2D Modeling of Magnetron Plasma Torch in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lincun; Xia, Weidong

    2008-06-01

    A theoretical model is presented to describe the electromagnetic, heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena within a magnetron plasma torch and in the resultant plume, by using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Specific calculations are presented for a pure argon system (i.e., an argon plasma discharging into an argon environment), operated in a turbulent mode. An important finding of this work is that the external axial magnetic field (AMF) may have a significant effect on the behavior of arc plasma and thus affects the resulting plume. The AMF impels the plasma to retract axially and expand radially. As a result, the plasma intensity distribution on the cross section of torch seems to be more uniform. Numerical results also show that with AMF, the highest plasma temperature decreases and the anode arc root moves upstream significantly, while the current density distribution at the anode is more concentrated with a higher peak value. In addition, the use of AMF then induces a strong backflow at the torch spout and its magnitude increases with the AMF strength but decreases with the inlet gas velocity.

  2. Method and apparatus for controlling fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Miller, J.R.

    1980-06-27

    A method and apparatus for precisely controlling the rate (and hence amount) of fluid flow are given. The controlled flow rate is finely adjustable, can be extremely small (on the order of microliter-atmospheres per second), can be adjusted to zero (flow stopped), and is stable to better than 1% with time. The dead volume of the valve can be made arbitrarily small, in fact essentially zero. The valve employs no wearing mechanical parts (including springs, stems, or seals). The valve is finely adjustable, has a flow rate dynamic range of many decades, can be made compatible with any fluid, and is suitable for incorporation into an open or closed loop servo-control system.

  3. Fluid flow along faults in carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Valentina; Battaglia, Maurizio; Bigi, Sabina

    2015-04-01

    The study of fluid flow in fractured rocks plays a key role in reservoir management, including CO2 sequestration and waste isolation. We present a mathematical model of fluid flow in a fault zone, based on field data acquired in Majella Mountain, in the Central Apennines (Italy). The Majella is a thrust related, asymmetric, box shaped anticline. The mountain carbonate outcrops are part of a lower Cretaceous-Miocene succession, covered by a siliciclastic sequence of lower Pliocene age. We study a fault zone located in the Bolognano Formation (Oligo-Miocene age) and exposed in the Roman Valley Quarry near the town of Lettomanoppello, in the northern sector of the Majella Mountain. This is one of the best places in the Apennines to investigate a fault zone and has been the subject of numerous field studies. Faults are mechanical and permeability heterogeneities in the upper crust, so they strongly influence fluid flow. The distribution of the main components (core, damage zone) can lead a fault zone to act as a conduit, a barrier or a combined conduit-barrier system. We integrated existing and our own structural surveys of the area to better identify the major fault features (e.g., kind of fractures, statistical properties, geometry and pertrophysical characteristics). Our analytical model describe the Bolognano Formation using a dual porosity/dual permeability model: global flow occurs through the fracture network only, while rock matrix contain the majority of fluid storage and provide fluid drainage to the fractures. Pressure behavior is analyzed by examining the pressure drawdown curves, the derivative plots and the effects of the characteristic parameters. The analytical model has been calibrated against published data on fluid flow and pressure distribution in the Bolognano Formation.

  4. Titan2D Based Pyroclastic Flows Hazard Maps for Santa Ana Volcano, El Salvador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajo, J. V.; Martinez-Hackert, B.; Escobar, C. D.; Gutierrez, R. E.

    2009-05-01

    Santa Ana Volcano is located in the Apaneca Volcanic Field located to the west of El Salvador, Central America. It is one the six active volcanoes monitor by the Servicios Nacionales de Estudios Territoriales (SNET) in El Salvador, out of twenty that are considered active in this small country by Smithsonian definition. The Santa Ana Volcano is surrounded by rural communities in its proximal areas and in its close distal areas by the second largest city of the country. On October 1st 2005, after a few months of increased fumarolic and seismic activity, it erupted generating a 10 km high steam and ash plume, reportedly seen by some aircraft and estimated using photography by SNET members. Ash was deposited to the west, north-west part of the country, following typical wind pattern for the region, as well as small pyroclastic flows and major lahars in its eastern part. Coffee plantations were lost, as was some crop of coffee in the following season. However, to the west the ash fertilized the land and resulted in an enhanced harvest of coffee beans. Only 2 people were killed from the Blast, thanks to the auto evacuation of proximal communities. Whilst the last eruption had a relatively low human life toll, a stronger eruption spells havoc almost certainly for the region. At this moment no exhaustive study and understanding exists of the pyroclastic flows generated by the Santa Ana Volcano nor a map for this particular hazard. This study proposes the use of Titan2D for those two purposes, using a DEM generated by the SNET using topographic maps as well as DEMs generated using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer Images (ASTER).

  5. Fluid Flow with Logger Pro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairman, Stephen J.; Johnson, Joseph A.; Walkiewicz, Thomas A.

    2003-09-01

    Graphical analysis of experimental data that exhibit exponential behavior is typically postponed at many institutions until students are able to understand the theory underlying the concept of radioactive decay or of RC time constants in ac circuits. In 1960 Smithson and Pinkston described a laboratory exercise that uses the flow of water from a vertical column through a long horizontal capillary tube as a source of data that models radioactive decay. Many institutions have used this experiment simply as an early introduction to exponential behavior without reference to radioactive decay or ac circuits. Greenslade2 recently described a modification of this experiment to demonstrate the concept of secular equilibrium in radioactive decay. This paper presents results of similar experiments, but visual measurements are replaced in this work by data obtained with modern sensors interfaced to a computer. Experiments are described from simple exponential decay to an analogue of the complex interactions of three nuclides in a radioactive-series decay chain.

  6. Eddy flows in a fluid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavolzhenskii, M. V.

    1982-09-01

    Boussinesq equations are used in studying the spectral problem of the stability loss in the equilibrium state of a rotating layer of viscous fluid subjected to temperature inversion. It is shown that this loss can take the form of eddy flows localized around the axis of rotation. It is noted that flows of this type have properties similar to those of waterspouts, tornados, and other vortices.

  7. Automated analysis for fluid flow topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1989-01-01

    A new approach for visualizing vector data sets was developed by reducing the original vector field to a set of critical points and their connections, and was applied to fluid flow data sets. The critical point representation allows for considerable reduction in the data complexity. The representations are displayed as surfaces which are much simpler than the original data set, yet retain all the pertinent flow topology information. It is suggested that topological representations may be useful for database comparison.

  8. Maximal mixing by incompressible fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seis, Christian

    2013-12-01

    We consider a model for mixing binary viscous fluids under an incompressible flow. We prove the impossibility of perfect mixing in finite time for flows with finite viscous dissipation. As measures of mixedness we consider a Monge-Kantorovich-Rubinstein transportation distance and, more classically, the H-1 norm. We derive rigorous a priori lower bounds on these mixing norms which show that mixing cannot proceed faster than exponentially in time. The rate of the exponential decay is uniform in the initial data.

  9. Advanced designs for fluid flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Research was carried out on existing and new designs for minimally intrusive measurement of flow fields in the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell and the proposed Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment. The following topics are discussed: (1) identification and removal of foreign particles, (2) search for higher dielectric photochromic solutions, (3) selection of uv light source, (4) analysis of refractive techniques and (5) examination of fresnel lens applicability.

  10. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    These simulations of atmospheric flow use the same experimental parameters but started with slightly different initial conditions in the model. The simulations were part of data analysis for the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC), a planet in a test tube apparatus flown on Spacelab to mimic the atmospheres on gas giant planets and stars. (Credit: Dr. Tim Miller of Global Hydrology and Climate Center at the Marshall Space Flight Center)

  11. Classification of the stratified fluid flows regimes around a square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchin, V. A.; Matyushin, P. V.

    2015-10-01

    The 2D density stratified (in vertical direction) viscous fluid flows around a square cylinder with diameter d (moving in horizontal direction with the velocity U) have been simulated on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. For solving of the Navier-Stokes equations the Splitting on physical factors Method for Incompressible Fluid flows (SMIF) with hybrid explicit finite difference scheme (second-order accuracy in space, minimum scheme viscosity and dispersion, monotonous) has been used. The numerical method SMIF has been successfully applied for solving of the different problems: 2D and 3D separated homogeneous and stratified fluid flows around a sphere and a circular cylinder; the flows with free surface including regimes with broken surface wave; the air, heat and mass transfer in the clean rooms. At the present paper the original refined classification of 2D stratified viscous fluid flow regimes around a square cylinder at Re ≤ 200 has been obtained and the interesting fluid flows with two hanging vortices in the wake and with two wavy hanging sheets of density (connected with two hanging vortices) have been investigated in details at Fr = 0.1, Re = 50, where Re = U.d/ν is the Reynolds number, Fr = U/(N.d) is the internal Froude number, ν is the kinematical viscosity coefficient, N is the buoyancy frequency.

  12. Finite scale equations for compressible fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, Len G

    2008-01-01

    Finite-scale equations (FSE) describe the evolution of finite volumes of fluid over time. We discuss the FSE for a one-dimensional compressible fluid, whose every point is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations. The FSE contain new momentum and internal energy transport terms. These are similar to terms added in numerical simulation for high-speed flows (e.g. artificial viscosity) and for turbulent flows (e.g. subgrid scale models). These similarities suggest that the FSE may provide new insight as a basis for computational fluid dynamics. Our analysis of the FS continuity equation leads to a physical interpretation of the new transport terms, and indicates the need to carefully distinguish between volume-averaged and mass-averaged velocities in numerical simulation. We make preliminary connections to the other recent work reformulating Navier-Stokes equations.

  13. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.; Ohlsen, D.; Kittleman, S.; Borhani, N.; Leslie, F.; Miller, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) experiment performed visualizations of thermal convection in a rotating differentially heated spherical shell of fluid. In these experiments dielectric polarization forces are used to generate a radially directed buoyancy force. This enables the laboratory simulation of a number of geophysically and astrophysically important situations in which sphericity and rotation both impose strong constraints on global scale fluid motions. During USML-2 a large set of experiments with spherically symmetric heating were carried out. These enabled the determination of critical points for the transition to various forms of nonaxisymmetric convection and, for highly turbulent flows, the transition latitudes separating the different modes of motion. This paper presents a first analysis of these experiments as well as data on the general performance of the instrument during the USML-2 flight.

  14. Cryogenic fluid flow instabilities in heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, R. B.; Staub, F. W.

    1969-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigation determines the nature of oscillations and instabilities that occur in the flow of two-phase cryogenic fluids at both subcritical and supercritical pressures in heat exchangers. Test results with varying system parameters suggest certain design approaches with regard to heat exchanger geometry.

  15. Volcanic termor: Nonlinear excitation by fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, Bruce R.

    1994-06-01

    A nonlinear process analogous to the excitation mechanism of musical wind instruments and human vocal cords can explain many characteristics of volcanic tremor, including (1) periodic and 'chaotic' oscillations, with peaked and irregular spectra respectively, (2) rapid pulsations in eruptions occurring at the same frequency as tremor, (3) systematic changes in tremor amplitude as channel geometry evolves during an eruption, (4) the period doubling reported for Hawaiian deep tremor, and (5) the fact that the onset of termor can be either gradual or abrupt. Volcanic 'long-period' earthquakes can be explained as oscillations excited by transient disturbances produced by nearby earthquakes, fluid heterogeneity, or changes in channel geometry, when the magma flow rate is too low to excite continuous tremor. A simple lumped-parameter tremor model involving the flow of an incompressible viscous fluid through a channel with movable elastic walls leads to a third-order system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. For different driving fluid pressures, numerical solutions exhibit steady flow, simple limit-cycle oscillations, a cascade of period-doubling subharmonic bifurcations, and chaotic oscillations controlled by a strange attractor of Rossler type. In this model, tremor occurs most easily at local constrictions, and fluid discharge is lower than would occur in unstable steady flow.

  16. 14 CFR 23.1095 - Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. 23.1095... Induction System § 23.1095 Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. (a) If a carburetor deicing fluid system is used, it must be able to simultaneously supply each engine with a rate of fluid flow, expressed...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1095 - Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. 23.1095... Induction System § 23.1095 Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. (a) If a carburetor deicing fluid system is used, it must be able to simultaneously supply each engine with a rate of fluid flow, expressed...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1095 - Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. 23.1095... Induction System § 23.1095 Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. (a) If a carburetor deicing fluid system is used, it must be able to simultaneously supply each engine with a rate of fluid flow, expressed...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1095 - Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. 23.1095... Induction System § 23.1095 Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. (a) If a carburetor deicing fluid system is used, it must be able to simultaneously supply each engine with a rate of fluid flow, expressed...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1095 - Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. 23.1095... Induction System § 23.1095 Carburetor deicing fluid flow rate. (a) If a carburetor deicing fluid system is used, it must be able to simultaneously supply each engine with a rate of fluid flow, expressed...

  1. A qualitative view of cryogenic fluid injection into high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Schlumberger, J.; Proctor, M.

    1991-01-01

    The injection of supercritical pressure, subcritical temperature fluids, into a 2-D, ambient, static temperature and static pressure supersonic tunnel and free jet supersonic nitrogen flow field was observed. Observed patterns with fluid air were the same as those observed for fluid nitrogen injected into the tunnel at 90 deg to the supersonic flow. The nominal injection pressure was of 6.9 MPa and tunnel Mach number was 2.7. When injected directly into and opposing the tunnel exhaust flow, the observed patterns with fluid air were similar to those observed for fluid nitrogen but appeared more diffusive. Cryogenic injection creates a high density region within the bow shock wake but the standoff distance remains unchanged from the gaseous value. However, as the temperature reaches a critical value, the shock faded and advanced into the supersonic stream. For both fluids, nitrogen and air, the phenomena was completely reversible.

  2. Enhanced fluid flow through nanoscale carbon pipes.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Max; Cagnon, Laurent; Thanou, Maya; Quirke, Nick

    2008-09-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies demonstrate that pressure driven flow of fluids through nanoscale ( d < 10 nm) carbon pores occurs 4 to 5 orders of magnitude faster than predicted by extrapolation from conventional theory. Here, we report experimental results for flow of water, ethanol, and decane through carbon nanopipes with larger inner diameters (43 +/- 3 nm) than previously investigated. We find enhanced transport up to 45 times theoretical predictions. In contrast to previous work, in our systems, decane flows faster than water. These nanopipes were composed of amorphous carbon deposited from ethylene vapor in alumina templates using a single step fabrication process. PMID:18680352

  3. Onset of turbulence from the receptivity stage of fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, T K; Bhaumik, S

    2011-10-01

    The traditional viewpoint of fluid flow considers the transition to turbulence to occur by the secondary and nonlinear instability of wave packets, which have been created experimentally by localized harmonic excitation. The boundary layer has been shown theoretically to support spatiotemporal growing wave fronts by Sengupta, Rao, and Venkatasubbaiah [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 224504 (2006)] by a linear mechanism, which is shown here to grow continuously, causing the transition to turbulence. Here, we track spatiotemporal wave fronts to a nonlinear turbulent state by solving the full 2D Navier-Stokes equation, without any limiting assumptions. Thus, this is the only demonstration of deterministic disturbances evolving from a receptivity stage to the full turbulent flow. This is despite the prevalent competing conjectures of the event being three-dimensional and/or stochastic in nature. PMID:22107294

  4. Granular Material Flows with Interstitial Fluid Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Melany L.; Brennen, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    The research focused on experimental measurements of the rheological properties of liquid-solid and granular flows. In these flows, the viscous effects of the interstitial fluid, the inertia of the fluid and particles, and the collisional interactions of the particles may all contribute to the flow mechanics. These multiphase flows include industrial problems such as coal slurry pipelines, hydraulic fracturing processes, fluidized beds, mining and milling operation, abrasive water jet machining, and polishing and surface erosion technologies. In addition, there are a wide range of geophysical flows such as debris flows, landslides and sediment transport. In extraterrestrial applications, the study of transport of particulate materials is fundamental to the mining and processing of lunar and Martian soils and the transport of atmospheric dust (National Research Council 2000). The recent images from Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft dramatically depict the complex sand and dust flows on Mars, including dune formation and dust avalanches on the slip-face of dune surfaces. These Aeolian features involve a complex interaction of the prevailing winds and deposition or erosion of the sediment layer; these features make a good test bed for the verification of global circulation models of the Martian atmosphere.

  5. Behaviour of a rimmed elliptical inclusion in 2D slow incompressible viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancktelow, N. S.

    2012-04-01

    The shape preferred orientation of natural populations of inclusions (or "porphyroclasts") is often inconsistent with predictions from established analytical theory for inclusions with coherent boundaries (e.g., Pennacchioni et al. 2001). A totally incoherent or slipping interface can explain observed stable back-rotated (or antithetic) orientations but not the observed cut-off axial ratio, below which inclusions still rotate. However, this behaviour is reproduced by a rimmed inclusion with a rim viscosity that is not infinitely weak but still weaker than the matrix (e.g., Schmid and Podladchikov 2005; Johnson et al. 2009). In this study, finite-element numerical modelling (FEM) is employed to investigate this system in 2D over a very wide parameter space, from a viscosity ratio (relative to the matrix) of the inclusion from 106 to 1, the rim from 10-6 to 1, the axial ratio from 1.00025 to 20, and the rim thickness from 5% to 20%. Theoretical consideration of a concentric elliptical inclusion and ellipse reduces the number of scalar values to be determined to fully characterize the system to two: one for the rate of stretch of the inclusion and one for the rate of rotation. From these two values, the rotation and stretching rate can be calculated for any orientation and 2D background flow field. For effectively rigid particles, the cut-off axial ratio between rotation and stabilization is determined by the remaining two parameters, namely the rim viscosity and the thickness, with low rim viscosity or thick rims promoting stabilization. The shape fabric of a population of particles in a high strain shear zone, presented as a typical Rf/φ plot, can be forward modelled using an initial value Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE) approach. Because the rim does not remain elliptical to high strain, this method cannot accurately model the behaviour of individual inclusions. However, a statistical approach, allowing variation in rim viscosity, which is also a proxy for

  6. Approaches to Modeling Coupled Flow and Reaction in a 2-D Cementation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl; Cochepin, B.; Trotignon, L.; Bildstein, O.; Steefel, C.; Lagneau, V.; van der Lee, J.

    2008-04-01

    Porosity evolution at reactive interfaces is a key process that governs the evolution and performances of many engineered systems that have important applications in earth and environmental sciences. This is the case, for example, at the interface between cement structures and clays in deep geological nuclear waste disposals. Although in a different transport regime, similar questions arise for permeable reactive barriers used for biogeochemical remediation in surface environments. The COMEDIE project aims at investigating the coupling between transport, hydrodynamics and chemistry when significant variations of porosity occur. The present work focuses on a numerical benchmark used as a design exercise for the future COMEDIE-2D experiment. The use of reactive transport simulation tools like Hytec and Crunch provides predictions of the physico-chemical evolutions that are expected during the future experiments in laboratory. Focus is given in this paper on the evolution during the simulated experiment of precipitate, permeability and porosity fields. A first case is considered in which the porosity is constant. Results obtained with Crunch and Hytec are in relatively good agreement. Differences are attributable to the models of reactive surface area taken into account for dissolution/precipitation processes. Crunch and Hytec simulations taking into account porosity variations are then presented and compared. Results given by the two codes are in qualitative agreement, with differences attributable in part to the models of reactive surface area for dissolution/precipitation processes. As a consequence, the localization of secondary precipitates predicted by Crunch leads to lower local porosities than for predictions obtained by Hytec and thus to a stronger coupling between flow and chemistry. This benchmark highlights the importance of the surface area model employed to describe systems in which strong porosity variations occur as a result of dissolution

  7. Using heteroclinic orbits to quantify topological entropy in fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattari, Sulimon; Chen, Qianting; Mitchell, Kevin A.

    2016-03-01

    Topological approaches to mixing are important tools to understand chaotic fluid flows, ranging from oceanic transport to the design of micro-mixers. Typically, topological entropy, the exponential growth rate of material lines, is used to quantify topological mixing. Computing topological entropy from the direct stretching rate is computationally expensive and sheds little light on the source of the mixing. Earlier approaches emphasized that topological entropy could be viewed as generated by the braiding of virtual, or "ghost," rods stirring the fluid in a periodic manner. Here, we demonstrate that topological entropy can also be viewed as generated by the braiding of ghost rods following heteroclinic orbits instead. We use the machinery of homotopic lobe dynamics, which extracts symbolic dynamics from finite-length pieces of stable and unstable manifolds attached to fixed points of the fluid flow. As an example, we focus on the topological entropy of a bounded, chaotic, two-dimensional, double-vortex cavity flow. Over a certain parameter range, the topological entropy is primarily due to the braiding of a period-three orbit. However, this orbit does not explain the topological entropy for parameter values where it does not exist, nor does it explain the excess of topological entropy for the entire range of its existence. We show that braiding by heteroclinic orbits provides an accurate computation of topological entropy when the period-three orbit does not exist, and that it provides an explanation for some of the excess topological entropy when the period-three orbit does exist. Furthermore, the computation of symbolic dynamics using heteroclinic orbits has been automated and can be used to compute topological entropy for a general 2D fluid flow.

  8. Using heteroclinic orbits to quantify topological entropy in fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Sattari, Sulimon; Chen, Qianting; Mitchell, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    Topological approaches to mixing are important tools to understand chaotic fluid flows, ranging from oceanic transport to the design of micro-mixers. Typically, topological entropy, the exponential growth rate of material lines, is used to quantify topological mixing. Computing topological entropy from the direct stretching rate is computationally expensive and sheds little light on the source of the mixing. Earlier approaches emphasized that topological entropy could be viewed as generated by the braiding of virtual, or "ghost," rods stirring the fluid in a periodic manner. Here, we demonstrate that topological entropy can also be viewed as generated by the braiding of ghost rods following heteroclinic orbits instead. We use the machinery of homotopic lobe dynamics, which extracts symbolic dynamics from finite-length pieces of stable and unstable manifolds attached to fixed points of the fluid flow. As an example, we focus on the topological entropy of a bounded, chaotic, two-dimensional, double-vortex cavity flow. Over a certain parameter range, the topological entropy is primarily due to the braiding of a period-three orbit. However, this orbit does not explain the topological entropy for parameter values where it does not exist, nor does it explain the excess of topological entropy for the entire range of its existence. We show that braiding by heteroclinic orbits provides an accurate computation of topological entropy when the period-three orbit does not exist, and that it provides an explanation for some of the excess topological entropy when the period-three orbit does exist. Furthermore, the computation of symbolic dynamics using heteroclinic orbits has been automated and can be used to compute topological entropy for a general 2D fluid flow. PMID:27036190

  9. Flow behaviour of extremely bidisperse magnetizable fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susan-Resiga, Daniela; Bica, Doina; Vékás, L.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we investigated the rheological and magnetorheological behaviours of an extremely bidisperse (nano-micro) magnetizable fluid (sample D1) for comparison of a commercial magnetorheological fluid (MRF-140CG; LORD Co. (USA)) with the same magnetic solid volume fraction, using the Physica MCR-300 rheometer with a 20 mm diameter plate-plate magnetorheological cell (MRD180). D1 sample is a suspension of micrometer range Fe particles in a transformer oil based magnetic fluid as carrier. For both types of samples, the experimental data for zero and non-zero magnetic field conditions were fitted to equations derived from the Newtonian and Cross type flow equations, as well as the Herschel-Bulkley model. The main advantage of both rheological equations for the quantitative description of the magnetic field behaviour of samples is that they can be used in regular CFD codes to compute the flow properties of the magnetorheological fluid and of the bidisperse magnetizable fluid for practical applications.

  10. Ultrasonic fluid flow measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-10-12

    An apparatus for measuring the flow of a fluid in a pipe using ultrasonic waves. The apparatus comprises an ultrasonic generator, a lens for focusing the sound energy produced by the generator, and means for directing the focused energy into the side of the pipe through an opening and in a direction close to parallel to the long axis of the pipe. A cone carries the sound energy to the lens from the generator. Depending on the choice of materials, there may be a quarter-wave, acoustic impedance matching section between the generator and the cone to reduce the reflections of energy at the cone boundary. The lens material has an acoustic impedance similar to that of the cone material but a different sonic velocity so that the lens can converge the sound waves in the fluid. A transition section between the lens and the fluid helps to couple the energy to the fluid and assures it is directed as close to parallel to the fluid flow direction as possible. 3 figures.

  11. Ultrasonic fluid flow measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the flow of a fluid in a pipe using ultrasonic waves. The apparatus comprises an ultrasonic generator, a lens for focusing the sound energy produced by the generator, and means for directing the focused energy into the side of the pipe through an opening and in a direction close to parallel to the long axis of the pipe. A cone carries the sound energy to the lens from the generator. Depending on the choice of materials, there may be a quarter-wave, acoustic impedance matching section between the generator and the cone to reduce the reflections of energy at the cone boundary. The lens material has an acoustic impedance similar to that of the cone material but a different sonic velocity so that the lens can converge the sound waves in the fluid. A transition section between the lens and the fluid helps to couple the energy to the fluid and assures it is directed as close to parallel to the fluid flow direction as possible.

  12. 2-Phase Fluid Flow & Heat Transport

    1993-03-13

    GEOTHER is a three-dimensional, geothermal reservoir simulation code. The model describes heat transport and flow of a single component, two-phase fluid in porous media. It is based on the continuity equations for steam and water, which are reduced to two nonlinear partial differential equations in which the dependent variables are fluid pressure and enthalpy. GEOTHER can be used to simulate the fluid-thermal interaction in rock that can be approximated by a porous media representation. Itmore » can simulate heat transport and the flow of compressed water, two-phase mixtures, and superheated steam in porous media over a temperature range of 10 to 300 degrees C. In addition, it can treat the conversion from single to two-phase flow, and vice versa. It can be used for evaluation of a near repository spatial scale and a time scale of a few years to thousands of years. The model can be used to investigate temperature and fluid pressure changes in response to thermal loading by waste materials.« less

  13. Approximation of 2D Euler Equations by the Second-Grade Fluid Equations with Dirichlet Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Filho, Milton C.; Nussenzveig Lopes, Helena J.; Titi, Edriss S.; Zang, Aibin

    2015-06-01

    The second-grade fluid equations are a model for viscoelastic fluids, with two parameters: α > 0, corresponding to the elastic response, and , corresponding to viscosity. Formally setting these parameters to 0 reduces the equations to the incompressible Euler equations of ideal fluid flow. In this article we study the limits of solutions of the second-grade fluid system, in a smooth, bounded, two-dimensional domain with no-slip boundary conditions. This class of problems interpolates between the Euler- α model (), for which the authors recently proved convergence to the solution of the incompressible Euler equations, and the Navier-Stokes case ( α = 0), for which the vanishing viscosity limit is an important open problem. We prove three results. First, we establish convergence of the solutions of the second-grade model to those of the Euler equations provided , as α → 0, extending the main result in (Lopes Filho et al., Physica D 292(293):51-61, 2015). Second, we prove equivalence between convergence (of the second-grade fluid equations to the Euler equations) and vanishing of the energy dissipation in a suitably thin region near the boundary, in the asymptotic regime , as α → 0. This amounts to a convergence criterion similar to the well-known Kato criterion for the vanishing viscosity limit of the Navier-Stokes equations to the Euler equations. Finally, we obtain an extension of Kato's classical criterion to the second-grade fluid model, valid if , as . The proof of all these results relies on energy estimates and boundary correctors, following the original idea by Kato.

  14. Monotectic composite growth with fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöcker, C.; Ratke, L.

    It is a well-known fluid-mechanical phenomenon that thermocapillary forces induce surface convection on a fluid-fluid interface. This so-called Marangoni convection depends on the variation of the surface energy along the interface. In our present work we focus our attention on the evolution of a fibrous monotectic microstructure with liquid L 2 fibers. We will show, that the Marangoni convection has a strong influence on the transport of solute in front of the solidification front, despite the flow induced by density differences. The resulting flow field affects the constitutional undercooling and therefore the mean undercooling of a monotectic solidification front. In a previous paper we discussed qualitatively the influence of fluid flow on the microstructure evolution of composite monotetic growth (C. Stöcker, L. Ratke, J. Crystal Growth 203 (1999) 582). We introduced an analytical model that takes the density differences of the phases and the surface convection on the L 1-L 2 surface into consideration. With this extended Jackson and Hunt theory for composite monotectic growth we derived a characteristic equation for the inter-rod distance depending on solidification velocity and temperature gradient. In this paper we develop a more accurate model. We solve numerically the diffusion equation coupled with the Navier-Stokes equation in the L 1 phase to find the minimal undercooling for a given velocity and temperature gradient. We derive a Jackson and Hunt diagram and show that the fluid flow leads to a strong dependence of the inter-rod distance on the temperature gradient opposite to eutectic solidification.

  15. Modeling Tools Predict Flow in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    "Because rocket engines operate under extreme temperature and pressure, they present a unique challenge to designers who must test and simulate the technology. To this end, CRAFT Tech Inc., of Pipersville, Pennsylvania, won Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Marshall Space Flight Center to develop software to simulate cryogenic fluid flows and related phenomena. CRAFT Tech enhanced its CRUNCH CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software to simulate phenomena in various liquid propulsion components and systems. Today, both government and industry clients in the aerospace, utilities, and petrochemical industries use the software for analyzing existing systems as well as designing new ones."

  16. Slip mechanisms in complex fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2015-10-28

    The classical no-slip boundary condition of fluid mechanics is not always a valid assumption for the flow of several classes of complex fluids including polymer melts, their blends, polymer solutions, microgels, glasses, suspensions and pastes. In fact, it appears that slip effect in these systems is the rule and not the exemption. The occurrence of slip complicates the analysis of rheological data, although it provides new opportunities to understand their behavior in restricted environments delineating additional molecular mechanisms i.e. entropic restrictions due to limitations in the number of molecular conformations. This article discusses these complexities and provides future research opportunities. PMID:26345121

  17. SIMULATIONS OF 2D AND 3D THERMOCAPILLARY FLOWS BY A LEAST-SQUARES FINITE ELEMENT METHOD. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical results for time-dependent 2D and 3D thermocapillary flows are presented in this work. The numerical algorithm is based on the Crank-Nicolson scheme for time integration, Newton's method for linearization, and a least-squares finite element method, together with a matri...

  18. 2-D transmitral flows simulation by means of the immersed boundary method on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denaro, F. M.; Sarghini, F.

    2002-04-01

    Interaction between computational fluid dynamics and clinical researches recently allowed a deeper understanding of the physiology of complex phenomena involving cardio-vascular mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to develop a simplified numerical model based on the Immersed Boundary Method and to perform numerical simulations in order to study the cardiac diastolic phase during which the left ventricle is filled with blood flowing from the atrium throughout the mitral valve. As one of the diagnostic problems to be faced by clinicians is the lack of a univocal definition of the diastolic performance from the velocity measurements obtained by Eco-Doppler techniques, numerical simulations are supposed to provide an insight both into the physics of the diastole and into the interpretation of experimental data. An innovative application of the Immersed Boundary Method on unstructured grids is presented, fulfilling accuracy requirements related to the development of a thin boundary layer along the moving immersed boundary. It appears that this coupling between unstructured meshes and the Immersed Boundary Method is a promising technique when a wide range of spatial scales is involved together with a moving boundary. Numerical simulations are performed in a range of physiological parameters and a qualitative comparison with experimental data is presented, in order to demonstrate that, despite the simplified model, the main physiological characteristics of the diastole are well represented. Copyright

  19. 2-D left ventricular flow estimation by combining speckle tracking with Navier-Stokes-based regularization: an in silico, in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hang; Bijnens, Nathalie; Coisne, Damien; Lugiez, Mathieu; Rutten, Marcel; D'hooge, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of multiple ultrasound approaches to left ventricular (LV) flow characterization in two dimensions, this technique remains in its childhood and further developments seem warranted. This article describes a new methodology for tracking the 2-D LV flow field based on ultrasound data. Hereto, a standard speckle tracking algorithm was modified by using a dynamic kernel embedding Navier-Stokes-based regularization in an iterative manner. The performance of the proposed approach was first quantified in synthetic ultrasound data based on a computational fluid dynamics model of LV flow. Next, an experimental flow phantom setup mimicking the normal human heart was used for experimental validation by employing simultaneous optical particle image velocimetry as a standard reference technique. Finally, the applicability of the approach was tested in a clinical setting. On the basis of the simulated data, pointwise evaluation of the estimated velocity vectors correlated well (mean r = 0.84) with the computational fluid dynamics measurement. During the filling period of the left ventricle, the properties of the main vortex obtained from the proposed method were also measured, and their correlations with the reference measurement were also calculated (radius, r = 0.96; circulation, r = 0.85; weighted center, r = 0.81). In vitro results at 60 bpm during one cardiac cycle confirmed that the algorithm properly measures typical characteristics of the vortex (radius, r = 0.60; circulation, r = 0.81; weighted center, r = 0.92). Preliminary qualitative results on clinical data revealed physiologic flow fields. PMID:25438850

  20. Two-fluid Hydrodynamic Model for Fluid-Flow Simulation in Fluid-Solids Systems

    1994-06-20

    FLUFIX is a two-dimensional , transient, Eulerian, and finite-difference program, based on a two-fluid hydrodynamic model, for fluid flow simulation in fluid-solids systems. The software is written in a modular form using the Implicit Multi-Field (IMF) numerical technique. Quantities computed are the spatial distribution of solids loading, gas and solids velocities, pressure, and temperatures. Predicted are bubble formation, bed frequencies, and solids recirculation. Applications include bubbling and circulating atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed reactors, combustors,more » gasifiers, and FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) reactors.« less

  1. Analysis of Fluid Flow over a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Peter L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method, apparatus, and computer program product for modeling heat radiated by a structure. The flow of a fluid over a surface of a model of the structure is simulated. The surface has a plurality of surface elements. Heat radiated by the plurality of surface elements in response to the fluid flowing over the surface of the model of the structure is identified. An effect of heat radiated by at least a portion of the plurality of surface elements on each other is identified. A model of the heat radiated by the structure is created using the heat radiated by the plurality of surface elements and the effect of the heat radiated by at least a portion of the plurality of surface elements on each other.

  2. Visualization of working fluid flow in gravity assisted heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2015-05-01

    Heat pipe is device working with phase changes of working fluid inside hermetically closed pipe at specific pressure. The phase changes of working fluid from fluid to vapor and vice versa help heat pipe to transport high heat flux. The article deal about construction and processes casing in heat pipe during operation. Experiment visualization of working fluid flow is performed with glass heat pipe filed with ethanol. The visualization of working fluid flow explains the phenomena as working fluid boiling, nucleation of bubbles, vapor flow, vapor condensation on the wall, vapor and condensate flow interaction, flow down condensate film thickness on the wall, occurred during the heat pipe operation.

  3. Bernoulli theorem generalized to rheologically complex viscous fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutyan, M. A.; Krapivskii, P. L.

    1992-08-01

    The Bernoulli theorem is generalized to two-dimensional and axisymmetric micropolar incompressible fluid flows. It is shown that the approach developed is also applicable to magnetohydrodynamic flows of a viscous Newtonian fluid.

  4. Numerical Simulations of High-Frequency Respiratory Flows in 2D and 3D Lung Bifurcation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zixi; Parameswaran, Shamini; Hu, Yingying; He, Zhaoming; Raj, Rishi; Parameswaran, Siva

    2014-07-01

    To better understand the human pulmonary system and optimize the high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) design, numerical simulations were conducted under normal breathing frequency and HFOV condition using a CFD code Ansys Fluent and its user-defined C programs. 2D and 3D double bifurcating lung models were created, and the geometry corresponds to fifth to seventh generations of airways with the dimensions based on the Weibel's pulmonary model. Computations were carried out for different Reynolds numbers (Re = 400 and 1000) and Womersley numbers (α = 4 and 16) to study the air flow fields, gas transportation, and wall shear stresses in the lung airways. Flow structure was compared with experimental results. Both 2D and 3D numerical models successfully reproduced many results observed in the experiment. The oxygen concentration distribution in the lung model was investigated to analyze the influence of flow oscillation on gas transport inside the lung model.

  5. Strain memory of 2D and 3D rigid inclusion populations in viscous flows - What is clast SPO telling us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahr, Donald W.; Law, Richard D.

    2014-11-01

    We model the development of shape preferred orientation (SPO) of a large population of two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) rigid clasts suspended in a linear viscous matrix deformed by superposed steady and continuously non-steady plane strain flows to investigate the sensitivity of clasts to changing boundary conditions during a single or superposed deformation events. Resultant clast SPOs are compared to one developed by an identical initial population that experienced a steady flow history of constant kinematic vorticity and reached an identical finite strain state, allowing examination of SPO sensitivity to deformation path. Rotation paths of individual triaxial inclusions are complex, even for steady plane strain flow histories. It has been suggested that the 3D nature of the system renders predictions based on 2D models inadequate for applied clast-based kinematic vorticity gauges. We demonstrate that for a large population of clasts, simplification to a 2D model does provide a good approximation to the SPO predicted by full 3D analysis for steady and non-steady plane strain deformation paths. Predictions of shape fabric development from 2D models are not only qualitatively similar to the more complex 3D analysis, but they display the same limitations of techniques based on clast SPO commonly used as a quantitative kinematic vorticity gauge. Our model results from steady, superposed, and non-steady flow histories with a significant pure shearing component at a wide range of finite strain resemble predictions for an identical initial population that experienced a single steady simple shearing deformation. We conclude that individual 2D and 3D clasts respond instantaneously to changes in boundary conditions, however, in aggregate, the SPO of a population of rigid inclusions does not reflect the late-stage kinematics of deformation, nor is it an indicator of the unique 'mean' kinematic vorticity experienced by a deformed rock volume.

  6. Visualization periodic flows in a continuously stratified fluid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardakov, R.; Vasiliev, A.

    2012-04-01

    To visualize the flow pattern of viscous continuously stratified fluid both experimental and computational methods were developed. Computational procedures were based on exact solutions of set of the fundamental equations. Solutions of the problems of flows producing by periodically oscillating disk (linear and torsion oscillations) were visualized with a high resolutions to distinguish small-scale the singular components on the background of strong internal waves. Numerical algorithm of visualization allows to represent both the scalar and vector fields, such as velocity, density, pressure, vorticity, stream function. The size of the source, buoyancy and oscillation frequency, kinematic viscosity of the medium effects were traced in 2D an 3D posing problems. Precision schlieren instrument was used to visualize the flow pattern produced by linear and torsion oscillations of strip and disk in a continuously stratified fluid. Uniform stratification was created by the continuous displacement method. The buoyancy period ranged from 7.5 to 14 s. In the experiments disks with diameters from 9 to 30 cm and a thickness of 1 mm to 10 mm were used. Different schlieren methods that are conventional vertical slit - Foucault knife, vertical slit - filament (Maksoutov's method) and horizontal slit - horizontal grating (natural "rainbow" schlieren method) help to produce supplementing flow patterns. Both internal wave beams and fine flow components were visualized in vicinity and far from the source. Intensity of high gradient envelopes increased proportionally the amplitude of the source. In domains of envelopes convergence isolated small scale vortices and extended mushroom like jets were formed. Experiments have shown that in the case of torsion oscillations pattern of currents is more complicated than in case of forced linear oscillations. Comparison with known theoretical model shows that nonlinear interactions between the regular and singular flow components must be taken

  7. Piezoelectric energy harvesting in internal fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Colonius, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA) showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph's clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well. PMID:26473879

  8. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting in Internal Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Colonius, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA) showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph’s clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well. PMID:26473879

  9. 2D fluid-analytical simulation of electromagnetic effects in low pressure, high frequency electronegative capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Lieberman, M. A.; Marakhtanov, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    A fast 2D axisymmetric fluid-analytical multifrequency capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) reactor code is used to study center high nonuniformity in a low pressure electronegative chlorine discharge. In the code, a time-independent Helmholtz wave equation is used to solve for the capacitive fields in the linearized frequency domain. This eliminates the time dependence from the electromagnetic (EM) solve, greatly speeding up the simulations at the cost of neglecting higher harmonics. However, since the code allows up to three driving frequencies, we can add the two most important harmonics to the CCP simulations as the second and third input frequencies. The amplitude and phase of these harmonics are estimated by using a recently developed 1D radial nonlinear transmission line (TL) model of a highly asymmetric cylindrical discharge (Lieberman et al 2015 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 24 055011). We find that at higher applied frequencies, the higher harmonics contribute significantly to the center high nonuniformity due to their shorter plasma wavelengths.

  10. Physical aspects of computing the flow of a viscous fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.

    1984-01-01

    One of the main themes in fluid dynamics at present and in the future is going to be computational fluid dynamics with the primary focus on the determination of drag, flow separation, vortex flows, and unsteady flows. A computation of the flow of a viscous fluid requires an understanding and consideration of the physical aspects of the flow. This is done by identifying the flow regimes and the scales of fluid motion, and the sources of vorticity. Discussions of flow regimes deal with conditions of incompressibility, transitional and turbulent flows, Navier-Stokes and non-Navier-Stokes regimes, shock waves, and strain fields. Discussions of the scales of fluid motion consider transitional and turbulent flows, thin- and slender-shear layers, triple- and four-deck regions, viscous-inviscid interactions, shock waves, strain rates, and temporal scales. In addition, the significance and generation of vorticity are discussed. These physical aspects mainly guide computations of the flow of a viscous fluid.

  11. Integration of 2-D hydraulic model and high-resolution LiDAR-derived DEM for floodplain flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, D.; Wang, J.; Cheng, X.; Rui, Y.; Ye, S.

    2015-02-01

    The rapid progress of Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) technology has made acquirement and application of high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) data increasingly popular, especially with regards to the study of floodplain flow modeling. High-resolution DEM data include many redundant interpolation points, needs a high amount of calculation, and does not match the size of computational mesh. These disadvantages are a common problem for floodplain flow modeling studies. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydraulic modeling, a popular method of analyzing floodplain flow, offers high precision of elevation parameterization for computational mesh while ignoring much micro-topographic information of the DEM data itself. We offer a flood simulation method that integrates 2-D hydraulic model results and high-resolution DEM data, enabling the calculation of flood water levels in DEM grid cells through local inverse distance weighted interpolation. To get rid of the false inundation areas during interpolation, it employs the run-length encoding method to mark the inundated DEM grid cells and determine the real inundation areas through the run-length boundary tracing technique, which solves the complicated problem of the connectivity between DEM grid cells. We constructed a 2-D hydraulic model for the Gongshuangcha polder, a flood storage area of Dongting Lake, using our integrated method to simulate the floodplain flow. The results demonstrate that this method can solve DEM associated problems efficiently and simulate flooding processes with greater accuracy than DEM only simulations.

  12. A central difference type approximation of convection in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanos, Constantine P.

    In fluid flow and heat transfer problems, to eliminate instability and oscillations resulting from the numerical approximation of the convection term, it is common practice to use first order upwind differencing. For example, first order upwind differencing is used in codes like COMMIX and PHOENICS. However, in problems characterized by high Peclet numbers, this approach is highly inaccurate unless an excessive number of nodes is used. To eliminate this difficulty, a method of grid adaptation using central differencing in one-dimensional problems was presented. In the effort to extend this approach to 2-D and 3-D problems a new method was developed for multidimensional problems that is superior to first order upwind differencing even for a few non-adaptive grid points. This method is presented in this work.

  13. Fluid flow in solidifying monotectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecker, A.; Frazier, D. O.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1989-01-01

    Use of a two-wavelength holographic technique results in a simultaneous determination of temperature and composition profiles during directional solidification in a system with a miscibility gap. The relationships among fluid flow, phase separation, and mass transport during the solidification of the monotectic alloy are discussed. The primary sources of fluid motion in this system are buoyancy and thermocapillary forces. These forces act together when phase separation results in the formation of droplets (this occurs at the solid-liquid interface and in the bulk melt). In the absence of phase separation, buoyancy results from density gradients related to temperature and compositional gradients in the single-phase bulk melt. The effects of buoyancy are especially evident in association with water- or ethanol-rich volumes created at the solid-liquid growth interface.

  14. Testing the Markov hypothesis in fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Daniel W.; Saggini, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Stochastic Markov processes are used very frequently to model, for example, processes in turbulence and subsurface flow and transport. Based on the weak Chapman-Kolmogorov equation and the strong Markov condition, we present methods to test the Markov hypothesis that is at the heart of these models. We demonstrate the capabilities of our methodology by testing the Markov hypothesis for fluid and inertial particles in turbulence, and fluid particles in the heterogeneous subsurface. In the context of subsurface macrodispersion, we find that depending on the heterogeneity level, Markov models work well above a certain scale of interest for media with different log-conductivity correlation structures. Moreover, we find surprising similarities in the velocity dynamics of the different media considered.

  15. ICEG2D (v2.0) - An Integrated Software Package for Automated Prediction of Flow Fields for Single-Element Airfoils With Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson David S.; Soni, Bharat K.

    2001-01-01

    An integrated geometry/grid/simulation software package, ICEG2D, is being developed to automate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for single- and multi-element airfoils with ice accretions. The current version, ICEG213 (v2.0), was designed to automatically perform four primary functions: (1) generate a grid-ready surface definition based on the geometrical characteristics of the iced airfoil surface, (2) generate high-quality structured and generalized grids starting from a defined surface definition, (3) generate the input and restart files needed to run the structured grid CFD solver NPARC or the generalized grid CFD solver HYBFL2D, and (4) using the flow solutions, generate solution-adaptive grids. ICEG2D (v2.0) can be operated in either a batch mode using a script file or in an interactive mode by entering directives from a command line within a Unix shell. This report summarizes activities completed in the first two years of a three-year research and development program to address automation issues related to CFD simulations for airfoils with ice accretions. As well as describing the technology employed in the software, this document serves as a users manual providing installation and operating instructions. An evaluation of the software is also presented.

  16. Micro-PIV measurements of multiphase flow of water and supercritical CO2 in 2D heterogeneous porous micromodels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Kazemifar, F.; Blois, G.; Christensen, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow of water and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) in porous media is central to geological sequestration of CO2 into saline aquifers. However, our fundamental understanding of the coupled flow dynamics of CO2 and water in complex geologic media still remains limited, especially at the pore scale. Recently, studies have been carried out in 2D homogeneous models with the micro-PIV technique, yielding very interesting observations of pore-scale flow transport. The primary aim of this work is to leverage this experimental protocol to quantify the pore-scale flow of water and liquid/supercritical CO2 in 2D heterogeneous porous micromodels under reservoir-relevant conditions. The goal is to capture the dynamics of this multi-phase flow in a porous matrix that mimics the heterogeneity of natural rock. Fluorescent microscopy and the micro-PIV technique are employed to simultaneously measure the spatially-resolved instantaneous velocity field in the water and quantify the instantaneous spatial configuration of both phases. The results for heterogeneous micromodels will be presented and compared with those for homogeneous micromodels, yielding valuable insight into flow processes at the pore scale in natural rock.

  17. Adaptive clutter filter in 2-D color flow imaging based on in vivo I/Q signal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Zhang, Congyao; Liu, Dong C

    2014-01-01

    Color flow imaging has been well applied in clinical diagnosis. For the high quality color flow images, clutter filter is important to separate the Doppler signals from blood and tissue. Traditional clutter filters, such as finite impulse response, infinite impulse response and regression filters, were applied, which are based on the hypothesis that the clutter signal is stationary or tissue moves slowly. However, in realistic clinic color flow imaging, the signals are non-stationary signals because of accelerated moving tissue. For most related papers, simulated RF signals are widely used without in vivo I/Q signal. Hence, in this paper, adaptive polynomial regression filter, which is down mixing with instantaneous clutter frequency, was proposed based on in vivo carotid I/Q signal in realistic color flow imaging. To get the best performance, the optimal polynomial order of polynomial regression filter and the optimal polynomial order for estimation of instantaneous clutter frequency respectively were confirmed. Finally, compared with the mean blood velocity and quality of 2-D color flow image, the experiment results show that adaptive polynomial regression filter, which is down mixing with instantaneous clutter frequency, can significantly enhance the mean blood velocity and get high quality 2-D color flow image. PMID:24211911

  18. Fluid flow in solidifying monotectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecker, A.; Frazier, D. O.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1989-11-01

    Use of a two-wavelength holographic technique results in a simultaneous determination of temperature and composition profiles during directional solidification in a system with a miscibility gap. A shadowgraph technique is employed for flow visualization. By these methods, flow regimes are identified and related to particular melt compositions. We discuss the relationships among fluid flow, phase separation, and mass transport during the solidification of the monotectic alloy. The primary sources of fluid motion in this system are buoyancy and thermocapillary forces. These forces act together when phase separation results in the formation of droplets (this occurs at the solid-liquid interface and in the bulk melt). While buoyancy forces arise due to density differences between the droplet and the host phase, thermocapillary forces (associated with temperature gradients in the droplet surface) may predominate. In the absence of phase separation, buoyancy results from density gradients related to temperature and compositional gradients in the single-phase bulk melt. The effects of buoyancy are especially evident in association with water- or ethanol-rich volumes created at the solid-liquid growth interface.

  19. Fluid flow through packings of rotating obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Rafael S.; Andrade, José S.; Andrade, Roberto F. S.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate through numerical simulation the nonstationary flow of a Newtonian fluid through a two-dimensional channel filled with an array of circular obstacles of distinct sizes. The disks may rotate around their respective centers, modeling a nonstationary, inhomogeneous porous medium. Obstacle sizes and positions are defined by the geometry of an Apollonian packing (AP). To allow for fluid flow, the radii of the disks are uniformly reduced by a factor 0.6 ≤s ≤0.8 for assemblies corresponding to the four first AP generations. The investigation is targeted to elucidate the main features of the rotating regime as compared to the fixed disk condition. It comprises the evaluation of the region of validity of Darcy's law as well as the study of the nonlinear hydraulic resistance as a function of the channel Reynolds number, the reduction factor s , and the AP generation. Depending on a combination of these factors, the resistance of rotating disks may be larger or smaller than that of the corresponding static case. We also analyze the flow redistribution in the interdisk channels as a result of the rotation pattern and characterize the angular velocity of the disks. Here, the striking feature is the emergence of a stable oscillatory behavior of the angular velocity for almost all disks that are inserted into the assemblies after the second generation.

  20. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3 mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67 kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3 mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7 mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  1. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor. PMID:26073599

  2. A 2-D oscillating flow analysis in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Kyung H.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional oscillating flow analysis was conducted, simulating the gas flow inside Stirling heat exchangers. Both laminar and turbulent oscillating pipe flow were investigated numerically for Re(max) = 1920 (Va = 80), 10800 (Va = 272), 19300 (Va = 272), and 60800 (Va = 126). The results are compared with experimental results of previous investigators. Also, predictions of the flow regime on present oscillating flow conditions were checked by comparing velocity amplitudes and phase differences with those from laminar theory and quasi-steady profile. A high Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model was used for turbulent oscillating pipe flow. Finally, performance evaluation of the K-epsilon model was made to explore the applicability of quasi-steady turbulent models to unsteady oscillating flow analysis.

  3. A 2-D oscillating flow analysis in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Kyung H.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1991-01-01

    A two dimensional oscillating flow analysis was conducted, simulating the gas flow inside Stirling heat exchangers. Both laminar and turbulent oscillating pipe flow were investigated numerically for Re(max) = 1920 (Va = 80), 10800 (Va = 272), 19300 (Va = 272), and 60800 (Va = 126). The results are compared with experimental results of previous investigators. Also, predictions of the flow regime on present oscillating flow conditions were checked by comparing velocity amplitudes and phase differences with those from laminar theory and quasi-steady profile. A high Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model was used for turbulent oscillating pipe flow. Finally, performance evaluation of the K-epsilon model was made to explore the applicability of quasi-steady turbulent models to unsteady oscillating flow analysis.

  4. Flow Diode and Method for Controlling Fluid Flow Origin of the Invention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flow diode configured to permit fluid flow in a first direction while preventing fluid flow in a second direction opposite the first direction is disclosed. The flow diode prevents fluid flow without use of mechanical closures or moving parts. The flow diode utilizes a bypass flowline whereby all fluid flow in the second direction moves into the bypass flowline having a plurality of tortuous portions providing high fluidic resistance. The portions decrease in diameter such that debris in the fluid is trapped. As fluid only travels in one direction through the portions, the debris remains trapped in the portions.

  5. Flow rate measurement in aggressive conductive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovikova, Nataliia; Kolesnikov, Yuri; Karcher, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Two non-contact experimental methods of flow rate measurements for aggressive conductive liquids are described. The techniques are based on electromagnetic forces and Faraday's law: Lorentz force is induced inside moving conductive liquid under influence of variable magnetic field of permanent magnets. They are mounted along a liquid metal channel or (in case of the second method) inserted into rotated metal wheels. The force acts in the opposite of fluids' velocity direction and hence it is possible to measure reaction force of it that takes place according to Newton's law on magnetic field source - permanent magnets. And by knowing the force, which linearly depends on velocity, one can calculate mean flow rate of liquid. In addition experimental "dry" calibration and its results are described for one of the measurements' techniques.

  6. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Cross Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This drawing shows a cross-section view of the test cell at the heart of the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) that flew on two Spacelab missions. The middle and lower drawings depict the volume of the silicone oil layer that served as the atmosphere as the steel ball rotated and an electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). An Acrobat PDF copy of this drawing is available at http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  7. Bubble Formation in Yield Stress Fluids Using Flow-Focusing and T -Junction Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborie, Benoit; Rouyer, Florence; Angelescu, Dan E.; Lorenceau, Elise

    2015-05-01

    We study the production of bubbles inside yield stress fluids (YSFs) in axisymmetric T -junction and flow-focusing devices. Taking advantage of yield stress over capillary stress, we exhibit a robust break-up mechanism reminiscent of the geometrical operating regime in 2D flow-focusing devices for Newtonian fluids. We report that when the gas is pressure driven, the dynamics is unsteady due to hydrodynamic feedback and YSF deposition on the walls of the channels. However, the present study also identifies pathways for potential steady-state production of bubbly YSFs at large scale.

  8. Microscale imaging of cilia-driven fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brendan K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia-driven fluid flow is important for multiple processes in the body, including respiratory mucus clearance, gamete transport in the oviduct, right-left patterning in the embryonic node, and cerebrospinal fluid circulation. Multiple imaging techniques have been applied towards quantifying ciliary flow. Here we review common velocimetry methods of quantifying fluid flow. We then discuss four important optical modalities, including light microscopy, epifluorescence, confocal microscopy, and optical coherence tomography, that have been used to investigate cilia-driven flow. PMID:25417211

  9. Unified slip boundary condition for fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Thalakkottor, Joseph John; Mohseni, Kamran

    2016-08-01

    Determining the correct matching boundary condition is fundamental to our understanding of several everyday problems. Despite over a century of scientific work, existing velocity boundary conditions are unable to consistently explain and capture the complete physics associated with certain common but complex problems, such as moving contact lines and corner flows. The widely used Maxwell and Navier slip boundary conditions make an implicit assumption that velocity varies only in the wall normal direction. This makes their boundary condition inapplicable in the vicinity of contact lines and corner points, where velocity gradient exists both in the wall normal and wall tangential directions. In this paper, by identifying this implicit assumption we are able to extend Maxwell's slip model. Here, we present a generalized velocity boundary condition that shows that slip velocity is a function of not only the shear rate but also the linear strain rate. In addition, we present a universal relation for slip length, which shows that, for a general flow, slip length is a function of the principal strain rate. The universal relation for slip length along with the generalized velocity boundary condition provides a unified slip boundary condition to model a wide range of steady Newtonian fluid flows. We validate the unified slip boundary for simple Newtonian liquids by using molecular dynamics simulations and studying both the moving contact line and corner flow problems. PMID:27627398

  10. VFLOW2D - A Vorte-Based Code for Computing Flow Over Elastically Supported Tubes and Tube Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    WOLFE,WALTER P.; STRICKLAND,JAMES H.; HOMICZ,GREGORY F.; GOSSLER,ALBERT A.

    2000-10-11

    A numerical flow model is developed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow past immersed, elastically supported tube arrays. This work is motivated by the objective of predicting forces and motion associated with both deep-water drilling and production risers in the oil industry. This work has other engineering applications including simulation of flow past tubular heat exchangers or submarine-towed sensor arrays and the flow about parachute ribbons. In the present work, a vortex method is used for solving the unsteady flow field. This method demonstrates inherent advantages over more conventional grid-based computational fluid dynamics. The vortex method is non-iterative, does not require artificial viscosity for stability, displays minimal numerical diffusion, can easily treat moving boundaries, and allows a greatly reduced computational domain since vorticity occupies only a small fraction of the fluid volume. A gridless approach is used in the flow sufficiently distant from surfaces. A Lagrangian remap scheme is used near surfaces to calculate diffusion and convection of vorticity. A fast multipole technique is utilized for efficient calculation of velocity from the vorticity field. The ability of the method to correctly predict lift and drag forces on simple stationary geometries over a broad range of Reynolds numbers is presented.

  11. Fluid Flow and Solidification Under Combined Action of Magnetic Fields and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, B. Q.; Shu, Y.; Li, K.; deGroh, H. C.

    2002-01-01

    Mathematical models, both 2-D and 3-D, are developed to represent g-jitter induced fluid flows and their effects on solidification under combined action of magnetic fields and microgravity. The numerical model development is based on the finite element solution of governing equations describing the transient g-jitter driven fluid flows, heat transfer and solutal transport during crystal growth with and without an applied magnetic field in space vehicles. To validate the model predictions, a ground-based g-jitter simulator is developed using the oscillating wall temperatures where timely oscillating fluid flows are measured using a laser PIV system. The measurements are compared well with numerical results obtained from the numerical models. Results show that a combined action derived from magnetic damping and microgravity can be an effective means to control the melt flow and solutal transport in space single crystal growth systems.

  12. A numerical method for computing unsteady 2-D boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainer, Andreas

    1988-01-01

    A numerical method for computing unsteady two-dimensional boundary layers in incompressible laminar and turbulent flows is described and applied to a single airfoil changing its incidence angle in time. The solution procedure adopts a first order panel method with a simple wake model to solve for the inviscid part of the flow, and an implicit finite difference method for the viscous part of the flow. Both procedures integrate in time in a step-by-step fashion, in the course of which each step involves the solution of the elliptic Laplace equation and the solution of the parabolic boundary layer equations. The Reynolds shear stress term of the boundary layer equations is modeled by an algebraic eddy viscosity closure. The location of transition is predicted by an empirical data correlation originating from Michel. Since transition and turbulence modeling are key factors in the prediction of viscous flows, their accuracy will be of dominant influence to the overall results.

  13. 2D and 3D potential flows with rotational source terms in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkalai, K.; Leboeuf, F.

    A computational method capable of treating two- and three-dimensional potential flows is developed which includes blade effects and viscosity in source terms determined over the entire flowfield considered. Details of the mathematical and numerical formulations are given, and grid generation and density calculation are discussed. Preliminary results obtained with the codes developed here are then presented, and the possibility of applying the method to more complex flows is examined.

  14. Study of Unsteady Flow Actuation Produced by Surface Plasma Actuator on 2-D Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Minh Khang; Shin, Jichul

    2014-10-01

    Effect of flow actuation driven by low current continuous or pulsed DC surface glow discharge plasma actuator is studied. Schlieren image of induced flow on flat plate taken at a high repetition rate reveals that the actuation is mostly initiated near the cathode. Assuming that the actuation is mostly achieved by ions in the cathode sheath region, numerical model for the source of flow actuation is obtained by analytical estimation of ion pressure force created in DC plasma sheath near the cathode and added in momentum equation as a body force term. Modeled plasma flow actuator is simulated with NACA0012 airfoil oscillating over a certain range of angle of attack (AoA) at specific reduced frequencies of airfoil. By changing actuation authority according to the change in AoA, stabilization of unsteady flow field is improved and hence steady aerodynamic performance can be maintained. Computational result shows that plasma actuation is only effective in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of separated flow. It turns out that plasma pulse frequency should be tuned for optimal performance depending on phase angle and rotating speed. The actuation authority can be parameterized by a ratio between plasma pulse frequency and reduced frequency.

  15. Space Coffee Cup: Capillary Flow Driven Fluids in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    Interested in learning more about how fluids react in Space? In this video, Professor Mark Weislogel, and Dr. Marshall Porterfield will discuss the Space Coffee Cup and Capillary Flow Driven Fluids...

  16. Thermal and Fluid Flow Brazing Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    HOSKING, FLOYD MICHAEL; GIANOULAKIS,STEVEN E.; GIVLER,RICHARD C.; SCHUNK,P. RANDALL

    1999-12-15

    The thermal response of fixtured parts in a batch-type brazing furnace can require numerous, time-consuming development runs before an acceptable furnace schedule or joint design is established. Powerful computational simulation tools are being developed to minimize the required number of verification experiments, improve furnace throughput, and increase product yields. Typical furnace simulations are based on thermal, fluid flow, and structural codes that incorporate the fundamental physics of the brazing process. The use of massively parallel computing to predict furnace and joint-level responses is presented. Measured and computed data are compared. Temperature values are within 1-270 of the expected peak brazing temperature for different loading conditions. Sensitivity studies reveal that the thermal response is more sensitive to the thermal boundary conditions of the heating enclosure than variability y in the materials data. Braze flow simulations predict fillet geometry and free surface joint defects. Dynamic wetting conditions, interfacial reactions, and solidification structure add a high degree of uncertainty to the flow results.

  17. An experimental study of flow separation over a flat plate with 2D transverse grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Emily Michelle

    Nature has long been an inspiration for research in engineering. In particular, the biological surfaces of aquatic swimmers have been studied for their potential as drag reducing surfaces. The hydrodynamic benefit of riblets, or grooves embedded parallel to the flow, which appear on many aquatic biological surfaces, have been well documented and implemented in practical engineering applications. However the skin of dolphins is embedded with grooves that run perpendicular to the flow of water over their bodies. It is theorized that the transverse grooves present on dolphin skin trap vortices between them, creating a partial slip condition over the surface and inducing turbulence augmentation in the boundary layer, thus controlling boundary layer separation over the dolphin's skin. Similarly, sharks are covered with scales that are flexible at the base and capable of bristling, forming grooves running transverse to the flow. It is theorized that the scales bristle when encountering a reversing flow, thereby trapping vortices between the scales and, similarly, delaying boundary layer separation. In an attempt to test this hypothesis and study these affects, a spinning cylinder was used in a water tunnel to induce separation over a flat plate with 2 mm, rectangular transverse grooves and sinusoidal grooves of similar scaling. The results were compared to tripped, turbulent boundary layer separation occurring over a flat plate without grooves using time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The strength of the adverse pressure gradient was varied, and the observed delay in flow separation and other affects upon the boundary layer are discussed.

  18. 2D Flow patterning in Hele-Shaw configurations using Non-Uniform Electroosmotic Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Rubin, Shimon; Gat, Amir; Bercovici, Moran

    2015-11-01

    We present an analytical study, validated by numerical simulations, of electroosmotic flow in a Hele-Shaw configuration with non-uniform zeta potential distribution. Applying the lubrication approximation and assuming thin electric double layer, we derive a pair of uncoupled Poisson equations for the pressure and the stream function, and show that the inhomogeneous parts in these equations are governed by gradients in zeta potential parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field, respectively. We obtain a solution for the case of a disk with uniform zeta potential and show that the flow field created is an exact dipole, even in the immediate vicinity of the disk. We then illustrate the ability to generate complex flow fields using superposition of such disks. Furthermore, we study the inverse problem in which we define the desired flow pattern and solve for the zeta potential distribution required in order to establish it. We demonstrate that such inverse problem solutions can be used to create directional flows confined within narrow regions, without physical walls. We show that these solutions can be assembled to create complex microfluidic networks, composed of intersecting channels and turns, which are basic building blocks in microfluidic devices.

  19. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics modelling of the fluid flow and heat transfer in the weld pool during laser spot welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Mingming; Browne, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics is employed, for the first time, to develop a numerical model for the melting and fluid flow during laser welding process. In this meshlessLagrangian method the gas-melt two phase flow, heat transfer, surface tension, and melting of solid parent material are considered. This model was used to study the evolution of temperature field and fluid flow in the case study of laser spot welding in 2D. The simulation results show a strong influence of the melting process on the flow of liquid metal and a clear influence of the Marangoni flow on the heat transfer is also found.

  20. Wind-tunnel experiments of thermally-stratified turbulent boundary layer flow over a wall-mounted 2-D block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent boundary-layer flows over complex topography have been extensively studied in the atmospheric sciences and wind engineering communities. The upwind turbulence level, the atmospheric thermal stability and the shape of the topography as well as surface characteristics play important roles in turbulent transport of momentum and scalar fluxes. However, to the best of our knowledge, atmospheric thermal stability has rarely been taken into account in laboratory simulations, particularly in wind-tunnel experiments. Extension of such studies in thermally-stratified wind tunnels will substantially advance our understanding of thermal stability effects on the physics of flow over complex topography. Additionally, high-resolution experimental data can be used for development of new parameterization of surface fluxes and validation of numerical models such as Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). A series of experiments of neutral and thermally-stratified boundary-layer flows over a wall-mounted 2-D block were conducted at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory boundary-layer wind tunnel. The 2-D block, with a width to height ratio of 2:1, occupied the lowest 25% of the turbulent boundary layer. Stable and convective boundary layers were simulated by independently controlling the temperature of air flow, the test section floor, and the wall-mounted block surfaces. Measurements using high-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), x-wire/cold-wire anemometry, thermal-couples and surface heat flux sensors were made to quantify the turbulent properties and surface fluxes in distinct macroscopic flow regions, including the separation/recirculation zones, evolving shear layer and the asymptotic far wake. Emphasis will be put on addressing thermal stability effects on the spatial distribution of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and turbulent fluxes of momentum and scalar from the near to far wake region. Terms of the TKE budget equation are also inferred from measurements and

  1. Wind-tunnel experiments of turbulent flow over a surface-mounted 2-D block in a thermally-stratified boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent flows over complex surface topography have been of great interest in the atmospheric science and wind engineering communities. The geometry of the topography, surface roughness and temperature characteristics as well as the atmospheric thermal stability play important roles in determining momentum and scalar flux distribution. Studies of turbulent flow over simplified topography models, under neutrally stratified boundary-layer conditions, have provided insights into fluid dynamics. However, atmospheric thermal stability has rarely been considered in laboratory experiments, e.g., wind-tunnel experiments. Series of wind-tunnel experiments of thermally-stratified boundary-layer flow over a surface-mounted 2-D block, in a well-controlled boundary-layer wind tunnel, will be presented. Measurements using high-resolution PIV, x-wire/cold-wire anemometry and surface heat flux sensors were conducted to quantify the turbulent flow properties, including the size of the recirculation zone, coherent vortex structures and the subsequent boundary layer recovery. Results will be shown to address thermal stability effects on momentum and scalar flux distribution in the wake, as well as dominant mechanism of turbulent kinetic energy generation and consumption. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from the Swiss National Foundation (Grant 200021-132122), the National Science Foundation (Grant ATM-0854766) and NASA (Grant NNG06GE256).

  2. On stability and turbulence of fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisenberg, Werner

    1951-01-01

    This investigation is divided into two parts, the treatment of the stability problem of fluid flows on the one hand, and that of the turbulent motion on the other. The first part summarizes all previous investigations under a unified point of view, that is, sets up as generally as possible the conditions under which a profile possesses unstable or stable characteristics, and indicates the methods for solution of the stability equation for any arbitrary velocity profile and for calculation of the critical Reynolds number for unstable profiles. In the second part, under certain greatly idealizing assumptions, differential equations for the turbulent motions are derived and from them qualitative information about several properties of the turbulent velocity distribution is obtained.

  3. Integration of 2-D hydraulic model and high-resolution lidar-derived DEM for floodplain flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, D.; Wang, J.; Cheng, X.; Rui, Y.; Ye, S.

    2015-08-01

    The rapid progress of lidar technology has made the acquirement and application of high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) data increasingly popular, especially in regards to the study of floodplain flow. However, high-resolution DEM data pose several disadvantages for floodplain modeling studies; e.g., the data sets contain many redundant interpolation points, large numbers of calculations are required to work with data, and the data do not match the size of the computational mesh. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydraulic modeling, which is a popular method for analyzing floodplain flow, offers highly precise elevation parameterization for computational mesh while ignoring much of the micro-topographic information of the DEM data itself. We offer a flood simulation method that integrates 2-D hydraulic model results and high-resolution DEM data, thus enabling the calculation of flood water levels in DEM grid cells through local inverse distance-weighted interpolation. To get rid of the false inundation areas during interpolation, it employs the run-length encoding method to mark the inundated DEM grid cells and determine the real inundation areas through the run-length boundary tracing technique, which solves the complicated problem of connectivity between DEM grid cells. We constructed a 2-D hydraulic model for the Gongshuangcha detention basin, which is a flood storage area of Dongting Lake in China, by using our integrated method to simulate the floodplain flow. The results demonstrate that this method can solve DEM associated problems efficiently and simulate flooding processes with greater accuracy than simulations only with DEM.

  4. MEAN FLOW AND TURBULENCE MEASUREMENTS AROUND A 2-D ARRAY OF BUILDINGS IN A WIND TUNNEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to predict the dispersion of harmful materials released in or near an urban environment, it is important to first understand the complex flow patterns which result from the interaction of the wind with buildings and, more commonly, clusters of buildings. Recent advanc...

  5. Turbulence Measurements on a 2D NACA 0036 with Synthetic Jet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    An active flow control experiment was conducted on a 2-ft chord NACA 0036 airfoil in a 3-ft by 4-ft Wind Tunnel at Re = 1 x 10(exp 6). The model was equipped with synthetic jet actuators at x/c = 0.30 and 0.65 that provided 120 Hz periodic excitation at a C(sub mu) 0.86% through 0.06-in wide slots. Three different slot con gurations were tested, including a baseline with no slots. Surface pressure data was collected to compare to previous tests and to combine with turbulence data to aid future CFD modeling efforts. Turbulence data, measured by hot-wire, was compared with and without flow control. Pressure data corroborates previous test data and provides more points for CFD validation. Hot-wire results showed ow control reduced the separated wake size and brought the high Reynolds stress shear layer closer to the airfoil surface. The position of this layer to the surface was altered more significantly than the magnitude of the peak stresses. Flow control was shown to increase turbulent energy in the attached boundary layer downstream of the slot but to have little effect upstream. These results provide further justification to continue assessing the potential of active flow control to reduce drag of helicopter airframe components.

  6. Episodic fluid flow in the Nankai accretionary complex: Timescale, geochemistry, flow rates, and fluid budget

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    Down-hole geochemical anomalies encountered in active accretionary systems can be used to constrain the timing, rates, and localization of fluid flow. Here we combine a coupled flow and solute transport model with a kinetic model for smectite dehydration to better understand and quantify fluid flow in the Nankai accretionary complex offshore of Japan. Compaction of sediments and clay dehydration provide fluid sources which drive the model flow system. We explicitly include the consolidation rate of underthrust sediments in our calculations to evaluate the impact that variations in this unknown quantity have on pressure and chloride distribution. Sensitivity analysis of steady state pressure solutions constrains bulk and flow conduit permeabilities. Steady state simulations with 30% smectite in the incoming sedimentary sequence result in minimum chloride concentrations at site 808 of 550 mM, but measured chlorinity is as low as 447 mM. We simulate the transient effects of hydrofracture or a strain event by assuming an instantaneous permeability increase of 3-4 orders of magnitude along a flow conduit (in this case the de??collement), using steady state results as initial conditions. Transient results with an increase in de??collement permeability from 10-16 m2 to 10-13 m2 and 20% smectite reproduce the observed chloride profile at site 808 after 80-160 kyr. Modeled chloride concentrations are highly sensitive to the consolidation rate of underthrust sediments, such that rapid compaction of underthrust material leads to increased freshening. Pressures within the de??collement during transient simulations rise rapidly to a significant fraction of lithostatic and remain high for at least 160 kyr, providing a mechanism for maintaining high permeability. Flow rates at the deformation front for transient simulations are in good agreement with direct measurements, but steady state flow rates are 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than observed. Fluid budget calculations

  7. Fluid Flow in Subduction Zones and Mountain Belts: The Importance of Permeability Heterogeneity and Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ague, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Fluids are generally expected to be driven upward in the deep parts of orogens, but permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy must also be considered to properly interpret fluid infiltration and kinetic reaction histories preserved in the rock record. This paper focuses on new 2-D models of Darcian fluid flow incorporating permeability contrasts between rock units, the permeability tensor, and reactive fluid sources (e.g., dehydration). Factor of ten contrasts between the minimum and maximum permeability values in anisotropic rocks can strongly divert flow, but contrasts of as little as a factor of two still influence flow behavior. The first example considers fluid flow in subduction zone mélange, Syros, Greece. Geochemical evidence suggests that the interiors of meta-mafic blocks of oceanic crust in the mélange underwent limited fluid-rock reaction, despite extensive dehydration and decarbonation of the subduction complex. Modeling shows that if the blocks have lower permeability than the surrounding serpentine-rich matrix, then flow is diverted around the blocks resulting in little infiltration except at block margins, consistent with field relations. In this way, the subducted oceanic crust could preserve little evidence of fluid infiltration, even though considerable flow occurred through the mélange. The largest fluid fluxes are concentrated in matrix where blocks are in close proximity, and this effect increases as the anisotropy of the matrix increases. The lack of fluid infiltration into blocks could account for the observed limited metamorphism and strong kinetic overstepping of reactions that in some cases allowed preservation of ocean-floor mineral assemblages even at blueschist-eclogite facies conditions. The second example examines fluid flow through a folded sequence in which the direction of maximum permeability is parallel to the folded layering, and is based on field relations of Barrovian metamorphic sequences in CT, USA, and Scotland. As the

  8. Fluid flow dynamics under location uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mémin, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    We present a derivation of a stochastic model of Navier Stokes equations that relies on a decomposition of the velocity fields into a differentiable drift component and a time uncorrelated uncertainty random term. This type of decomposition is reminiscent in spirit to the classical Reynolds decomposition. However, the random velocity fluctuations considered here are not differentiable with respect to time, and they must be handled through stochastic calculus. The dynamics associated with the differentiable drift component is derived from a stochastic version of the Reynolds transport theorem. It includes in its general form an uncertainty dependent "subgrid" bulk formula that cannot be immediately related to the usual Boussinesq eddy viscosity assumption constructed from thermal molecular agitation analogy. This formulation, emerging from uncertainties on the fluid parcels location, explains with another viewpoint some subgrid eddy diffusion models currently used in computational fluid dynamics or in geophysical sciences and paves the way for new large-scales flow modelling. We finally describe an applications of our formalism to the derivation of stochastic versions of the Shallow water equations or to the definition of reduced order dynamical systems.

  9. A coupled model of fluid flow in jointed rock

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, Daniel; Martineau, Rick; James, Mark; Brown, Don

    1991-01-01

    We present a fully coupled model of fluid flow in jointed rock, where the fluid flow depends on the joint openings and the joint openings depend on the fluid pressure. The joints and rock blocks are modeled discretely using the finite element method. Solutions for the fluid and rock are obtained and iteration is performed until both solutions converge. Example applications include an examination of the effects of back-pressure on flow in a geothermal reservoir and transient fluid injection into a reservoir.

  10. A knowledge-based approach to automated flow-field zoning for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1989-01-01

    An automated three-dimensional zonal grid generation capability for computational fluid dynamics is shown through the development of a demonstration computer program capable of automatically zoning the flow field of representative two-dimensional (2-D) aerodynamic configurations. The applicability of a knowledge-based programming approach to the domain of flow-field zoning is examined. Several aspects of flow-field zoning make the application of knowledge-based techniques challenging: the need for perceptual information, the role of individual bias in the design and evaluation of zonings, and the fact that the zoning process is modeled as a constructive, design-type task (for which there are relatively few examples of successful knowledge-based systems in any domain). Engineering solutions to the problems arising from these aspects are developed, and a demonstration system is implemented which can design, generate, and output flow-field zonings for representative 2-D aerodynamic configurations.

  11. SUTRA: A model for 2D or 3D saturated-unsaturated, variable-density ground-water flow with solute or energy transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, Clifford I.; Provost, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    SUTRA (Saturated-Unsaturated Transport) is a computer program that simulates fluid movement and the transport of either energy or dissolved substances in a subsurface environment. This upgraded version of SUTRA adds the capability for three-dimensional simulation to the former code (Voss, 1984), which allowed only two-dimensional simulation. The code employs a two- or three-dimensional finite-element and finite-difference method to approximate the governing equations that describe the two interdependent processes that are simulated: 1) fluid density-dependent saturated or unsaturated ground-water flow; and 2) either (a) transport of a solute in the ground water, in which the solute may be subject to: equilibrium adsorption on the porous matrix, and both first-order and zero-order production or decay; or (b) transport of thermal energy in the ground water and solid matrix of the aquifer. SUTRA may also be used to simulate simpler subsets of the above processes. A flow-direction-dependent dispersion process for anisotropic media is also provided by the code and is introduced in this report. As the primary calculated result, SUTRA provides fluid pressures and either solute concentrations or temperatures, as they vary with time, everywhere in the simulated subsurface system. SUTRA flow simulation may be employed for two-dimensional (2D) areal, cross sectional and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of saturated ground-water flow systems, and for cross sectional and 3D modeling of unsaturated zone flow. Solute-transport simulation using SUTRA may be employed to model natural or man-induced chemical-species transport including processes of solute sorption, production, and decay. For example, it may be applied to analyze ground-water contaminant transport problems and aquifer restoration designs. In addition, solute-transport simulation with SUTRA may be used for modeling of variable-density leachate movement, and for cross sectional modeling of saltwater intrusion in

  12. 2D models of gas flow and ice grain acceleration in Enceladus' vents using DSMC methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Orenthal J.; Combi, Michael R.; Tenishev, Valeriy M.

    2015-09-01

    The gas distribution of the Enceladus water vapor plume and the terminal speeds of ejected ice grains are physically linked to its subsurface fissures and vents. It is estimated that the gas exits the fissures with speeds of ∼300-1000 m/s, while the micron-sized grains are ejected with speeds comparable to the escape speed (Schmidt, J. et al. [2008]. Nature 451, 685-688). We investigated the effects of isolated axisymmetric vent geometries on subsurface gas distributions, and in turn, the effects of gas drag on grain acceleration. Subsurface gas flows were modeled using a collision-limiter Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique in order to consider a broad range of flow regimes (Bird, G. [1994]. Molecular Gas Dynamics and the Direct Simulation of Gas Flows. Oxford University Press, Oxford; Titov, E.V. et al. [2008]. J. Propul. Power 24(2), 311-321). The resulting DSMC gas distributions were used to determine the drag force for the integration of ice grain trajectories in a test particle model. Simulations were performed for diffuse flows in wide channels (Reynolds number ∼10-250) and dense flows in narrow tubular channels (Reynolds number ∼106). We compared gas properties like bulk speed and temperature, and the terminal grain speeds obtained at the vent exit with inferred values for the plume from Cassini data. In the simulations of wide fissures with dimensions similar to that of the Tiger Stripes the resulting subsurface gas densities of ∼1014-1020 m-3 were not sufficient to accelerate even micron-sized ice grains to the Enceladus escape speed. In the simulations of narrow tubular vents with radii of ∼10 m, the much denser flows with number densities of 1021-1023 m-3 accelerated micron-sized grains to bulk gas speed of ∼600 m/s. Further investigations are required to understand the complex relationship between the vent geometry, gas source rate and the sizes and speeds of ejected grains.

  13. 2D velocity and temperature measurements in high speed flows based on spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1992-01-01

    The use of molecular Rayleigh scattering for measurements of gas velocity and temperature is evaluated. Molecular scattering avoids problems associated with the seeding required by conventional laser anemometry and particle image velocimetry. The technique considered herein is based on the measurement of the spectrum of the scattered light. Planar imaging of Rayleigh scattering using a laser light sheet is evaluated for conditions at 30 km altitude (typical hypersonic flow conditions). The Cramer-Rao lower bounds for velocity and temperature measurement uncertainties are calculated for an ideal optical spectrum analyzer and for a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer used in a static, imaging mode. With this technique, a single image of the Rayleigh scattered light from clean flows can be analyzed to obtain temperature and one component of velocity. Experimental results are presented for planar velocity measurements in a Mach 1.3 air jet.

  14. SIMULATION REAL SCALE EXPERIMENT ON LEVEE BREACH USING 2D SHALLOW FLOW MODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenno, Hiroki; Iwasaki, Toshiki; Shimizu, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Ichiro

    Flood in rivers is a common disaster all over the world. If a levee breach happens, it sometimes causes a fatal disaster. In addition, many buildings, urban facilities, lifelines, etc. are seriously damaged. Detailed mechanism of a levee breach has not been clarified yet. Therefore, it is important to predict the collapsing process of riverbank and behavior of overtop flow for reducing damage. We applied a two-dimensional shallow flow computational model to levee breach phenomena caused by overflow and the performance of the model was elucidated. A calibration of the numerical model is made through the comparison with field experimental data. Recently, a real-scale experiment on a levee breach was carried out at the Chiyoda Experimental Channel in Hokkaido, Japan. We performed the computation under the same conditions in the experiment. The computational results showed the excellent performance for simulating levee breach phenomena.

  15. 2D simulation of granular flow over irregular steep slopes using global and local coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juez, C.; Murillo, J.; García-Navarro, P.

    2013-12-01

    In this work approximate augmented Riemann solvers are formulated providing appropriate numerical schemes for mathematical models of granular flow on irregular steep slopes. Fluxes and source terms are discretized to ensure steady state configurations including correct modeling of start/stop flow conditions, both in a global and a local system of coordinates. The weak solutions presented involve the effect of bed slope in pressure distribution and frictional effects by means of the adequate gravity acceleration components. The numerical solvers proposed are first tested against 1D cases with exact solution and then their results are compared with experimental data in order to check the suitability of the mathematical models described in this work. Comparisons between results provided when using global and local system of coordinates are presented. The obtained results point out that both the global and the local system of coordinates can be used to predict faithfully the overall behavior of the phenomena considered in this work.

  16. Flow transition with 2-D roughness elements in a 3-D channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhining; Liu, Chaoquin; Mccormick, Stephen F.

    1993-01-01

    We develop a new numerical approach to study the spatially evolving instability of the streamwise dominant flow in the presence of roughness elements. The difficulty in handling the flow over the boundary surface with general geometry is removed by using a new conservative form of the governing equations and an analytical mapping. The numerical scheme uses second-order backward Euler in time, fourth-order central differences in all three spatial directions, and boundary-fitted staggered grids. A three-dimensional channel with multiple two-dimensional-type roughness elements is employed as the test case. Fourier analysis is used to decompose different Fourier modes of the disturbance. The results show that surface roughness leads to transition at lower Reynolds number than for smooth channels.

  17. A High Order Discontinuous Galerkin Method for 2D Incompressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jia-Guo; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a high order discontinuous Galerkin method for two dimensional incompressible flow in vorticity streamfunction formulation. The momentum equation is treated explicitly, utilizing the efficiency of the discontinuous Galerkin method The streamfunction is obtained by a standard Poisson solver using continuous finite elements. There is a natural matching between these two finite element spaces, since the normal component of the velocity field is continuous across element boundaries. This allows for a correct upwinding gluing in the discontinuous Galerkin framework, while still maintaining total energy conservation with no numerical dissipation and total enstrophy stability The method is suitable for inviscid or high Reynolds number flows. Optimal error estimates are proven and verified by numerical experiments.

  18. Influence of flow topology on Lagrangian statistics in forced 2-D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadoch, Benjamin; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Bos, Wouter; Schneider, Kai

    2010-11-01

    Conditional Lagrangian statistics of forced two-dimensional turbulence in unbounded and bounded domains are studied by means of direct numerical simulation. The instantaneous flow domain is decomposed into either vorticity or strain dominated regions and a quiescent background region using the Okubo-Weiss criterion. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the residence time of the particles exhibits an exponential behavior in the background, while in the vorticity and strain dominated regions self-similar algebraic tails are found. For Lagrangian acceleration it is shown that both the vorticity and strain region are responsible for the heavy tails. Finally, the conditional PDFs of the curvature are found to be independent of the different flow domains yielding algebraic tails with slope close to -2, characteristic for an inverse chi-square distribution.

  19. The 2-D and 3-D time marching transonic potential flow method for propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Marc H.

    1988-01-01

    Recent efforts concentrated on the development of aerodynamic tools for the analysis of rotors at transonic speeds and of configurations involving relative rotation. Three distinct approaches were taken: (1) extension of the lifting surface method of Williams and Hwang (1986) to relative rotation; (2) development of a time marching linear potential method for counter rotation; and (3) development of 2 and 3 dimensional finite volume potential flow schemes for single rotation. Results from each of these approaches are described.

  20. Film flows and self-organized patterns of 2D-localized structures

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Films flowing down an inclined plane are considered. An unconventional perturbation approach is discussed. It yields the most general evolution equation for film thickness and the least restrictive conditions for its validity. Results of numerical simulations of the dissipative-dispersive evolution equation indicate that novel, more complex type of spatiotemporal patterns can exist for strange attractors of nonequilibrium systems. It is suggested that real-life experiments satisfying the validity conditions of this theory are possible.

  1. Numerical solution of 2D wet steam flow with non-equilibrium condensation and real thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hric, V.; Halama, J.

    2015-03-10

    An approach to modeling of wet steam flow with non-equilibrium condensation phenomenon is presented. The first part of our flow model is homogeneous Euler system of transport equations for mass, momentum and total energy of wet steam (mixture). The additional second part describes liquid phase via non-homogeneous system of transport equations for moments of droplets number distribution function and relies on corrected classical nucleation theory. Moment equations are closed by linearization of droplet growth rate model. All necessary relations for thermodynamic properties of steam are provided by IAPWS set of equations. However, properties of condensate are simply modeled by liquid saturation data. Two real equations of state are implemented. Recently developed CFD formulation for entropy (does not require iteration process) and so-called IAPWS special gas equation for Helmholtz energy (one iteration loop is necessary). Flow model is validated on converging-diverging supersonic nozzle with Barschdorff geometry. Simulations were performed by in-house CFD code based on finite volume method and stiff character of equations was solved by symmetrical time operator splitting. Achieved results satisfactorily agreed with experimental data.

  2. Symplectically invariant flow equations for N = 2, D = 4 gauged supergravity with hypermultiplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Dietmar; Petri, Nicolò; Rabbiosi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    We consider N = 2 supergravity in four dimensions, coupled to an arbitrary number of vector- and hypermultiplets, where abelian isometries of the quaternionic hyperscalar target manifold are gauged. Using a static and spherically or hyperbolically symmetric ansatz for the fields, a one-dimensional effective action is derived whose variation yields all the equations of motion. By imposing a sort of Dirac charge quantization condition, one can express the complete scalar potential in terms of a superpotential and write the action as a sum of squares. This leads to first-order flow equations, that imply the second-order equations of motion. The first-order flow turns out to be driven by Hamilton's characteristic function in the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism, and contains among other contributions the superpotential of the scalars. We then include also magnetic gaugings and generalize the flow equations to a symplectically covariant form. Moreover, by rotating the charges in an appropriate way, an alternative set of non-BPS first-order equations is obtained that corresponds to a different squaring of the action. Finally, we use our results to derive the attractor equations for near-horizon geometries of extremal black holes.

  3. Fluid flow and mass flux determinations at vent sites on the Cascadia margin accretionary prism

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, B.; Strasser, J.C. ); Suess, E. )

    1990-06-10

    Fluid venting from the toe of the accretionary prism off Oregon was measured in situ during a series of dives with DSRV Alvin in 1987 and 1988. A benthic chamber was place over active vent sites to sequentially collect samples of venting fluids and to make direct measurements of discharge rates. Calibrated flow meter measurements and flow rates determined from dissolved methane transfer indicate that discharge from two vent sites, Alvin 1428 and Alvin 1900, ranges roughly between 100 and 500 l/m{sup 2}d with the most reliable estimates falling in the range of 125-150 l/m{sup 2}d. These rates imply subsurface advective flow on the order of 100 m/yr. Comparison of observed discharge rates with rates calculated for steady state expulsion supported by accretion-related compaction indicates that the observed flow is greater than predicted flow by several orders of magnitude. The disparity dictates that fluids are not derived locally, but are transported laterally within the prism, or that flow is not steady state and that individual vents are short-lived features in the ongoing accretion process.

  4. Fluid flow plate for decreased density of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vitale, Nicholas G.

    1999-01-01

    A fluid flow plate includes first and second outward faces. Each of the outward faces has a flow channel thereon for carrying respective fluid. At least one of the fluids serves as reactant fluid for a fuel cell of a fuel cell assembly. One or more pockets are formed between the first and second outward faces for decreasing density of the fluid flow plate. A given flow channel can include one or more end sections and an intermediate section. An interposed member can be positioned between the outward faces at an interface between an intermediate section, of one of the outward faces, and an end section, of that outward face. The interposed member can serve to isolate the reactant fluid from the opposing outward face. The intermediate section(s) of flow channel(s) on an outward face are preferably formed as a folded expanse.

  5. Fluid flow and particle transport in mechanically ventilated airways. Part I. Fluid flow structures.

    PubMed

    Van Rhein, Timothy; Alzahrany, Mohammed; Banerjee, Arindam; Salzman, Gary

    2016-07-01

    A large eddy simulation-based computational study of fluid flow and particle transport in upper tracheobronchial airways is carried out to investigate the effect of ventilation parameters on pulmonary fluid flow. Respiratory waveforms commonly used by commercial mechanical ventilators are used to study the effect of ventilation parameters and ventilation circuit on pulmonary fluid dynamics. A companion paper (Alzahrany et al. in Med Biol Eng Comput, 2014) reports our findings on the effect of the ventilation parameters and circuit on particle transport and aerosolized drug delivery. The endotracheal tube (ETT) was found to be an important geometric feature and resulted in a fluid jet that caused an increase in turbulence and created a recirculation zone with high wall shear stress in the main bronchi. Stronger turbulence was found in lower airways than would be found under normal breathing conditions due to the presence of the jet caused by the ETT. The pressure-controlled sinusoidal waveform induced the lowest wall shear stress on the airways wall. PMID:26563199

  6. SWAT and River-2D Modelling of Pinder River for Analysing Snow Trout Habitat under Different Flow Abstraction Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nale, J. P.; Gosain, A. K.; Khosa, R.

    2015-12-01

    Pinder River, one of major headstreams of River Ganga, originates in Pindari Glaciers of Kumaon Himalayas and after passing through rugged gorges meets Alaknanda at Karanprayag forming one of the five celestial confluences of Upper Ganga region. While other sub-basins of Upper Ganga are facing severe ecological losses, Pinder basin is still in its virginal state and is well known for its beautiful valleys besides being host to unique and rare biodiversity. A proposed 252 MW run-of-river hydroelectric project at Devsari on this river has been a major concern on account of its perceived potential for egregious environmental and social impacts. In this context, the study presented tries to analyse the expected changes in aquatic habitat conditions after this project is operational (with different operation policies). SWAT hydrological modelling platform has been used to derive stream flow simulations under various scenarios ranging from the present to the likely future conditions. To analyse the habitat conditions, a two dimensional hydraulic-habitat model 'River-2D', a module of iRIC software, is used. Snow trout has been identified as the target keystone species and its habitat preferences, in the form of flow depths, flow velocity and substrate condition, are obtained from diverse sources of related literature and are provided as Habitat Suitability Indices to River-2D. Bed morphology constitutes an important River-2D input and has been obtained, for the designated 1 km long study reach of Pinder upto Karanprayag, from a combination of actual field observations and supplemented by SRTM 1 Arc-Second Global digital elevation data. Monthly Weighted Usable Area for three different life stages (Spawning, Juvenile and Adult) of Snow Trout are obtained corresponding to seven different flow discharges ranging from 10 cumec to 1000 cumec. Comparing the present and proposed future river flow conditions obtained from SWAT modelling, losses in Weighted Usable Area, for the

  7. On the coupling between fluid flow and mesh motion in the modelling of fluid structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmer, Wulf G.; Perić, Djordje

    2008-12-01

    Partitioned Newton type solution strategies for the strongly coupled system of equations arising in the computational modelling of fluid solid interaction require the evaluation of various coupling terms. An essential part of all ALE type solution strategies is the fluid mesh motion. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the terms which couple the fluid flow with the fluid mesh motion on the convergence behaviour of the overall solution procedure. We show that the computational efficiency of the simulation of many fluid solid interaction processes, including fluid flow through flexible pipes, can be increased significantly if some of these coupling terms are calculated exactly.

  8. Generating Inviscid and Viscous Fluid-Flow Simulations over an Aircraft Surface Using a Fluid-Flow Mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L. (Inventor); Sturdza, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Fluid-flow simulation over a computer-generated aircraft surface is generated using inviscid and viscous simulations. A fluid-flow mesh of fluid cells is obtained. At least one inviscid fluid property for the fluid cells is determined using an inviscid fluid simulation that does not simulate fluid viscous effects. A set of intersecting fluid cells that intersects the aircraft surface are identified. One surface mesh polygon of the surface mesh is identified for each intersecting fluid cell. A boundary-layer prediction point for each identified surface mesh polygon is determined. At least one boundary-layer fluid property for each boundary-layer prediction point is determined using the at least one inviscid fluid property of the corresponding intersecting fluid cell and a boundary-layer simulation that simulates fluid viscous effects. At least one updated fluid property for at least one fluid cell is determined using the at least one boundary-layer fluid property and the inviscid fluid simulation.

  9. Thermohydrodynamic Analysis of Cryogenic Liquid Turbulent Flow Fluid Film Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    Computational programs developed for the thermal analysis of tilting and flexure-pad hybrid bearings, and the unsteady flow and transient response of a point mass rotor supported on fluid film bearings are described. The motion of a cryogenic liquid on the thin film annular region of a fluid film bearing is described by a set of mass and momentum conservation, and energy transport equations for the turbulent bulk-flow velocities and pressure, and accompanied by thermophysical state equations for evaluation of the fluid material properties. Zeroth-order equations describe the fluid flow field for a journal static equilibrium position, while first-order (linear) equations govern the fluid flow for small amplitude-journal center translational motions. Solution to the zeroth-order flow field equations provides the bearing flow rate, load capacity, drag torque and temperature rise. Solution to the first-order equations determines the rotordynamic force coefficients due to journal radial motions.

  10. Flow of an electrorheological fluid between eccentric rotating cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Průša, Vít; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2012-01-01

    Electrorheological fluids have numerous potential applications in vibration dampers, brakes, valves, clutches, exercise equipment, etc. The flows in such applications are complex three-dimensional flows. Most models that have been developed to describe the flows of electrorheological fluids are one-dimensional models. Here, we discuss the behavior of two fully three-dimensional models for electrorheological fluids. The models are such that they reduce, in the case of simple shear flows with the intensity of the electric field perpendicular to the streamlines, to the same constitutive relation, but they would not be identical in more complicated three-dimensional settings. In order to show the difference between the two models, we study the flow of these fluids between eccentrically placed rotating cylinders kept at different potentials, in the setting that corresponds to technologically relevant problem of flow of electrorheological fluid in journal bearing. Even though the two models have quite a different constitutive structure, due to the assumed forms for the velocity and pressure fields, the models lead to the same velocity field but to different pressure fields. This finding illustrates the need for considering the flows of fluids described by three-dimensional constitutive models in complex geometries, and not restricting ourselves to flows of fluids described by one-dimensional models or simple shear flows of fluids characterized by three-dimensional models.

  11. 2D transient granular flows over obstacles: experimental and numerical work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juez, Carmelo; Caviedes-Voullième, Daniel; Murillo, Javier; García-Navarro, Pilar

    2016-04-01

    Landslides are an ubiquitous natural hazard, and therefore human infrastructure and settlements are often at risk in mountainous regions. In order to better understand and predict landslides, systematic studies of the phenomena need to be undertaken. In particular, computational tools which allow for analysis of field problems require to be thoroughly tested, calibrated and validated under controlled conditions. And to do so, it is necessary for such controlled experiments to be fully characterized in the same terms as the numerical model requires. This work presents an experimental study of dry granular flow over a rough bed with topography which resembles a mountain valley. It has an upper region with a very high slope. The geometry of the bed describes a fourth order polynomial curve, with a low point with zero slope, and afterwards a short region with adverse slope. Obstacles are present in the lower regions which are used as model geometries of human structures. The experiments consisted of a sudden release a mass of sand on the upper region, and allowing it to flow downslope. Furthermore, it has been frequent in previous studies to measure final states of the granular mass at rest, but seldom has transient data being provided, and never for the entire field. In this work we present transient measurements of the moving granular surfaces, obtained with a consumer-grade RGB-D sensor. The sensor, developed for the videogame industry, allows to measure the moving surface of the sand, thus obtaining elevation fields. The experimental results are very consistent and repeatable. The measured surfaces clearly show the distinctive features of the granular flow around the obstacles and allow to qualitatively describe the different flow patterns. More importantly, the quantitative description of the granular surface allows for benchmarking and calibration of predictive numerical models, key in scaling the small-scale experimental knowledge into the field. In addition, as

  12. Effects of Fluid Flow on Slip Evolution in a Thermoporoelastic Medium: Implications for Seismic Moment Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Yamashita, T.

    2015-12-01

    We have constructed a framework associated with the interaction among heat, fluid pressure and inelastic pore creation, and found three nondimensional parameters, Su, Su' and Ta, which are related to the dilatancy effect, fluid flow effect and the upper limit of the dilatancy, respectively. Without fluid flow, they were found to generate two qualitatively different slip behaviors, acceleration case and spontaneous slip cessation case. In particular, the acceleration case shows the initial deceleration and later acceleration approaching the final high-speed slip. Between the deceleration and acceleration phases, we observe a transient state featured by low and approximately constant slip velocity. We employ the fluid flow effect here and give some implications for understanding the temporal evolution of seismic moments. For example, Ide et al. (2007) found that ordinary earthquakes and slow earthquakes have different forms of temporal evolutions of the seismic moments. In addition, Duputel et al. (2013) observed examples showing exceptional moment evolution behavior even among ordinary earthquakes. Yamashita and Suzuki (2011) successfully modeled the former result by introducing slip-induced dilatancy coupled with fluid flow, while the modeling of the latter remains unaccomplished. If we introduce the fluid flow, we observe only the acceleration case and the duration of the transient state is longer than that without the fluid flow. This can be a model for a slow earthquake if we assume a 2-D model, and the seismic moment of such an earthquake evolves in almost a quadratic function in time. On the other hand, for the acceleration case without the fluid flow, the seismic moment evolution is almost a cubic function. Moreover, for the spontaneous slip cessation case, it evolves with a quadratic or linear function. The framework explaining all the behaviors mentioned above has been obtained. Quantitative investigation on the nondimensional parameters will also be done.

  13. SATURATION MEASUREMENT OF IMMISCIBLE FLUIDS IN 2-D STATIC SYSTEMS: VALIDATION BY LIGHT TRANSMISSION VISUALIZATION (SAN FRANCISCO, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is a part of an ongoing research project that aims at assessing the environmental benefits of DNAPL removal. The laboratory part of the research project is to examine the functional relationship between DNAPL architecture, mass removal and contaminant mass flux in 2-D ...

  14. Modeling water flow and nitrate dynamics in a plastic mulch vegetable cultivation system using HYDRUS-2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipović, Vilim; Romić, Davor; Romić, Marija; Matijević, Lana; Mallmann, Fábio J. K.; Robinson, David A.

    2016-04-01

    Growing vegetables commercially requires intensive management and involves high irrigation demands and input of agrochemicals. Plastic mulch application in combination with drip irrigation is a common agricultural management technique practiced due to variety of benefits to the crop, mostly vegetable biomass production. However, the use of these techniques can result in various impacts on water and nutrient distribution in underlying soil and consequently affect nutrient leaching towards groundwater resources. The aim of this work is to estimate the effect of plastic mulch cover in combination with drip irrigation on water and nitrate dynamics in soil using HYDRUS-2D model. The field site was located in Croatian costal karst area on a Gleysol (WRB). The experiment was designed according to the split-plot design in three repetitions and was divided into plots with plastic mulch cover (MULCH) and control plots with bare soil (CONT). Each of these plots received applications of three levels of nitrogen fertilizer: 70, 140, and 210 kg per ha. All plots were equipped with drip irrigation and cropped with bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Bianca F1). Lysimeters were installed at 90 cm depth in all plots and were used for monitoring the water and nitrate outflow. HYDRUS-2D was used for modeling the water and nitrogen outflow in the MULCH and CONT plots, implementing the proper boundary conditions. HYDRUS-2D simulated results showed good fitting to the field site observed data in both cumulative water and nitrate outflow, with high level of agreement. Water flow simulations produced model efficiency of 0.84 for CONT and 0.56 for MULCH plots, while nitrate simulations showed model efficiency ranging from 0.67 to 0.83 and from 0.70 to 0.93, respectively. Additional simulations were performed with the absence of the lysimeter, revealing faster transport of nitrates below drip line in the CONT plots, mostly because of the increased surface area subjected to precipitation

  15. Some specific features of the NMR study of fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Some specific features of studying fluid flows with a NMR spectrometer are considered. The consideration of these features in the NMR spectrometer design makes it possible to determine the relative concentrations of paramagnetic ions and measure the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times ( T 1 and T 2, respectively) in fluid flows with an error no larger than 0.5%. This approach allows one to completely avoid errors in determining the state of a fluid from measured relaxation constants T 1 and T 2, which is especially urgent when working with medical suspensions and biological solutions. The results of an experimental study of fluid flows are presented.

  16. Device for deriving energy from a flow of fluid

    SciTech Connect

    van Holten, T.

    1982-12-07

    Improved process and device for extracting energy present in a flowing fluid medium wherein a supported hub with propellers or blades is placed in said medium and the blades are provided with a wing or vane at the tip. The wing is of such a form that it generates a ''venturi effect'' in the flowing medium by which a part of the fluid which should normally pass outside the propeller disc area, is drawn into the propeller. The improvement consists of mixing of fluid which normally should pass outside the venturi with fluid which has flowed through the blades by provisions on blades and/or wing or vanes.

  17. Fluid flow into vertical fractures from a point source

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P.E.; Zhu, Q.

    1995-03-01

    Flow into a fracture from a point source recently has been the focus of attention in the petroleum industry. The suggestion has been made that, in this flow configuration, convection (gravity-driven flow) would dominate Stokes`-type settling for determining final proppant distribution. The theory is that when a dense fluid flows into a fracture filled with a less dense fluid from a point source, the density of the fluid will force it to the bottom of the fracture. This clearly happens when the two fluids have low viscosity. However, viscosity of both the fluid in the fracture and the displacing fluid and nonuniformities in the fracture influence displacement process significantly. Results presented in this study clearly show the effects of viscosity and fracture nonuniformity on the convective settling mechanism.

  18. Working fluid flow visualization in gravity heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2016-03-01

    Heat pipe is device working with phase changes of working fluid inside hermetically closed pipe at specific pressure. The phase changes of working fluid from fluid to vapour and vice versa help heat pipe to transport high heat flux. The article deal about gravity heat pipe construction and processes casing inside during heat pipe operation. Experiment working fluid flow visualization is performed with two glass heat pipes with different inner diameter (13 mm and 22 mm) and filled with water. The working fluid flow visualization explains the phenomena as a working fluid boiling, nucleation of bubbles, and vapour condensation on the wall, vapour and condensate flow interaction, flow down condensate film thickness on the wall occurred during the heat pipe operation.

  19. A mathematical model for understanding fluid flow through engineered tissues containing microvessels.

    PubMed

    Morin, Kristen T; Lenz, Michelle S; Labat, Caroline A; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge is limited about fluid flow in tissues containing engineered microvessels, which can be substantially different in topology than native capillary networks. A need exists for a computational model that allows for flow through tissues dense in nonpercolating and possibly nonperfusable microvessels to be efficiently evaluated. A finite difference (FD) model based on Poiseuille flow through a distribution of straight tubes acting as point sources and sinks, and Darcy flow through the interstitium, was developed to describe fluid flow through a tissue containing engineered microvessels. Accuracy of the FD model was assessed by comparison to a finite element (FE) model for the case of a single tube. Because the case of interest is a tissue with microvessels aligned with the flow, accuracy was also assessed in depth for a corresponding 2D FD model. The potential utility of the 2D FD model was then explored by correlating metrics of flow through the model tissue to microvessel morphometric properties. The results indicate that the model can predict the density of perfused microvessels based on parameters that can be easily measured. PMID:25424905

  20. Qualitative investigation of cryogenic fluid injection into a supersonic flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Boldman, D. R.; Neumann, H. E.; Vlcek, B. L.

    1990-01-01

    The behavior of liquid nitrogen injected into a supersonic nitrogen flow field was investigated using an experimental apparatus in which a Mach 2.7 2D gas nitrogen tunnel is coupled with a high-pressure cryogenic source. Observations were monitored and recorded via a video camera and a motion picture camera. It was found that the penetration of a supersonic flow field by injection of liquid nitrogen is strongly dependent on the flow Mach number, the cryogen injection pressure (Pi/Pc), the injector configuration, and the cryogen temperature. For a 2D gaseous N2, Mach 2.7 tunnel, with cryogen injection Pi/Pc approaching 2, the injected fluid penetration for the 1/8-in. injection port approached one half of the tunnel width at 90-deg injection, and one fourth of the tunnel width at 20-deg injection.

  1. Application of Gas-Kinetic BGK Scheme for Solving 2-D Compressible Inviscid Flow around Linear Turbine Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdusslam, Saleh N.; Chit, Ong J.; Hamdan, Megat M.; Omar, Ashraf A.; Asrar, Waqar

    2006-12-01

    Fluid flows within turbomachinery tend to be extremely complex. Understanding such flows is crucial in the effort to improve current turbomachinery designs. Hence, computational approaches can be used to great advantage in this regard. In this paper, gas-kinetic BGK (Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook) scheme is developed for simulating compressible inviscid flow around a linear turbine cascade. BGK scheme is an approximate Riemann solver that uses the collisional Boltzmann equation as the governing equation for flow evolutions. For efficient computations, particle distribution functions in the general solution of the BGK model are simplified and used for the flow simulations. Second-order accuracy is achieved via the reconstruction of flow variables using the MUSCL (Monotone Upstream-Centered Schemes for Conservation Laws) interpolation technique together with a multistage Runge-Kutta method. A multi-zone H-type mesh for the linear turbine cascades is generated using a structured algebraic grid generation method. Computed results are compared with available experimental data and found to be in agreement with each other. In order to further substantiate the performance of the BGK scheme, another test case, namely a wedge cascade, is used. The numerical solutions obtained via this test are validated against analytical solutions, which showed to be in good agreement.

  2. Method and apparatus for chemically altering fluids in continuous flow

    DOEpatents

    Heath, W.O.; Virden, J.W. Jr.; Richardson, R.L.; Bergsman, T.M.

    1993-10-19

    The present invention relates to a continuous flow fluid reactor for chemically altering fluids. The reactor operates on standard frequency (50 to 60 Hz) electricity. The fluid reactor contains particles that are energized by the electricity to form a corona throughout the volume of the reactor and subsequently a non-equilibrium plasma that interacts with the fluid. Particles may form a fixed bed or a fluid bed. Electricity may be provided through electrodes or through an inductive coil. Fluids include gases containing exhaust products and organic fuels requiring oxidation. 4 figures.

  3. Method and apparatus for chemically altering fluids in continuous flow

    DOEpatents

    Heath, William O.; Virden, Jr., Judson W.; Richardson, R. L.; Bergsman, Theresa M.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a continuous flow fluid reactor for chemically altering fluids. The reactor operates on standard frequency (50 to 60 Hz) electricity. The fluid reactor contains particles that are energized by the electricity to form a corona throughout the volume of the reactor and subsequently a non-equilibrium plasma that interacts with the fluid. Particles may form a fixed bed or a fluid bed. Electricity may be provided through electrodes or through an inductive coil. Fluids include gases containing exhaust products and organic fuels requiring oxidation.

  4. MHD Flow of the Micropolar Fluid between Eccentrically Rotating Disks.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Neetu

    2014-01-01

    This analytical investigation examines the magnetohydrodynamic flow problem of an incompressible micropolar fluid between the two eccentrically placed disks. Employing suitable transformations, the flow governing partial differential equations is reduced to ordinary differential equations. An exact solution representing the different flow characteristic of micropolar fluid has been derived by solving the ordinary differential equations. Analysis of the flow characteristics of the micropolar fluid has been done graphically by varying the Reynolds number and the Hartmann number. This analysis has been carried out for the weak and strong interactions. PMID:27355040

  5. MHD Flow of the Micropolar Fluid between Eccentrically Rotating Disks

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Neetu

    2014-01-01

    This analytical investigation examines the magnetohydrodynamic flow problem of an incompressible micropolar fluid between the two eccentrically placed disks. Employing suitable transformations, the flow governing partial differential equations is reduced to ordinary differential equations. An exact solution representing the different flow characteristic of micropolar fluid has been derived by solving the ordinary differential equations. Analysis of the flow characteristics of the micropolar fluid has been done graphically by varying the Reynolds number and the Hartmann number. This analysis has been carried out for the weak and strong interactions.

  6. Microfluidic flow switching design using volume of fluid model.

    PubMed

    Chein, Reiyu; Tsai, S H

    2004-03-01

    In this study, a volume of fluid (VOF) model was employed for microfluidic switch design. The VOF model validity in predicting the interface between fluid streams with different viscosities co-flowing in a microchannel was first verified by experimental observation. It was then extended to microfluidic flow switch design. Two specific flow switches, one with a guided fluid to one of five desired outlet ports, and another with a guided fluid flows into one, two, or three outlet ports equally distributed along the outlet channel of a Y-shaped channel. The flow switching was achieved by controlling the flow rate ratios between tested and buffer fluids. The numerical results showed that the VOF model could successfully predict the flow switching phenomena in these flow switches. The numerical results also showed that the flow rate ratio required for flow switching depends on the viscosity ratio between the tested and buffer fluids. The numerical simulation was verified by experimental study and the agreement was good. PMID:15307449

  7. Application of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics models to complex ecological stream flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Diplas, Panayiotis

    2008-01-01

    SummaryComplex flow patterns generated by irregular channel topography, such as boulders, submerged large woody debris, riprap and spur dikes, provide unique habitat for many aquatic organisms. Numerical modeling of the flow structures surrounding these obstructions is challenging, yet it represents an important tool for aquatic habitat assessment. In this study, the ability of two- (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics models to reproduce these localized complex flow features is examined. The 3-D model is validated with laboratory data obtained from the literature for the case of a flow around a hemisphere under emergent and submerged conditions. The performance of the 2-D and 3-D models is then evaluated by comparing the numerical results with field measurements of flow around several boulders located at a reach of the Smith River, a regulated mountainous stream, obtained at base and peak flows. Close agreement between measured values and the velocity profiles predicted by the two models is obtained outside the wakes behind the hemisphere and boulders. However, the results suggest that in the vicinity of these obstructions the 3-D model is better suited for reproducing the circulation flow behavior at both low and high discharges. Application of the 2-D and 3-D models to meso-scale stream flows of ecological significance is furthermore demonstrated by using a recently developed spatial hydraulic metric to quantify flow complexity surrounding a number of brown trout spawning sites. It is concluded that the 3-D model can provide a much more accurate description of the heterogeneous velocity patterns favored by many aquatic species over a broad range of flows, especially under deep flow conditions when the various obstructions are submerged. Issues pertaining to selection of appropriate models for a variety of flow regimes and potential implication of the 3-D model on the development of better habitat suitability criteria are discussed. The

  8. Application of the high-resolution Godunov method to the multi-fluid flow calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jin-Song; Li, Ping; Zhang, Zhan-Ji; Hua, Jin-Song; Tan, Hua

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we have numerically solved the multi-fluid problems using an operator-split two-step high-resolution Godunov PPM (parabolic piecewise method) for the flow in complex geometries. By using the front capturing method, the PPM integrator captures the interface in the solution process. The basic multi-fluid integrator is coupled to a Cartesian grid algorithm where a VOF (volume of fluid) representation of the fluid interface is also used. As an application of this method, we test the 2D interfacial advection example and simulate an experimental hypervelocity launcher model from Sandia National Laboratories. The computational design of the hypervelocity launcher is also given in the paper.

  9. Thermodynamics and flow-frames for dissipative relativistic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ván, P.; Biró, T. S.

    2014-01-14

    A general thermodynamic treatment of dissipative relativistic fluids is introduced, where the temperature four vector is not parallel to the velocity field of the fluid. Generic stability and kinetic equilibrium points out a particular thermodynamics, where the temperature vector is parallel to the enthalpy flow vector and the choice of the flow fixes the constitutive functions for viscous stress and heat. The linear stability of the homogeneous equilibrium is proved in a mixed particle-energy flow-frame.

  10. Fundamental Processes of Atomization in Fluid-Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Christopher; Leighton, David T.; Chang, Hsueh-Chia; McCready, Mark J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses our proposed experimental and theoretical study of atomization in gas-liquid and liquid-liquid flows. While atomization is a very important process in these flows, the fundamental mechanism is not understood and there is no predictive theory. Previous photographic studies in (turbulent) gas-liquid flows have shown that liquid is atomized when it is removed by the gas flow from the crest of large solitary or roll waves. Our preliminary studies in liquid-liquid laminar flows exhibit the same mechanism. The two-liquid system is easier to study than gas-liquid systems because the time scales are much slower, the length scales much larger, and there is no turbulence. The proposed work is intended to obtain information about the mechanism of formation, rate of occurrence and the evolving shape of solitary waves; and quantitative aspects of the detailed events of the liquid removal process that can be used to verify a general predictive theory.

  11. Vibration of a Flexible Pipe Conveying Viscous Pulsating Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GORMAN, D. G.; REESE, J. M.; ZHANG, Y. L.

    2000-02-01

    The non-linear equations of motion of a flexible pipe conveying unsteadily flowing fluid are derived from the continuity and momentum equations of unsteady flow. These partial differential equations are fully coupled through equilibrium of contact forces, the normal compatibility of velocity at the fluid- pipe interfaces, and the conservation of mass and momentum of the transient fluid. Poisson coupling between the pipe wall and fluid is also incorporated in the model. A combination of the finite difference method and the method of characteristics is employed to extract displacements, hydrodynamic pressure and flow velocities from the equations. A numerical example of a pipeline conveying fluid with a pulsating flow is given and discussed.

  12. Finite Element Analysis of Magnetic Damping Effects on G-Jitter Induced Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Bo; Li, Ben Q.; deGroh, Henry C., III

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports some interim results on numerical modeling and analyses of magnetic damping of g-jitter driven fluid flow in microgravity. A finite element model is developed to represent the fluid flow, thermal and solute transport phenomena in a 2-D cavity under g-jitter conditions with and without an applied magnetic field. The numerical model is checked by comparing with analytical solutions obtained for a simple parallel plate channel flow driven by g-jitter in a transverse magnetic field. The model is then applied to study the effect of steady state g-jitter induced oscillation and on the solute redistribution in the liquid that bears direct relevance to the Bridgman-Stockbarger single crystal growth processes. A selection of computed results is presented and the results indicate that an applied magnetic field can effectively damp the velocity caused by g-jitter and help to reduce the time variation of solute redistribution.

  13. An immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for single- and multi-component fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Favier, Julien; D'Ortona, Umberto; Poncet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a numerical method to simulate single- and multi-component fluid flows around moving/deformable solid boundaries, based on the coupling of Immersed Boundary (IB) and Lattice Boltzmann (LB) methods. The fluid domain is simulated with LB method using the single relaxation time BGK model, in which an interparticle potential model is applied for multi-component fluid flows. The IB-related force is directly calculated with the interpolated definition of the fluid macroscopic velocity on the Lagrangian points that define the immersed solid boundary. The present IB-LB method can better ensure the no-slip solid boundary condition, thanks to an improved spreading operator. The proposed method is validated through several 2D/3D single- and multi-component fluid test cases with a particular emphasis on wetting conditions on solid wall. Finally, a 3D two-fluid application case is given to show the feasibility of modeling the fluid transport via a cluster of beating cilia.

  14. Debris Flow Simulation using FLO-2D on the 2004 Landslide Area of Real, General Nakar, and Infanta, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes, F.; dela Resma, M.; Ferrer, P.; Realino, V.; Aquino, D. T.; Eco, R. C.; Lagmay, A.

    2013-12-01

    From November 14 to December 3, 2004, Luzon Island was ravaged by 4 successive typhoons: Typhoon Mufia, Tropical Storm Merbok, Tropical Depression Winnie, and Super Typhoon Nanmadol. Tropical Depression Winnie was the most destructive of the four when it triggered landslides on November 29 that devastated the municipalities of Infanta, General Nakar, and Real in Quezon Province, southeast Luzon. Winnie formed east of Central Luzon on November 27 before it moved west-northwestward over southeastern Luzon on November 29. A total of 1,068 lives were lost and more than USD 170 million worth of damages to crops and infrastructure were incurred from the landslides triggered by Typhoon Winnie on November 29 and the flooding caused by the 4 typhoons. FLO-2D, a flood routing software for generating flood and debris flow hazard maps, was utilized to simulate the debris flows that could potentially affect the study area. Based from the rainfall intensity-duration-frequency analysis, the cumulative rainfall from typhoon Winnie on November 29 which was approximately 342 mm over a 9-hour period was classified within a 100-year return period. The Infanta station of the Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) was no longer able to measure the amount of rainfall after this period because the rain gauge in that station was washed away by floods. Rainfall data with a 100-year return period was simulated over the watersheds delineated from a SAR-derived digital elevation model. The resulting debris flow hazard map was compared with results from field investigation and previous studies made on the landslide event. The simulation identified 22 barangays (villages) with a total of 45,155 people at risk of turbulent flow and flooding.

  15. TITAN2D simulations of pyroclastic flows at Cerro Machín Volcano, Colombia: Hazard implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcia, H. F.; Sheridan, M. F.; Macías, J. L.; Cortés, G. P.

    2010-03-01

    Cerro Machín is a dacitic tuff ring located in the central part of the Colombian Andes. It lies at the southern end of the Cerro Bravo-Cerro Machín volcanic belt. This volcano has experienced at least six major explosive eruptions during the last 5000 years. These eruptions have generated pyroclastic flows associated with Plinian activity that have traveled up to 8 km from the crater, and pyroclastic flows associated with Vulcanian activity with shorter runouts of 5 km from the source. Today, some 21,000 people live within a 8 km radius of Cerro Machín. The volcano is active with fumaroles and has shown increasing seismic activity since 2004, and therefore represents a potentially increasing threat to the local population. To evaluate the possible effects of future eruptions that may generate pyroclastic density currents controlled by granular flow dynamics we performed flow simulations with the TITAN2D code. These simulations were run in all directions around the volcano, using the input parameters of the largest eruption reported. The results show that an eruption of 0.3 km 3 of pyroclastic flows from a collapsing Plinian column would travel up to 9 km from the vent, emplacing a deposit thicker than 60 m within the Toche River valley. Deposits >45 m thick can be expected in the valleys of San Juan, Santa Marta, and Azufral creeks, while 30 m thick deposits could accumulate within the drainages of the Tochecito, Bermellón, and Coello Rivers. A minimum area of 56 km 2 could be affected directly by this kind of eruption. In comparison, Vulcanian column-collapse pyroclastic flows of 0.1 km 3 would travel up to 6 km from the vent depositing >45 m thick debris inside the Toche River valley and more than 30 m inside the valleys of San Juan, Santa Marta, and Azufral creeks. The minimum area that could be affected directly by this kind of eruption is 33 km 2. The distribution and thickness of the deposits obtained by these simulations are consistent with the hazard

  16. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  17. Experiments on two-phase flow in a quasi-2D porous medium: investigation of boundary effects in the measurement of pressure-saturation relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Marcel; Fiorentino, Eve-Agnès; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Toussaint, Renaud; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    We have performed two-phase flow experiments to analyze the drainage from a quasi-2D random porous medium. The medium is transparent, which allows for the visualization of the invasion pattern during the flow and is initially fully saturated with a viscous fluid (a dyed glycerol-water mix). As the pressure in the fluid is gradually reduced, air penetrates from an open inlet, thus displacing the fluid which leaves the system from the outlet in the opposite side. A feedback mechanism was devised to control the experiment: the capillary pressure (difference in pressure between the non-wetting and wetting phases) is continuously increased to be just above the threshold value necessary to drive the invasion process. This mechanism is intended to keep the invasion process slow, in the so-called capillary regime, where capillary forces dominate the dynamics. Pressure measurements and pictures of the flow are recorded and the pressure-saturation relationship is computed. The effects of the boundary conditions to this quantity are verified experimentally by repeatedly performing the analysis using porous media of different sizes. We show that some features of the pressure-saturation curve are strongly affected by boundary effects. The invasion close to the inlet and outlet of the model are particularly influenced by the boundaries and this is reflected in the phases of pressure building up in the pressure-saturation curves, in the beginning and end of the invasion process. Conversely, at the central part of the model (away from the boundaries), the invasion process happens at an essentially constant capillary pressure, which is reflected as a plateau in the pressure-saturation curve. Additionally, the use of a high-resolution camera allows us to analyze the images down to the pore scale. We can directly obtain a distribution of pore-throat sizes in the model (and their associated capillary pressure thresholds) and divide it into distributions of invaded / non-invaded pores

  18. Effects of mesh resolution and topographic representation in 2D finite volume models of shallow water fluvial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horritt, M. S.; Bates, P. D.; Mattinson, M. J.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryThe effects of mesh resolution and topographic data quality on the predictions of a 2D finite volume model of channel flow are investigated. 25 cm resolution side scan sonar swath bathymetry of a 7 km reach of the river Thames, UK, provides topography for a series of finite volume models with resolutions ranging from 2.5 to 50 m. Results from the coarser meshes are compared with the 2.5 m simulation which is used as a benchmark. The model shows greater sensitivity to mesh resolution than topographic sampling. Sensitivity to mesh resolution is attributed to two effects of roughly equal magnitude. Small elements are able to represent hydraulic features such as recirculation zones, and a more accurate representation of the domain boundary helps to drive these flow features. In practical terms, a models at a resolution of 20 and 50 m require 50 m cross-sections, whereas the 10 m model predictions are improved by using all the bathymetry data.

  19. Effect of Fluid Friction on Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through Solid Tumor Microvascular Network

    PubMed Central

    Sefidgar, Mostafa; Soltani, M.; Bazmara, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    A solid tumor is investigated as porous media for fluid flow simulation. Most of the studies use Darcy model for porous media. In Darcy model, the fluid friction is neglected and a few simplified assumptions are implemented. In this study, the effect of these assumptions is studied by considering Brinkman model. A multiscale mathematical method which calculates fluid flow to a solid tumor is used in this study to investigate how neglecting fluid friction affects the solid tumor simulation. The mathematical method involves processes such as blood flow through vessels and solute and fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. The sprouting angiogenesis model is used for generating capillary network and then fluid flow governing equations are implemented to calculate blood flow through the tumor-induced capillary network. Finally, the two models of porous media are used for modeling fluid flow in normal and tumor tissues in three different shapes of tumors. Simulations of interstitial fluid transport in a solid tumor demonstrate that the simplifications used in Darcy model affect the interstitial velocity and Brinkman model predicts a lower value for interstitial velocity than the values that Darcy model predicts. PMID:25960764

  20. Conjugate Compressible Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    A computational approach to modeling transient, compressible fluid flow with heat transfer in long, narrow ducts is presented. The primary application of the model is for analyzing fluid flow and heat transfer in solid propellant rocket motor nozzle joints during motor start-up, but the approach is relevant to a wide range of analyses involving rapid pressurization and filling of ducts. Fluid flow is modeled through solution of the spatially one-dimensional, transient Euler equations. Source terms are included in the governing equations to account for the effects of wall friction and heat transfer. The equation solver is fully-implicit, thus providing greater flexibility than an explicit solver. This approach allows for resolution of pressure wave effects on the flow as well as for fast calculation of the steady-state solution when a quasi-steady approach is sufficient. Solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with source terms significantly reduces computational run times compared to general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages solving the Navier-Stokes equations with resolved boundary layers. In addition, conjugate heat transfer is more readily implemented using the approach described in this paper than with most general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages. The compressible flow code has been integrated with a transient heat transfer solver to analyze heat transfer between the fluid and surrounding structure. Conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solutions are presented. The author is unaware of any previous work available in the open literature which uses the same approach described in this paper.

  1. Predictions of bubbly flows in vertical pipes using two-fluid models in CFDS-FLOW3D code

    SciTech Connect

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B.; Unrau, D.

    1995-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study exploring the performance of two sets of two-fluid closure relationships applied to the simulation of turbulent air-water bubbly upflows through vertical pipes. Predictions obtained with the default CFDS-FLOW3D model for dispersed flows were compared with the predictions of a new model (based on the work of Lee), and with the experimental data of Liu. The new model, implemented in the CFDS-FLOW3D code, included additional source terms in the {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} {kappa}-{epsilon} transport equations for the liquid phase, as well as modified model coefficients and wall functions. All simulations were carried out in a 2-D axisymmetric format, collapsing the general multifluid framework of CFDS-FLOW3D to the two-fluid (air-water) case. The newly implemented model consistently improved predictions of radial-velocity profiles of both phases, but failed to accurately reproduce the experimental phase-distribution data. This shortcoming was traced to the neglect of anisotropic effects in the modelling of liquid-phase turbulence. In this sense, the present investigation should be considered as the first step toward the ultimate goal of developing a theoretically sound and universal CFD-type two-fluid model for bubbly flows in channels.

  2. A framework for estimating potential fluid flow from digital imagery.

    PubMed

    Luttman, Aaron; Bollt, Erik M; Basnayake, Ranil; Kramer, Sean; Tufillaro, Nicholas B

    2013-09-01

    Given image data of a fluid flow, the flow field, , governing the evolution of the system can be estimated using a variational approach to optical flow. Assuming that the flow field governing the advection is the symplectic gradient of a stream function or the gradient of a potential function-both falling under the category of a potential flow-it is natural to re-frame the optical flow problem to reconstruct the stream or potential function directly rather than the components of the flow individually. There are several advantages to this framework. Minimizing a functional based on the stream or potential function rather than based on the components of the flow will ensure that the computed flow is a potential flow. Next, this approach allows a more natural method for imposing scientific priors on the computed flow, via regularization of the optical flow functional. Also, this paradigm shift gives a framework--rather than an algorithm--and can be applied to nearly any existing variational optical flow technique. In this work, we develop the mathematical formulation of the potential optical flow framework and demonstrate the technique on synthetic flows that represent important dynamics for mass transport in fluid flows, as well as a flow generated by a satellite data-verified ocean model of temperature transport. PMID:24089970

  3. Unbalanced-flow, fluid-mixing plug with metering capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Van Buskirk, Paul D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A fluid mixer plug has holes formed therethrough such that a remaining portion is closed to fluid flow. The plug's inlet face defines a central circuit region and a ring-shaped region with the ring-shaped region including at least some of the plug's remaining portion so-closed to fluid flow. This remaining portion or closed region at each radius R of the ring shaped region satisfies a radius independent, flow-based relationship. Entry openings are defined in the plug's inlet face in correspondence with the holes. The entry openings define an open flow area at each radius of the ring-shaped region. The open flow area at each such radius satisfies the inverse of the flow-based relationship defining the closed regions of the plug.

  4. Flow networks: A characterization of geophysical fluid transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ser-Giacomi, Enrico; Rossi, Vincent; López, Cristóbal; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2015-03-01

    We represent transport between different regions of a fluid domain by flow networks, constructed from the discrete representation of the Perron-Frobenius or transfer operator associated to the fluid advection dynamics. The procedure is useful to analyze fluid dynamics in geophysical contexts, as illustrated by the construction of a flow network associated to the surface circulation in the Mediterranean sea. We use network-theory tools to analyze the flow network and gain insights into transport processes. In particular, we quantitatively relate dispersion and mixing characteristics, classically quantified by Lyapunov exponents, to the degree of the network nodes. A family of network entropies is defined from the network adjacency matrix and related to the statistics of stretching in the fluid, in particular, to the Lyapunov exponent field. Finally, we use a network community detection algorithm, Infomap, to partition the Mediterranean network into coherent regions, i.e., areas internally well mixed, but with little fluid interchange between them.

  5. Feedback regulated induction heater for a flowing fluid

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Swift, Gregory W.

    1985-01-01

    A regulated induction heater for heating a stream of flowing fluid to a predetermined desired temperature. The heater includes a radiofrequency induction coil which surrounds a glass tube through which the fluid flows. A heating element consisting of a bundle of approximately 200 stainless steel capillary tubes located within the glass tube couples the output of the induction coil to the fluid. The temperature of the fluid downstream from the heating element is sensed with a platinum resistance thermometer, the output of which is applied to an adjustable proportional and integral feedback control circuit which regulates the power applied to the induction coil. The heater regulates the fluid temperature to within 0.005.degree. C. at a flow rate of 50 cm.sup.3 /second with a response time of less than 0.1 second, and can accommodate changes in heat load up to 1500 watts.

  6. Feedback regulated induction heater for a flowing fluid

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, A.; Swift, G.W.

    1984-06-13

    A regulated induction heater for heating a stream of flowing fluid to a predetermined desired temperature. The heater includes a radiofrequency induction coil which surrounds a glass tube through which the fluid flows. A heating element consisting of a bundle of approximately 200 stainless steel capillary tubes located within the glass tube couples the output of the induction coil to the fluid. The temperature of the fluid downstream from the heating element is sensed with a platinum resistance thermometer, the output of which is applied to an adjustable porportional and integral feedback control circuit which regulates the power applied to the induction coil. The heater regulates the fluid temperature to within 0.005/sup 0/C at a flow rate of 50 cm/sup 3//sec with a response time of less than 0.1 second, and can accommodate changes in heat load up to 1500 watts.

  7. Apparatus for irradiating a continuously flowing stream of fluid

    DOEpatents

    Speir, Leslie G.; Adams, Edwin L.

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus for irradiating a continuously flowing stream of fluid is diosed. The apparatus consists of a housing having a spherical cavity and a spherical moderator containing a radiation source positioned within the spherical cavity. The spherical moderator is of lesser diameter than the spherical cavity so as to define a spherical annular volume around the moderator. The housing includes fluid intake and output conduits which open onto the spherical cavity at diametrically opposite positions. Fluid flows through the cavity around the spherical moderator and is uniformly irradiated due to the 4.pi. radiation geometry. The irradiation source, for example a .sup.252 CF neutron source, is removable from the spherical moderator through a radial bore which extends outwardly to an opening on the outside of the housing. The radiation source may be routinely removed without interrupting the flow of fluid or breaching the containment of the fluid.

  8. Superconfinement tailors fluid flow at microscales

    PubMed Central

    Setu, Siti Aminah; Dullens, Roel P.A.; Hernández-Machado, Aurora; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Aarts, Dirk G.A.L.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding fluid dynamics under extreme confinement, where device and intrinsic fluid length scales become comparable, is essential to successfully develop the coming generations of fluidic devices. Here we report measurements of advancing fluid fronts in such a regime, which we dub superconfinement. We find that the strong coupling between contact-line friction and geometric confinement gives rise to a new stability regime where the maximum speed for a stable moving front exhibits a distinctive response to changes in the bounding geometry. Unstable fronts develop into drop-emitting jets controlled by thermal fluctuations. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics in superconfined systems is dominated by interfacial forces. Henceforth, we present a theory that quantifies our experiments in terms of the relevant interfacial length scale, which in our system is the intrinsic contact-line slip length. Our findings show that length-scale overlap can be used as a new fluid-control mechanism in strongly confined systems. PMID:26073752

  9. Destabilization of confined granular packings due to fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monloubou, Martin; Sandnes, Bjørnar

    2016-04-01

    Fluid flow through granular materials can cause fluidization when fluid drag exceeds the frictional stress within the packing. Fluid driven failure of granular packings is observed in both natural and engineered settings, e.g. soil liquefaction and flowback of proppants during hydraulic fracturing operations. We study experimentally the destabilization and flow of an unconsolidated granular packing subjected to a point source fluid withdrawal using a model system consisting of a vertical Hele-Shaw cell containing a water-grain mixture. The fluid is withdrawn from the cell at a constant rate, and the emerging flow patterns are imaged in time-lapse mode. Using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), we show that the granular flow gets localized in a narrow channel down the center of the cell, and adopts a Gaussian velocity profile similar to those observed in dry grain flows in silos. We investigate the effects of the experimental parameters (flow rate, grain size, grain shape, fluid viscosity) on the packing destabilization, and identify the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed complex flow behaviour.

  10. Laminar flow of two miscible fluids in a simple network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karst, Casey M.; Storey, Brian D.; Geddes, John B.

    2013-03-01

    When a fluid comprised of multiple phases or constituents flows through a network, nonlinear phenomena such as multiple stable equilibrium states and spontaneous oscillations can occur. Such behavior has been observed or predicted in a number of networks including the flow of blood through the microcirculation, the flow of picoliter droplets through microfluidic devices, the flow of magma through lava tubes, and two-phase flow in refrigeration systems. While the existence of nonlinear phenomena in a network with many inter-connections containing fluids with complex rheology may seem unsurprising, this paper demonstrates that even simple networks containing Newtonian fluids in laminar flow can demonstrate multiple equilibria. The paper describes a theoretical and experimental investigation of the laminar flow of two miscible Newtonian fluids of different density and viscosity through a simple network. The fluids stratify due to gravity and remain as nearly distinct phases with some mixing occurring only by diffusion. This fluid system has the advantage that it is easily controlled and modeled, yet contains the key ingredients for network nonlinearities. Experiments and 3D simulations are first used to explore how phases distribute at a single T-junction. Once the phase separation at a single junction is known, a network model is developed which predicts multiple equilibria in the simplest of networks. The existence of multiple stable equilibria is confirmed experimentally and a criterion for existence is developed. The network results are generic and could be applied to or found in different physical systems.

  11. Performance of Magnetorheological Fluids Flowing Through Metal Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. h.; Fu, Z. m.; Yao, X. y.; Li, F.

    2011-01-01

    If magnetorheological (MR) fluids are stored in porous materials, when excited by the external magnetic field, MR fluid will be drawn out and produce MR effect, which could be used to solve the following problems of the MR damper, such as the seal, volume and the cost of MR fluid damper. In this paper, the effect of structure of metal foams on the performance of MR fluid is investigated; the relationship between the penetrability and the porosity of the metal foams is measured, the change of MR fluid performance flowing though the metal foams is obtained. It shows that, after flowing through metal foams, the change of performance of MR fluid is about 2.5%. Compared to the sponge, the porous metal foams have the obvious advantages in high porosity and rigidity, which provide a convenient and low-cost way to design the MR damper.

  12. Collapsible sheath fluid reservoirs for flow cytometers

    DOEpatents

    Mark, Graham A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a container in the form of a single housing for holding fluid, including a first collapsible reservoir having a first valve. The first reservoir initially contains a volume of fluid. The container also includes a second reservoir, initially empty (or substantially empty), expandable to a second volume. The second reservoir has a second valve. As the volume of said first reservoir decreases, the volume of the second reservoir proportionally increases.

  13. Some connections between fluid mechanics and the solving of industrial and environmental fluid-flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. C. R.

    1981-05-01

    The ways in which advances in fluid mechanics have led to improvements in engineering design are discussed, with attention to the stimulation of fluid mechanics research by industrial and environmental problems. The development of many practical uses of fluid flow without the benefit of scientific study is also emphasized. Among the topics discussed are vortices and coherent structures in turbulent flows, lubrication, jet and multiphase flows, the control and exploitation of waves, the effect of unsteady forces on structures, and dispersion phenomena. Among the practical achievements covered are the use of bluff shields to control separated flow over truck bodies and reduce aerodynamic drag, ink-jet printing, hovercraft stability, fluidized-bed combustion, the fluid/solid instabilities caused by air flow around a computer memory floppy disc, and various wind turbines.

  14. Centrifuge in space fluid flow visualization experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William A.; Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Dunbar, Bonnie J.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype flow visualization system is constructed to examine buoyancy driven flows during centrifugation in space. An axial density gradient is formed by imposing a thermal gradient between the two ends of the test cell. Numerical computations for this geometry showed that the Prandtl number plays a limited part in determining the flow.

  15. Debris-flow deposition: Effects of pore-fluid pressure and friction concentrated at flow margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Iverson, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of pore-fluid pressure and total bed-normal stress at the base of several ???10 m3 experimental debris flows provide new insight into the process of debris-flow deposition. Pore-fluid pressures nearly sufficient to cause liquefaction were developed and maintained during flow mobilization and acceleration, persisted in debris-flow interiors during flow deceleration and deposition, and dissipated significantly only during postdepositional sediment consolidation. In contrast, leading edges of debris flows exhibited little or no positive pore-fluid pressure. Deposition therefore resulted from grain-contact friction and bed friction concentrated at flow margins. This finding contradicts models that invoke widespread decay of excess pore-fluid pressure, uniform viscoplastic yield strength, or pervasive grain-collision stresses to explain debris-flow deposition. Furthermore, the finding demonstrates that deposit thickness cannot be used to infer the strength of flowing debris.

  16. A two-fluid model for avalanche and debris flows.

    PubMed

    Pitman, E Bruce; Le, Long

    2005-07-15

    Geophysical mass flows--debris flows, avalanches, landslides--can contain O(10(6)-10(10)) m(3) or more of material, often a mixture of soil and rocks with a significant quantity of interstitial fluid. These flows can be tens of meters in depth and hundreds of meters in length. The range of scales and the rheology of this mixture presents significant modelling and computational challenges. This paper describes a depth-averaged 'thin layer' model of geophysical mass flows containing a mixture of solid material and fluid. The model is derived from a 'two-phase' or 'two-fluid' system of equations commonly used in engineering research. Phenomenological modelling and depth averaging combine to yield a tractable set of equations, a hyperbolic system that describes the motion of the two constituent phases. If the fluid inertia is small, a reduced model system that is easier to solve may be derived. PMID:16011934

  17. Thermal analysis of turbulent flow of a supercritical fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamane, E.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the large variation of thermodynamics and transport properties near the pseudocritical temperature on the heat transfer coefficient of supercritical fluid in turbulent flow was studied. The formation of the characteristics peak in the heat transfer coefficient vs. bulk temperature curve is described, and the necessity of the fluid element at pseudocritical temperature located in the buffer layer is discussed.

  18. Flow of Magnetohydrodynamic Micropolar Fluid Induced by Radially Stretching Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Nawaz, Muhammad; Hendi, Awatif A.

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the flow of a micropolar fluid between radial stretching sheets. The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) nonlinear problem is treated using the homotopy analysis method (HAM) and the velocity profiles are predicted for the pertinent parameters. The values of skin friction and couple shear stress coefficients are obtained for various values of Reynolds number, Hartman number, and micropolar fluid parameter.

  19. Nanoscale Fluid Flows in the Vicinity of Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    2006-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of dense and rarefied fluids comprising small chain molecules in chemically patterned nanochannels predict a novel switching from Poiseuille to plug flow along the channel. We also demonstrate behavior akin to the lotus effect for a nanodrop on a chemically patterned substrate. Our results show that one can control and exploit the behavior of fluids at the nanoscale using chemical patterning.

  20. Modelling Fault Zone Evolution: Implications for fluid flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, H.; Lunn, R. J.; Shipton, Z. K.

    2009-04-01

    Flow simulation models are of major interest to many industries including hydrocarbon, nuclear waste, sequestering of carbon dioxide and mining. One of the major uncertainties in these models is in predicting the permeability of faults, principally in the detailed structure of the fault zone. Studying the detailed structure of a fault zone is difficult because of the inaccessible nature of sub-surface faults and also because of their highly complex nature; fault zones show a high degree of spatial and temporal heterogeneity i.e. the properties of the fault change as you move along the fault, they also change with time. It is well understood that faults influence fluid flow characteristics. They may act as a conduit or a barrier or even as both by blocking flow across the fault while promoting flow along it. Controls on fault hydraulic properties include cementation, stress field orientation, fault zone components and fault zone geometry. Within brittle rocks, such as granite, fracture networks are limited but provide the dominant pathway for flow within this rock type. Research at the EU's Soultz-sous-Forệt Hot Dry Rock test site [Evans et al., 2005] showed that 95% of flow into the borehole was associated with a single fault zone at 3490m depth, and that 10 open fractures account for the majority of flow within the zone. These data underline the critical role of faults in deep flow systems and the importance of achieving a predictive understanding of fault hydraulic properties. To improve estimates of fault zone permeability, it is important to understand the underlying hydro-mechanical processes of fault zone formation. In this research, we explore the spatial and temporal evolution of fault zones in brittle rock through development and application of a 2D hydro-mechanical finite element model, MOPEDZ. The authors have previously presented numerical simulations of the development of fault linkage structures from two or three pre-existing joints, the results of

  1. Numerical simulation of blood flow and interstitial fluid pressure in solid tumor microcirculation based on tumor-induced angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gaiping; Wu, Jie; Xu, Shixiong; Collins, M. W.; Long, Quan; König, Carola S.; Jiang, Yuping; Wang, Jian; Padhani, A. R.

    2007-10-01

    A coupled intravascular transvascular interstitial fluid flow model is developed to study the distributions of blood flow and interstitial fluid pressure in solid tumor microcirculation based on a tumor-induced microvascular network. This is generated from a 2D nine-point discrete mathematical model of tumor angiogenesis and contains two parent vessels. Blood flow through the microvascular network and interstitial fluid flow in tumor tissues are performed by the extended Poiseuille’s law and Darcy’s law, respectively, transvascular flow is described by Starling’s law; effects of the vascular permeability and the interstitial hydraulic conductivity are also considered. The simulation results predict the heterogeneous blood supply, interstitial hypertension and low convection on the inside of the tumor, which are consistent with physiological observed facts. These results may provide beneficial information for anti-angiogenesis treatment of tumor and further clinical research.

  2. Observation and simulation of heterogeneous 2D water and solute flow processes in ditch beds for subsequent catchment modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dages, Cecile; Samouelian, Anatja; Lanoix, Marthe; Dollinger, Jeanne; Chakkour, Sara; Chovelon, Gabrielle; Trabelsi, Khouloud; Voltz, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Ditches are involved in the transfer of pesticide to surface and groundwaters (e.g. Louchart et al., 2001). Soil horizons underlying ditch beds may present specific soil characteristics compared to neighbouring field soils due to erosion/deposition processes, to the specific biological activities (rooting dynamic and animal habitat) in the ditches (e.g. Vaughan et al., 2008) and to management practices (burning, dredging, mowing,...). Moreover, in contrast to percolation processes in field soils that can be assumed to be mainly 1D vertical, those occurring in the ditch beds are by essence 2D or even 3D. Nevertheless, due to a lake of knowledge, these specific aspects of transfer within ditch beds are generally omitted for hydrological simulation at the catchment scale (Mottes et al., 2014). Accordingly, the aims of this study were i) to characterize subsurface solute transfer through ditch beds and ii) to determine equivalent hydraulic parameters of the ditch beds for use in catchment scale hydrological simulations. A complementary aim was to evaluate the error in predictions performed when percolation in ditches is assumed to be similar to that in the neighbouring field soil. First, bromide transfer experiments were performed on undisturbed soil column (15 cm long with a 15 cm inner-diameter), horizontally and vertically sampled within each soil horizon underlying a ditch bed and within the neighboring field. Columns were sampled at the Roujan catchment (Hérault, France), which belongs to the long term Mediterranean hydrological observatory OMERE (Voltz and Albergel, 2002). Second, for each column, a set of parameters was determined by inverse optimization with mobile-immobile or dual permeability models, with CXTFIT (Toride et al., 1999) or with HYDRUS (Simunek et al., 1998). Third, infiltration and percolation in the ditch was simulated by a 2D flow domain approach considering the 2D variation in hydraulic properties of the cross section of a ditch bed. Last

  3. Digital in-line holography for the extraction of 3D trajectories of small particles in a 2D Benard-von Karman flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Nebya; Allano, Daniel; Godard, Gilles; Malek, Mokrane; Lebrun, Denis; Paranthoën, P.

    2006-09-01

    Digital In-line Holography is widely used to visualize fluid flows seeded with small particles. Such holograms record directly the far-field diffraction patterns of particles on a CCD camera. From the successive reconstruction planes, the three-dimensional location of the particles can be determined. This imaging system doesn't need focusing. The principle is based on the direct analysis of the diffraction patterns by mean of space-frequency operators such as Wavelet Transformation or Fractional Fourier Transformation. This method, already tested in our laboratory, leads to a better resolution than classical holography for the estimation of 3D particle locations (50μm instead of 0.5mm in depth). In the case of moving particles, it is interesting to illuminate the sample volume by several laser pulses. This can be easily realized by controlling the input current of a modulated laser diode. Then, the CCD camera cumulates the sum of in-line particle holograms recorded at different times. By searching for the best focus plane of each particle image, the 3D coordinate of each particle can be extracted at a given time. This technique is applied to determine trajectories of small particles in a well-controlled 2D Benard-von Karman street allowing a Lagrangian approach. Preliminary results are presented.

  4. Fluid pressure and flow as a cause of bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Fahlgren, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Background Unstable implants in bone become surrounded by an osteolytic zone. This is seen around loose screws, for example, but may also contribute to prosthetic loosening. Previous animal studies have shown that such zones can be induced by fluctuations in fluid pressure or flow, caused by implant instability. Method To understand the roles of pressure and flow, we describe the 3-dimensional distribution of osteolytic lesions in response to fluid pressure and flow in a previously reported rat model of aseptic loosening. 50 rats had a piston inserted in the proximal tibia, designed to produce 20 local spikes in fluid pressure of a clinically relevant magnitude (700 mmHg) twice a day. The spikes lasted for about 0.3 seconds. After 2 weeks, the pressure was measured in vivo, and the osteolytic lesions induced were studied using micro-CT scans. Results Most bone resorption occurred at pre-existing cavities within the bone in the periphery around the pressurized region, and not under the piston. This region is likely to have a higher fluid flow and less pressure than the area just beneath the piston. The velocity of fluid flow was estimated to be very high (roughly 20 mm/s). Interpretation The localization of the resorptive lesions suggests that high-velocity fluid flow is important for bone resorption induced by instability. PMID:20718695

  5. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governing equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.

  6. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governingmore » equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.« less

  7. Numerical investigation of three-dimensional transonic flows of Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinnella, Paola; Corre, Christophe

    2006-11-01

    Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson (BZT) fluids are fluids of the retrograde type (i.e. that superheat when expanded), which exhibit a region of negative values of the Fundamental Derivative of Gasdynamics γ. As a consequence, they display, in the transonic and supersonic regime, nonclassical gasdynamic behaviours, such as rarefaction shock waves and mixed shock/fan waves. The peculiar properties of BZT fluids have received increased interest in recent years because of the possibility of enhancing turbine efficiency in Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs). The present research provides for the first time a detailed investigation of transonic BZT flows past a 3D configuration, representative of an isolated turbine blade with infinite tip leakage, namely, the ONERA M-6 wing. Since BZT phenomena mainly affect the inviscid flow behavior, the analysis is restricted to the Euler equations, completed by the realistic Martin-Hou equation of state. The governing equations are solved numerically using a structured flow-solver based on a third-order accurate centred scheme. The results are validated through systematic comparisons with an unstructured multidimensional upwind solver. An investigation of the flow patterns for several choices of the upstream thermodynamic conditions is provided, showing the complexity of the 3D aerodynamics of BZT fluids, and confirming the advantages in terms of improved aerodynamic performance already demonstrated for 2D configurations.

  8. Maxwell, electromagnetism, and fluid flow in resistive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    Common wisdom has it that Darcy [1856] founded the modern field of fluid flow through porous media with his celebrated 1856 experiment on the steady flow of water through a sand column. For considerable time, Darcy's empirical observation, in conjunction with Fourier's [1807] heat equation, was used to analyze fluid flow in porous media simply by mathematical analogy. Hubbert [1940] is credited with placing Darcy's work on sound hydrodynamic foundations. Among other things, he defined an energy potential, interpreted permeability in the context of balancing impelling and resistive forces, and derived an expression for the refraction of flow lines. In 1856, James Clerk Maxwell constructed a theory for the flow of an incompressible fluid in a resistive medium as a metaphor for comprehending the emerging field of electromagnetism [Maxwell, 1890].

  9. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  10. Numerical model of water flow and solute accumulation in vertisols using HYDRUS 2D/3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Tomáš; Dahan, Ofer; Turkeltub, Tuvia

    2015-04-01

    Keywords: dessication-crack-induced-salinization, preferential flow, conceptual model, numerical model, vadose zone, vertisols, soil water retention function, HYDRUS 2D/3D Vertisols cover a hydrologically very significant area of semi-arid regions often through which water infiltrates to groundwater aquifers. Understanding of water flow and solute accumulation is thus very relevant to agricultural activity and water resources management. Previous works suggest a conceptual model of dessication-crack-induced-salinization where salinization of sediment in the deep section of the vadose zone (up to 4 m) is induced by subsurface evaporation due to convective air flow in the dessication cracks. It suggests that the salinization is induced by the hydraulic gradient between the dry sediment in the vicinity of cracks (low potential) and the relatively wet sediment further from the main cracks (high potential). This paper presents a modified previously suggested conceptual model and a numerical model. The model uses a simple uniform flow approach but unconventionally prescribes the boundary conditions and the hydraulic parameters of soil. The numerical model is bound to one location close to a dairy farm waste lagoon, but the application of the suggested conceptual model could be possibly extended to all semi-arid regions with vertisols. Simulations were conducted using several modeling approaches with an ultimate goal of fitting the simulation results to the controlling variables measured in the field: temporal variation in water content across thick layer of unsaturated clay sediment (>10 m), sediment salinity and salinity the water draining down the vadose zone to the water table. The development of the model was engineered in several steps; all computed as forward solutions by try-and-error approach. The model suggests very deep instant infiltration of fresh water up to 12 m, which is also supported by the field data. The paper suggests prescribing a special atmospheric

  11. Rising of a single Taylor drop in a stagnant liquid—2D laminar flow and axisymmetry limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Direito, F. J. N.; Campos, J. B. L. M.; Miranda, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    A numerical (computational fluid dynamics (CFD)) study concerning the rise of individual liquid Taylor drops through vertical columns of stagnant heavier liquids is presented in this paper. CFD simulations were performed in Ansys Fluent, using its implementation of volume of fluid method, assuming the flow to be axisymmetric and laminar. Different physical conditions were tested, corresponding to different combinations of relevant dimensionless parameters and the numerical method was validated through experimental data available in the literature. The viscosity ratio between the lighter and the heavier liquid was within the range 0.01-40 and Eötvös number was between 8 and 30. Morton number was within the interval of 2.32 × 10-6-100. Froude number results were compared to data from a literature correlation. The accordance is acceptable for the ranges studied. Velocity profiles in significant regions are reported (drop nose, drop bottom and continuous phase liquid film). The influence of changing one dimensionless parameter alone was assessed. For small and large viscosity ratios, axisymmetric behavior is not a valid assumption.

  12. Bone tissue engineering: the role of interstitial fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsley, M. V.; Frangos, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established that vascularization is required for effective bone healing. This implies that blood flow and interstitial fluid (ISF) flow are required for healing and maintenance of bone. The fact that changes in bone blood flow and ISF flow are associated with changes in bone remodeling and formation support this theory. ISF flow in bone results from transcortical pressure gradients produced by vascular and hydrostatic pressure, and mechanical loading. Conditions observed to alter flow rates include increases in venous pressure in hypertension, fluid shifts occurring in bedrest and microgravity, increases in vascularization during the injury-healing response, and mechanical compression and bending of bone during exercise. These conditions also induce changes in bone remodeling. Previously, we hypothesized that interstitial fluid flow in bone, and in particular fluid shear stress, serves to mediate signal transduction in mechanical loading- and injury-induced remodeling. In addition, we proposed that a lack or decrease of ISF flow results in the bone loss observed in disuse and microgravity. The purpose of this article is to review ISF flow in bone and its role in osteogenesis.

  13. Capacitance probe for fluid flow and volume measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids are disclosed, including the use of a capacitive probe for measuring the flow volume of a material within a flow stream. The capacitance probe has at least two elongate electrodes and, in a specific embodiment of the invention, has three parallel elongate electrodes with the center electrode being an extension of the center conductor of a co-axial cable. A conductance probe is also provided to provide more accurate flow volume data in response to conductivity of the material within the flow stream. A preferred embodiment of the present invention provides for a gas flow stream through a microgravity environment that allows for monitoring a flow volume of a fluid sample, such as a urine sample, that is entrained within the gas flow stream.

  14. Capacitance Probe for Fluid Flow and Volume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids are disclosed, including the use of a capacitive probe for measuring the flow volume of a material within a flow stream. The capacitance probe has at least two elongate electrodes and, in a specific embodiment of the invention, has three parallel elongate electrodes with the center electrode being an extension of the center conductor of a co-axial cable. A conductance probe is also provided to provide more accurate flow volume data in response to conductivity of the material within the flow stream. A preferred embodiment of the present invention provides for a gas flow stream through a micro-gravity environment that allows for monitoring a flow volume of a fluid sample, such as a urine sample, that is entrained within the gas flow stream.

  15. Axisymmetric flows from fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bo; Zheng, Zhong; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-02-01

    We study the axisymmetric flows generated from fluid injection into a horizontal confined porous medium that is originally saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. Neglecting the effects of surface tension and fluid mixing, we use the lubrication approximation to obtain a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation that describes the time evolution of the sharp fluid-fluid interface. The flow behaviors are controlled by two dimensionless groups: M, the viscosity ratio of displaced fluid relative to injected fluid, and Γ, which measures the relative importance of buoyancy and fluid injection. For this axisymmetric geometry, the similarity solution involving R2/T (where R is the dimensionless radial coordinate and T is the dimensionless time) is an exact solution to the nonlinear governing equation for all times. Four analytical expressions are identified as asymptotic approximations (two of which are new solutions): (i) injection-driven flow with the injected fluid being more viscous than the displaced fluid (Γ ≪ 1 and M < 1) where we identify a self-similar solution that indicates a parabolic interface shape; (ii) injection-driven flow with injected and displaced fluids of equal viscosity (Γ ≪ 1 and M = 1), where we find a self-similar solution that predicts a distinct parabolic interface shape; (iii) injection-driven flow with a less viscous injected fluid (Γ ≪ 1 and M > 1) for which there is a rarefaction wave solution, assuming that the Saffman-Taylor instability does not occur at the reservoir scale; and (iv) buoyancy-driven flow (Γ ≫ 1) for which there is a well-known self-similar solution corresponding to gravity currents in an unconfined porous medium [S. Lyle et al. "Axisymmetric gravity currents in a porous medium," J. Fluid Mech. 543, 293-302 (2005)]. The various axisymmetric flows are summarized in a Γ-M regime diagram with five distinct dynamic behaviors including the four asymptotic regimes and an intermediate regime

  16. Numerical study of subcritical flow with fluid injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, R.

    1990-01-01

    It is suggested that the study of synthetic flows, where controlled experiments can be performed, is useful in understanding turbulent flow structures. The early states of formation of hairpin structures in shear flows and the subsequent evolution of these structures is studied in shear flows and the subsequent evolution of these structures is studied through numerical simulations, by developing full-time dependent three-dimensional flow solution of an initially laminar (subcritical) flow in which injection of fluid through a narrow streamwise slot from the bottom wall of a plate is carried out. Details of the numerical approach and significance of the present findings are reported in this work.

  17. Surface tension driven flow in glass melts and model fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneil, T. J.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Surface tension driven flow has been investigated analytically and experimentally using an apparatus where a free column of molten glass or model fluids was supported at its top and bottom faces by solid surfaces. The glass used in the experiments was sodium diborate, and the model fluids were silicone oils. In both the model fluid and glass melt experiments, conclusive evidence was obtained to prove that the observed flow was driven primarily by surface tension forces. The experimental observations are in qualitative agreement with predictions from the theoretical model.

  18. Pulmonary fluid flow challenges for experimental and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Levy, Rachel; Hill, David B; Forest, M Gregory; Grotberg, James B

    2014-12-01

    Modeling the flow of fluid in the lungs, even under baseline healthy conditions, presents many challenges. The complex rheology of the fluids, interaction between fluids and structures, and complicated multi-scale geometry all add to the complexity of the problem. We provide a brief overview of approaches used to model three aspects of pulmonary fluid and flow: the surfactant layer in the deep branches of the lung, the mucus layer in the upper airway branches, and closure/reopening of the airway. We discuss models of each aspect, the potential to capture biological and therapeutic information, and open questions worthy of further investigation. We hope to promote multi-disciplinary collaboration by providing insights into mathematical descriptions of fluid-mechanics in the lung and the kinds of predictions these models can make. PMID:25096289

  19. Pulmonary Fluid Flow Challenges for Experimental and Mathematical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Rachel; Hill, David B.; Forest, M. Gregory; Grotberg, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling the flow of fluid in the lungs, even under baseline healthy conditions, presents many challenges. The complex rheology of the fluids, interaction between fluids and structures, and complicated multi-scale geometry all add to the complexity of the problem. We provide a brief overview of approaches used to model three aspects of pulmonary fluid and flow: the surfactant layer in the deep branches of the lung, the mucus layer in the upper airway branches, and closure/reopening of the airway. We discuss models of each aspect, the potential to capture biological and therapeutic information, and open questions worthy of further investigation. We hope to promote multi-disciplinary collaboration by providing insights into mathematical descriptions of fluid-mechanics in the lung and the kinds of predictions these models can make. PMID:25096289

  20. System and method measuring fluid flow in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.; Kidd, T.G.

    1999-05-18

    A system is described for measuring fluid mass flow in a conduit in which there exists a pressure differential in the fluid between at least two spaced-apart locations in the conduit. The system includes a first pressure transducer disposed in the side of the conduit at a first location for measuring pressure of fluid at that location, a second or more pressure transducers disposed in the side of the conduit at a second location, for making multiple measurements of pressure of fluid in the conduit at that location, and a computer for computing the average pressure of the multiple measurements at the second location and for computing flow rate of fluid in the conduit from the pressure measurement by the first pressure transducer and from the average pressure calculation of the multiple measurements. 3 figs.

  1. System and method measuring fluid flow in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos German; Kidd, Terrel G.

    1999-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid mass flow in a conduit in which there exists a pressure differential in the fluid between at least two spaced-apart locations in the conduit. The system includes a first pressure transducer disposed in the side of the conduit at a first location for measuring pressure of fluid at that location, a second or more pressure transducers disposed in the side of the conduit at a second location, for making multiple measurements of pressure of fluid in the conduit at that location, and a computer for computing the average pressure of the multiple measurements at the second location and for computing flow rate of fluid in the conduit from the pressure measurement by the first pressure transducer and from the average pressure calculation of the multiple measurements.

  2. Transonic Flows of Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Mark; Andreyev, Aleksandr

    2013-11-01

    We examine steady transonic flows of Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson (BZT) fluids over thin turbine blades or airfoils. BZT fluids are ordinary fluids having a region of negative fundamental derivative over a finite range of pressures and temperatures in the single phase regime. We present the transonic small disturbance equation, shock jump conditions, and shock existence conditions capable of capturing the qualitative behavior of BZT fluids. The flux function is seen to be quartic in the pressure or density perturbation rather than the quadratic (convex) flux function of the perfect gas theory. We show how this nonconvex flux function can be used to predict and explain the complex flows possible. Numerical solutions using a successive line relaxation (SLR) scheme are presented. New results of interest include shock-splitting, collisions between expansion and compression shocks, two compressive bow shocks in supersonic flows, and the observation of as many as three normal stern shocks following an oblique trailing edge shock.

  3. An Iterative CT Reconstruction Algorithm for Fast Fluid Flow Imaging.

    PubMed

    Van Eyndhoven, Geert; Batenburg, K Joost; Kazantsev, Daniil; Van Nieuwenhove, Vincent; Lee, Peter D; Dobson, Katherine J; Sijbers, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The study of fluid flow through solid matter by computed tomography (CT) imaging has many applications, ranging from petroleum and aquifer engineering to biomedical, manufacturing, and environmental research. To avoid motion artifacts, current experiments are often limited to slow fluid flow dynamics. This severely limits the applicability of the technique. In this paper, a new iterative CT reconstruction algorithm for improved a temporal/spatial resolution in the imaging of fluid flow through solid matter is introduced. The proposed algorithm exploits prior knowledge in two ways. First, the time-varying object is assumed to consist of stationary (the solid matter) and dynamic regions (the fluid flow). Second, the attenuation curve of a particular voxel in the dynamic region is modeled by a piecewise constant function over time, which is in accordance with the actual advancing fluid/air boundary. Quantitative and qualitative results on different simulation experiments and a real neutron tomography data set show that, in comparison with the state-of-the-art algorithms, the proposed algorithm allows reconstruction from substantially fewer projections per rotation without image quality loss. Therefore, the temporal resolution can be substantially increased, and thus fluid flow experiments with faster dynamics can be performed. PMID:26259219

  4. Numerical modeling of fluid flow with rafts: An application to lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsepelev, Igor; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Although volcanic lava flows do not significantly affect the life of people, its hazard is not negligible as hot lava kills vegetation, destroys infrastructure, and may trigger a flood due to melting of snow/ice. The lava flow hazard can be reduced if the flow patterns are known, and the complexity of the flow with debris is analyzed to assist in disaster risk mitigation. In this paper we develop three-dimensional numerical models of a gravitational flow of multi-phase fluid with rafts (mimicking rigid lava-crust fragments) on a horizontal and topographic surfaces to explore the dynamics and the interaction of lava flows. We have obtained various flow patterns and spatial distribution of rafts depending on conditions at the surface of fluid spreading, obstacles on the way of a fluid flow, raft landing scenarios, and the size of rafts. Furthermore, we analyze two numerical models related to specific lava flows: (i) a model of fluid flow with rafts inside an inclined channel, and (ii) a model of fluid flow from a single vent on an artificial topography, when the fluid density, its viscosity, and the effusion rate vary with time. Although the studied models do not account for lava solidification, crust formation, and its rupture, the results of the modeling may be used for understanding of flows with breccias before a significant lava cooling.

  5. Experimental study of quasi-2D dipolar vortex streets generated by a moving momentum source in a stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; You, Y.; Noblesse, F.

    2016-07-01

    Experiments are conducted in a linear stratified fluid with a momentum source modeled via a nozzle jet moving horizontally. The generation mechanism of the quasi-two-dimensional dipolar vortex streets is investigated and their evolution characteristics are analyzed. Observation shows that the formation of a dipolar vortex street requires a nonzero motion of the nozzle in addition to conditions of the Reynolds and Froude number (Re, Fr). The (Re, Fr) condition that the dipolar vortex streets can be generated is determined via experimental measurements. The explanation for the absence of such a vortex street can be the low energy of the jet and the strong body-effect disturbance of the solid nozzle. The dependence of the vortex street dimensionless formation time τ and the Strouhal number St on the Froude number Fr or the Reynolds number Re is analyzed. This analysis shows that τ and St appear to be independent of Re and approximately have power-law relations with Fr via data fitting. The exponents of Fr in the two power-law functions are -0.27 for τ and -0.21 for St, while the constant coefficients are 65 and 0.21.

  6. System proportions fluid-flow in response to demand signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Control system provides proportioned fluid flow rates in response to demand signals. It compares a digital signal, representing a flow demand, with a reference signal to yield a control voltage to one or more solenoid valves connected to orifices of a predetermined size.

  7. Hydromechanical Modeling of Fluid Flow in the Lower Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, J.

    2011-12-01

    The lower crust lies within an ambiguous rheological regime between the brittle upper crust and ductile sub-lithospheric mantle. This ambiguity has allowed two schools of thought to develop concerning the nature of fluid flow in the lower crust. The classical school holds that lower crustal rocks are inviscid and that any fluid generated by metamorphic devolatilization is squeezed out of rocks as rapidly as it is produced. According to this school, permeability is a dynamic property and fluid flow is upward. In contrast, the modern school uses concepts from upper crustal hydrology that presume implicitly, if not explicitly, that rocks are rigid or, at most, brittle. For the modern school, the details of crustal permeability determine fluid flow and as these details are poorly known almost anything is possible. Reality, to the extent that it is reflected by inference from field studies, offers some support to both schools. In particular, evidence of significant lateral and channelized fluid flow are consistent with flow in rigid media, while evidence for short (104 - 105 y) grain-scale fluid-rock interaction during much longer metamorphic events, suggests that reaction-generated grain-scale permeability is sealed rapidly by compaction; a phenomenon that is also essential to prevent extensive retrograde metamorphism. These observations provide a compelling argument for recognizing in conceptual models of lower crustal fluid flow that rocks are neither inviscid nor rigid, but compact by viscous mechanisms on a finite time-scale. This presentation will review the principle consequences of, and obstacles to, incorporating compaction in such models. The role of viscous compaction in the lower crust is extraordinarily uncertain, but ignoring this uncertainty in models of lower crustal fluid flow does not make the models any more certain. Models inevitably invoke an initial steady state hydraulic regime. This initial steady state is critical to model outcomes because it

  8. Fluid migration in the subduction zone: a coupled fluid flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongliang; Huismans, Ritske; Rondenay, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zone are the main entry point of water into earth's mantle and play an important role in the global water cycle. The progressive release of water by metamorphic dehydration induce important physical-chemical process in the subduction zone, such as hydrous melting, hydration and weakening of the mantle wedge, creation of pore fluid pressures that may weaken the subduction interface and induce earthquakes. Most previous studies on the role of fluids in subduction zones assume vertical migration or migration according to the dynamic pressure in the solid matrix without considering the pore fluid pressure effect on the deformation of the solid matrix. Here we investigate this interaction by explicitly modeling two-phase coupled poro-plastic flow during subduction. In this approach, the fluid migrates by compaction and decompaction of the solid matrix and affects the subduction dynamics through pore fluid pressure dependent frictional-plastic yield. Our preliminary results indicate that: 1) the rate of fluid migration depends strongly on the permeability and the bulk viscosity of the solid matrix, 2) fluid transfer occurs preferentially along the slab and then propagates into the mantle wedge by viscous compaction driven fluid flow, 3) fluid transport from the surface to depth is a prerequisite for producing high fluid pore pressures and associated hydration induced weakening of the subduction zone interface.

  9. A preliminary study to Assess Model Uncertainties in Fluid Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Oliver Delchini; Jean C. Ragusa

    2009-09-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the impact of various flow models for a simplified primary coolant loop of a light water nuclear reactor. The various fluid flow models are based on the Euler equations with an additional friction term, gravity term, momentum source, and energy source. The geometric model is purposefully chosen simple and consists of a one-dimensional (1D) loop system in order to focus the study on the validity of various fluid flow approximations. The 1D loop system is represented by a rectangle; the fluid is heated up along one of the vertical legs and cooled down along the opposite leg. A pressurizer and a pump are included in the horizontal legs. The amount of energy transferred and removed from the system is equal in absolute value along the two vertical legs. The various fluid flow approximations are compressible vs. incompressible, and complete momentum equation vs. Darcy’s approximation. The ultimate goal is to compute the fluid flow models’ uncertainties and, if possible, to generate validity ranges for these models when applied to reactor analysis. We also limit this study to single phase flows with low-Mach numbers. As a result, sound waves carry a very small amount of energy in this particular case. A standard finite volume method is used for the spatial discretization of the system.

  10. Flow over a membrane-covered, fluid-filled cavity

    PubMed Central

    Mongeau, Luc; Frankel, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    The flow-induced response of a membrane covering a fluid-filled cavity located in a section of a rigid-walled channel was explored using finite element analysis. The membrane was initially aligned with the channel wall and separated the channel fluid from the cavity fluid. As fluid flowed over the membrane-covered cavity, a streamwise-dependent transmural pressure gradient caused membrane deformation. This model has application to synthetic models of the vocal fold cover layer used in voice production research. In this paper, the model is introduced and responses of the channel flow, the membrane, and the cavity flow are summarized for a range of flow and membrane parameters. It is shown that for high values of cavity fluid viscosity, the intracavity pressure and the beam deflection both reached steady values. For combinations of low cavity viscosity and sufficiently large upstream pressures, large-amplitude membrane vibrations resulted. Asymmetric conditions were introduced by creating cavities on opposing sides of the channel and assigning different stiffness values to the two membranes. The asymmetry resulted in reduction in or cessation of vibration amplitude, depending on the degree of asymmetry, and in significant skewing of the downstream flow field. PMID:24723738

  11. Flow over a membrane-covered, fluid-filled cavity.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Scott L; Mongeau, Luc; Frankel, Steven H

    2007-01-01

    The flow-induced response of a membrane covering a fluid-filled cavity located in a section of a rigid-walled channel was explored using finite element analysis. The membrane was initially aligned with the channel wall and separated the channel fluid from the cavity fluid. As fluid flowed over the membrane-covered cavity, a streamwise-dependent transmural pressure gradient caused membrane deformation. This model has application to synthetic models of the vocal fold cover layer used in voice production research. In this paper, the model is introduced and responses of the channel flow, the membrane, and the cavity flow are summarized for a range of flow and membrane parameters. It is shown that for high values of cavity fluid viscosity, the intracavity pressure and the beam deflection both reached steady values. For combinations of low cavity viscosity and sufficiently large upstream pressures, large-amplitude membrane vibrations resulted. Asymmetric conditions were introduced by creating cavities on opposing sides of the channel and assigning different stiffness values to the two membranes. The asymmetry resulted in reduction in or cessation of vibration amplitude, depending on the degree of asymmetry, and in significant skewing of the downstream flow field. PMID:24723738

  12. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  13. Advances in modelling of biomimetic fluid flow at different scales

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The biomimetic flow at different scales has been discussed at length. The need of looking into the biological surfaces and morphologies and both geometrical and physical similarities to imitate the technological products and processes has been emphasized. The complex fluid flow and heat transfer problems, the fluid-interface and the physics involved at multiscale and macro-, meso-, micro- and nano-scales have been discussed. The flow and heat transfer simulation is done by various CFD solvers including Navier-Stokes and energy equations, lattice Boltzmann method and molecular dynamics method. Combined continuum-molecular dynamics method is also reviewed. PMID:21711847

  14. Fluid Flow Technology that Measures Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    From 1994 to 1996, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a Center Director's Discretionary Fund research effort to apply artificial intelligence technologies to the health management of plant equipment and space propulsion systems. Through this effort, NASA established a business relationship with Quality Monitoring and Control (QMC), of Kingwood, Texas, to provide hardware modeling and artificial intelligence tools. Very detailed and accurate Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) analysis and algorithms were jointly created, which identified several missing, critical instrumentation needs for adequately evaluating the engine health status. One of the missing instruments was a liquid oxygen (LOX) flow measurement. This instrument was missing since the original SSME included a LOX turbine flow meter that failed during a ground test, resulting in considerable damage for NASA. New balanced flow meter technology addresses this need with robust, safe, and accurate flow metering hardware.

  15. Modelling fluid flow in a reciprocating compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuhovcak, Jan; Hejčík, Jiří; Jícha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on the valves characteristics, which affects the flow through the suction and discharge line. Understanding the phenomenon inside the compressor is necessary step in development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide capabilities to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor, however they are too complicated in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several parameters describing compressor could be therefore examined without the CFD analysis, such is valve characteristic, flow through the cycle and heat transfer. The aim of this paper is to show a numerical tool for reciprocating compressor based on the energy balance through the cycle, which provides valve characteristics, flow through the cycle and heat losses from the cylinder. Spring-damping-mass model was used for the valve description. Boundary conditions were extracted from the performance test of 4-cylinder semihermetic compressor and numerical tool validation was performed with indicated p-V diagram comparison.

  16. A 2-D spectral-element method for computing spherical-earth seismograms-II. Waves in solid-fluid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; Fournier, Alexandre; Dahlen, F. A.

    2008-09-01

    We portray a dedicated spectral-element method to solve the elastodynamic wave equation upon spherically symmetric earth models at the expense of a 2-D domain. Using this method, 3-D wavefields of arbitrary resolution may be computed to obtain Fréchet sensitivity kernels, especially for diffracted arrivals. The meshing process is presented for varying frequencies in terms of its efficiency as measured by the total number of elements, their spacing variations and stability criteria. We assess the mesh quantitatively by defining these numerical parameters in a general non-dimensionalized form such that comparisons to other grid-based methods are straightforward. Efficient-mesh generation for the PREM example and a minimum-messaging domain decomposition and parallelization strategy lay foundations for waveforms up to frequencies of 1 Hz on moderate PC clusters. The discretization of fluid, solid and respective boundary regions is similar to previous spectral-element implementations, save for a fluid potential formulation that incorporates the density, thereby yielding identical boundary terms on fluid and solid sides. We compare the second-order Newmark time extrapolation scheme with a newly implemented fourth-order symplectic scheme and argue in favour of the latter in cases of propagation over many wavelengths due to drastic accuracy improvements. Various validation examples such as full moment-tensor seismograms, wavefield snapshots, and energy conservation illustrate the favourable behaviour and potential of the method.

  17. Direct numerical simulation of solidification microstructures affected by fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Juric, D.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of fluid flow on the solidification morphology of pure materials and solute microsegregation patterns of binary alloys are studied using a computational methodology based on a front tracking/finite difference method. A general single field formulation is presented for the full coupling of phase change, fluid flow, heat and solute transport. This formulation accounts for interfacial rejection/absorption of latent heat and solute, interfacial anisotropies, discontinuities in material properties between the liquid and solid phases, shrinkage/expansion upon solidification and motion and deformation of the solid. Numerical results are presented for the two dimensional dendritic solidification of pure succinonitrile and the solidification of globulitic grains of a plutonium-gallium alloy. For both problems, comparisons are made between solidification without fluid flow and solidification within a shear flow.

  18. A Causal, Covariant Theory of Dissipative Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scofield, Dillon; Huq, Pablo

    2015-04-01

    The use of newtonian viscous dissipation theory in covariant fluid flow theories is known to lead to predictions that are inconsistent with the second law of thermodynamics and to predictions that are acausal. For instance, these problems effectively limit the covariant form of the Navier-Stokes theory (NST) to time-independent flow regimes. Thus the NST, the work horse of fluid dynamical theory, is limited in its ability to model time-dependent turbulent, stellar or thermonuclear flows. We show how such problems are avoided by a new geometrodynamical theory of fluids. This theory is based on a recent result of geometrodynamics showing current conservation implies gauge field creation, called the vortex field lemma and classification of flows by their Pfaff dimension. Experimental confirmation of the theory is reviewed.

  19. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  20. Dynamical systems characterization of inertial effects of fluid flow in a curved artery model under pulsatile flow forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggiero, Michael; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine inertial effects in a 180-degree model of curved arteries under pulsatile inflow conditions. Two-component, two-dimensional particle image velocimetery (2C-2D PIV) data were acquired upstream of and at several cross-sectional locations in the curved artery model. A blood-analog fluid comprised of 71% saturated sodium iodide solution, 28% glycerol and 1% distilled water (by volume) was subjected to multi-harmonic pulsatile inflow functions. First, signal time-lag was quantified by cross-correlating the input (voltage-time) supplied to a programmable pump and the output PIV (flow rate-time) measurements. The experiment was then treated as a linear, time-invariant system, and frequency response was estimated for phase shifts across a certain spectrum. Input-output signal dissimilarities were attributable to intrinsic inertial effects of flow. By coupling pressure-time and upstream flow rate-time measurements, the experiment was modeled using system identification methods. Results elucidate the role of inertial effects in fluid flow velocity measurements and the effect of these delays on secondary flow structure detection in a curved artery model. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  1. Nanoscale Pore Imaging and Pore Scale Fluid Flow Modeling in Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, Liviu; Silin, Dmitriy

    2004-08-19

    For many rocks of high economic interest such as chalk, diatomite, tight gas sands or coal, nanometer scale resolution is needed to resolve the 3D-pore structure, which controls the flow and trapping of fluids in the rocks. Such resolutions cannot be achieved with existing tomographic technologies. A new 3D imaging method, based on serial sectioning and using the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technology has been developed. FIB allows for the milling of layers as thin as 10 nanometers by using accelerated Ga+ ions to sputter atoms from the sample surface. After each milling step, as a new surface is exposed, a 2D image of this surface is generated. Next, the 2D images are stacked to reconstruct the 3D pore or grain structure. Resolutions as high as 10 nm are achievable using such a technique. A new robust method of pore-scale fluid flow modeling has been developed and applied to sandstone and chalk samples. The method uses direct morphological analysis of the pore space to characterize the petrophysical properties of diverse formations. Not only petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressures) can be computed but also flow processes, such as those encountered in various IOR approaches, can be simulated. Petrophysical properties computed with the new method using the new FIB data will be presented. Present study is a part of the development of an Electronic Core Laboratory at LBNL/UCB.

  2. The fluid mechanics of continuous flow electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saville, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective is to establish theoretically and confirm experimentally the ultimate capabilities of continuous flow electrophoresis chambers operating in an environment essentially free of particle sedimentation and buoyancy. The efforts are devoted to: (1) studying the effects of particle concentration on sample conductivity and dielectric constant. The dielectric constant and conductivity were identified as playing crucial roles in the behavior of the sample and on the resolving power and throughput of continuous flow devices; and (2) improving the extant mathematical models to predict flow fields and particle trajectories in continuous flow electrophoresis. A dielectric spectrometer was designed and built to measure the complex dielectric constant of a colloidal dispersion as a function of frequency between 500 Hz and 200 kHz. The real part of the signal can be related to the sample's conductivity and the imaginary part to its dielectric constant. Measurements of the dielectric constants of several different dispersions disclosed that the dielectric constants of dilute systems of the sort encountered in particle electrophoresis are much larger than would be expected based on the extant theory. Experiments were carried out to show that, in many cases, this behavior is due to the presence of a filamentary structure of small hairs on the particle surface. A technique for producing electrokinetically ideal synthetic latex particles by heat treating was developed. Given the ubiquitous nature of hairy surfaces with both cells and synthetic particles, it was deemed necessary to develop a theory to explain their behavior. A theory for electrophoretic mobility of hairy particles was developed. Finally, the extant computer programs for predicting the structure of electro-osmotically driven flows were extended to encompass flow channels with variable wall mobilities.

  3. Active Learning in Fluid Mechanics: Youtube Tube Flow and Puzzling Fluids Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrenya, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Active-learning exercises appropriate for a course in undergraduate fluid mechanics are presented. The first exercise involves an experiment in gravity-driven tube flow, with small groups of students partaking in a contest to predict the experimental flow rates using the mechanical energy balance. The second exercise takes the form of an…

  4. The origin of massive hydrothermal alterations: what drives fluid flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul D.; Martín-Martín, Juan-Diego; Corbella, Mercè; Stafford, Sherry L.; Griera, Albert; Teixell, Antonio; Salas, Ramón; Travé, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermal alterations form when fluids warmer than the host rocks flow through them dissolving and precipitating minerals. These fluids typically flow upwards from deeper geologic units using faults as major conduits. In some cases, hydrothermal alterations affect large (km-scale) rock volumes. One example of such process is the massive high-temperature dolostones that crop out at the Benicàssim outcrop analogue (Maestrat Basin, E Spain). In this area, seismic-scale fault-controlled stratabound dolostone bodies extend over several kilometres away from large-scale faults, replacing Lower Cretaceous limestones. The fluid responsible for such alteration is a seawater-derived brine that interacted with underlying Permian-Triassic and Paleozoic basement rocks. The estimated volume of fluid required to produce the Benicàssim dolomitization is huge, with fluid-rock ratios in the order of several tens to a few hundreds, depending on composition and reaction temperature (Gomez-Rivas et al., 2014). An open key question is what brought this warm fluid (80 - 150 ºC) upwards to a depth of less than 1 km, where the dolomitization reaction took place. The driving forces should have been able not only to provide sufficient fluid volumes at shallow depths but also to heat up the whole host rock, including the non-replaced limestones. There are two hyphoteses for driving a warm fluid upwards in the Maestrat Basin: (a) rapid release through faults of overpressured solutions in recurrent pulses and (b) thermal convection. We present a series of heat and fluid flow numerical simulations to constrain the dolomitization conditions under these two end-member cases. The results indicate that in a pulsating model the fluid must flow upwards at velocities higher than cm/s to keep their elevated temperature. Otherwise they cool down quickly, and the host rocks cannot be heated. Such velocities can be reached if the fluid flow velocity equals that of fracture propagation, as in mobile

  5. Particle Deposition in a Two-Fluid Flow Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Yit Fatt; Goharzadeh, Afshin; Vargas, Francisco M.; John Chai, Chee Kiong

    2014-11-01

    The formation of particle deposit on surfaces occurs in many applications. For example, in the oil and gas industry, deposition of wax, hydrates and asphaltene reduces flows and clogs pipelines eventually if left untreated. Removal of the deposits is costly as it disrupts production. To further complicate the problem, the main flow carrying the depositing particles is often of a multi-phase nature. Successful mitigation effort requires good understanding and eventual prediction of the deposition process interacting within a multiphase flow environment. This work presents a model for prediction of particle deposition in a two-fluid flow environment. Modeling of the process is challenging as there are two unknown evolving interfaces, i.e. the fluid-fluid interface and the depositing front. Both interfaces are captured via the level-set method. The deposition at the depositing front is modeled as a first order reaction. The two immiscible fluids are modeled using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Solution of the equations is implemented using a finite volume method. The model is then verified against known solutions. Preliminary results on deposition process in a two-fluid flow environment are presented. ADNOC R&D Oil-Sub Committee.

  6. Fluid dynamics following flow shut-off in bottle filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thete, Sumeet; Appathurai, Santosh; Gao, Haijing; Basaran, Osman

    2012-11-01

    Bottle filling is ubiquitous in industry. Examples include filling of bottles with shampoos and cleaners, engine oil and pharmaceuticals. In these examples, fluid flows out of a nozzle to fill bottles in an assembly line. Once the required volume of fluid has flowed out of the nozzle, the flow is shut off. However, an evolving fluid thread or string may remain suspended from the nozzle following flow shut-off and persist. This stringing phenomenon can be detrimental to a bottle filling operation because it can adversely affect line speed and filling accuracy by causing uncertainty in fill volume, product loss and undesirable marring of the bottles' exterior surfaces. The dynamics of stringing are studied numerically primarily by using the 1D, slender-jet approximation of the flow equations. A novel feature entails development and use of a new boundary condition downstream of the nozzle exit to expedite the computations. While the emphasis is on stringing of Newtonian fluids and use of 1D approximations, results will also be presented for situations where (a) the fluids are non-Newtonian and (b) the full set of equations are solved without invoking the 1D approximation. Phase diagrams will be presented that identify conditions for which stringing can be problematic.

  7. A GPU-accelerated flow solver for incompressible two-phase fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codyer, Stephen; Raessi, Mehdi; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-11-01

    We present a numerical solver for incompressible, immiscible, two-phase fluid flows that is accelerated by using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the projection method, which involves solving a pressure Poisson problem at each time step. A second-order discretization of the Poisson problem leads to a sparse matrix with five and seven diagonals for two- and three-dimensional simulations, respectively. Running a serial linear algebra solver on a single CPU can take 50-99.9% of the total simulation time to solve the above system for pressure. To remove this bottleneck, we utilized the large parallelization capabilities of GPUs; we developed a linear algebra solver based on the conjugate gradient iterative method (CGIM) by using CUDA 4.0 libraries and compared its performance with CUSP, an open-source, GPU library for linear algebra. Compared to running the CGIM solver on a single CPU core, for a 2D case, our GPU solver yields speedups of up to 88x in solver time and 81x overall time on a single GPU card. In 3D cases, the speedups are up to 81x (solver) and 15x (overall). Speedup is faster at higher grid resolutions and our GPU solver outperforms CUSP. Current work examines the acceleration versus a parallel CGIM CPU solver.

  8. Method, apparatus and system for controlling fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    McMurtrey, Ryan D.; Ginosar, Daniel M.; Burch, Joesph V.

    2007-10-30

    A system, apparatus and method of controlling the flow of a fluid are provided. In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, a flow control device includes a valve having a flow path defined therethrough and a valve seat in communication with the flow path with a valve stem disposed in the valve seat. The valve stem and valve seat are cooperatively configured to cause mutual relative linear displacement thereof in response to rotation of the valve stem. A gear member is coupled with the rotary stem and a linear positioning member includes a portion which complementarily engages the gear member. Upon displacement of the linear positioning member along a first axis, the gear member and rotary valve stem are rotated about a second axis and the valve stem and valve seat are mutually linearly displaced to alter the flow of fluid through the valve.

  9. Three dimensional simulation of fluid flow in X-ray CT images of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Omari, A.; Masad, E.

    2004-11-01

    A numerical scheme is developed in order to simulate fluid flow in three dimensional (3-D) microstructures. The governing equations for steady incompressible flow are solved using the semi-implicit method for pressure-linked equations (SIMPLE) finite difference scheme within a non-staggered grid system that represents the 3-D microstructure. This system allows solving the governing equations using only one computational cell. The numerical scheme is verified through simulating fluid flow in idealized 3-D microstructures with known closed form solutions for permeability. The numerical factors affecting the solution in terms of convergence and accuracy are also discussed. These factors include the resolution of the analysed microstructure and the truncation criterion. Fluid flow in 2-D X-ray computed tomography (CT) images of real porous media microstructure is also simulated using this numerical model. These real microstructures include field cores of asphalt mixes, laboratory linear kneading compactor (LKC) specimens, and laboratory Superpave gyratory compactor (SGC) specimens. The numerical results for the permeability of the real microstructures are compared with the results from closed form solutions. Copyright

  10. Regulation of tumor invasion by interstitial fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Adrian C.; Swartz, Melody A.

    2011-02-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression is undisputed, yet the significance of biophysical forces in the microenvironment remains poorly understood. Interstitial fluid flow is a nearly ubiquitous and physiologically relevant biophysical force that is elevated in tumors because of tumor-associated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, as well as changes in the tumor stroma. Not only does it apply physical forces to cells directly, but interstitial flow also creates gradients of soluble signals in the tumor microenvironment, thus influencing cell behavior and modulating cell-cell interactions. In this paper, we highlight our current understanding of interstitial fluid flow in the context of the tumor, focusing on the physical changes that lead to elevated interstitial flow, how cells sense flow and how they respond to changes in interstitial flow. In particular, we emphasize that interstitial flow can directly promote tumor cell invasion through a mechanism known as autologous chemotaxis, and indirectly support tumor invasion via both biophysical and biochemical cues generated by stromal cells. Thus, interstitial fluid flow demonstrates how important biophysical factors are in cancer, both by modulating cell behavior and coupling biophysical and biochemical signals.

  11. Computerized tomographic analysis of fluid flow in fractured tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, C.W.; Sharer, J.C. ); Springer, E.P. )

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this summary is to demonstrate the usefulness of X-ray computerized tomography to observe fluid flow down a fracture and rock matrix imbibition in a sample of Bandelier tuff. This was accomplished by using a tuff sample 152.4 mm long and 50.8 mm in diameter. A longitudinal fracture was created by cutting the core with a wire saw. The fractured piece was then coupled to its adjacent section to that the fracture was not expected. Water was injected into a dry sample at five flow rates and CT scanning performed at set intervals during the flow. Cross sectional images and longitudinal reconstructions were built and saturation profiles calculated for the sample at each time interval at each flow rate. The results showed that for the test conditions, the fracture was not a primary pathway of fluid flow down the sample. At a slow fluid injection rate into the dry sample, the fluid was imbibed into the rock uniformly down the length of the core. With increasing injection rates, the flow remained uniform over the core cross section through complete saturation.

  12. Flow lasers. [fluid mechanics of high power continuous output operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Russell, D. A.; Hertzberg, A.

    1975-01-01

    The present work reviews the fluid-mechanical aspects of high-power continuous-wave (CW) lasers. The flow characteristics of these devices appear as classical fluid-mechanical phenomena recast in a complicated interactive environment. The fundamentals of high-power lasers are reviewed, followed by a discussion of the N2-CO2 gas dynamic laser. Next, the HF/DF supersonic diffusion laser is described, and finally the CO electrical-discharge laser is discussed.

  13. Studies of fluid flow indicators, Pacific margin of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.; McAdoo, B.; Langseth, M.; Orange, D.

    1996-12-31

    Seismic reflection profiles off Costa Rica image a decrease in thickness of the underthrust sedimentary section from the Middle America Trench, implying a significant reduction of porosity in the outer 3-5 km from the trench and a source of vent water through the wedge. We encountered no evidence of discrete fluid venting over the outer 3-5 km of this margin from dives using the ALVIN submersible or from heat flow measurements (based on absence of chemosynthetic vent communities and heat flow anomalies in this zone). Vent communities occur farther upslope, associated with a series of out-of-sequence thrusts, with two mud diapirs, and a mid-slope canyon. We infer that fracture permeability dominates in the out-of-sequence thrusts, upflow of fluid-rich muds in the diapir, and focusing of fluid flow in the canyon. Over 100 heat flow observations on the wedge and incoming COCOS plate showed a broad area of anomalously low heat flow (13 mW/m{sup 2}) seaward of the frontal thrust, whereas the expected heat flow for ocean crust of early Miocene age is seven times greater. The very low regional heat flow may reflect refrigeration by vigorous sea water flow through the upper crust pillow basalts. Heat flow increases to about 30 mW/m{sup 2} throughout the lower slope to mid-slope, implying a combination of widespread fluid venting, reheating of the cooled crust and frictional heating at the base of the wedge. The lack of discrete vents over the outer 3-5 km of the margin indicates diffuse flow and likely temporal episodicity, as this region has been aseismic since 1950.

  14. Studies of fluid flow indicators, Pacific margin of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.; McAdoo, B. ); Langseth, M. ); Orange, D. )

    1996-01-01

    Seismic reflection profiles off Costa Rica image a decrease in thickness of the underthrust sedimentary section from the Middle America Trench, implying a significant reduction of porosity in the outer 3-5 km from the trench and a source of vent water through the wedge. We encountered no evidence of discrete fluid venting over the outer 3-5 km of this margin from dives using the ALVIN submersible or from heat flow measurements (based on absence of chemosynthetic vent communities and heat flow anomalies in this zone). Vent communities occur farther upslope, associated with a series of out-of-sequence thrusts, with two mud diapirs, and a mid-slope canyon. We infer that fracture permeability dominates in the out-of-sequence thrusts, upflow of fluid-rich muds in the diapir, and focusing of fluid flow in the canyon. Over 100 heat flow observations on the wedge and incoming COCOS plate showed a broad area of anomalously low heat flow (13 mW/m[sup 2]) seaward of the frontal thrust, whereas the expected heat flow for ocean crust of early Miocene age is seven times greater. The very low regional heat flow may reflect refrigeration by vigorous sea water flow through the upper crust pillow basalts. Heat flow increases to about 30 mW/m[sup 2] throughout the lower slope to mid-slope, implying a combination of widespread fluid venting, reheating of the cooled crust and frictional heating at the base of the wedge. The lack of discrete vents over the outer 3-5 km of the margin indicates diffuse flow and likely temporal episodicity, as this region has been aseismic since 1950.

  15. Triangular spectral elements for incompressible fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, C.; Vanrosendale, John

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the use of triangular elements in the spectral element method for direct simulation of incompressible flow. Triangles provide much greater geometric flexibility than quadrilateral elements and are better conditioned and more accurate when small angles arise. We employ a family of tensor product algorithms for triangles, allowing triangular elements to be handled with comparable arithmetic complexity to quadrilateral elements. The triangular discretizations are applied and validated on the Poisson equation. These discretizations are then applied to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a laminar channel flow solution is given. These new triangular spectral elements can be combined with standard quadrilateral elements, yielding a general and flexible high order method for complex geometries in two dimensions.

  16. Fluid flow and chemical reaction kinetics in metamorphic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lasaga, A.C.; Rye, D.M. )

    1993-05-01

    The treatment and effects of chemical reaction kinetics during metamorphism are developed along with the incorporation of fluid flow, diffusion, and thermal evolution. The interplay of fluid flow and surface reaction rates, the distinction between steady state and equilibrium, and the possible overstepping of metamorphic reactions are discussed using a simple analytic model. This model serves as an introduction to the second part of the paper, which develops a reaction model that solves the coupled temperature-fluid flow-chemical composition differential equations relevant to metamorphic processes. Consideration of stable isotopic evidence requires that such a kinetic model be considered for the chemical evolution of a metamorphic aureole. A general numerical scheme is discussed to handle the solution of the model. The results of this kinetic model allow us to reach several important conclusions regarding the factors controlling the chemical evolution of mineral assemblages during a metamorphic event. 41 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Numerical computational of fluid flow through a detached retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiann, Lim Yeou; Ismail, Zuhaila; Shafie, Sharidan; Fitt, Alistair

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a phenomenon of fluid flow through a detached retina is studied. Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment happens when vitreous humour flow through a detached retina. The exact mechanism of Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment is complex and remains incomplete. To understand the fluid flow, a paradigm mathematical model is developed and is approximated by the lubrication theory. The numerical results of the velocity profile and pressure distribution are computed by using Finite Element Method. The effects of fluid mechanical on the retinal detachment is discussed and analyzed. Based on the analysis, it is found that the retinal detachment deformation affects the pressure distribution. It is important to comprehend the development of the retinal detachment so that a new treatment method can be developed.

  18. Fluid flow in nanopores: Accurate boundary conditions for carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, Vladimir P.; Nicholson, David; Quirke, Nicholas

    2002-11-01

    Steady-state Poiseuille flow of a simple fluid in carbon nanopores under a gravitylike force is simulated using a realistic empirical many-body potential model for carbon. Building on our previous study of slit carbon nanopores we show that fluid flow in a nanotube is also characterized by a large slip length. By analyzing temporal profiles of the velocity components of particles colliding with the wall we obtain values of the Maxwell coefficient defining the fraction of molecules thermalized by the wall and, for the first time, propose slip boundary conditions for smooth continuum surfaces such that they are equivalent in adsorption, diffusion, and fluid flow properties to fully dynamic atomistic models.

  19. Modeling of fluid and heat flow in fractured geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1988-08-01

    In most geothermal reservoirs large-scale permeability is dominated by fractures, while most of the heat and fluid reserves are stored in the rock matrix. Early-time fluid production comes mostly from the readily accessible fracture volume, while reservoir behavior at later time depends upon the ease with which fluid and heat can be transferred from the rock matrix to the fractures. Methods for modeling flow in fractured porous media must be able to deal with this matrix-fracture exchange, the so-called interporosity flow. This paper reviews recent work at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on numerical modeling of nonisothermal multiphase flow in fractured porous media. We also give a brief summary of simulation applications to problems in geothermal production and reinjection. 29 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Multiphase Flow of Immiscible Fluids on Unstructured Moving Meshes.

    PubMed

    Misztal, Marek K; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam; Fursund, Jens; Christensen, Brian Bunch; Bærentzen, J Andreas; Bridson, Robert

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization operations improve element quality and avoid element inversion. In the context of multiphase flow, we guarantee that every element is occupied by a single fluid and, consequently, the interface between fluids is represented by a set of faces in the simplicial complex. This approach ensures that the underlying discretization matches the physics and avoids the additional book-keeping required in grid-based methods where multiple fluids may occupy the same cell. Our Lagrangian approach naturally leads us to adopt a finite element approach to simulation, in contrast to the finite volume approaches adopted by a majority of fluid simulation techniques that use tetrahedral meshes. We characterize fluid simulation as an optimization problem allowing for full coupling of the pressure and velocity fields and the incorporation of a second-order surface energy. We introduce a preconditioner based on the diagonal Schur complement and solve our optimization on the GPU. We provide the results of parameter studies as well as a performance analysis of our method, together with suggestions for performance optimization. PMID:23836703

  1. Multiphase flow of immiscible fluids on unstructured moving meshes.

    PubMed

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam; Fursund, Jens; Christensen, Brian Bunch; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Bridson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization operations improve element quality and avoid element inversion. In the context of multiphase flow, we guarantee that every element is occupied by a single fluid and, consequently, the interface between fluids is represented by a set of faces in the simplicial complex. This approach ensures that the underlying discretization matches the physics and avoids the additional book-keeping required in grid-based methods where multiple fluids may occupy the same cell. Our Lagrangian approach naturally leads us to adopt a finite element approach to simulation, in contrast to the finite volume approaches adopted by a majority of fluid simulation techniques that use tetrahedral meshes. We characterize fluid simulation as an optimization problem allowing for full coupling of the pressure and velocity fields and the incorporation of a second-order surface energy. We introduce a preconditioner based on the diagonal Schur complement and solve our optimization on the GPU. We provide the results of parameter studies as well as a performance analysis of our method, together with suggestions for performance optimization. PMID:24201322

  2. Analysis for flow of Jeffrey fluid with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Asad, Sadia; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-04-01

    An analysis of the boundary layer flow and heat transfer in a Jeffrey fluid containing nanoparticles is presented in this paper. Here, fluid motion is due to a stretchable cylinder. The thermal conductivity of the fluid is taken to be temperature-dependent. The partial differential equations of velocity, temperature, and concentration fields are transformed to a dimensionless system of ordinary differential equations. Nonlinear governing analysis is computed for the homotopy solutions. The behaviors of Brownian motion and thermophoresis diffusion of nanoparticles have been examined graphically. Numerical values of the local Nusselt number are computed and analyzed.

  3. Apparatus for controlling fluid flow in a conduit wall

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2003-05-13

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  4. Fluid flow from a low to a higher density liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, F.

    1984-12-01

    The penetration of liquid from a low density brine solution into a higher density solution below it has been measured as a function of vertical flow velocity and the density difference of the two solutions. The flow velocity was produced by a horizontal disc rotating in the low density liquid. The results show the penetration distance and penetration rate are dependent on flow velocity and in particular are very sensitive to small changes in the density difference between the two liquids. The observations are considered in relation to liquid penetration into dendritic arrays, and fluid flow in the pool of ingots and continuously cast steel billets, during solidification.

  5. Rotation of a rod system containing inertial fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, A. D.

    2012-11-01

    This paper considers a rod system for which it is possible to correctly formulate and solve the problem of three-dimensional motion in the physical space of an elastic pipeline area containing inertial incompressible fluid flow. The precession of the axis of an elastic pipeline along which inertial incompressible fluid flows is described, a physical phenomenon which has not been previously studied. With the use of rigid body dynamics, it was theoretically established that a three-dimensional dynamic process is possible in an open (exchanging mass with the environment) elastic-inertial rod system.

  6. Using artificial intelligence to control fluid flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelsey, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation is an essential tool for the prediction of fluid flow. Many powerful simulation programs exist today. However, using these programs to reliably analyze fluid flow and other physical situations requires considerable human effort and expertise to set up a simulation, determine whether the output makes sense, and repeatedly run the simulation with different inputs until a satisfactory result is achieved. Automating this process is not only of considerable practical importance but will also significantly advance basic artificial intelligence (AI) research in reasoning about the physical world.

  7. Balanced Flow Metering and Conditioning: Technology for Fluid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R.

    2006-01-01

    Revolutionary new technology that creates balanced conditions across the face of a multi-hole orifice plate has been developed, patented and exclusively licensed for commercialization. This balanced flow technology simultaneously measures mass flow rate, volumetric flow rate, and fluid density with little or no straight pipe run requirements. Initially, the balanced plate was a drop in replacement for a traditional orifice plate, but testing revealed substantially better performance as compared to the orifice plate such as, 10 times better accuracy, 2 times faster (shorter distance) pressure recovery, 15 times less acoustic noise energy generation, and 2.5 times less permanent pressure loss. During 2004 testing at MSFC, testing revealed several configurations of the balanced flow meter that match the accuracy of Venturi meters while having only slightly more permanent pressure loss. However, the balanced meter only requires a 0.25 inch plate and has no upstream or downstream straight pipe requirements. As a fluid conditioning device, the fluid usually reaches fully developed flow within 1 pipe diameter of the balanced conditioning plate. This paper will describe the basic balanced flow metering technology, provide performance details generated by testing to date and provide implementation details along with calculations required for differing degrees of flow metering accuracy.

  8. A thermal stack structure for measurement of fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hao; Mitchell, S. J. N.; Campbell, D. H.; Gamble, Harold S.

    2003-03-01

    A stacked thermal structure for fluid flow sensing has been designed, fabricated, and tested. A double-layer polysilicon process was employed in the fabrication. Flow measurement is based on the transfer of heat from a temperature sensor element to the moving fluid. The undoped or lightly doped polysilicon temperature sensor is located on top of a heavily doped polysilicon heater element. A dielectric layer between the heater and the sensor elements provides both thermal coupling and electrical isolation. In comparison to a hot-wire flow sensor, the heating and sensing functions are separated, allowing the electrical characteristics of each to be optimized. Undoped polysilicon has a large temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) up to 7 %/K and is thus a preferred material for the sensor. However, heavily doped polysilicon is preferred for the heater due to its lower resistance. The stacked flow sensor structure offers a high thermal sensitivity making it especially suitable for medical applications where the working temperatures are restricted. Flow rates of various fluids can be measured over a wide range. The fabricated flow sensors were used to measure the flow rate of water in the range μl - ml/min and gas (Helium) in the range 10 - 100ml/min.

  9. Beyond poiseuille: preservation fluid flow in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh; Randle, Lucy V; Callaghan, Paul T; Watson, Christopher J E; Callaghan, Chris J

    2013-01-01

    Poiseuille's equation describes the relationship between fluid viscosity, pressure, tubing diameter, and flow, yet it is not known if cold organ perfusion systems follow this equation. We investigated these relationships in an ex vivo model and aimed to offer some rationale for equipment selection. Increasing the cannula size from 14 to 20 Fr increased flow rate by a mean (SD) of 13 (12)%. Marshall's hyperosmolar citrate was three times less viscous than UW solution, but flows were only 45% faster. Doubling the bag pressure led to a mean (SD) flow rate increase of only 19 (13)%, not twice the rate. When external pressure devices were used, 100 mmHg of continuous pressure increased flow by a mean (SD) of 43 (17)% when compared to the same pressure applied initially only. Poiseuille's equation was not followed; this is most likely due to "slipping" of preservation fluid within the plastic tubing. Cannula size made little difference over the ranges examined; flows are primarily determined by bag pressure and fluid viscosity. External infusor devices require continuous pressurisation to deliver high flow. Future studies examining the impact of perfusion variables on graft outcomes should include detailed equipment descriptions. PMID:24062943

  10. Beyond Poiseuille: Preservation Fluid Flow in an Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Saurabh; Randle, Lucy V.; Callaghan, Paul T.; Watson, Christopher J. E.; Callaghan, Chris J.

    2013-01-01

    Poiseuille's equation describes the relationship between fluid viscosity, pressure, tubing diameter, and flow, yet it is not known if cold organ perfusion systems follow this equation. We investigated these relationships in an ex vivo model and aimed to offer some rationale for equipment selection. Increasing the cannula size from 14 to 20 Fr increased flow rate by a mean (SD) of 13 (12)%. Marshall's hyperosmolar citrate was three times less viscous than UW solution, but flows were only 45% faster. Doubling the bag pressure led to a mean (SD) flow rate increase of only 19 (13)%, not twice the rate. When external pressure devices were used, 100 mmHg of continuous pressure increased flow by a mean (SD) of 43 (17)% when compared to the same pressure applied initially only. Poiseuille's equation was not followed; this is most likely due to “slipping” of preservation fluid within the plastic tubing. Cannula size made little difference over the ranges examined; flows are primarily determined by bag pressure and fluid viscosity. External infusor devices require continuous pressurisation to deliver high flow. Future studies examining the impact of perfusion variables on graft outcomes should include detailed equipment descriptions. PMID:24062943

  11. On two-dimensional flows of compressible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Stefan

    1945-01-01

    This report is devoted to the study of two-dimensional steady motion of a compressible fluid. It is shown that the complete flow pattern around a closed obstacle cannot be obtained by the method of Chaplygin. In order to overcome this difficulty, a formula for the stream-function of a two-dimensional subsonic flow is derived. The formula involves an arbitrary function of a complex variable and yields all possible subsonic flow patterns of certain types. Conditions are given so that the flow pattern in the physical plane will represent a flow around a closed curve. The formula obtained can be employed for the approximate determination of a subsonic flow around an obstacle. The method can be extended to partially supersonic flows.

  12. Dynamics of a fluid flow on Mars: lava or mud?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    We have identified an enigmatic flow in S.W. Cerberus Fossae, Mars. The flow originates from an almost circular pit within a remnant of a yardang at 0.58 degrees N, 155.28 degrees E, within the lower unit of the Medusae Fossae Formation. The flow is ~42 km long and 0.5 to 2.0 km wide. The surface textures of the resulting deposit show that the material flowed in such a way that the various deformation patterns on its surface were generally preserved as it moved, only being distorted or disrupted when the flow encountered major topographic obstacles or was forced to make rapid changes of direction. This observation of a stiff, generally undeformed surface layer overlying a relatively mobile base suggests that, while it was moving, the fluid material flowed in a laminar, and possibly non-Newtonian, fashion. The least-complicated non-Newtonian fluids are Bingham plastics. On this basis we use measurements of flow width, length, thickness and substrate slope obtained from images, a DEM constructed from stereo pairs of Context Camera (CTX) images, and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) altimetry points to deduce the rheological properties of the fluid, treating it as both a Newtonian and a Bingham material for comparison. The Newtonian option requires the fluid to have a viscosity close to 100 Pa s and to have flowed everywhere in a turbulent fashion. The Bingham option requires laminar flow, a plastic viscosity close to 1 Pa s, and a yield strength of ~185 Pa. We compare these parameters values with those of various environmental fluids on Earth in an attempt to narrow the range of possible materials forming the martian flow. A mafic to ultramafic lava would fit the Newtonian option but the required turbulence does not seem consistent with the surface textures. The Bingham option satisfies the morphological constraint of laminar motion if the material is a mud flow consisting of ~40% water and ~60% silt-sized silicate solids. Elsewhere on Mars, deposits with similar

  13. Squeeze Flow of Yield Stress Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelot, David; Yarin, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The squeeze flow of yield stress materials are investigated using a non-invasive optical technique. In the experiments, cylindrically-shaped samples of Carbopol solutions and Bentonite dispersions are rapidly compressed between two transparent plates using a constant force and the instantaneous cross-sectional area is recorded as a function of time using a high speed CCD camera. Furthermore, visualization of the boundary reveals that the no-slip condition holds. In addition, shear experiments are conducted using parallel-plate and vane viscometers. The material exhibits first a fast stage of squeezing in which the normal stresses dominate and viscosity plays the main role. Then, the second (slow) stage sets in where the material exhibits a slow deformation dominated by yield stress. At the end, the deformation process is arrested by yield stress. The material response is attributed to the Bingham-like or Herschel-Bulkley-like rheological behavior. Squeeze flow is developed into a convenient and simple tool for studying yield stress materials. This work is supported by the United States Gypsum Corp.

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow Studies and Recent Advancements.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Erin J; Yamada, Shinya

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques used to assess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) movement in the central nervous system (CNS), including Phase-Contrast (PC), Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse, and simultaneous multi slice echo planar phase contrast imaging. These techniques have been used to assess CSF movement in the CNS under normal and pathophysiological situations. PC can quantitatively measure stroke volume in selected regions, particularly the aqueduct of Sylvius, as synchronized to the heartbeat. The PC is frequently used to investigate those patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus and a Chiari I malformation. Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse, with high signal-to-noise ratio, captures motion of CSF anywhere in the CNS over a time period of up to 5 seconds. Variations of PC-MRI improved temporal resolution and included contributions from respiration. With non-invasive imaging such as these, more can be understood about CSF dynamics, especially with respect to the relative effects of cardiac and respiratory changes on CSF movement. PMID:27063659

  15. Flow in left atrium using MR fluid motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kelvin K. L.; Kelso, Richard M.; Worthley, Steve M.; Sanders, Prash; Mazumdar, Jagannath; Abbott, Derek

    2007-12-01

    A recent development based on optical flow applied onto Fast Imaging in Steady State Free Precession (TrueFISP) magnetic resonance imaging is able to deliver good estimation of the flow profile in the human heart chamber. The examination of cardiac flow based on tracking of MR signals emitted by moving blood is able to give medical doctors insight into the flow patterns within the human heart using standard MRI procedure without specifically subjecting the patient to longer scan times using more dedicated scan protocols such as phase contrast MRI. Although MR fluid motion estimation has its limitations in terms of accurate flow mapping, the use of a comparatively quick scan procedure and computational post-processing gives satisfactory flow quantification and can assist in management of cardiac patients. In this study, we present flow in the left atria of five human subjects using MR fluid motion tracking. The measured flow shows that vortices exist within the atrium of heart. Although the scan is two-dimensional, we have produced multiple slices of flow maps in a spatial direction to show that the vortex exist in a three-dimensional space.

  16. Seals/Secondary Fluid Flows Workshop 1997; Volume I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The 1997 Conference provided discussions and data on (a) program overviews, (b) developments in seals and secondary air management systems, (c) interactive seals flows with secondary air or fluid flows and powerstream flows, (d) views of engine externals and limitations, (e) high speed engine research sealing needs and demands, and (f) a short course on engine design development margins. Sealing concepts discussed include, mechanical rim and cavity seals, leaf, finger, air/oil, rope, floating-brush, floating-T-buffer, and brush seals. Engine externals include all components of engine fluid systems, sensors and their support structures that lie within or project through the nacelle. The clean features of the nacelle belie the minefield of challenges and opportunities that lie within. Seals; Secondary air flows; Rotordynamics; Gas turbine; Aircraft; CFD; Testing; Turbomachinery

  17. Fluid-flow-induced flutter of a flag

    PubMed Central

    Argentina, Médéric; Mahadevan, L.

    2005-01-01

    We give an explanation for the onset of fluid-flow-induced flutter in a flag. Our theory accounts for the various physical mechanisms at work: the finite length and the small but finite bending stiffness of the flag, the unsteadiness of the flow, the added mass effect, and vortex shedding from the trailing edge. Our analysis allows us to predict a critical speed for the onset of flapping as well as the frequency of flapping. We find that in a particular limit corresponding to a low-density fluid flowing over a soft high-density flag, the flapping instability is akin to a resonance between the mode of oscillation of a rigid pivoted airfoil in a flow and a hinged-free elastic plate vibrating in its lowest mode. PMID:15684057

  18. The flow of a compressible fluid past a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Carl

    1943-01-01

    An iteration method is employed to obtain the flow of a compressible fluid past a curved surface. The first approximation which leads to the Prandtl-Glauert rule, is based on the assumption that the flow differs but little from a pure translation. The iteration process then consists in improving this first approximation in order that it will apply to a flow differing from pure translatory motion to a greater degree. The method fails when the Mach number of the undisturbed stream reaches unity but permits a transition from subsonic to supersonic conditions without the appearance of a compression shock. The limiting value at which potential flow no longer exits is indicated by the apparent divergence of the power series representing the velocity of the fluid at the surface of the solid boundary.

  19. Fluid-flow-induced flutter of a flag.

    PubMed

    Argentina, Médéric; Mahadevan, L

    2005-02-01

    We give an explanation for the onset of fluid-flow-induced flutter in a flag. Our theory accounts for the various physical mechanisms at work: the finite length and the small but finite bending stiffness of the flag, the unsteadiness of the flow, the added mass effect, and vortex shedding from the trailing edge. Our analysis allows us to predict a critical speed for the onset of flapping as well as the frequency of flapping. We find that in a particular limit corresponding to a low-density fluid flowing over a soft high-density flag, the flapping instability is akin to a resonance between the mode of oscillation of a rigid pivoted airfoil in a flow and a hinged-free elastic plate vibrating in its lowest mode. PMID:15684057

  20. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  1. Experimental analysis on MR fluid channel flow dynamics with complex fluid-wall interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Hideya; Takana, Hidemasa; Shinohara, Keisuke; Mizuki, Kotoe; Katagiri, Kazunari; Ohta, Makoto

    2011-05-01

    MR fluid plugging performance by aggregation of magnetized particles in MR fluid is recently expected to be one of the most promising applications in medical or safety devices, such as blood flow control, steam issuing shut-down valve and fuel supply control for automobile. In this study, dynamic response of MR fluid plugging and its breakdown in a pressure mode with complex fluid-wall interactions was experimentally investigated, considering the effects of magnetic flux density, wall surface structure, wall permeability and wall elasticity of tube. Higher endurance pressure is obtained for wall surface groove structure and for steel wall due to a strong anchoring effect by rigid cluster formation in a concave region and strong MR fluid column formation in a channel core region, respectively. Furthermore, MR fluid plugging performance and the fluid storage characteristic of PVA tube as a bio-material was clarified. Because of the large radial expansion of the tube at the applied magnetic region in a pressure mode, PVA tube shows unique characteristics, such as storing MR fluid under magnetic field and MR fluid jet issuing under releasing magnetic field.

  2. Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Cecilia Bravo

    2006-06-30

    This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

  3. Tactile soft-sparse mean fluid-flow imaging with a robotic whisker array.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Cagdas; Jones, Douglas L; Kamalabadi, Farzad

    2015-08-01

    An array of whiskers is critical to many mammals to survive in their environment. However, current engineered systems generally employ vision, radar or sonar to explore the surroundings, not having sufficiently benefited from tactile perception. Inspired by the whisking animals, we present here a novel tomography-based tactile fluid-flow imaging technique for the reconstruction of surroundings with an artificial whisker array. The moment sensed at the whisker base is the weighted integral of the drag force per length, which is proportional to the relative velocity squared on a whisker segment. We demonstrate that the 2D cross-sectional mean fluid-flow velocity-field can be successfully mapped out by collecting moment measurements at different angular positions with the whisker array. We use a regularized version of the FOCal underdetermined system solver algorithm with a smoothness constraint to obtain soft-sparse static estimates of the 2D cross-sectional velocity-squared distribution. This new proposed approach has the strong potential to be an alternative environmental sensing technology, particularly in dark or murky environments. PMID:26241787

  4. Fluid flow systems analysis to save energy

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, P.S.

    1999-07-01

    Industrial processes use rotating equipment (e.g.; pump, fan, blower, centrifugal compressor, positive displacement compressor) and pipe (or duct) to move fluid from point A to B, with many processes using electric motors as the prime mover. Most of the systems in the industry are over-designed to meet a peak load demand which might occur over a small fraction of the time or to satisfy a higher pressure demanded by a much smaller user in the same process. The system over-design will result in a selection of larger but inefficient rotating equipment and electric motor system. A careful life cycle cost and economic evaluation must be undertaken to ensure that the process audit, reengineering and equipment selections are not impacting the industrial process goals, but result in a least optimal cost over the life of the project. The paper will define, discuss, and present various process systems in chemical, hydrocarbon and pulp and paper industries. It will discuss the interactive impact of the changes in the mechanical system configuration and the changes in the process variables to better redesign the system and reduce the cost of operation. it will also present a check list of energy conservation measures (ECM) or opportunities. Such ECMs will be related to hydraulics, system components, process modifications, and system efficiency. Two or three case studies will be presented focusing on various conservation measures that improve electrical operating efficiency of a distillation column system. An incremental cost and payback analysis will be presented to assist the investment in process optimization and energy savings' measures.

  5. Using a genetic algorithm to solve fluid-flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, R.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Genetic algorithms are based on the mechanics of the natural selection and natural genetics processes. These algorithms are finding increasing application to a wide variety of engineering optimization and machine learning problems. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the use of a genetic algorithm to solve fluid flow problems. Specifically, the authors use the algorithm to solve the one-dimensional flow equations for a pipe.

  6. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-12-31

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  7. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  8. Stability of axisymmetric swirl flows of viscous incompressible fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktershev, S. P.; Kuibin, P. A.

    2013-09-01

    A new method of solution to the problem of stability of the swirl flow of viscous incompressible fluid is developed. The method based on expansion of the required function into power series of radial coordinate allows an avoidance of difficulties related to numerical integration of the system of differential equations with a singular point. Stability of the Poiseuille flow in a rotating pipe is considered as an example.

  9. A Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program to Model Flow Distribution in Fluid Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Bailey, John W.; Schallhorn, Paul; Steadman, Todd

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a general purpose computer program for analyzing steady state and transient flow in a complex network. The program is capable of modeling phase changes, compressibility, mixture thermodynamics and external body forces such as gravity and centrifugal. The program's preprocessor allows the user to interactively develop a fluid network simulation consisting of nodes and branches. Mass, energy and specie conservation equations are solved at the nodes; the momentum conservation equations are solved in the branches. The program contains subroutines for computing "real fluid" thermodynamic and thermophysical properties for 33 fluids. The fluids are: helium, methane, neon, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, fluorine, hydrogen, parahydrogen, water, kerosene (RP-1), isobutane, butane, deuterium, ethane, ethylene, hydrogen sulfide, krypton, propane, xenon, R-11, R-12, R-22, R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134A, R-152A, nitrogen trifluoride and ammonia. The program also provides the options of using any incompressible fluid with constant density and viscosity or ideal gas. Seventeen different resistance/source options are provided for modeling momentum sources or sinks in the branches. These options include: pipe flow, flow through a restriction, non-circular duct, pipe flow with entrance and/or exit losses, thin sharp orifice, thick orifice, square edge reduction, square edge expansion, rotating annular duct, rotating radial duct, labyrinth seal, parallel plates, common fittings and valves, pump characteristics, pump power, valve with a given loss coefficient, and a Joule-Thompson device. The system of equations describing the fluid network is solved by a hybrid numerical method that is a combination of the Newton-Raphson and successive substitution methods. This paper also illustrates the application and verification of the code by comparison with Hardy Cross method for steady state flow and analytical solution for unsteady flow.

  10. Aging and free surface flow of a thixotropic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, H. T.; Roussel, N.; Coussot, P.

    2005-03-01

    Free surface flows of thixotropic fluids such as paints, self-compacting concrete, or natural mudflows are of noticeable practical interest. Here we study the basic characteristics of the uniform flow of a layer of thixotropic fluid under gravity. A theoretical approach relying on a simple thixotropy constitutive equation shows that after some time at rest over a small slope angle the fluid layer should start to flow rather abruptly beyond a new, larger, critical slope angle. The theory also predicts that the critical time at which the layer velocity should significantly increase is proportional to the duration of the preliminary rest and tends to infinity when the new slope approaches the critical slope. Experiments carried out with different suspensions show that the qualitative trends of the flows are in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions, except that the critical time for flow start appears to be proportional to a power 0.6 of the time of rest whereas the theory predicts a linear dependence. We show that this indicates a restructuration process at rest differing from the restructuration process under flow.

  11. Fluid and particulate suspension flows at fracture junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Tak S.; Koplik, Joel

    2015-03-01

    Suspended particles can be a serious problem in geological contexts such as fluid recovery from reservoirs because they alter the rheology of the flowing liquids and may obstruct transport by narrowing flow channels due to deposition or gravitational sedimentation. In particular, the irregular geometry of the fracture walls can trap particles, induce jamming and cause unwanted channeling effects. We have investigated particle suspension flows in tight geological fractures using lattice Boltzmann method in the past. In this work we extend these studies to flows at a junction where two fractures intersect, an essential step towards a complete understanding of flows in fracture networks. The fracture walls are modeled as realistic self-affine fractal surfaces, and we focus on the case of tight fractures, where the wall roughness, the aperture and the particle size are all comparable. The simulations provide complete detail on the particle configurations and the fluid flow field, from which the stresses in the fluid and the forces acting on the bounding walls can be computed. With these information, phenomena such as particle mixing and dispersion, mechanical responses of the solid walls, possible jamming and release at junctions, and other situations of interest can be investigated. Work supported by NERSC and DOE.

  12. The Effect of Surface Tension on the Gravity-driven Thin Film Flow of Newtonian and Power-law Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    Gravity-driven thin film flow is of importance in many fields, as well as for the design of polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides. There have been many prior works on gravity-driven thin films. However, the incorporation of surface tension effect has not been well studied for non-Newtonian fluids. After surface tension effect was incorporated into our 2D (i.e. 1D spreading) power-law model, we found that surface tension effect not only impacted the spreading speed of the microbicide gel, but also had an influence on the shape of the 2D spreading profile. We observed a capillary ridge at the front of the fluid bolus. Previous literature shows that the emergence of a capillary ridge is strongly related to the contact line fingering instability. Fingering instabilities during epithelial coating may change the microbicide gel distribution and therefore impact how well it can protect the epithelium. In this study, we focused on the capillary ridge in 2D flow and performed a series of simulations and showed how the capillary ridge height varies with other parameters, such as surface tension coefficient, inclination angle, initial thickness, and power-law parameters. As shown in our results, we found that capillary ridge height increased with higher surface tension, steeper inclination angle, bigger initial thickness, and more Newtonian fluids. This study provides the initial insights of how to optimize the flow and prevent the appearance of a capillary ridge and fingering instability. PMID:23687391

  13. Tracing fluid flow in geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, P.E.; Adams, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    A family of fluorescent compounds, the polycyclic aromatic sulfonates, were evaluated for application in intermediate- and high-temperature geothermal reservoirs. Whereas the naphthalene sulfonates were found to be very thermally stable and reasonably detectable, the amino-substituted naphthalene sulfonates were found to be somewhat less thermally stable, but much more detectable. A tracer test was conducted at the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir using one of the substituted naphthalene sulfonates, amino G, and fluorescein. Four of 9 production wells showed tracer breakthrough during the first 200 days of the test. Reconstructed tracer return curves are presented that correct for the thermal decay of tracer assuming an average reservoir temperature of 227{degrees}C. In order to examine the feasibility of using numerical simulation to model tracer flow, we developed simple, two-dimensional models of the geothermal reservoir using the numerical simulation programs TETRAD and TOUGH2. By fitting model outputs to measured return curves, we show that numerical reservoir simulations can be calibrated with the tracer data. Both models predict the same order of elution, approximate tracer concentrations, and return curve shapes. Using these results, we propose a method for using numerical models to design a tracer test.

  14. Qualification of a surrogate matrix-based absolute quantification method for amyloid-β₄₂ in human cerebrospinal fluid using 2D UPLC-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Korecka, Magdalena; Waligorska, Teresa; Figurski, Michal; Toledo, Jon B; Arnold, Steven E; Grossman, Murray; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M

    2014-01-01

    The primary aims of this work were to: 1) establish a calibrator surrogate matrix for quantification of amyloid-β (Aβ)42 in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and preparation of quality control samples for LC-MS-MS methodology, 2) validate analytical performance of the assay, and 3) evaluate its diagnostic utility and compare it with the AlzBio3 immunoassay. The analytical methodology was based on a 2D-UPLC-MS-MS platform. Sample pretreatment used 5 M guanidine hydrochloride and extraction on μElution SPE columns as previously described. A column cleaning procedure involved gradual removal of aqueous solvents by acetonitrile assured consistent long-term chromatography performance. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve and correlation analyses evaluated the diagnostic utility of UPLC-MS-MS compared to AlzBio3 immunoassay for detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The surrogate matrix, artificial CSF containing 4 mg/mL of BSA, provides linear and reproducible calibration comparable to human pooled CSF as calibration matrix. Appropriate cleaning of the trapping and analytical columns provided every-day, trouble-free runs. Analyses of CSF Aβ42 showed that UPLC-MS-MS distinguished neuropathologically-diagnosed AD subjects from healthy controls with at least equivalent diagnostic utility to AlzBio3. Comparison of ROC curves for these two assays showed no statistically significant difference (p = 0.2229). Linear regression analysis of Aβ42 concentrations measured by this mass spectrometry-based method compared to the AlzBio3 immunoassay showed significantly higher but highly correlated results. In conclusion, the newly established surrogate matrix for 2D-UPLC-MS-MS measurement of Aβ42 provides selective, reproducible, and accurate results. The documented analytical performance and diagnostic performance for AD versus controls supports consideration as a candidate reference method. PMID:24625802

  15. Interaction of an acoustical 2D-beam with an elastic cylinder with arbitrary location in a non-viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2015-09-01

    The classical Resonance Scattering Theory (RST) for plane waves in acoustics is generalized for the case of a 2D arbitrarily-shaped beam incident upon an elastic cylinder with arbitrary location that is immersed in a nonviscous fluid. The formulation is valid for an elastic (or viscoelastic) cylinder (or a cylindrical shell, a layered cylinder/shell, or a multilayered cylindrical shell, etc.) of any size and material. Partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) for the incident, internal and scattered fields are derived, and numerical examples illustrate the theory. The wave-fields are expressed using a generalized PWSE involving the beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) and the scattering coefficients of the cylinder. When the beam is shifted off the center of the cylinder, the off-axial BSCs are evaluated by performing standard numerical integration. Acoustic resonance scattering directivity diagrams are calculated by subtracting an appropriate background from the expression of the scattered pressure field. The properties related to the arbitrary scattering of a zeroth-order quasi-Gaussian cylindrical beam (chosen as an example) by an elastic brass cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of the beam, and shifted off-axially are analyzed and discussed. Moreover, the total and resonance backscattering form function moduli are numerically computed, and the results discussed with emphasis on the contribution of the surface waves circumnavigating the cylinder circular surface to the resonance backscattering. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to derive general expressions for the axial and transverse acoustic radiation force functions for the cylinder in any 2D beam of arbitrary shape. Examples are provided for a zeroth-order quasi Gaussian cylindrical beam with different waist. Potential applications are in underwater and physical acoustics, however, ongoing research in biomedical ultrasound, non-destructive evaluation, imaging, manufacturing, instrumentation, and

  16. Alternative experiments using the geophysical fluid flow cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    This study addresses the possibility of doing large scale dynamics experiments using the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell. In particular, cases where the forcing generates a statically stable stratification almost everywhere in the spherical shell are evaluated. This situation is typical of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. By calculating the strongest meridional circulation expected in the spacelab experiments, and testing its stability using quasi-geostrophic stability theory, it is shown that strongly nonlinear baroclinic waves on a zonally symmetric modified thermal wind will not occur. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell does not have a deep enough fluid layer to permit useful studies of large scale planetary wave processes arising from instability. It is argued, however, that by introducing suitable meridional barriers, a significant contribution to the understanding of the oceanic thermocline problem could be made.

  17. Global Optimization Techniques for Fluid Flow and Propulsion Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, Wei; Papila, Nilay; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Tucker, Kevin; Griffin, Lisa; Dorney, Dan; Huber, Frank; Tran, Ken; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of global optimization techniques for fluid flow and propulsion devices. Details are given on the need, characteristics, and techniques for global optimization. The techniques include response surface methodology (RSM), neural networks and back-propagation neural networks, design of experiments, face centered composite design (FCCD), orthogonal arrays, outlier analysis, and design optimization.

  18. Design of vortex fluid amplifiers with asymmetrical flow fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawley, T. J.; Price, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    Variation of geometric parameters, including supply area, control area, chamber length, and outlet diameter, of a large scale, modular design vortex fluid amplifier with single supply and control jets, has confirmed and extended a previously published design method, developed for vortex amplifiers with symmetric flow fields. This allows application of the method to devices which are more representative of practical, production type components.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR FIRE SUPPRESSANT FLUID FLOW.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the project is to develop a computer code capable of predicting single and two phase hydrodynamic behavior of fire suppressant fluids during transport through piping systems. This new code will be able to predict pressure losses and flow rates for a wide variety ...

  20. Flow Curve Determination for Non-Newtonian Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjahjadi, Mahari; Gupta, Santosh K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experimental program to examine flow curve determination for non-Newtonian fluids. Includes apparatus used (a modification of Walawender and Chen's set-up, but using a 50cc buret connected to a glass capillary through a Tygon tube), theoretical information, procedures, and typical results obtained. (JN)

  1. Application of IR thermography for unsteady fluid-flow research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppel, Tiit; Lahdeniemi, Matti; Ekholm, Ari

    1998-03-01

    In the recent years the IR thermography technique has been sued successfully as a new contactless instrument for gas and fluid flow research in pipes and on the surface of a flat plate. It is well known that most energy changes in the flow take place in the boundary layer. This is in turn important for the intensity of convective heat transfer in pipe flows and enables to measure processes connected with energy changes in the flow from outside the pipe. Series of measurements of suddenly accelerated and pulsating pipe flow were made at Satakunta Polytechnic, Technology Pori, Finland. The theoretical criterion describing the transition from laminar to turbulent regime is found depending on the critical thickness of the boundary layer of suddenly accelerated flow. At the moment of transition of the 'plug' type flow into turbulent flow, the velocities in the wall region diminish and this can be detected using the IR thermography from the wall temperature changes. the experimental results of the mean velocity development and transition criteria correspond to the theoretical calculations. The changes of the internal structure of the flow affect the convective heat transfer and this in turn influences the pipe wall temperature. IR thermography measures pipe wall temperature changes and consequently we can detect flow structure changes in the boundary layer in the accelerated and decelerated phase of the pulsating pipe flow.

  2. Review of coaxial flow gas core nuclear rocket fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    Almost all of the fluid mechanics research associated with the coaxial flow gas core reactor ended abruptly with the interruption of NASA's space nuclear program because of policy and budgetary considerations in 1973. An overview of program accomplishments is presented through a review of the experiments conducted and the analyses performed. Areas are indicated where additional research is required for a fuller understanding of cavity flow and of the factors which influence cold and hot flow containment. A bibliography is included with graphic material.

  3. Instability of fluid flow over saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, Tatyana; Kolchanova, Ekaterina; Lyubimov, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the stability of a fluid flow over a saturated porous medium. The problem is of importance due to the applications to washing out of contaminants from the bottom layer of vegetation, whose properties are similar to the properties of porous medium. In the case of porous medium with the relatively high permeability and porosity the flow involves a part of the fluid saturating the porous medium, with the tangential fluid velocity drop occurring because of the resistance of the solid matrix. The drop leads to the instability analogous to Kelvin-Helmholtz one accompanied by the formation of travelling waves. In the present paper we consider a two-layer system consisting of a pure fluid layer and a porous layer saturated by the fluid located underneath. The system is bounded by a rigid surface at the bottom and a non-deformable free surface at the top. It is under the gravity and inclined at a slight angle to the horizontal axis. The boundary conditions at the interface between the fluid and porous layers are the continuity of fluid velocities and the balance of normal and tangential stresses taking into account the resistance of the solid matrix with respect to the fluid flow near the interface [1-2]. The problem is solved in the framework of the Brinkman model applying the classical shooting algorithm with orthogonalization. The stability boundaries of the stationary fluid flow over the saturated porous medium with respect to the small oscillatory perturbations are obtained for the various values of the Darcy number and the ratio of the porous layer thickness to the full thickness of the system d. It was shown that at the d > 0.5 with increasing the porous layer thickness (or with decreasing of the fluid layer thickness) the stability threshold rises. This is because of the fact that the instability is primarily caused by perturbations located in the fluid layer. At the d < 0.5 the reduction of the porous layer thickness leads to the stability threshold

  4. ICEG2D: An Integrated Software Package for Automated Prediction of Flow Fields for Single-Element Airfoils with Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David S.; Soni, Bharat K.

    2000-01-01

    An integrated software package, ICEG2D, was developed to automate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for single-element airfoils with ice accretion. ICEG2D is designed to automatically perform three primary functions: (1) generating a grid-ready, surface definition based on the geometrical characteristics of the iced airfoil surface, (2) generating a high-quality grid using the generated surface point distribution, and (3) generating the input and restart files needed to run the general purpose CFD solver NPARC. ICEG2D can be executed in batch mode using a script file or in an interactive mode by entering directives from a command line. This report summarizes activities completed in the first year of a three-year research and development program to address issues related to CFD simulations for aircraft components with ice accretion. Specifically, this document describes the technology employed in the software, the installation procedure, and a description of the operation of the software package. Validation of the geometry and grid generation modules of ICEG2D is also discussed.

  5. High frequency flow-structural interaction in dense subsonic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Baw-Lin; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of the detailed dynamic behavior in rocket propellant feed systems and engines and other such high-energy fluid systems requires precise analysis to assure structural performance. Designs sometimes require placement of bluff bodies in a flow passage. Additionally, there are flexibilities in ducts, liners, and piping systems. A design handbook and interactive data base have been developed for assessing flow/structural interactions to be used as a tool in design and development, to evaluate applicable geometries before problems develop, or to eliminate or minimize problems with existing hardware. This is a compilation of analytical/empirical data and techniques to evaluate detailed dynamic characteristics of both the fluid and structures. These techniques have direct applicability to rocket engine internal flow passages, hot gas drive systems, and vehicle propellant feed systems. Organization of the handbook is by basic geometries for estimating Strouhal numbers, added mass effects, mode shapes for various end constraints, critical onset flow conditions, and possible structural response amplitudes. Emphasis is on dense fluids and high structural loading potential for fatigue at low subsonic flow speeds where high-frequency excitations are possible. Avoidance and corrective measure illustrations are presented together with analytical curve fits for predictions compiled from a comprehensive data base.

  6. ANFIS modeling for prediction of particle motions in fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdari, Arman; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2015-11-01

    Accurate dynamic analysis of parcel of solid particles driven in fluid flow system is of interest for many natural and industrial applications such as sedimentation process, study of cloud particles in atmosphere, etc. In this paper, numerical modeling of solid particles in incompressible flow using Eulerian-Lagrangian approach is carried out to investigate the dynamic behavior of particles in different flow conditions; channel and cavity flow. Although modern computers have been well developed, the high computational time and costs for this kind of problems are still demanded. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is used to simulate fluid flows and combined with the Lagrangian approach to predict the motion of particles in the range of masses. Some particles are selected, and subjected to Adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict the trajectory of moving solid particles. Using a hybrid learning procedure from computational particle movement, the ANFIS can construct an input-output mapping based on fuzzy if-then rules and stipulated computational fluid dynamics prediction pairs. The obtained results from ANFIS algorithm is validated and compared with the set of benchmark data provided based on point-like approach coupled with the LBM method.

  7. Squeeze flow of a Carreau fluid during sphere impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, J.; Marston, J. O.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    We present results from a combined numerical and experimental investigation into the squeeze flow induced when a solid sphere impacts onto a thin, ultra-viscous film of non-Newtonian fluid. We examine both the sphere motion through the liquid as well as the fluid flow field in the region directly beneath the sphere during approach to a solid plate. In the experiments we use silicone oil as the model fluid, which is well-described by the Carreau model. We use high-speed imaging and particle tracking to achieve flow visualisation within the film itself and derive the corresponding velocity fields. We show that the radial velocity either diverges as the gap between the sphere and the wall diminishes (Ztip → 0) or that it reaches a maximum value and then decays rapidly to zero as the sphere comes to rest at a non-zero distance (Ztip = Zmin) away from the wall. The horizontal shear rate is calculated and is responsible for significant viscosity reduction during the approach of the sphere. Our model of this flow, based on lubrication theory, is solved numerically and compared to experimental trials. We show that our model is able to correctly describe the physical features of the flow observed in the experiments.

  8. Map of fluid flow in fractal porous medium into fractal continuum flow.

    PubMed

    Balankin, Alexander S; Elizarraraz, Benjamin Espinoza

    2012-05-01

    This paper is devoted to fractal continuum hydrodynamics and its application to model fluid flows in fractally permeable reservoirs. Hydrodynamics of fractal continuum flow is developed on the basis of a self-consistent model of fractal continuum employing vector local fractional differential operators allied with the Hausdorff derivative. The generalized forms of Green-Gauss and Kelvin-Stokes theorems for fractional calculus are proved. The Hausdorff material derivative is defined and the form of Reynolds transport theorem for fractal continuum flow is obtained. The fundamental conservation laws for a fractal continuum flow are established. The Stokes law and the analog of Darcy's law for fractal continuum flow are suggested. The pressure-transient equation accounting the fractal metric of fractal continuum flow is derived. The generalization of the pressure-transient equation accounting the fractal topology of fractal continuum flow is proposed. The mapping of fluid flow in a fractally permeable medium into a fractal continuum flow is discussed. It is stated that the spectral dimension of the fractal continuum flow d(s) is equal to its mass fractal dimension D, even when the spectral dimension of the fractally porous or fissured medium is less than D. A comparison of the fractal continuum flow approach with other models of fluid flow in fractally permeable media and the experimental field data for reservoir tests are provided. PMID:23004869

  9. Map of fluid flow in fractal porous medium into fractal continuum flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Elizarraraz, Benjamin Espinoza

    2012-05-01

    This paper is devoted to fractal continuum hydrodynamics and its application to model fluid flows in fractally permeable reservoirs. Hydrodynamics of fractal continuum flow is developed on the basis of a self-consistent model of fractal continuum employing vector local fractional differential operators allied with the Hausdorff derivative. The generalized forms of Green-Gauss and Kelvin-Stokes theorems for fractional calculus are proved. The Hausdorff material derivative is defined and the form of Reynolds transport theorem for fractal continuum flow is obtained. The fundamental conservation laws for a fractal continuum flow are established. The Stokes law and the analog of Darcy's law for fractal continuum flow are suggested. The pressure-transient equation accounting the fractal metric of fractal continuum flow is derived. The generalization of the pressure-transient equation accounting the fractal topology of fractal continuum flow is proposed. The mapping of fluid flow in a fractally permeable medium into a fractal continuum flow is discussed. It is stated that the spectral dimension of the fractal continuum flow ds is equal to its mass fractal dimension D, even when the spectral dimension of the fractally porous or fissured medium is less than D. A comparison of the fractal continuum flow approach with other models of fluid flow in fractally permeable media and the experimental field data for reservoir tests are provided.

  10. Geometrodynamical Fluid Theory Applied to Dynamo Flows in Planetary Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Kayla; Miramontes, Diego; Scofield, Dillon

    2015-11-01

    Due to their reliance on a Newtonian viscous stress model, the traditional Navier-Stokes equations are of parabolic type; this in turn leads to acausal behavior of solutions to these equations, e.g., a localized disturbance at any point instantaneously affects the solution arbitrarily far away. Geometrodynamical fluid theory (GFT) avoids this problem through a relativistically covariant formulation of the flow equations. Using GFT, we derive the magnetohydrodynamic equations describing the balance of energy-momentum appropriate for dynamo flows in planetary interiors. These equations include interactions between magnetic and fluid vortex fields. We derive scaling laws from these equations and compare them with scaling laws derived from the traditional approach. Finally, we discuss implications of these scalings for flows in planetary dynamos.

  11. Neutron Radiography of Fluid Flow for Geothermal Energy Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, P.; Polsky, Y.; Anovitz, L.; Carmichael, J.; Bilheux, H.; Jacobsen, D.; Hussey, D.

    Enhanced geothermal systems seek to expand the potential for geothermal energy by engineering heat exchange systems within the earth. A neutron radiography imaging method has been developed for the study of fluid flow through rock under environmental conditions found in enhanced geothermal energy systems. For this method, a pressure vessel suitable for neutron radiography was designed and fabricated, modifications to imaging instrument setups were tested, multiple contrast agents were tested, and algorithms developed for tracking of flow. The method has shown success for tracking of single phase flow through a manufactured crack in a 3.81 cm (1.5 inch) diameter core within a pressure vessel capable of confinement up to 69 MPa (10,000 psi) using a particle tracking approach with bubbles of fluorocarbon-based fluid as the "particles" and imaging with 10 ms exposures.

  12. Neutron radigoraphy of fluid flow for geothermal energy research

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R.; Polsky, Yarom; Anovitz, L.; Carmichael, Justin R.; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Jacobson, David; Hussey, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced geothermal systems seek to expand the potential for geothermal energy by engineering heat exchange systems within the earth. A neutron radiography imaging method has been developed for the study of fluid flow through rock under environmental conditions found in enhanced geothermal energy systems. For this method, a pressure vessel suitable for neutron radiography was designed and fabricated, modifications to imaging instrument setups were tested, multiple contrast agents were tested, and algorithms developed for tracking of flow. The method has shown success for tracking of single phase flow through a manufactured crack in a 3.81 cm (1.5 inch) diameter core within a pressure vessel capable of confinement up to 69 MPa (10,000 psi) using a particle tracking approach with bubbles of fluorocarbon-based fluid as the “particles” and imaging with 10 ms exposures.

  13. Visualization of two-fluid flows of superfluid helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; La Mantia, Marco; Lathrop, Daniel P.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-03-01

    Cryogenic flow visualization techniques have been proved in recent years to be a very powerful experimental method to study superfluid turbulence. Micron-sized solid particles and metastable helium molecules are specifically being used to investigate in detail the dynamics of quantum flows. These studies belong to a well-established, interdisciplinary line of inquiry that focuses on the deeper understanding of turbulence, one of the open problem of modern physics, relevant to many research fields, ranging from fluid mechanics to cosmology. Progress made to date is discussed, to highlight its relevance to a wider scientific community, and future directions are outlined. The latter include, e.g., detailed studies of normal-fluid turbulence, dissipative mechanisms, and unsteady/oscillatory flows.

  14. Visualization of two-fluid flows of superfluid helium-4

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; La Mantia, Marco; Lathrop, Daniel P.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic flow visualization techniques have been proved in recent years to be a very powerful experimental method to study superfluid turbulence. Micron-sized solid particles and metastable helium molecules are specifically being used to investigate in detail the dynamics of quantum flows. These studies belong to a well-established, interdisciplinary line of inquiry that focuses on the deeper understanding of turbulence, one of the open problem of modern physics, relevant to many research fields, ranging from fluid mechanics to cosmology. Progress made to date is discussed, to highlight its relevance to a wider scientific community, and future directions are outlined. The latter include, e.g., detailed studies of normal-fluid turbulence, dissipative mechanisms, and unsteady/oscillatory flows. PMID:24704871

  15. Numerical Simulation of Flow-Induced Structure in Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takehiro

    2007-04-01

    It is important to investigate the flow-induced structure for the analysis of the mechanism of flow behavior of complex fluids. The present paper includes two topics in which the flow-induced structure is numerically investigated. The first topic treats the suspensions of disc-like particles under simple shear flows. Disc-like particles were modeled by oblate spheroid particles, and the Brownian dynamics simulation was performed for suspensions of the particles interacting via the Gay-Berne potential. This simulation confirmed that this model system was applicable to the analysis of flow of suspension of disc-like particles. The second one is the numerical simulation of the deformation behavior of a droplet in shear flows. The present simulation is the first step for the numerical simulation of the flow-induced structure in emulsions. This simulation can demonstrate the deformation behavior of droplet observed in experiments and predict effects of non-Newtonian property of fluids on the droplet deformation.

  16. 3D topographic correction of the BSR heat flow and detection of focused fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Li, Hong-Lin; Zou, Chang-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is a seismic indicator of the bottom of a gas hydrate stability zone. Its depth can be used to calculate the seafloor surface heat flow. The calculated BSR heat flow variations include disturbances from two important factors: (1) seafloor topography, which focuses the heat flow over regions of concave topography and defocuses it over regions of convex topography, and (2) the focused warm fluid flow within the accretionary prism coming from depths deeper than BSR. The focused fluid flow can be detected if the contribution of the topography to the BSR heat flow is removed. However, the analytical equation cannot solve the topographic effect at complex seafloor regions. We prove that 3D finite element method can model the topographic effect on the regional background heat flow with high accuracy, which can then be used to correct the topographic effect and obtain the BSR heat flow under the condition of perfectly flat topography. By comparing the corrected BSR heat flow with the regional background heat flow, focused fluid flow regions can be detected that are originally too small and cannot be detected using present-day equipment. This method was successfully applied to the midslope region of northern Cascadia subducting margin. The results suggest that the Cucumber Ridge and its neighboring area are positive heat flow anomalies, about 10%-20% higher than the background heat flow after 3D topographic correction. Moreover, the seismic imaging associated the positive heat flow anomaly areas with seabed fracture-cavity systems. This suggests flow of warm gas-carrying fluids along these high-permeability pathways, which could result in higher gas hydrate concentrations.

  17. Modelling of Turbulent Flows of Newtonian Fluids Based on Analogies to Flows of Non-Newtonian Fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Ning

    In this work, we derive necessary and sufficient conditions for turbulent secondary flows of a Newtonian fluid and necessary and sufficient conditions for laminar steady secondary flows of a Non-Newtonian fluid in a straight tube. It is found that there is a striking similarity between them. This similarity motivates the assumption used in developing a generalized non-linear K- epsilon model. Based on an analogy that exists between the constitutive relations for turbulent mean flows of a Newtonian fluid and that for laminar flows of a Non -Newtonian fluid, and making use of the constitutive framework of extended thermodynamics, we develop a generalized non -linear K-epsilon model with the same relaxation time as that which appears in the turbulence model proposed by Yakhot, Orszag, Thangam, Gatski and Speziale in 1992. We show that the non-linear K-epsilon model developed by Speziale in 1987 is unable to predict the relaxation phenomena of the Reynolds stresses because of involving no K and dotepsilon , and a coefficient of which leads to a negative relaxation time for the Reynolds stresses. To correct this deficiency, we resort to making use of the relaxation time in the model of Yakhot et al.. The approximate form of our generalized non-linear K-epsilon model, which can predict the relaxation phenomena of the Reynolds stresses and is frame indifferent, is an extension of the standard K-epsilon model and the non-linear K-epsilon model of Speziale.

  18. Stratigraphic analysis of 3-D and 2-D seismic data to delineate porous carbonate debris flow in permian strata along the northwestern margin of the Midlan

    SciTech Connect

    Pacht, J.A.; Brooks, L.; Messa, F.

    1995-12-31

    Carbonate debris flow are very important plays in Leonard strata along the northwestern margin of the Midland Basin. Delineation of these strata, however, is difficult and detailed stratigraphic analysis of both 2D and 3D seismic data is important in reducing risk. Porous debris flows are best developed during lowstand time. When sea-level falls to a point at or below the shelf margin, sand to boulder-sized clasts created by reef-front erosion are funneled through slope gullies onto the base of the slope. Large debris flows exhibit well-defined mounds which downlap onto the sequence boundary. Many of these flows, however, are too thin to exhibit discrete reflections. 3D seismic data are used to define subtle changes in amplitude and frequency which suggest presence of porous strata. Along the northwest shelf, porous debris flows exhibit lower amplitude (dim spots) and lower frequency than surrounding strata. They are commonly developed immediately downdip of major slump scars.

  19. Fluid structure interaction solver coupled with volume of fluid method for two-phase flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerroni, D.; Fancellu, L.; Manservisi, S.; Menghini, F.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we propose to study the behavior of a solid elastic object that interacts with a multiphase flow. Fluid structure interaction and multiphase problems are of great interest in engineering and science because of many potential applications. The study of this interaction by coupling a fluid structure interaction (FSI) solver with a multiphase problem could open a large range of possibilities in the investigation of realistic problems. We use a FSI solver based on a monolithic approach, while the two-phase interface advection and reconstruction is computed in the framework of a Volume of Fluid method which is one of the more popular algorithms for two-phase flow problems. The coupling between the FSI and VOF algorithm is efficiently handled with the use of MEDMEM libraries implemented in the computational platform Salome. The numerical results of a dam break problem over a deformable solid are reported in order to show the robustness and stability of this numerical approach.

  20. Fluid dynamics aspects of miniaturized axial-flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kang, Can; Huang, Qifeng; Li, Yunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Rotary blood pump (RBP) is a kind of crucial ventricular assist device (VAD) and its advantages have been evidenced and acknowledged in recent years. Among the factors that influence the operation performance and the durability of various rotary blood pumps, medium property and the flow features in pump's flow passages are conceivably significant. The major concern in this paper is the fluid dynamics aspects of such a kind of miniaturized pump. More specifically, the structural features of axial-flow blood pump and corresponding flow features are analyzed in detail. The narrow flow passage between blade tips and pump casing and the rotor-stator interaction (RSI) zone may exert a negative effect on the shear stress distribution in the blood flow. Numerical techniques are briefly introduced in view of their contribution to facilitating the optimal design of blood pump and the visualization of shear stress distribution and multiphase flow analysis. Additionally, with the development of flow measurement techniques, the high-resolution, effective and non-intrusive flow measurement techniques catering to the measurement of the flows inside rotary blood pumps are highly anticipated. PMID:24211957

  1. Noninvasive characterization of a flowing multiphase fluid using ultrasonic interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2003-11-11

    An apparatus for noninvasively monitoring the flow and/or the composition of a flowing liquid using ultrasound is described. The position of the resonance peaks for a fluid excited by a swept-frequency ultrasonic signal have been found to change frequency both in response to a change in composition and in response to a change in the flow velocity thereof. Additionally, the distance between successive resonance peaks does not change as a function of flow, but rather in response to a change in composition. Thus, a measurement of both parameters (resonance position and resonance spacing), once calibrated, permits the simultaneous determination of flow rate and composition using the apparatus and method of the present invention.

  2. Noninvasive Characterization Of A Flowing Multiphase Fluid Using Ultrasonic Interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2005-05-10

    An apparatus for noninvasively monitoring the flow and/or the composition of a flowing liquid using ultrasound is described. The position of the resonance peaks for a fluid excited by a swept-frequency ultrasonic signal have been found to change frequency both in response to a change in composition and in response to a change in the flow velocity thereof. Additionally, the distance between successive resonance peaks does not change as a function of flow, but rather in response to a change in composition. Thus, a measurement of both parameters (resonance position and resonance spacing), once calibrated, permits the simultaneous determination of flow rate and composition using the apparatus and method of the present invention.

  3. Noninvasive characterization of a flowing multiphase fluid using ultrasonic interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for noninvasively monitoring the flow and/or the composition of a flowing liquid using ultrasound is described. The position of the resonance peaks for a fluid excited by a swept-frequency ultrasonic signal have been found to change frequency both in response to a change in composition and in response to a change in the flow velocity thereof. Additionally, the distance between successive resonance peaks does not change as a function of flow, but rather in response to a change in composition. Thus, a measurement of both parameters (resonance position and resonance spacing), once calibrated, permits the simultaneous determination of flow rate and composition using the apparatus and method of the present invention.

  4. Changes in rabbit lacrimal gland fluid osmolarity with flow rate.

    PubMed

    Gilbard, J P; Dartt, D A

    1982-12-01

    To determine whether the osmolarity of rabbit lacrimal gland fluid (LGF) changes with flow rate, microvolumes (approximately 0.2 microliters) were collected directly from he cannulated glandular excretory duct of anesthetized rabbits. Low flow rates were obtained by collection of LGF 5 min after instillation of proparacaine: higher flow rates were obtained by stimulation with 0.45, 0.9, 3.8, or 15 micrograms of acetylcholine administered by local arterial injection. At low flow rates (less than 0.11 microliters/min), LGF osmolarity was 334 +/- 4 mOsm/L (n = 19). As flow rate increased to maximal rates (13.0 to 19.1 microliters/min), LGF osmolarity decreased to a value of 299 +/- 2 mOsm/L (n = 7). In keratoconjunctivitis sicca, increase in LGF osmolarity, as well as tear film evaporation, may contribute to elevated tear film osmolarity. PMID:7141824

  5. Flow in the well: computational fluid dynamics is essential in flow chamber construction

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Jörg; Frank, Wolfram; Schroten, Horst

    2007-01-01

    A perfusion system was developed to generate well defined flow conditions within a well of a standard multidish. Human vein endothelial cells were cultured under flow conditions and cell response was analyzed by microscopy. Endothelial cells became elongated and spindle shaped. As demonstrated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD), cells were cultured under well defined but time varying shear stress conditions. A damper system was introduced which reduced pulsatile flow when using volumetric pumps. The flow and the wall shear stress distribution were analyzed by CFD for the steady and unsteady flow field. Usage of the volumetric pump caused variations of the wall shear stresses despite the controlled fluid environment and introduction of a damper system. Therefore the use of CFD analysis and experimental validation is critical in developing flow chambers and studying cell response to shear stress. The system presented gives an effortless flow chamber setup within a 6-well standard multidish. PMID:19002993

  6. In vitro flow assessment: from PC-MRI to computational fluid dynamics including fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzke, Jonas; Rengier, Fabian; Weis, Christian; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Initiation and development of cardiovascular diseases can be highly correlated to specific biomechanical parameters. To examine and assess biomechanical parameters, numerical simulation of cardiovascular dynamics has the potential to complement and enhance medical measurement and imaging techniques. As such, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have shown to be suitable to evaluate blood velocity and pressure in scenarios, where vessel wall deformation plays a minor role. However, there is a need for further validation studies and the inclusion of vessel wall elasticity for morphologies being subject to large displacement. In this work, we consider a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model including the full elasticity equation to take the deformability of aortic wall soft tissue into account. We present a numerical framework, in which either a CFD study can be performed for less deformable aortic segments or an FSI simulation for regions of large displacement such as the aortic root and arch. Both of the methods are validated by means of an aortic phantom experiment. The computational results are in good agreement with 2D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) velocity measurements as well as catheter-based pressure measurements. The FSI simulation shows a characteristic vessel compliance effect on the flow field induced by the elasticity of the vessel wall, which the CFD model is not capable of. The in vitro validated FSI simulation framework can enable the computation of complementary biomechanical parameters such as the stress distribution within the vessel wall.

  7. Gravity-Driven Thin Film Flow of an Ellis Fluid.

    PubMed

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Kieweg, Sarah L

    2013-12-01

    The thin film lubrication approximation has been studied extensively for moving contact lines of Newtonian fluids. However, many industrial and biological applications of the thin film equation involve shear-thinning fluids, which often also exhibit a Newtonian plateau at low shear. This study presents new numerical simulations of the three-dimensional (i.e. two-dimensional spreading), constant-volume, gravity-driven, free surface flow of an Ellis fluid. The numerical solution was validated with a new similarity solution, compared to previous experiments, and then used in a parametric study. The parametric study centered around rheological data for an example biological application of thin film flow: topical drug delivery of anti-HIV microbicide formulations, e.g. hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) polymer solutions. The parametric study evaluated how spreading length and front velocity saturation depend on Ellis parameters. A lower concentration polymer solution with smaller zero shear viscosity (η 0), τ 1/2, and λ values spread further. However, when comparing any two fluids with any possible combinations of Ellis parameters, the impact of changing one parameter on spreading length depends on the direction and magnitude of changes in the other two parameters. In addition, the isolated effect of the shear-thinning parameter, λ, on the front velocity saturation depended on τ 1/2. This study highlighted the relative effects of the individual Ellis parameters, and showed that the shear rates in this flow were in both the shear-thinning and plateau regions of rheological behavior, emphasizing the importance of characterizing the full range of shear-rates in rheological measurements. The validated numerical model and parametric study provides a useful tool for future steps to optimize flow of a fluid with rheological behavior well-described by the Ellis constitutive model, in a range of industrial and biological applications. PMID:25309029

  8. Gravity-Driven Thin Film Flow of an Ellis Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O.

    2014-01-01

    The thin film lubrication approximation has been studied extensively for moving contact lines of Newtonian fluids. However, many industrial and biological applications of the thin film equation involve shear-thinning fluids, which often also exhibit a Newtonian plateau at low shear. This study presents new numerical simulations of the three-dimensional (i.e. two-dimensional spreading), constant-volume, gravity-driven, free surface flow of an Ellis fluid. The numerical solution was validated with a new similarity solution, compared to previous experiments, and then used in a parametric study. The parametric study centered around rheological data for an example biological application of thin film flow: topical drug delivery of anti-HIV microbicide formulations, e.g. hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) polymer solutions. The parametric study evaluated how spreading length and front velocity saturation depend on Ellis parameters. A lower concentration polymer solution with smaller zero shear viscosity (η0), τ1/2, and λ values spread further. However, when comparing any two fluids with any possible combinations of Ellis parameters, the impact of changing one parameter on spreading length depends on the direction and magnitude of changes in the other two parameters. In addition, the isolated effect of the shear-thinning parameter, λ, on the front velocity saturation depended on τ1/2. This study highlighted the relative effects of the individual Ellis parameters, and showed that the shear rates in this flow were in both the shear-thinning and plateau regions of rheological behavior, emphasizing the importance of characterizing the full range of shear-rates in rheological measurements. The validated numerical model and parametric study provides a useful tool for future steps to optimize flow of a fluid with rheological behavior well-described by the Ellis constitutive model, in a range of industrial and biological applications. PMID:25309029

  9. Steady and oscillatory fluid flows produce a similar osteogenic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Case, N; Sen, B; Thomas, J A; Styner, M; Xie, Z; Jacobs, C R; Rubin, J

    2011-03-01

    Mechanical loading induces positive changes in the skeleton due to direct effects on bone cells, which may include regulation of transcription factors that support osteoblast differentiation and function. Flow effects on osteoblast transcription factors have generally been evaluated after short exposures. In this work, we assayed flow effects on osteogenic genes at early and late time points in a preosteoblast (CIMC-4) cell line and evaluated both steady and oscillatory flows. Four hours of steady unidirectional flow decreased the level of RANKL mRNA 53 ± 7% below that of nonflowed cells, but increases in Runx2 and osterix mRNA (44 ± 22% and 129 ± 12%, respectively) were significant only after 12-19 h of continuous flow. Late flow effects on RANKL and osterix were also induced by an intermittent flow-rest protocol (four cycles of 1 h on/1 h off + overnight rest). Four hours of oscillatory flow decreased RANKL mRNA at this early time point (63 ± 2%) but did not alter either osterix or Runx2. When oscillatory flow was delivered using the intermittent flow-rest protocol, Runx2 and osterix mRNA increased significantly (85 ± 19% and 161 ± 22%, respectively). Both β-catenin and ERK1/2, known to be involved in RANKL regulation, were rapidly activated by steady flow. Inhibition of flow-activated ERK1/2 prevented the increase in osterix mRNA but not Runx2; Runx2 phosphorylation was increased by flow, an effect which likely contributes to osterix induction. This work shows that both steady and oscillatory fluid flows can support enhancement of an osteogenic phenotype. PMID:21165611

  10. Preconditioning methods for ideal and multiphase fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashish

    The objective of this study is to develop a preconditioning method for ideal and multiphase multispecies compressible fluid flow solver using homogeneous equilibrium mixture model. The mathematical model for fluid flow going through phase change uses density and temperature in the formulation, where the density represents the multiphase mixture density. The change of phase of the fluid is then explicitly determined using the equation of state of the fluid, which only requires temperature and mixture density. The method developed is based on a finite-volume framework in which the numerical fluxes are computed using Roe's approximate Riemann solver and the modified Harten, Lax and Van-leer scheme (HLLC). All speed Roe and HLLC flux based schemes have been developed either by using preconditioning or by directly modifying dissipation to reduce the effect of acoustic speed in its numerical dissipation when Mach number decreases. Preconditioning proposed by Briley, Taylor and Whitfield, Eriksson and Turkel are studied in this research, where as low dissipation schemes proposed by Rieper and Thornber, Mosedale, Drikakis, Youngs and Williams are also considered. Various preconditioners are evaluated in terms of development, performance, accuracy and limitations in simulations at various Mach numbers. A generalized preconditioner is derived which possesses well conditioned eigensystem for multiphase multispecies flow simulations. Validation and verification of the solution procedure are carried out on several small model problems with comparison to experimental, theoretical, and other numerical results. Preconditioning methods are evaluated using three basic geometries; 1) bump in a channel 2) flow over a NACA0012 airfoil and 3) flow over a cylinder, which are then compared with theoretical and numerical results. Multiphase capabilities of the solver are evaluated in cryogenic and non-cryogenic conditions. For cryogenic conditions the solver is evaluated by predicting

  11. Channelized fluid flow in oceanic crust reconciles heat-flow and permeability data

    PubMed

    Fisher; Becker

    2000-01-01

    Hydrothermal fluid circulation within the sea floor profoundly influences the physical, chemical and biological state of the crust and the oceans. Circulation within ridge flanks (in crust more than 1 Myr old) results in greater heat loss and fluid flux than that at ridge crests and persists for millions of years, thereby altering the composition of the crust and overlying ocean. Fluid flow in oceanic crust is, however, limited by the extent and nature of the rock's permeability. Here we demonstrate that the global data set of borehole permeability measurements in uppermost oceanic crust defines a trend with age that is consistent with changes in seismic velocity. This trend-which indicates that fluid flow should be greatly reduced in crust older than a few million years-would appear to be inconsistent with heat-flow observations, which on average indicate significant advective heat loss in crust up to 65 Myr old. But our calculations, based on a lateral flow model, suggest that regional-scale permeabilities are much higher than have been measured in boreholes. These results can be reconciled if most of the fluid flow in the upper crust is channelized through a small volume of rock, influencing the geometry of convection and the nature of fluid-rock interaction. PMID:10638753

  12. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  13. Investigation of particle lateral migration in sample-sheath flow of viscoelastic fluid and Newtonian fluid.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dan; Zhang, Jun; Yan, Sheng; Peng, Gangrou; Zhao, Qianbin; Alici, Gursel; Du, Hejun; Li, Weihua

    2016-08-01

    In this work, particle lateral migration in sample-sheath flow of viscoelastic fluid and Newtonian fluid was experimentally investigated. The 4.8-μm micro-particles were dispersed in a polyethylene oxide (PEO) viscoelastic solution, and then the solution was injected into a straight rectangular channel with a deionised (DI) water Newtonian sheath flow. Micro-particles suspended in PEO solution migrated laterally to a DI water stream, but migration in the opposite direction from a DI water stream to a PEO solution stream or from one DI water stream to another DI water stream could not be achieved. The lateral migration of particles depends on the viscoelastic properties of the sample fluids. Furthermore, the effects of channel length, flow rate, and PEO concentration were studied. By using viscoelastic sample flow and Newtonian sheath flow, a selective particle lateral migration can be achieved in a simple straight channel, without any external force fields. This particle lateral migration technique could be potentially used in solution exchange fields such as automated cell staining and washing in microfluidic platforms, and holds numerous biomedical applications. PMID:27140330

  14. Flow regime classification in air magnetic fluid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, T.; DeVuyst, F.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2008-05-01

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  15. Flow regime classification in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, T; De Vuyst, F; Yamaguchi, H

    2008-05-21

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors. PMID:21694270

  16. Magneto-polar fluid flow through a porous medium of variable permeability in slip flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, P. K.; Jha, A. K.; Sharma, R.

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical study is carried out to obtain an analytical solution of free convective heat transfer for the flow of a polar fluid through a porous medium with variable permeability bounded by a semi-infinite vertical plate in a slip flow regime. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicular to the porous surface. The free stream velocity follows an exponentially decreasing small perturbation law. Using the approximate method the expressions for the velocity, microrotation, and temperature are obtained. Further, the results of the skin friction coefficient, the couple stress coefficient and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are presented with various values of fluid properties and flow conditions.

  17. Nanometer-scale imaging and pore-scale fluid flow modeling inchalk

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, Liviu; Silin, Dmitriy; Radmilovich, Velimir

    2005-08-23

    For many rocks of high economic interest such as chalk,diatomite, tight gas sands or coal, nanometer scale resolution is neededto resolve the 3D-pore structure, which controls the flow and trapping offluids in the rocks. Such resolutions cannot be achieved with existingtomographic technologies. A new 3D imaging method, based on serialsectioning and using the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technology has beendeveloped. FIB allows for the milling of layers as thin as 10 nanometersby using accelerated Ga+ ions to sputter atoms from the sample surface.After each milling step, as a new surface is exposed, a 2D image of thissurface is generated. Next, the 2D images are stacked to reconstruct the3D pore or grain structure. Resolutions as high as 10 nm are achievableusing this technique. A new image processing method uses directmorphological analysis of the pore space to characterize thepetrophysical properties of diverse formations. In addition to estimationof the petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability, relativepermeability and capillary pressures), the method is used for simulationof fluid displacement processes, such as those encountered in variousimproved oil recovery (IOR) approaches. Computed with the new methodcapillary pressure curves are in good agreement with laboratory data. Themethod has also been applied for visualization of the fluid distributionat various saturations from the new FIB data.

  18. Identification of the wave speed and the second viscosity of cavitation flows with 2D RANS computations - Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaix, J.; Alligné, S.; Nicolet, C.; Avellan, F.; Münch, C.

    2015-12-01

    1D hydro-electric models are useful to predict dynamic behaviour of hydro-power plants. Regarding vortex rope and cavitation surge in Francis turbines, the 1D models require some inputs that can be provided by numerical simulations. In this paper, a 2D cavitating Venturi is considered. URANS computations are performed to investigate the dynamic behaviour of the cavitation sheet depending on the frequency variation of the outlet pressure. The results are used to calibrate and to assess the reliability of the 1D models.

  19. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos G.; Boucher, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit.

  20. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1997-06-24

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit. 2 figs.

  1. Governing equations for electro-conjugate fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoda, K.; Takemura, K.; Fukagata, K.; Yokota, S.; Edamura, K.

    2013-12-01

    An electro-conjugation fluid (ECF) is a kind of dielectric liquid, which generates a powerful flow when high DC voltage is applied with tiny electrodes. This study deals with the derivation of the governing equations for electro-conjugate fluid flow based on the Korteweg-Helmholtz (KH) equation which represents the force in dielectric liquid subjected to high DC voltage. The governing equations consist of the Gauss's law, charge conservation with charge recombination, the KH equation, the continuity equation and the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The KH equation consists of coulomb force, dielectric constant gradient force and electrostriction force. The governing equation gives the distribution of electric field, charge density and flow velocity. In this study, direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used in order to get these distribution at arbitrary time. Successive over-relaxation (SOR) method is used in analyzing Gauss's law and constrained interpolation pseudo-particle (CIP) method is used in analyzing charge conservation with charge recombination. The third order Runge-Kutta method and conservative second-order-accurate finite difference method is used in analyzing the Navier-Stokes equations with the KH equation. This study also deals with the measurement of ECF ow generated with a symmetrical pole electrodes pair which are made of 0.3 mm diameter piano wire. Working fluid is FF-1EHA2 which is an ECF family. The flow is observed from the both electrodes, i.e., the flow collides in between the electrodes. The governing equation successfully calculates mean flow velocity in between the collector pole electrode and the colliding region by the numerical simulation.

  2. Lagrangian analysis of fluid transport in empirical vortex ring flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Dabiri, John O.; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    2006-04-01

    In this paper we apply dynamical systems analyses and computational tools to fluid transport in empirically measured vortex ring flows. Measurements of quasisteadily propagating vortex rings generated by a mechanical piston-cylinder apparatus reveal lobe dynamics during entrainment and detrainment that are consistent with previous theoretical and numerical studies. In addition, the vortex ring wake of a free-swimming Aurelia aurita jellyfish is measured and analyzed in the framework of dynamical systems to elucidate similar lobe dynamics in a naturally occurring biological flow. For the mechanically generated rings, a comparison of the net entrainment rate based on the present methods with a previous Eulerian analysis shows good correspondence. However, the current Lagrangian framework is more effective than previous analyses in capturing the transport geometry, especially when the flow becomes more unsteady, as in the case of the free-swimming jellyfish. Extensions of these results to more complex flow geometries is suggested.

  3. A stochastic filtering technique for fluid flow velocity fields tracking.

    PubMed

    Cuzol, Anne; Mémin, Etienne

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we present a method for the temporal tracking of fluid flow velocity fields. The technique we propose is formalized within a sequential Bayesian filtering framework. The filtering model combines an Itô diffusion process coming from a stochastic formulation of the vorticity-velocity form of the Navier-Stokes equation and discrete measurements extracted from the image sequence. In order to handle a state space of reasonable dimension, the motion field is represented as a combination of adapted basis functions, derived from a discretization of the vorticity map of the fluid flow velocity field. The resulting nonlinear filtering problem is solved with the particle filter algorithm in continuous time. An adaptive dimensional reduction method is applied to the filtering technique, relying on dynamical systems theory. The efficiency of the tracking method is demonstrated on synthetic and real-world sequences. PMID:19443925

  4. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  5. Communications: Mechanical Deformation of Dendrites by Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilling, J.; Hellawell, A.

    1996-01-01

    It is generally accepted that liquid agitation during alloy solidification assists in crystal multiplication, as in dendrite fragmentation and the detachment of side arms in the mushy region of a casting. Even without deliberate stirring by electromagnetic or mechanical means, there is often vigorous interdendritic fluid flow promoted by natural thermosolutal convection. In this analysis, we shall estimate the stress at the root of a secondary dendrite arm of aluminum arising from the action of a flow of molten metal past the dendrite arm.

  6. Measuring fluid flow and heat output in seafloor hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, Leonid N.; Hurt, Robert S.; Smith, Joshua E.; Genc, Gence; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-12-01

    We review techniques for measuring fluid flow and advective heat output from seafloor hydrothermal systems and describe new anemometer and turbine flowmeter devices we have designed, built, calibrated, and tested. These devices allow measuring fluid velocity at high- and low-temperature focused and diffuse discharge sites at oceanic spreading centers. The devices perform at ocean floor depths and black smoker temperatures and can be used to measure flow rates ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Flow velocity is determined from the rotation rate of the rotor blades or paddle assembly. These devices have an open bearing design that eliminates clogging by particles or chemical precipitates as the fluid passes by the rotors. The devices are compact and lightweight enough for deployment from either an occupied or remotely operated submersible. The measured flow rates can be used in conjunction with vent temperature or geochemical measurements to obtain heat outputs or geochemical fluxes from both vent chimneys and diffuse flow regions. The devices have been tested on 30 Alvin dives on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and 3 Jason dives on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). We measured an anomalously low entrainment coefficient (0.064) and report 104 new measurements over a wide range of discharge temperatures (5°-363°C), velocities (2-199 cm/s), and depths (1517-2511 m). These include the first advective heat output measurements at the High Rise vent field and the first direct fluid flow measurement at Middle Valley. Our data suggest that black smoker heat output at the Main Endeavour vent field may have declined since 1994 and that after the 2005-2006 eruption, the high-temperature advective flow at the EPR 9°50'N field may have become more channelized, predominately discharging through the Bio 9 structure. We also report 16 measurements on 10 Alvin dives and 2 Jason dives with flow meters that predate devices described in this work and were used in the process of their development

  7. Simulation of flow past a sphere in a stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Stadler, Matthew; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to simulate spatially-evolving flow past a sphere in a stratified fluid. The immersed boundary method is used to treat the sphere inside the domain. The main objective of this study is to characterize the near wake region. Statistics of interest include the drag coefficient, separation angle, Strouhal number, and the spatial evolution of the velocity fluctuations and the defect velocity. In addition to quantitative statistics, visualizations of the vortex structures in the wake will also be provided and discussed. Results are compared and contrasted with previous experimental and numerical data for unstratified and stratified flow past a sphere.

  8. Fluid flow in fractured rock: Theory and application

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.C.S.; Hestir, K.; Karasaki, K.; Davey, A.; Peterson, J.; Kemeny, J.; Landsfeld, M.

    1989-07-01

    The phenomena of fluid flow in fractured rock is dominated by the fact that is not all parts of the domain are in hydraulic communication. In theory, it is possible to determine connectivity and permeability from stochastic parameters that describe the fracture geometry. When this approach is applied to the field we find it very difficult to sufficiently determine the geometry which controls the flow. Simulated annealing, an inverse technique which focus on finding the pattern of conductors may provide a better way to characterize these systems. 30 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. ICEd-ALE Treatment of 3-D Fluid Flow.

    1999-09-13

    Version: 00 SALE3D calculates three-dimensional fluid flow at all speeds, from the incompressible limit to highly supersonic. An implicit treatment of the pressure calculation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique provides this flow speed flexibility. In addition, the computing mesh may move with the fluid in a typical Lagrangian fashion, be held in an Eulerian manner, or move in some arbitrarily specified way to provide a continuous rezoning capability. This latitudemore » results from use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) treatment of the mesh. The partial differential equations solved are the Navier-Stokes equations and the mass and internal energy equations. The fluid pressure is determined from an equation of state and supplemented with an artificial viscous pressure for the computation of shock waves. The computing mesh consists of a three-dimensional network of arbitrarily shaped, six-sided deformable cells, and a variety of user-selectable boundary conditions are provided in the program.« less

  10. Microbubbles reveal chiral fluid flows in bacterial swarms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yilin; Hosu, Basarab G.; Berg, Howard C.

    2011-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria can swim within a thin film of fluid that coats a solid surface, such as agar; this is a means for colony expansion known as swarming. We found that micrometer-sized bubbles make excellent tracers for the motion of this fluid. The microbubbles form explosively when small aliquots of an aqueous suspension of droplets of a water-insoluble surfactant (Span 83) are placed on the agar ahead of a swarm, as the water is absorbed by the agar and the droplets are exposed to air. Using these bubbles, we discovered an extensive stream (or river) of swarm fluid flowing clockwise along the leading edge of an Escherichia coli swarm, at speeds of order 10 μm/s, about three times faster than the swarm expansion. The flow is generated by the action of counterclockwise rotating flagella of cells stuck to the substratum, which drives fluid clockwise around isolated cells (when viewed from above), counterclockwise between cells in dilute arrays, and clockwise in front of cells at the swarm edge. The river provides an avenue for long-range communication in the swarming colony, ideally suited for secretory vesicles that diffuse poorly. These findings broaden our understanding of swarming dynamics and have implications for the engineering of bacterial-driven microfluidic devices. PMID:21300887

  11. Cytoskeletal Dynamics and Fluid Flow in Drosophila Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Canio, Gabriele; Goldstein, Raymond; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    The biological world includes a broad range of phenomena in which transport in a fluid plays a central role. Among these is the fundamental issue of cell polarity arising during development, studied historically using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. The polarity of the oocyte is known to be induced by the translocation of mRNAs by kinesin motor proteins along a dense microtubule cytoskeleton, a process which also induces cytoplasmic streaming. Recent experimental observations have revealed the remarkable fluid-structure interactions that occur as the streaming flows back-react on the microtubules. In this work we use a combination of theory and simulations to address the interplay between the fluid flow and the configuration of cytoskeletal filaments leading to the directed motion inside the oocyte. We show in particular that the mechanical coupling between the fluid motion and the orientation of the microtubules can lead to a transition to coherent motion within the oocyte, as observed. Supported by EPSRC and ERC Advanced Investigator Grant 247333.

  12. Optimization of micropillar sequences for fluid flow sculpting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoecklein, Daniel; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2016-01-01

    Inertial fluid flow deformation around pillars in a microchannel is a new method for controlling fluid flow. Sequences of pillars have been shown to produce a rich phase space with a wide variety of flow transformations. Previous work has successfully demonstrated manual design of pillar sequences to achieve desired transformations of the flow cross section, with experimental validation. However, such a method is not ideal for seeking out complex sculpted shapes as the search space quickly becomes too large for efficient manual discovery. We explore fast, automated optimization methods to solve this problem. We formulate the inertial flow physics in microchannels with different micropillar configurations as a set of state transition matrix operations. These state transition matrices are constructed from experimentally validated streamtraces for a fixed channel length per pillar. This facilitates modeling the effect of a sequence of micropillars as nested matrix-matrix products, which have very efficient numerical implementations. With this new forward model, arbitrary micropillar sequences can be rapidly simulated with various inlet configurations, allowing optimization routines quick access to a large search space. We integrate this framework with the genetic algorithm and showcase its applicability by designing micropillar sequences for various useful transformations. We computationally discover micropillar sequences for complex transformations that are substantially shorter than manually designed sequences. We also determine sequences for novel transformations that were difficult to manually design. Finally, we experimentally validate these computational designs by fabricating devices and comparing predictions with the results from confocal microscopy.

  13. Yield Hardening of Electrorheological Fluids in Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helal, Ahmed; Qian, Bian; McKinley, Gareth H.; Hosoi, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    Electrorheological fluids offer potential for developing rapidly actuated hydraulic devices where shear forces or pressure-driven flow are present. In this study, the Bingham yield stress of electrorheological fluids with different particle volume fractions is investigated experimentally in wall-driven and pressure-driven flow modes using measurements in a parallel-plate rheometer and a microfluidic channel, respectively. A modified Krieger-Dougherty model can be used to describe the effects of the particle volume fraction on the yield stress and is in good agreement with the viscometric data. However, significant yield hardening in pressure-driven channel flow is observed and attributed to an increase and eventual saturation of the particle volume fraction in the channel. A phenomenological physical model linking the densification and consequent microstructure to the ratio of the particle aggregation time scale compared to the convective time scale is presented and used to predict the enhancement in yield stress in channel flow, enabling us to reconcile discrepancies in the literature between wall-driven and pressure-driven flows.

  14. Experimental study of fluid flows in a precessing cylindrical annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yufeng; Noir, Jerome; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    The flow inside a precessing fluid cavity has been given particular attention since the end of the 19th century in geophysical and industrial contexts. The present study aims at shedding light on the underlying mechanism by which the flow inside a precessing cylindrical annulus transitions from laminar to multiple scale complex structures. We address this problem experimentally using ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry to diagnose the fluid velocity in a rotating and precessing cylindrical annulus. When precession is weak, the flow can be described as a superposition of forced inertial modes. Above a critical value of the precession rate, the forced flow couples with two free inertial modes satisfying triadic resonance conditions, leading to the classical growth and collapse. Using a Bayesian approach, we extract the wavenumber, frequency, growth rate, and amplitude of each mode involved in the instability. In some cases, we observe for the first time ever experimentally two pairs of free modes coexisting with the forced flow. At larger precession rates, we do not observe triadic resonance any more, instead we observe several harmonics whose frequencies are integer multiples of the rotation frequency.

  15. GEOSIM: A numerical model for geophysical fluid flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Karen A.; Miller, Timothy L.; Lu, Huei-Iin

    1991-01-01

    A numerical model which simulates geophysical fluid flow in a wide range of problems is described in detail, and comparisons of some of the model's results are made with previous experimental and numerical studies. The model is based upon the Boussinesq Navier-Stokes equations in spherical coordinates, which can be reduced to a cylindrical system when latitudinal walls are used near the pole and the ratio of latitudinal length to the radius of the sphere is small. The equations are approximated by finite differences in the meridional plane and spectral decomposition in the azimuthal direction. The user can specify a variety of boundary and initial conditions, and there are five different spectral truncation options. The results of five validation cases are presented: (1) the transition between axisymmetric flow and baroclinic wave flow in the side heated annulus; (2) the steady baroclinic wave of the side heated annulus; (3) the wave amplitude vacillation of the side heated annulus; (4) transition to baroclinic wave flow in a bottom heated annulus; and (5) the Spacelab Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (spherical) experiment.

  16. Fluid flow measurements by means of vibration monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagna, Mauro M.; Dinardo, Giuseppe; Fabbiano, Laura; Vacca, Gaetano

    2015-11-01

    The achievement of accurate fluid flow measurements is fundamental whenever the control and the monitoring of certain physical quantities governing an industrial process are required. In that case, non-intrusive devices are preferable, but these are often more sophisticated and expensive than those which are more common (such as nozzles, diaphrams, Coriolis flowmeters and so on). In this paper, a novel, non-intrusive, simple and inexpensive methodology is presented to measure the fluid flow rate (in a turbulent regime) whose physical principle is based on the acquisition of transversal vibrational signals induced by the fluid itself onto the pipe walls it is flowing through. Such a principle of operation would permit the use of micro-accelerometers capable of acquiring and transmitting the signals, even by means of wireless technology, to a control room for the monitoring of the process under control. A possible application (whose feasibility will be investigated by the authors in a further study) of this introduced technology is related to the employment of a net of micro-accelerometers to be installed on pipeline networks of aqueducts. This apparatus could lead to the faster and easier detection and location of possible leaks of fluid affecting the pipeline network with more affordable costs. The authors, who have previously proven the linear dependency of the acceleration harmonics amplitude on the flow rate, here discuss an experimental analysis of this functional relation with the variation in the physical properties of the pipe in terms of its diameter and constituent material, to find the eventual limits to the practical application of the measurement methodology.

  17. The asymptotic degrees of freedom of fluid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Foias, C.

    1990-09-01

    We have obtained rigorous estimates for the attractors of some basic dissipative differential equations which are within the physical or numerical ranges (e.g. 2D Navier-Stokes equations). We have shown that the ring laser cavity equations have a finite dimensional attractor. We have constructed inertial manifolds for a large class of dissipative differential equations (e.g. Kuramoto-Sivashinsky and Ginzberg-Landau equations). For a large class of equations including the 2D Navier-Stokes equations we have introduced several approximate intertial manifolds which yield new approximative ordinary differential equations with better error estimates then those of the usual Galerkin approximations. We have evidence that the new approximating schemes lead to computational improvements upon the Galerkin schemes. We have given a normal form for the Navier-Stokes which allows the explicit asymptotic integration of the equations. We have also proposed a new theoretical approach to decaying homogeneous turbulence. We also made some contribution to robust control theory which may be relevant to fluid dynamics.

  18. Draft: Modeling Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media Including Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Area

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, Jennifer; Hassanizadeh, S Majid

    2008-01-01

    We present a new numerical model for macro-scale twophase flow in porous media which is based on a physically consistent theory of multi-phase flow.The standard approach for modeling the flow of two fluid phases in a porous medium consists of a continuity equation for each phase, an extended form of Darcy’s law as well as constitutive relationships for relative permeability and capillary pressure. This approach is known to have a number of important shortcomings and, in particular, it does not account for the presence and role of fluid - fluid interfaces. An alternative is to use an extended model which is founded on thermodynamic principles and is physically consistent. In addition to the standard equations, the model uses a balance equation for specific interfacial area. The constitutive relationship for capillary pressure involves not only saturation, but also specific interfacial area. We show how parameters can be obtained for the alternative model using experimental data from a new kind of flow cell and present results of a numerical modeling study

  19. An experimental study of recirculating flow through fluid sediment interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, A.; Basu, A. J.; Pietrzyk, U.; Raffel, M.

    1999-03-01

    We report here visualizations and quantitative measurements of scalar transport, under the influence of rotation, through permeable sediments with an overlying fluid layer. The experimental set-up considered here is a stationary cylinder containing a fluid-saturated porous medium up to its midheight, with supernatant water on top. A rotating lid generates, in the upper fluid region, a flow that partially percolates into the porous layer below. The velocity field in the fluid layer is obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Further, dye transport from the sediment is studied using two different techniques. The first one is positron emission tomography (PET), a non-invasive method which allowed us to ‘see’ through the opaque solid matrix, and to obtain full three-dimensional pictures of dye transport through the sediment. The second one is digital photographic visualization from outside, and subsequent image processing in order to obtain the near-wall dye-washout depth. The experimental data suggest that the temporal evolution of washout depth for different sediments follows near-logarithmic behaviour. This finding is of importance for the a priori estimation of the transport of fluid and other solute substances in sandy aquatic sediments.

  20. A direct sensitivity comparison between flow-modulated comprehensive 2D and 1D GC in untargeted and targeted MS-based experiments.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Franchina, Flavio A; Zoccali, Mariosimone; Bonaccorsi, Ivana; Cacciola, Francesco; Mondello, Luigi

    2013-09-01

    The present contribution is focused on the measurement of the analytical sensitivity attained in untargeted/targeted MS/MS experiments, performed using flow-modulator comprehensive 2D and 1D GC. The comprehensive 2D experiment was performed by diverting part of the high flow (circa 80%) to flush the accumulation loop (about 28 mL/min) to waste, to reduce the gas flow entering the ion source. 1D analyses were performed through: (i) unmodulated and (ii) single column applications. An equivalent temperature program was applied in the modulated and unmodulated analyses, while a faster one was employed in the single column one. In all application types, the (same) triple quadrupole instrument was operated in the full-scan and multiple reaction monitoring modes. A genuine sweet orange oil and the same sample spiked with 20 phytosanitary compounds were employed to reach the research objective. The results highlight the problems related to the flow modulation-MS combination. Specifically, it was found that sensitivity was on average three to four times higher in unmodulated and optimized single-column applications. PMID:23868497

  1. Application of rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA) to intermittent fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows, 2D MHD simulation and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Chang, T.

    2010-12-01

    A new method in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events was introduced by Cheng and Wu [Chang T. and Wu C.C., Physical Rev, E77, 045401(R), 2008]. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has been demonstrated using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. It has also been successfully applied to in-situ solar wind observations [Chang T., Wu, C.C. and Podesta, J., AIP Conf Proc. 1039, 75, 2008], and the broadband electric field oscillations from the auroral zone [Tam, S.W.Y. et al., Physical Rev, E81, 036414, 2010]. We take the next step in this procedure. By using the ROMA spectra and the scaled probability distribution functions (PDFs), raw PDFs can be calculated, which can be compared directly with PDFs from observations or simulation results. In addition to 2D MHD simulation results and in-situ solar wind observation, we show clearly using the ROMA analysis the multifractal character of the 3D fluid simulation data obtained from the JHU turbulence database cluster at http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu. In particular, we show the scaling of the non-symmetrical PDF for the parallel-velocity fluctuations of this 3D fluid data.

  2. Nanoscale transient porosity controls large-scale metamorphic fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plümper, Oliver; Botan, Alexandru; Los, Catharina; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    The reaction of fluids with rocks is fundamental for Earth's dynamics as they facilitate heat/mass transfer and induce volume changes, weaknesses and instabilities in rock masses that localize deformation enabling tectonic responses to plate motion. During these fluid-rock interactions it is the ability of a rock to transmit fluid, its permeability, that controls the rates of metamorphic reactions. However, although some geological environments (e.g., sediments) are open to fluids, the majority of solid rocks (e.g., granites, elcogites, peridotites, etc.) are nearly impermeable. Surprisingly though, even in rocks that are nominally impermeable widespread fluid-rock interactions are observed leading to the question: How can fluids migrate through vast amounts of nominally impermeable rocks? Here we investigate one of the most wide-spread fluid-mediated metamorphic processes in the Earth's crust, the albitization of feldspatic rocks. We show that fluid flow and element mobilization during albitization is controlled by an interaction between grain boundary diffusion and reaction front migration through an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation process. Using a combination of focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM)-assisted nanotomography combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the porosity is dictated by pore channels with a pore diameter ranging between 10 to 100 nm. Three-dimensional visualization of the feldspar pore network reveals that the pore channels must have been connected during the replacement reaction. Analysis of the pore aspect ratios suggests that a Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability associated to surface energy minimization caused the disconnection of the pore channels. Fluid transport in nanometer-sized objects with at least one characteristic dimension below 100 nm enables the occurrence of physical phenomena that are impossible at bigger length scales. Thus, on the basis of our microstructural

  3. Parallel Plate Flow of a Third-Grade Fluid and a Newtonian Fluid With Variable Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, Volkan; Pakdemirli, Mehmet; Aksoy, Yiğit

    2016-07-01

    Steady-state parallel plate flow of a third-grade fluid and a Newtonian fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity is considered. Approximate analytical solutions are constructed using the newly developed perturbation-iteration algorithms. Two different perturbation-iteration algorithms are used. The velocity and temperature profiles obtained by the iteration algorithms are contrasted with the numerical solutions as well as with the regular perturbation solutions. It is found that the perturbation-iteration solutions converge better to the numerical solutions than the regular perturbation solutions, in particular when the validity criteria of the regular perturbation solution are not satisfied. The new analytical approach produces promising results in solving complex fluid problems.

  4. Traveling hairpin-shaped fluid vortices in plane Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, K.; Nagata, M.

    2010-11-01

    Traveling-wave solutions are discovered in plane Couette flow. They are obtained when the so-called steady hairpin vortex state found recently by Gibson [J. Fluid Mech. 638, 243 (2009)]10.1017/S0022112009990863 and Itano and Generalis [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 114501 (2009)]10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.114501 is continued to sliding Couette flow geometry between two concentric cylinders by using the radius ratio as a homotopy parameter. It turns out that in the plane Couette flow geometry two traveling waves having the phase velocities with opposite signs are associated with their appearance from the steady hairpin vortex state, where the amplitude of the phase velocities increases gradually from zero as the Reynolds number is increased. The solutions obviously inherit the streaky structure of the hairpin vortex state, but shape preserving flow patterns propagate in the streamwise direction. Other striking features of the solution are asymmetric mean flow profiles and strong quasistreamwise vortices which occupy the vicinity of only the top or bottom moving boundary, depending on the sign of the phase velocity. Furthermore, we find that the pitchfork bifurcation associated with the appearance of the solution becomes imperfect when the flow is perturbed by a Poiseuille flow component.

  5. Monitoring Fluid Flow in Fractured Carbonate Rocks Using Seismic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2008-12-01

    The physical properties of carbonate rock are strongly influenced by the rock fabric which depends on the depositional environment, diagenetic and tectonic processes. The most common form of heterogeneity is layering caused by a variation in porosity among layers and within layers. The variation in porosity among layers leads to anisotropic behavior in the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of carbonate rocks. We present the results of a laboratory study to examine the effect of fabric-controlled layering on fluid flow and seismic wave propagation through intact and fractured carbonate rock. Experiments were performed on cubic samples of Austin Chalk Cordova Cream. Samples AC1, AC5 and AC6 are cubic samples that measure 100 mm on edge. The samples were sealed and contained three inlet and three outlet ports for fluid invasion experiments. Two orthogonal seismic arrays were used to record both compressional and shear wave transmission through intact and fractured samples. The arrays used piezoelectric contact transducers with a central frequency 1.0 MHz. Between the two arrays, sixteen sources and sixteen receivers were used. Seismic measurements were made on the samples as a function of stress and during fluid saturation. The location of the invading fluid front as a function of time was monitored by using the peak-to-peak amplitude of the transmitted signals. The front was assumed to be between a source-receiver pair when the signal amplitude decreased by 50% over the initial value. The hydraulic gradient was parallel and perpendicular to the layers for AC5 and AC6, respectively. Sample AC1 was fractured and flow ports were established on the edges of the fracture plane. The weakly directed fabric controlled the rate at which fluid flowed through the samples. From the seismic data on AC6, the fluid first spread vertically along a layer before flowing across the layers. For AC6, it took the fluid two and half hours to flow between the inlet and the outlet

  6. Fluid Dynamical Instabilities in a Partially Ionized Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Hideyuki; Nishi, Ryoichi

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, we reveal that there are two fluid dynamical instabilities for a partially ionized flow with quasi-static contraction: the instability of the Alfvén wave and the two-fluid instability. We find them by means of linear perturbation analysis, adopting the following unperturbed state; the magnetic field has a gradient against the terminal flow of neutrals, which are accelerated because of gravity. The terminal velocity is determined by the balance between the gravity and the friction force, which originates from the ion-neutral collisions. The instability of the Alfvén wave occurs because of the imbalance of the restoring force, which is generated by the unperturbed background magnetic field if a wavelength is longer than a critical wavelength. Indeed, this critical wavelength is obtained from the comparison between the local restoring efficiency and that of the background unperturbed field. It is estimated as of the order of ~0.01 pc when the grains are the dominant charged particles. Thus, we speculate that this instability is responsible for the formation of the observed small-scale structure in the molecular clouds. If the relative speed between the ions and the neutrals is larger than the thermal speed of the neutrals, there is another instability, i.e., the so-called two-fluid instability. Fortunately, although the two-fluid instability coexists with the instability of the Alfvén wave, structure formation via the instability of the Alfvén wave is possible since its growth rate is larger than that of the two-fluid instability.

  7. Lymphatic vessel development: fluid flow and valve-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Kume, Tsutomu

    2015-08-01

    Hemodynamic forces regulate many aspects of blood vessel disease and development, including susceptibility to atherosclerosis and remodeling of primary blood vessels into a mature vascular network. Vessels of the lymphatic circulatory system are also subjected to fluid flow-associated forces, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which these forces regulate the formation and maintenance of lymphatic vessels remain largely uncharacterized. This issue of the JCI includes two articles that begin to address how fluid flow influences lymphatic vessel development and function. Sweet et al. demonstrate that lymph flow is essential for the remodeling of primary lymphatic vessels, for ensuring the proper distribution of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and for the development and maturation of lymphatic valves. Kazenwadel et al. show that flow-induced lymphatic valve development is initiated by the upregulation of GATA2, which has been linked to lymphedema in patients with Emberger syndrome. Together, these observations and future studies inspired by these results have potential to lead to the development of strategies for the treatment of lymphatic disorders. PMID:26214518

  8. Pressure of Newtonian fluid flow through curved pipes and elbows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Xinxin; Sun, Haosen; Chen, Mingjiu; Lu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Yuancheng; Liu, Xueting

    2013-08-01

    Under conditions of high temperature and high pressure, the non-uniformity of pressure loads has intensified the stress concentration which impacts the safety of curved pipes and elbows. This paper focuses on the pressure distribution and flow characteristic in a curved 90° bend pipe with circular cross-sections, which are widely used in industrial applications. These flow and pressure characteristics in curved bend pipes have been researched by employing numerical simulation and theoretical analysis. Based on the dimensionless analysis method a formula for the pressure of Newtonian fluid flow through the elbow pipes is deduced. Also the pressure distributions of several elbows with different curvature ratio R/D are obtained by numerical methods. The influence of these non-dimensional parameters such as non-dimensional curvature ratio, Reynolds number and non-dimensional axial angle α and circumferential angle β on the pressure distribution in elbow pipes is discussed in detail. A number of important results have been achieved. This paper provides theoretical and numerical methods to understand the mechanical property of fluid flow in elbow pipes, to analyze the stress and to design the wall thickness of elbow pipes.

  9. Fluid and Cell Transport Through a Microfabricated Flow Chamber.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, James Patrick

    We use silicon processing techniques to construct microfabricated fluid flow chambers. Custom designed silicon wafers with feature sizes of 1-10 μm and etch depths from 0.5-5 μm are anodically bonded to Pyrex glass to create a hermetically sealed chamber. A pressure gradient is placed across the chamber to induce bulk fluid flow. Properties of fluid flow and red blood cells are recorded using video microscopy. The human red blood cell is ideal for studying cellular membranes. It is an 8 μm diameter biconcave disc containing a membrane and associated cytoskeleton which surrounds a thick solution of hemoglobin. The material properties of individual red blood cells have been extensively studied in the past using micropipettes. However, we can get statistics on hundreds of red blood cells by fabricating an array of narrow channels 4 mu m x 4 μm in cross-section (the diameter of the smallest capillaries in the human body) and 13 μm long. These narrow channels are followed by an open space. This geometry forces red cells to repeatedly fold and unfold. Using these arrays, we show that the shear modulus of the membrane does not have a unique value, but has a distribution that ranges from 3-12 times 10 ^{-6} N/m. The surprisingly wide distribution is not due to cell size or cell age. It does seem to be correlated with intracellular Ca^ {2+}<=vels, leading us to believe that cell rigidity is controlled by some active process. We also report observations on red blood cells changing their rigidity by factors of fifty over tens of seconds. These microfabricated flow chambers are ideal for studying fluid flow through porous media. We construct custom designed two-dimensional environments with micron size features. These environments can be described by simple analytical theories which also attempt to describe flow through rock. For example, we image viscous imbibition of water into a percolation grid with 5 mu m edges in real time, and measure the permeability as a function

  10. OCT-based three-dimensional, three vector component imaging of cilia-driven fluid flow for developmental biology (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Zhou, Kevin C.; Gamm, Ute A.; Bhandari, Vineet; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    One critical barrier to the robust study of cilia-driven fluid flow in developmental biology is a lack of methods for acquiring three-dimensional (3D) images of three vector component (3C) measurements of flow velocities. A 3D3C map of cilia-driven fluid flow quantifies the flow speed along three axes (e.g. three Cartesian vector components v_x, v_y, v_z) at each point in 3D space. 3D3C quantification is important because cilia-driven fluid flow is not amenable to simplifying assumptions (e.g. parabolic flow profile. Such quantification may enable systematically detailed characterization of performance using shear force and power dissipation metrics derived from 3D3C flow velocity fields. We report our OCT-based results in developing methods for the 3D3C quantification of cilia-driven flow fields. First, we used custom scan protocols and reconstruction algorithms to synthesize 3D3C flow velocity fields from 2D2C fields generated using correlation-based methods (directional dynamic light scattering and digital particle image velocimetry). Xenopus results include flow driven by ciliated embryo skin and flow driven by ciliated ependymal cells in developing brain ventricles. Second, we developed a new approach to particle tracking velocimetry that generates 2D2.5C (2.5C: v_x,|v_y|,v_z) velocity fields from single-plane 2D image acquisitions. We demonstrated this particle streak velocimetry method in calibrated flow phantoms and in flow driven by ciliated Xenopus embryo skin. Additionally, we have preliminary results extending particle streak velocimetry to 3D3C in calibrated flow phantoms with ongoing work in Xenopus embryos.

  11. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, G. A.; Trapp, J. A.

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles, thus, avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  12. Local mesh refinement for incompressible fluid flow with free surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaka, H.; Kajiwara, H.; Ogura, K.

    1995-09-01

    A new local mesh refinement (LMR) technique has been developed and applied to incompressible fluid flows with free surface boundaries. The LMR method embeds patches of fine grid in arbitrary regions of interest. Hence, more accurate solutions can be obtained with a lower number of computational cells. This method is very suitable for the simulation of free surface movements because free surface flow problems generally require a finer computational grid to obtain adequate results. By using this technique, one can place finer grids only near the surfaces, and therefore greatly reduce the total number of cells and computational costs. This paper introduces LMR3D, a three-dimensional incompressible flow analysis code. Numerical examples calculated with the code demonstrate well the advantages of the LMR method.

  13. Advanced numerics for multi-dimensional fluid flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanka, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the development and use of mathematical models for the simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer and combustion processes in engineering equipment. The equations representing the multi-dimensional transport of mass, momenta and species are numerically solved by finite-difference or finite-element techniques. However despite the multiude of differencing schemes and solution algorithms, and the advancement of computing power, the calculation of multi-dimensional flows, especially three-dimensional flows, remains a mammoth task. The following discussion is concerned with the author's recent work on the construction of accurate discretization schemes for the partial derivatives, and the efficient solution of the set of nonlinear algebraic equations resulting after discretization. The present work has been jointly supported by the Ramjet Engine Division of the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  14. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A. ); Trapp, J.A. Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles thus avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  15. Flow behaviour of negatively buoyant jets in immiscible ambient fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, A.; Phillips, J. C.; Mier-Torrecilla, M.; Idelsohn, S. R.; Oñate, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate experimentally the injection of a negatively buoyant jet into a homogenous immiscible ambient fluid. Experiments are carried out by injecting a jet of dyed fresh water through a nozzle in the base of a cylindrical tank containing rapeseed oil. The fountain inlet flow rate and nozzle diameter were varied to cover a wide range of Richardson Ri (8 × 10-4 < Ri < 1.98), Reynolds Re (467 < Re < 5,928) and Weber We (2.40 < We < 308.56) numbers. Based on the Re, Ri and We values for the experiments, we have determined a regime map to define how these values may control the occurrence of the observed flow types. Whereas Ri plays a stronger role when determining the maximum penetration height, the effect of the Reynolds number is stronger predicting the flow behaviour for a specific nozzle diameter and injection velocity.

  16. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A.; Trapp, J.A. |

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles thus avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  17. Identification of the wave speed and the second viscosity in cavitating flow with 2D RANS computations - Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alligné, S.; Decaix, J.; Nicolet, C.; Avellan, F.; Münch, C.

    2015-12-01

    The 1D modelling of cavitation vortex rope dynamics in Francis turbine draft tube is decisive for prediction of pressure fluctuations in the system. However, models are defined with parameters which values must be quantified either experimentally or numerically. In this paper a methodology based on CFD simulations is setup to identify these parameters by exciting the flow through outlet boundary condition. A simplified test case is considered to assess if 1D cavitation model parameters can be identified from CFD simulations. It is shown that a low wave speed and a second viscosity due to the cavitating flow can be identified.

  18. Fluid Flow Prediction with Development System Interwell Connectivity Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakov, M.; Deeva, T.; Pustovskikh, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper interwell connectivity has been studied. First of all, literature review of existing methods was made which is divided into three groups: Statistically-Based Methods, Material (fluid) Propagation-Based Methods and Potential (pressure) Change Propagation-Based Method. The disadvantages of the first and second groups are as follows: methods do not involve fluid flow through porous media, ignore any changes of well conditions (BHP, skin factor, etc.). The last group considers changes of well conditions and fluid flow through porous media. In this work Capacitance method (CM) has been chosen for research. This method is based on material balance and uses weight coefficients lambdas to assess well influence. In the next step synthetic model was created for examining CM. This model consists of an injection well and a production well. CM gave good results, it means that flow rates which were calculated by analytical method (CM) show matching with flow rate in model. Further new synthetic model was created which includes six production and one injection wells. This model represents seven-spot pattern. To obtain lambdas weight coefficients, the delta function was entered using by minimization algorithm. Also synthetic model which has three injectors and thirteen producer wells was created. This model simulates seven-spot pattern production system. Finally Capacitance method (CM) has been adjusted on real data of oil Field Ω. In this case CM does not give enough satisfying results in terms of field data liquid rate. In conclusion, recommendations to simplify CM calculations were given. Field Ω is assumed to have one injection and one production wells. In this case, satisfying results for production rates and cumulative production were obtained.

  19. Capillary Corner Flows With Partial and Nonwetting Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolleddula, D. A.; Weislogel, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Capillary flow in containers or conduits with interior corners are common place in nature and industry. The majority of investigations addressing such flows solve the problem numerically in terms of a friction factor for flows along corners with contact angles below the Concus-Finn critical wetting condition for the particular conduit geometry of interest. This research effort provides missing numerical data for the flow resistance function F(sub i) for partially and nonwetting systems above the Concus-Finn condition. In such cases the fluid spontaneously de-wets the interior corner and often retracts into corner-bound drops. A banded numerical coefficient is desirable for further analysis and is achieved by careful selection of length scales x(sub s) and y(sub s) to nondimensionalize the problem. The optimal scaling is found to be identical to the wetting scaling, namely x(sub s) = H and y(sub s) = Htan (alpha), where H is the height from the corner to the free surface and a is the corner half-angle. Employing this scaling produces a relatively weakly varying flow resistance F(sub i) and for subsequent analyses is treated as a constant. Example solutions to steady and transient flow problems are provided that illustrate applications of this result.

  20. Fluid flow in nanopores: An examination of hydrodynamic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, V. P.; Nicholson, D.; Quirke, N.

    2001-08-01

    Steady-state Poiseuille flow of a simple fluid in carbon slit pores under a gravity-like force is simulated using a realistic empirical many-body potential model for carbon. In this work we focus on the small Knudsen number regime, where the macroscopic equations are applicable, and simulate different wetting conditions by varying the strength of fluid-wall interactions. We show that fluid flow in a carbon pore is characterized by a large slip length even in the strongly wetting case, contrary to the predictions of Tolstoi's theory. When the surface density of wall atoms is reduced to values typical of a van der Waals solid, the streaming velocity profile vanishes at the wall, in accordance with earlier findings. From the velocity profiles we have calculated the slip length and by analyzing temporal profiles of the velocity components of particles colliding with the wall we obtained values of the Maxwell coefficient defining the fraction of molecules thermalized by the wall.