Science.gov

Sample records for 2-d image processing

  1. Joint 2D and 3D phase processing for quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to 2D echo-planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Zhang, Yuyao; Gibbs, Eric; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) measures tissue magnetic susceptibility and typically relies on time-consuming three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (GRE) MRI. Recent studies have shown that two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI), which is commonly used in functional MRI (fMRI) and other dynamic imaging techniques, can also be used to produce data suitable for QSM with much shorter scan times. However, the production of high-quality QSM maps is difficult because data obtained by 2D multi-slice scans often have phase inconsistencies across adjacent slices and strong susceptibility field gradients near air-tissue interfaces. To address these challenges in 2D EPI-based QSM studies, we present a new data processing procedure that integrates 2D and 3D phase processing. First, 2D Laplacian-based phase unwrapping and 2D background phase removal are performed to reduce phase inconsistencies between slices and remove in-plane harmonic components of the background phase. This is followed by 3D background phase removal for the through-plane harmonic components. The proposed phase processing was evaluated with 2D EPI data obtained from healthy volunteers, and compared against conventional 3D phase processing using the same 2D EPI datasets. Our QSM results were also compared with QSM values from time-consuming 3D GRE data, which were taken as ground truth. The experimental results show that this new 2D EPI-based QSM technique can produce quantitative susceptibility measures that are comparable with those of 3D GRE-based QSM across different brain regions (e.g. subcortical iron-rich gray matter, cortical gray and white matter). This new 2D EPI QSM reconstruction method is implemented within STI Suite, which is a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. 2-D nonlinear IIR-filters for image processing - An exploratory analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P. H.; Sartori, M.

    1991-01-01

    A new nonlinear IIR filter structure is introduced and its deterministic properties are analyzed. It is shown to be better suited for image processing applications than its linear shift-invariant counterpart. The new structure is obtained from causality inversion of a 2D quarterplane causal linear filter with respect to the two directions of propagation. It is demonstrated, that by using this design, a nonlinear 2D lowpass filter can be constructed, which is capable of effectively suppressing Gaussian or impulse noise without destroying important image information.

  3. 2D-CELL: image processing software for extraction and analysis of 2-dimensional cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetti, F.; Telley, H.; Leibling, Th. M.; Mocellin, A.

    1992-01-01

    2D-CELL is a software package for the processing and analyzing of photographic images of cellular structures in a largely interactive way. Starting from a binary digitized image, the programs extract the line network (skeleton) of the structure and determine the graph representation that best models it. Provision is made for manually correcting defects such as incorrect node positions or dangling bonds. Then a suitable algorithm retrieves polygonal contours which define individual cells — local boundary curvatures are neglected for simplicity. Using elementary analytical geometry relations, a range of metric and topological parameters describing the population are then computed, organized into statistical distributions and graphically displayed.

  4. Filters in 2D and 3D Cardiac SPECT Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Ploussi, Agapi; Synefia, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiac imaging is a noninvasive, sensitive method providing information on cardiac structure and physiology. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) evaluates myocardial perfusion, viability, and function and is widely used in clinical routine. The quality of the tomographic image is a key for accurate diagnosis. Image filtering, a mathematical processing, compensates for loss of detail in an image while reducing image noise, and it can improve the image resolution and limit the degradation of the image. SPECT images are then reconstructed, either by filter back projection (FBP) analytical technique or iteratively, by algebraic methods. The aim of this study is to review filters in cardiac 2D, 3D, and 4D SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality mirroring the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT images. Several filters, including the Hanning, Butterworth, and Parzen filters, were evaluated in combination with the two reconstruction methods as well as with a specified MatLab program. Results showed that for both 3D and 4D cardiac SPECT the Butterworth filter, for different critical frequencies and orders, produced the best results. Between the two reconstruction methods, the iterative one might be more appropriate for cardiac SPECT, since it improves lesion detectability due to the significant improvement of image contrast. PMID:24804144

  5. Filters in 2D and 3D Cardiac SPECT Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Maria; Ploussi, Agapi; Rouchota, Maritina; Synefia, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiac imaging is a noninvasive, sensitive method providing information on cardiac structure and physiology. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) evaluates myocardial perfusion, viability, and function and is widely used in clinical routine. The quality of the tomographic image is a key for accurate diagnosis. Image filtering, a mathematical processing, compensates for loss of detail in an image while reducing image noise, and it can improve the image resolution and limit the degradation of the image. SPECT images are then reconstructed, either by filter back projection (FBP) analytical technique or iteratively, by algebraic methods. The aim of this study is to review filters in cardiac 2D, 3D, and 4D SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality mirroring the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT images. Several filters, including the Hanning, Butterworth, and Parzen filters, were evaluated in combination with the two reconstruction methods as well as with a specified MatLab program. Results showed that for both 3D and 4D cardiac SPECT the Butterworth filter, for different critical frequencies and orders, produced the best results. Between the two reconstruction methods, the iterative one might be more appropriate for cardiac SPECT, since it improves lesion detectability due to the significant improvement of image contrast.

  6. Web-based interactive 2D/3D medical image processing and visualization software.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Seyyed Ehsan; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Rahmani, Roohollah; Faghih-Roohi, Shahrooz; Taimouri, Vahid; Sabouri, Ahmad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2010-05-01

    There are many medical image processing software tools available for research and diagnosis purposes. However, most of these tools are available only as local applications. This limits the accessibility of the software to a specific machine, and thus the data and processing power of that application are not available to other workstations. Further, there are operating system and processing power limitations which prevent such applications from running on every type of workstation. By developing web-based tools, it is possible for users to access the medical image processing functionalities wherever the internet is available. In this paper, we introduce a pure web-based, interactive, extendable, 2D and 3D medical image processing and visualization application that requires no client installation. Our software uses a four-layered design consisting of an algorithm layer, web-user-interface layer, server communication layer, and wrapper layer. To compete with extendibility of the current local medical image processing software, each layer is highly independent of other layers. A wide range of medical image preprocessing, registration, and segmentation methods are implemented using open source libraries. Desktop-like user interaction is provided by using AJAX technology in the web-user-interface. For the visualization functionality of the software, the VRML standard is used to provide 3D features over the web. Integration of these technologies has allowed implementation of our purely web-based software with high functionality without requiring powerful computational resources in the client side. The user-interface is designed such that the users can select appropriate parameters for practical research and clinical studies.

  7. Soft-tissues Image Processing: Comparison of Traditional Segmentation Methods with 2D active Contour Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulka, J.; Gescheidtova, E.; Bartusek, K.

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with modern methods of image processing, especially image segmentation, classification and evaluation of parameters. It focuses primarily on processing medical images of soft tissues obtained by magnetic resonance tomography (MR). It is easy to describe edges of the sought objects using segmented images. The edges found can be useful for further processing of monitored object such as calculating the perimeter, surface and volume evaluation or even three-dimensional shape reconstruction. The proposed solutions can be used for the classification of healthy/unhealthy tissues in MR or other imaging. Application examples of the proposed segmentation methods are shown. Research in the area of image segmentation focuses on methods based on solving partial differential equations. This is a modern method for image processing, often called the active contour method. It is of great advantage in the segmentation of real images degraded by noise with fuzzy edges and transitions between objects. In the paper, results of the segmentation of medical images by the active contour method are compared with results of the segmentation by other existing methods. Experimental applications which demonstrate the very good properties of the active contour method are given.

  8. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  9. Angle-resolved 2D imaging of electron emission processes in atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kukk, E.; Wills, A.A.; Langer, B.; Bozek, J.D.; Berrah, N.

    2004-09-02

    A variety of electron emission processes have been studied in detail for both atomic and molecular systems, using a highly efficient experimental system comprising two time-of-flight (TOF) rotatable electron energy analyzers and a 3rd generation synchrotron light source. Two examples are used here to illustrate the obtained results. Firstly, electron emissions in the HCL molecule have been mapped over a 14 eV wide photon energy range over the Cl 2p ionization threshold. Particular attention is paid to the dissociative core-excited states, for which the Auger electron emission shows photon energy dependent features. Also, the evolution of resonant Auger to the normal Auger decay distorted by post-collision interaction has been observed and the resonating behavior of the valence photoelectron lines studied. Secondly, an atomic system, neon, in which excitation of doubly excited states and their subsequent decay to various accessible ionic states has been studied. Since these processes only occurs via inter-electron correlations, the many body dynamics of an atom can be probed, revealing relativistic effects, surprising in such a light atom. Angular distribution of the decay of the resonances to the parity unfavored continuum exhibits significant deviation from the LS coupling predictions.

  10. Effect of image processing version on detection of non-calcification cancers in 2D digital mammography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Cooke, J.; Given-Wilson, R. M.; Wallis, M. G.; Halling-Brown, M.; Mackenzie, A.; Chakraborty, D. P.; Bosmans, H.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2013-03-01

    Image processing (IP) is the last step in the digital mammography imaging chain before interpretation by a radiologist. Each manufacturer has their own IP algorithm(s) and the appearance of an image after IP can vary greatly depending upon the algorithm and version used. It is unclear whether these differences can affect cancer detection. This work investigates the effect of IP on the detection of non-calcification cancers by expert observers. Digital mammography images for 190 patients were collected from two screening sites using Hologic amorphous selenium detectors. Eighty of these cases contained non-calcification cancers. The images were processed using three versions of IP from Hologic - default (full enhancement), low contrast (intermediate enhancement) and pseudo screen-film (no enhancement). Seven experienced observers inspected the images and marked the location of regions suspected to be non-calcification cancers assigning a score for likelihood of malignancy. This data was analysed using JAFROC analysis. The observers also scored the clinical interpretation of the entire case using the BSBR classification scale. This was analysed using ROC analysis. The breast density in the region surrounding each cancer and the number of times each cancer was detected were calculated. IP did not have a significant effect on the radiologists' judgment of the likelihood of malignancy of individual lesions or their clinical interpretation of the entire case. No correlation was found between number of times each cancer was detected and the density of breast tissue surrounding that cancer.

  11. Noninvasive real-time 2D imaging of temperature distribution during the plastic pellet cooling process by using electrical capacitance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Yusuke; Sapkota, Achyut; Sugawara, Michiko; Takei, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study has launched a concept to image a real-time 2D temperature distribution noninvasively by a combination of the electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) technique and a permittivity-temperature calibration equation for the plastic pellet cooling process. The concept has two steps, which are the relative permittivity calculation from the measured capacitance among the many electrodes by the ECT technique, and the temperature distribution imaging from the relative permittivity by the permittivity-temperature calibration equation. An ECT sensor with 12 electrodes was designed to image the cross-sectional temperature distribution during the polymethyl methacrylate pellets cooling process. The images of temperature distribution were successfully reconstructed from the relative permittivity distribution at every time step during the process. The images reasonably indicate the temperature diffusion in a 2D space and time within a 0.0065 and 0.0175 time-dependent temperature deviation, as compared to an analytical thermal conductance simulation and thermocouple measurement.

  12. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  13. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  14. Sensor fusion of 2D and 3D data for the processing of images of dental imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methot, Jean-Francois; Mokhtari, Marielle; Laurendeau, Denis; Poussart, Denis

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents a computer vision system for the acquisition and processing of 3-D images of wax dental imprints. The ultimate goal of the system is to measure a set of 10 orthodontic parameters that will be fed to an expert system for automatic diagnosis of occlusion problems. An approach for the acquisition of range images of both sides of the imprint is presented. Range is obtained from a shape-from-absorption technique applied to a pair of grey-level images obtained at two different wavelengths. The accuracy of the range values is improved using sensor fusion between the initial range image and a reflectance image from the pair of grey-level images. The improved range image is segmented in order to find the interstices between teeth and, following further processing, the type of each tooth on the profile. Once each tooth has been identified, its accurate location on the imprint is found using a region- growing approach and its shape is reconstructed with third degree polynomial functions. The reconstructed shape will be later used by the system to find specific features that are needed to estimate the orthodontic parameters.

  15. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  16. 2D/3D Image Registration using Regression Learning

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chen-Rui; Frederick, Brandon; Mageras, Gig; Chang, Sha; Pizer, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In computer vision and image analysis, image registration between 2D projections and a 3D image that achieves high accuracy and near real-time computation is challenging. In this paper, we propose a novel method that can rapidly detect an object’s 3D rigid motion or deformation from a 2D projection image or a small set thereof. The method is called CLARET (Correction via Limited-Angle Residues in External Beam Therapy) and consists of two stages: registration preceded by shape space and regression learning. In the registration stage, linear operators are used to iteratively estimate the motion/deformation parameters based on the current intensity residue between the target projec-tion(s) and the digitally reconstructed radiograph(s) (DRRs) of the estimated 3D image. The method determines the linear operators via a two-step learning process. First, it builds a low-order parametric model of the image region’s motion/deformation shape space from its prior 3D images. Second, using learning-time samples produced from the 3D images, it formulates the relationships between the model parameters and the co-varying 2D projection intensity residues by multi-scale linear regressions. The calculated multi-scale regression matrices yield the coarse-to-fine linear operators used in estimating the model parameters from the 2D projection intensity residues in the registration. The method’s application to Image-guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) requires only a few seconds and yields good results in localizing a tumor under rigid motion in the head and neck and under respiratory deformation in the lung, using one treatment-time imaging 2D projection or a small set thereof. PMID:24058278

  17. 2D Orthogonal Locality Preserving Projection for Image Denoising.

    PubMed

    Shikkenawis, Gitam; Mitra, Suman K

    2016-01-01

    Sparse representations using transform-domain techniques are widely used for better interpretation of the raw data. Orthogonal locality preserving projection (OLPP) is a linear technique that tries to preserve local structure of data in the transform domain as well. Vectorized nature of OLPP requires high-dimensional data to be converted to vector format, hence may lose spatial neighborhood information of raw data. On the other hand, processing 2D data directly, not only preserves spatial information, but also improves the computational efficiency considerably. The 2D OLPP is expected to learn the transformation from 2D data itself. This paper derives mathematical foundation for 2D OLPP. The proposed technique is used for image denoising task. Recent state-of-the-art approaches for image denoising work on two major hypotheses, i.e., non-local self-similarity and sparse linear approximations of the data. Locality preserving nature of the proposed approach automatically takes care of self-similarity present in the image while inferring sparse basis. A global basis is adequate for the entire image. The proposed approach outperforms several state-of-the-art image denoising approaches for gray-scale, color, and texture images.

  18. Real-time 2-D temperature imaging using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S

    2010-01-01

    We have previously introduced methods for noninvasive estimation of temperature change using diagnostic ultrasound. The basic principle was validated both in vitro and in vivo by several groups worldwide. Some limitations remain, however, that have prevented these methods from being adopted in monitoring and guidance of minimally invasive thermal therapies, e.g., RF ablation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound (HIFU). In this letter, we present first results from a real-time system for 2-D imaging of temperature change using pulse-echo ultrasound. The front end of the system is a commercially available scanner equipped with a research interface, which allows the control of imaging sequence and access to the RF data in real time. A high-frame-rate 2-D RF acquisition mode, M2D, is used to capture the transients of tissue motion/deformations in response to pulsed HIFU. The M2D RF data is streamlined to the back end of the system, where a 2-D temperature imaging algorithm based on speckle tracking is implemented on a graphics processing unit. The real-time images of temperature change are computed on the same spatial and temporal grid of the M2D RF data, i.e., no decimation. Verification of the algorithm was performed by monitoring localized HIFU-induced heating of a tissue-mimicking elastography phantom. These results clearly demonstrate the repeatability and sensitivity of the algorithm. Furthermore, we present in vitro results demonstrating the possible use of this algorithm for imaging changes in tissue parameters due to HIFU-induced lesions. These results clearly demonstrate the value of the real-time data streaming and processing in monitoring, and guidance of minimally invasive thermotherapy.

  19. FINDIF and AutoDiff: 2-D and 1-D Diffusion Processing From BSE Images With Uncertainty Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    This contribution presents a pair of processing tools for the modelling of diffusion profiles in crystals. FINDIF is a finite-difference model coded in C++ that allows for diffusion anisotropy (within the limitations of a square grid), composition dependence tied to diffusing species, varying mineral phases, dynamic temperature-dependent partitioning and variable conditions of temperature. In this regard it provides an open-ended tool for the modelling of complex diffusion geometries in natural samples. AutoDiff uses a database of profiles generated in FINDIF to enable rapid matching of profiles measured in natural samples with those in the database. This provides a quick method to determine timescales from natural crystals that does not involve lengthy iteration of finite difference methods. This also provides a constraint on whether the profile is likely to be diffusion-generated or could represent crystal growth processes, as deviations from ideal profiles indicate a difference in process from that assumed; e.g., a simple square-wave initial geometry assumption versus the presence of growth effects. Finally, a method for propagating uncertainties in diffusional geochronometers is resented, that incorporates several key parameters in measured data that can influence the accuracy of the end result. This can be presented as a full statistical treatment (via Monte Carlo methods) or as a near-equivalent method that can estimate uncertainties with good precision with less computational overhead, suitable for rapid investigation.

  20. Building 3D scenes from 2D image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Paul D.

    2006-05-01

    Sequences of 2D images, taken by a single moving video receptor, can be fused to generate a 3D representation. This dynamic stereopsis exists in birds and reptiles, whereas the static binocular stereopsis is common in mammals, including humans. Most multimedia computer vision systems for stereo image capture, transmission, processing, storage and retrieval are based on the concept of binocularity. As a consequence, their main goal is to acquire, conserve and enhance pairs of 2D images able to generate a 3D visual perception in a human observer. Stereo vision in birds is based on the fusion of images captured by each eye, with previously acquired and memorized images from the same eye. The process goes on simultaneously and conjointly for both eyes and generates an almost complete all-around visual field. As a consequence, the baseline distance is no longer fixed, as in the case of binocular 3D view, but adjustable in accordance with the distance to the object of main interest, allowing a controllable depth effect. Moreover, the synthesized 3D scene can have a better resolution than each individual 2D image in the sequence. Compression of 3D scenes can be achieved, and stereo transmissions with lower bandwidth requirements can be developed.

  1. Quantifying Therapeutic and Diagnostic Efficacy in 2D Microvascular Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Vickerman, Mary B.; Keith, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    VESGEN is a newly automated, user-interactive program that maps and quantifies the effects of vascular therapeutics and regulators on microvascular form and function. VESGEN analyzes two-dimensional, black and white vascular images by measuring important vessel morphology parameters. This software guides the user through each required step of the analysis process via a concise graphical user interface (GUI). Primary applications of the VESGEN code are 2D vascular images acquired as clinical diagnostic images of the human retina and as experimental studies of the effects of vascular regulators and therapeutics on vessel remodeling.

  2. Interactive 2D to 3D stereoscopic image synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Mark H.; Lipton, Lenny

    2005-03-01

    Advances in stereoscopic display technologies, graphic card devices, and digital imaging algorithms have opened up new possibilities in synthesizing stereoscopic images. The power of today"s DirectX/OpenGL optimized graphics cards together with adapting new and creative imaging tools found in software products such as Adobe Photoshop, provide a powerful environment for converting planar drawings and photographs into stereoscopic images. The basis for such a creative process is the focus of this paper. This article presents a novel technique, which uses advanced imaging features and custom Windows-based software that utilizes the Direct X 9 API to provide the user with an interactive stereo image synthesizer. By creating an accurate and interactive world scene with moveable and flexible depth map altered textured surfaces, perspective stereoscopic cameras with both visible frustums and zero parallax planes, a user can precisely model a virtual three-dimensional representation of a real-world scene. Current versions of Adobe Photoshop provide a creative user with a rich assortment of tools needed to highlight elements of a 2D image, simulate hidden areas, and creatively shape them for a 3D scene representation. The technique described has been implemented as a Photoshop plug-in and thus allows for a seamless transition of these 2D image elements into 3D surfaces, which are subsequently rendered to create stereoscopic views.

  3. Bayesian 2D Current Reconstruction from Magnetic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Colin B.; Bierbaum, Matthew K.; Nowack, Katja; Sethna, James P.

    We employ a Bayesian image reconstruction scheme to recover 2D currents from magnetic flux imaged with scanning SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interferometric Devices). Magnetic flux imaging is a versatile tool to locally probe currents and magnetic moments, however present reconstruction methods sacrifice resolution due to numerical instability. Using state-of-the-art blind deconvolution techniques we recover the currents, point-spread function and height of the SQUID loop by optimizing the probability of measuring an image. We obtain uncertainties on these quantities by sampling reconstructions. This generative modeling technique could be used to develop calibration protocols for scanning SQUIDs, to diagnose systematic noise in the imaging process, and can be applied to many tools beyond scanning SQUIDs.

  4. [Design of the 2D-FFT image reconstruction software based on Matlab].

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-yu; Wang, Hong-zhi

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents a Matlab's implementation for 2D-FFT image reconstruction algorithm of magnetic resonance imaging, with the universal COM component that Windows system can identify. This allows to segregate the 2D-FFT image reconstruction algorithm from the business magnetic resonance imaging closed system, providing the ability for initial data processing before reconstruction, which would be important for improving the image quality, diagnostic value and image post-processing.

  5. Reconstruction-based 3D/2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Tomazevic, Dejan; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel 3D/2D registration method, where first, a 3D image is reconstructed from a few 2D X-ray images and next, the preoperative 3D image is brought into the best possible spatial correspondence with the reconstructed image by optimizing a similarity measure. Because the quality of the reconstructed image is generally low, we introduce a novel asymmetric mutual information similarity measure, which is able to cope with low image quality as well as with different imaging modalities. The novel 3D/2D registration method has been evaluated using standardized evaluation methodology and publicly available 3D CT, 3DRX, and MR and 2D X-ray images of two spine phantoms, for which gold standard registrations were known. In terms of robustness, reliability and capture range the proposed method outperformed the gradient-based method and the method based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs).

  6. A scanning-mode 2D shear wave imaging (s2D-SWI) system for ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Wang, Congzhi; Li, Yongchuan; Zhou, Juan; Yang, Ge; Xiao, Yang; Feng, Ge; Jin, Qiaofeng; Mu, Peitian; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound elastography is widely used for the non-invasive measurement of tissue elasticity properties. Shear wave imaging (SWI) is a quantitative method for assessing tissue stiffness. SWI has been demonstrated to be less operator dependent than quasi-static elastography, and has the ability to acquire quantitative elasticity information in contrast with acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. However, traditional SWI implementations cannot acquire two dimensional (2D) quantitative images of the tissue elasticity distribution. This study proposes and evaluates a scanning-mode 2D SWI (s2D-SWI) system. The hardware and image processing algorithms are presented in detail. Programmable devices are used to support flexible control of the system and the image processing algorithms. An analytic signal based cross-correlation method and a Radon transformation based shear wave speed determination method are proposed, which can be implemented using parallel computation. Imaging of tissue mimicking phantoms, and in vitro, and in vivo imaging test are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed system. The s2D-SWI system represents a new choice for the quantitative mapping of tissue elasticity, and has great potential for implementation in commercial ultrasound scanners.

  7. Image Appraisal for 2D and 3D Electromagnetic Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1999-01-28

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and posterior model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. A method to examine how the horizontal and vertical resolution varies spatially within the electromagnetic property image is developed by examining the columns of the model resolution matrix. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how errors in the inversion process such as data noise and incorrect a priori assumptions about the imaged model map into parameter error. This type of image is shown to be useful in analyzing spatial variations in the image sensitivity to the data. A method is analyzed for statistically estimating the model covariance matrix when the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion). A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on 2D and 3D synthetic cross well EM data sets, as well as a field data set collected at the Lost Hills Oil Field in Central California.

  8. WE-AB-BRA-07: Quantitative Evaluation of 2D-2D and 2D-3D Image Guided Radiation Therapy for Clinical Trial Credentialing, NRG Oncology/RTOG

    SciTech Connect

    Giaddui, T; Yu, J; Xiao, Y; Jacobs, P; Manfredi, D; Linnemann, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 2D-2D kV image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) credentialing evaluation for clinical trial qualification was historically qualitative through submitting screen captures of the fusion process. However, as quantitative DICOM 2D-2D and 2D-3D image registration tools are implemented in clinical practice for better precision, especially in centers that treat patients with protons, better IGRT credentialing techniques are needed. The aim of this work is to establish methodologies for quantitatively reviewing IGRT submissions based on DICOM 2D-2D and 2D-3D image registration and to test the methodologies in reviewing 2D-2D and 2D-3D IGRT submissions for RTOG/NRG Oncology clinical trials qualifications. Methods: DICOM 2D-2D and 2D-3D automated and manual image registration have been tested using the Harmony tool in MIM software. 2D kV orthogonal portal images are fused with the reference digital reconstructed radiographs (DRR) in the 2D-2D registration while the 2D portal images are fused with DICOM planning CT image in the 2D-3D registration. The Harmony tool allows alignment of the two images used in the registration process and also calculates the required shifts. Shifts calculated using MIM are compared with those submitted by institutions for IGRT credentialing. Reported shifts are considered to be acceptable if differences are less than 3mm. Results: Several tests have been performed on the 2D-2D and 2D-3D registration. The results indicated good agreement between submitted and calculated shifts. A workflow for reviewing these IGRT submissions has been developed and will eventually be used to review IGRT submissions. Conclusion: The IROC Philadelphia RTQA center has developed and tested a new workflow for reviewing DICOM 2D-2D and 2D-3D IGRT credentialing submissions made by different cancer clinical centers, especially proton centers. NRG Center for Innovation in Radiation Oncology (CIRO) and IROC RTQA center continue their collaborative efforts to enhance

  9. Photorealistic image synthesis and camera validation from 2D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos Ferrer, Juan C.; González Chévere, David; Manian, Vidya

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a new 3D scene reconstruction technique using the Unity 3D game engine. The method presented here allow us to reconstruct the shape of simple objects and more complex ones from multiple 2D images, including infrared and digital images from indoor scenes and only digital images from outdoor scenes and then add the reconstructed object to the simulated scene created in Unity 3D, these scenes are then validated with real world scenes. The method used different cameras settings and explores different properties in the reconstructions of the scenes including light, color, texture, shapes and different views. To achieve the highest possible resolution, it was necessary the extraction of partial textures from visible surfaces. To recover the 3D shapes and the depth of simple objects that can be represented by the geometric bodies, there geometric characteristics were used. To estimate the depth of more complex objects the triangulation method was used, for this the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters were calculated using geometric camera calibration. To implement the methods mentioned above the Matlab tool was used. The technique presented here also let's us to simulate small simple videos, by reconstructing a sequence of multiple scenes of the video separated by small margins of time. To measure the quality of the reconstructed images and video scenes the Fast Low Band Model (FLBM) metric from the Video Quality Measurement (VQM) software was used. Low bandwidth perception based features include edges and motion.

  10. Available information in 2D motional Stark effect imaging.

    PubMed

    Creese, Mathew; Howard, John

    2010-10-01

    Recent advances in imaging techniques have allowed the extension of the standard polarimetric 1D motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic to 2D imaging of the internal magnetic field of fusion devices [J. Howard, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 125003 (2008)]. This development is met with the challenge of identifying and extracting the new information, which can then be used to increase the accuracy of plasma equilibrium and current density profile determinations. This paper develops a 2D analysis of the projected MSE polarization orientation and Doppler phase shift. It is found that, for a standard viewing position, the 2D MSE imaging system captures sufficient information to allow imaging of the internal vertical magnetic field component B(Z)(r,z) in a tokamak.

  11. 2-D Drift Velocities from the IMAGE EUV Plasmaspheric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D.; Adrian, M.

    2007-01-01

    The IMAGE Mission extreme ultraviolet imager (EUY) observes He+ plasmaspheric ions throughout the inner magnetosphere. Limited by ionizing radiation and viewing close to the Sun, images of the He+ distribution are available every 10 minutes for many hours as the spacecraft passes through apogee in its highly elliptical orbit. As a consistent constituent at about 15%, He+ is an excellent surrogate for monitoring all of the processes that control the dynamics of plasmaspheric plasma. In particular, the motion ofHe+ transverse to the ambient magnetic field is a direct indication of convective electric fields. The analysis of boundary motions has already achieved new insights into the electrodynamic coupling processes taking place between energetic magnetospheric plasmas and the ionosphere. Yet to be fulfilled, however, is the original promise that global EUY images of the plasmasphere might yield two-dimensional pictures of meso-scale to macro-scale electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. This work details the technique and initial application of an IMAGE EUY analysis that appears capable of following thermal plasma motion on a global basis.

  12. [3D display of sequential 2D medical images].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yisong; Chen, Yazhu

    2003-12-01

    A detailed review is given in this paper on various current 3D display methods for sequential 2D medical images and the new development in 3D medical image display. True 3D display, surface rendering, volume rendering, 3D texture mapping and distributed collaborative rendering are discussed in depth. For two kinds of medical applications: Real-time navigation system and high-fidelity diagnosis in computer aided surgery, different 3D display methods are presented.

  13. Infrared image processing devoted to thermal non-contact characterization-Applications to Non-Destructive Evaluation, Microfluidics and 2D source term distribution for multispectral tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batsale, Jean-Christophe; Pradere, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    The cost of IR cameras is more and more decreasing. Beyond the preliminary calibration step and the global instrumentation, the infrared image processing is then one of the key step for achieving in very broad domains. Generally the IR images are coming from the transient temperature field related to the emission of a black surface in response to an external or internal heating (active IR thermography). The first applications were devoted to the so called thermal Non-Destructive Evaluation methods by considering a thin sample and 1D transient heat diffusion through the sample (transverse diffusion). With simplified assumptions related to the transverse diffusion, the in-plane diffusion and transport phenomena can be also considered. A general equation can be applied in order to balance the heat transfer at the pixel scale or between groups of pixels in order to estimate several fields of thermophysical properties (heterogeneous field of in-plane diffusivity, flow distributions, source terms). There is a lot of possible strategies to process the space and time distributed big amount of data (previous integral transformation of the images, compression, elimination of the non useful areas...), generally based on the necessity to analyse the derivative versus space and time of the temperature field. Several illustrative examples related to the Non-Destructive Evaluation of heterogeneous solids, the thermal characterization of chemical reactions in microfluidic channels and the design of systems for multispectral tomography, will be presented.

  14. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-04

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  15. Volumetric elasticity imaging with a 2-D CMUT array.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Ted G; Hall, Timothy J; Panda, Satchi; Richards, Michael S; Barbone, Paul E; Jiang, Jingfeng; Resnick, Jeff; Barnes, Steve

    2010-06-01

    This article reports the use of a two-dimensional (2-D) capacitive micro-machined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) to acquire radio-frequency (RF) echo data from relatively large volumes of a simple ultrasound phantom to compare three-dimensional (3-D) elasticity imaging methods. Typical 2-D motion tracking for elasticity image formation was compared with three different methods of 3-D motion tracking, with sum-squared difference (SSD) used as the similarity measure. Differences among the algorithms were the degree to which they tracked elevational motion: not at all (2-D search), planar search, combination of multiple planes and plane independent guided search. The cross-correlation between the predeformation and motion-compensated postdeformation RF echo fields was used to quantify motion tracking accuracy. The lesion contrast-to-noise ratio was used to quantify image quality. Tracking accuracy and strain image quality generally improved with increased tracking sophistication. When used as input for a 3-D modulus reconstruction, high quality 3-D displacement estimates yielded accurate and low noise modulus reconstruction.

  16. Volumetric Elasticity Imaging with a 2D CMUT Array

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Ted G.; Hall, Timothy J.; Panda, Satchi; Richards, Michael S.; Barbone, Paul E.; Jiang, Jingfeng; Resnick, Jeff; Barnes, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the use of a two-dimensional (2D) capacitive micro-machined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) to acquire radio frequency (RF) echo data from relatively large volumes of a simple ultrasound phantom to compare 3D elasticity imaging methods. Typical 2D motion tracking for elasticity image formation was compared to three different methods of 3D motion tracking, with sum-squared difference (SSD) used as the similarity measure. Differences among the algorithms were the degree to which they tracked elevational motion: not at all (2D search), planar search, combination of multiple planes, and plane independent guided search. The cross correlation between the pre-deformation and motion-compensated post-deformation RF echo fields was used to quantify motion tracking accuracy. The lesion contrast-to-noise ratio was used to quantify image quality. Tracking accuracy and strain image quality generally improved with increased tracking sophistication. When used as input for a 3D modulus reconstruction, high quality 3D displacement estimates yielded accurate and low noise modulus reconstruction. PMID:20510188

  17. Volume Calculation of Venous Thrombosis Using 2D Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Dhibi, M; Puentes, J; Bressollette, L; Guias, B; Solaiman, B

    2005-01-01

    Venous thrombosis screening exams use 2D ultrasound images, from which medical experts obtain a rough idea of the thrombosis aspect and infer an approximate volume. Such estimation is essential to follow up the thrombosis evolution. This paper proposes a method to calculate venous thrombosis volume from non-parallel 2D ultrasound images, taking advantage of a priori knowledge about the thrombosis shape. An interactive ellipse fitting contour segmentation extracts the 2D thrombosis contours. Then, a Delaunay triangulation is applied to the set of 2D segmented contours positioned in 3D, and the area that each contour defines, to obtain a global thrombosis 3D surface reconstruction, with a dense triangulation inside the contours. Volume is calculated from the obtained surface and contours triangulation, using a maximum unit normal component approach. Preliminary results obtained on 3 plastic phantoms and 3 in vitro venous thromboses, as well as one in vivo case are presented and discussed. An error rate of volume estimation inferior to 4,5% for the plastic phantoms, and 3,5% for the in vitro venous thromboses was obtained.

  18. Aircraft target identification based on 2D ISAR images using multiresolution analysis wavelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Xiao, Huaitie; Hu, Xiangjiang

    2001-09-01

    The formation of 2D ISAR images for radar target identification hold much promise for additional distinguish- ability between targets. Since an image contains important information is a wide range of scales, and this information is often independent from one scale to another, wavelet analysis provides a method of identifying the spatial frequency content of an image and the local regions within the image where those spatial frequencies exist. In this paper, a multiresolution analysis wavelet method based on 2D ISAR images was proposed for use in aircraft radar target identification under the wide band high range resolution radar background. The proposed method was performed in three steps; first, radar backscatter signals were processed in the form of 2D ISAR images, then, Mallat's wavelet algorithm was used in the decomposition of images, finally, a three layer perceptron neural net was used as classifier. The result of experiments demonstrated that the feasibility of using multiresolution analysis wavelet for target identification.

  19. A 2D histogram representation of images for pooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xinnan; Zhang, Yu-Jin

    2011-03-01

    Designing a suitable image representation is one of the most fundamental issues of computer vision. There are three steps in the popular Bag of Words based image representation: feature extraction, coding and pooling. In the final step, current methods make an M x K encoded feature matrix degraded to a K-dimensional vector (histogram), where M is the number of features, and K is the size of the codebook: information is lost dramatically here. In this paper, a novel pooling method, based on 2-D histogram representation, is proposed to retain more information from the encoded image features. This pooling method can be easily incorporated into state-of- the-art computer vision system frameworks. Experiments show that our approach improves current pooling methods, and can achieve satisfactory performance of image classification and image reranking even when using a small codebook and costless linear SVM.

  20. Microwave Imaging with Infrared 2-D Lock-in Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiyo, Noritaka; Arai, Mizuki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Nishikata, Atsuhiro; Maeno, Takashi

    We have developed a 3-D electromagnetic field measurement system using 2-D lock-in amplifier. This system uses an amplitude modulated electromagnetic wave source to heat a resistive screen. A very small change of temperature on a screen illuminated with the modulated electromagnetic wave is measured using an infrared thermograph camera. In this paper, we attempted to apply our system to microwave imaging. By placing conductor patches in front of the resistive screen and illuminating with microwave, the shape of each conductor was clearly observed as the temperature difference image of the screen. In this way, the conductor pattern inside the non-contact type IC card could be visualized. Moreover, we could observe the temperature difference image reflecting the shape of a Konnyaku (a gelatinous food made from devil's-tonge starch) or a dried fishbone, both as non-conducting material resembling human body. These results proved that our method is applicable to microwave see-through imaging.

  1. A novel point cloud registration using 2D image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien-Chou; Tai, Yen-Chou; Lee, Jhong-Jin; Chen, Yong-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Since a 3D scanner only captures a scene of a 3D object at a time, a 3D registration for multi-scene is the key issue of 3D modeling. This paper presents a novel and an efficient 3D registration method based on 2D local feature matching. The proposed method transforms the point clouds into 2D bearing angle images and then uses the 2D feature based matching method, SURF, to find matching pixel pairs between two images. The corresponding points of 3D point clouds can be obtained by those pixel pairs. Since the corresponding pairs are sorted by their distance between matching features, only the top half of the corresponding pairs are used to find the optimal rotation matrix by the least squares approximation. In this paper, the optimal rotation matrix is derived by orthogonal Procrustes method (SVD-based approach). Therefore, the 3D model of an object can be reconstructed by aligning those point clouds with the optimal transformation matrix. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the proposed method is close to the ICP, but the computation cost is reduced significantly. The performance is six times faster than the generalized-ICP algorithm. Furthermore, while the ICP requires high alignment similarity of two scenes, the proposed method is robust to a larger difference of viewing angle.

  2. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Marcus, Andrew H.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-06-07

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  3. NGMIX: Gaussian mixture models for 2D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Erin

    2015-08-01

    NGMIX implements Gaussian mixture models for 2D images. Both the PSF profile and the galaxy are modeled using mixtures of Gaussians. Convolutions are thus performed analytically, resulting in fast model generation as compared to methods that perform the convolution in Fourier space. For the galaxy model, NGMIX supports exponential disks and de Vaucouleurs and Sérsic profiles; these are implemented approximately as a sum of Gaussians using the fits from Hogg & Lang (2013). Additionally, any number of Gaussians can be fit, either completely free or constrained to be cocentric and co-elliptical.

  4. 2D ERT imaging of tracer dispersion in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekmine, G.; Pessel, M.; Auradou, H.

    2009-12-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography applied in cross-borehole is a method often used to follow the invasion process of pollutants. The aim of this work is to test experimentally the electrode arrays and inversion processes used to obtain a spatial representation of tracer propagation in porous media. Experiments were conducted in a plexiglass container with glass beads of 166 microns in diameter. The height of the container is 275 mm, its width 85 mm and its thickness 10 mm. 21 electrodes, equally spaced, are placed along each of the lateral sides of the porous medium : these electrodes are used to perform the electrical measurements. The device is lightened from behind and a video camera records the fluid propagation. The tracer (i.e the pollutant) is a water solution containing a known amount of dye together with NaCl (0.5g/l up to 1.5g/l). The medium is first saturated by a water solution containing a slight concentration of NaCl so that its density is smaller than the tracer’s. An upward flow is first established, the denser fluid is injected at the bottom and over the full width of the medium. In this way, the flow is stabilized by gravity avoiding the development of unstable fingers. Still, the fluids are miscible and a mixing front develops during the flow: in the present study, the interest is to estimate the 2D tracer front dispersion by both optical and electrical imaging. The comparison of the two techniques allows to study the ability of the inversion process to quantify the solute transport. A sensitivity analysis is led in order to determine the best measurement sequence to monitor the tracer’s front evolution through the entire volume of the medium. Hence, each time step is constituted by the same 190 transverse dipole-dipole set of lasting 5 minutes between the first and the last measurement. At the laboratory scale, the experimental design affects the measurements through edges effects: most of these artefacts can be partially suppressed by using

  5. Methods for 2-D and 3-D Endobronchial Ultrasound Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Zang, Xiaonan; Bascom, Rebecca; Gilbert, Christopher; Toth, Jennifer; Higgins, William

    2016-07-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is now commonly used for cancer-staging bronchoscopy. Unfortunately, EBUS is challenging to use and interpreting EBUS video sequences is difficult. Other ultrasound imaging domains, hampered by related difficulties, have benefited from computer-based image-segmentation methods. Yet, so far, no such methods have been proposed for EBUS. We propose image-segmentation methods for 2-D EBUS frames and 3-D EBUS sequences. Our 2-D method adapts the fast-marching level-set process, anisotropic diffusion, and region growing to the problem of segmenting 2-D EBUS frames. Our 3-D method builds upon the 2-D method while also incorporating the geodesic level-set process for segmenting EBUS sequences. Tests with lung-cancer patient data showed that the methods ran fully automatically for nearly 80% of test cases. For the remaining cases, the only user-interaction required was the selection of a seed point. When compared to ground-truth segmentations, the 2-D method achieved an overall Dice index = 90.0% ±4.9%, while the 3-D method achieved an overall Dice index = 83.9 ± 6.0%. In addition, the computation time (2-D, 0.070 s/frame; 3-D, 0.088 s/frame) was two orders of magnitude faster than interactive contour definition. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of the methods for EBUS localization in a multimodal image-guided bronchoscopy system.

  6. Real-time application of critical dimension measurement of TFT-LCD pattern using a newly proposed 2D image-processing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Ho; Kim, You-Sik; Kim, Sung-Ryoung; Lee, Il-Hwan; Pahk, Heui-Jae

    2008-07-01

    A critical dimension measurement system for TFT-LCD patterns has been implemented in this study. To improve the measurement accuracy, an imaging auto-focus algorithm, fast pattern-matching algorithm, and precise edge detection algorithm with subpixel accuracy have been developed and implemented in the system. The optimum focusing position can be calculated using the image focus estimator. The two-step auto-focusing technique has been newly proposed for various LCD patterns, and various focus estimators have been compared to select a stable and accurate one. Fast pattern matching and subpixel edge detection have been developed for measurement. The new approach, called NEMC, is based on edge detection for the selection of influential points; in this approach, points having a strong edge magnitude are only used in the matching procedure. To accelerate pattern matching, point correlation and an image pyramid structure are combined. Edge detection is the most important technique in a vision inspection system. A two-stage edge detection algorithm has been introduced. In the first stage, a first order derivative operator such as the Sobel operator is used to place the edge points and to find the edge directions using a least-square estimation method with pixel accuracy. In the second stage, an eight-connected neighborhood of the estimated edge points is convolved with the LoG (Laplacian of Gaussian) operator, and the LoG-filtered image can be modeled as a continuous function using the facet model. The measurement results of the various patterns are finally presented. The developed system has been successfully used in the TFT-LCD manufacturing industry, and repeatability of less than 30 nm (3 σ) can be obtained with a very fast inspection time.

  7. 2-D fluorescence lifetime imaging using a time-gated image intensifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, K.; Hyde, S. C. W.; Dainty, J. C.; French, P. M. W.; Hares, J. D.

    1997-02-01

    We report a 2-D fluorescence lifetime imaging system based on a time-gated image intensifier and a Cr:LiSAF regenerative amplifier. We have demonstrated 185 ps temporal resolution. The deleterious effects of optical scattering are demonstrated.

  8. Tracking of deformable target in 2D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Lucas; Marchal, Maud; Le Bras, Anthony; Dardenne, Guillaume; Krupa, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for automatically tracking deformable target within 2D ultrasound images. Our approach uses only dense information combined with a physically-based model and has therefore the advantage of not using any fiducial marker nor a priori knowledge on the anatomical environment. The physical model is represented by a mass-spring damper system driven by different types of forces where the external forces are obtained by maximizing image similarity metric between a reference target and a deformed target across the time. This deformation is represented by a parametric warping model where the optimal parameters are estimated from the intensity variation. This warping function is well-suited to represent localized deformations in the ultrasound images because it directly links the forces applied on each mass with the motion of all the pixels in its vicinity. The internal forces constrain the deformation to physically plausible motions, and reduce the sensitivity to the speckle noise. The approach was validated on simulated and real data, both for rigid and free-form motions of soft tissues. The results are very promising since the deformable target could be tracked with a good accuracy for both types of motion. Our approach opens novel possibilities for computer-assisted interventions where deformable organs are involved and could be used as a new tool for interactive tracking of soft tissues in ultrasound images.

  9. Acousto-Optic Processing of 2-D Signals Using Temporal and Spatial Integration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-29

    AD-AI?3 411 ACOUSTO - OPTIC PROCESSING OF 2-D SIGNALS USING TEMPORAL 1/ AND SPATIAL INTEGR..(U) CRLIFORNIA INST OF TECH PASADENA DEPT OF ELECTRICAL...LECTE 3 FINAL REORT4 Submitted to: Al FORCE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH Grant Number AFOSR-82-0128 :A of % ACOUSTO - OPTIC PROCISSING OF 2-D SIGNALS...Psaltis, Applied Optics, Vol. 21, No. 3, 1 February 1982. (3) " Acousto - Optic /CCD Image Processor, Demetri Psaltis, Eung Gi Paek and Santosh Venkatesh

  10. A Block-matching based technique for the analysis of 2D gel images.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ana; Seoane, José A; Rodríguez, Alvaro; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; López-Campos, Guillermo; Dorado, Julián

    2010-01-01

    Research at protein level is a useful practice in personalized medicine. More specifically, 2D gel images obtained after electrophoresis process can lead to an accurate diagnosis. Several computational approaches try to help the clinicians to establish the correspondence between pairs of proteins of multiple 2D gel images. Most of them perform the alignment of a patient image referred to a reference image. In this work, an approach based on block-matching techniques is developed. Its main characteristic is that it does not need to perform the whole alignment between two images considering each protein separately. A comparison with other published methods is presented. It can be concluded that this method works over broad range of proteomic images, although they have a high level of difficulty.

  11. Real-time 2D Imaging of Thermal and Mechanical Tissue Response to Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2010-03-01

    An integrated system capable of performing high frame-rate two-dimensional (2D) temperature imaging in realtime is has been developed. The system consists of a SonixRP ultrasound scanner and a custom built data processing unit connected with Gigabit Ethernet (GbE). The SonixRP scanner which serves as the frontend of the integrated system allows us to have flexibilities of controlling the beam sequence and accessing the radio frequency (RF) data in realtime through its research interface. The RF data is then streamlined to the backend of the system through GbE, where the data is processed using a 2D temperature estimation algorithm running in a general purpose graphics processing unit (GPU). Using this system, we have developed a 2D high frame-rate imaging mode, M2D, for imaging the mechanical and thermal tissue response to subtherapeutic HIFU beams. In this paper, we present results from imaging subtherapetic HIFU beams in vitro porcine heart before and after lesion formation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of tissue parameter changes due to HIFU-induced lesions.

  12. 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation from 2D transversal ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Jin, Changzhu; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-12-01

    Visualizing and analyzing the morphological structure of carotid bifurcations are important for understanding the etiology of carotid atherosclerosis, which is a major cause of stroke and transient ischemic attack. For delineation of vasculatures in the carotid artery, ultrasound examinations have been widely employed because of a noninvasive procedure without ionizing radiation. However, conventional 2D ultrasound imaging has technical limitations in observing the complicated 3D shapes and asymmetric vasodilation of bifurcations. This study aims to propose image-processing techniques for better 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation in a rat by using 2D cross-sectional ultrasound images. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging system with a probe centered at 40MHz was employed to obtain 2D transversal images. The lumen boundaries in each transverse ultrasound image were detected by using three different techniques; an ellipse-fitting, a correlation mapping to visualize the decorrelation of blood flow, and the ellipse-fitting on the correlation map. When the results are compared, the third technique provides relatively good boundary extraction. The incomplete boundaries of arterial lumen caused by acoustic artifacts are somewhat resolved by adopting the correlation mapping and the distortion in the boundary detection near the bifurcation apex was largely reduced by using the ellipse-fitting technique. The 3D lumen geometry of a carotid artery was obtained by volumetric rendering of several 2D slices. For the 3D vasodilatation of the carotid bifurcation, lumen geometries at the contraction and expansion states were simultaneously depicted at various view angles. The present 3D reconstruction methods would be useful for efficient extraction and construction of the 3D lumen geometries of carotid bifurcations from 2D ultrasound images.

  13. Multifractal analysis of 2D gray soil images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Torres, Ivan; Losada, Juan Carlos; Heck, Richard; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure, understood as the spatial arrangement of soil pores, is one of the key factors in soil modelling processes. Geometric properties of individual and interpretation of the morphological parameters of pores can be estimated from thin sections or 3D Computed Tomography images (Tarquis et al., 2003), but there is no satisfactory method to binarized these images and quantify the complexity of their spatial arrangement (Tarquis et al., 2008, Tarquis et al., 2009; Baveye et al., 2010). The objective of this work was to apply a multifractal technique, their singularities (α) and f(α) spectra, to quantify it without applying any threshold (Gónzalez-Torres, 2014). Intact soil samples were collected from four horizons of an Argisol, formed on the Tertiary Barreiras group of formations in Pernambuco state, Brazil (Itapirema Experimental Station). The natural vegetation of the region is tropical, coastal rainforest. From each horizon, showing different porosities and spatial arrangements, three adjacent samples were taken having a set of twelve samples. The intact soil samples were imaged using an EVS (now GE Medical. London, Canada) MS-8 MicroCT scanner with 45 μm pixel-1 resolution (256x256 pixels). Though some samples required paring to fit the 64 mm diameter imaging tubes, field orientation was maintained. References Baveye, P.C., M. Laba, W. Otten, L. Bouckaert, P. Dello, R.R. Goswami, D. Grinev, A. Houston, Yaoping Hu, Jianli Liu, S. Mooney, R. Pajor, S. Sleutel, A. Tarquis, Wei Wang, Qiao Wei, Mehmet Sezgin. Observer-dependent variability of the thresholding step in the quantitative analysis of soil images and X-ray microtomography data. Geoderma, 157, 51-63, 2010. González-Torres, Iván. Theory and application of multifractal analysis methods in images for the study of soil structure. Master thesis, UPM, 2014. Tarquis, A.M., R.J. Heck, J.B. Grau; J. Fabregat, M.E. Sanchez and J.M. Antón. Influence of Thresholding in Mass and Entropy Dimension of 3-D

  14. Simultaneous 3D–2D image registration and C-arm calibration: Application to endovascular image-guided interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrović, Uroš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Špiclin, Žiga

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D–2D) image registration is a key to fusion and simultaneous visualization of valuable information contained in 3D pre-interventional and 2D intra-interventional images with the final goal of image guidance of a procedure. In this paper, the authors focus on 3D–2D image registration within the context of intracranial endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs), where the 3D and 2D images are generally acquired with the same C-arm system. The accuracy and robustness of any 3D–2D registration method, to be used in a clinical setting, is influenced by (1) the method itself, (2) uncertainty of initial pose of the 3D image from which registration starts, (3) uncertainty of C-arm’s geometry and pose, and (4) the number of 2D intra-interventional images used for registration, which is generally one and at most two. The study of these influences requires rigorous and objective validation of any 3D–2D registration method against a highly accurate reference or “gold standard” registration, performed on clinical image datasets acquired in the context of the intervention. Methods: The registration process is split into two sequential, i.e., initial and final, registration stages. The initial stage is either machine-based or template matching. The latter aims to reduce possibly large in-plane translation errors by matching a projection of the 3D vessel model and 2D image. In the final registration stage, four state-of-the-art intrinsic image-based 3D–2D registration methods, which involve simultaneous refinement of rigid-body and C-arm parameters, are evaluated. For objective validation, the authors acquired an image database of 15 patients undergoing cerebral EIGI, for which accurate gold standard registrations were established by fiducial marker coregistration. Results: Based on target registration error, the obtained success rates of 3D to a single 2D image registration after initial machine-based and

  15. Bi-sided integral imaging with 2D/3D convertibility using scattering polarizer.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Jiwoon; Hong, Keehoon; Park, Soon-gi; Hong, Jisoo; Min, Sung-Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2013-12-16

    We propose a two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) convertible bi-sided integral imaging. The proposed system uses the polarization state of projected light for switching its operation mode between 2D and 3D modes. By using an optical module composed of two scattering polarizers and one linear polarizer, the proposed integral imaging system simultaneously provides 3D images with 2D background images for observers who are located in the front and the rear sides of the system. The occlusion effect between 2D images and 3D images is realized by using a compensation mask for 2D images and the elemental images. The principle of proposed system is experimentally verified.

  16. 3D/2D Model-to-Image Registration for Quantitative Dietary Assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Jia, Wenyan; Li, Zhaoxin; Sun, Yung-Nien; Sun, Mingui

    2012-12-31

    Image-based dietary assessment is important for health monitoring and management because it can provide quantitative and objective information, such as food volume, nutrition type, and calorie intake. In this paper, a new framework, 3D/2D model-to-image registration, is presented for estimating food volume from a single-view 2D image containing a reference object (i.e., a circular dining plate). First, the food is segmented from the background image based on Otsu's thresholding and morphological operations. Next, the food volume is obtained from a user-selected, 3D shape model. The position, orientation and scale of the model are optimized by a model-to-image registration process. Then, the circular plate in the image is fitted and its spatial information is used as constraints for solving the registration problem. Our method takes the global contour information of the shape model into account to obtain a reliable food volume estimate. Experimental results using regularly shaped test objects and realistically shaped food models with known volumes both demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  17. Development of a 2D Image Reconstruction and Viewing System for Histological Images from Multiple Tissue Blocks: Towards High-Resolution Whole-Organ 3D Histological Images.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Noriaki; Bautista, Pinky A; Haneishi, Hideaki; Snuderl, Matija; Yagi, Yukako

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution 3D histology image reconstruction of the whole brain organ starts from reconstructing the high-resolution 2D histology images of a brain slice. In this paper, we introduced a method to automatically align the histology images of thin tissue sections cut from the multiple paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of a brain slice. For this method, we employed template matching and incorporated an optimization technique to further improve the accuracy of the 2D reconstructed image. In the template matching, we used the gross image of the brain slice as a reference to the reconstructed 2D histology image of the slice, while in the optimization procedure, we utilized the Jaccard index as the metric of the reconstruction accuracy. The results of our experiment on the initial 3 different whole-brain tissue slices showed that while the method works, it is also constrained by tissue deformations introduced during the tissue processing and slicing. The size of the reconstructed high-resolution 2D histology image of a brain slice is huge, and designing an image viewer that makes particularly efficient use of the computing power of a standard computer used in our laboratories is of interest. We also present the initial implementation of our 2D image viewer system in this paper.

  18. A review of 3D/2D registration methods for image-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Markelj, P; Tomaževič, D; Likar, B; Pernuš, F

    2012-04-01

    Registration of pre- and intra-interventional data is one of the key technologies for image-guided radiation therapy, radiosurgery, minimally invasive surgery, endoscopy, and interventional radiology. In this paper, we survey those 3D/2D data registration methods that utilize 3D computer tomography or magnetic resonance images as the pre-interventional data and 2D X-ray projection images as the intra-interventional data. The 3D/2D registration methods are reviewed with respect to image modality, image dimensionality, registration basis, geometric transformation, user interaction, optimization procedure, subject, and object of registration.

  19. 3D-2D registration of cerebral angiograms: a method and evaluation on clinical images.

    PubMed

    Mitrovic, Uroš; Špiclin, Žiga; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo

    2013-08-01

    Endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) involve navigation of a catheter through the vasculature followed by application of treatment at the site of anomaly using live 2D projection images for guidance. 3D images acquired prior to EIGI are used to quantify the vascular anomaly and plan the intervention. If fused with the information of live 2D images they can also facilitate navigation and treatment. For this purpose 3D-2D image registration is required. Although several 3D-2D registration methods for EIGI achieve registration accuracy below 1 mm, their clinical application is still limited by insufficient robustness or reliability. In this paper, we propose a 3D-2D registration method based on matching a 3D vasculature model to intensity gradients of live 2D images. To objectively validate 3D-2D registration methods, we acquired a clinical image database of 10 patients undergoing cerebral EIGI and established "gold standard" registrations by aligning fiducial markers in 3D and 2D images. The proposed method had mean registration accuracy below 0.65 mm, which was comparable to tested state-of-the-art methods, and execution time below 1 s. With the highest rate of successful registrations and the highest capture range the proposed method was the most robust and thus a good candidate for application in EIGI.

  20. 2D Images Recorded With a Single-Sided Magnetic Particle Imaging Scanner.

    PubMed

    Grafe, Ksenija; von Gladiss, Anselm; Bringout, Gael; Ahlborg, Mandy; Buzug, Thorsten M

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging is a new medical imaging modality, which detects superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The particles are excited by magnetic fields. Most scanners have a tube-like measurement field and therefore, both the field of view and the object size are limited. A single-sided scanner has the advantage that the object is not limited in size, only the penetration depth is limited. A single-sided scanner prototype for 1D imaging has been presented in 2009. Simulations have been published for a 2D single-sided scanner and first 1D measurements have been carried out. In this paper, the first 2D single-sided scanner prototype is presented and the first calibration-based reconstruction results of measured 2D phantoms are shown. The field free point is moved on a Lissajous trajectory inside a 30 × 30 mm2 area. Images of phantoms with a maximal distance of 10 mm perpendicular to the scanner surface have been reconstructed. Different cylindrically shaped holes of phantoms have been filled with 6.28 μl undiluted Resovist. After the measurement and image reconstruction of the phantoms, particle volumes could be distinguished with a distance of 2 mm and 6 mm in vertical and horizontal direction, respectively.

  1. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, A.; Agulles-Pedrós, L.

    2016-07-01

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the 99mTc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  2. Designing of sparse 2D arrays for Lamb wave imaging using coarray concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-03-01

    2D ultrasonic arrays have considerable application potential in Lamb wave based SHM systems, since they enable equivocal damage imaging and even in some cases wave-mode selection. Recently, it has been shown that the 2D arrays can be used in SHM applications in a synthetic focusing (SF) mode, which is much more effective than the classical phase array mode commonly used in NDT. The SF mode assumes a single element excitation of subsequent transmitters and off-line processing the acquired data. In the simplest implementation of the technique, only single multiplexed input and output channels are required, which results in significant hardware simplification. Application of the SF mode for 2D arrays creates additional degrees of freedom during the design of the array topology, which complicates the array design process, however, it enables sparse array designs with performance similar to that of the fully populated dense arrays. In this paper we present the coarray concept to facilitate synthesis process of an array's aperture used in the multistatic synthetic focusing approach in Lamb waves-based imaging systems. In the coherent imaging, performed in the transmit/receive mode, the sum coarray is a morphological convolution of the transmit/receive sub-arrays. It can be calculated as the set of sums of the individual sub-arrays' elements locations. The coarray framework will be presented here using a an example of a star-shaped array. The approach will be discussed in terms of beampatterns of the resulting imaging systems. Both simulated and experimental results will be included.

  3. Designing of sparse 2D arrays for Lamb wave imaging using coarray concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ambroziński, Łukasz Stepinski, Tadeusz Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-03-31

    2D ultrasonic arrays have considerable application potential in Lamb wave based SHM systems, since they enable equivocal damage imaging and even in some cases wave-mode selection. Recently, it has been shown that the 2D arrays can be used in SHM applications in a synthetic focusing (SF) mode, which is much more effective than the classical phase array mode commonly used in NDT. The SF mode assumes a single element excitation of subsequent transmitters and off-line processing the acquired data. In the simplest implementation of the technique, only single multiplexed input and output channels are required, which results in significant hardware simplification. Application of the SF mode for 2D arrays creates additional degrees of freedom during the design of the array topology, which complicates the array design process, however, it enables sparse array designs with performance similar to that of the fully populated dense arrays. In this paper we present the coarray concept to facilitate synthesis process of an array’s aperture used in the multistatic synthetic focusing approach in Lamb waves-based imaging systems. In the coherent imaging, performed in the transmit/receive mode, the sum coarray is a morphological convolution of the transmit/receive sub-arrays. It can be calculated as the set of sums of the individual sub-arrays’ elements locations. The coarray framework will be presented here using a an example of a star-shaped array. The approach will be discussed in terms of beampatterns of the resulting imaging systems. Both simulated and experimental results will be included.

  4. On Limits of Embedding in 3D Images Based on 2D Watson's Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavehvash, Zahra; Ghaemmaghami, Shahrokh

    We extend the Watson image quality metric to 3D images through the concept of integral imaging. In the Watson's model, perceptual thresholds for changes to the DCT coefficients of a 2D image are given for information hiding. These thresholds are estimated in a way that the resulting distortion in the 2D image remains undetectable by the human eyes. In this paper, the same perceptual thresholds are estimated for a 3D scene in the integral imaging method. These thresholds are obtained based on the Watson's model using the relation between 2D elemental images and resulting 3D image. The proposed model is evaluated through subjective tests in a typical image steganography scheme.

  5. Clinical Assessment of 2D/3D Registration Accuracy in 4 Major Anatomic Sites Using On-Board 2D Kilovoltage Images for 6D Patient Setup.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Yang, T Jonathan; Furtado, Hugo; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Ballangrud, Åse; Powell, Simon N; Mechalakos, James

    2015-06-01

    To provide a comprehensive assessment of patient setup accuracy in 6 degrees of freedom (DOFs) using 2-dimensional/3-dimensional (2D/3D) image registration with on-board 2-dimensional kilovoltage (OB-2 DkV) radiographic images, we evaluated cranial, head and neck (HN), and thoracic and abdominal sites under clinical conditions. A fast 2D/3D image registration method using graphics processing unit GPU was modified for registration between OB-2 DkV and 3D simulation computed tomography (simCT) images, with 3D/3D registration as the gold standard for 6 DOF alignment. In 2D/3D registration, body roll rotation was obtained solely by matching orthogonal OB-2 DkV images with a series of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from simCT with a small rotational increment along the gantry rotation axis. The window/level adjustments for optimal visualization of the bone in OB-2 DkV and DRRs were performed prior to registration. Ideal patient alignment at the isocenter was calculated and used as an initial registration position. In 3D/3D registration, cone-beam CT (CBCT) was aligned to simCT on bony structures using a bone density filter in 6DOF. Included in this retrospective study were 37 patients treated in 55 fractions with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic body radiotherapy for cranial and paraspinal cancer. A cranial phantom was used to serve as a control. In all cases, CBCT images were acquired for patient setup with subsequent OB-2 DkV verification. It was found that the accuracy of the 2D/3D registration was 0.0 ± 0.5 mm and 0.1° ± 0.4° in phantom. In patient, it is site dependent due to deformation of the anatomy: 0.2 ± 1.6 mm and -0.4° ± 1.2° on average for each dimension for the cranial site, 0.7 ± 1.6 mm and 0.3° ± 1.3° for HN, 0.7 ± 2.0 mm and -0.7° ± 1.1° for the thorax, and 1.1 ± 2.6 mm and -0.5° ± 1.9° for the abdomen. Anatomical deformation and presence of soft tissue in 2D/3D registration affect the consistency with

  6. Clinical Assessment of 2D/3D Registration Accuracy in 4 Major Anatomic Sites Using On-Board 2D Kilovoltage Images for 6D Patient Setup

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang; Yang, T. Jonathan; Furtado, Hugo; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Ballangrud, Åse; Powell, Simon N.; Mechalakos, James

    2015-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive assessment of patient setup accuracy in 6 degrees of freedom (DOFs) using 2-dimensional/3-dimensional (2D/3D) image registration with on-board 2-dimensional kilovoltage (OB-2DkV) radiographic images, we evaluated cranial, head and neck (HN), and thoracic and abdominal sites under clinical conditions. A fast 2D/3D image registration method using graphics processing unit GPU was modified for registration between OB-2DkV and 3D simulation computed tomography (simCT) images, with 3D/3D registration as the gold standard for 6DOF alignment. In 2D/3D registration, body roll rotation was obtained solely by matching orthogonal OB-2DkV images with a series of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from simCT with a small rotational increment along the gantry rotation axis. The window/level adjustments for optimal visualization of the bone in OB-2DkV and DRRs were performed prior to registration. Ideal patient alignment at the isocenter was calculated and used as an initial registration position. In 3D/3D registration, cone-beam CT (CBCT) was aligned to simCT on bony structures using a bone density filter in 6DOF. Included in this retrospective study were 37 patients treated in 55 fractions with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic body radiotherapy for cranial and paraspinal cancer. A cranial phantom was used to serve as a control. In all cases, CBCT images were acquired for patient setup with subsequent OB-2DkV verification. It was found that the accuracy of the 2D/3D registration was 0.0 ± 0.5 mm and 0.1° ± 0.4° in phantom. In patient, it is site dependent due to deformation of the anatomy: 0.2 ± 1.6 mm and −0.4° ± 1.2° on average for each dimension for the cranial site, 0.7 ± 1.6 mm and 0.3° ± 1.3° for HN, 0.7 ± 2.0 mm and −0.7° ± 1.1° for the thorax, and 1.1 ± 2.6 mm and −0.5° ± 1.9° for the abdomen. Anatomical deformation and presence of soft tissue in 2D/3D registration affect the consistency with

  7. The agreement between 3D, standard 2D and triplane 2D speckle tracking: effects of image quality and 3D volume rate.

    PubMed

    Trache, Tudor; Stöbe, Stephan; Tarr, Adrienn; Pfeiffer, Dietrich; Hagendorff, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Comparison of 3D and 2D speckle tracking performed on standard 2D and triplane 2D datasets of normal and pathological left ventricular (LV) wall-motion patterns with a focus on the effect that 3D volume rate (3DVR), image quality and tracking artifacts have on the agreement between 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 37 patients with normal LV function and 18 patients with ischaemic wall-motion abnormalities underwent 2D and 3D echocardiography, followed by offline speckle tracking measurements. The values of 3D global, regional and segmental strain were compared with the standard 2D and triplane 2D strain values. Correlation analysis with the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was also performed. The 3D and 2D global strain values correlated good in both normally and abnormally contracting hearts, though systematic differences between the two methods were observed. Of the 3D strain parameters, the area strain showed the best correlation with the LVEF. The numerical agreement of 3D and 2D analyses varied significantly with the volume rate and image quality of the 3D datasets. The highest correlation between 2D and 3D peak systolic strain values was found between 3D area and standard 2D longitudinal strain. Regional wall-motion abnormalities were similarly detected by 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 2DST of triplane datasets showed similar results to those of conventional 2D datasets. 2D and 3D speckle tracking similarly detect normal and pathological wall-motion patterns. Limited image quality has a significant impact on the agreement between 3D and 2D numerical strain values.

  8. A 2-D imaging heat-flux gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M. ); Beshears, D.L.; Sartory, W.K.; Tobin, K.W.; Williams, R.K. ); Turley, W.D. . Santa Barbara Operations)

    1991-07-01

    This report describes a new leadless two-dimensional imaging optical heat-flux gauge. The gauge is made by depositing arrays of thermorgraphic-phosphor (TP) spots onto the faces of a polymethylpentene is insulator. In the first section of the report, we describe several gauge configurations and their prototype realizations. A satisfactory configuration is an array of right triangles on each face that overlay to form squares when the gauge is viewed normal to the surface. The next section of the report treats the thermal conductivity of TPs. We set up an experiment using a comparative longitudinal heat-flow apparatus to measure the previously unknown thermal conductivity of these materials. The thermal conductivity of one TP, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu, is 0.0137 W/cm{center dot}K over the temperature range from about 300 to 360 K. The theories underlying the time response of TP gauges and the imaging characteristics are discussed in the next section. Then we discuss several laboratory experiments to (1) demonstrate that the TP heat-flux gauge can be used in imaging applications; (2) obtain a quantum yield that enumerates what typical optical output signal amplitudes can be obtained from TP heat-flux gauges; and (3) determine whether LANL-designed intensified video cameras have sufficient sensitivity to acquire images from the heat-flux gauges. We obtained positive results from all the measurements. Throughout the text, we note limitations, areas where improvements are needed, and where further research is necessary. 12 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. 3-D Deep Penetration Photoacoustic Imaging with a 2-D CMUT Array.

    PubMed

    Ma, Te-Jen; Kothapalli, Sri Rajasekhar; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Oralkan, Omer; Kamaya, Aya; Wygant, Ira O; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2010-10-11

    In this work, we demonstrate 3-D photoacoustic imaging of optically absorbing targets embedded as deep as 5 cm inside a highly scattering background medium using a 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array with a center frequency of 5.5 MHz. 3-D volumetric images and 2-D maximum intensity projection images are presented to show the objects imaged at different depths. Due to the close proximity of the CMUT to the integrated frontend circuits, the CMUT array imaging system has a low noise floor. This makes the CMUT a promising technology for deep tissue photoacoustic imaging.

  10. Framework for 2D-3D image fusion of infrared thermography with preoperative MRI.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Nico; Weidner, Florian; Urban, Peter; Meyer, Tobias; Schnabel, Christian; Radev, Yordan; Schackert, Gabriele; Petersohn, Uwe; Koch, Edmund; Gumhold, Stefan; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2017-01-23

    Multimodal medical image fusion combines information of one or more images in order to improve the diagnostic value. While previous applications mainly focus on merging images from computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonic and single-photon emission computed tomography, we propose a novel approach for the registration and fusion of preoperative 3D MRI with intraoperative 2D infrared thermography. Image-guided neurosurgeries are based on neuronavigation systems, which further allow us track the position and orientation of arbitrary cameras. Hereby, we are able to relate the 2D coordinate system of the infrared camera with the 3D MRI coordinate system. The registered image data are now combined by calibration-based image fusion in order to map our intraoperative 2D thermographic images onto the respective brain surface recovered from preoperative MRI. In extensive accuracy measurements, we found that the proposed framework achieves a mean accuracy of 2.46 mm.

  11. 3D/2D image registration: the impact of X-ray views and their number.

    PubMed

    Tomazevic, Dejan; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2007-01-01

    An important part of image-guided radiation therapy or surgery is registration of a three-dimensional (3D) preoperative image to two-dimensional (2D) images of the patient. It is expected that the accuracy and robustness of a 3D/2D image registration method do not depend solely on the registration method itself but also on the number and projections (views) of intraoperative images. In this study, we systematically investigate these factors by using registered image data, comprising of CT and X-ray images of a cadaveric lumbar spine phantom and the recently proposed 3D/2D registration method. The results indicate that the proportion of successful registrations (robustness) significantly increases when more X-ray images are used for registration.

  12. 2D and 3D visualization methods of endoscopic panoramic bladder images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Alexander; Heisterklaus, Iris; Müller, Yannick; Stehle, Thomas; Gross, Sebastian; Aach, Til

    2011-03-01

    While several mosaicking algorithms have been developed to compose endoscopic images of the internal urinary bladder wall into panoramic images, the quantitative evaluation of these output images in terms of geometrical distortions have often not been discussed. However, the visualization of the distortion level is highly desired for an objective image-based medical diagnosis. Thus, we present in this paper a method to create quality maps from the characteristics of transformation parameters, which were applied to the endoscopic images during the registration process of the mosaicking algorithm. For a global first view impression, the quality maps are laid over the panoramic image and highlight image regions in pseudo-colors according to their local distortions. This illustration supports then surgeons to identify geometrically distorted structures easily in the panoramic image, which allow more objective medical interpretations of tumor tissue in shape and size. Aside from introducing quality maps in 2-D, we also discuss a visualization method to map panoramic images onto a 3-D spherical bladder model. Reference points are manually selected by the surgeon in the panoramic image and the 3-D model. Then the panoramic image is mapped by the Hammer-Aitoff equal-area projection onto the 3-D surface using texture mapping. Finally the textured bladder model can be freely moved in a virtual environment for inspection. Using a two-hemisphere bladder representation, references between panoramic image regions and their corresponding space coordinates within the bladder model are reconstructed. This additional spatial 3-D information thus assists the surgeon in navigation, documentation, as well as surgical planning.

  13. GPU accelerated generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs for 2-D/3-D image registration.

    PubMed

    Dorgham, Osama M; Laycock, Stephen D; Fisher, Mark H

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in programming languages for graphics processing units (GPUs) provide developers with a convenient way of implementing applications which can be executed on the CPU and GPU interchangeably. GPUs are becoming relatively cheap, powerful, and widely available hardware components, which can be used to perform intensive calculations. The last decade of hardware performance developments shows that GPU-based computation is progressing significantly faster than CPU-based computation, particularly if one considers the execution of highly parallelisable algorithms. Future predictions illustrate that this trend is likely to continue. In this paper, we introduce a way of accelerating 2-D/3-D image registration by developing a hybrid system which executes on the CPU and utilizes the GPU for parallelizing the generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Based on the advancements of the GPU over the CPU, it is timely to exploit the benefits of many-core GPU technology by developing algorithms for DRR generation. Although some previous work has investigated the rendering of DRRs using the GPU, this paper investigates approximations which reduce the computational overhead while still maintaining a quality consistent with that needed for 2-D/3-D registration with sufficient accuracy to be clinically acceptable in certain applications of radiation oncology. Furthermore, by comparing implementations of 2-D/3-D registration on the CPU and GPU, we investigate current performance and propose an optimal framework for PC implementations addressing the rigid registration problem. Using this framework, we are able to render DRR images from a 256×256×133 CT volume in ~24 ms using an NVidia GeForce 8800 GTX and in ~2 ms using NVidia GeForce GTX 580. In addition to applications requiring fast automatic patient setup, these levels of performance suggest image-guided radiation therapy at video frame rates is technically feasible using relatively low cost PC

  14. Constructing a Database from Multiple 2D Images for Camera Pose Estimation and Robot Localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Michael; Ansar, Adnan I.; Brennan, Shane; Clouse, Daniel S.; Padgett, Curtis W.

    2012-01-01

    The LMDB (Landmark Database) Builder software identifies persistent image features (landmarks) in a scene viewed multiple times and precisely estimates the landmarks 3D world positions. The software receives as input multiple 2D images of approximately the same scene, along with an initial guess of the camera poses for each image, and a table of features matched pair-wise in each frame. LMDB Builder aggregates landmarks across an arbitrarily large collection of frames with matched features. Range data from stereo vision processing can also be passed to improve the initial guess of the 3D point estimates. The LMDB Builder aggregates feature lists across all frames, manages the process to promote selected features to landmarks, and iteratively calculates the 3D landmark positions using the current camera pose estimations (via an optimal ray projection method), and then improves the camera pose estimates using the 3D landmark positions. Finally, it extracts image patches for each landmark from auto-selected key frames and constructs the landmark database. The landmark database can then be used to estimate future camera poses (and therefore localize a robotic vehicle that may be carrying the cameras) by matching current imagery to landmark database image patches and using the known 3D landmark positions to estimate the current pose.

  15. Dynamic tracking of a deformable tissue based on 3D-2D MR-US image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marami, Bahram; Sirouspour, Shahin; Fenster, Aaron; Capson, David W.

    2014-03-01

    Real-time registration of pre-operative magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images with intra-operative Ultrasound (US) images can be a valuable tool in image-guided therapies and interventions. This paper presents an automatic method for dynamically tracking the deformation of a soft tissue based on registering pre-operative three-dimensional (3D) MR images to intra-operative two-dimensional (2D) US images. The registration algorithm is based on concepts in state estimation where a dynamic finite element (FE)- based linear elastic deformation model correlates the imaging data in the spatial and temporal domains. A Kalman-like filtering process estimates the unknown deformation states of the soft tissue using the deformation model and a measure of error between the predicted and the observed intra-operative imaging data. The error is computed based on an intensity-based distance metric, namely, modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND), and no segmentation or feature extraction from images is required. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by dynamically deforming 3D pre-operative MR images of a breast phantom tissue based on real-time 2D images obtained from an US probe. Experimental results on different registration scenarios showed that deformation tracking converges in a few iterations. The average target registration error on the plane of 2D US images for manually selected fiducial points was between 0.3 and 1.5 mm depending on the size of deformation.

  16. Automatic Masking for Robust 3D-2D Image Registration in Image-Guided Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ketcha, M. D.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    During spinal neurosurgery, patient-specific information, planning, and annotation such as vertebral labels can be mapped from preoperative 3D CT to intraoperative 2D radiographs via image-based 3D-2D registration. Such registration has been shown to provide a potentially valuable means of decision support in target localization as well as quality assurance of the surgical product. However, robust registration can be challenged by mismatch in image content between the preoperative CT and intraoperative radiographs, arising, for example, from anatomical deformation or the presence of surgical tools within the radiograph. In this work, we develop and evaluate methods for automatically mitigating the effect of content mismatch by leveraging the surgical planning data to assign greater weight to anatomical regions known to be reliable for registration and vital to the surgical task while removing problematic regions that are highly deformable or often occluded by surgical tools. We investigated two approaches to assigning variable weight (i.e., "masking") to image content and/or the similarity metric: (1) masking the preoperative 3D CT ("volumetric masking"); and (2) masking within the 2D similarity metric calculation ("projection masking"). The accuracy of registration was evaluated in terms of projection distance error (PDE) in 61 cases selected from an IRB-approved clinical study. The best performing of the masking techniques was found to reduce the rate of gross failure (PDE > 20 mm) from 11.48% to 5.57% in this challenging retrospective data set. These approaches provided robustness to content mismatch and eliminated distinct failure modes of registration. Such improvement was gained without additional workflow and has motivated incorporation of the masking methods within a system under development for prospective clinical studies. PMID:27335531

  17. Automatic Masking for Robust 3D-2D Image Registration in Image-Guided Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ketcha, M D; De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    During spinal neurosurgery, patient-specific information, planning, and annotation such as vertebral labels can be mapped from preoperative 3D CT to intraoperative 2D radiographs via image-based 3D-2D registration. Such registration has been shown to provide a potentially valuable means of decision support in target localization as well as quality assurance of the surgical product. However, robust registration can be challenged by mismatch in image content between the preoperative CT and intraoperative radiographs, arising, for example, from anatomical deformation or the presence of surgical tools within the radiograph. In this work, we develop and evaluate methods for automatically mitigating the effect of content mismatch by leveraging the surgical planning data to assign greater weight to anatomical regions known to be reliable for registration and vital to the surgical task while removing problematic regions that are highly deformable or often occluded by surgical tools. We investigated two approaches to assigning variable weight (i.e., "masking") to image content and/or the similarity metric: (1) masking the preoperative 3D CT ("volumetric masking"); and (2) masking within the 2D similarity metric calculation ("projection masking"). The accuracy of registration was evaluated in terms of projection distance error (PDE) in 61 cases selected from an IRB-approved clinical study. The best performing of the masking techniques was found to reduce the rate of gross failure (PDE > 20 mm) from 11.48% to 5.57% in this challenging retrospective data set. These approaches provided robustness to content mismatch and eliminated distinct failure modes of registration. Such improvement was gained without additional workflow and has motivated incorporation of the masking methods within a system under development for prospective clinical studies.

  18. Automatic masking for robust 3D-2D image registration in image-guided spine surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketcha, M. D.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    During spinal neurosurgery, patient-specific information, planning, and annotation such as vertebral labels can be mapped from preoperative 3D CT to intraoperative 2D radiographs via image-based 3D-2D registration. Such registration has been shown to provide a potentially valuable means of decision support in target localization as well as quality assurance of the surgical product. However, robust registration can be challenged by mismatch in image content between the preoperative CT and intraoperative radiographs, arising, for example, from anatomical deformation or the presence of surgical tools within the radiograph. In this work, we develop and evaluate methods for automatically mitigating the effect of content mismatch by leveraging the surgical planning data to assign greater weight to anatomical regions known to be reliable for registration and vital to the surgical task while removing problematic regions that are highly deformable or often occluded by surgical tools. We investigated two approaches to assigning variable weight (i.e., "masking") to image content and/or the similarity metric: (1) masking the preoperative 3D CT ("volumetric masking"); and (2) masking within the 2D similarity metric calculation ("projection masking"). The accuracy of registration was evaluated in terms of projection distance error (PDE) in 61 cases selected from an IRB-approved clinical study. The best performing of the masking techniques was found to reduce the rate of gross failure (PDE > 20 mm) from 11.48% to 5.57% in this challenging retrospective data set. These approaches provided robustness to content mismatch and eliminated distinct failure modes of registration. Such improvement was gained without additional workflow and has motivated incorporation of the masking methods within a system under development for prospective clinical studies.

  19. Accurate positioning for head and neck cancer patients using 2D and 3D image guidance

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyejoo; Lovelock, Dale M.; Yorke, Ellen D.; Kriminiski, Sergey; Lee, Nancy; Amols, Howard I.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal is to determine an optimized image-guided setup by comparing setup errors determined by two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) image guidance for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients immobilized by customized thermoplastic masks. Nine patients received weekly imaging sessions, for a total of 54, throughout treatment. Patients were first set up by matching lasers to surface marks (initial) and then translationally corrected using manual registration of orthogonal kilovoltage (kV) radiographs with DRRs (2D-2D) on bony anatomy. A kV cone beam CT (kVCBCT) was acquired and manually registered to the simulation CT using only translations (3D-3D) on the same bony anatomy to determine further translational corrections. After treatment, a second set of kVCBCT was acquired to assess intrafractional motion. Averaged over all sessions, 2D-2D registration led to translational corrections from initial setup of 3.5 ± 2.2 (range 0–8) mm. The addition of 3D-3D registration resulted in only small incremental adjustment (0.8 ± 1.5 mm). We retrospectively calculated patient setup rotation errors using an automatic rigid-body algorithm with 6 degrees of freedom (DoF) on regions of interest (ROI) of in-field bony anatomy (mainly the C2 vertebral body). Small rotations were determined for most of the imaging sessions; however, occasionally rotations > 3° were observed. The calculated intrafractional motion with automatic registration was < 3.5 mm for eight patients, and < 2° for all patients. We conclude that daily manual 2D-2D registration on radiographs reduces positioning errors for mask-immobilized HNC patients in most cases, and is easily implemented. 3D-3D registration adds little improvement over 2D-2D registration without correcting rotational errors. We also conclude that thermoplastic masks are effective for patient immobilization. PMID:21330971

  20. Robust Prediction for Stationary Processes. 2D Enriched Version.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-24

    When i=! thwn for any e~, thle anise at any of" thle nominal processes 1,2.3, or 4 is the same Sfor the prediLtk)[s inl (29) and (30), as expected. (2...For any mi>l1 thle anise at thle nominal process ;.t viz. e(;.yG1 ), i=1,2 converges to e(f.vrnm*) as e- As c-*1, eq *In ) converges to a Except for

  1. 3-D Reconstruction From 2-D Radiographic Images and Its Application to Clinical Veterinary Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sato, Motoyoshi

    3D imaging technique is very important and indispensable in diagnosis. The main stream of the technique is one in which 3D image is reconstructed from a set of slice images, such as X-ray CT and MRI. However, these systems require large space and high costs. On the other hand, a low cost and small size 3D imaging system is needed in clinical veterinary medicine, for example, in the case of diagnosis in X-ray car or pasture area. We propose a novel 3D imaging technique using 2-D X-ray radiographic images. This system can be realized by cheaper system than X-ray CT and enables to get 3D image in X-ray car or portable X-ray equipment. In this paper, a 3D visualization technique from 2-D radiographic images is proposed and several reconstructions are shown. These reconstructions are evaluated by veterinarians.

  2. Acousto-Optic Processing of 2-D Signals Using Temporal and Spatial Integration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-31

    Documents includes data on: Architectures; Coherence Properties of Pulsed Laser Diodes; Acousto - optic device data; Dynamic Range Issues; Image correlation; Synthetic aperture radar; 2-D Fourier transform; and Moments.

  3. Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Images are prepared from data acquired by the multispectral scanner aboard Landsat, which views Earth in four ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum, two visible bands and two infrared. Scanner picks up radiation from ground objects and converts the radiation signatures to digital signals, which are relayed to Earth and recorded on tape. Each tape contains "pixels" or picture elements covering a ground area; computerized equipment processes the tapes and plots each pixel, line be line to produce the basic image. Image can be further processed to correct sensor errors, to heighten contrast for feature emphasis or to enhance the end product in other ways. Key factor in conversion of digital data to visual form is precision of processing equipment. Jet Propulsion Laboratory prepared a digital mosaic that was plotted and enhanced by Optronics International, Inc. by use of the company's C-4300 Colorwrite, a high precision, high speed system which manipulates and analyzes digital data and presents it in visual form on film. Optronics manufactures a complete family of image enhancement processing systems to meet all users' needs. Enhanced imagery is useful to geologists, hydrologists, land use planners, agricultural specialists geographers and others.

  4. Comparison of DP3 Signals Evoked by Comfortable 3D Images and 2D Images — an Event-Related Potential Study using an Oddball Task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Peng; Wu, Xiang; Gao, Dingguo; Liang, Haowen; Wang, Jiahui; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; She, Juncong; Chen, Jun

    2017-02-01

    The horizontal binocular disparity is a critical factor for the visual fatigue induced by watching stereoscopic TVs. Stereoscopic images that possess the disparity within the ‘comfort zones’ and remain still in the depth direction are considered comfortable to the viewers as 2D images. However, the difference in brain activities between processing such comfortable stereoscopic images and 2D images is still less studied. The DP3 (differential P3) signal refers to an event-related potential (ERP) component indicating attentional processes, which is typically evoked by odd target stimuli among standard stimuli in an oddball task. The present study found that the DP3 signal elicited by the comfortable 3D images exhibits the delayed peak latency and enhanced peak amplitude over the anterior and central scalp regions compared to the 2D images. The finding suggests that compared to the processing of the 2D images, more attentional resources are involved in the processing of the stereoscopic images even though they are subjectively comfortable.

  5. Comparison of DP3 Signals Evoked by Comfortable 3D Images and 2D Images - an Event-Related Potential Study using an Oddball Task.

    PubMed

    Ye, Peng; Wu, Xiang; Gao, Dingguo; Liang, Haowen; Wang, Jiahui; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; She, Juncong; Chen, Jun

    2017-02-22

    The horizontal binocular disparity is a critical factor for the visual fatigue induced by watching stereoscopic TVs. Stereoscopic images that possess the disparity within the 'comfort zones' and remain still in the depth direction are considered comfortable to the viewers as 2D images. However, the difference in brain activities between processing such comfortable stereoscopic images and 2D images is still less studied. The DP3 (differential P3) signal refers to an event-related potential (ERP) component indicating attentional processes, which is typically evoked by odd target stimuli among standard stimuli in an oddball task. The present study found that the DP3 signal elicited by the comfortable 3D images exhibits the delayed peak latency and enhanced peak amplitude over the anterior and central scalp regions compared to the 2D images. The finding suggests that compared to the processing of the 2D images, more attentional resources are involved in the processing of the stereoscopic images even though they are subjectively comfortable.

  6. Comparison of DP3 Signals Evoked by Comfortable 3D Images and 2D Images — an Event-Related Potential Study using an Oddball Task

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Peng; Wu, Xiang; Gao, Dingguo; Liang, Haowen; Wang, Jiahui; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; She, Juncong; Chen, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The horizontal binocular disparity is a critical factor for the visual fatigue induced by watching stereoscopic TVs. Stereoscopic images that possess the disparity within the ‘comfort zones’ and remain still in the depth direction are considered comfortable to the viewers as 2D images. However, the difference in brain activities between processing such comfortable stereoscopic images and 2D images is still less studied. The DP3 (differential P3) signal refers to an event-related potential (ERP) component indicating attentional processes, which is typically evoked by odd target stimuli among standard stimuli in an oddball task. The present study found that the DP3 signal elicited by the comfortable 3D images exhibits the delayed peak latency and enhanced peak amplitude over the anterior and central scalp regions compared to the 2D images. The finding suggests that compared to the processing of the 2D images, more attentional resources are involved in the processing of the stereoscopic images even though they are subjectively comfortable. PMID:28225044

  7. On the use of steady-state signal equations for 2D TrueFISP imaging.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Bram F; Heijman, Edwin; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2009-07-01

    To explain the signal behavior in 2D-TrueFISP imaging, a slice excitation profile should be considered that describes a variation of effective flip angles and magnetization phases after excitation. These parameters can be incorporated into steady-state equations to predict the final signal within a pixel. The use of steady-state equations assumes that excitation occurs instantaneously, although in reality this is a nonlinear process. In addition, often the flip angle variation within the slice excitation profile is solely considered when using steady-state equations, while TrueFISP is especially known for its sensitivity to phase variations. The purpose of this study was therefore to evaluate the precision of steady-state equations in calculating signal intensities in 2D TrueFISP imaging. To that end, steady-state slice profiles and corresponding signal intensities were calculated as function of flip angle, RF phase advance and pulse shape. More complex Bloch simulations were considered as a gold standard, which described every excitation within the sequence until steady state was reached. They were used to analyze two different methods based on steady-state equations. In addition, measurements on phantoms were done with corresponding imaging parameters. Although the Bloch simulations described the steady-state slice profile formation better than methods based on steady-state equations, the latter performed well in predicting the steady-state signal resulting from it. In certain cases the phase variation within the slice excitation profile did not even have to be taken into account.

  8. 2D harmonic filtering of MR phase images in multicenter clinical setting: toward a magnetic signature of cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Kaaouana, Takoua; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Samaille, Thomas; Thiery, Nathalie; Dufouil, Carole; Delmaire, Christine; Dormont, Didier; Chupin, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) have emerged as a new imaging marker of small vessel disease. Composed of hemosiderin, CMBs are paramagnetic and can be detected with MRI sequences sensitive to magnetic susceptibility (typically, gradient recalled echo T2* weighted images). Nevertheless, their identification remains challenging on T2* magnitude images because of confounding structures and lesions. In this context, T2* phase image may play a key role in better characterizing CMBs because of its direct relationship with local magnetic field variations due to magnetic susceptibility difference. To address this issue, susceptibility-based imaging techniques were proposed, such as Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI) and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM). But these techniques have not yet been validated for 2D clinical data in multicenter settings. Here, we introduce 2DHF, a fast 2D phase processing technique embedding both unwrapping and harmonic filtering designed for data acquired in 2D, even with slice-to-slice inconsistencies. This method results in internal field maps which reveal local field details due to magnetic inhomogeneity within the region of interest only. This technique is based on the physical properties of the induced magnetic field and should yield consistent results. A synthetic phantom was created for numerical simulations. It simulates paramagnetic and diamagnetic lesions within a 'brain-like' tissue, within a background. The method was evaluated on both this synthetic phantom and multicenter 2D datasets acquired in standardized clinical setting, and compared with two state-of-the-art methods. It proved to yield consistent results on synthetic images and to be applicable and robust on patient data. As a proof-of-concept, we finally illustrate that it is possible to find a magnetic signature of CMBs and CMCs on internal field maps generated with 2DHF on 2D clinical datasets that give consistent results with CT-scans in a subsample of 10 subjects

  9. Effect of segmentation errors on 3D-to-2D registration of implant models in X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Hoff, William A; Komistek, Richard D; Dennis, Douglas A

    2005-02-01

    In many biomedical applications, it is desirable to estimate the three-dimensional (3D) position and orientation (pose) of a metallic rigid object (such as a knee or hip implant) from its projection in a two-dimensional (2D) X-ray image. If the geometry of the object is known, as well as the details of the image formation process, then the pose of the object with respect to the sensor can be determined. A common method for 3D-to-2D registration is to first segment the silhouette contour from the X-ray image; that is, identify all points in the image that belong to the 2D silhouette and not to the background. This segmentation step is then followed by a search for the 3D pose that will best match the observed contour with a predicted contour. Although the silhouette of a metallic object is often clearly visible in an X-ray image, adjacent tissue and occlusions can make the exact location of the silhouette contour difficult to determine in places. Occlusion can occur when another object (such as another implant component) partially blocks the view of the object of interest. In this paper, we argue that common methods for segmentation can produce errors in the location of the 2D contour, and hence errors in the resulting 3D estimate of the pose. We show, on a typical fluoroscopy image of a knee implant component, that interactive and automatic methods for segmentation result in segmented contours that vary significantly. We show how the variability in the 2D contours (quantified by two different metrics) corresponds to variability in the 3D poses. Finally, we illustrate how traditional segmentation methods can fail completely in the (not uncommon) cases of images with occlusion.

  10. 3D-2D Deformable Image Registration Using Feature-Based Nonuniform Meshes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaohu; Cai, Yiqi; Yang, Yin; Wang, Jing; Jia, Xun

    2016-01-01

    By using prior information of planning CT images and feature-based nonuniform meshes, this paper demonstrates that volumetric images can be efficiently registered with a very small portion of 2D projection images of a Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scan. After a density field is computed based on the extracted feature edges from planning CT images, nonuniform tetrahedral meshes will be automatically generated to better characterize the image features according to the density field; that is, finer meshes are generated for features. The displacement vector fields (DVFs) are specified at the mesh vertices to drive the deformation of original CT images. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the deformed anatomy are generated and compared with corresponding 2D projections. DVFs are optimized to minimize the objective function including differences between DRRs and projections and the regularity. To further accelerate the above 3D-2D registration, a procedure to obtain good initial deformations by deforming the volume surface to match 2D body boundary on projections has been developed. This complete method is evaluated quantitatively by using several digital phantoms and data from head and neck cancer patients. The feature-based nonuniform meshing method leads to better results than either uniform orthogonal grid or uniform tetrahedral meshes. PMID:27019849

  11. 3D-2D Deformable Image Registration Using Feature-Based Nonuniform Meshes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zichun; Guo, Xiaohu; Cai, Yiqi; Yang, Yin; Wang, Jing; Jia, Xun; Mao, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    By using prior information of planning CT images and feature-based nonuniform meshes, this paper demonstrates that volumetric images can be efficiently registered with a very small portion of 2D projection images of a Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scan. After a density field is computed based on the extracted feature edges from planning CT images, nonuniform tetrahedral meshes will be automatically generated to better characterize the image features according to the density field; that is, finer meshes are generated for features. The displacement vector fields (DVFs) are specified at the mesh vertices to drive the deformation of original CT images. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the deformed anatomy are generated and compared with corresponding 2D projections. DVFs are optimized to minimize the objective function including differences between DRRs and projections and the regularity. To further accelerate the above 3D-2D registration, a procedure to obtain good initial deformations by deforming the volume surface to match 2D body boundary on projections has been developed. This complete method is evaluated quantitatively by using several digital phantoms and data from head and neck cancer patients. The feature-based nonuniform meshing method leads to better results than either uniform orthogonal grid or uniform tetrahedral meshes.

  12. 3D surface reconstruction of apples from 2D NIR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bin; Jiang, Lu; Cheng, Xuemei; Tao, Yang

    2005-11-01

    Machine vision methods are widely used in apple defect detection and quality grading applications. Currently, 2D near-infrared (NIR) imaging of apples is often used to detect apple defects because the image intensity of defects is different from normal apple parts. However, a drawback of this method is that the apple calyx also exhibits similar image intensity to the apple defects. Since an apple calyx often appears in the NIR image, the false alarm rate is high with the 2D NIR imaging method. In this paper, a 2D NIR imaging method is extended to a 3D reconstruction so that the apple calyx can be differentiated from apple defects according to their different 3D depth information. The Lambertian model is used to evaluate the reflectance map of the apple surface, and then Pentland's Shape-From-Shading (SFS) method is applied to reconstruct the 3D surface information of the apple based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). Pentland's method is directly derived from human perception properties, making it close to the way human eyes recover 3D information from a 2D scene. In addition, the FFT reduces the computation time significantly. The reconstructed 3D apple surface maps are shown in the results, and different depths of apple calyx and defects are obtained correctly.

  13. Multiresolution image representation using combined 2-D and 1-D directional filter banks.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuichi; Ikehara, Masaaki; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, effective multiresolution image representations using a combination of 2-D filter bank (FB) and directional wavelet transform (WT) are presented. The proposed methods yield simple implementation and low computation costs compared to previous 1-D and 2-D FB combinations or adaptive directional WT methods. Furthermore, they are nonredundant transforms and realize quad-tree like multiresolution representations. In applications on nonlinear approximation, image coding, and denoising, the proposed filter banks show visual quality improvements and have higher PSNR than the conventional separable WT or the contourlet.

  14. Encrypting 2D/3D image using improved lensless integral imaging in Fresnel domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Qiong-Hua; Kim, Seok-Tae; Lee, In-Kwon

    2016-12-01

    We propose a new image encryption technique, for the first time to our knowledge, combined Fresnel transform with the improved lensless integral imaging technique. In this work, before image encryption, the input image is first recorded into an elemental image array (EIA) by using the improved lensless integral imaging technique. The recorded EIA is encrypted into random noise by use of two phase masks located in the Fresnel domain. The positions of phase masks and operation wavelength, as well as the integral imaging system parameters are used as encryption keys that can ensure security. Compared with previous works, the main novelty of this proposed method resides in the fact that the elemental images possess distributed memory characteristic, which greatly improved the robustness of the image encryption algorithm. Meanwhile, the proposed pixel averaging algorithm can effectively address the overlapping problem existing in the computational integral imaging reconstruction process. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. Results also indicate the high robustness against data loss attacks.

  15. Nanohole-array-based device for 2D snapshot multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Najiminaini, Mohamadreza; Vasefi, Fartash; Kaminska, Bozena; Carson, Jeffrey J L

    2013-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional (2D) snapshot multispectral imager that utilizes the optical transmission characteristics of nanohole arrays (NHAs) in a gold film to resolve a mixture of input colors into multiple spectral bands. The multispectral device consists of blocks of NHAs, wherein each NHA has a unique periodicity that results in transmission resonances and minima in the visible and near-infrared regions. The multispectral device was illuminated over a wide spectral range, and the transmission was spectrally unmixed using a least-squares estimation algorithm. A NHA-based multispectral imaging system was built and tested in both reflection and transmission modes. The NHA-based multispectral imager was capable of extracting 2D multispectral images representative of four independent bands within the spectral range of 662 nm to 832 nm for a variety of targets. The multispectral device can potentially be integrated into a variety of imaging sensor systems.

  16. 2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K. Sanpei, A. Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S.; Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N.

    2014-03-15

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

  17. Model-based 3D/2D deformable registration of MR images.

    PubMed

    Marami, Bahram; Sirouspour, Shahin; Capson, David W

    2011-01-01

    A method is proposed for automatic registration of 3D preoperative magnetic resonance images of deformable tissue to a sequence of its 2D intraoperative images. The algorithm employs a dynamic continuum mechanics model of the deformation and similarity (distance) measures such as correlation ratio, mutual information or sum of squared differences for registration. The registration is solely based on information present in the 3D preoperative and 2D intraoperative images and does not require fiducial markers, feature extraction or image segmentation. Results of experiments with a biopsy training breast phantom show that the proposed method can perform well in the presence of large deformations. This is particularly useful for clinical applications such as MR-based breast biopsy where large tissue deformations occur.

  18. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2004-12-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  19. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2005-01-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  20. Detection of Leptomeningeal Metastasis by Contrast-Enhanced 3D T1-SPACE: Comparison with 2D FLAIR and Contrast-Enhanced 2D T1-Weighted Images

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Bomi; Hwang, Eo-Jin; Lee, Song; Jang, Jinhee; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced 3D(dimensional) T1-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions (T1-SPACE), 2D fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image in detection of leptomeningeal metastasis except for invasive procedures such as a CSF tapping. Materials and Methods Three groups of patients were included retrospectively for 9 months (from 2013-04-01 to 2013-12-31). Group 1 patients with positive malignant cells in CSF cytology (n = 22); group 2, stroke patients with steno-occlusion in ICA or MCA (n = 16); and group 3, patients with negative results on MRI, whose symptom were dizziness or headache (n = 25). A total of 63 sets of MR images are separately collected and randomly arranged: (1) CE 3D T1-SPACE; (2) 2D FLAIR; and (3) CE T1-GRE using a 3-Tesla MR system. A faculty neuroradiologist with 8-year-experience and another 2nd grade trainee in radiology reviewed each MR image- blinded by the results of CSF cytology and coded their observations as positives or negatives of leptomeningeal metastasis. The CSF cytology result was considered as a gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity of each MR images were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was compared using a McNemar’s test. A Cohen's kappa analysis was performed to assess inter-observer agreements. Results Diagnostic accuracy was not different between 3D T1-SPACE and CSF cytology by both raters. However, the accuracy test of 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE was inconsistent by the two raters. The Kappa statistic results were 0.657 (3D T1-SPACE), 0.420 (2D FLAIR), and 0.160 (2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE). The 3D T1-SPACE images showed the highest inter-observer agreements between the raters. Conclusions Compared to 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE, contrast-enhanced 3D T1 SPACE showed a better detection rate of

  1. Combining 2D synchrosqueezed wave packet transform with optimization for crystal image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Wirth, Benedikt; Yang, Haizhao

    2016-04-01

    We develop a variational optimization method for crystal analysis in atomic resolution images, which uses information from a 2D synchrosqueezed transform (SST) as input. The synchrosqueezed transform is applied to extract initial information from atomic crystal images: crystal defects, rotations and the gradient of elastic deformation. The deformation gradient estimate is then improved outside the identified defect region via a variational approach, to obtain more robust results agreeing better with the physical constraints. The variational model is optimized by a nonlinear projected conjugate gradient method. Both examples of images from computer simulations and imaging experiments are analyzed, with results demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Snapshot 2D tomography via coded aperture x-ray scatter imaging

    PubMed Central

    MacCabe, Kenneth P.; Holmgren, Andrew D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Brady, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a fan beam coded aperture x-ray scatter imaging system which acquires a tomographic image from each snapshot. This technique exploits cylindrical symmetry of the scattering cross section to avoid the scanning motion typically required by projection tomography. We use a coded aperture with a harmonic dependence to determine range, and a shift code to determine cross-range. Here we use a forward-scatter configuration to image 2D objects and use serial exposures to acquire tomographic video of motion within a plane. Our reconstruction algorithm also estimates the angular dependence of the scattered radiance, a step toward materials imaging and identification. PMID:23842254

  3. A comparison of 2D and 3D digital image correlation for a membrane under inflation

    PubMed Central

    Murienne, Barbara J.; Nguyen, Thao D.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC) is becoming widely used to characterize the behavior of structures undergoing 3D deformations. However, the use of 3D-DIC can be challenging under certain conditions, such as high magnification, and therefore small depth of field, or a highly controlled environment with limited access for two-angled cameras. The purpose of this study is to compare 2D-DIC and 3D-DIC for the same inflation experiment and evaluate whether 2D-DIC can be used when conditions discourage the use of a stereo-vision system. A latex membrane was inflated vertically to 5.41 kPa (reference pressure), then to 7.87 kPa (deformed pressure). A two-camera stereo-vision system acquired top-down images of the membrane, while a single camera system simultaneously recorded images of the membrane in profile. 2D-DIC and 3D-DIC were used to calculate horizontal (in the membrane plane) and vertical (out of the membrane plane) displacements, and meridional strain. Under static conditions, the baseline uncertainty in horizontal displacement and strain were smaller for 3D-DIC than 2D-DIC. However, the opposite was observed for the vertical displacement, for which 2D-DIC had a smaller baseline uncertainty. The baseline absolute error in vertical displacement and strain were similar for both DIC methods, but it was larger for 2D-DIC than 3D-DIC for the horizontal displacement. Under inflation, the variability in the measurements were larger than under static conditions for both DIC methods. 2D-DIC showed a smaller variability in displacements than 3D-DIC, especially for the vertical displacement, but a similar strain uncertainty. The absolute difference in the average displacements and strain between 3D-DIC and 2D-DIC were in the range of the 3D-DIC variability. Those findings suggest that 2D-DIC might be used as an alternative to 3D-DIC to study the inflation response of materials under certain conditions. PMID:26543296

  4. A comparison of 2D and 3D digital image correlation for a membrane under inflation.

    PubMed

    Murienne, Barbara J; Nguyen, Thao D

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC) is becoming widely used to characterize the behavior of structures undergoing 3D deformations. However, the use of 3D-DIC can be challenging under certain conditions, such as high magnification, and therefore small depth of field, or a highly controlled environment with limited access for two-angled cameras. The purpose of this study is to compare 2D-DIC and 3D-DIC for the same inflation experiment and evaluate whether 2D-DIC can be used when conditions discourage the use of a stereo-vision system. A latex membrane was inflated vertically to 5.41 kPa (reference pressure), then to 7.87 kPa (deformed pressure). A two-camera stereo-vision system acquired top-down images of the membrane, while a single camera system simultaneously recorded images of the membrane in profile. 2D-DIC and 3D-DIC were used to calculate horizontal (in the membrane plane) and vertical (out of the membrane plane) displacements, and meridional strain. Under static conditions, the baseline uncertainty in horizontal displacement and strain were smaller for 3D-DIC than 2D-DIC. However, the opposite was observed for the vertical displacement, for which 2D-DIC had a smaller baseline uncertainty. The baseline absolute error in vertical displacement and strain were similar for both DIC methods, but it was larger for 2D-DIC than 3D-DIC for the horizontal displacement. Under inflation, the variability in the measurements were larger than under static conditions for both DIC methods. 2D-DIC showed a smaller variability in displacements than 3D-DIC, especially for the vertical displacement, but a similar strain uncertainty. The absolute difference in the average displacements and strain between 3D-DIC and 2D-DIC were in the range of the 3D-DIC variability. Those findings suggest that 2D-DIC might be used as an alternative to 3D-DIC to study the inflation response of materials under certain conditions.

  5. A comparison of 2D and 3D digital image correlation for a membrane under inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murienne, Barbara J.; Nguyen, Thao D.

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC) is becoming widely used to characterize the behavior of structures undergoing 3D deformations. However, the use of 3D-DIC can be challenging under certain conditions, such as high magnification, and therefore small depth of field, or a highly controlled environment with limited access for two-angled cameras. The purpose of this study is to compare 2D-DIC and 3D-DIC for the same inflation experiment and evaluate whether 2D-DIC can be used when conditions discourage the use of a stereo-vision system. A latex membrane was inflated vertically to 5.41 kPa (reference pressure), then to 7.87 kPa (deformed pressure). A two-camera stereo-vision system acquired top-down images of the membrane, while a single camera system simultaneously recorded images of the membrane in profile. 2D-DIC and 3D-DIC were used to calculate horizontal (in the membrane plane) and vertical (out of the membrane plane) displacements, and meridional strain. Under static conditions, the baseline uncertainty in horizontal displacement and strain were smaller for 3D-DIC than 2D-DIC. However, the opposite was observed for the vertical displacement, for which 2D-DIC had a smaller baseline uncertainty. The baseline absolute error in vertical displacement and strain were similar for both DIC methods, but it was larger for 2D-DIC than 3D-DIC for the horizontal displacement. Under inflation, the variability in the measurements were larger than under static conditions for both DIC methods. 2D-DIC showed a smaller variability in displacements than 3D-DIC, especially for the vertical displacement, but a similar strain uncertainty. The absolute difference in the average displacements and strain between 3D-DIC and 2D-DIC were in the range of the 3D-DIC variability. Those findings suggest that 2D-DIC might be used as an alternative to 3D-DIC to study the inflation response of materials under certain conditions.

  6. The Ultrasonic Measurement of Crystallographic Orientation for Imaging Anisotropic Components with 2d Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, C. J. L.; Dunhill, A. K.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    Single crystal components are used widely in the gas-turbine industry. However, these components are elastically anisotropic which causes difficulties when performing NDE inspections with ultrasound. Recently an ultrasonic algorithm for a 2D array has been corrected to perform the reliable volumetric inspection of single crystals. For the algorithm to be implemented the crystallographic orientation of the components must be known. This paper, therefore, develops and reviews crystallographic orientation methods using 2D ultrasonic arrays. The methods under examination are based on the anisotropic propagation of surface and bulk waves and an image-based orientation method is also considered.

  7. 2D Doppler backscattering using synthetic aperture microwave imaging of MAST edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. A.; Brunner, K. J.; Freethy, S. J.; Huang, B. K.; Shevchenko, V. F.; Vann, R. G. L.

    2016-02-01

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is already established as a powerful diagnostic; its extension to 2D enables imaging of turbulence characteristics from an extended region of the cut-off surface. The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic has conducted proof-of-principle 2D DBS experiments of MAST edge plasma. SAMI actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (±40° vertical and horizontal) and tuneable (10-34.5 GHz) beam. The Doppler backscattered signal is digitised in vector form using an array of eight Vivaldi PCB antennas. This allows the receiving array to be focused in any direction within the field of view simultaneously to an angular range of 6-24° FWHM at 10-34.5 GHz. This capability is unique to SAMI and is a novel way of conducting DBS experiments. In this paper the feasibility of conducting 2D DBS experiments is explored. Initial observations of phenomena previously measured by conventional DBS experiments are presented; such as momentum injection from neutral beams and an abrupt change in power and turbulence velocity coinciding with the onset of H-mode. In addition, being able to carry out 2D DBS imaging allows a measurement of magnetic pitch angle to be made; preliminary results are presented. Capabilities gained through steering a beam using a phased array and the limitations of this technique are discussed.

  8. New applications for the touchscreen in 2D and 3D medical imaging workstations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Ken; Goble, John C.; Pausch, Randy; Kassell, Neal F.

    1995-04-01

    We present a new interface technique which augments a 3D user interface based on the physical manipulation of tools, or props, with a touchscreen. This hybrid interface intuitively and seamlessly combines 3D input with more traditional 2D input in the same user interface. Example 2D interface tasks of interest include selecting patient images from a database, browsing through axial, coronal, and sagittal image slices, or adjusting image center and window parameters. Note the facility with which a touchscreen can be used: the surgeon can move in 3D using the props, and then, without having to put the props down, the surgeon can reach out and touch the screen to perform 2D tasks. Based on previous work by Sears, we provide touchscreen users with visual feedback in the form of a small cursor which appears above the finger, allowing targets much smaller than the finger itself to be selected. Based on our informal user observations to date, this touchscreen stabilization algorithm allows targets as small as 1.08 mm X 1.08 mm to be selected by novices, and makes possible selection of targets as small as 0.27 mm X 0.27 mm after some training. Based on implemented prototype systems, we suggest that touchscreens offer not only intuitive 2D input which is well accepted by physicians, but that touchscreens also offer fast and accurate input which blends well with 3D interaction techniques.

  9. A challenge problem for 2D/3D imaging of targets from a volumetric data set in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casteel, Curtis H., Jr.; Gorham, LeRoy A.; Minardi, Michael J.; Scarborough, Steven M.; Naidu, Kiranmai D.; Majumder, Uttam K.

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes a challenge problem whose scope is the 2D/3D imaging of stationary targets from a volumetric data set of X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data collected in an urban environment. The data for this problem was collected at a scene consisting of numerous civilian vehicles and calibration targets. The radar operated in circular SAR mode and completed 8 circular flight paths around the scene with varying altitudes. Data consists of phase history data, auxiliary data, processing algorithms, processed images, as well as ground truth data. Interest is focused on mitigating the large side lobes in the point spread function. Due to the sparse nature of the elevation aperture, traditional imaging techniques introduce excessive artifacts in the processed images. Further interests include the formation of highresolution 3D SAR images with single pass data and feature extraction for 3D SAR automatic target recognition applications. The purpose of releasing the Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set is to provide the community with X-band SAR data that supports the development of new algorithms for high-resolution 2D/3D imaging.

  10. A positioning QA procedure for 2D/2D (kV/MV) and 3D/3D (CT/CBCT) image matching for radiotherapy patient setup.

    PubMed

    Guan, Huaiqun; Hammoud, Rabih; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2009-10-06

    A positioning QA procedure for Varian's 2D/2D (kV/MV) and 3D/3D (planCT/CBCT) matching was developed. The procedure was to check: (1) the coincidence of on-board imager (OBI), portal imager (PI), and cone beam CT (CBCT)'s isocenters (digital graticules) to a linac's isocenter (to a pre-specified accuracy); (2) that the positioning difference detected by 2D/2D (kV/MV) and 3D/3D(planCT/CBCT) matching can be reliably transferred to couch motion. A cube phantom with a 2 mm metal ball (bb) at the center was used. The bb was used to define the isocenter. Two additional bbs were placed on two phantom surfaces in order to define a spatial location of 1.5 cm anterior, 1.5 cm inferior, and 1.5 cm right from the isocenter. An axial scan of the phantom was acquired from a multislice CT simulator. The phantom was set at the linac's isocenter (lasers); either AP MV/R Lat kV images or CBCT images were taken for 2D/2D or 3D/3D matching, respectively. For 2D/2D, the accuracy of each device's isocenter was obtained by checking the distance between the central bb and the digital graticule. Then the central bb in orthogonal DRRs was manually moved to overlay to the off-axis bbs in kV/MV images. For 3D/3D, CBCT was first matched to planCT to check the isocenter difference between the two CTs. Manual shifts were then made by moving CBCT such that the point defined by the two off-axis bbs overlay to the central bb in planCT. (PlanCT can not be moved in the current version of OBI1.4.) The manual shifts were then applied to remotely move the couch. The room laser was used to check the accuracy of the couch movement. For Trilogy (or Ix-21) linacs, the coincidence of imager and linac's isocenter was better than 1 mm (or 1.5 mm). The couch shift accuracy was better than 2 mm.

  11. Fast Threshold image segmentation based on 2D Fuzzy Fisher and Random Local Optimized QPSO.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunming; Xie, Yongchun; Liu, Da; Wang, Li

    2016-10-26

    In the paper, a real-time segmentation method which separates the target signal from the navigation image is proposed. In the approaching docking stage, the navigation image is composed of target and nontarget signal, which are separately bright spot and space vehicle itself. Since the non-target signals is the main part of the navigation image, the traditional entropy-related criterions and Ostu-related criterions will bring inadequate segmentation, while the mere 2D Fisher criterion will causes over-segmentation, all the methods show their shortages in dealing with this kind of case. To guarantee a precise image segmentation, a revised 2D fuzzy Fisher is proposed in the paper to make a trade-off between positioning target regions and retaining target fuzzy boundaries. Firstly, to reduce redundant computations in finding the threshold pair, a 2D fuzzy Fisher criterion based integral image is established by way of simplifying the corresponding fuzzy domains. And then, to quicken the convergence, a random orthogonal component is added in its quasioptimum particle to enhance its local searching capacity in each iteration. Experimental results show its competence of quick segmentation.

  12. A wavelet relational fuzzy C-means algorithm for 2D gel image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Rashwan, Shaheera; Faheem, Mohamed Talaat; Sarhan, Amany; Youssef, Bayumy A B

    2013-01-01

    One of the most famous algorithms that appeared in the area of image segmentation is the Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) algorithm. This algorithm has been used in many applications such as data analysis, pattern recognition, and image segmentation. It has the advantages of producing high quality segmentation compared to the other available algorithms. Many modifications have been made to the algorithm to improve its segmentation quality. The proposed segmentation algorithm in this paper is based on the Fuzzy C-Means algorithm adding the relational fuzzy notion and the wavelet transform to it so as to enhance its performance especially in the area of 2D gel images. Both proposed modifications aim to minimize the oversegmentation error incurred by previous algorithms. The experimental results of comparing both the Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) and the Wavelet Fuzzy C-Means (WFCM) to the proposed algorithm on real 2D gel images acquired from human leukemias, HL-60 cell lines, and fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) demonstrate the improvement achieved by the proposed algorithm in overcoming the segmentation error. In addition, we investigate the effect of denoising on the three algorithms. This investigation proves that denoising the 2D gel image before segmentation can improve (in most of the cases) the quality of the segmentation.

  13. A quantitative damage imaging technique based on enhanced CCRTM for composite plates using 2D scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiaze; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-10-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) non-contact areal scan system was developed to image and quantify impact damage in a composite plate using an enhanced zero-lag cross-correlation reverse-time migration (E-CCRTM) technique. The system comprises a single piezoelectric wafer mounted on the composite plate and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) for scanning a region in the vicinity of the PZT to capture the scattered wavefield. The proposed damage imaging technique takes into account the amplitude, phase, geometric spreading, and all of the frequency content of the Lamb waves propagating in the plate; thus, a reflectivity coefficients of the delamination is calculated and potentially related to damage severity. Comparisons are made in terms of damage imaging quality between 2D areal scans and 1D line scans as well as between the proposed and existing imaging conditions. The experimental results show that the 2D E-CCRTM performs robustly when imaging and quantifying impact damage in large-scale composites using a single PZT actuator with a nearby areal scan using LDV.

  14. A faster method for 3D/2D medical image registration—a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Wirth, Joachim; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Baumann, Bernard; Staedele, Harald; Hammer, Beat; Claudius Gellrich, Niels; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Regazzoni, Pietro; Messmer, Peter

    2003-08-01

    3D/2D patient-to-computed-tomography (CT) registration is a method to determine a transformation that maps two coordinate systems by comparing a projection image rendered from CT to a real projection image. Iterative variation of the CT's position between rendering steps finally leads to exact registration. Applications include exact patient positioning in radiation therapy, calibration of surgical robots, and pose estimation in computer-aided surgery. One of the problems associated with 3D/2D registration is the fact that finding a registration includes solving a minimization problem in six degrees of freedom (dof) in motion. This results in considerable time requirements since for each iteration step at least one volume rendering has to be computed. We show that by choosing an appropriate world coordinate system and by applying a 2D/2D registration method in each iteration step, the number of iterations can be grossly reduced from n6 to n5. Here, n is the number of discrete variations around a given coordinate. Depending on the configuration of the optimization algorithm, this reduces the total number of iterations necessary to at least 1/3 of it's original value. The method was implemented and extensively tested on simulated x-ray images of a tibia, a pelvis and a skull base. When using one projective image and a discrete full parameter space search for solving the optimization problem, average accuracy was found to be 1.0 +/- 0.6(°) and 4.1 +/- 1.9 (mm) for a registration in six parameters, and 1.0 +/- 0.7(°) and 4.2 +/- 1.6 (mm) when using the 5 + 1 dof method described in this paper. Time requirements were reduced by a factor 3.1. We conclude that this hardware-independent optimization of 3D/2D registration is a step towards increasing the acceptance of this promising method for a wide number of clinical applications.

  15. A faster method for 3D/2D medical image registration--a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Wirth, Joachim; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Baumann, Bernard; Staedele, Harald; Hammer, Beat; Gellrich, Niels Claudius; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Regazzoni, Pietro; Messmer, Peter

    2003-08-21

    3D/2D patient-to-computed-tomography (CT) registration is a method to determine a transformation that maps two coordinate systems by comparing a projection image rendered from CT to a real projection image. Iterative variation of the CT's position between rendering steps finally leads to exact registration. Applications include exact patient positioning in radiation therapy, calibration of surgical robots, and pose estimation in computer-aided surgery. One of the problems associated with 3D/2D registration is the fact that finding a registration includes solving a minimization problem in six degrees of freedom (dof) in motion. This results in considerable time requirements since for each iteration step at least one volume rendering has to be computed. We show that by choosing an appropriate world coordinate system and by applying a 2D/2D registration method in each iteration step, the number of iterations can be grossly reduced from n6 to n5. Here, n is the number of discrete variations around a given coordinate. Depending on the configuration of the optimization algorithm, this reduces the total number of iterations necessary to at least 1/3 of it's original value. The method was implemented and extensively tested on simulated x-ray images of a tibia, a pelvis and a skull base. When using one projective image and a discrete full parameter space search for solving the optimization problem, average accuracy was found to be 1.0 +/- 0.6(degrees) and 4.1 +/- 1.9 (mm) for a registration in six parameters, and 1.0 +/- 0.7(degrees) and 4.2 +/- 1.6 (mm) when using the 5 + 1 dof method described in this paper. Time requirements were reduced by a factor 3.1. We conclude that this hardware-independent optimization of 3D/2D registration is a step towards increasing the acceptance of this promising method for a wide number of clinical applications.

  16. Craniosynostosis: prenatal diagnosis by 2D/3D ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Helfer, Talita Micheletti; Peixoto, Alberto Borges; Tonni, Gabriele; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2016-09-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the process of premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It is a common condition that occurs in about 1 to 2,000 live births. Craniosynostosis may be classified in primary or secondary. It is also classified as nonsyndromic or syndromic. According to suture commitment, craniosynostosis may affect a single suture or multiple sutures. There is a wide range of syndromes involving craniosynostosis and the most common are Apert, Pffeifer, Crouzon, Shaethre-Chotzen and Muenke syndromes. The underlying etiology of nonsyndromic craniosynostosis is unknown. Mutations in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling pathway play a crucial role in the etiology of craniosynostosis syndromes. Prenatal ultrasound`s detection rate of craniosynostosis is low. Nowadays, different methods can be applied for prenatal diagnosis of craniosynostosis, such as two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) scan and, finally, molecular diagnosis. The presence of craniosynostosis may affect the birthing process. Fetuses with craniosynostosis also have higher rates of perinatal complications. In order to avoid the risks of untreated craniosynostosis, children are usually treated surgically soon after postnatal diagnosis.

  17. Comparison of spatiotemporal interpolators for 4D image reconstruction from 2D transesophageal ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haak, Alexander; van Stralen, Marijn; van Burken, Gerard; Klein, Stefan; Pluim, Josien P. W.; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Bosch, Johan G.

    2012-03-01

    °For electrophysiology intervention monitoring, we intend to reconstruct 4D ultrasound (US) of structures in the beating heart from 2D transesophageal US by scanplane rotation. The image acquisition is continuous but unsynchronized to the heart rate, which results in a sparsely and irregularly sampled dataset and a spatiotemporal interpolation method is desired. Previously, we showed the potential of normalized convolution (NC) for interpolating such datasets. We explored 4D interpolation by 3 different methods: NC, nearest neighbor (NN), and temporal binning followed by linear interpolation (LTB). The test datasets were derived by slicing three 4D echocardiography datasets at random rotation angles (θ, range: 0-180) and random normalized cardiac phase (τ, range: 0-1). Four different distributions of rotated 2D images with 600, 900, 1350, and 1800 2D input images were created from all TEE sets. A 2D Gaussian kernel was used for NC and optimal kernel sizes (σθ and στ) were found by performing an exhaustive search. The RMS gray value error (RMSE) of the reconstructed images was computed for all interpolation methods. The estimated optimal kernels were in the range of σθ = 3.24 - 3.69°/ στ = 0.045 - 0.048, σθ = 2.79°/ στ = 0.031 - 0.038, σθ = 2.34°/ στ = 0.023 - 0.026, and σθ = 1.89°/ στ = 0.021 - 0.023 for 600, 900, 1350, and 1800 input images respectively. We showed that NC outperforms NN and LTB. For a small number of input images the advantage of NC is more pronounced.

  18. Assessment of some problematic factors in facial image identification using a 2D/3D superimposition technique.

    PubMed

    Atsuchi, Masaru; Tsuji, Akiko; Usumoto, Yosuke; Yoshino, Mineo; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2013-09-01

    The number of criminal cases requiring facial image identification of a suspect has been increasing because a surveillance camera is installed everywhere in the city and furthermore, the intercom with the recording function is installed in the home. In this study, we aimed to analyze the usefulness of a 2D/3D facial image superimposition system for image identification when facial aging, facial expression, and twins are under consideration. As a result, the mean values of the average distances calculated from the 16 anatomical landmarks between the 3D facial images of the 50s groups and the 2D facial images of the 20s, 30s, and 40s groups were 2.6, 2.3, and 2.2mm, respectively (facial aging). The mean values of the average distances calculated from 12 anatomical landmarks between the 3D normal facial images and four emotional expressions were 4.9 (laughter), 2.9 (anger), 2.9 (sadness), and 3.6mm (surprised), respectively (facial expressions). The average distance obtained from 11 anatomical landmarks between the same person in twins was 1.1mm, while the average distance between different person in twins was 2.0mm (twins). Facial image identification using the 2D/3D facial image superimposition system demonstrated adequate statistical power and identified an individual with high accuracy, suggesting its usefulness. However, computer technology concerning video image processing and superimpose progress, there is a need to keep familiar with the morphology and anatomy as its base.

  19. Reproducing 2D breast mammography images with 3D printed phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Matthew; Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badal, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    Mammography is currently the standard imaging modality used to screen women for breast abnormalities and, as a result, it is a tool of great importance for the early detection of breast cancer. Physical phantoms are commonly used as surrogates of breast tissue to evaluate some aspects of the performance of mammography systems. However, most phantoms do not reproduce the anatomic heterogeneity of real breasts. New fabrication technologies, such as 3D printing, have created the opportunity to build more complex, anatomically realistic breast phantoms that could potentially assist in the evaluation of mammography systems. The primary objective of this work is to present a simple, easily reproducible methodology to design and print 3D objects that replicate the attenuation profile observed in real 2D mammograms. The secondary objective is to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of the competing 3D printing technologies, and characterize the x-ray properties of the different materials they use. Printable phantoms can be created using the open-source code introduced in this work, which processes a raw mammography image to estimate the amount of x-ray attenuation at each pixel, and outputs a triangle mesh object that encodes the observed attenuation map. The conversion from the observed pixel gray value to a column of printed material with equivalent attenuation requires certain assumptions and knowledge of multiple imaging system parameters, such as x-ray energy spectrum, source-to-object distance, compressed breast thickness, and average breast material attenuation. A detailed description of the new software, a characterization of the printed materials using x-ray spectroscopy, and an evaluation of the realism of the sample printed phantoms are presented.

  20. Shadow scanning lens-free microscopy with tomographic reconstruction of 2D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manturov, Alexey O.; Blushtein, Eugeny A.; Morev, Vladislav S.

    2016-04-01

    Shadow Scanning Lens-free Microscopy (SSLM) is a possible method for optical imaging that can potentially achieve high spatial resolution. At present work we discuss the SSLM and analyse the resolution limit conditioned by the light scattering from the edge scanning imaging system that uses a shadow from moving knife edge or wire to collect the sets of tomographic projection data of two-dimensional objects. The results of numerical estimation of the SSLM resolution for reconstruction of 2D object image are presented. The experimental setup of SSLM with wire scanning element was developed. The developed device works in a UV band range and shows the spatial resolution about 90 nm.

  1. Development of a novel 2D color map for interactive segmentation of histological images

    PubMed Central

    Chaudry, Qaiser; Sharma, Yachna; Raza, Syed H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    We present a color segmentation approach based on a two-dimensional color map derived from the input image. Pathologists stain tissue biopsies with various colored dyes to see the expression of biomarkers. In these images, because of color variation due to inconsistencies in experimental procedures and lighting conditions, the segmentation used to analyze biological features is usually ad-hoc. Many algorithms like K-means use a single metric to segment the image into different color classes and rarely provide users with powerful color control. Our 2D color map interactive segmentation technique based on human color perception information and the color distribution of the input image, enables user control without noticeable delay. Our methodology works for different staining types and different types of cancer tissue images. Our proposed method’s results show good accuracy with low response and computational time making it a feasible method for user interactive applications involving segmentation of histological images.

  2. Occluded target viewing and identification high-resolution 2D imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Dippel, George F.; Cecchetti, Kristen D.; Wikman, John C.; Drouin, David P.; Egbert, Paul I.

    2007-09-01

    BAE SYSTEMS has developed a high-resolution 2D imaging laser radar (LADAR) system that has proven its ability to detect and identify hard targets in occluded environments, through battlefield obscurants, and through naturally occurring image-degrading atmospheres. Limitations of passive infrared imaging for target identification using medium wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long wavelength infrared (LWIR) atmospheric windows are well known. Of particular concern is that as wavelength is increased the aperture must be increased to maintain resolution, hence, driving apertures to be very larger for long-range identification; impractical because of size, weight, and optics cost. Conversely, at smaller apertures and with large f-numbers images may become photon starved with long integration times. Here, images are most susceptible to distortion from atmospheric turbulence, platform vibration, or both. Additionally, long-range identification using passive thermal imaging is clutter limited arising from objects in close proximity to the target object.

  3. 2D Ultrasound and 3D MR Image Registration of the Prostate for Brachytherapy Surgical Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shihui; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhiyong; Liu, Ranlu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound (US) images are widely used in minimally invasive prostate procedure for its noninvasive nature and convenience. However, the poor quality of US image makes it difficult to be used as guiding utility. To improve the limitation, we propose a multimodality image guided navigation module that registers 2D US images with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based on high quality preoperative models. A 2-step spatial registration method is used to complete the procedure which combines manual alignment and rapid mutual information (MI) optimize algorithm. In addition, a 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction model of prostate with surrounding organs is employed to combine with the registered images to conduct the navigation. Registration accuracy is measured by calculating the target registration error (TRE). The results show that the error between the US and preoperative MR images of a polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel model phantom is 1.37 ± 0.14 mm, with a similar performance being observed in patient experiments. PMID:26448009

  4. CAST2D: A finite element computer code for casting process modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1991-10-01

    CAST2D is a coupled thermal-stress finite element computer code for casting process modeling. This code can be used to predict the final shape and stress state of cast parts. CAST2D couples the heat transfer code TOPAZ2D and solid mechanics code NIKE2D. CAST2D has the following features in addition to all the features contained in the TOPAZ2D and NIKE2D codes: (1) a general purpose thermal-mechanical interface algorithm (i.e., slide line) that calculates the thermal contact resistance across the part-mold interface as a function of interface pressure and gap opening; (2) a new phase change algorithm, the delta function method, that is a robust method for materials undergoing isothermal phase change; (3) a constitutive model that transitions between fluid behavior and solid behavior, and accounts for material volume change on phase change; and (4) a modified plot file data base that allows plotting of thermal variables (e.g., temperature, heat flux) on the deformed geometry. Although the code is specialized for casting modeling, it can be used for other thermal stress problems (e.g., metal forming).

  5. 2D wavelet-analysis-based calibration technique for flat-panel imaging detectors: application in cone beam volume CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    1999-05-01

    The application of the newly developed flat panel x-ray imaging detector in cone beam volume CT has attracted increasing interest recently. Due to an imperfect solid state array manufacturing process, however, defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image unavoidably exist in all kinds of flat panel x-ray imaging detectors, which will cause severe streak and ring artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image and severely degrade image quality. A calibration technique, in which the artifacts resulting from the defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image can be reduced significantly, is presented in this paper. The detection of defective elements is distinctively based upon two-dimensional (2D) wavelet analysis. Because of its inherent localizability in recognizing singularities or discontinuities, wavelet analysis possesses the capability of detecting defective elements over a rather large x-ray exposure range, e.g., 20% to approximately 60% of the dynamic range of the detector used. Three-dimensional (3D) images of a low-contrast CT phantom have been reconstructed from projection images acquired by a flat panel x-ray imaging detector with and without calibration process applied. The artifacts caused individually by defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image have been separated and investigated in detail, and the correlation with each other have also been exposed explicitly. The investigation is enforced by quantitative analysis of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the image uniformity of the cone beam reconstruction image. It has been demonstrated that the ring and streak artifacts resulting from the imperfect performance of a flat panel x-ray imaging detector can be reduced dramatically, and then the image qualities of a cone beam reconstruction image, such as contrast resolution and image uniformity are improved significantly. Furthermore, with little modification, the calibration technique presented here is also applicable

  6. A 2D MTF approach to evaluate and guide dynamic imaging developments

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Hoge, W. Scott; Madore, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    As the number and complexity of partially sampled dynamic imaging methods continue to increase, reliable strategies to evaluate performance may prove most useful. In the present work, an analytical framework to evaluate given reconstruction methods is presented. A perturbation algorithm allows the proposed evaluation scheme to perform robustly without requiring knowledge about the inner workings of the method being evaluated. A main output of the evaluation process consists of a 2D modulation transfer function (MTF), an easy-to-interpret visual rendering of a method’s ability to capture all combinations of spatial and temporal frequencies. Approaches to evaluate noise properties and artifact content at all spatial and temporal frequencies are also proposed. One fully sampled phantom and three fully sampled cardiac cine datasets were subsampled (R=4 and 8), and reconstructed with the different methods tested here. A hybrid method, which combines the main advantageous features observed in our assessments, was proposed and tested in a cardiac cine application, with acceleration factors of 3.5 and 6.3 (skip factor of 4 and 8, respectively). This approach combines features from methods such as k-t sensitivity-encoding (k-t SENSE), unaliasing by Fourier encoding the overlaps in the temporal dimension-SENSE (UNFOLD-SENSE), generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA), sensitivity profiles from an array of coils for encoding and reconstruction in parallel (SPACE-RIP), self, hybrid referencing with UNFOLD and GRAPPA (SHRUG) and GRAPPA-enhanced sensitivity maps for SENSE reconstructions (GEYSER). PMID:19877276

  7. Preliminary work of real-time ultrasound imaging system for 2-D array transducer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has emerged as a non-invasive imaging modality that can provide anatomical structure information in real time. To enable the experimental analysis of new 2-D array ultrasound beamforming methods, a pre-beamformed parallel raw data acquisition system was developed for 3-D data capture of 2D array transducer. The transducer interconnection adopted the row-column addressing (RCA) scheme, where the columns and rows were active in sequential for transmit and receive events, respectively. The DAQ system captured the raw data in parallel and the digitized data were fed through the field programmable gate array (FPGA) to implement the pre-beamforming. Finally, 3-D images were reconstructed through the devised platform in real-time.

  8. Image Pretreatment Tools II: Normalization Techniques for 2-DE and 2-D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Robotti, Elisa; Marengo, Emilio; Quasso, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is usually applied to identify different protein expression profiles in biological samples (e.g., control vs. pathological, control vs. treated). Information about the effect to be investigated (a pathology, a drug, a ripening effect, etc.) is however generally confounded with experimental variability that is quite large in 2-DE and may arise from small variations in the sample preparation, reagents, sample loading, electrophoretic conditions, staining and image acquisition. Obtaining valid quantitative estimates of protein abundances in each map, before the differential analysis, is therefore fundamental to provide robust candidate biomarkers. Normalization procedures are applied to reduce experimental noise and make the images comparable, improving the accuracy of differential analysis. Certainly, they may deeply influence the final results, and to this respect they have to be applied with care. Here, the most widespread normalization procedures are described both for what regards the applications to 2-DE and 2D Difference Gel-electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) maps.

  9. Image compression and encryption scheme based on 2D compressive sensing and fractional Mellin transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nanrun; Li, Haolin; Wang, Di; Pan, Shumin; Zhou, Zhihong

    2015-05-01

    Most of the existing image encryption techniques bear security risks for taking linear transform or suffer encryption data expansion for adopting nonlinear transformation directly. To overcome these difficulties, a novel image compression-encryption scheme is proposed by combining 2D compressive sensing with nonlinear fractional Mellin transform. In this scheme, the original image is measured by measurement matrices in two directions to achieve compression and encryption simultaneously, and then the resulting image is re-encrypted by the nonlinear fractional Mellin transform. The measurement matrices are controlled by chaos map. The Newton Smoothed l0 Norm (NSL0) algorithm is adopted to obtain the decryption image. Simulation results verify the validity and the reliability of this scheme.

  10. A design principle of polymers processable into 2D homeotropic order

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Chan, Yi-Tsu; Miyajima, Daigo; Kajitani, Takashi; Kosaka, Atsuko; Fukushima, Takanori; Lobez, Jose M.; Aida, Takuzo

    2016-01-01

    How to orient polymers homeotropically in thin films has been a long-standing issue in polymer science because polymers intrinsically prefer to lie down. Here we provide a design principle for polymers that are processable into a 2D homeotropic order. The key to this achievement was a recognition that cylindrical polymers can be designed to possess oppositely directed local dipoles in their cross-section, which possibly force polymers to tightly connect bilaterally, affording a 2D rectangular assembly. With a physical assistance of the surface grooves on Teflon sheets that sandwich polymer samples, homeotropic ordering is likely nucleated and gradually propagates upon hot-pressing towards the interior of the film. Consequently, the 2D rectangular lattice is constructed such that its b axis (side chains) aligns along the surface grooves, while its c axis (polymer backbone) aligns homeotropically on a Teflon sheet. This finding paves the way to molecularly engineered 2D polymers with anomalous functions. PMID:27897189

  11. A design principle of polymers processable into 2D homeotropic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Chan, Yi-Tsu; Miyajima, Daigo; Kajitani, Takashi; Kosaka, Atsuko; Fukushima, Takanori; Lobez, Jose M.; Aida, Takuzo

    2016-11-01

    How to orient polymers homeotropically in thin films has been a long-standing issue in polymer science because polymers intrinsically prefer to lie down. Here we provide a design principle for polymers that are processable into a 2D homeotropic order. The key to this achievement was a recognition that cylindrical polymers can be designed to possess oppositely directed local dipoles in their cross-section, which possibly force polymers to tightly connect bilaterally, affording a 2D rectangular assembly. With a physical assistance of the surface grooves on Teflon sheets that sandwich polymer samples, homeotropic ordering is likely nucleated and gradually propagates upon hot-pressing towards the interior of the film. Consequently, the 2D rectangular lattice is constructed such that its b axis (side chains) aligns along the surface grooves, while its c axis (polymer backbone) aligns homeotropically on a Teflon sheet. This finding paves the way to molecularly engineered 2D polymers with anomalous functions.

  12. 2D-pattern matching image and video compression: theory, algorithms, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Alzina, Marc; Szpankowski, Wojciech; Grama, Ananth

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a lossy data compression framework based on an approximate two-dimensional (2D) pattern matching (2D-PMC) extension of the Lempel-Ziv (1977, 1978) lossless scheme. This framework forms the basis upon which higher level schemes relying on differential coding, frequency domain techniques, prediction, and other methods can be built. We apply our pattern matching framework to image and video compression and report on theoretical and experimental results. Theoretically, we show that the fixed database model used for video compression leads to suboptimal but computationally efficient performance. The compression ratio of this model is shown to tend to the generalized entropy. For image compression, we use a growing database model for which we provide an approximate analysis. The implementation of 2D-PMC is a challenging problem from the algorithmic point of view. We use a range of techniques and data structures such as k-d trees, generalized run length coding, adaptive arithmetic coding, and variable and adaptive maximum distortion level to achieve good compression ratios at high compression speeds. We demonstrate bit rates in the range of 0.25-0.5 bpp for high-quality images and data rates in the range of 0.15-0.5 Mbps for a baseline video compression scheme that does not use any prediction or interpolation. We also demonstrate that this asymmetric compression scheme is capable of extremely fast decompression making it particularly suitable for networked multimedia applications.

  13. JetCurry: Modeling 3D geometry of AGN jets from 2D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosak, Katie; Li, KunYang; Avachat, Sayali S.; Perlman, Eric S.

    2017-02-01

    Written in Python, JetCurry models the 3D geometry of jets from 2-D images. JetCurry requires NumPy and SciPy and incorporates emcee (ascl:1303.002) and AstroPy (ascl:1304.002), and optionally uses VPython. From a defined initial part of the jet that serves as a reference point, JetCurry finds the position of highest flux within a bin of data in the image matrix and fits along the x axis for the general location of the bends in the jet. A spline fitting is used to smooth out the resulted jet stream.

  14. JetCurry: Modeling 3D geometry of AGN jets from 2D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kunyang; Kosak, Katie; Avachat, Sayali S.; Perlman, Eric S.

    2017-02-01

    Written in Python, JetCurry models the 3D geometry of AGN jets from 2-D images. JetCurry requires NumPy and SciPy and incorporates emcee (ascl:1303.002) and AstroPy (ascl:1304.002), and optionally uses VPython. From a defined initial part of the jet that serves as a reference point, JetCurry finds the position of highest flux within a bin of data in the image matrix and fits along the x axis for the general location of the bends in the jet. A spline fitting is used to smooth out the resulted jet stream.

  15. 2D image classification for 3D anatomy localization: employing deep convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Bob D.; Wolterink, Jelmer M.; de Jong, Pim A.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Localization of anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) is a preprocessing step in many medical image analysis tasks. While trivial for humans, it is complex for automatic methods. Classic machine learning approaches require the challenge of hand crafting features to describe differences between ROIs and background. Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) alleviate this by automatically finding hierarchical feature representations from raw images. We employ this trait to detect anatomical ROIs in 2D image slices in order to localize them in 3D. In 100 low-dose non-contrast enhanced non-ECG synchronized screening chest CT scans, a reference standard was defined by manually delineating rectangular bounding boxes around three anatomical ROIs -- heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Every anatomical ROI was automatically identified using a combination of three CNNs, each analyzing one orthogonal image plane. While single CNNs predicted presence or absence of a specific ROI in the given plane, the combination of their results provided a 3D bounding box around it. Classification performance of each CNN, expressed in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was >=0.988. Additionally, the performance of ROI localization was evaluated. Median Dice scores for automatically determined bounding boxes around the heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta were 0.89, 0.70, and 0.85 respectively. The results demonstrate that accurate automatic 3D localization of anatomical structures by CNN-based 2D image classification is feasible.

  16. Breast density measurement: 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images versus 2D digital mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Liu, Xinming; Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for breast cancer. However, breast density is currently estimated using mammograms which are intrinsically 2D in nature and cannot accurately represent the real breast anatomy. In this study, a novel technique for measuring breast density based on the segmentation of 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) images was developed and the results were compared to those obtained from 2D digital mammograms. 16 mastectomy breast specimens were imaged with a bench top flat-panel based CBCT system. The reconstructed 3D CT images were corrected for the cupping artifacts and then filtered to reduce the noise level, followed by using threshold-based segmentation to separate the dense tissue from the adipose tissue. For each breast specimen, volumes of the dense tissue structures and the entire breast were computed and used to calculate the volumetric breast density. BI-RADS categories were derived from the measured breast densities and compared with those estimated from conventional digital mammograms. The results show that in 10 of 16 cases the BI-RADS categories derived from the CBCT images were lower than those derived from the mammograms by one category. Thus, breasts considered as dense in mammographic examinations may not be considered as dense with the CBCT images. This result indicates that the relation between breast cancer risk and true (volumetric) breast density needs to be further investigated.

  17. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidgunst, C.; Ritter, D.; Lang, E.

    2007-09-15

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology.

  18. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Schmidgunst, C; Ritter, D; Lang, E

    2007-09-01

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems, (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology.

  19. [Study on the processing of leech by FTIR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Bing-Ning; Wu, Yan-Wen; Ouyang, Jie; Sun, Su-Qin; Chen, Shun-Cong

    2011-04-01

    The chemical differences of traditional Chinese medicine leech before and after processing were analyzed by FTIR and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The result showed that the leech was high in protein, with characteristic peaks of amide I, II bands. Comparing the IR spectra of samples, the primary difference was that the characteristic peak of fresh leech was at 1 543 cm(-1), while that of crude and processed leech was at 1 535 cm(-1). A 2D-IR spectrum with heating perturbation was used to track the processing dynamics of leech In the 2D-IR correlation spectra, fresh leech exhibited stronger automatic peaks of the amide I and II bands than that of processed leech, which indicates that the protein components of the fresh leech were more sensitive to heat perturbation than the processed one. Moreover, the result of FTIR and 2D-IR correlation spectra validated that the 3-dimensional structure of protein was damaged and hydrogen bonds were broken after processing, which resulted in the inactivation of protein. The fatty acids and cholesterol components of leech were also oxidized in this process.

  20. Image compression-encryption scheme based on hyper-chaotic system and 2D compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nanrun; Pan, Shumin; Cheng, Shan; Zhou, Zhihong

    2016-08-01

    Most image encryption algorithms based on low-dimensional chaos systems bear security risks and suffer encryption data expansion when adopting nonlinear transformation directly. To overcome these weaknesses and reduce the possible transmission burden, an efficient image compression-encryption scheme based on hyper-chaotic system and 2D compressive sensing is proposed. The original image is measured by the measurement matrices in two directions to achieve compression and encryption simultaneously, and then the resulting image is re-encrypted by the cycle shift operation controlled by a hyper-chaotic system. Cycle shift operation can change the values of the pixels efficiently. The proposed cryptosystem decreases the volume of data to be transmitted and simplifies the keys distribution simultaneously as a nonlinear encryption system. Simulation results verify the validity and the reliability of the proposed algorithm with acceptable compression and security performance.

  1. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  2. 2D Imaging in a Lightweight Portable MRI Scanner without Gradient Coils

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Clarissa Zimmerman; Stockmann, Jason P.; Armstrong, Brandon D.; Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lev, Michael H.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose As the premiere modality for brain imaging, MRI could find wider applicability if lightweight, portable systems were available for siting in unconventional locations such as Intensive Care Units, physician offices, surgical suites, ambulances, emergency rooms, sports facilities, or rural healthcare sites. Methods We construct and validate a truly portable (<100kg) and silent proof-of-concept MRI scanner which replaces conventional gradient encoding with a rotating lightweight cryogen-free, low-field magnet. When rotated about the object, the inhomogeneous field pattern is used as a rotating Spatial Encoding Magnetic field (rSEM) to create generalized projections which encode the iteratively reconstructed 2D image. Multiple receive channels are used to disambiguate the non-bijective encoding field. Results The system is validated with experimental images of 2D test phantoms. Similar to other non-linear field encoding schemes, the spatial resolution is position dependent with blurring in the center, but is shown to be likely sufficient for many medical applications. Conclusion The presented MRI scanner demonstrates the potential for portability by simultaneously relaxing the magnet homogeneity criteria and eliminating the gradient coil. This new architecture and encoding scheme shows convincing proof of concept images that are expected to be further improved with refinement of the calibration and methodology. PMID:24668520

  3. Volumetric synthetic aperture imaging with a piezoelectric 2D row-column probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Engholm, Mathias; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Beers, Christopher; Lei, Anders; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    The synthetic aperture (SA) technique can be used for achieving real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D row-column addressed transducers. This paper investigates SA volumetric imaging performance of an in-house prototyped 3 MHz λ/2-pitch 62+62 element piezoelectric 2-D row-column addressed transducer array. Utilizing single element transmit events, a volume rate of 90 Hz down to 14 cm deep is achieved. Data are obtained using the experimental ultrasound scanner SARUS with a 70 MHz sampling frequency and beamformed using a delay-and-sum (DAS) approach. A signal-to-noise ratio of up to 32 dB is measured on the beamformed images of a tissue mimicking phantom with attenuation of 0.5 dB cm-1 MHz-1, from the surface of the probe to the penetration depth of 300λ. Measured lateral resolution as Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum (FWHM) is between 4λ and 10λ for 18% to 65% of the penetration depth from the surface of the probe. The averaged contrast is 13 dB for the same range. The imaging performance assessment results may represent a reference guide for possible applications of such an array in different medical fields.

  4. Augmented depth perception visualization in 2D/3D image fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Kreiser, Matthias; Wang, Lejing; Navab, Nassir; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2014-12-01

    2D/3D image fusion applications are widely used in endovascular interventions. Complaints from interventionists about existing state-of-art visualization software are usually related to the strong compromise between 2D and 3D visibility or the lack of depth perception. In this paper, we investigate several concepts enabling improvement of current image fusion visualization found in the operating room. First, a contour enhanced visualization is used to circumvent hidden information in the X-ray image. Second, an occlusion and depth color-coding scheme is considered to improve depth perception. To validate our visualization technique both phantom and clinical data are considered. An evaluation is performed in the form of a questionnaire which included 24 participants: ten clinicians and fourteen non-clinicians. Results indicate that the occlusion correction method provides 100% correctness when determining the true position of an aneurysm in X-ray. Further, when integrating an RGB or RB color-depth encoding in the image fusion both perception and intuitiveness are improved.

  5. 3D Materials image segmentation by 2D propagation: a graph-cut approach considering homomorphism.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, Jarrell; Zhou, Youjie; Simmons, Jeff; De Graef, Marc; Wang, Song

    2013-12-01

    Segmentation propagation, similar to tracking, is the problem of transferring a segmentation of an image to a neighboring image in a sequence. This problem is of particular importance to materials science, where the accurate segmentation of a series of 2D serial-sectioned images of multiple, contiguous 3D structures has important applications. Such structures may have distinct shape, appearance, and topology, which can be considered to improve segmentation accuracy. For example, some materials images may have structures with a specific shape or appearance in each serial section slice, which only changes minimally from slice to slice, and some materials may exhibit specific inter-structure topology that constrains their neighboring relations. Some of these properties have been individually incorporated to segment specific materials images in prior work. In this paper, we develop a propagation framework for materials image segmentation where each propagation is formulated as an optimal labeling problem that can be efficiently solved using the graph-cut algorithm. Our framework makes three key contributions: 1) a homomorphic propagation approach, which considers the consistency of region adjacency in the propagation; 2) incorporation of shape and appearance consistency in the propagation; and 3) a local non-homomorphism strategy to handle newly appearing and disappearing substructures during this propagation. To show the effectiveness of our framework, we conduct experiments on various 3D materials images, and compare the performance against several existing image segmentation methods.

  6. Adaptive optofluidic lens(es) for switchable 2D and 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hanyang; Wei, Kang; Zhao, Yi

    2016-03-01

    The stereoscopic image is often captured using dual cameras arranged side-by-side and optical path switching systems such as two separate solid lenses or biprism/mirrors. The miniaturization of the overall size of current stereoscopic devices down to several millimeters is at a sacrifice of further device size shrinkage. The limited light entry worsens the final image resolution and brightness. It is known that optofluidics offer good re-configurability for imaging systems. Leveraging this technique, we report a reconfigurable optofluidic system whose optical layout can be swapped between a singlet lens with 10 mm in diameter and a pair of binocular lenses with each lens of 3 mm in diameter for switchable two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging. The singlet and the binoculars share the same optical path and the same imaging sensor. The singlet acquires a 3D image with better resolution and brightness, while the binoculars capture stereoscopic image pairs for 3D vision and depth perception. The focusing power tuning capability of the singlet and the binoculars enable image acquisition at varied object planes by adjusting the hydrostatic pressure across the lens membrane. The vari-focal singlet and binoculars thus work interchangeably and complementarily. The device is thus expected to have applications in robotic vision, stereoscopy, laparoendoscopy and miniaturized zoom lens system.

  7. Development of 2D SIP Data Processing Software for a Metallic Mineral Deposit Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PARK, M.; Kim, K. S.; Seo, H. K.; Son, J.; Park, S.; Kim, C.; Kim, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    algorithm, we could get more reliable inversion result for the time-domain IP data. Therefore, it is expected the SIP method should be more popular if the developed 2D SIP processing software is widely used.

  8. Evaluation of the channelized Hotelling observer for signal detection in 2D tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRoque, Samuel J.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Edwards, Darrin C.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2007-03-01

    Signal detection by the channelized Hotelling (ch-Hotelling) observer is studied for tomographic application by employing a small, tractable 2D model of a computed tomography (CT) system. The primary goal of this manuscript is to develop a practical method for evaluating the ch-Hotelling observer that can generalize to larger 3D cone-beam CT systems. The use of the ch-Hotelling observer for evaluating tomographic image reconstruction algorithms is also demonstrated. For a realistic model for CT, the ch-Hotelling observer can be a good approximation to the ideal observer. The ch-Hotelling observer is applied to both the projection data and the reconstructed images. The difference in signal-to-noise ratio for signal detection in both of these domains provides a metric for evaluating the image reconstruction algorithm.

  9. Processable 2D materials beyond graphene: MoS2 liquid crystals and fibres.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Rouhollah; Aminorroaya-Yamini, Sima; Benedetti, Tania M; Aboutalebi, Seyed Hamed; Chao, Yunfeng; Wallace, Gordon G; Officer, David L

    2016-09-29

    Herein, we show properly engineered MoS2 crystals can readily form liquid crystalline dispersions in water making them ideal candidates for large-scale manufacturing processes. The guideline provided here can serve as the basis to develop practical protocols to address the long-standing goal of large-scale manufacturing of 2D materials.

  10. Parallelized CCHE2D flow model with CUDA Fortran on Graphics Process Units

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents the CCHE2D implicit flow model parallelized using CUDA Fortran programming technique on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). A parallelized implicit Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) solver using Parallel Cyclic Reduction (PCR) algorithm on GPU is developed and tested. This solve...

  11. A preliminary evaluation work on a 3D ultrasound imaging system for 2D array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiaoli; Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Li, Chunyu; Song, Junjie; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a preliminary evaluation work on a pre-designed 3-D ultrasound imaging system. The system mainly consists of four parts, a 7.5MHz, 24×24 2-D array transducer, the transmit/receive circuit, power supply, data acquisition and real-time imaging module. The row-column addressing scheme is adopted for the transducer fabrication, which greatly reduces the number of active channels . The element area of the transducer is 4.6mm by 4.6mm. Four kinds of tests were carried out to evaluate the imaging performance, including the penetration depth range, axial and lateral resolution, positioning accuracy and 3-D imaging frame rate. Several strong reflection metal objects , fixed in a water tank, were selected for the purpose of imaging due to a low signal-to-noise ratio of the transducer. The distance between the transducer and the tested objects , the thickness of aluminum, and the seam width of the aluminum sheet were measured by a calibrated micrometer to evaluate the penetration depth, the axial and lateral resolution, respectively. The experiment al results showed that the imaging penetration depth range was from 1.0cm to 6.2cm, the axial and lateral resolution were 0.32mm and 1.37mm respectively, the imaging speed was up to 27 frames per second and the positioning accuracy was 9.2%.

  12. Development of ultra-fast 2D ion Doppler tomography using image intensified CMOS fast camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; Kuwahata, Akihiro; Yamanaka, Haruki; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; TS-group Team

    2015-11-01

    The world fastest novel time-resolved 2D ion Doppler tomography diagnostics has been developed using fast camera with high-speed gated image intensifier (frame rate: 200kfps. phosphor decay time: ~ 1 μ s). Time evolution of line-integrated spectra are diffracted from a f=1m, F/8.3 and g=2400L/mm Czerny-Turner polychromator, whose output is intensified and recorded to a high-speed camera with spectral resolution of ~0.005nm/pixel. The system can accommodate up to 36 (9 ×4) spatial points recorded at 5 μs time resolution, tomographic reconstruction is applied for the line-integrated spectra, time-resolved (5 μs/frame) local 2D ion temperature measurement has been achieved without any assumption of shot repeatability. Ion heating during intermittent reconnection event which tends to happen during high guide field merging tokamak was measured around diffusion region in UTST. The measured 2D profile shows ion heating inside the acceleration channel of reconnection outflow jet, stagnation point and downstream region where reconnected field forms thick closed flux surface as in MAST. Achieved maximum ion temperature increases as a function of Brec2 and shows good fit with MAST experiment, demonstrating promising CS-less startup scenario for spherical tokamak. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 15H05750 and 15K20921.

  13. Wideband 2-D Array Design Optimization With Fabrication Constraints for 3-D US Imaging.

    PubMed

    Roux, Emmanuel; Ramalli, Alessandro; Liebgott, Herve; Cachard, Christian; Robini, Marc C; Tortoli, Piero

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) 2-D arrays are of increasing interest due to their electronic steering capability to investigate 3-D regions without requiring any probe movement. These arrays are typically populated by thousands of elements that, ideally, should be individually driven by the companion scanner. Since this is not convenient, the so-called microbeamforming methods, yielding a prebeamforming stage performed in the probe handle by suitable custom integrated circuits, have so far been implemented in a few commercial high-end scanners. A possible approach to implement relatively cheap and efficient 3-D US imaging systems is using 2-D sparse arrays in which a limited number of elements can be coupled to an equal number of independent transmit/receive channels. In order to obtain US beams with adequate characteristics all over the investigated volume, the layout of such arrays must be carefully designed. This paper provides guidelines to design, by using simulated annealing optimization, 2-D sparse arrays capable of fitting specific applications or fabrication/implementation constraints. In particular, an original energy function based on multidepth 3-D analysis of the beam pattern is also exploited. A tutorial example is given, addressed to find the N e elements that should be activated in a 2-D fully populated array to yield efficient acoustic radiating performance over the entire volume. The proposed method is applied to a 32 ×32 array centered at 3 MHz to select the 128, 192, and 256 elements that provide the best acoustic performance. It is shown that the 256-element optimized array yields sidelobe levels even lower (by 5.7 dB) than that of the reference 716-element circular and (by 10.3 dB) than that of the reference 1024-element array.

  14. Visualizing 3D Objects from 2D Cross Sectional Images Displayed "In-Situ" versus "Ex-Situ"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Stetten, George

    2010-01-01

    The present research investigates how mental visualization of a 3D object from 2D cross sectional images is influenced by displacing the images from the source object, as is customary in medical imaging. Three experiments were conducted to assess people's ability to integrate spatial information over a series of cross sectional images in order to…

  15. Diesel combustion and emissions formation using multiple 2-D imaging diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Dec, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    Understanding how emissions are formed during diesel combustion is central to developing new engines that can comply with increasingly stringent emission standards while maintaining or improving performance levels. Laser-based planar imaging diagnostics are uniquely capable of providing the temporally and spatially resolved information required for this understanding. Using an optically accessible research engine, a variety of two-dimensional (2-D) imaging diagnostics have been applied to investigators of direct-injection (DI) diesel combustion and emissions formation. These optical measurements have included the following laser-sheet imaging data: Mie scattering to determine liquid-phase fuel distributions, Rayleigh scattering for quantitative vapor-phase-fuel/air mixture images, laser induced incandescence (LII) for relative soot concentrations, simultaneous LII and Rayleigh scattering for relative soot particle-size distributions, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) to obtain early PAH (polyaromatic hydrocarbon) distributions, PLIF images of the OH radical that show the diffusion flame structure, and PLIF images of the NO radical showing the onset of NO{sub x} production. In addition, natural-emission chemiluminescence images were obtained to investigate autoignition. The experimental setup is described, and the image data showing the most relevant results are presented. Then the conceptual model of diesel combustion is summarized in a series of idealized schematics depicting the temporal and spatial evolution of a reacting diesel fuel jet during the time period investigated. Finally, recent PLIF images of the NO distribution are presented and shown to support the timing and location of NO formation hypothesized from the conceptual model.

  16. Beamforming of Ultrasound Signals from 1-D and 2-D Arrays under Challenging Imaging Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovljevic, Marko

    Beamforming of ultrasound signals in the presence of clutter, or partial aperture blockage by an acoustic obstacle can lead to reduced visibility of the structures of interest and diminished diagnostic value of the resulting image. We propose new beamforming methods to recover the quality of ultrasound images under such challenging conditions. Of special interest are the signals from large apertures, which are more susceptible to partial blockage, and from commercial matrix arrays that suffer from low sensitivity due to inherent design/hardware limitations. A coherence-based beamforming method designed for suppressing the in vivo clutter, namely Short-lag Spatial Coherence (SLSC) Imaging, is first implemented on a 1-D array to enhance visualization of liver vasculature in 17 human subjects. The SLSC images show statistically significant improvements in vessel contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio over the matched B-mode images. The concept of SLSC imaging is then extended to matrix arrays, and the first in vivo demonstration of volumetric SLSC imaging on a clinical ultrasound system is presented. The effective suppression of clutter via volumetric SLSC imaging indicates it could potentially compensate for the low sensitivity associated with most commercial matrix arrays. The rest of the dissertation assesses image degradation due to elements blocked by ribs in a transthoracic scan. A method to detect the blocked elements is demonstrated using simulated, ex vivo, and in vivo data from the fully-sampled 2-D apertures. The results show that turning off the blocked elements both reduces the near-field clutter and improves visibility of anechoic/hypoechoic targets. Most importantly, the ex vivo data from large synthetic apertures indicates that the adaptive weighing of the non-blocked elements can recover the loss of focus quality due to periodic rib structure, allowing large apertures to realize their full resolution potential in transthoracic ultrasound.

  17. Digital image processing.

    PubMed

    Seeram, Euclid

    2004-01-01

    Digital image processing is now commonplace in radiology, nuclear medicine and sonography. This article outlines underlying principles and concepts of digital image processing. After completing this article, readers should be able to: List the limitations of film-based imaging. Identify major components of a digital imaging system. Describe the history and application areas of digital image processing. Discuss image representation and the fundamentals of digital image processing. Outline digital image processing techniques and processing operations used in selected imaging modalities. Explain the basic concepts and visualization tools used in 3-D and virtual reality imaging. Recognize medical imaging informatics as a new area of specialization for radiologic technologists.

  18. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X. M.; Yang, Z. J.; Ma, X. D.; Zhu, Y. L.; Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  19. 2D Feature Recognition And 3d Reconstruction In Solar Euv Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2005-05-01

    EUV images show the solar corona in a typical temperature range of T >rsim 1 MK, which encompasses the most common coronal structures: loops, filaments, and other magnetic structures in active regions, the quiet Sun, and coronal holes. Quantitative analysis increasingly demands automated 2D feature recognition and 3D reconstruction, in order to localize, track, and monitor the evolution of such coronal structures. We discuss numerical tools that “fingerprint” curvi-linear 1D features (e.g., loops and filaments). We discuss existing finger-printing algorithms, such as the brightness-gradient method, the oriented-connectivity method, stereoscopic methods, time-differencing, and space time feature recognition. We discuss improved 2D feature recognition and 3D reconstruction techniques that make use of additional a priori constraints, using guidance from magnetic field extrapolations, curvature radii constraints, and acceleration and velocity constraints in time-dependent image sequences. Applications of these algorithms aid the analysis of SOHO/EIT, TRACE, and STEREO/SECCHI data, such as disentangling, 3D reconstruction, and hydrodynamic modeling of coronal loops, postflare loops, filaments, prominences, and 3D reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field in general.

  20. Groundwater Exploration Using 2-D Resistivity Imaging Technique in Marang, Terengganu, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Muhammad; Nawawi, M. N. M.

    2010-07-01

    Surface water is critically important in supplying water to streams and wetlands, and in providing water for irrigation, manufacturing, electricity power and other uses and it is an important source of water supply especially in various regions in Malaysia and it become ever more important with an increasing population. However groundwater can be an alternative source of water to the ever increasing population. Groundwater is water located beneath the ground surface in soil pore spaces and in the fractures of lithologic water formations. This would provide alternative freshwater source. In order to determine the existence of usable groundwater for agriculture purposes in Marang Terengganu, 2-D resistivity imaging technique was utilized. Three lines were surveyed at the site. The 2-D resistivity imaging technique utilized the Pole -dipole array because of relatively good horizontal coverage but it has significantly higher signal strength. The total length of the survey lines is 400 meters. Three lines were surveyed for groundwater delineation purpose. At Marang, the survey site shows the existence of groundwater. The maximum depth of investigations for the surveys is 125 meters. In general the results show that the subsurface is made up of sand and clay (resistivity value of less 100 ohm-m) and sandstone with resistivity of more than 2000 ohm-m in all the sections. This zone can be a source of groundwater.

  1. Groundwater exploration using 2D Resistivity Imaging in Pagoh, Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Muhammad; Nawawi, M. N. M.

    2010-12-01

    Groundwater is a very important component of water resources in nature. Since the demand of groundwater increases with population growth, it is necessary to explore groundwater more intensively. In Malaysia only less than 2% of the present water used is developed from groundwater. In order to determine the existence of usable groundwater for irrigation and drinking purposes in Pagoh, 2D resistivity imaging technique was utilized. The 2-D resistivity imaging technique utilized the Wenner—Schlumberger electrode array configuration because this array is moderately sensitive to both horizontal and vertical structures. Three lines were surveyed for groundwater delineation purpose The length for each survey lines are 400 meters. At Pagoh, the survey site shows the existence of groundwater. It is indicated by the resistivity values about 10-100 ohm-m. The maximum depth of investigation survey is 77 meters. In general the results show that the subsurface is made up of alluvium and clay and the high resistivity values of more than 1000 ohm-m near the surface is due laterite and the end of the depth can be interpreted as mixture of weathered material or bedrock.

  2. SNARK09 - a software package for reconstruction of 2D images from 1D projections.

    PubMed

    Klukowska, Joanna; Davidi, Ran; Herman, Gabor T

    2013-06-01

    The problem of reconstruction of slices and volumes from 1D and 2D projections has arisen in a large number of scientific fields (including computerized tomography, electron microscopy, X-ray microscopy, radiology, radio astronomy and holography). Many different methods (algorithms) have been suggested for its solution. In this paper we present a software package, SNARK09, for reconstruction of 2D images from their 1D projections. In the area of image reconstruction, researchers often desire to compare two or more reconstruction techniques and assess their relative merits. SNARK09 provides a uniform framework to implement algorithms and evaluate their performance. It has been designed to treat both parallel and divergent projection geometries and can either create test data (with or without noise) for use by reconstruction algorithms or use data collected by another software or a physical device. A number of frequently-used classical reconstruction algorithms are incorporated. The package provides a means for easy incorporation of new algorithms for their testing, comparison and evaluation. It comes with tools for statistical analysis of the results and ten worked examples.

  3. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak.

    PubMed

    Pan, X M; Yang, Z J; Ma, X D; Zhu, Y L; Luhmann, N C; Domier, C W; Ruan, B W; Zhuang, G

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  4. Pre-stack depth migration for improved imaging under seafloor canyons: 2D case study of Browse Basin, Australia*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debenham, Helen 124Westlake, Shane

    2014-06-01

    In the Browse Basin, as in many areas of the world, complex seafloor topography can cause problems with seismic imaging. This is related to complex ray paths, and sharp lateral changes in velocity. This paper compares ways in which 2D Kirchhoff imaging can be improved below seafloor canyons, using both time and depth domain processing. In the time domain, to improve on standard pre-stack time migration (PSTM) we apply removable seafloor static time shifts in order to reduce the push down effect under seafloor canyons before migration. This allows for better event continuity in the seismic imaging. However this approach does not fully solve the problem, still giving sub-optimal imaging, leaving amplitude shadows and structural distortion. Only depth domain processing with a migration algorithm that honours the paths of the seismic energy as well as a detailed velocity model can provide improved imaging under these seafloor canyons, and give confidence in the structural components of the exploration targets in this area. We therefore performed depth velocity model building followed by pre-stack depth migration (PSDM), the result of which provided a step change improvement in the imaging, and provided new insights into the area.

  5. Image processing in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Richard

    1994-04-01

    Today's personal computers are more powerful than the mainframes that processed images during the early days of space exploration. We have entered an age in which anyone can do image processing. Topics covering the following aspects of image processing are discussed: digital-imaging basics, image calibration, image analysis, scaling, spatial enhancements, and compositing.

  6. TU-CD-207-08: Intrinsic Image Quality Comparison of Synthesized 2-D and FFDM Images

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J; Wells, J; Samei, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: With the combined interest of managing patient dose, maintaining or improving image quality, and maintaining or improving the diagnostic utility of mammographic data, this study aims to compare the intrinsic image quality of Hologic’s synthesized 2-D (C-View) and 2-D FFDM images in terms of resolution, contrast, and noise. Methods: This study utilized a novel 3-D printed anthropomorphic breast phantom in addition to the American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography accreditation phantom. Analysis of the 3-D anthropomorphic phantom included visual assessment of resolution and analysis of the normalized noise power spectrum. Analysis of the ACR phantom included both visual inspection and objective automated analysis using in-house software. The software incorporates image- and object-specific CNR visibility thresholds which account for image characteristics such as noise texture which affect object visualization. T- test statistical analysis was also performed on ACR phantom scores. Results: The spatial resolution of C-View images is markedly lower (at least 50% worse) than that of FFDM. And while this is generally associated with the benefit of reduced relative noise magnitude, the noise in C-View images tends to have a more mottled (predominantly low-frequency) texture. In general, for high contrast objects, C-View provides superior visualization over FFDM; however this benefit diminishes for low contrast objects and is applicable only to objects that are sufficiently larger than the spatial resolution threshold. Based on both observer and automated ACR phantom analysis, between 50–70% of C-View images failed to meet ACR minimum accreditation requirements – primarily due to insufficient (unbroken) fiber visibility. Conclusion: Compared to FFDM, C-View offers better depiction of objects of certain size and contrast, but provides poorer overall resolution and noise properties. Based on these findings, the utilization of C-View images in the clinical

  7. Rotationally symmetric triangulation sensor with integrated object imaging using only one 2D detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Johannes; Lei, Wang; Becker, Jonathan; Jun, Gao; Ott, Peter

    2006-04-01

    In this paper a distance measurement sensor is introduced, equipped with two integrated optical systems, the first one for rotationally symmetric triangulation and the second one for imaging the object while using only one 2D detector for both purposes. Rotationally symmetric triangulation, introduced in [1], eliminates some disadvantages of classical triangulation sensors, especially at steps or strong curvatures of the object, wherefore the measurement result depends not any longer on the angular orientation of the sensor. This is achieved by imaging the scattered light from an illuminated object point to a centered and sharp ring on a low cost area detector. The diameter of the ring is proportional to the distance of the object. The optical system consists of two off axis aspheric reflecting surfaces. This system allows for integrating a second optical system in order to capture images of the object at the same 2D detector. A mock-up was realized for the first time which consists of the reflecting optics for triangulation manufactured by diamond turning. A commercially available appropriate small lens system for imaging was mechanically integrated in the reflecting optics. Alternatively, some designs of retrofocus lens system for larger field of views were investigated. The optical designs allow overlying the image of the object and the ring for distance measurement in the same plane. In this plane a CCD detector is mounted, centered to the optical axis for both channels. A fast algorithm for the evaluation of the ring is implemented. The characteristics, i.e. the ring diameter versus object distance shows very linear behavior. For illumination of the object point for distance measurement, the beam of a red laser diode system is reflected by a wavelength bandpath filter on the axis of the optical system in. Additionally, the surface of the object is illuminated by LED's in the green spectrum. The LED's are located on the outside rim of the reflecting optics. The

  8. A survey among Brazilian thoracic surgeons about the use of preoperative 2D and 3D images

    PubMed Central

    Cipriano, Federico Enrique Garcia; Arcêncio, Livia; Dessotte, Lycio Umeda; Rodrigues, Alfredo José; Vicente, Walter Villela de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Background Describe the characteristics of how the thoracic surgeon uses the 2D/3D medical imaging to perform surgical planning, clinical practice and teaching in thoracic surgery and check the initial choice and the final choice of the Brazilian Thoracic surgeon as the 2D and 3D models pictures before and after acquiring theoretical knowledge on the generation, manipulation and interactive 3D views. Methods A descriptive research type Survey cross to data provided by the Brazilian Thoracic Surgeons (members of the Brazilian Society of Thoracic Surgery) who responded to the online questionnaire via the internet on their computers or personal devices. Results Of the 395 invitations visualized distributed by email, 107 surgeons completed the survey. There was no statically difference when comparing the 2D vs. 3D models pictures for the following purposes: diagnosis, assessment of the extent of disease, preoperative surgical planning, and communication among physicians, resident training, and undergraduate medical education. Regarding the type of tomographic image display routinely used in clinical practice (2D or 3D or 2D–3D model image) and the one preferred by the surgeon at the end of the questionnaire. Answers surgeons for exclusive use of 2D images: initial choice =50.47% and preferably end =14.02%. Responses surgeons to use 3D models in combination with 2D images: initial choice =48.60% and preferably end =85.05%. There was a significant change in the final selection of 3D models used together with the 2D images (P<0.0001). Conclusions There is a lack of knowledge of the 3D imaging, as well as the use and interactive manipulation in dedicated 3D applications, with consequent lack of uniformity in the surgical planning based on CT images. These findings certainly confirm in changing the preference of thoracic surgeons of 2D views of technologies for 3D images. PMID:27621874

  9. 2D Seismic Imaging of Elastic Parameters by Frequency Domain Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.; Operto, S.

    2008-12-01

    Thanks to recent advances in parallel computing, full waveform inversion is today a tractable seismic imaging method to reconstruct physical parameters of the earth interior at different scales ranging from the near- surface to the deep crust. We present a massively parallel 2D frequency-domain full-waveform algorithm for imaging visco-elastic media from multi-component seismic data. The forward problem (i.e. the resolution of the frequency-domain 2D PSV elastodynamics equations) is based on low-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method (P0 and/or P1 interpolations). Thanks to triangular unstructured meshes, the DG method allows accurate modeling of both body waves and surface waves in case of complex topography for a discretization of 10 to 15 cells per shear wavelength. The frequency-domain DG system is solved efficiently for multiple sources with the parallel direct solver MUMPS. The local inversion procedure (i.e. minimization of residuals between observed and computed data) is based on the adjoint-state method which allows to efficiently compute the gradient of the objective function. Applying the inversion hierarchically from the low frequencies to the higher ones defines a multiresolution imaging strategy which helps convergence towards the global minimum. In place of expensive Newton algorithm, the combined use of the diagonal terms of the approximate Hessian matrix and optimization algorithms based on quasi-Newton methods (Conjugate Gradient, LBFGS, ...) allows to improve the convergence of the iterative inversion. The distribution of forward problem solutions over processors driven by a mesh partitioning performed by METIS allows to apply most of the inversion in parallel. We shall present the main features of the parallel modeling/inversion algorithm, assess its scalability and illustrate its performances with realistic synthetic case studies.

  10. Singular value decomposition-based 2D image reconstruction for computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; He, Lu; Luo, Yan; Yu, Hengyong

    2017-01-01

    Singular value decomposition (SVD)-based 2D image reconstruction methods are developed and evaluated for a broad class of inverse problems for which there are no analytical solutions. The proposed methods are fast and accurate for reconstructing images in a non-iterative fashion. The multi-resolution strategy is adopted to reduce the size of the system matrix to reconstruct large images using limited memory capacity. A modified high-contrast Shepp-Logan phantom, a low-contrast FORBILD head phantom, and a physical phantom are employed to evaluate the proposed methods with different system configurations. The results show that the SVD methods can accurately reconstruct images from standard scan and interior scan projections and that they outperform other benchmark methods. The general SVD method outperforms the other SVD methods. The truncated SVD and Tikhonov regularized SVD methods accurately reconstruct a region-of-interest (ROI) from an internal scan with a known sub-region inside the ROI. Furthermore, the SVD methods are much faster and more flexible than the benchmark algorithms, especially in the ROI reconstructions in our experiments.

  11. Embedded morphological dilation coding for 2D and 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, Fabio; Signoroni, Alberto; Leonardi, Riccardo

    2002-01-01

    Current wavelet-based image coders obtain high performance thanks to the identification and the exploitation of the statistical properties of natural images in the transformed domain. Zerotree-based algorithms, as Embedded Zerotree Wavelets (EZW) and Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Trees (SPIHT), offer high Rate-Distortion (RD) coding performance and low computational complexity by exploiting statistical dependencies among insignificant coefficients on hierarchical subband structures. Another possible approach tries to predict the clusters of significant coefficients by means of some form of morphological dilation. An example of a morphology-based coder is the Significance-Linked Connected Component Analysis (SLCCA) that has shown performance which are comparable to the zerotree-based coders but is not embedded. A new embedded bit-plane coder is proposed here based on morphological dilation of significant coefficients and context based arithmetic coding. The algorithm is able to exploit both intra-band and inter-band statistical dependencies among wavelet significant coefficients. Moreover, the same approach is used both for two and three-dimensional wavelet-based image compression. Finally we the algorithms are tested on some 2D images and on a medical volume, by comparing the RD results to those obtained with the state-of-the-art wavelet-based coders.

  12. Layer-by-Layer Assembled 2D Montmorillonite Dielectrics for Solution-Processed Electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Liu, Xiaolong; Geier, Michael L; McMorrow, Julian J; Jariwala, Deep; Beck, Megan E; Huang, Wei; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-01-06

    Layer-by-layer assembled 2D montmorillonite nanosheets are shown to be high-performance, solution-processed dielectrics. These scalable and spatially uniform sub-10 nm thick dielectrics yield high areal capacitances of ≈600 nF cm(-2) and low leakage currents down to 6 × 10(-9) A cm(-2) that enable low voltage operation of p-type semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube and n-type indium gallium zinc oxide field-effect transistors.

  13. A 2D to 3D ultrasound image registration algorithm for robotically assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteghamatian, Mehdi; Pautler, Stephen E.; McKenzie, Charles A.; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    Robotically assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) is an effective approach to resect the diseased organ, with stereoscopic views of the targeted tissue improving the dexterity of the surgeons. However, since the laparoscopic view acquires only the surface image of the tissue, the underlying distribution of the cancer within the organ is not observed, making it difficult to make informed decisions on surgical margins and sparing of neurovascular bundles. One option to address this problem is to exploit registration to integrate the laparoscopic view with images of pre-operatively acquired dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI that can demonstrate the regions of malignant tissue within the prostate. Such a view potentially allows the surgeon to visualize the location of the malignancy with respect to the surrounding neurovascular structures, permitting a tissue-sparing strategy to be formulated directly based on the observed tumour distribution. If the tumour is close to the capsule, it may be determined that the adjacent neurovascular bundle (NVB) needs to be sacrificed within the surgical margin to ensure that any erupted tumour was resected. On the other hand, if the cancer is sufficiently far from the capsule, one or both NVBs may be spared. However, in order to realize such image integration, the pre-operative image needs to be fused with the laparoscopic view of the prostate. During the initial stages of the operation, the prostate must be tracked in real time so that the pre-operative MR image remains aligned with patient coordinate system. In this study, we propose and investigate a novel 2D to 3D ultrasound image registration algorithm to track the prostate motion with an accuracy of 2.68+/-1.31mm.

  14. Investigation of fast particle driven instabilities by 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, I. G. J.; Lauber, Ph; Curran, D.; Boom, J. E.; Tobias, B. J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Park, H. K.; Garcia Munoz, M.; Geiger, B.; Maraschek, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; da Graça, S.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2011-12-01

    Detailed measurements of the 2D mode structure of Alfvén instabilities in the current ramp-up phase of neutral beam heated discharges were performed on ASDEX Upgrade, using the electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic. This paper focuses on the observation of reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes (RSAEs) and bursting modes that, with the use of the information from ECEI, have been identified as beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs). Both RSAEs with first and second radial harmonic mode structures were observed. Calculations with the linear gyro-kinetic code LIGKA revealed that the ratio of the damping rates and the frequency difference between the first and second harmonic modes strongly depended on the shape of the q-profile. The bursting character of the BAE type modes, which were radially localized to rational q surfaces, was observed to sensitively depend on the plasma parameters, ranging from strongly bursting to almost steady state.

  15. A high speed 2D time-to-impact algorithm targeted for smart image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, Anders; Forchheimer, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a 2D extension of a previously described 1D method for a time-to-impact sensor [5][6]. As in the earlier paper, the approach is based on measuring time instead of the apparent motion of points in the image plane to obtain data similar to the optical flow. The specific properties of the motion field in the time-to-impact application are used, such as using simple feature points which are tracked from frame to frame. Compared to the 1D case, the features will be proportionally fewer which will affect the quality of the estimation. We give a proposal on how to solve this problem. Results obtained are as promising as those obtained from the 1D sensor.

  16. A Novel Assessment of Various Bio-Imaging Methods for Lung Tumor Detection and Treatment by using 4-D and 2-D CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Judice A., Antony; Geetha, Dr. K. Parimala

    2013-01-01

    Lung Cancer is known as one of the most difficult cancer to cure, and the number of deaths that it causes generally increasing. A detection of the Lung Cancer in its early stage can be helpful for Medical treatment to limit the danger, but it is a challenging problem due to Cancer cell structure. Interpretation of Medical image is often difficult and time consuming, even for the experienced Physicians. The aid of image analysis Based on machine learning can make this process easier. This paper describes fully Automatic Decision Support system for Lung Cancer diagnostic from CT Lung images. Most traditional medical diagnosis systems are founded on huge quantity of training data and takes long processing time. However, on the occasion that very little volume of data is available, the traditional diagnosis systems derive defects such as larger error, Time complexity. Focused on the solution to this problem, a Medical Diagnosis System based on Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is presented. In this paper we describe a pre-processing stage involving some Noise removal techniques help to solve this problem, we preprocess an images (by Mean Error Square Filtering and Histogram analysis)obtained after scanning the Lung CT images. Secondly separate the lung areas from an image by a segmentation process (by Thresholding and region growing techniques). Finally we developed HMM for the classification of Cancer Nodule. Results are checked for 2D and 4D CT images. This automation process reduces the time complexity and increases the diagnosis confidence. PMID:23847454

  17. Time-resolved diffusion tomographic 2D and 3D imaging in highly scattering turbid media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Cai, Wei (Inventor); Liu, Feng (Inventor); Lax, Melvin (Inventor); Das, Bidyut B. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for imaging objects in highly scattering turbid media. According to one embodiment of the invention, the method involves using a plurality of intersecting source/detectors sets and time-resolving equipment to generate a plurality of time-resolved intensity curves for the diffusive component of light emergent from the medium. For each of the curves, the intensities at a plurality of times are then inputted into the following inverse reconstruction algorithm to form an image of the medium: ##EQU1## wherein W is a matrix relating output at source and detector positions r.sub.s and r.sub.d, at time t, to position r, .LAMBDA. is a regularization matrix, chosen for convenience to be diagonal, but selected in a way related to the ratio of the noise, to fluctuations in the absorption (or diffusion) X.sub.j that we are trying to determine: .LAMBDA..sub.ij =.lambda..sub.j .delta..sub.ij with .lambda..sub.j =/<.DELTA.Xj.DELTA.Xj> Y is the data collected at the detectors, and X.sup.k is the kth iterate toward the desired absoption information. An algorithm, which combines a two dimensional (2D) matrix inversion with a one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform inversion is used to obtain images of three dimensional hidden objects in turbid scattering media.

  18. Time-resolved diffusion tomographic 2D and 3D imaging in highly scattering turbid media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Cai, Wei (Inventor); Gayen, Swapan K. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method for imaging objects in highly scattering turbid media. According to one embodiment of the invention, the method involves using a plurality of intersecting source/detectors sets and time-resolving equipment to generate a plurality of time-resolved intensity curves for the diffusive component of light emergent from the medium. For each of the curves, the intensities at a plurality of times are then inputted into the following inverse reconstruction algorithm to form an image of the medium: wherein W is a matrix relating output at source and detector positions r.sub.s and r.sub.d, at time t, to position r, .LAMBDA. is a regularization matrix, chosen for convenience to be diagonal, but selected in a way related to the ratio of the noise, to fluctuations in the absorption (or diffusion) X.sub.j that we are trying to determine: .LAMBDA..sub.ij =.lambda..sub.j .delta..sub.ij with .lambda..sub.j =/<.DELTA.Xj.DELTA.Xj> Y is the data collected at the detectors, and X.sup.k is the kth iterate toward the desired absorption information. An algorithm, which combines a two dimensional (2D) matrix inversion with a one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform inversion is used to obtain images of three dimensional hidden objects in turbid scattering media.

  19. Extending Ripley’s K-Function to Quantify Aggregation in 2-D Grayscale Images

    PubMed Central

    Amgad, Mohamed; Itoh, Anri; Tsui, Marco Man Kin

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we describe the extension of Ripley’s K-function to allow for overlapping events at very high event densities. We show that problematic edge effects introduce significant bias to the function at very high densities and small radii, and propose a simple correction method that successfully restores the function’s centralization. Using simulations of homogeneous Poisson distributions of events, as well as simulations of event clustering under different conditions, we investigate various aspects of the function, including its shape-dependence and correspondence between true cluster radius and radius at which the K-function is maximized. Furthermore, we validate the utility of the function in quantifying clustering in 2-D grayscale images using three modalities: (i) Simulations of particle clustering; (ii) Experimental co-expression of soluble and diffuse protein at varying ratios; (iii) Quantifying chromatin clustering in the nuclei of wt and crwn1 crwn2 mutant Arabidopsis plant cells, using a previously-published image dataset. Overall, our work shows that Ripley’s K-function is a valid abstract statistical measure whose utility extends beyond the quantification of clustering of non-overlapping events. Potential benefits of this work include the quantification of protein and chromatin aggregation in fluorescent microscopic images. Furthermore, this function has the potential to become one of various abstract texture descriptors that are utilized in computer-assisted diagnostics in anatomic pathology and diagnostic radiology. PMID:26636680

  20. New float equivalent calibration method for 2D image measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Jiansong; Wang, Zhong; Lu, Ruijun; Shen, Xinlan

    2015-08-01

    Pixel equivalent is an important parameter to describe the relationship between pixels of digital images and actual size of measured piece in a 2D image measuring system. It is mainly calibrated with the standard component method, which is traditionally off-line and requires measuring conditions and attitude of devices to remain constant while measuring and calibrating. To overcome above limitations, a new calibration method is proposed in this paper which is defined as the float equivalent method. This method requires the standard component and measured piece be placed in image measuring system simultaneously. Everytime before measuring, no matter aiming at the same measuring point or not, the pixel equivalent is calibrated for this specific time, specific condition, specific measuring point, and specific object distance. This method has the advantage of reducing the influence of conditions changing on the accuracy without additional calibration equipment or operations. The steel tape verification system is taken as an example to testify the effectiveness of the method.

  1. Automatic ultrasound image enhancement for 2D semi-automatic breast-lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Hall, Christopher S.

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer is the fastest growing cancer, accounting for 29%, of new cases in 2012, and second leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States and worldwide. Ultrasound (US) has been used as an indispensable tool for breast cancer detection/diagnosis and treatment. In computer-aided assistance, lesion segmentation is a preliminary but vital step, but the task is quite challenging in US images, due to imaging artifacts that complicate detection and measurement of the suspect lesions. The lesions usually present with poor boundary features and vary significantly in size, shape, and intensity distribution between cases. Automatic methods are highly application dependent while manual tracing methods are extremely time consuming and have a great deal of intra- and inter- observer variability. Semi-automatic approaches are designed to counterbalance the advantage and drawbacks of the automatic and manual methods. However, considerable user interaction might be necessary to ensure reasonable segmentation for a wide range of lesions. This work proposes an automatic enhancement approach to improve the boundary searching ability of the live wire method to reduce necessary user interaction while keeping the segmentation performance. Based on the results of segmentation of 50 2D breast lesions in US images, less user interaction is required to achieve desired accuracy, i.e. < 80%, when auto-enhancement is applied for live-wire segmentation.

  2. Absorption and scattering 2-D volcano images from numerically calculated space-weighting functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Ibañez, Jesus; Prudencio, Janire; Bianco, Francesca; De Siena, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Short-period small magnitude seismograms mainly comprise scattered waves in the form of coda waves (the tail part of the seismogram, starting after S waves and ending when the noise prevails), spanning more than 70 per cent of the whole seismogram duration. Corresponding coda envelopes provide important information about the earth inhomogeneity, which can be stochastically modeled in terms of distribution of scatterers in a random medium. In suitable experimental conditions (i.e. high earth heterogeneity), either the two parameters describing heterogeneity (scattering coefficient), intrinsic energy dissipation (coefficient of intrinsic attenuation) or a combination of them (extinction length and seismic albedo) can be used to image Earth structures. Once a set of such parameter couples has been measured in a given area and for a number of sources and receivers, imaging their space distribution with standard methods is straightforward. However, as for finite-frequency and full-waveform tomography, the essential problem for a correct imaging is the determination of the weighting function describing the spatial sensitivity of observable data to scattering and absorption anomalies. Due to the nature of coda waves, the measured parameter couple can be seen as a weighted space average of the real parameters characterizing the rock volumes illuminated by the scattered waves. This paper uses the Monte Carlo numerical solution of the Energy Transport Equation to find approximate but realistic 2-D space-weighting functions for coda waves. Separate images for scattering and absorption based on these sensitivity functions are then compared with those obtained with commonly used sensitivity functions in an application to data from an active seismic experiment carried out at Deception Island (Antarctica). Results show that these novel functions are based on a reliable and physically grounded method to image magnitude and shape of scattering and absorption anomalies. Their

  3. Model-based segmentation and quantification of subcellular structures in 2D and 3D fluorescent microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörz, Stefan; Heinzer, Stephan; Weiss, Matthias; Rohr, Karl

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a model-based approach for segmenting and quantifying GFP-tagged subcellular structures of the Golgi apparatus in 2D and 3D microscopy images. The approach is based on 2D and 3D intensity models, which are directly fitted to an image within 2D circular or 3D spherical regions-of-interest (ROIs). We also propose automatic approaches for the detection of candidates, for the initialization of the model parameters, and for adapting the size of the ROI used for model fitting. Based on the fitting results, we determine statistical information about the spatial distribution and the total amount of intensity (fluorescence) of the subcellular structures. We demonstrate the applicability of our new approach based on 2D and 3D microscopy images.

  4. Differential morphology and image processing.

    PubMed

    Maragos, P

    1996-01-01

    Image processing via mathematical morphology has traditionally used geometry to intuitively understand morphological signal operators and set or lattice algebra to analyze them in the space domain. We provide a unified view and analytic tools for morphological image processing that is based on ideas from differential calculus and dynamical systems. This includes ideas on using partial differential or difference equations (PDEs) to model distance propagation or nonlinear multiscale processes in images. We briefly review some nonlinear difference equations that implement discrete distance transforms and relate them to numerical solutions of the eikonal equation of optics. We also review some nonlinear PDEs that model the evolution of multiscale morphological operators and use morphological derivatives. Among the new ideas presented, we develop some general 2-D max/min-sum difference equations that model the space dynamics of 2-D morphological systems (including the distance computations) and some nonlinear signal transforms, called slope transforms, that can analyze these systems in a transform domain in ways conceptually similar to the application of Fourier transforms to linear systems. Thus, distance transforms are shown to be bandpass slope filters. We view the analysis of the multiscale morphological PDEs and of the eikonal PDE solved via weighted distance transforms as a unified area in nonlinear image processing, which we call differential morphology, and briefly discuss its potential applications to image processing and computer vision.

  5. Iterative Stable Alignment and Clustering of 2D Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengfan; Fang, Jia; Chittuluru, Johnathan; Asturias, Francisco J.; Penczek, Pawel A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification of homogeneous subsets of images in a macromolecular electron microscopy (EM) image data set is a critical step in single-particle analysis. The task is handled by iterative algorithms, whose performance is compromised by the compounded limitations of image alignment and K-means clustering. Here we describe an approach, iterative stable alignment and clustering (ISAC) that, relying on a new clustering method and on the concepts of stability and reproducibility, can extract validated, homogeneous subsets of images. ISAC requires only a small number of simple parameters and, with minimal human intervention, can eliminate bias from two-dimensional image clustering and maximize the quality of group averages that can be used for ab initio three-dimensional structural determination and analysis of macromolecular conformational variability. Repeated testing of the stability and reproducibility of a solution within ISAC eliminates heterogeneous or incorrect classes and introduces critical validation to the process of EM image clustering. PMID:22325773

  6. Development of 2D imaging of SXR plasma radiation by means of GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Jabłoński, S.; Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Poźniak, K.; Kasprowicz, G.; Zabołotny, W.; Wojeński, A.; Byszuk, A.; Burza, M.; Juszczyk, B.; Zienkiewicz, P.

    2014-11-01

    Presented 2D gaseous detector system has been developed and designed to provide energy resolved fast dynamic plasma radiation imaging in the soft X-Ray region with 0.1 kHz exposure frequency for online, made in real time, data acquisition (DAQ) mode. The detection structure is based on triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) amplification structure followed by the pixel readout electrode. The efficiency of detecting unit was adjusted for the radiation energy region of tungsten in high-temperature plasma, the main candidate for the plasma facing material for future thermonuclear reactors. Here we present preliminary laboratory results and detector parameters obtained for the developed system. The operational characteristics and conditions of the detector were designed to work in the X-Ray range of 2-17 keV. The detector linearity was checked using the fluorescence lines of different elements and was found to be sufficient for good photon energy reconstruction. Images of two sources through various screens were performed with an X-Ray laboratory source and 55Fe source showing a good imaging capability. Finally offline stream-handling data acquisition mode has been developed for the detecting system with timing down to the ADC sampling frequency rate (~13 ns), up to 2.5 MHz of exposure frequency, which could pave the way to invaluable physics information about plasma dynamics due to very good time resolving ability. Here we present results of studied spatial resolution and imaging properties of the detector for conditions of laboratory moderate counting rates and high gain.

  7. Ultrasound 2D strain estimator based on image registration for ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Torres, Mylin; Kirkpatrick, Stephanie; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach to calculate 2D strain through the registration of the pre- and post-compression (deformation) B-mode image sequences based on an intensity-based non-rigid registration algorithm (INRA). Compared with the most commonly used cross-correlation (CC) method, our approach is not constrained to any particular set of directions, and can overcome displacement estimation errors introduced by incoherent motion and variations in the signal under high compression. This INRA method was tested using phantom and in vivo data. The robustness of our approach was demonstrated in the axial direction as well as the lateral direction where the standard CC method frequently fails. In addition, our approach copes well under large compression (over 6%). In the phantom study, we computed the strain image under various compressions and calculated the signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNS) ratios. The SNR and CNS values of the INRA method were much higher than those calculated from the CC-based method. Furthermore, the clinical feasibility of our approach was demonstrated with the in vivo data from patients with arm lymphedema.

  8. Coronary arteries motion modeling on 2D x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Sundar, Hari

    2012-02-01

    During interventional procedures, 3D imaging modalities like CT and MRI are not commonly used due to interference with the surgery and radiation exposure concerns. Therefore, real-time information is usually limited and building models of cardiac motion are difficult. In such case, vessel motion modeling based on 2-D angiography images become indispensable. Due to issues with existing vessel segmentation algorithms and the lack of contrast in occluded vessels, manual segmentation of certain branches is usually necessary. In addition, such occluded branches are the most important vessels during coronary interventions and obtaining motion models for these can greatly help in reducing the procedure time and radiation exposure. Segmenting different cardiac phases independently does not guarantee temporal consistency and is not efficient for occluded branches required manual segmentation. In this paper, we propose a coronary motion modeling system which extracts the coronary tree for every cardiac phase, maintaining the segmentation by tracking the coronary tree during the cardiac cycle. It is able to map every frame to the specific cardiac phase, thereby inferring the shape information of the coronary arteries using the model corresponding to its phase. Our experiments show that our motion modeling system can achieve promising results with real-time performance.

  9. Measurement of food volume based on single 2-D image without conventional camera calibration.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yaofeng; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui

    2012-01-01

    Food portion size measurement combined with a database of calories and nutrients is important in the study of metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. In this work, we present a convenient and accurate approach to the calculation of food volume by measuring several dimensions using a single 2-D image as the input. This approach does not require the conventional checkerboard based camera calibration since it is burdensome in practice. The only prior requirements of our approach are: 1) a circular container with a known size, such as a plate, a bowl or a cup, is present in the image, and 2) the picture is taken under a reasonable assumption that the camera is always held level with respect to its left and right sides and its lens is tilted down towards foods on the dining table. We show that, under these conditions, our approach provides a closed form solution to camera calibration, allowing convenient measurement of food portion size using digital pictures.

  10. Image-Processing Educator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Apple Image-Processing Educator (AIPE) explores ability of microcomputers to provide personalized computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in digital image processing of remotely sensed images. AIPE is "proof-of-concept" system, not polished production system. User-friendly prompts provide access to explanations of common features of digital image processing and of sample programs that implement these features.

  11. Integrated circuits for volumetric ultrasound imaging with 2-D CMUT arrays.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Anshuman; Choe, Jung Woo; Lee, Byung Chul; Wygant, Ira O; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Ömer; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2013-12-01

    Real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging systems require transmit and receive circuitry to generate ultrasound beams and process received echo signals. The complexity of building such a system is high due to requirement of the front-end electronics needing to be very close to the transducer. A large number of elements also need to be interfaced to the back-end system and image processing of a large dataset could affect the imaging volume rate. In this work, we present a 3-D imaging system using capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technology that addresses many of the challenges in building such a system. We demonstrate two approaches in integrating the transducer and the front-end electronics. The transducer is a 5-MHz CMUT array with an 8 mm × 8 mm aperture size. The aperture consists of 1024 elements (32 × 32) with an element pitch of 250 μm. An integrated circuit (IC) consists of a transmit beamformer and receive circuitry to improve the noise performance of the overall system. The assembly was interfaced with an FPGA and a back-end system (comprising of a data acquisition system and PC). The FPGA provided the digital I/O signals for the IC and the back-end system was used to process the received RF echo data (from the IC) and reconstruct the volume image using a phased array imaging approach. Imaging experiments were performed using wire and spring targets, a ventricle model and a human prostrate. Real-time volumetric images were captured at 5 volumes per second and are presented in this paper.

  12. Implementation, study and calibration of a modified ASM2d for the simulation of SBR processes.

    PubMed

    Marsili Libelli, S; Ratini, P; Spagni, A; Bortone, G

    2001-01-01

    An enhanced process model for SBRs has been developed. Though the basic mechanism largely draws on the Activated Sludge Model n. 2d, its new features are the splitting of the nitrification stage in a two-step process, according to the well known Nitrosomonas-Nitrobacter oxidation sequence, and an improved XPAO dynamics, involved in the anaerobic/aerobic phosphorus removal process. The model was implemented through the DLL technique allowing complied C++ modules to be linked to an ordinary Simulink block diagram. The static sensitivity study revealed that if the parameter vector is partitioned into subsets of biologically related parameters and calibrated separately, the calibration procedure does not present particularly difficult aspects. Trajectory sensitivity showed also to which extent data collection could be optimised in order to improve calibration accuracy. The study of the shape of the error functional generated by parameters couples allows a much more effective calibration strategy.

  13. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D–2D image registration

    PubMed Central

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM = 0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p < 0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE—e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE = 0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p < 0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is applicable to situations where conventional

  14. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-07

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a 'self-calibration' of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM-e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE-e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  15. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G. J.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE—e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  16. Interferometry based multispectral photon-limited 2D and 3D integral image encryption employing the Hartley transform.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, Inbarasan; Guo, Changliang; Lee, Byung-Geun; Sheridan, John T

    2015-06-15

    We present a method of securing multispectral 3D photon-counted integral imaging (PCII) using classical Hartley Transform (HT) based encryption by employing optical interferometry. This method has the simultaneous advantages of minimizing complexity by eliminating the need for holography recording and addresses the phase sensitivity problem encountered when using digital cameras. These together with single-channel multispectral 3D data compactness, the inherent properties of the classical photon counting detection model, i.e. sparse sensing and the capability for nonlinear transformation, permits better authentication of the retrieved 3D scene at various depth cues. Furthermore, the proposed technique works for both spatially and temporally incoherent illumination. To validate the proposed technique simulations were carried out for both the 2D and 3D cases. Experimental data is processed and the results support the feasibility of the encryption method.

  17. Preparation of 2D sequences of corneal images for 3D model building.

    PubMed

    Elbita, Abdulhakim; Qahwaji, Rami; Ipson, Stanley; Sharif, Mhd Saeed; Ghanchi, Faruque

    2014-04-01

    A confocal microscope provides a sequence of images, at incremental depths, of the various corneal layers and structures. From these, medical practioners can extract clinical information on the state of health of the patient's cornea. In this work we are addressing problems associated with capturing and processing these images including blurring, non-uniform illumination and noise, as well as the displacement of images laterally and in the anterior-posterior direction caused by subject movement. The latter may cause some of the captured images to be out of sequence in terms of depth. In this paper we introduce automated algorithms for classification, reordering, registration and segmentation to solve these problems. The successful implementation of these algorithms could open the door for another interesting development, which is the 3D modelling of these sequences.

  18. Determining ice water content from 2D crystal images in convective cloud systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Delphine; Coutris, Pierre; Fontaine, Emmanuel; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter

    2016-04-01

    Cloud microphysical in-situ instrumentation measures bulk parameters like total water content (TWC) and/or derives particle size distributions (PSD) (utilizing optical spectrometers and optical array probes (OAP)). The goal of this work is to introduce a comprehensive methodology to compute TWC from OAP measurements, based on the dataset collected during recent HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals)/HIWC (High Ice Water Content) field campaigns. Indeed, the HAIC/HIWC field campaigns in Darwin (2014) and Cayenne (2015) provide a unique opportunity to explore the complex relationship between cloud particle mass and size in ice crystal environments. Numerous mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) were sampled with the French Falcon 20 research aircraft at different temperature levels from -10°C up to 50°C. The aircraft instrumentation included an IKP-2 (isokinetic probe) to get reliable measurements of TWC and the optical array probes 2D-S and PIP recording images over the entire ice crystal size range. Based on the known principle relating crystal mass and size with a power law (m=α•Dβ), Fontaine et al. (2014) performed extended 3D crystal simulations and thereby demonstrated that it is possible to estimate the value of the exponent β from OAP data, by analyzing the surface-size relationship for the 2D images as a function of time. Leroy et al. (2015) proposed an extended version of this method that produces estimates of β from the analysis of both the surface-size and perimeter-size relationships. Knowing the value of β, α then is deduced from the simultaneous IKP-2 TWC measurements for the entire HAIC/HIWC dataset. The statistical analysis of α and β values for the HAIC/HIWC dataset firstly shows that α is closely linked to β and that this link changes with temperature. From these trends, a generalized parameterization for α is proposed. Finally, the comparison with the initial IKP-2 measurements demonstrates that the method is able to predict TWC values

  19. Image Outlier Detection and Feature Extraction via L1-Norm-Based 2D Probabilistic PCA.

    PubMed

    Ju, Fujiao; Sun, Yanfeng; Gao, Junbin; Hu, Yongli; Yin, Baocai

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces an L1-norm-based probabilistic principal component analysis model on 2D data (L1-2DPPCA) based on the assumption of the Laplacian noise model. The Laplacian or L1 density function can be expressed as a superposition of an infinite number of Gaussian distributions. Under this expression, a Bayesian inference can be established based on the variational expectation maximization approach. All the key parameters in the probabilistic model can be learned by the proposed variational algorithm. It has experimentally been demonstrated that the newly introduced hidden variables in the superposition can serve as an effective indicator for data outliers. Experiments on some publicly available databases show that the performance of L1-2DPPCA has largely been improved after identifying and removing sample outliers, resulting in more accurate image reconstruction than the existing PCA-based methods. The performance of feature extraction of the proposed method generally outperforms other existing algorithms in terms of reconstruction errors and classification accuracy.

  20. Large resistive 2D Micromegas with genetic multiplexing and some imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouteille, S.; Attié, D.; Baron, P.; Calvet, D.; Magnier, P.; Mandjavidze, I.; Procureur, S.; Riallot, M.

    2016-10-01

    The performance of the first large resistive Micromegas detectors with 2D readout and genetic multiplexing is presented. These detectors have a 50 × 50cm2 active area and are equipped with 1024 strips both in X- and Y-directions. The same genetic multiplexing pattern is applied on both coordinates, resulting in the compression of signals on 2 × 61 readout channels. Four such detectors have been built at CERN, and extensively tested with cosmics. The resistive strip film allows for very high gain operation, compensating for the charge spread on the 2 dimensions as well as the S / N loss due to the huge, 1 nF input capacitance. This film also creates a significantly different signal shape in the X- and Y-coordinates due to the charge evacuation along the resistive strips. All in all a detection efficiency above 95% is achieved with a 1 cm drift gap. Though not yet optimal, the measured 300 μm spatial resolution allows for very precise imaging in the field of muon tomography, and some applications of these detectors are presented.

  1. Substorm development as observed by Interball UV imager and 2-D magnetic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyatsky, W.; Cogger, L. L.; Jackel, B.; Hamza, A. M.; Hughes, W. J.; Murr, D.; Rasmussen, O.

    2001-10-01

    Results of the study of two substorms from Interball auroral UV measurements and two-dimensional patterns of equivalent ionospheric currents derived from the MACCS/CANOPUS and Greenland magnetometer arrays are presented. Substorm development in 2-D equivalent ionospheric current patterns may be described in terms of the formation of two vortices in the equivalent currents: a morning vortex related to downward field-aligned current and an evening vortex related to upward field-aligned current. Poleward propagation of the magnetic disturbances during substorm expansive phase was found to be associated mainly with a poleward displacement of the morning vortex, whereas the evening vortex remained approximately at the same position. As a result, the initial quasi-azimuthal separation of the vortices was replaced by their quasi-meridional separation at substorm maximum. Interball UV images during this period showed the formation of a bright auroral border at the poleward edge of substorm auroral bulge. The auroral UV images showed also that the auroral distribution in the region between the polar border and the main auroral oval tends to have a form of bubbles or petals growing from a bright protuberant region on the equatorward boundary of the auroral oval. However, the resolution of the UV imager was not sufficient for the reliable separation of such the structures, therefore, this result should be considered as preliminary. Overlapping of the auroral UV images onto equivalent current patterns shows that the bright substorm surge was well collocated with the evening vortex whereas the poleward auroral border did not coincide with any evident feature in equivalent ionospheric currents and was located several degrees equatorward of the morning current vortex center related to downward field-aligned current. The ground-based magnetic array allowing us to obtain instantaneous patterns of equivalent ionospheric currents gives a possibility to propose a new index for

  2. Parametric phase information based 2D Cepstrum PSF estimation method for blind de-convolution of ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jooyoung; Park, Sung-Chan; Kim, Jung-ho; Song, Jongkeun

    2014-02-01

    In the ultrasound imaging system, blurring which occurs after passing through ultrasound scanner system, represents point spread function (PSF) that describes the response of the ultrasound imaging system to a point source distribution. So, de-blurring can be achieved by de-convolving the ultrasound images with an estimated of corresponding PSF. However, it is hard to attain an accurate estimation of PSF due to the unknown properties of the tissues of the human body through the ultrasound signal propagates. In this paper, we present a new method for PSF estimation in the Fourier domain (FD) based on parametric minimum phase information, and simultaneously, it performs fast 2D de-convolution in the ultrasound imaging system. Although most of complex cepstrum methods [14], are obtained using complex 2D phase unwrapping [18] [19] in order to estimate the FD-phase information of PSF, our algorithm estimates the 2D PSF using 2D FD-phase information with the parametric weighting factor α and β. They affect the feature of PSF shapes.This makes the computations much simpler and the estimation more accurate. Our algorithm works on the beam-formed uncompressed radio-frequency data, with pre-measured and estimated 2D PSFs database from actual probe used. We have tested our algorithm with vera-sonic system and commercial ultrasound scanner (Philips C4-2), in known speed of sound phantoms and unknown speeds in vivo scans.

  3. Multispectral imaging and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Julie

    2014-02-01

    The color accuracy of conventional RGB cameras is not sufficient for many color-critical applications. One of these applications, namely the measurement of color defects in yarns, is why Prof. Til Aach and the Institute of Image Processing and Computer Vision (RWTH Aachen University, Germany) started off with multispectral imaging. The first acquisition device was a camera using a monochrome sensor and seven bandpass color filters positioned sequentially in front of it. The camera allowed sampling the visible wavelength range more accurately and reconstructing the spectra for each acquired image position. An overview will be given over several optical and imaging aspects of the multispectral camera that have been investigated. For instance, optical aberrations caused by filters and camera lens deteriorate the quality of captured multispectral images. The different aberrations were analyzed thoroughly and compensated based on models for the optical elements and the imaging chain by utilizing image processing. With this compensation, geometrical distortions disappear and sharpness is enhanced, without reducing the color accuracy of multispectral images. Strong foundations in multispectral imaging were laid and a fruitful cooperation was initiated with Prof. Bernhard Hill. Current research topics like stereo multispectral imaging and goniometric multispectral measure- ments that are further explored with his expertise will also be presented in this work.

  4. Tropical Oceanic Precipitation Processes over Warm Pool: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.- K.; Johnson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Rainfall is a key link in the hydrologic cycle as well as the primary heat source for the atmosphere, The vertical distribution of convective latent-heat release modulates the large-scale circulations of the tropics, Furthermore, changes in the moisture distribution at middle and upper levels of the troposphere can affect cloud distributions and cloud liquid water and ice contents. How the incoming solar and outgoing longwave radiation respond to these changes in clouds is a major factor in assessing climate change. Present large-scale weather and climate models simulate cloud processes only crudely, reducing confidence in their predictions on both global and regional scales. One of the most promising methods to test physical parameterizations used in General Circulation Models (GCMS) and climate models is to use field observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and physically realistic parameterizations of cloud microphysical processes, and allow for their complex interactions with solar and infrared radiative transfer processes. The CRMs can reasonably well resolve the evolution, structure, and life cycles of individual clouds and cloud systems, The major objective of this paper is to investigate the latent heating, moisture and momenti,im budgets associated with several convective systems developed during the TOGA COARE IFA - westerly wind burst event (late December, 1992). The tool for this study is the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (CCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysical scheme, The model domain contains 256 x 256 grid points (using 2 km resolution) in the horizontal and 38 grid points (to a depth of 22 km depth) in the vertical, The 2D domain has 1024 grid points. The simulations are performed over a 7 day time period. We will examine (1) the precipitation processes (i.e., condensation/evaporation) and their interaction with warm pool; (2) the heating and moisture budgets in the convective and

  5. Wound Measurement Techniques: Comparing the Use of Ruler Method, 2D Imaging and 3D Scanner.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aj; Wollak, C; Shah, J B

    2013-12-01

    The statistics on the growing number of non-healing wounds is alarming. In the United States, chronic wounds affect 6.5 million patients. An estimated US $25 billion is spent annually on treatment of chronic wounds and the burden is rapidly growing due to increasing health care costs, an aging population and a sharp rise in the incidence of diabetes and obesity worldwide.(1) Accurate wound measurement techniques will help health care personnel to monitor the wounds which will indirectly help improving care.(7,9) The clinical practice of measuring wounds has not improved even today.(2,3) A common method like the ruler method to measure wounds has poor interrater and intrarater reliability.(2,3) Measuring the greatest length by the greatest width perpendicular to the greatest length, the perpendicular method, is more valid and reliable than other ruler based methods.(2) Another common method like acetate tracing is more accurate than the ruler method but still has its disadvantages. These common measurement techniques are time consuming with variable inaccuracies. In this study, volumetric measurements taken with a non-contact 3-D scanner are benchmarked against the common ruler method, acetate grid tracing, and 2-D image planimetry volumetric measurement technique. A liquid volumetric fill method is used as the control volume. Results support the hypothesis that the 3-D scanner consistently shows accurate volumetric measurements in comparison to standard volumetric measurements obtained by the waterfill technique (average difference of 11%). The 3-D scanner measurement technique was found more reliable and valid compared to other three techniques, the ruler method (average difference of 75%), acetate grid tracing (average difference of 41%), and 2D planimetric measurements (average difference of 52%). Acetate tracing showed more accurate measurements compared to the ruler method (average difference of 41% (acetate tracing) compared to 75% (ruler method)). Improving

  6. Wound Measurement Techniques: Comparing the Use of Ruler Method, 2D Imaging and 3D Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aj; Wollak, C.; Shah, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    The statistics on the growing number of non-healing wounds is alarming. In the United States, chronic wounds affect 6.5 million patients. An estimated US $25 billion is spent annually on treatment of chronic wounds and the burden is rapidly growing due to increasing health care costs, an aging population and a sharp rise in the incidence of diabetes and obesity worldwide.1 Accurate wound measurement techniques will help health care personnel to monitor the wounds which will indirectly help improving care.7,9 The clinical practice of measuring wounds has not improved even today.2,3 A common method like the ruler method to measure wounds has poor interrater and intrarater reliability.2,3 Measuring the greatest length by the greatest width perpendicular to the greatest length, the perpendicular method, is more valid and reliable than other ruler based methods.2 Another common method like acetate tracing is more accurate than the ruler method but still has its disadvantages. These common measurement techniques are time consuming with variable inaccuracies. In this study, volumetric measurements taken with a non-contact 3-D scanner are benchmarked against the common ruler method, acetate grid tracing, and 2-D image planimetry volumetric measurement technique. A liquid volumetric fill method is used as the control volume. Results support the hypothesis that the 3-D scanner consistently shows accurate volumetric measurements in comparison to standard volumetric measurements obtained by the waterfill technique (average difference of 11%). The 3-D scanner measurement technique was found more reliable and valid compared to other three techniques, the ruler method (average difference of 75%), acetate grid tracing (average difference of 41%), and 2D planimetric measurements (average difference of 52%). Acetate tracing showed more accurate measurements compared to the ruler method (average difference of 41% (acetate tracing) compared to 75% (ruler method)). Improving the

  7. Multifractal and Singularity Maps of soil surface moisture distribution derived from 2D image analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbrera, Ramiro; Millán, Humberto; Martín-Sotoca, Juan Jose; Pérez Soto, Luis; Sanchez, Maria Elena; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    methods for mapping geochemical anomalies caused by buried sources and for predicting undiscovered mineral deposits in covered areas. Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 122, 55-70. Cumbrera, R., Ana M. Tarquis, Gabriel Gascó, Humberto Millán (2012) Fractal scaling of apparent soil moisture estimated from vertical planes of Vertisol pit images. Journal of Hydrology (452-453), 205-212. Martin Sotoca; J.J. Antonio Saa-Requejo, Juan Grau and Ana M. Tarquis (2016). Segmentation of singularity maps in the context of soil porosity. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 18, EGU2016-11402. Millán, H., Cumbrera, R. and Ana M. Tarquis (2016) Multifractal and Levy-stable statistics of soil surface moisture distribution derived from 2D image analysis. Applied Mathematical Modelling, 40(3), 2384-2395.

  8. Registration of 2D to 3D joint images using phase-based mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi, Rupin; Abugharbieh, Rafeef; Pickering, Mark; Scarvell, Jennie; Smith, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Registration of two dimensional to three dimensional orthopaedic medical image data has important applications particularly in the area of image guided surgery and sports medicine. Fluoroscopy to computer tomography (CT) registration is an important case, wherein digitally reconstructed radiographs derived from the CT data are registered to the fluoroscopy data. Traditional registration metrics such as intensity-based mutual information (MI) typically work well but often suffer from gross misregistration errors when the image to be registered contains a partial view of the anatomy visible in the target image. Phase-based MI provides a robust alternative similarity measure which, in addition to possessing the general robustness and noise immunity that MI provides, also employs local phase information in the registration process which makes it less susceptible to the aforementioned errors. In this paper, we propose using the complex wavelet transform for computing image phase information and incorporating that into a phase-based MI measure for image registration. Tests on a CT volume and 6 fluoroscopy images of the knee are presented. The femur and the tibia in the CT volume were individually registered to the fluoroscopy images using intensity-based MI, gradient-based MI and phase-based MI. Errors in the coordinates of fiducials present in the bone structures were used to assess the accuracy of the different registration schemes. Quantitative results demonstrate that the performance of intensity-based MI was the worst. Gradient-based MI performed slightly better, while phase-based MI results were the best consistently producing the lowest errors.

  9. Transverse Strains in Muscle Fascicles during Voluntary Contraction: A 2D Frequency Decomposition of B-Mode Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Wakeling, James M.

    2014-01-01

    When skeletal muscle fibres shorten, they must increase in their transverse dimensions in order to maintain a constant volume. In pennate muscle, this transverse expansion results in the fibres rotating to greater pennation angle, with a consequent reduction in their contractile velocity in a process known as gearing. Understanding the nature and extent of this transverse expansion is necessary to understand the mechanisms driving the changes in internal geometry of whole muscles during contraction. Current methodologies allow the fascicle lengths, orientations, and curvatures to be quantified, but not the transverse expansion. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate techniques for quantifying transverse strain in skeletal muscle fascicles during contraction from B-mode ultrasound images. Images were acquired from the medial and lateral gastrocnemii during cyclic contractions, enhanced using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering and the spatial frequencies resolved using 2D discrete Fourier transforms. The frequency information was resolved into the fascicle orientations that were validated against manually digitized values. The transverse fascicle strains were calculated from their wavelengths within the images. These methods showed that the transverse strain increases while the longitudinal fascicle length decreases; however, the extent of these strains was smaller than expected. PMID:25328509

  10. Application of conformal map theory for design of 2-D ultrasonic array structure for NDT imaging application: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, Sivaram N; Jackson, Joseph C; Dziewierz, Jerzy; O'Leary, Richard; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasonic phased arrays are becoming increasingly popular in nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Sparse array element configurations are required to fully exploit the potential benefits of 2-D phased arrays. This paper applies the conformal mapping technique as a means of designing sparse 2-D array layouts for NDE applications. Modeling using both Huygens' field prediction theory and 2-D fast Fourier transformation is employed to study the resulting new structure. A conformal power map was used that, for fixed beam width, was shown in simulations to have a greater contrast than rectangular or random arrays. A prototype aperiodic 2-D array configuration for direct contact operation in steel, with operational frequency ~3 MHz, was designed using the array design principle described in this paper. Experimental results demonstrate a working sparse-array transducer capable of performing volumetric imaging.

  11. Register cardiac fiber orientations from 3D DTI volume to 2D ultrasound image of rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound or echocardiography is one of the most widely used examinations for the diagnosis of cardiac diseases. However, it only supplies the geometric and structural information of the myocardium. In order to supply more detailed microstructure information of the myocardium, this paper proposes a registration method to map cardiac fiber orientations from three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) volume to the 2D ultrasound image. It utilizes a 2D/3D intensity based registration procedure including rigid, log-demons, and affine transformations to search the best similar slice from the template volume. After registration, the cardiac fiber orientations are mapped to the 2D ultrasound image via fiber relocations and reorientations. This method was validated by six images of rat hearts ex vivo. The evaluation results indicated that the final Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) achieved more than 90% after geometric registrations; and the inclination angle errors (IAE) between the mapped fiber orientations and the gold standards were less than 15 degree. This method may provide a practical tool for cardiologists to examine cardiac fiber orientations on ultrasound images and have the potential to supply additional information for diagnosis of cardiac diseases.

  12. Toward an Efficient Icing CFD Process Using an Interactive Software Toolkit: Smagglce 2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Choo, Yung K.; Schilling, Herbert W.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Cotton, Barbara J.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional CID analysis for iced airfoils can be a labor-intensive task. The software toolkit SmaggIce 2D is being developed to help streamline the CID process and provide the unique features needed for icing. When complete, it will include a combination of partially automated and fully interactive tools for all aspects of the tasks leading up to the flow analysis: geometry preparation, domain decomposition. block boundary demoralization. gridding, and linking with a flow solver. It also includes tools to perform ice shape characterization, an important aid in determining the relationship between ice characteristics and their effects on aerodynamic performance. Completed tools, work-in-progress, and planned features of the software toolkit are presented here.

  13. Toward an Efficient Icing CFD Process Using an Interactive Software Toolkit--SmaggIce 2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Choo, Yung K.; Schilling, Herbert W.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Cotton, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    Two-dimensional CFD analysis for iced airfoils can be a labor-intensive task. The software toolkit SmaggIce 2D is being developed to help streamline the CFD process and provide the unique features needed for icing. When complete, it will include a combination of partially automated and fully interactive tools for all aspects of the tasks leading up to the flow analysis: geometry preparation, domain decomposition, block boundary discretization. gridding, and linking with a flow solver. It also includes tools to perform ice shape characterization, an important aid in determining the relationship between ice characteristics and their effects on aerodynamic performance. Completed tools, work-in-progress, and planned features of the software toolkit are presented here.

  14. Registration of 2D x-ray images to 3D MRI by generating pseudo-CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Gounis, M. J.; van de Kraats, E. B.; Sprinkhuizen, S. M.; Timmer, J.; Homan, R.; Bartels, L. W.

    2011-02-01

    Spatial and soft tissue information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can be very valuable during image-guided procedures, where usually only real-time two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images are available. Registration of 2D x-ray images to three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, acquired prior to the procedure, can provide optimal information to guide the procedure. However, registering x-ray images to MRI data is not a trivial task because of their fundamental difference in tissue contrast. This paper presents a technique that generates pseudo-computed tomography (CT) data from multi-spectral MRI acquisitions which is sufficiently similar to real CT data to enable registration of x-ray to MRI with comparable accuracy as registration of x-ray to CT. The method is based on a k-nearest-neighbors (kNN)-regression strategy which labels voxels of MRI data with CT Hounsfield Units. The regression method uses multi-spectral MRI intensities and intensity gradients as features to discriminate between various tissue types. The efficacy of using pseudo-CT data for registration of x-ray to MRI was tested on ex vivo animal data. 2D-3D registration experiments using CT and pseudo-CT data of multiple subjects were performed with a commonly used 2D-3D registration algorithm. On average, the median target registration error for registration of two x-ray images to MRI data was approximately 1 mm larger than for x-ray to CT registration. The authors have shown that pseudo-CT data generated from multi-spectral MRI facilitate registration of MRI to x-ray images. From the experiments it could be concluded that the accuracy achieved was comparable to that of registering x-ray images to CT data.

  15. Spectroscopic-tomography of biological membrane with high-spatial resolution by the imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Asuka; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Qi, Wei; Takuma, Takashi; Ishimaru, Ichirou

    2011-07-01

    We proposed the imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy that is the phase-shift interferometry between the objective lights. The proposed method can measure the 2D spectral image at the limited depth. Because of the imaging optical system, the 2D spectral images can be measured in high spatial resolution. And in the depth direction, we can get the spectral distribution only in the focal plane. In this report, we mention about the principle of the proposed wide field imaging-type 2D Fourier spectroscopy. And, we obtained the spectroscopic tomography of biological tissue of mouse's ear. In the visible region, we confirmed the difference of spectral characteristics between blood vessel region and other region. In the near infrared region (λ=900nm~1700nm), we can obtain the high-contrast blood vessel image of mouse's ear in the deeper part by InGaAs camera. Furthermore, in the middle infrared region(λ=8μ~14μm), we have successfully measured the radiation spectroscopic-imaging with wild field of view by the infrared module, such as the house plants. Additionally, we propose correction geometrical model that can convert the mechanical phase-shift value into the substantial phase difference in each oblique optical axes. We successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed correction geometrical model and can reduce the spectral error into the error range into +/-3nm using the He-Ne laser whose wavelength 632.8nm.

  16. 2D/4D marker-free tumor tracking using 4D CBCT as the reference image.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengjiao; Sharp, Gregory C; Rit, Simon; Delmon, Vivien; Wang, Guangzhi

    2014-05-07

    Tumor motion caused by respiration is an important issue in image-guided radiotherapy. A 2D/4D matching method between 4D volumes derived from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 2D fluoroscopic images was implemented to track the tumor motion without the use of implanted markers. In this method, firstly, 3DCBCT and phase-rebinned 4DCBCT are reconstructed from cone beam acquisition. Secondly, 4DCBCT volumes and a streak-free 3DCBCT volume are combined to improve the image quality of the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Finally, the 2D/4D matching problem is converted into a 2D/2D matching between incoming projections and DRR images from each phase of the 4DCBCT. The diaphragm is used as a target surrogate for matching instead of using the tumor position directly. This relies on the assumption that if a patient has the same breathing phase and diaphragm position as the reference 4DCBCT, then the tumor position is the same. From the matching results, the phase information, diaphragm position and tumor position at the time of each incoming projection acquisition can be derived. The accuracy of this method was verified using 16 candidate datasets, representing lung and liver applications and one-minute and two-minute acquisitions. The criteria for the eligibility of datasets were described: 11 eligible datasets were selected to verify the accuracy of diaphragm tracking, and one eligible dataset was chosen to verify the accuracy of tumor tracking. The diaphragm matching accuracy was 1.88 ± 1.35 mm in the isocenter plane and the 2D tumor tracking accuracy was 2.13 ± 1.26 mm in the isocenter plane. These features make this method feasible for real-time marker-free tumor motion tracking purposes.

  17. Development of fast patient position verification software using 2D-3D image registration and its clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kumagai, Motoki; Miki, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Riki; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    To improve treatment workflow, we developed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-based patient positional verification software application and integrated it into carbon-ion scanning beam treatment. Here, we evaluated the basic performance of the software. The algorithm provides 2D/3D registration matching using CT and orthogonal X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) images. The participants were 53 patients with tumors of the head and neck, prostate or lung receiving carbon-ion beam treatment. 2D/3D-ITchi-Gime (ITG) calculation accuracy was evaluated in terms of computation time and registration accuracy. Registration calculation was determined using the similarity measurement metrics gradient difference (GD), normalized mutual information (NMI), zero-mean normalized cross-correlation (ZNCC), and their combination. Registration accuracy was dependent on the particular metric used. Representative examples were determined to have target registration error (TRE) = 0.45 ± 0.23 mm and angular error (AE) = 0.35 ± 0.18° with ZNCC + GD for a head and neck tumor; TRE = 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and AE = 0.16 ± 0.07° with ZNCC for a pelvic tumor; and TRE = 1.19 ± 0.78 mm and AE = 0.83 ± 0.61° with ZNCC for lung tumor. Calculation time was less than 7.26 s.The new registration software has been successfully installed and implemented in our treatment process. We expect that it will improve both treatment workflow and treatment accuracy. PMID:26081313

  18. Development of fast patient position verification software using 2D-3D image registration and its clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kumagai, Motoki; Miki, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Riki; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-09-01

    To improve treatment workflow, we developed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-based patient positional verification software application and integrated it into carbon-ion scanning beam treatment. Here, we evaluated the basic performance of the software. The algorithm provides 2D/3D registration matching using CT and orthogonal X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) images. The participants were 53 patients with tumors of the head and neck, prostate or lung receiving carbon-ion beam treatment. 2D/3D-ITchi-Gime (ITG) calculation accuracy was evaluated in terms of computation time and registration accuracy. Registration calculation was determined using the similarity measurement metrics gradient difference (GD), normalized mutual information (NMI), zero-mean normalized cross-correlation (ZNCC), and their combination. Registration accuracy was dependent on the particular metric used. Representative examples were determined to have target registration error (TRE) = 0.45 ± 0.23 mm and angular error (AE) = 0.35 ± 0.18° with ZNCC + GD for a head and neck tumor; TRE = 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and AE = 0.16 ± 0.07° with ZNCC for a pelvic tumor; and TRE = 1.19 ± 0.78 mm and AE = 0.83 ± 0.61° with ZNCC for lung tumor. Calculation time was less than 7.26 s.The new registration software has been successfully installed and implemented in our treatment process. We expect that it will improve both treatment workflow and treatment accuracy.

  19. Integral equation analysis and optimization of 2D layered nanolithography masks by complex images Green's function technique in TM polarization.

    PubMed

    Haghtalab, Mohammad; Faraji-Dana, Reza

    2012-05-01

    Analysis and optimization of diffraction effects in nanolithography through multilayered media with a fast and accurate field-theoretical approach is presented. The scattered field through an arbitrary two-dimensional (2D) mask pattern in multilayered media illuminated by a TM-polarized incident wave is determined by using an electric field integral equation formulation. In this formulation the electric field is represented in terms of complex images Green's functions. The method of moments is then employed to solve the resulting integral equation. In this way an accurate and computationally efficient approximate method is achieved. The accuracy of the proposed method is vindicated through comparison with direct numerical integration results. Moreover, the comparison is made between the results obtained by the proposed method and those obtained by the full-wave finite-element method. The ray tracing method is combined with the proposed method to describe the imaging process in the lithography. The simulated annealing algorithm is then employed to solve the inverse problem, i.e., to design an optimized mask pattern to improve the resolution. Two binary mask patterns under normal incident coherent illumination are designed by this method, where it is shown that the subresolution features improve the critical dimension significantly.

  20. WASI-2D: A software tool for regionally optimized analysis of imaging spectrometer data from deep and shallow waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gege, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An image processing software has been developed which allows quantitative analysis of multi- and hyperspectral data from oceanic, coastal and inland waters. It has been implemented into the Water Colour Simulator WASI, which is a tool for the simulation and analysis of optical properties and light field parameters of deep and shallow waters. The new module WASI-2D can import atmospherically corrected images from airborne sensors and satellite instruments in various data formats and units like remote sensing reflectance or radiance. It can be easily adapted by the user to different sensors and to optical properties of the studied area. Data analysis is done by inverse modelling using established analytical models. The bio-optical model of the water column accounts for gelbstoff (coloured dissolved organic matter, CDOM), detritus, and mixtures of up to 6 phytoplankton classes and 2 spectrally different types of suspended matter. The reflectance of the sea floor is treated as sum of up to 6 substrate types. An analytic model of downwelling irradiance allows wavelength dependent modelling of sun glint and sky glint at the water surface. The provided database covers the spectral range from 350 to 1000 nm in 1 nm intervals. It can be exchanged easily to represent the optical properties of water constituents, bottom types and the atmosphere of the studied area.

  1. Hyperspectral image processing methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral image processing refers to the use of computer algorithms to extract, store and manipulate both spatial and spectral information contained in hyperspectral images across the visible and near-infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. A typical hyperspectral image processing work...

  2. A GPU Simulation Tool for Training and Optimisation in 2D Digital X-Ray Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gallio, Elena; Rampado, Osvaldo; Gianaria, Elena; Bianchi, Silvio Diego; Ropolo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiology is performed by means of digital detectors, with various types of technology and different performance in terms of efficiency and image quality. Following the arrival of a new digital detector in a radiology department, all the staff involved should adapt the procedure parameters to the properties of the detector, in order to achieve an optimal result in terms of correct diagnostic information and minimum radiation risks for the patient. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a software capable of simulating a digital X-ray imaging system, using graphics processing unit computing. All radiological image components were implemented in this application: an X-ray tube with primary beam, a virtual patient, noise, scatter radiation, a grid and a digital detector. Three different digital detectors (two digital radiography and a computed radiography systems) were implemented. In order to validate the software, we carried out a quantitative comparison of geometrical and anthropomorphic phantom simulated images with those acquired. In terms of average pixel values, the maximum differences were below 15%, while the noise values were in agreement with a maximum difference of 20%. The relative trends of contrast to noise ratio versus beam energy and intensity were well simulated. Total calculation times were below 3 seconds for clinical images with pixel size of actual dimensions less than 0.2 mm. The application proved to be efficient and realistic. Short calculation times and the accuracy of the results obtained make this software a useful tool for training operators and dose optimisation studies.

  3. A GPU Simulation Tool for Training and Optimisation in 2D Digital X-Ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gallio, Elena; Rampado, Osvaldo; Gianaria, Elena; Bianchi, Silvio Diego; Ropolo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiology is performed by means of digital detectors, with various types of technology and different performance in terms of efficiency and image quality. Following the arrival of a new digital detector in a radiology department, all the staff involved should adapt the procedure parameters to the properties of the detector, in order to achieve an optimal result in terms of correct diagnostic information and minimum radiation risks for the patient. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a software capable of simulating a digital X-ray imaging system, using graphics processing unit computing. All radiological image components were implemented in this application: an X-ray tube with primary beam, a virtual patient, noise, scatter radiation, a grid and a digital detector. Three different digital detectors (two digital radiography and a computed radiography systems) were implemented. In order to validate the software, we carried out a quantitative comparison of geometrical and anthropomorphic phantom simulated images with those acquired. In terms of average pixel values, the maximum differences were below 15%, while the noise values were in agreement with a maximum difference of 20%. The relative trends of contrast to noise ratio versus beam energy and intensity were well simulated. Total calculation times were below 3 seconds for clinical images with pixel size of actual dimensions less than 0.2 mm. The application proved to be efficient and realistic. Short calculation times and the accuracy of the results obtained make this software a useful tool for training operators and dose optimisation studies. PMID:26545097

  4. Modeling of 2D diffusion processes based on microscopy data: parameter estimation and practical identifiability analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diffusion is a key component of many biological processes such as chemotaxis, developmental differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. Since recently, the spatial gradients caused by diffusion can be assessed in-vitro and in-vivo using microscopy based imaging techniques. The resulting time-series of two dimensional, high-resolutions images in combination with mechanistic models enable the quantitative analysis of the underlying mechanisms. However, such a model-based analysis is still challenging due to measurement noise and sparse observations, which result in uncertainties of the model parameters. Methods We introduce a likelihood function for image-based measurements with log-normal distributed noise. Based upon this likelihood function we formulate the maximum likelihood estimation problem, which is solved using PDE-constrained optimization methods. To assess the uncertainty and practical identifiability of the parameters we introduce profile likelihoods for diffusion processes. Results and conclusion As proof of concept, we model certain aspects of the guidance of dendritic cells towards lymphatic vessels, an example for haptotaxis. Using a realistic set of artificial measurement data, we estimate the five kinetic parameters of this model and compute profile likelihoods. Our novel approach for the estimation of model parameters from image data as well as the proposed identifiability analysis approach is widely applicable to diffusion processes. The profile likelihood based method provides more rigorous uncertainty bounds in contrast to local approximation methods. PMID:24267545

  5. Serial grouping of 2D-image regions with object-based attention in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jeurissen, Danique; Self, Matthew W; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2016-01-01

    After an initial stage of local analysis within the retina and early visual pathways, the human visual system creates a structured representation of the visual scene by co-selecting image elements that are part of behaviorally relevant objects. The mechanisms underlying this perceptual organization process are only partially understood. We here investigate the time-course of perceptual grouping of two-dimensional image-regions by measuring the reaction times of human participants and report that it is associated with the gradual spread of object-based attention. Attention spreads fastest over large and homogeneous areas and is slowed down at locations that require small-scale processing. We find that the time-course of the object-based selection process is well explained by a 'growth-cone' model, which selects surface elements in an incremental, scale-dependent manner. We discuss how the visual cortical hierarchy can implement this scale-dependent spread of object-based attention, leveraging the different receptive field sizes in distinct cortical areas. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14320.001 PMID:27291188

  6. Quantification of tracer plume transport parameters in 2D saturated porous media by cross-borehole ERT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekmine, G.; Auradou, H.; Pessel, M.; Rayner, J. L.

    2017-04-01

    Cross-borehole ERT imaging was tested to quantify the average velocity and transport parameters of tracer plumes in saturated porous media. Seven tracer tests were performed at different flow rates and monitored by either a vertical or horizontal dipole-dipole ERT sequence. These sequences were tested to reconstruct the shape and temporally follow the spread of the tracer plumes through a background regularization procedure. Data sets were inverted with the same inversion parameters and 2D model sections of resistivity ratios were converted to tracer concentrations. Both array types provided an accurate estimation of the average pore velocity vz. The total mass Mtot recovered was always overestimated by the horizontal dipole-dipole and underestimated by the vertical dipole-dipole. The vertical dipole-dipole was however reliable to quantify the longitudinal dispersivity λz, while the horizontal dipole-dipole returned better estimation for the transverse component λx. λ and Mtot were mainly influenced by the 2D distribution of the cumulated electrical sensitivity and the Shadow Effects induced by the third dimension. The size reduction of the edge of the plume was also related to the inability of the inversion process to reconstruct sharp resistivity contrasts at the interface. Smoothing was counterbalanced by a non-realistic rise of the ERT concentrations around the centre of mass returning overpredicted total masses. A sensitivity analysis on the cementation factor m and the porosity ϕ demonstrated that a change in one of these parameters by 8% involved non negligible variations by 30 and 40% of the dispersion coefficients and mass recovery.

  7. Parallel asynchronous systems and image processing algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, D. D.; Perera, A. G. U.

    1989-01-01

    A new hardware approach to implementation of image processing algorithms is described. The approach is based on silicon devices which would permit an independent analog processing channel to be dedicated to evey pixel. A laminar architecture consisting of a stack of planar arrays of the device would form a two-dimensional array processor with a 2-D array of inputs located directly behind a focal plane detector array. A 2-D image data stream would propagate in neuronlike asynchronous pulse coded form through the laminar processor. Such systems would integrate image acquisition and image processing. Acquisition and processing would be performed concurrently as in natural vision systems. The research is aimed at implementation of algorithms, such as the intensity dependent summation algorithm and pyramid processing structures, which are motivated by the operation of natural vision systems. Implementation of natural vision algorithms would benefit from the use of neuronlike information coding and the laminar, 2-D parallel, vision system type architecture. Besides providing a neural network framework for implementation of natural vision algorithms, a 2-D parallel approach could eliminate the serial bottleneck of conventional processing systems. Conversion to serial format would occur only after raw intensity data has been substantially processed. An interesting challenge arises from the fact that the mathematical formulation of natural vision algorithms does not specify the means of implementation, so that hardware implementation poses intriguing questions involving vision science.

  8. Double-channel, frequency-steered acoustic transducer with 2-D imaging capabilities.

    PubMed

    Baravelli, Emanuele; Senesi, Matteo; Ruzzene, Massimo; De Marchi, Luca; Speciale, Nicolò

    2011-07-01

    A frequency-steerable acoustic transducer (FSAT) is employed for imaging of damage in plates through guided wave inspection. The FSAT is a shaped array with a spatial distribution that defines a spiral in wavenumber space. Its resulting frequency-dependent directional properties allow beam steering to be performed by a single two-channel device, which can be used for the imaging of a two-dimensional half-plane. Ad hoc signal processing algorithms are developed and applied to the localization of acoustic sources and scatterers when FSAT arrays are used as part of pitch-catch and pulse-echo configurations. Localization schemes rely on the spectrogram analysis of received signals upon dispersion compensation through frequency warping and the application of the frequency-angle map characteristic of FSAT. The effectiveness of FSAT designs and associated imaging schemes are demonstrated through numerical simulations and experiments. Preliminary experimental validation is performed by forming a discrete array through the points of the measurement grid of a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. The presented results demonstrate the frequency-dependent directionality of the spiral FSAT and suggest its application for frequency-selective acoustic sensors, for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the directional generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health.

  9. Sparse matrix beamforming and image reconstruction for real-time 2D HIFU monitoring using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) with in vitro validation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Gary Y.; Provost, Jean; Grondin, Julien; Wang, Shutao; Marquet, Fabrice; Bunting, Ethan; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method. HMIFU utilizes an Amplitude-Modulated (fAM = 25 Hz) HIFU beam to induce a localized focal oscillatory motion, which is simultaneously estimated and imaged by confocally-aligned imaging transducer. HMIFU feasibilities have been previously shown in silico, in vitro, and in vivo in 1-D or 2-D monitoring of HIFU treatment. The objective of this study is to develop and show the feasibility of a novel fast beamforming algorithm for image reconstruction using GPU-based sparse-matrix operation with real-time feedback. In this study, the algorithm was implemented onto a fully integrated, clinically relevant HMIFU system composed of a 93-element HIFU transducer (fcenter = 4.5MHz) and coaxially-aligned 64-element phased array (fcenter = 2.5MHz) for displacement excitation and motion estimation, respectively. A single transmit beam with divergent beam transmit was used while fast beamforming was implemented using a GPU-based delay-and-sum method and a sparse-matrix operation. Axial HMI displacements were then estimated from the RF signals using a 1-D normalized cross-correlation method and streamed to a graphic user interface. The present work developed and implemented a sparse matrix beamforming onto a fully-integrated, clinically relevant system, which can stream displacement images up to 15 Hz using a GPU-based processing, an increase of 100 fold in rate of streaming displacement images compared to conventional CPU-based conventional beamforming and reconstruction processing. The achieved feedback rate is also currently the fastest and only approach that does not require interrupting the HIFU treatment amongst the acoustic radiation force based HIFU imaging techniques. Results in phantom experiments showed reproducible displacement imaging, and monitoring of twenty two in vitro HIFU treatments using the new 2D system showed a

  10. 3D reconstruction of light flux distribution on arbitrary surfaces from 2D multi-photographic images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueli; Gao, Xinbo; Chen, Duofang; Ma, Xiaopeng; Zhao, Xiaohui; Shen, Man; Li, Xiangsi; Qu, Xiaochao; Liang, Jimin; Ripoll, Jorge; Tian, Jie

    2010-09-13

    Optical tomography can demonstrate accurate three-dimensional (3D) imaging that recovers the 3D spatial distribution and concentration of the luminescent probes in biological tissues, compared with planar imaging. However, the tomographic approach is extremely difficult to implement due to the complexity in the reconstruction of 3D surface flux distribution from multi-view two dimensional (2D) measurements on the subject surface. To handle this problem, a novel and effective method is proposed in this paper to determine the surface flux distribution from multi-view 2D photographic images acquired by a set of non-contact detectors. The method is validated with comparison experiments involving both regular and irregular surfaces. Reconstruction of the inside probes based on the reconstructed surface flux distribution further demonstrates the potential of the proposed method in its application in optical tomography.

  11. Estimation of 3-D pore network coordination number of rocks from watershed segmentation of a single 2-D image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, Arash; Ayatollahi, Shahab; Kharrat, Riyaz; Dashti, Nader

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we have utilized 3-D micro-tomography images of real and synthetic rocks to introduce two mathematical correlations which estimate the distribution parameters of 3-D coordination number using a single 2-D cross-sectional image. By applying a watershed segmentation algorithm, it is found that the distribution of 3-D coordination number is acceptably predictable by statistical analysis of the network extracted from 2-D images. In this study, we have utilized 25 volumetric images of rocks in order to propose two mathematical formulas. These formulas aim to approximate the average and standard deviation of coordination number in 3-D pore networks. Then, the formulas are applied for five independent test samples to evaluate the reliability. Finally, pore network flow modeling is used to find the error of absolute permeability prediction using estimated and measured coordination numbers. Results show that the 2-D images are considerably informative about the 3-D network of the rocks and can be utilized to approximate the 3-D connectivity of the porous spaces with determination coefficient of about 0.85 that seems to be acceptable considering the variety of the studied samples.

  12. Sparse matrix beamforming and image reconstruction for 2-D HIFU monitoring using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) with in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Provost, Jean; Grondin, Julien; Wang, Shutao; Marquet, Fabrice; Bunting, Ethan; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-11-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) utilizes an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam to induce a localized focal oscillatory motion simultaneously estimated. The objective of this study is to develop and show the feasibility of a novel fast beamforming algorithm for image reconstruction using GPU-based sparse-matrix operation with real-time feedback. In this study, the algorithm was implemented onto a fully integrated, clinically relevant HMIFU system. A single divergent transmit beam was used while fast beamforming was implemented using a GPU-based delay-and-sum method and a sparse-matrix operation. Axial HMI displacements were then estimated from the RF signals using a 1-D normalized cross-correlation method and streamed to a graphic user interface with frame rates up to 15 Hz, a 100-fold increase compared to conventional CPU-based processing. The real-time feedback rate does not require interrupting the HIFU treatment. Results in phantom experiments showed reproducible HMI images and monitoring of 22 in vitro HIFU treatments using the new 2-D system demonstrated reproducible displacement imaging, and monitoring of 22 in vitro HIFU treatments using the new 2-D system showed a consistent average focal displacement decrease of 46.7 ±14.6% during lesion formation. Complementary focal temperature monitoring also indicated an average rate of displacement increase and decrease with focal temperature at 0.84±1.15%/(°)C, and 2.03±0.93%/(°)C , respectively. These results reinforce the HMIFU capability of estimating and monitoring stiffness related changes in real time. Current ongoing studies include clinical translation of the presented system for monitoring of HIFU treatment for breast and pancreatic tumor applications.

  13. Spectrum simulation of rough and nanostructured targets from their 2D and 3D image by Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiettekatte, François; Chicoine, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Corteo is a program that implements Monte Carlo (MC) method to simulate ion beam analysis (IBA) spectra of several techniques by following the ions trajectory until a sufficiently large fraction of them reach the detector to generate a spectrum. Hence, it fully accounts for effects such as multiple scattering (MS). Here, a version of Corteo is presented where the target can be a 2D or 3D image. This image can be derived from micrographs where the different compounds are identified, therefore bringing extra information into the solution of an IBA spectrum, and potentially significantly constraining the solution. The image intrinsically includes many details such as the actual surface or interfacial roughness, or actual nanostructures shape and distribution. This can for example lead to the unambiguous identification of structures stoichiometry in a layer, or at least to better constraints on their composition. Because MC computes in details the trajectory of the ions, it simulates accurately many of its aspects such as ions coming back into the target after leaving it (re-entry), as well as going through a variety of nanostructures shapes and orientations. We show how, for example, as the ions angle of incidence becomes shallower than the inclination distribution of a rough surface, this process tends to make the effective roughness smaller in a comparable 1D simulation (i.e. narrower thickness distribution in a comparable slab simulation). Also, in ordered nanostructures, target re-entry can lead to replications of a peak in a spectrum. In addition, bitmap description of the target can be used to simulate depth profiles such as those resulting from ion implantation, diffusion, and intermixing. Other improvements to Corteo include the possibility to interpolate the cross-section in angle-energy tables, and the generation of energy-depth maps.

  14. 2D Transducer Array for High-Speed 3D Imaging System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    low voltage differential signaling ( LVDS ) interface and a peripheral component interconnect (PCI) bus. The maximum numbers of transmission and...32-channel analog to digital converter (ADC) was attached to the developed transducer array. LVDS 2D Array Front End D a t a A c q u i s i t i o

  15. Biomedical image processing.

    PubMed

    Huang, H K

    1981-01-01

    Biomedical image processing is a very broad field; it covers biomedical signal gathering, image forming, picture processing, and image display to medical diagnosis based on features extracted from images. This article reviews this topic in both its fundamentals and applications. In its fundamentals, some basic image processing techniques including outlining, deblurring, noise cleaning, filtering, search, classical analysis and texture analysis have been reviewed together with examples. The state-of-the-art image processing systems have been introduced and discussed in two categories: general purpose image processing systems and image analyzers. In order for these systems to be effective for biomedical applications, special biomedical image processing languages have to be developed. The combination of both hardware and software leads to clinical imaging devices. Two different types of clinical imaging devices have been discussed. There are radiological imagings which include radiography, thermography, ultrasound, nuclear medicine and CT. Among these, thermography is the most noninvasive but is limited in application due to the low energy of its source. X-ray CT is excellent for static anatomical images and is moving toward the measurement of dynamic function, whereas nuclear imaging is moving toward organ metabolism and ultrasound is toward tissue physical characteristics. Heart imaging is one of the most interesting and challenging research topics in biomedical image processing; current methods including the invasive-technique cineangiography, and noninvasive ultrasound, nuclear medicine, transmission, and emission CT methodologies have been reviewed. Two current federally funded research projects in heart imaging, the dynamic spatial reconstructor and the dynamic cardiac three-dimensional densitometer, should bring some fruitful results in the near future. Miscrosopic imaging technique is very different from the radiological imaging technique in the sense that

  16. Simulation of abrasive flow machining process for 2D and 3D mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Rupalika; Maity, Kalipada

    2015-12-01

    Improvement of surface finish and material removal has been quite a challenge in a finishing operation such as abrasive flow machining (AFM). Factors that affect the surface finish and material removal are media viscosity, extrusion pressure, piston velocity, and particle size in abrasive flow machining process. Performing experiments for all the parameters and accurately obtaining an optimized parameter in a short time are difficult to accomplish because the operation requires a precise finish. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was employed to accurately determine optimum parameters. In the current work, a 2D model was designed, and the flow analysis, force calculation, and material removal prediction were performed and compared with the available experimental data. Another 3D model for a swaging die finishing using AFM was simulated at different viscosities of the media to study the effects on the controlling parameters. A CFD simulation was performed by using commercially available ANSYS FLUENT. Two phases were considered for the flow analysis, and multiphase mixture model was taken into account. The fluid was considered to be a

  17. Integration of 3D and 2D imaging data for assured navigation in unknown environments: initial steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Evan; Uijt de Haag, Maarten

    2009-05-01

    This paper discusses the initial steps of the development of a novel navigation method that integrates three-dimensional (3D) point cloud data, two-dimensional (2D) gray-level (intensity), and data from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). A time-of-flight camera such as MESA's Swissranger will output both the 3D and 2D data. The target application is position and attitude determination of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and autonomous ground vehicles (AGV) in urban or indoor environments. In urban and indoor environments a GPS position capability may not only be unavailable due to shadowing, significant signal attenuation or multipath, but also due to intentional denial or deception. The proposed algorithm extracts key features such as planar surfaces, lines and corner-points from both the 3D (point-cloud) and 2D (intensity) imagery. Consecutive observations of corresponding features in the 3D and 2D image frames are then used to compute estimates of position and orientation changes. Since the use of 3D image features for positioning suffers from limited feature observability resulting in deteriorated position accuracies, and the 2D imagery suffers from an unknown depth when estimating the pose from consecutive image frames, it is expected that the integration of both data sets will alleviate the problems with the individual methods resulting in an position and attitude determination method with a high level of assurance. An Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) is used to set up the tracking gates necessary to perform data association of the features in consecutive frames. Finally, the position and orientation change estimates can be used to correct for the IMU drift errors.

  18. SU-E-T-431: Feasiblity of Using CT Scout Images for 2D LDR Brachytherpay Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, J; Weaver, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: i) To show the feasibility of using CT scout images for 2D low-dose rate brachytherapy planning with BrachyVision (version 10.4); ii) to show their advantages and disadvantages over DRRs. Methods: A phantom was constructed to house a Fletcher-Suite applicator. The phantom is made of Styrofoam with metal BBs positioned at well-defined separations. These markers are used to assess the image distortion in the scout images. Unlike DRRs, scout images are distorted only in the direction normal to the couch direction; therefore, they needed to be scaled unidirectionally prior to importing into BrachyVision. In addition to confirming the scaling is performed correctly by measuring distances between well-positioned BB, we also compare a LDR plan using scout images to a 3D CT-based plan. Results: There is no distortion of the image along the couch direction due to the collimation of the CT scanner. The distortion in the transverse plane can be corrected by multiplying by the ratio of distances between source-to-isocenter and source-to-detector. The results show the distance separations between BBs as measured in scout images and by a caliber are within a few millimeters. Dosimetrically, the difference between the dose rates to points A and B based on scout images and on 3D CT are less than a few percents. The accuracy can be improved by correcting for the distortion on the transverse plane. Conclusion: It is possible to use CT scout images for 2D planning in BrachyVision. This is an advantage because scout images have no metal artifacts often present in CT images or DRRs. Another advantage is the lack of distortion in the couch direction. One major disadvantage is that the image distortion due to beam divergence can be large. This is due to the inherent short distance between source-to-isocenter and source-to-detector on a CT scanner.

  19. Intensifying the response of distributed optical fibre sensors using 2D and 3D image restoration

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Marcelo A.; Ramírez, Jaime A.; Thévenaz, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Distributed optical fibre sensors possess the unique capability of measuring the spatial and temporal map of environmental quantities that can be of great interest for several field applications. Although existing methods for performance enhancement have enabled important progresses in the field, they do not take full advantage of all information present in the measured data, still giving room for substantial improvement over the state-of-the-art. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an approach for performance enhancement that exploits the high level of similitude and redundancy contained on the multidimensional information measured by distributed fibre sensors. Exploiting conventional image and video processing, an unprecedented boost in signal-to-noise ratio and measurement contrast is experimentally demonstrated. The method can be applied to any white-noise-limited distributed fibre sensor and can remarkably provide a 100-fold improvement in the sensor performance with no hardware modification. PMID:26927698

  20. New generation CMOS 2D imager evaluation and qualification for semiconductor inspection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Hart, Darcy

    2013-09-01

    Semiconductor fabrication process defect inspection industry is always driven by inspection resolution and through-put. With fabrication technology node advances to 2X ~1Xnm range, critical macro defect size approaches to typical CMOS camera pixel size range, therefore single pixel defect detection technology becomes more and more essential, which is fundamentally constrained by camera performance. A new evaluation model is presented here to specifically describe the camera performance for semiconductor machine vision applications, especially targeting at low image contrast high speed applications. Current mainline cameras and high-end OEM cameras are evaluated with this model. Camera performances are clearly differentiated among CMOS technology generations and vendors, which will facilitate application driven camera selection and operation optimization. The new challenges for CMOS detectors are discussed for semiconductor inspection applications.

  1. Impact of lens distortions on strain measurements obtained with 2D digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lava, P.; Van Paepegem, W.; Coppieters, S.; De Baere, I.; Wang, Y.; Debruyne, D.

    2013-05-01

    The determination of strain fields based on displacements obtained via digital image correlation (DIC) at the micro-strain level (≤1000 μm/m) is still a cumbersome task. In particular when high-strain gradients are involved, e.g. in composite materials with multidirectional fibre reinforcement, uncertainties in the experimental setup and errors in the derivation of the displacement fields can substantially hamper the strain identification process. In this contribution, the aim is to investigate the impact of lens distortions on strain measurements. To this purpose, we first perform pure rigid body motion experiments, revealing the importance of precise correction of lens distortions. Next, a uni-axial tensile test on a textile composite with spatially varying high strain gradients is performed, resulting in very accurately determined strains along the fibers of the material.

  2. Application of Compressed Sensing to 2-D Ultrasonic Propagation Imaging System data

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenas, David D.; Farrar, Charles R.; Chong, See Yenn; Lee, J.R.; Park, Gyu Hae; Flynn, Eric B.

    2012-06-29

    The Ultrasonic Propagation Imaging (UPI) System is a unique, non-contact, laser-based ultrasonic excitation and measurement system developed for structural health monitoring applications. The UPI system imparts laser-induced ultrasonic excitations at user-defined locations on a structure of interest. The response of these excitations is then measured by piezoelectric transducers. By using appropriate data reconstruction techniques, a time-evolving image of the response can be generated. A representative measurement of a plate might contain 800x800 spatial data measurement locations and each measurement location might be sampled at 500 instances in time. The result is a total of 640,000 measurement locations and 320,000,000 unique measurements. This is clearly a very large set of data to collect, store in memory and process. The value of these ultrasonic response images for structural health monitoring applications makes tackling these challenges worthwhile. Recently compressed sensing has presented itself as a candidate solution for directly collecting relevant information from sparse, high-dimensional measurements. The main idea behind compressed sensing is that by directly collecting a relatively small number of coefficients it is possible to reconstruct the original measurement. The coefficients are obtained from linear combinations of (what would have been the original direct) measurements. Often compressed sensing research is simulated by generating compressed coefficients from conventionally collected measurements. The simulation approach is necessary because the direct collection of compressed coefficients often requires compressed sensing analog front-ends that are currently not commercially available. The ability of the UPI system to make measurements at user-defined locations presents a unique capability on which compressed measurement techniques may be directly applied. The application of compressed sensing techniques on this data holds the potential to

  3. Tracking objects outside the line of sight using 2D intensity images

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Jonathan; Peters, Christoph; Martín, Jaime; Laurenzis, Martin; Hullin, Matthias B.

    2016-01-01

    The observation of objects located in inaccessible regions is a recurring challenge in a wide variety of important applications. Recent work has shown that using rare and expensive optical setups, indirect diffuse light reflections can be used to reconstruct objects and two-dimensional (2D) patterns around a corner. Here we show that occluded objects can be tracked in real time using much simpler means, namely a standard 2D camera and a laser pointer. Our method fundamentally differs from previous solutions by approaching the problem in an analysis-by-synthesis sense. By repeatedly simulating light transport through the scene, we determine the set of object parameters that most closely fits the measured intensity distribution. We experimentally demonstrate that this approach is capable of following the translation of unknown objects, and translation and orientation of a known object, in real time. PMID:27577969

  4. Comparison of simultaneous and sequential two-view registration for 3D/2D registration of vascular images.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Chetna; Van Horn, Mark; Weeks, Susan; Bullitt, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Accurate 3D/2D vessel registration is complicated by issues of image quality, occlusion, and other problems. This study performs a quantitative comparison of 3D/2D vessel registration in which vessels segmented from preoperative CT or MR are registered with biplane x-ray angiograms by either a) simultaneous two-view registration with advance calculation of the relative pose of the two views, or b) sequential registration with each view. We conclude on the basis of phantom studies that, even in the absence of image errors, simultaneous two-view registration is more accurate than sequential registration. In more complex settings, including clinical conditions, the relative accuracy of simultaneous two-view registration is even greater.

  5. 2-D Fused Image Reconstruction approach for Microwave Tomography: a theoretical assessment using FDTD Model.

    PubMed

    Bindu, G; Semenov, S

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient two-dimensional fused image reconstruction approach for Microwave Tomography (MWT). Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) models were created for a viable MWT experimental system having the transceivers modelled using thin wire approximation with resistive voltage sources. Born Iterative and Distorted Born Iterative methods have been employed for image reconstruction with the extremity imaging being done using a differential imaging technique. The forward solver in the imaging algorithm employs the FDTD method of solving the time domain Maxwell's equations with the regularisation parameter computed using a stochastic approach. The algorithm is tested with 10% noise inclusion and successful image reconstruction has been shown implying its robustness.

  6. 2-D/3-D ECE imaging data for validation of turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Minjun; Lee, Jaehyun; Yun, Gunsu; Lee, Woochang; Park, Hyeon K.; Park, Young-Seok; Sabbagh, Steve A.; Wang, Weixing; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.

    2015-11-01

    The 2-D/3-D KSTAR ECEI diagnostic can provide a local 2-D/3-D measurement of ECE intensity. Application of spectral analysis techniques to the ECEI data allows local estimation of frequency spectra S (f) , wavenumber spectra S (k) , wavernumber and frequency spectra S (k , f) , and bispectra b (f1 ,f2) of ECE intensity over the 2-D/3-D space, which can be used to validate turbulence simulations. However, the minimum detectable fluctuation amplitude and the maximum detectable wavenumber are limited by the temporal and spatial resolutions of the diagnostic system, respectively. Also, the finite measurement area of the diagnostic channel could introduce uncertainty in the spectra estimation. The limitations and accuracy of the ECEI estimated spectra have been tested by a synthetic ECEI diagnostic with the model and/or fluctuations calculated by GTS. Supported by the NRF of Korea under Contract No. NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029881 and NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029865 and by U.S. DOE grant DE-FG02-99ER54524.

  7. Apple Image Processing Educator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A software system design is proposed and demonstrated with pilot-project software. The system permits the Apple II microcomputer to be used for personalized computer-assisted instruction in the digital image processing of LANDSAT images. The programs provide data input, menu selection, graphic and hard-copy displays, and both general and detailed instructions. The pilot-project results are considered to be successful indicators of the capabilities and limits of microcomputers for digital image processing education.

  8. Image Processing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    To convert raw data into environmental products, the National Weather Service and other organizations use the Global 9000 image processing system marketed by Global Imaging, Inc. The company's GAE software package is an enhanced version of the TAE, developed by Goddard Space Flight Center to support remote sensing and image processing applications. The system can be operated in three modes and is combined with HP Apollo workstation hardware.

  9. Image processing mini manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Christine G.; Posenau, Mary-Anne; Leonard, Desiree M.; Avis, Elizabeth L.; Debure, Kelly R.; Stacy, Kathryn; Vonofenheim, Bill

    1992-01-01

    The intent is to provide an introduction to the image processing capabilities available at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) Central Scientific Computing Complex (CSCC). Various image processing software components are described. Information is given concerning the use of these components in the Data Visualization and Animation Laboratory at LaRC.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine: comparison of 2D T2-weighted turbo spin echo, 2D T2*weighted gradient-recalled echo and 3D T2-weighted variable flip-angle turbo spin echo sequences.

    PubMed

    Meindl, T; Wirth, S; Weckbach, S; Dietrich, O; Reiser, M; Schoenberg, S O

    2009-03-01

    To compare an isotropic three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution T2-weighted (w) MR sequence and its reformations with conventional sequences for imaging of the cervical spine. Fifteen volunteers were examined at 1.5 T using sagittal and axial 3D T2-w, sagittal and axial 2D T2w, and axial 2D T2*w MR sequences. Axial reformations of the sagittal 3D dataset were generated (3D MPR T2w). Signal-to-noise and image homogeneity were evaluated in a phantom and in vivo. Visibility of ten anatomical structures of the cervical spine was evaluated. Artifacts were assessed. For statistical analysis, Cohen's kappa, Wilcoxon matched pairs, and t-testing were utilized. There were no significant differences in homogeneity between the sequences. Sagittal 3D T2w enabled better delineation of nerve roots, neural foramina, and intraforaminal structures compared to sagittal 2D T2w. Axial 3D T2w and axial 3D MPR T2w resulted in superior visibility of most anatomical structures compared to axial 2D T2w and comparable results to 2D T2*w concerning the spinal cord, nerve roots, intraforaminal structures, and fat. Artifacts were most pronounced in axial 2D T2w and axial 3D T2w. Acquisition of a 3D T2w data set is feasible in the cervical spine with superior delineation of anatomical structures compared to 2D sequences.

  11. Quantification and geometric analysis of coiling patterns in gastropod shells based on 3D and 2D image data.

    PubMed

    Noshita, Koji

    2014-12-21

    The morphology of gastropod shells has been a focus of analyses in ecology and evolution. It has recently emerged as an important issue in developmental biology, thanks to recent advancements in molecular biological techniques. The growing tube model is a theoretical morphological model for describing various coiling patterns of molluscan shells, and it is a useful theoretical tool to relate local tissue growth with global shell morphology. However, the growing tube model has rarely been adopted in empirical research owing to the difficulty in estimating the parameters of the model from morphological data. In this article, I solve this problem by developing methods of parameter estimation when (1) 3D Computed Tomography (CT) data are available and (2) only 2D image data (such as photographs) are available. When 3D CT data are available, the parameters can be estimated by fitting an analytical solution of the growing tube model to the data. When only 2D image data are available, we first fit Raup׳s model to the 2D image data and then convert the parameters of Raup׳s model to those of the growing tube model. To illustrate the use of these methods, I apply them to data generated by a computer simulation of the model. Both methods work well, except when shells grow without coiling. I also demonstrate the effectiveness of the methods by applying the model to actual 3D CT data and 2D image data of land snails. I conclude that the method proposed in this article can reconstruct the coiling pattern from observed data.

  12. Adaptive clutter filter in 2-D color flow imaging based on in vivo I/Q signal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Zhang, Congyao; Liu, Dong C

    2014-01-01

    Color flow imaging has been well applied in clinical diagnosis. For the high quality color flow images, clutter filter is important to separate the Doppler signals from blood and tissue. Traditional clutter filters, such as finite impulse response, infinite impulse response and regression filters, were applied, which are based on the hypothesis that the clutter signal is stationary or tissue moves slowly. However, in realistic clinic color flow imaging, the signals are non-stationary signals because of accelerated moving tissue. For most related papers, simulated RF signals are widely used without in vivo I/Q signal. Hence, in this paper, adaptive polynomial regression filter, which is down mixing with instantaneous clutter frequency, was proposed based on in vivo carotid I/Q signal in realistic color flow imaging. To get the best performance, the optimal polynomial order of polynomial regression filter and the optimal polynomial order for estimation of instantaneous clutter frequency respectively were confirmed. Finally, compared with the mean blood velocity and quality of 2-D color flow image, the experiment results show that adaptive polynomial regression filter, which is down mixing with instantaneous clutter frequency, can significantly enhance the mean blood velocity and get high quality 2-D color flow image.

  13. Twin robotic x-ray system for 2D radiographic and 3D cone-beam CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Steinbrener, Jan; Jerebko, Anna K.; Voigt, Johannes M.; Scholz, Rosemarie; Ritschl, Ludwig; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we provide an initial characterization of a novel twin robotic X-ray system. This system is equipped with two motor-driven telescopic arms carrying X-ray tube and flat-panel detector, respectively. 2D radiographs and fluoroscopic image sequences can be obtained from different viewing angles. Projection data for 3D cone-beam CT reconstruction can be acquired during simultaneous movement of the arms along dedicated scanning trajectories. We provide an initial evaluation of the 3D image quality based on phantom scans and clinical images. Furthermore, initial evaluation of patient dose is conducted. The results show that the system delivers high image quality for a range of medical applications. In particular, high spatial resolution enables adequate visualization of bone structures. This system allows 3D X-ray scanning of patients in standing and weight-bearing position. It could enable new 2D/3D imaging workflows in musculoskeletal imaging and improve diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders.

  14. Using artificial neural networks to invert 2D DC resistivity imaging data for high resistivity contrast regions: A MATLAB application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyamadpour, Ahmad; Taib, Samsudin; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2009-11-01

    MATLAB is a high-level matrix/array language with control flow statements and functions. MATLAB has several useful toolboxes to solve complex problems in various fields of science, such as geophysics. In geophysics, the inversion of 2D DC resistivity imaging data is complex due to its non-linearity, especially for high resistivity contrast regions. In this paper, we investigate the applicability of MATLAB to design, train and test a newly developed artificial neural network in inverting 2D DC resistivity imaging data. We used resilient propagation to train the network. The model used to produce synthetic data is a homogeneous medium of 100 Ω m resistivity with an embedded anomalous body of 1000 Ω m. The location of the anomalous body was moved to different positions within the homogeneous model mesh elements. The synthetic data were generated using a finite element forward modeling code by means of the RES2DMOD. The network was trained using 21 datasets and tested on another 16 synthetic datasets, as well as on real field data. In field data acquisition, the cable covers 120 m between the first and the last take-out, with a 3 m x-spacing. Three different electrode spacings were measured, which gave a dataset of 330 data points. The interpreted result shows that the trained network was able to invert 2D electrical resistivity imaging data obtained by a Wenner-Schlumberger configuration rapidly and accurately.

  15. Coloured computational imaging with single-pixel detectors based on a 2D discrete cosine transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bao-Lei; Yang, Zhao-Hua; Liu, Xia; Wu, Ling-An

    2017-02-01

    We propose and demonstrate a computational imaging technique that uses structured illumination based on a two-dimensional discrete cosine transform to perform imaging with a single-pixel detector. A scene is illuminated by a projector with two sets of orthogonal patterns, then by applying an inverse cosine transform to the spectra obtained from the single-pixel detector a full-color image is retrieved. This technique can retrieve an image from sub-Nyquist measurements, and the background noise is easily canceled to give excellent image quality. Moreover, the experimental setup is very simple.

  16. Image Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (MIR) is using a digital image processing system which employs NASA-developed technology. MIR's computer system is the largest radiology system in the world. It is used in diagnostic imaging. Blood vessels are injected with x-ray dye, and the images which are produced indicate whether arteries are hardened or blocked. A computer program developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory known as Mini-VICAR/IBIS was supplied to MIR by COSMIC. The program provides the basis for developing the computer imaging routines for data processing, contrast enhancement and picture display.

  17. The 2D versus 3D imaging trade-off: The impact of over- or under-estimating small throats for simulating permeability in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, C. A.; Crandell, L. E.; Um, W.; Jones, K. W.; Lindquist, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical reactions in the subsurface can alter the porosity and permeability of a porous medium through mineral precipitation and dissolution. While effects on porosity are relatively well understood, changes in permeability are more difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling is used to estimate the permeability of a porous medium using pore and throat size distributions. These distributions can be determined from 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections or from 3D X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images of small cores. Each method has unique advantages as well as unique sources of error. 3D CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network without the inherent geometry-based biases of 2D images but is limited by resolutions around 1 μm. 2D SEM imaging has the advantage of higher resolution, and the ability to examine sub-grain scale variations in porosity and mineralogy, but is limited by the small size of the sample of pores that are quantified. A pore network model was created to estimate flow permeability in a sand-packed experimental column investigating reaction of sediments with caustic radioactive tank wastes in the context of the Hanford, WA site. Before, periodically during, and after reaction, 3D images of the porous medium in the column were produced using the X2B beam line facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Lab. These images were interpreted using 3DMA-Rock to characterize the pore and throat size distributions. After completion of the experiment, the column was sectioned and imaged using 2D SEM in backscattered electron mode. The 2D images were interpreted using erosion-dilation to estimate the pore and throat size distributions. A bias correction was determined by comparison with the 3D image data. A special image processing method was developed to infer the pore space before reaction by digitally removing the precipitate. The different sets of pore

  18. Fast 2-D ultrasound strain imaging: the benefits of using a GPU.

    PubMed

    Idzenga, Tim; Gaburov, Evghenii; Vermin, Willem; Menssen, Jan; de Korte, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Deformation of tissue can be accurately estimated from radio-frequency ultrasound data using a 2-dimensional normalized cross correlation (NCC)-based algorithm. This procedure, however, is very computationally time-consuming. A major time reduction can be achieved by parallelizing the numerous computations of NCC. In this paper, two approaches for parallelization have been investigated: the OpenMP interface on a multi-CPU system and Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) on a graphics processing unit (GPU). The performance of the OpenMP and GPU approaches were compared with a conventional Matlab implementation of NCC. The OpenMP approach with 8 threads achieved a maximum speed-up factor of 132 on the computing of NCC, whereas the GPU approach on an Nvidia Tesla K20 achieved a maximum speed-up factor of 376. Neither parallelization approach resulted in a significant loss in image quality of the elastograms. Parallelization of the NCC computations using the GPU, therefore, significantly reduces the computation time and increases the frame rate for motion estimation.

  19. Registration of 2D C-Arm and 3D CT Images for a C-Arm Image-Assisted Navigation System for Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Ju; Lin, Geng-Li; Tse, Alex; Chu, Hong-Yu; Tseng, Ching-Shiow

    2015-01-01

    C-Arm image-assisted surgical navigation system has been broadly applied to spinal surgery. However, accurate path planning on the C-Arm AP-view image is difficult. This research studies 2D-3D image registration methods to obtain the optimum transformation matrix between C-Arm and CT image frames. Through the transformation matrix, the surgical path planned on preoperative CT images can be transformed and displayed on the C-Arm images for surgical guidance. The positions of surgical instruments will also be displayed on both CT and C-Arm in the real time. Five similarity measure methods of 2D-3D image registration including Normalized Cross-Correlation, Gradient Correlation, Pattern Intensity, Gradient Difference Correlation, and Mutual Information combined with three optimization methods including Powell's method, Downhill simplex algorithm, and genetic algorithm are applied to evaluate their performance in converge range, efficiency, and accuracy. Experimental results show that the combination of Normalized Cross-Correlation measure method with Downhill simplex algorithm obtains maximum correlation and similarity in C-Arm and Digital Reconstructed Radiograph (DRR) images. Spine saw bones are used in the experiment to evaluate 2D-3D image registration accuracy. The average error in displacement is 0.22 mm. The success rate is approximately 90% and average registration time takes 16 seconds. PMID:27018859

  20. Diagnostic algorithm: how to make use of new 2D, 3D and 4D ultrasound technologies in breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Weismann, C F; Datz, L

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this publication is to present a time saving diagnostic algorithm consisting of two-dimensional (2D), three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound (US) technologies. This algorithm of eight steps combines different imaging modalities and render modes which allow a step by step analysis of 2D, 3D and 4D diagnostic criteria. Advanced breast US systems with broadband high frequency linear transducers, full digital data management and high resolution are the actual basis for two-dimensional breast US studies in order to detect early breast cancer (step 1). The continuous developments of 2D US technologies including contrast resolution imaging (CRI) and speckle reduction imaging (SRI) have a direct influence on the high quality of three-dimensional and four-dimensional presentation of anatomical breast structures and pathological details. The diagnostic options provided by static 3D volume datasets according to US BI-RADS analogue assessment, concerning lesion shape, orientation, margin, echogenic rim sign, lesion echogenicity, acoustic transmission, associated calcifications, 3D criteria of the coronal plane, surrounding tissue composition (step 2) and lesion vascularity (step 6) are discussed. Static 3D datasets offer the combination of long axes distance measurements and volume calculations, which are the basis for an accurate follow-up in BI-RADS II and BI-RADS III lesions (step 3). Real time 4D volume contrast imaging (VCI) is able to demonstrate tissue elasticity (step 5). Glass body rendering is a static 3D tool which presents greyscale and colour information to study the vascularity and the vascular architecture of a lesion (step 6). Tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) is used for a slice by slice documentation in different investigation planes (A-,B- or C-plane) (steps 4 and 7). The final step 8 uses the panoramic view technique (XTD-View) to document the localisation within the breast and to make the position of a lesion simply

  1. Multi-imaging capabilities of a 2D diffraction grating in combination with digital holography.

    PubMed

    Paturzo, Melania; Merola, Francesco; Ferraro, Pietro

    2010-04-01

    In this Letter we report on an alternative approach to get multiple images in microscopy, exploiting the capabilities of both a lithium niobate diffraction grating and digital holographic technique. We demonstrate that multi-imaging can be achieved in a lensless configuration by using a hexagonal diffraction grating but overcoming, thanks to digital holography (DH), the many constrains imposed by the grating parameters in multi-imaging with Talbot effect or Talbot array illuminators. In fact, DH permits the numerical reconstruction of the optical field diffracted by the grating, thus obtaining in-focus multiple images in a plane different from the fractional or entire Talbot ones.

  2. Characterization of controlled bone defects using 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Biren J; Longsine, Whitney; Sabonghy, Eric P; Han, Arum; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley K; Ferrari, Mauro; Righetti, Raffaella

    2010-08-21

    Ultrasound is emerging as an attractive alternative modality to standard x-ray and CT methods for bone assessment applications. As of today, however, there is a lack of systematic studies that investigate the performance of diagnostic ultrasound techniques in bone imaging applications. This study aims at understanding the performance limitations of new ultrasound techniques for imaging bones in controlled experiments in vitro. Experiments are performed on samples of mammalian and non-mammalian bones with controlled defects with size ranging from 400 microm to 5 mm. Ultrasound findings are statistically compared with those obtained from the same samples using standard x-ray imaging modalities and optical microscopy. The results of this study demonstrate that it is feasible to use diagnostic ultrasound imaging techniques to assess sub-millimeter bone defects in real time and with high accuracy and precision. These results also demonstrate that ultrasound imaging techniques perform comparably better than x-ray imaging and optical imaging methods, in the assessment of a wide range of controlled defects both in mammalian and non-mammalian bones. In the future, ultrasound imaging techniques might provide a cost-effective, real-time, safe and portable diagnostic tool for bone imaging applications.

  3. 2D and 3D MALDI-imaging: conceptual strategies for visualization and data mining.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Herbert; Heldmann, Stefan; Trede, Dennis; Strehlow, Jan; Wirtz, Stefan; Dreher, Wolfgang; Berger, Judith; Oetjen, Janina; Kobarg, Jan Hendrik; Fischer, Bernd; Maass, Peter

    2014-01-01

    3D imaging has a significant impact on many challenges in life sciences, because biology is a 3-dimensional phenomenon. Current 3D imaging-technologies (various types MRI, PET, SPECT) are labeled, i.e. they trace the localization of a specific compound in the body. In contrast, 3D MALDI mass spectrometry-imaging (MALDI-MSI) is a label-free method imaging the spatial distribution of molecular compounds. It complements 3D imaging labeled methods, immunohistochemistry, and genetics-based methods. However, 3D MALDI-MSI cannot tap its full potential due to the lack of statistical methods for analysis and interpretation of large and complex 3D datasets. To overcome this, we established a complete and robust 3D MALDI-MSI pipeline combined with efficient computational data analysis methods for 3D edge preserving image denoising, 3D spatial segmentation as well as finding colocalized m/z values, which will be reviewed here in detail. Furthermore, we explain, why the integration and correlation of the MALDI imaging data with other imaging modalities allows to enhance the interpretation of the molecular data and provides visualization of molecular patterns that may otherwise not be apparent. Therefore, a 3D data acquisition workflow is described generating a set of 3 different dimensional images representing the same anatomies. First, an in-vitro MRI measurement is performed which results in a three-dimensional image modality representing the 3D structure of the measured object. After sectioning the 3D object into N consecutive slices, all N slices are scanned using an optical digital scanner, enabling for performing the MS measurements. Scanning the individual sections results into low-resolution images, which define the base coordinate system for the whole pipeline. The scanned images conclude the information from the spatial (MRI) and the mass spectrometric (MALDI-MSI) dimension and are used for the spatial three-dimensional reconstruction of the object performed by image

  4. Infrared imaging of 2-D temperature distribution during cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bernard; Welch, Ashley J

    2002-12-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used in conjunction with pulsed laser irradiation for treatment of dermatologic indications. The main goal of this study was to determine the radial temperature distribution created by CSC and evaluate the importance of radial temperature gradients upon the subsequent analysis of tissue cooling throughout the skin. Since direct measurement of surface temperatures during CSC are hindered by the formation of a liquid cryogen layer, temperature distributions were estimated using a thin, black aluminum sheet. An infrared focal plane array camera was used to determine the 2-D backside temperature distribution during a cryogen spurt, which preliminary measurements have shown is a good indicator of the front-side temperature distribution. The measured temperature distribution was approximately gaussian in shape. Next, the transient temperature distributions in skin were calculated for two cases: 1) the standard 1-D solution which assumes a uniform cooling temperature distribution, and 2) a 2-D solution using a nonuniform surface cooling temperature distribution based upon the back-side infrared temperature measurements. At the end of a 100-ms cryogen spurt, calculations showed that, for the two cases, large discrepancies in temperatures at the surface and at a 60-micron depth were found at radii greater than 2.5 mm. These results suggest that it is necessary to consider radial temperature gradients during cryogen spray cooling of tissue.

  5. Nonrigid Registration of 2-D and 3-D Dynamic Cell Nuclei Images for Improved Classification of Subcellular Particle Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Han; Chen, Yi-Chun M.; Spector, David L.; Eils, Roland; Rohr, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The observed motion of subcellular particles in fluorescence microscopy image sequences of live cells is generally a superposition of the motion and deformation of the cell and the motion of the particles. Decoupling the two types of movements to enable accurate classification of the particle motion requires the application of registration algorithms. We have developed an intensity-based approach for nonrigid registration of multi-channel microscopy image sequences of cell nuclei. First, based on 3-D synthetic images we demonstrate that cell nucleus deformations change the observed motion types of particles and that our approach allows to recover the original motion. Second, we have successfully applied our approach to register 2-D and 3-D real microscopy image sequences. A quantitative experimental comparison with previous approaches for nonrigid registration of cell microscopy has also been performed. PMID:20840894

  6. 2D and 3D imaging resolution trade-offs in quantifying pore throats for prediction of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Beckingham, Lauren E.; Peters, Catherine A.; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.; Lindquist, W.Brent

    2013-09-03

    Although the impact of subsurface geochemical reactions on porosity is relatively well understood, changes in permeability remain difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling was used to predict permeability based on pore- and pore-throat size distributions determined from analysis of 2D scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections and 3D X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) data. The analyzed specimens were a Viking sandstone sample from the Alberta sedimentary basin and an experimental column of reacted Hanford sediments. For the column, a decrease in permeability due to mineral precipitation was estimated, but the permeability estimates were dependent on imaging technique and resolution. X-ray CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network while 2D SEM imaging can easily analyze sub-grain and intragranular variations in mineralogy. Pore network models informed by analyses of 2D and 3D images at comparable resolutions produced permeability esti- mates with relatively good agreement. Large discrepancies in predicted permeabilities resulted from small variations in image resolution. Images with resolutions 0.4 to 4 lm predicted permeabilities differ- ing by orders of magnitude. While lower-resolution scans can analyze larger specimens, small pore throats may be missed due to resolution limitations, which in turn overestimates permeability in a pore-network model in which pore-to-pore conductances are statistically assigned. Conversely, high-res- olution scans are capable of capturing small pore throats, but if they are not actually flow-conducting predicted permeabilities will be below expected values. In addition, permeability is underestimated due to misinterpreting surface-roughness features as small pore throats. Comparison of permeability pre- dictions with expected and measured permeability values showed that the largest discrepancies resulted from the highest resolution images and the best predictions of

  7. A robust cell counting approach based on a normalized 2D cross-correlation scheme for in-line holographic images.

    PubMed

    Ra, Ho-Kyeong; Kim, Hyungseok; Yoon, Hee Jung; Son, Sang Hyuk; Park, Taejoon; Moon, Sangjun

    2013-09-07

    To achieve the important aims of identifying and marking disease progression, cell counting is crucial for various biological and medical procedures, especially in a Point-Of-Care (POC) setting. In contrast to the conventional manual method of counting cells, a software-based approach provides improved reliability, faster speeds, and greater ease of use. We present a novel software-based approach to count in-line holographic cell images using the calculation of a normalized 2D cross-correlation. This enables fast, computationally-efficient pattern matching between a set of cell library images and the test image. Our evaluation results show that the proposed system is capable of quickly counting cells whilst reliably and accurately following human counting capability. Our novel approach is 5760 times faster than manual counting and provides at least 68% improved accuracy compared to other image processing algorithms.

  8. Enhanced 2D-image upconversion using solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Christian; Karamehmedović, Emir; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2009-11-09

    Based on enhanced upconversion, we demonstrate a highly efficient method for converting a full image from one part of the electromagnetic spectrum into a new desired wavelength region. By illuminating a metal transmission mask with a 765 nm Gaussian beam to create an image and subsequently focusing the image inside a nonlinear PPKTP crystal located in the high intra-cavity field of a 1342 nm solid-state Nd:YVO(4) laser, an upconverted image at 488 nm is generated. We have experimentally achieved an upconversion efficiency of 40% under CW conditions. The proposed technique can be further adapted for high efficiency mid-infrared image upconversion where direct and fast detection is difficult or impossible to perform with existing detector technologies.

  9. Experimental validation of 2D uncertainty quantification for digital image correlation.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.

    2010-03-01

    Because digital image correlation (DIC) has become such an important and standard tool in the toolbox of experimental mechanicists, a complete uncertainty quantification of the method is needed. It should be remembered that each DIC setup and series of images will have a unique uncertainty based on the calibration quality and the image and speckle quality of the analyzed images. Any pretest work done with a calibrated DIC stereo-rig to quantify the errors using known shapes and translations, while useful, do not necessarily reveal the uncertainty of a later test. This is particularly true with high-speed applications where actual test images are often less than ideal. Work has previously been completed on the mathematical underpinnings of DIC uncertainty quantification and is already published, this paper will present corresponding experimental work used to check the validity of the uncertainty equations.

  10. 3D localized 2D ultrafast J-resolved magnetic resonance spectroscopy: in vitro study on a 7 T imaging system.

    PubMed

    Roussel, T; Giraudeau, P; Ratiney, H; Akoka, S; Cavassila, S

    2012-02-01

    2D Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a well known tool for the analysis of complicated and overlapped MR spectra and was therefore originally used for structural analysis. It also presents a potential for biomedical applications as shown by an increasing number of works related to localized in vivo experiments. However, 2D MRS suffers from long acquisition times due to the necessary collection of numerous increments in the indirect dimension (t(1)). This paper presents the first 3D localized 2D ultrafast J-resolved MRS sequence, developed on a small animal imaging system, allowing the acquisition of a 3D localized 2D J-resolved MRS spectrum in a single scan. Sequence parameters were optimized regarding Signal-to-Noise ratio and spectral resolution. Sensitivity and spatial localization properties were characterized and discussed. An automatic post-processing method allowing the reduction of artifacts inherent to ultrafast excitation is also presented. This sequence offers an efficient signal localization and shows a great potential for in vivo dynamic spectroscopy.

  11. Normal and shear strain imaging using 2D deformation tracking on beam steered linear array datasets

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiyan; Varghese, Tomy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Previous publications have reported on the use of one-dimensional cross-correlation analysis with beam-steered echo signals. However, this approach fails to accurately track displacements at larger depths (>4.5 cm) due to lower signal-to-noise. In this paper, the authors present the use of adaptive parallelogram shaped two-dimensional processing blocks for deformation tracking. Methods: Beam-steered datasets were acquired using a VFX 9L4 linear array transducer operated at a 6 MHz center frequency for steered angles from −15 to 15° in increments of 1°, on both uniformly elastic and single-inclusion tissue-mimicking phantoms. Echo signals were acquired to a depth of 65 mm with the focus set at 40 mm corresponding to the center of phantom. Estimated angular displacements along and perpendicular to the beam direction are used to compute axial and lateral displacement vectors using a least-squares approach. Normal and shear strain tensor component are then estimated based on these displacement vectors. Results: Their results demonstrate that parallelogram shaped two-dimensional deformation tracking significantly improves spatial resolution (factor of 7.79 along the beam direction), signal-to-noise (5 dB improvement), and contrast-to-noise (8–14 dB improvement) associated with strain imaging using beam steering on linear array transducers. Conclusions: Parallelogram shaped two-dimensional deformation tracking is demonstrated in beam-steered radiofrequency data, enabling its use in the estimation of normal and shear strain components. PMID:23298118

  12. Towards the clinical integration of an image-guided navigation system for percutaneous liver tumor ablation using freehand 2D ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Spinczyk, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Primary and metastatic liver tumors constitute a significant challenge for contemporary medicine. Several improvements are currently being developed and implemented to advance image navigation systems for percutaneous liver focal lesion ablation in clinical applications at the diagnosis, planning and intervention stages. First, the automatic generation of an anatomically accurate parametric model of the preoperative patient liver was proposed in addition to a method to visually evaluate and make manual corrections. Second, a marker was designed to facilitate rigid registration between the model of the preoperative patient liver and the patient during treatment. A specific approach was implemented and tested for rigid mapping by continuously tracking a set of uniquely identified markers and by accounting for breathing motion, facilitating the determination of the optimal breathing phase for needle insertion into the liver tissue. Third, to overcome the challenge of tracking the absolute position of the planned target point, an intra-operative ultrasound (US) system was integrated based on the Public Software Library for UltraSound and OpenIGTLink protocol, which tracks breathing motion in a 2D time sequence of US images. Additionally, to improve the visibility of liver focal lesions, an approach to determine spatio-temporal correspondence between the US sequence and the 4D computed tomography (CT) examination was developed, implemented and tested. This proposed method of processing anatomical model, rigid registration approach and the implemented US tracking and fusion method were tested in 20 anonymized CT and in 10 clinical cases, respectively. The presented methodology can be applied and used with any older 2D US systems, which are currently commonly used in clinical practice.

  13. Image Processing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosio, M. A.

    1990-11-01

    ABSTRACT: A brief description of astronomical image software is presented. This software was developed in a Digital Micro Vax II Computer System. : St presenta una somera descripci6n del software para procesamiento de imagenes. Este software fue desarrollado en un equipo Digital Micro Vax II. : DATA ANALYSIS - IMAGE PROCESSING

  14. Textural analyses of carbon fiber materials by 2D-FFT of complex images obtained by high frequency eddy current imaging (HF-ECI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Martin H.; Heuer, Henning

    2012-04-01

    Carbon fiber based materials are used in many lightweight applications in aeronautical, automotive, machine and civil engineering application. By the increasing automation in the production process of CFRP laminates a manual optical inspection of each resin transfer molding (RTM) layer is not practicable. Due to the limitation to surface inspection, the quality parameters of multilayer 3 dimensional materials cannot be observed by optical systems. The Imaging Eddy- Current (EC) NDT is the only suitable inspection method for non-resin materials in the textile state that allows an inspection of surface and hidden layers in parallel. The HF-ECI method has the capability to measure layer displacements (misaligned angle orientations) and gap sizes in a multilayer carbon fiber structure. EC technique uses the variation of the electrical conductivity of carbon based materials to obtain material properties. Beside the determination of textural parameters like layer orientation and gap sizes between rovings, the detection of foreign polymer particles, fuzzy balls or visualization of undulations can be done by the method. For all of these typical parameters an imaging classification process chain based on a high resolving directional ECimaging device named EddyCus® MPECS and a 2D-FFT with adapted preprocessing algorithms are developed.

  15. Individual Recognition in Domestic Cattle (Bos taurus): Evidence from 2D-Images of Heads from Different Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, Marjorie; Deputte, Bertrand L.; Heyman, Yvan; Baudoin, Claude

    2009-01-01

    Background In order to maintain cohesion of groups, social animals need to process social information efficiently. Visual individual recognition, which is distinguished from mere visual discrimination, has been studied in only few mammalian species. In addition, most previous studies used either a small number of subjects or a few various views as test stimuli. Dairy cattle, as a domestic species allow the testing of a good sample size and provide a large variety of test stimuli due to the morphological diversity of breeds. Hence cattle are a suitable model for studying individual visual recognition. This study demonstrates that cattle display visual individual recognition and shows the effect of both familiarity and coat diversity in discrimination. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether 8 Prim'Holstein heifers could recognize 2D-images of heads of one cow (face, profiles, ¾ views) from those of other cows. Experiments were based on a simultaneous discrimination paradigm through instrumental conditioning using food rewards. In Experiment 1, all images represented familiar cows (belonging to the same social group) from the Prim'Holstein breed. In Experiments 2, 3 and 4, images were from unfamiliar (unknown) individuals either from the same breed or other breeds. All heifers displayed individual recognition of familiar and unfamiliar individuals from their own breed. Subjects reached criterion sooner when recognizing a familiar individual than when recognizing an unfamiliar one (Exp 1: 3.1±0.7 vs. Exp 2: 5.2±1.2 sessions; Z = 1.99, N = 8, P = 0.046). In addition almost all subjects recognized unknown individuals from different breeds, however with greater difficulty. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrated that cattle have efficient individual recognition based on categorization capacities. Social familiarity improved their performance. The recognition of individuals with very different coat characteristics from the subjects was

  16. Rapid and efficient redox processes within 2D covalent organic framework thin films.

    PubMed

    DeBlase, Catherine R; Hernández-Burgos, Kenneth; Silberstein, Katharine E; Rodríguez-Calero, Gabriel G; Bisbey, Ryan P; Abruña, Héctor D; Dichtel, William R

    2015-03-24

    Two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (2D COFs) are ideally suited for organizing redox-active subunits into periodic, permanently porous polymer networks of interest for pseudocapacitive energy storage. Here we describe a method for synthesizing crystalline, oriented thin films of a redox-active 2D COF on Au working electrodes. The thickness of the COF film was controlled by varying the initial monomer concentration. A large percentage (80-99%) of the anthraquinone groups are electrochemically accessible in films thinner than 200 nm, an order of magnitude improvement over the same COF prepared as a randomly oriented microcrystalline powder. As a result, electrodes functionalized with oriented COF films exhibit a 400% increase in capacitance scaled to electrode area as compared to those functionalized with the randomly oriented COF powder. These results demonstrate the promise of redox-active COFs for electrical energy storage and highlight the importance of controlling morphology for optimal performance.

  17. Assessing 3D tunnel position in ACL reconstruction using a novel single image 3D-2D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, X.; Yau, W. P.; Otake, Y.; Cheung, P. Y. S.; Hu, Y.; Taylor, R. H.

    2012-02-01

    The routinely used procedure for evaluating tunnel positions following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions based on standard X-ray images is known to pose difficulties in terms of obtaining accurate measures, especially in providing three-dimensional tunnel positions. This is largely due to the variability in individual knee joint pose relative to X-ray plates. Accurate results were reported using postoperative CT. However, its extensive usage in clinical routine is hampered by its major requirement of having CT scans of individual patients, which is not available for most ACL reconstructions. These difficulties are addressed through the proposed method, which aligns a knee model to X-ray images using our novel single-image 3D-2D registration method and then estimates the 3D tunnel position. In the proposed method, the alignment is achieved by using a novel contour-based 3D-2D registration method wherein image contours are treated as a set of oriented points. However, instead of using some form of orientation weighting function and multiplying it with a distance function, we formulate the 3D-2D registration as a probability density estimation using a mixture of von Mises-Fisher-Gaussian (vMFG) distributions and solve it through an expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. Compared with the ground-truth established from postoperative CT, our registration method in an experiment using a plastic phantom showed accurate results with errors of (-0.43°+/-1.19°, 0.45°+/-2.17°, 0.23°+/-1.05°) and (0.03+/-0.55, -0.03+/-0.54, -2.73+/-1.64) mm. As for the entry point of the ACL tunnel, one of the key measurements, it was obtained with high accuracy of 0.53+/-0.30 mm distance errors.

  18. Visualizing 3D objects from 2D cross sectional images displayed in-situ versus ex-situ.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L; Stetten, George

    2010-03-01

    The present research investigates how mental visualization of a 3D object from 2D cross sectional images is influenced by displacing the images from the source object, as is customary in medical imaging. Three experiments were conducted to assess people's ability to integrate spatial information over a series of cross sectional images in order to visualize an object posed in 3D space. Participants used a hand-held tool to reveal a virtual rod as a sequence of cross-sectional images, which were displayed either directly in the space of exploration (in-situ) or displaced to a remote screen (ex-situ). They manipulated a response stylus to match the virtual rod's pitch (vertical slant), yaw (horizontal slant), or both. Consistent with the hypothesis that spatial colocation of image and source object facilitates mental visualization, we found that although single dimensions of slant were judged accurately with both displays, judging pitch and yaw simultaneously produced differences in systematic error between in-situ and ex-situ displays. Ex-situ imaging also exhibited errors such that the magnitude of the response was approximately correct but the direction was reversed. Regression analysis indicated that the in-situ judgments were primarily based on spatiotemporal visualization, while the ex-situ judgments relied on an ad hoc, screen-based heuristic. These findings suggest that in-situ displays may be useful in clinical practice by reducing error and facilitating the ability of radiologists to visualize 3D anatomy from cross sectional images.

  19. Known-Component 3D-2D Registration for Image Guidance and Quality Assurance in Spine Surgery Pedicle Screw Placement

    PubMed Central

    Uneri, A.; Stayman, J. W.; De Silva, T.; Wang, A. S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Gokaslan, Z. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To extend the functionality of radiographic/fluoroscopic imaging systems already within standard spine surgery workflow to: 1) provide guidance of surgical device analogous to an external tracking system; and 2) provide intraoperative quality assurance (QA) of the surgical product. Methods Using fast, robust 3D-2D registration in combination with 3D models of known components (surgical devices), the 3D pose determination was solved to relate known components to 2D projection images and 3D preoperative CT in near-real-time. Exact and parametric models of the components were used as input to the algorithm to evaluate the effects of model fidelity. The proposed algorithm employs the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) to maximize gradient correlation (GC) between measured projections and simulated forward projections of components. Geometric accuracy was evaluated in a spine phantom in terms of target registration error at the tool tip (TREx), and angular deviation (TREϕ) from planned trajectory. Results Transpedicle surgical devices (probe tool and spine screws) were successfully guided with TREx <2 mm and TREϕ<0.5° given projection views separated by at least >30° (easily accommodated on a mobile C-arm). QA of the surgical product based on 3D-2D registration demonstrated the detection of pedicle screw breach with TREx <1 mm, demonstrating a trend of improved accuracy correlated to the fidelity of the component model employed. Conclusions 3D-2D registration combined with 3D models of known surgical components provides a novel method for near-real-time guidance and quality assurance using a mobile C-arm without external trackers or fiducial markers. Ongoing work includes determination of optimal views based on component shape and trajectory, improved robustness to anatomical deformation, and expanded preclinical testing in spine and intracranial surgeries. PMID:26028805

  20. Known-component 3D-2D registration for image guidance and quality assurance in spine surgery pedicle screw placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneri, A.; Stayman, J. W.; De Silva, T.; Wang, A. S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Gokaslan, Z. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose. To extend the functionality of radiographic / fluoroscopic imaging systems already within standard spine surgery workflow to: 1) provide guidance of surgical device analogous to an external tracking system; and 2) provide intraoperative quality assurance (QA) of the surgical product. Methods. Using fast, robust 3D-2D registration in combination with 3D models of known components (surgical devices), the 3D pose determination was solved to relate known components to 2D projection images and 3D preoperative CT in near-real-time. Exact and parametric models of the components were used as input to the algorithm to evaluate the effects of model fidelity. The proposed algorithm employs the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) to maximize gradient correlation (GC) between measured projections and simulated forward projections of components. Geometric accuracy was evaluated in a spine phantom in terms of target registration error at the tool tip (TREx), and angular deviation (TREΦ) from planned trajectory. Results. Transpedicle surgical devices (probe tool and spine screws) were successfully guided with TREx<2 mm and TREΦ <0.5° given projection views separated by at least >30° (easily accommodated on a mobile C-arm). QA of the surgical product based on 3D-2D registration demonstrated the detection of pedicle screw breach with TREx<1 mm, demonstrating a trend of improved accuracy correlated to the fidelity of the component model employed. Conclusions. 3D-2D registration combined with 3D models of known surgical components provides a novel method for near-real-time guidance and quality assurance using a mobile C-arm without external trackers or fiducial markers. Ongoing work includes determination of optimal views based on component shape and trajectory, improved robustness to anatomical deformation, and expanded preclinical testing in spine and intracranial surgeries.

  1. Applying a 2D based CAD scheme for detecting micro-calcification clusters using digital breast tomosynthesis images: an assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has emerged as a promising imaging modality for screening mammography. However, visually detecting micro-calcification clusters depicted on DBT images is a difficult task. Computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes for detecting micro-calcification clusters depicted on mammograms can achieve high performance and the use of CAD results can assist radiologists in detecting subtle micro-calcification clusters. In this study, we compared the performance of an available 2D based CAD scheme with one that includes a new grouping and scoring method when applied to both projection and reconstructed DBT images. We selected a dataset involving 96 DBT examinations acquired on 45 women. Each DBT image set included 11 low dose projection images and a varying number of reconstructed image slices ranging from 18 to 87. In this dataset 20 true-positive micro-calcification clusters were visually detected on the projection images and 40 were visually detected on the reconstructed images, respectively. We first applied the CAD scheme that was previously developed in our laboratory to the DBT dataset. We then tested a new grouping method that defines an independent cluster by grouping the same cluster detected on different projection or reconstructed images. We then compared four scoring methods to assess the CAD performance. The maximum sensitivity level observed for the different grouping and scoring methods were 70% and 88% for the projection and reconstructed images with a maximum false-positive rate of 4.0 and 15.9 per examination, respectively. This preliminary study demonstrates that (1) among the maximum, the minimum or the average CAD generated scores, using the maximum score of the grouped cluster regions achieved the highest performance level, (2) the histogram based scoring method is reasonably effective in reducing false-positive detections on the projection images but the overall CAD sensitivity is lower due to lower signal-to-noise ratio

  2. Automatic localization of target vertebrae in spine surgery using fast CT-to-fluoroscopy (3D-2D) image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Localization of target vertebrae is an essential step in minimally invasive spine surgery, with conventional methods relying on "level counting" - i.e., manual counting of vertebrae under fluoroscopy starting from readily identifiable anatomy (e.g., the sacrum). The approach requires an undesirable level of radiation, time, and is prone to counting errors due to the similar appearance of vertebrae in projection images; wrong-level surgery occurs in 1 of every ~3000 cases. This paper proposes a method to automatically localize target vertebrae in x-ray projections using 3D-2D registration between preoperative CT (in which vertebrae are preoperatively labeled) and intraoperative fluoroscopy. The registration uses an intensity-based approach with a gradient-based similarity metric and the CMA-ES algorithm for optimization. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and a robust similarity metric are computed on GPU to accelerate the process. Evaluation in clinical CT data included 5,000 PA and LAT projections randomly perturbed to simulate human variability in setup of mobile intraoperative C-arm. The method demonstrated 100% success for PA view (projection error: 0.42mm) and 99.8% success for LAT view (projection error: 0.37mm). Initial implementation on GPU provided automatic target localization within about 3 sec, with further improvement underway via multi-GPU. The ability to automatically label vertebrae in fluoroscopy promises to streamline surgical workflow, improve patient safety, and reduce wrong-site surgeries, especially in large patients for whom manual methods are time consuming and error prone.

  3. Methods in Astronomical Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörsäter, S.

    A Brief Introductory Note History of Astronomical Imaging Astronomical Image Data Images in Various Formats Digitized Image Data Digital Image Data Philosophy of Astronomical Image Processing Properties of Digital Astronomical Images Human Image Processing Astronomical vs. Computer Science Image Processing Basic Tools of Astronomical Image Processing Display Applications Calibration of Intensity Scales Calibration of Length Scales Image Re-shaping Feature Enhancement Noise Suppression Noise and Error Analysis Image Processing Packages: Design of AIPS and MIDAS AIPS MIDAS Reduction of CCD Data Bias Subtraction Clipping Preflash Subtraction Dark Subtraction Flat Fielding Sky Subtraction Extinction Correction Deconvolution Methods Rebinning/Combining Summary and Prospects for the Future

  4. Tracking contrast agents using real-time 2D photoacoustic imaging system for cardiac applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsson, Ragnar; Montilla, Leonardo; Ingram, Pier; Witte, Russell S.

    2009-02-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a rapidly developing imaging modality that can detect optical contrast agents with high sensitivity. While detectors in PA imaging have traditionally been single element ultrasound transducers, use of array systems is desirable because they potentially provide high frame rates to capture dynamic events, such as injection and distribution of contrast in clinical applications. We present preliminary data consisting of 40 second sequences of coregistered pulse-echo (PE) and PA images acquired simultaneously in real time using a clinical ultrasonic machine. Using a 7 MHz linear array, the scanner allowed simultaneous acquisition of inphase-quadrature (IQ) data on 64 elements at a rate limited by the illumination source (Q-switched laser at 20 Hz) with spatial resolution determined to be 0.6 mm (axial) and 0.4 mm (lateral). PA images had a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 35 dB without averaging. The sequences captured the injection and distribution of an infrared-absorbing contrast agent into a cadaver rat heart. From these data, a perfusion time constant of 0.23 s-1 was estimated. After further refinement, the system will be tested in live animals. Ultimately, an integrated system in the clinic could facilitate inexpensive molecular screening for coronary artery disease.

  5. 2D and 3D Refraction Based X-ray Imaging Suitable for Clinical and Pathological Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Masami; Bando, Hiroko; Ueno, Ei

    2007-01-19

    The first observation of micro papillary (MP) breast cancer by x-ray dark-field imaging (XDFI) and the first observation of the 3D x-ray internal structure of another breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS), are reported. The specimen size for the sheet-shaped MP was 26 mm x 22 mm x 2.8 mm, and that for the rod-shaped DCIS was 3.6 mm in diameter and 4.7 mm in height. The experiment was performed at the Photon Factory, KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. We achieved a high-contrast x-ray image by adopting a thickness-controlled transmission-type angular analyzer that allows only refraction components from the object for 2D imaging. This provides a high-contrast image of cancer-cell nests, cancer cells and stroma. For x-ray 3D imaging, a new algorithm due to the refraction for x-ray CT was created. The angular information was acquired by x-ray optics diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI). The number of data was 900 for each reconstruction. A reconstructed CT image may include ductus lactiferi, micro calcification and the breast gland. This modality has the possibility to open up a new clinical and pathological diagnosis using x-ray, offering more precise inspection and detection of early signs of breast cancer.

  6. Magnetic resonance image reconstruction using trained geometric directions in 2D redundant wavelets domain and non-convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Ning, Bende; Qu, Xiaobo; Guo, Di; Hu, Changwei; Chen, Zhong

    2013-11-01

    Reducing scanning time is significantly important for MRI. Compressed sensing has shown promising results by undersampling the k-space data to speed up imaging. Sparsity of an image plays an important role in compressed sensing MRI to reduce the image artifacts. Recently, the method of patch-based directional wavelets (PBDW) which trains geometric directions from undersampled data has been proposed. It has better performance in preserving image edges than conventional sparsifying transforms. However, obvious artifacts are presented in the smooth region when the data are highly undersampled. In addition, the original PBDW-based method does not hold obvious improvement for radial and fully 2D random sampling patterns. In this paper, the PBDW-based MRI reconstruction is improved from two aspects: 1) An efficient non-convex minimization algorithm is modified to enhance image quality; 2) PBDW are extended into shift-invariant discrete wavelet domain to enhance the ability of transform on sparsifying piecewise smooth image features. Numerical simulation results on vivo magnetic resonance images demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the original PBDW in terms of removing artifacts and preserving edges.

  7. Hardware support for shape decoding from 2D-region-based image representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privat, Gilles; Le Hin, Ivan

    1997-01-01

    Graphics systems have long been using standard libraries or APIs to insulate applications from implementation specifics. The same approach is applicable to natural image representations based on object primitives, such as proposed for MPEG4 standardization. The rendering of these image objects can be hidden behind APIs and supported either in hardware or software, depending on the level of representation they address, so that higher-level manipulation of these objects is made independent of the pixel level. We evaluate the trade-offs involved in the choice of these primitives to be used as pivotal intermediate representations. The example addressed is shape coding for image regions obtained from segmentation. Shape coding primitives based on either contour (chain codes), union of elementary patterns and alphaplane are evaluated with regard to both the possibility to support them on different architecture models and the level of functionalities they make available.

  8. 3D information from 2D images recorded in the European Modular Cultivation System on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solheim, B. G. B.

    2009-12-01

    The European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) on the ISS allows long-term biological experiments, e.g. on plants. Video cameras provide near real-time 2D images from these experiments. A method to obtain 3D coordinates and stereoscopic images from these 2D images has been developed and is described in this paper. The procedure was developed to enhance the data output of the MULTIGEN-1 experiment in 2007. One of the main objectives of the experiment was to study growth movements of the Arabidopsis plants and the effect of gravity on these. 3D data were important during parts of the experiment and the paper presents the method developed to acquire 3D data, the accuracy of the data, limitations to the technique and ways to improve the accuracy. Sequences of 3D data obtained from the MULTIGEN-1 experiment are used to illustrate the potential of this newfound capability of the EMCS. In the experiment setup, a positional depth accuracy of about ±0.4 mm for relative object distances and an absolute depth accuracy of about ±1.4 mm for time dependent phenomena was reached. The ability to both view biological specimens in 3D as well as obtaining quantitative 3D data added greatly to the scientific output of the MULTIGEN-1 experiment. The uses of the technique to other researchers and their experiments are discussed.

  9. 3D/2D model-to-image registration applied to TIPS surgery.

    PubMed

    Jomier, Julien; Bullitt, Elizabeth; Van Horn, Mark; Pathak, Chetna; Aylward, Stephen R

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a novel model-to-image registration technique which aligns a 3-dimensional model of vasculature with two semiorthogonal fluoroscopic projections. Our vascular registration method is used to intra-operatively initialize the alignment of a catheter and a preoperative vascular model in the context of image-guided TIPS (Transjugular, Intrahepatic, Portosystemic Shunt formation) surgery. Registration optimization is driven by the intensity information from the projection pairs at sample points along the centerlines of the model. Our algorithm shows speed, accuracy and consistency given clinical data.

  10. Membrane-mirror-based display for viewing 2D and 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Stuart; Mason, Steven; Mair, Leslie S.; Waddell, Peter; Fraser, Simon M.

    1999-05-01

    Stretchable Membrane Mirrors (SMMs) have been developed at the University of Strathclyde as a cheap, lightweight and variable focal length alternative to conventional fixed- curvature glass based optics. A SMM uses a thin sheet of aluminized polyester film which is stretched over a specially shaped frame, forming an airtight cavity behind the membrane. Removal of air from that cavity causes the resulting air pressure difference to force the membrane back into a concave shape. Controlling the pressure difference acting over the membrane now controls the curvature or f/No. of the mirror. Mirrors from 0.15-m to 1.2-m in diameter have been constructed at the University of Strathclyde. The use of lenses and mirrors to project real images in space is perhaps one of the simplest forms of 3D display. When using conventional optics however, there are severe financial restrictions on what size of image forming element may be used, hence the appeal of a SMM. The mirrors have been used both as image forming elements and directional screens in volumetric, stereoscopic and large format simulator displays. It was found that the use of these specular reflecting surfaces greatly enhances the perceived image quality of the resulting magnified display.

  11. Learning-based roof style classification in 2D satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Andi; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Xin; Agam, Gady

    2015-05-01

    Accurately recognizing building roof style leads to a much more realistic 3D building modeling and rendering. In this paper, we propose a novel system for image based roof style classification using machine learning technique. Our system is capable of accurately recognizing four individual roof styles and a complex roof which is composed of multiple parts. We make several novel contributions in this paper. First, we propose an algorithm that segments a complex roof to parts which enable our system to recognize the entire roof based on recognition of each part. Second, to better characterize a roof image, we design a new feature extracted from a roof edge image. We demonstrate that this feature has much better performance compared to recognition results generated by Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG), Scale-invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) and Local Binary Patterns (LBP). Finally, to generate a classifier, we propose a learning scheme that trains the classifier using both synthetic and real roof images. Experiment results show that our classifier performs well on several test collections.

  12. Precise Evaluation of Anthropometric 2D Software Processing of Hand in Comparison with Direct Method

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Ehsanollah; Soury, Shiva; Zadeh, Akbar Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Various studies carried out on different photo anthropometry, but each one had some deficiencies which during the years they have been resolved. The objective of this paper is to test the efficiency of two-dimensional image processing software in photo anthropometry of hand. In this applied research, 204 office workers and industrial workers were selected. Their hands were measured by manual with photo anthropometric methods. In this study, designing the “Hand Photo Anthropometry Set,” we tried to fix the angle and distance of the camera in all of the photos. Thus, some of the common mistakes in photo anthropometric method got controlled. The taken photos were analyzed by Digimizer software, version 4.1.1.0 and Digital Caliper (Model: Mitutoyo Corp., Tokyo, Japan) was used via manual method. t-test statistical test on data revealed that there is no significant difference between the manual and photo anthropometric results (P > 0.05) and the correlation coefficients for hand dimensions are similar in both methods illustrated in the range of 0.71-0.95. The statistical analyses showed that photo anthropometry can be replaced with manual methods. Furthermore, it can provide a great help to develop an anthropometric database for work gloves manufacturers. Since the hand anthropometry is a necessary input for tool design, this survey can be used to determine the percentiles of workers’ hands. PMID:24696802

  13. New Insights to the Sawtooth Oscillation (m/n=1/1 mode) in Hot Plasmas based on High Resolution 2-D Images of Te Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    H.K. Park, N.C. Luhmann, Jr, A.J.H. Donné, C.W. Domier, T. Munsat, M.J. Van de Pol, and the TEXTOR Team

    2007-11-26

    Two dimensional (2-D) images of electron temperature fluctuations with high temporal and spatial resolution have been employed to study the sawtooth oscillation (m/n=1/1 mode) in Toroidal EXperiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR) tokamak plasmas. 2-D imaging data revealed new physics which were not available in previous studies based on the 1-D electron temperature measurement and X-ray tomography. Review of the physics of the sawtooth oscillation is given by comparative studies with prominent theoretical models suggest that a new physics paradigm is needed to describe the reconnection physics of the sawtooth oscillation. The new insights are: A pressure driven instability (not a ballooning mode) leads to the X-point reconnection process. The reconnection process is identified as a random 3-D local reconnection process with a helical structure. The reconnection time scale is similar for different types of sawtooth oscillation ("kink" and tearing type) and is significantly faster than the resistive time scale. Heat flow from the core to the outside of the inversion radius during the reconnection process is highly collective rather than stochastic.

  14. EEG-based cognitive load of processing events in 3D virtual worlds is lower than processing events in 2D displays.

    PubMed

    Dan, Alex; Reiner, Miriam

    2016-08-31

    Interacting with 2D displays, such as computer screens, smartphones, and TV, is currently a part of our daily routine; however, our visual system is built for processing 3D worlds. We examined the cognitive load associated with a simple and a complex task of learning paper-folding (origami) by observing 2D or stereoscopic 3D displays. While connected to an electroencephalogram (EEG) system, participants watched a 2D video of an instructor demonstrating the paper-folding tasks, followed by a stereoscopic 3D projection of the same instructor (a digital avatar) illustrating identical tasks. We recorded the power of alpha and theta oscillations and calculated the cognitive load index (CLI) as the ratio of the average power of frontal theta (Fz.) and parietal alpha (Pz). The results showed a significantly higher cognitive load index associated with processing the 2D projection as compared to the 3D projection; additionally, changes in the average theta Fz power were larger for the 2D conditions as compared to the 3D conditions, while alpha average Pz power values were similar for 2D and 3D conditions for the less complex task and higher in the 3D state for the more complex task. The cognitive load index was lower for the easier task and higher for the more complex task in 2D and 3D. In addition, participants with lower spatial abilities benefited more from the 3D compared to the 2D display. These findings have implications for understanding cognitive processing associated with 2D and 3D worlds and for employing stereoscopic 3D technology over 2D displays in designing emerging virtual and augmented reality applications.

  15. Heterogeneity of Particle Deposition by Pixel Analysis of 2D Gamma Scintigraphy Images

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Miao; Zeman, Kirby; Hurd, Harry; Donaldson, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Heterogeneity of inhaled particle deposition in airways disease may be a sensitive indicator of physiologic changes in the lungs. Using planar gamma scintigraphy, we developed new methods to locate and quantify regions of high (hot) and low (cold) particle deposition in the lungs. Methods: Initial deposition and 24 hour retention images were obtained from healthy (n=31) adult subjects and patients with mild cystic fibrosis lung disease (CF) (n=14) following inhalation of radiolabeled particles (Tc99m-sulfur colloid, 5.4 μm MMAD) under controlled breathing conditions. The initial deposition image of the right lung was normalized to (i.e., same median pixel value), and then divided by, a transmission (Tc99m) image in the same individual to obtain a pixel-by-pixel ratio image. Hot spots were defined where pixel values in the deposition image were greater than 2X those of the transmission, and cold spots as pixels where the deposition image was less than 0.5X of the transmission. The number ratio (NR) of the hot and cold pixels to total lung pixels, and the sum ratio (SR) of total counts in hot pixels to total lung counts were compared between healthy and CF subjects. Other traditional measures of regional particle deposition, nC/P and skew of the pixel count histogram distribution, were also compared. Results: The NR of cold spots was greater in mild CF, 0.221±0.047(CF) vs. 0.186±0.038 (healthy) (p<0.005) and was significantly correlated with FEV1 %pred in the patients (R=−0.70). nC/P (central to peripheral count ratio), skew of the count histogram, and hot NR or SR were not different between the healthy and mild CF patients. Conclusions: These methods may provide more sensitive measures of airway function and localization of deposition that might be useful for assessing treatment efficacy in these patients. PMID:25393109

  16. A universal and ultrasensitive vectorial nanomechanical sensor for imaging 2D force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lépinay, Laure Mercier; Pigeau, Benjamin; Besga, Benjamin; Vincent, Pascal; Poncharal, Philippe; Arcizet, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    The miniaturization of force probes into nanomechanical oscillators enables ultrasensitive investigations of forces on dimensions smaller than their characteristic length scales. It also unravels the vectorial character of the force field and how its topology impacts the measurement. Here we present an ultrasensitive method for imaging two-dimensional vectorial force fields by optomechanically following the bidimensional Brownian motion of a singly clamped nanowire. This approach relies on angular and spectral tomography of its quasi-frequency-degenerated transverse mechanical polarizations: immersing the nanoresonator in a vectorial force field not only shifts its eigenfrequencies but also rotates the orientation of the eigenmodes, as a nanocompass. This universal method is employed to map a tunable electrostatic force field whose spatial gradients can even dominate the intrinsic nanowire properties. Enabling vectorial force field imaging with demonstrated sensitivities of attonewton variations over the nanoprobe Brownian trajectory will have a strong impact on scientific exploration at the nanoscale.

  17. Label free biochemical 2D and 3D imaging using secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John S; Vickerman, John C; Winograd, Nicholas

    2011-10-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) provides a method for the detection of native and exogenous compounds in biological samples on a cellular scale. Through the development of novel ion beams the amount of molecular signal available from the sample surface has been increased. Through the introduction of polyatomic ion beams, particularly C(60), ToF-SIMS can now be used to monitor molecular signals as a function of depth as the sample is eroded thus proving the ability to generate 3D molecular images. Here we describe how this new capability has led to the development of novel instrumentation for 3D molecular imaging while also highlighting the importance of sample preparation and discuss the challenges that still need to be overcome to maximise the impact of the technique.

  18. A Novel Spectral Data Processing Procedure on Multi-Object Fiber Spectral Data Based on 2-D Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Ye, Z. F.; Xu, X.

    2016-01-01

    The data processing procedures currently used on most multi-object fiber spectroscopic telescopes, such as Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Anglo-Australia Telescope (AAT), etc., are based on one-dimensional (1-D) algorithms. In this paper, LAMOST is taken as an example to display the proposed multi-object fiber spectral data processing procedure. In the using processing procedure on LAMOST, after the pretreatment process, the two-dimensional (2-D) observed raw data are extracted into 1-D intermediate data simply based on 1-D model. Then the subsequent key steps are all done by 1-D algorithms. However, this processing procedure is not in accord with the formation mechanism of the observed spectra. Therefore, it brings a considerable error in each step. To solve the problem, we propose a novel processing procedure that has not been used on LAMOST or other telescopes. The modules of the procedure are reordered, and the main steps are all based on 2-D algorithms. The principles of the core algorithms are explained in detail. Besides, some partial experimental results are shown to prove the effectiveness and superiority of the 2-D algorithms.

  19. Region-Based Feature Interpretation for Recognizing 3D Models in 2D images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Likewise, if two model lines are colinear or are connected at their endpoints, they must do the same in the image (again, within some bounds, to account...not well defined. Is a flowerpot part of the plant object? The answer depends on the vision task, and even then may be ambiguous or allow overlapping...However, not all have been tried, either in psychological tests or in vision systems. Proximity: Features are close to each other. Edge Connectivity

  20. Distributed computing architecture for image-based wavefront sensing and 2D FFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Dean, Bruce H.; Haghani, Shadan

    2006-06-01

    Image-based wavefront sensing provides significant advantages over interferometric-based wavefront sensors such as optical design simplicity and stability. However, the image-based approach is computationally intensive, and therefore, applications utilizing the image-based approach gain substantial benefits using specialized high-performance computing architectures. The development and testing of these computing architectures are essential to missions such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Terrestrial Planet Finder-Coronagraph (TPF-C and CorSpec), and the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT). The algorithms implemented on these specialized computing architectures make use of numerous two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) which necessitate an all-to-all communication when applied on a distributed computational architecture. Several solutions for distributed computing are presented with an emphasis on a 64 Node cluster of digital signal processors (DSPs) and multiple DSP field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), offering a novel application of low-diameter graph theory. Timing results and performance analysis are presented. The solutions offered could be applied to other computationally complex all-to-all communication problems.

  1. Distributed Computing Architecture for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing and 2 D FFTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Dean, Bruce H.; Haghani, Shadan

    2006-01-01

    Image-based wavefront sensing (WFS) provides significant advantages over interferometric-based wavefi-ont sensors such as optical design simplicity and stability. However, the image-based approach is computational intensive, and therefore, specialized high-performance computing architectures are required in applications utilizing the image-based approach. The development and testing of these high-performance computing architectures are essential to such missions as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Terrestial Planet Finder-Coronagraph (TPF-C and CorSpec), and Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT). The development of these specialized computing architectures require numerous two-dimensional Fourier Transforms, which necessitate an all-to-all communication when applied on a distributed computational architecture. Several solutions for distributed computing are presented with an emphasis on a 64 Node cluster of DSPs, multiple DSP FPGAs, and an application of low-diameter graph theory. Timing results and performance analysis will be presented. The solutions offered could be applied to other all-to-all communication and scientifically computationally complex problems.

  2. Image processing occupancy sensor

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2016-09-27

    A system and method of detecting occupants in a building automation system environment using image based occupancy detection and position determinations. In one example, the system includes an image processing occupancy sensor that detects the number and position of occupants within a space that has controllable building elements such as lighting and ventilation diffusers. Based on the position and location of the occupants, the system can finely control the elements to optimize conditions for the occupants, optimize energy usage, among other advantages.

  3. 2-D Precise Radiation Mapping of Sedimentary Core Using Imaging Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, M.; Tsuchiya, N.

    2006-12-01

    The imaging plate (IP) is a storage film coated with photostimulated phosphor (BaFBr: Eu2+), and the latent images produced by irradiation of the imaging plate are read by superficial scanning with stimulation light and are reconstructed as two-dimensional dot images on a computer display. It has an excellent performance for radiation detection, and its advantages include an ease of use, a high position resolution (up to 25ƒÊm), a large detection area (up to 35'43cm2), a high detection sensitivity with high signal-to- noise ratio, an extremely wide dynamic range of dose, a sensitivity to several kinds of radiation, and an erasing capability for reuse (Hareyama et al., 2000). In this study, in order to develop a nondestructive, precise and large area evaluation method of sedimentary structure, an application of autoradiography using IP is attempted to marine sediments. Imaging plate (BAS-MS2040 Fujifilm Co. Ltd., 20'~40 cm2) was cut into rectangular five pieces (4'~40 cm2). Whole round marine sedimentary cores were divided into two half for duplicate and they were covered with a plastic wrap. The rectangular IP were put along the center line of plane side of half round. The exposure in the low temperature was for 48 hours in a shield box. The latent images produced by irradiation of the IP were read out by using the BAS-2500 imaging analyzer (Fujifilm Co. Ltd.). Radiation dose of IP is output as PSL value, that is unique dose units and quantities of IP system. Position resolution was set to 50ƒÊm. Marine sedimentary cores including volcanic ash layer were measured using IP and Natural Gamma Logger (NGL), which is measuring instrument for marine sediments in practice use, to compare their measuring ability. As a result of experiment, it becomes clear that high dose distribution is found at volcanic ash layer with IP, meanwhile it can't be found with NGL. The content of radiation source in volcanic ash layer is supposed to be high compared with other layers

  4. Automatic Evaluation of Scan Adequacy and Dysplasia Metrics in 2-D Ultrasound Images of the Neonatal Hip.

    PubMed

    Quader, Niamul; Hodgson, Antony J; Mulpuri, Kishore; Schaeffer, Emily; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2017-03-21

    Ultrasound (US) imaging of an infant's hip joint is widely used for early detection of developmental dysplasia of the hip. In current US-based diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip, trained clinicians acquire US images and, if they judge them to be adequate (i.e., to contain relevant hip joint structures), analyze them manually to extract clinically useful dysplasia metrics. However, both the scan adequacy classification and dysplasia metrics extraction steps exhibit significant variability within and between both clinicians and institutions, which can result in significant over- and undertreatment rates. To reduce the subjectivity resulting from this variability, we propose a computational image analysis technique that automatically identifies adequate images and subsequently extracts dysplasia metrics from these 2-D US images. Our automatic method uses local phase symmetry-based image measures to robustly identify intensity-invariant geometric features of bone/cartilage boundaries from the US images. Using the extracted geometric features, we trained a random forest classifier to classify images as adequate or inadequate, and in the adequate images we used a subset of the geometric features to calculate key dysplasia metrics. We validated our method on a data set of 693 US scans collected from 35 infants. Our approach produces excellent agreement with clinician adequacy classifications (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.985) and in reducing variability in the measured developmental dysplasia of the hip metrics (p < 0.05). The automatically computed dysplasia metrics appear to be slightly biased toward higher Graf categories than the manually estimated metrics, which could potentially reduce missed early diagnoses.

  5. 2D and 3D GPR imaging of structural ceilings in historic and existing constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colla, Camilla

    2014-05-01

    GPR applications in civil engineering are to date quite diversified. With respect to civil constructions and monumental buildings, detection of voids, cavities, layering in structural elements, variation of geometry, of moisture content, of materials, areas of decay, defects, cracks have been reported in timber, concrete and masonry elements. Nonetheless, many more fields of investigation remain unexplored. This contribution gives an account of a variety of examples of structural ceilings investigation by GPR radar in reflection mode, either as 2D or 3D data acquisition and visualisation. Ceilings have a pre-eminent role in buildings as they contribute to a good structural behaviour of the construction. Primarily, the following functions can be listed for ceilings: a) they carry vertical dead and live loads on floors and distribute such loads to the vertical walls; b) they oppose to external horizontal forces such as wind loads and earthquakes helping to transfer such forces from the loaded element to the other walls; c) they contribute to create the box skeleton and behaviour of a building, connecting the different load bearing walls and reducing the slenderness and flexural instability of such walls. Therefore, knowing how ceilings are made in specific buildings is of paramount importance for architects and structural engineers. According to the type of building and age of construction, ceilings may present very different solutions and materials. Moreover, in existing constructions, ceilings may have been substituted, modified or strengthened due to material decay or to change of use of the building. These alterations may often go unrecorded in technical documentation or technical drawings may be unavailable. In many cases, the position, orientation and number of the load carrying elements in ceilings may be hidden or not be in sight, due for example to the presence of false ceilings or to technical plants. GPR radar can constitute a very useful tool for

  6. Quantum image processing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastriani, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a number of problems concerning the practical (real) implementation of the techniques known as quantum image processing. The most serious problem is the recovery of the outcomes after the quantum measurement, which will be demonstrated in this work that is equivalent to a noise measurement, and it is not considered in the literature on the subject. It is noteworthy that this is due to several factors: (1) a classical algorithm that uses Dirac's notation and then it is coded in MATLAB does not constitute a quantum algorithm, (2) the literature emphasizes the internal representation of the image but says nothing about the classical-to-quantum and quantum-to-classical interfaces and how these are affected by decoherence, (3) the literature does not mention how to implement in a practical way (at the laboratory) these proposals internal representations, (4) given that quantum image processing works with generic qubits, this requires measurements in all axes of the Bloch sphere, logically, and (5) among others. In return, the technique known as quantum Boolean image processing is mentioned, which works with computational basis states (CBS), exclusively. This methodology allows us to avoid the problem of quantum measurement, which alters the results of the measured except in the case of CBS. Said so far is extended to quantum algorithms outside image processing too.

  7. A Stochastic Hill Climbing Approach for Simultaneous 2D Alignment and Clustering of Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Cyril F; Bonnet, Frederic; Elmlund, Dominika; Elmlund, Hans

    2016-06-07

    A critical step in the analysis of novel cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single-particle datasets is the identification of homogeneous subsets of images. Methods for solving this problem are important for data quality assessment, ab initio 3D reconstruction, and analysis of population diversity due to the heterogeneous nature of macromolecules. Here we formulate a stochastic algorithm for identification of homogeneous subsets of images. The purpose of the method is to generate improved 2D class averages that can be used to produce a reliable 3D starting model in a rapid and unbiased fashion. We show that our method overcomes inherent limitations of widely used clustering approaches and proceed to test the approach on six publicly available experimental cryo-EM datasets. We conclude that, in each instance, ab initio 3D reconstructions of quality suitable for initialization of high-resolution refinement are produced from the cluster centers.

  8. 2D and 3D Terahertz Imaging and X-Rays CT for Sigillography Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, M.; Durand, R.; Bassel, L.; Recur, B.; Balacey, H.; Bou Sleiman, J.; Perraud, J.-B.; Mounaix, P.

    2017-04-01

    Seals are part of our cultural heritage but the study of these objects is limited because of their fragility. Terahertz and X-Ray imaging are used to analyze a collection of wax seals from the fourteenth to eighteenth centuries. In this work, both techniques are compared in order to discuss their advantages and limits and their complementarity for conservation state study of the samples. Thanks to 3D analysis and reconstructions, defects and fractures are detected with an estimation of their depth position. The path from the parchment tongue inside the seals is also detected.

  9. 2D and 3D Terahertz Imaging and X-Rays CT for Sigillography Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, M.; Durand, R.; Bassel, L.; Recur, B.; Balacey, H.; Bou Sleiman, J.; Perraud, J.-B.; Mounaix, P.

    2017-01-01

    Seals are part of our cultural heritage but the study of these objects is limited because of their fragility. Terahertz and X-Ray imaging are used to analyze a collection of wax seals from the fourteenth to eighteenth centuries. In this work, both techniques are compared in order to discuss their advantages and limits and their complementarity for conservation state study of the samples. Thanks to 3D analysis and reconstructions, defects and fractures are detected with an estimation of their depth position. The path from the parchment tongue inside the seals is also detected.

  10. High-accuracy 2D digital image correlation measurements using low-cost imaging lenses: implementation of a generalized compensation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Bing; Yu, Liping; Wu, Dafang

    2014-02-01

    The ideal pinhole imaging model commonly assumed for an ordinary two-dimensional digital image correlation (2D-DIC) system is neither perfect nor stable because of the existence of small out-of-plane motion of the test sample surface that occurred after loading, small out-of-plane motion of the sensor target due to temperature variation of a camera and unavoidable geometric distortion of an imaging lens. In certain cases, these disadvantages can lead to significant errors in the measured displacements and strains. Although a high-quality bilateral telecentric lens has been strongly recommended to be used in the 2D-DIC system as an essential optical component to achieve high-accuracy measurement, it is not generally applicable due to its fixed field of view, limited depth of focus and high cost. To minimize the errors associated with the imperfectness and instability of a common 2D-DIC system using a low-cost imaging lens, a generalized compensation method using a non-deformable reference sample is proposed in this work. With the proposed method, the displacement of the reference sample rigidly attached behind the test sample is first measured using 2D-DIC, and then it is fitted using a parametric model. The fitted parametric model is then used to correct the displacements of the deformed sample to remove the influences of these unfavorable factors. The validity of the proposed compensation method is first verified using out-of-plane translation, out-of-plane rotation, in-plane translation tests and their combinations. Uniaxial tensile tests of an aluminum specimen were also performed to quantitatively examine the strain accuracy of the proposed compensation method. Experiments show that the proposed compensation method is an easy-to-implement yet effective technique for achieving high-accuracy deformation measurement using an ordinary 2D-DIC system.

  11. Performance of a 2D image-based anthropometric measurement and clothing sizing system.

    PubMed

    Meunier, P; Yin, S

    2000-10-01

    Two-dimensional, image-based anthropometric measurement systems offer an interesting alternative to traditional and three-dimensional methods in applications such as clothing sizing. These automated systems are attractive because of their low cost and the speed with which they can measure size and determine the best-fitting garment. Although these systems have appeal in this type of application, not much is known about the accuracy and precision of the measurements they take. In this paper, the performance of one such system was assessed. The accuracy of the system was analyzed using a database of 349 subjects (male and female) who were also measured with traditional anthropometric tools and techniques, and the precision was estimated through repeated measurements of both a plastic mannequin and a human subject. The results of the system were compared with those of trained anthropometrists, and put in perspective relative to clothing sizing requirements and short-term body changes. It was concluded that image-based systems are capable of providing anthropometric measurements that are quite comparable to traditional measurement methods (performed by skilled measurers), both in terms of accuracy and repeatability.

  12. Tangential 2-D Edge Imaging for GPI and Edge/Impurity Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ricardo Maqueda; Dr. Fred M. Levinton

    2011-12-23

    Nova Photonics, Inc. has a collaborative effort at the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This collaboration, based on fast imaging of visible phenomena, has provided key insights on edge turbulence, intermittency, and edge phenomena such as edge localized modes (ELMs) and multi-faceted axisymmetric radiation from the edge (MARFE). Studies have been performed in all these areas. The edge turbulence/intermittency studies make use of the Gas Puff Imaging diagnostic developed by the Principal Investigator (Ricardo Maqueda) together with colleagues from PPPL. This effort is part of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) edge, scrape-off layer and divertor group joint activity (DSOL-15: Inter-machine comparison of blob characteristics). The edge turbulence/blob study has been extended from the current location near the midplane of the device to the lower divertor region of NSTX. The goal of this effort was to study turbulence born blobs in the vicinity of the X-point region and their circuit closure on divertor sheaths or high density regions in the divertor. In the area of ELMs and MARFEs we have studied and characterized the mode structure and evolution of the ELM types observed in NSTX, as well as the study of the observed interaction between MARFEs and ELMs. This interaction could have substantial implications for future devices where radiative divertor regions are required to maintain detachment from the divertor plasma facing components.

  13. Intraoperative image-based multiview 2D/3D registration for image-guided orthopaedic surgery: incorporation of fiducial-based C-arm tracking and GPU-acceleration.

    PubMed

    Otake, Yoshito; Armand, Mehran; Armiger, Robert S; Kutzer, Michael D; Basafa, Ehsan; Kazanzides, Peter; Taylor, Russell H

    2012-04-01

    Intraoperative patient registration may significantly affect the outcome of image-guided surgery (IGS). Image-based registration approaches have several advantages over the currently dominant point-based direct contact methods and are used in some industry solutions in image-guided radiation therapy with fixed X-ray gantries. However, technical challenges including geometric calibration and computational cost have precluded their use with mobile C-arms for IGS. We propose a 2D/3D registration framework for intraoperative patient registration using a conventional mobile X-ray imager combining fiducial-based C-arm tracking and graphics processing unit (GPU)-acceleration. The two-stage framework 1) acquires X-ray images and estimates relative pose between the images using a custom-made in-image fiducial, and 2) estimates the patient pose using intensity-based 2D/3D registration. Experimental validations using a publicly available gold standard dataset, a plastic bone phantom and cadaveric specimens have been conducted. The mean target registration error (mTRE) was 0.34 ± 0.04 mm (success rate: 100%, registration time: 14.2 s) for the phantom with two images 90° apart, and 0.99 ± 0.41 mm (81%, 16.3 s) for the cadaveric specimen with images 58.5° apart. The experimental results showed the feasibility of the proposed registration framework as a practical alternative for IGS routines.

  14. Intraoperative Image-based Multiview 2D/3D Registration for Image-Guided Orthopaedic Surgery: Incorporation of Fiducial-Based C-Arm Tracking and GPU-Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Armand, Mehran; Armiger, Robert S.; Kutzer, Michael D.; Basafa, Ehsan; Kazanzides, Peter; Taylor, Russell H.

    2012-01-01

    Intraoperative patient registration may significantly affect the outcome of image-guided surgery (IGS). Image-based registration approaches have several advantages over the currently dominant point-based direct contact methods and are used in some industry solutions in image-guided radiation therapy with fixed X-ray gantries. However, technical challenges including geometric calibration and computational cost have precluded their use with mobile C-arms for IGS. We propose a 2D/3D registration framework for intraoperative patient registration using a conventional mobile X-ray imager combining fiducial-based C-arm tracking and graphics processing unit (GPU)-acceleration. The two-stage framework 1) acquires X-ray images and estimates relative pose between the images using a custom-made in-image fiducial, and 2) estimates the patient pose using intensity-based 2D/3D registration. Experimental validations using a publicly available gold standard dataset, a plastic bone phantom and cadaveric specimens have been conducted. The mean target registration error (mTRE) was 0.34 ± 0.04 mm (success rate: 100%, registration time: 14.2 s) for the phantom with two images 90° apart, and 0.99 ± 0.41 mm (81%, 16.3 s) for the cadaveric specimen with images 58.5° apart. The experimental results showed the feasibility of the proposed registration framework as a practical alternative for IGS routines. PMID:22113773

  15. [EOS imaging acquisition system : 2D/3D diagnostics of the skeleton].

    PubMed

    Tarhan, T; Froemel, D; Meurer, A

    2015-12-01

    The application spectrum of the EOS imaging acquisition system is versatile. It is especially useful in the diagnostics and planning of corrective surgical procedures in complex orthopedic cases. The application is indicated when assessing deformities and malpositions of the spine, pelvis and lower extremities. It can also be used in the assessment and planning of hip and knee arthroplasty. For the first time physicians have the opportunity to conduct examinations of the whole body under weight-bearing conditions in order to anticipate the effects of a planned surgical procedure on the skeletal system as a whole and therefore on the posture of the patient. Compared to conventional radiographic examination techniques, such as x-ray or computed tomography, the patient is exposed to much less radiation. Therefore, the pediatric application of this technique can be described as reasonable.

  16. Processing Of Binary Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, H. S.

    1985-07-01

    An overview of the recent progress in the area of digital processing of binary images in the context of document processing is presented here. The topics covered include input scan, adaptive thresholding, halftoning, scaling and resolution conversion, data compression, character recognition, electronic mail, digital typography, and output scan. Emphasis has been placed on illustrating the basic principles rather than descriptions of a particular system. Recent technology advances and research in this field are also mentioned.

  17. Image Processing for Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, R.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The Image Processing for Teaching project provides a powerful medium to excite students about science and mathematics, especially children from minority groups and others whose needs have not been met by traditional teaching. Using professional-quality software on microcomputers, students explore a variety of scientific data sets, including…

  18. Image processing and reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, Rick

    2012-06-15

    This talk will examine some mathematical methods for image processing and the solution of underdetermined, linear inverse problems. The talk will have a tutorial flavor, mostly accessible to undergraduates, while still presenting research results. The primary approach is the use of optimization problems. We will find that relaxing the usual assumption of convexity will give us much better results.

  19. Image-Processing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Hull, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    IMAGEP manipulates digital image data to effect various processing, analysis, and enhancement functions. It is keyboard-driven program organized into nine subroutines. Within subroutines are sub-subroutines also selected via keyboard. Algorithm has possible scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications in study of flows in materials, analysis of steels and ores, and pathology, respectively.

  20. Communication: two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (2D-CARS): simultaneous planar imaging and multiplex spectroscopy in a single laser shot.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J

    2013-06-14

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has been widely used as a powerful tool for chemical sensing, molecular dynamics measurements, and rovibrational spectroscopy since its development over 30 years ago, finding use in fields of study as diverse as combustion diagnostics, cell biology, plasma physics, and the standoff detection of explosives. The capability for acquiring resolved CARS spectra in multiple spatial dimensions within a single laser shot has been a long-standing goal for the study of dynamical processes, but has proven elusive because of both phase-matching and detection considerations. Here, by combining new phase matching and detection schemes with the high efficiency of femtosecond excitation of Raman coherences, we introduce a technique for single-shot two-dimensional (2D) spatial measurements of gas phase CARS spectra. We demonstrate a spectrometer enabling both 2D plane imaging and spectroscopy simultaneously, and present the instantaneous measurement of 15,000 spatially correlated rotational CARS spectra in N2 and air over a 2D field of 40 mm(2).

  1. Communication: Two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (2D-CARS): Simultaneous planar imaging and multiplex spectroscopy in a single laser shot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2013-06-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has been widely used as a powerful tool for chemical sensing, molecular dynamics measurements, and rovibrational spectroscopy since its development over 30 years ago, finding use in fields of study as diverse as combustion diagnostics, cell biology, plasma physics, and the standoff detection of explosives. The capability for acquiring resolved CARS spectra in multiple spatial dimensions within a single laser shot has been a long-standing goal for the study of dynamical processes, but has proven elusive because of both phase-matching and detection considerations. Here, by combining new phase matching and detection schemes with the high efficiency of femtosecond excitation of Raman coherences, we introduce a technique for single-shot two-dimensional (2D) spatial measurements of gas phase CARS spectra. We demonstrate a spectrometer enabling both 2D plane imaging and spectroscopy simultaneously, and present the instantaneous measurement of 15 000 spatially correlated rotational CARS spectra in N2 and air over a 2D field of 40 mm2.

  2. Communication: Two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (2D-CARS): Simultaneous planar imaging and multiplex spectroscopy in a single laser shot

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has been widely used as a powerful tool for chemical sensing, molecular dynamics measurements, and rovibrational spectroscopy since its development over 30 years ago, finding use in fields of study as diverse as combustion diagnostics, cell biology, plasma physics, and the standoff detection of explosives. The capability for acquiring resolved CARS spectra in multiple spatial dimensions within a single laser shot has been a long-standing goal for the study of dynamical processes, but has proven elusive because of both phase-matching and detection considerations. Here, by combining new phase matching and detection schemes with the high efficiency of femtosecond excitation of Raman coherences, we introduce a technique for single-shot two-dimensional (2D) spatial measurements of gas phase CARS spectra. We demonstrate a spectrometer enabling both 2D plane imaging and spectroscopy simultaneously, and present the instantaneous measurement of 15, 000 spatially correlated rotational CARS spectra in N2 and air over a 2D field of 40 mm2.

  3. How isopolyanions self-assemble and condense into a 2D tungsten oxide crystal: HRTEM imaging of atomic arrangement in an intermediate new hexagonal phase

    SciTech Connect

    Chemseddine, A. Bloeck, U.

    2008-10-15

    The structure and structural evolution of tungstic acid solutions, sols and gels are investigated by high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM). Acidification of sodium tungstate solutions, through a proton exchange resin, is achieved in a way that ensures homogeneity in size and shape of intermediate polytungstic species. Gelation is shown to involve polycondensation followed by a self-assembling process of polytungstic building blocks leading to sheets with a layered hexagonal structure. Single layers of this new metastable phase are composed of three-, four- and six-membered rings of WO{sub 6} octahedra located in the same plane. This is the first time that a 2D oxide crystal is isolated and observed by direct atomic resolution. Further ageing and structural evolution leading to single sheets of 2D ReO{sub 3}-type structure is directly observed by HRTEM. Based on this atomic level imaging, a model for the formation of the oxide network structure involving a self-assembling process of tritungstic based polymeric chain is proposed. The presence of tritungstic groups and their packing in electrochromic WO{sub 3} films made by different techniques is discussed. - Graphical abstract: From the isopolyanion to the extended bulk tungsten oxide: HRTEM imaging.

  4. On non-invasive 2D and 3D Chromatic White Light image sensors for age determination of latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Ronny; Gruhn, Stefan; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Bräutigam, Anja

    2012-10-10

    The feasibility of 2D-intensity and 3D-topography images from a non-invasive Chromatic White Light (CWL) sensor for the age determination of latent fingerprints is investigated. The proposed method might provide the means to solve the so far unresolved issue of determining a fingerprints age in forensics. Conducting numerous experiments for an indoor crime scene using selected surfaces, different influences on the aging of fingerprints are investigated and the resulting aging variability is determined in terms of inter-person, intra-person, inter-finger and intra-finger variation. Main influence factors are shown to be the sweat composition, temperature, humidity, wind, UV-radiation, surface type, contamination of the finger with water-containing substances, resolution and measured area size, whereas contact time, contact pressure and smearing of the print seem to be of minor importance. Such influences lead to a certain experimental variability in inter-person and intra-person variation, which is higher than the inter-finger and intra-finger variation. Comparing the aging behavior of 17 different features using 1490 time series with a total of 41,520 fingerprint images, the great potential of the CWL technique in combination with the binary pixel feature from prior work is shown. Performing three different experiments for the classification of fingerprints into the two time classes [0, 5 h] and [5, 24 h], a maximum classification performance of 79.29% (kappa=0.46) is achieved for a general case, which is further improved for special cases. The statistical significance of the two best-performing features (both binary pixel versions based on 2D-intensity images) is manually shown and a feature fusion is performed, highlighting the strong dependency of the features on each other. It is concluded that such method might be combined with additional capturing devices, such as microscopes or spectroscopes, to a very promising age estimation scheme.

  5. Image Processing Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-30

    Technical Journal, Vol. 36, pp. 653-709, May 1957. -50- 4. Image Restoration anJ Enhdikcement Projects Imaje restoration ani image enhancement are...n (9K =--i_ (9) -sn =0- 2. where o is the noise energy ani I is an identity matrix. n Color Imaje Scanner Calibration: A common problem in the...line of the imaje , and >at. The statistics cf the process N(k) can now be given in terms of the statistics of m , 8 2 , and the sequence W= (cLe (5

  6. Image processing techniques for acoustic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Brian P.

    1991-06-01

    The primary goal of this research is to test the effectiveness of various image processing techniques applied to acoustic images generated in MATLAB. The simulated acoustic images have the same characteristics as those generated by a computer model of a high resolution imaging sonar. Edge detection and segmentation are the two image processing techniques discussed in this study. The two methods tested are a modified version of the Kalman filtering and median filtering.

  7. Registration of dynamic multiview 2D ultrasound and late gadolinium enhanced images of the heart: Application to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy characterization.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Julián; Simon, Antoine; Halbert, Edgar; Tavard, François; Carré, François; Hernández, Alfredo; Donal, Erwan; Schnell, Frédéric; Garreau, Mireille

    2016-02-01

    Describing and analyzing heart multiphysics requires the acquisition and fusion of multisensor cardiac images. Multisensor image fusion enables a combined analysis of these heterogeneous modalities. We propose to register intra-patient multiview 2D+t ultrasound (US) images with multiview late gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images acquired during cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in order to fuse mechanical and tissue state information. The proposed procedure registers both US and LGE to cine MRI. The correction of slice misalignment and the rigid registration of multiview LGE and cine MRI are studied, to select the most appropriate similarity measure. It showed that mutual information performs the best for LGE slice misalignment correction and for LGE and cine registration. Concerning US registration, dynamic endocardial contours resulting from speckle tracking echocardiography were exploited in a geometry-based dynamic registration. We propose the use of an adapted dynamic time warping procedure to synchronize cardiac dynamics in multiview US and cine MRI. The registration of US and LGE MRI was evaluated on a dataset of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A visual assessment of 330 left ventricular regions from US images of 28 patients resulted in 92.7% of regions successfully aligned with cardiac structures in LGE. Successfully-aligned regions were then used to evaluate the abilities of strain indicators to predict the presence of fibrosis. Longitudinal peak-strain and peak-delay of aligned left ventricular regions were computed from corresponding regional strain curves from US. The Mann-Withney test proved that the expected values of these indicators change between the populations of regions with and without fibrosis (p < 0.01). ROC curves otherwise proved that the presence of fibrosis is one factor amongst others which modifies longitudinal peak-strain and peak-delay.

  8. The cone penetration test and 2D imaging resistivity as tools to simulate the distribution of hydrocarbons in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Corona, M.; García, J. A.; Taller, G.; Polgár, D.; Bustos, E.; Plank, Z.

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of geophysical electrical surveys is to determine the subsurface resistivity distribution by making measurements on the ground surface. From these measurements, the true resistivity of the subsurface can be estimated. The ground resistivity is related to various geological parameters, such as the mineral and fluid content, porosity and degree of water saturation in the rock. Electrical resistivity surveys have been used for many decades in hydrogeological, mining and geotechnical investigations. More recently, they have been used for environmental surveys. To obtain a more accurate subsurface model than is possible with a simple 1-D model, a more complex model must be used. In a 2-D model, the resistivity values are allowed to vary in one horizontal direction (usually referred to as the x direction) but are assumed to be constant in the other horizontal (the y) direction. A more realistic model would be a fully 3-D model where the resistivity values are allowed to change in all three directions. In this research, a simulation of the cone penetration test and 2D imaging resistivity are used as tools to simulate the distribution of hydrocarbons in soil.

  9. Constraining Polarized Foregrounds for EoR Experiments I: 2D Power Spectra from the PAPER-32 Imaging Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, S. A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Nunhokee, C. D.; Bernardi, G.; Pober, J. C.; Ali, Z. S.; Bradley, R. F.; Carilli, C. L.; DeBoer, D. R.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Jacobs, D. C.; Klima, P.; MacMahon, D. H. E.; Manley, J. R.; Moore, D. F.; Parsons, A. R.; Stefan, I. I.; Walbrugh, W. P.

    2016-06-01

    Current generation low-frequency interferometers constructed with the objective of detecting the high-redshift 21 cm background aim to generate power spectra of the brightness temperature contrast of neutral hydrogen in primordial intergalactic medium. Two-dimensional (2D) power spectra (power in Fourier modes parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight) that formed from interferometric visibilities have been shown to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth foregrounds (known as the wedge) and spectrally structured 21 cm background emission (the EoR window). However, polarized foregrounds are known to possess spectral structure due to Faraday rotation, which can leak into the EoR window. In this work we create and analyze 2D power spectra from the PAPER-32 imaging array in Stokes I, Q, U, and V. These allow us to observe and diagnose systematic effects in our calibration at high signal-to-noise within the Fourier space most relevant to EoR experiments. We observe well-defined windows in the Stokes visibilities, with Stokes Q, U, and V power spectra sharing a similar wedge shape to that seen in Stokes I. With modest polarization calibration, we see no evidence that polarization calibration errors move power outside the wedge in any Stokes visibility to the noise levels attained. Deeper integrations will be required to confirm that this behavior persists to the depth required for EoR detection.

  10. Leaf Area Index Estimation in Vineyards from Uav Hyperspectral Data, 2d Image Mosaics and 3d Canopy Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisperakis, I.; Stentoumis, Ch.; Grammatikopoulos, L.; Karantzalos, K.

    2015-08-01

    The indirect estimation of leaf area index (LAI) in large spatial scales is crucial for several environmental and agricultural applications. To this end, in this paper, we compare and evaluate LAI estimation in vineyards from different UAV imaging datasets. In particular, canopy levels were estimated from i.e., (i) hyperspectral data, (ii) 2D RGB orthophotomosaics and (iii) 3D crop surface models. The computed canopy levels have been used to establish relationships with the measured LAI (ground truth) from several vines in Nemea, Greece. The overall evaluation indicated that the estimated canopy levels were correlated (r2 > 73%) with the in-situ, ground truth LAI measurements. As expected the lowest correlations were derived from the calculated greenness levels from the 2D RGB orthomosaics. The highest correlation rates were established with the hyperspectral canopy greenness and the 3D canopy surface models. For the later the accurate detection of canopy, soil and other materials in between the vine rows is required. All approaches tend to overestimate LAI in cases with sparse, weak, unhealthy plants and canopy.

  11. Retinomorphic image processing.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kuntal; Bhaumik, Kamales; Sarkar, Sandip

    2008-01-01

    The present work is aimed at understanding and explaining some of the aspects of visual signal processing at the retinal level while exploiting the same towards the development of some simple techniques in the domain of digital image processing. Classical studies on retinal physiology revealed the nature of contrast sensitivity of the receptive field of bipolar or ganglion cells, which lie in the outer and inner plexiform layers of the retina. To explain these observations, a difference of Gaussian (DOG) filter was suggested, which was subsequently modified to a Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG) filter for computational ease in handling two-dimensional retinal inputs. Till date almost all image processing algorithms, used in various branches of science and engineering had followed LOG or one of its variants. Recent observations in retinal physiology however, indicate that the retinal ganglion cells receive input from a larger area than the classical receptive fields. We have proposed an isotropic model for the non-classical receptive field of the retinal ganglion cells, corroborated from these recent observations, by introducing higher order derivatives of Gaussian expressed as linear combination of Gaussians only. In digital image processing, this provides a new mechanism of edge detection on one hand and image half-toning on the other. It has also been found that living systems may sometimes prefer to "perceive" the external scenario by adding noise to the received signals in the pre-processing level for arriving at better information on light and shade in the edge map. The proposed model also provides explanation to many brightness-contrast illusions hitherto unexplained not only by the classical isotropic model but also by some other Gestalt and Constructivist models or by non-isotropic multi-scale models. The proposed model is easy to implement both in the analog and digital domain. A scheme for implementation in the analog domain generates a new silicon retina

  12. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2014-11-01

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (˜1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ˜0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  13. Mapping near-field environments of plasmonic and 2D materials with photo-induced force imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumkur, Thejaswi U.; Doiron, Chloe; Yang, Xiao; Li, Bo; Swearer, Dayne F.; Cerjan, Benjamin W.; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Ringe, Emilie; Thomann, Isabell

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the ability to map photo-induced gradient forces in materials, using a setup akin to atomic force microscopy. This technique allows for the simultaneous characterization of topographical features and optical near-fields in materials, with a high spatio-temporal resolution. We show that the near-field gradient forces can be translated onto electric fields, enabling the mapping of plasmonic hot-spots in gold nanostructures, and the resolution of sub-10 nm features in photocatalytic materials. We further show that the dispersion-sensitive nature of near-field gradient forces can be used to image and distinguish atomically thin layers of 2-D materials, with high contrast.

  14. Estimation and application of 2-D scattering matrices for sparse array imaging of simulated damage in composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Westin B.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2017-02-01

    Reliable detection of damage in composites is critically important for failure prevention in the aerospace industry since these materials are more frequently being used in high stress applications. Structural health monitoring (SHM) via guided wave sensors mounted on or embedded within a composite structure can help detect and localize damage in real-time while potentially reducing overall maintenance costs. One approach to guided wave SHM is sparse array imaging via the minimum variance algorithm, and it has been shown in prior work that incorporating expected scattering from defects of interest can improve the quality of damage localization and characterization. For this study, simulated damage in the form of attached magnets was used for estimating scattering from recorded wavefield data. Data were recorded on a circle centered at the damage location from multiple incident directions before and after the magnets were attached. Baseline subtraction is used to estimate scattering patterns for each incident direction, and these patterns are combined and interpolated to form a full 2-D scattering matrix. This matrix is then incorporated into the minimum variance imaging algorithm, and the efficacy of this scattering estimation methodology is evaluated by comparing the resulting sparse array images to those generated using simpler scattering assumptions.

  15. An explicit shape-constrained MRF-based contour evolution method for 2-D medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Chittajallu, Deepak R; Paragios, Nikos; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2014-01-01

    Image segmentation is, in general, an ill-posed problem and additional constraints need to be imposed in order to achieve the desired segmentation result. While segmenting organs in medical images, which is the topic of this paper, a significant amount of prior knowledge about the shape, appearance, and location of the organs is available that can be used to constrain the solution space of the segmentation problem. Among the various types of prior information, the incorporation of prior information about shape, in particular, is very challenging. In this paper, we present an explicit shape-constrained MAP-MRF-based contour evolution method for the segmentation of organs in 2-D medical images. Specifically, we represent the segmentation contour explicitly as a chain of control points. We then cast the segmentation problem as a contour evolution problem, wherein the evolution of the contour is performed by iteratively solving a MAP-MRF labeling problem. The evolution of the contour is governed by three types of prior information, namely: (i) appearance prior, (ii) boundary-edgeness prior, and (iii) shape prior, each of which is incorporated as clique potentials into the MAP-MRF problem. We use the master-slave dual decomposition framework to solve the MAP-MRF labeling problem in each iteration. In our experiments, we demonstrate the application of the proposed method to the challenging problem of heart segmentation in non-contrast computed tomography data.

  16. Automatic Measurement of Thalamic Diameter in 2D Fetal Ultrasound Brain Images using Shape Prior Constrained Regularized Level Sets.

    PubMed

    Sridar, Pradeeba; Kumar, Ashnil; Li, Changyang; Woo, Joyce; Quinton, Ann; Benzie, Ron; Peek, Michael; Feng, Dagan; Ramarathnam, Krishna Kumar; Nanan, Ralph; Kim, Jinman

    2016-06-20

    We derived an automated algorithm for accurately measuring the thalamic diameter from 2D fetal ultrasound (US) brain images. The algorithm overcomes the inherent limitations of the US image modality: non-uniform density, missing boundaries, and strong speckle noise. We introduced a 'guitar' structure that represents the negative space surrounding the thalamic regions. The guitar acts as a landmark for deriving the widest points of the thalamus even when its boundaries are not identifiable. We augmented a generalized level-set framework with a shape prior and constraints derived from statistical shape models of the guitars; this framework was used to segment US images and measure the thalamic diameter. Our segmentation method achieved a higher mean Dice similarity coefficient, Hausdorff distance, specificity and reduced contour leakage when compared to other well-established methods. The automatic thalamic diameter measurement had an inter-observer variability of -0.56±2.29 millimeters compared to manual measurement by an expert sonographer. Our method was capable of automatically estimating the thalamic diameter, with the measurement accuracy on par with clinical assessment. Our method can be used as part of computer-assisted screening tools that automatically measure the biometrics of the fetal thalamus; these biometrics are linked to neuro-developmental outcomes.

  17. Image processing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eeckhout, E.; Pope, P.; Balick, L.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The primary objective of this project was to advance image processing and visualization technologies for environmental characterization. This was effected by developing and implementing analyses of remote sensing data from satellite and airborne platforms, and demonstrating their effectiveness in visualization of environmental problems. Many sources of information were integrated as appropriate using geographic information systems.

  18. Topological textures and their bifurcation processes in 2D ferromagnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jinlü; Yang, Guo-Hong; Jiang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, by the use of the topological current theory, the topological structures and the dynamic processes in thin-film ferromagnetic systems are investigated directly from the viewpoint of topology. It is found that the topological charge of a thin-film ferromagnetic system can be changed by annihilation or creation processes of opposite polarized vortex-antivortex pairs taking place at space-time singularities of the normalized magnetization vector field of the system, the variation of the topological charge is integer and can further be expressed in terms of the Hopf indices and Brouwer degrees of the magnetization vector field around the singularities. Moreover, the change of the topological charge of the system is crucial to vortex core reversal processes in ferromagnetic thin films. With the help of the topological current theory and implicit function theorem, the processes of vortex merging, splitting as well as vortex core reversal are discussed in detail.

  19. 2-D multi-frequency imaging of a tumor inclusion in homogeneous breast phantom using harmonic motion doppler imaging method.

    PubMed

    Kamali Tafreshi, Azadeh; Top, Can; Gencer, Nevzat

    2017-02-02

    Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging (HMMDI) is a novel imaging modality to image the coupled electrical and mechanical properties of body tissues. In this paper, we used two experimental systems with different receiver configurations to obtain HMMDI images from tissue mimicking phantoms at multiple vibration frequencies between 15 Hz and 35 Hz. In the first system, we used a spectrum analyzer to obtain the Doppler data in frequency domain, while in the second one, we used a homodyne receiver that was designed to acquire time domain data. The developed phantoms mimic elastic and dielectric properties of breast fat tissue, and include a 14 mm × 9 mm cylindrical inclusion representing tumor. A focused ultrasound probe was mechanically scanned in two lateral dimensions to generate HMMDI images of the phantoms. The inclusions were resolved inside the fat phantom using both experimental setups. Image resolution increased with increasing vibration frequency. The sensitivity of the designed receiver was higher compared to the spectrum analyzer measurements. The results also showed that time domain data acquisition should be used to fully exploit the potential of the HMMDI method.

  20. Development and validation of a 2D dam break process model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flooding due to dam or levee breach often results in detrimental impact on the people and their properties in the flooding zone. The embankment breach process is often caused by overtopping or internal erosion due to excessive water in a reservoir or a river. This study is to develop a practical nu...

  1. Development of process parameters for 22 nm PMOS using 2-D analytical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheran, A. H. Afifah; Menon, P. S.; Ahmad, I.; Shaari, S.; Faizah, Z. A. Noor

    2015-04-01

    The complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (CMOSFET) has become major challenge to scaling and integration. Innovation in transistor structures and integration of novel materials are necessary to sustain this performance trend. CMOS variability in the scaling technology becoming very important concern due to limitation of process control; over statistically variability related to the fundamental discreteness and materials. Minimizing the transistor variation through technology optimization and ensuring robust product functionality and performance is the major issue.In this article, the continuation study on process parameters variations is extended and delivered thoroughly in order to achieve a minimum leakage current (ILEAK) on PMOS planar transistor at 22 nm gate length. Several device parameters are varies significantly using Taguchi method to predict the optimum combination of process parameters fabrication. A combination of high permittivity material (high-k) and metal gate are utilized accordingly as gate structure where the materials include titanium dioxide (TiO2) and tungsten silicide (WSix). Then the L9 of the Taguchi Orthogonal array is used to analyze the device simulation where the results of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of Smaller-the-Better (STB) scheme are studied through the percentage influences of the process parameters. This is to achieve a minimum ILEAK where the maximum predicted ILEAK value by International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) 2011 is said to should not above 100 nA/µm. Final results shows that the compensation implantation dose acts as the dominant factor with 68.49% contribution in lowering the device's leakage current. The absolute process parameters combination results in ILEAK mean value of 3.96821 nA/µm where is far lower than the predicted value.

  2. Development of process parameters for 22 nm PMOS using 2-D analytical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Maheran, A. H. Afifah; Menon, P. S.; Shaari, S.; Ahmad, I.; Faizah, Z. A. Noor

    2015-04-24

    The complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (CMOSFET) has become major challenge to scaling and integration. Innovation in transistor structures and integration of novel materials are necessary to sustain this performance trend. CMOS variability in the scaling technology becoming very important concern due to limitation of process control; over statistically variability related to the fundamental discreteness and materials. Minimizing the transistor variation through technology optimization and ensuring robust product functionality and performance is the major issue.In this article, the continuation study on process parameters variations is extended and delivered thoroughly in order to achieve a minimum leakage current (I{sub LEAK}) on PMOS planar transistor at 22 nm gate length. Several device parameters are varies significantly using Taguchi method to predict the optimum combination of process parameters fabrication. A combination of high permittivity material (high-k) and metal gate are utilized accordingly as gate structure where the materials include titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and tungsten silicide (WSi{sub x}). Then the L9 of the Taguchi Orthogonal array is used to analyze the device simulation where the results of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of Smaller-the-Better (STB) scheme are studied through the percentage influences of the process parameters. This is to achieve a minimum I{sub LEAK} where the maximum predicted I{sub LEAK} value by International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) 2011 is said to should not above 100 nA/µm. Final results shows that the compensation implantation dose acts as the dominant factor with 68.49% contribution in lowering the device’s leakage current. The absolute process parameters combination results in I{sub LEAK} mean value of 3.96821 nA/µm where is far lower than the predicted value.

  3. Spatially selective 2D RF inner field of view (iFOV) diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) of the pediatric spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Chris J.; Middleton, Devon M.; Alizadeh, Mahdi; Finsterbusch, Jürgen; Raunig, David L.; Faro, Scott H.; Shah, Pallav; Krisa, Laura; Sinko, Rebecca; Delalic, Joan Z.; Mulcahey, M.J.; Mohamed, Feroze B.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance based diffusion imaging has been gaining more utility and clinical relevance over the past decade. Using conventional echo planar techniques, it is possible to acquire and characterize water diffusion within the central nervous system (CNS); namely in the form of Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). While each modality provides valuable clinical information in terms of the presence of diffusion and its directionality, both techniques are limited to assuming an ideal Gaussian distribution for water displacement with no intermolecular interactions. This assumption neglects pathological processes that are not Gaussian therefore reducing the amount of potentially clinically relevant information. Additions to the Gaussian distribution measured by the excess kurtosis, or peakedness, of the probabilistic model provide a better understanding of the underlying cellular structure. The objective of this work is to provide mathematical and experimental evidence that Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) can offer additional information about the micromolecular environment of the pediatric spinal cord. This is accomplished by a more thorough characterization of the nature of random water displacement within the cord. A novel DKI imaging sequence based on a tilted 2D spatially selective radio frequency pulse providing reduced field of view (FOV) imaging was developed, implemented, and optimized on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner, and tested on pediatric subjects (healthy subjects: 15; patients with spinal cord injury (SCI):5). Software was developed and validated for post processing of the DKI images and estimation of the tensor parameters. The results show statistically significant differences in mean kurtosis (p < 0.01) and radial kurtosis (p < 0.01) between healthy subjects and subjects with SCI. DKI provides incremental and novel information over conventional diffusion acquisitions when coupled with higher order estimation algorithms

  4. Fundamental Concepts of Digital Image Processing

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Twogood, R. E.

    1983-03-01

    The field of a digital-image processing has experienced dramatic growth and increasingly widespread applicability in recent years. Fortunately, advances in computer technology have kept pace with the rapid growth in volume of image data in these and other applications. Digital image processing has become economical in many fields of research and in industrial and military applications. While each application has requirements unique from the others, all are concerned with faster, cheaper, more accurate, and more extensive computation. The trend is toward real-time and interactive operations, where the user of the system obtains preliminary results within a short enough time that the next decision can be made by the human processor without loss of concentration on the task at hand. An example of this is the obtaining of two-dimensional (2-D) computer-aided tomography (CAT) images. A medical decision might be made while the patient is still under observation rather than days later.

  5. Viscous dissipation in 2D fluid dynamics as a symplectic process and its metriplectic representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blender, Richard; Badin, Gualtiero

    2017-03-01

    Dissipation can be represented in Hamiltonian mechanics in an extended phase space as a symplectic process. The method uses an auxiliary variable which represents the excitation of unresolved dynamics and a Hamiltonian for the interaction between the resolved dynamics and the auxiliary variable. This method is applied to viscous dissipation (including hyper-viscosity) in a two-dimensional fluid, for which the dynamics is non-canonical. We derive a metriplectic representation and suggest a measure for the entropy of the system.

  6. scikit-image: image processing in Python

    PubMed Central

    Schönberger, Johannes L.; Nunez-Iglesias, Juan; Boulogne, François; Warner, Joshua D.; Yager, Neil; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Yu, Tony

    2014-01-01

    scikit-image is an image processing library that implements algorithms and utilities for use in research, education and industry applications. It is released under the liberal Modified BSD open source license, provides a well-documented API in the Python programming language, and is developed by an active, international team of collaborators. In this paper we highlight the advantages of open source to achieve the goals of the scikit-image library, and we showcase several real-world image processing applications that use scikit-image. More information can be found on the project homepage, http://scikit-image.org. PMID:25024921

  7. scikit-image: image processing in Python.

    PubMed

    van der Walt, Stéfan; Schönberger, Johannes L; Nunez-Iglesias, Juan; Boulogne, François; Warner, Joshua D; Yager, Neil; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Yu, Tony

    2014-01-01

    scikit-image is an image processing library that implements algorithms and utilities for use in research, education and industry applications. It is released under the liberal Modified BSD open source license, provides a well-documented API in the Python programming language, and is developed by an active, international team of collaborators. In this paper we highlight the advantages of open source to achieve the goals of the scikit-image library, and we showcase several real-world image processing applications that use scikit-image. More information can be found on the project homepage, http://scikit-image.org.

  8. Tropical Oceanic Precipitation Processes Over Warm Pool: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Johnson, D.; Simpson, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rainfall is a key link in the hydrologic cycle as well as the primary heat source for the atmosphere. The vertical distribution of convective latent-heat release modulates the large-scale circulations of the topics. Furthermore, changes in the moisture distribution at middle and upper levels of the troposphere can affect cloud distributions and cloud liquid water and ice contents. How the incoming solar and outgoing longwave radiation respond to these changes in clouds is a major factor in assessing climate change. Present large-scale weather and climate model simulate processes only crudely, reducing confidence in their predictions on both global and regional scales. One of the most promising methods to test physical parameterizations used in General Circulation Models (GCMs) and climate models is to use field observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and physically realistic parameterizations of cloud microphysical processes, and allow for their complex interactions with solar and infrared radiative transfer processes. The CRMs can reasonably well resolve the evolution, structure, and life cycles of individual clouds and clouds systems. The major objective of this paper is to investigate the latent heating, moisture and momentum budgets associated with several convective systems developed during the TOGA COARE IFA - westerly wind burst event (late December, 1992). The tool for this study is the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysics scheme.

  9. A Cylindrical, Inner Volume Selecting 2D-T2-Prep Improves GRAPPA-Accelerated Image Quality in MRA of the Right Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Coristine, Andrew J.; Yerly, Jerome; Stuber, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background Two-dimensional (2D) spatially selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses may be used to excite restricted volumes. By incorporating a "pencil beam" 2D pulse into a T2-Prep, one may create a "2D-T2-Prep" that combines T2-weighting with an intrinsic outer volume suppression. This may particularly benefit parallel imaging techniques, where artefacts typically originate from residual foldover signal. By suppressing foldover signal with a 2D-T2-Prep, image quality may therefore improve. We present numerical simulations, phantom and in vivo validations to address this hypothesis. Methods A 2D-T2-Prep and a conventional T2-Prep were used with GRAPPA-accelerated MRI (R = 1.6). The techniques were first compared in numerical phantoms, where per pixel maps of SNR (SNRmulti), noise, and g-factor were predicted for idealized sequences. Physical phantoms, with compartments doped to mimic blood, myocardium, fat, and coronary vasculature, were scanned with both T2-Preparation techniques to determine the actual SNRmulti and vessel sharpness. For in vivo experiments, the right coronary artery (RCA) was imaged in 10 healthy adults, using accelerations of R = 1,3, and 6, and vessel sharpness was measured for each. Results In both simulations and phantom experiments, the 2D-T2-Prep improved SNR relative to the conventional T2-Prep, by an amount that depended on both the acceleration factor and the degree of outer volume suppression. For in vivo images of the RCA, vessel sharpness improved most at higher acceleration factors, demonstrating that the 2D-T2-Prep especially benefits accelerated coronary MRA. Conclusion Suppressing outer volume signal with a 2D-T2-Prep improves image quality particularly well in GRAPPA-accelerated acquisitions in simulations, phantoms, and volunteers, demonstrating that it should be considered when performing accelerated coronary MRA. PMID:27736866

  10. Image processing in planetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulchignoni, M.; Picchiotti, A.

    The authors summarize the state of art in the field of planetary image processing in terms of available data, required procedures and possible improvements. More than a technical description of the adopted algorithms, that are considered as the normal background of any research activity dealing with interpretation of planetary data, the authors outline the advances in planetology achieved as a consequence of the availability of better data and more sophisticated hardware. An overview of the available data base and of the organizational efforts to make the data accessible and updated constitutes a valuable reference for those people interested in getting information. A short description of the processing sequence, illustrated by an example which shows the quality of the obtained products and the improvement in each successive step of the processing procedure gives an idea of the possible use of this kind of information.

  11. Robust and highly performant ring detection algorithm for 3d particle tracking using 2d microscope imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afik, Eldad

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional particle tracking is an essential tool in studying dynamics under the microscope, namely, fluid dynamics in microfluidic devices, bacteria taxis, cellular trafficking. The 3d position can be determined using 2d imaging alone by measuring the diffraction rings generated by an out-of-focus fluorescent particle, imaged on a single camera. Here I present a ring detection algorithm exhibiting a high detection rate, which is robust to the challenges arising from ring occlusion, inclusions and overlaps, and allows resolving particles even when near to each other. It is capable of real time analysis thanks to its high performance and low memory footprint. The proposed algorithm, an offspring of the circle Hough transform, addresses the need to efficiently trace the trajectories of many particles concurrently, when their number in not necessarily fixed, by solving a classification problem, and overcomes the challenges of finding local maxima in the complex parameter space which results from ring clusters and noise. Several algorithmic concepts introduced here can be advantageous in other cases, particularly when dealing with noisy and sparse data. The implementation is based on open-source and cross-platform software packages only, making it easy to distribute and modify. It is implemented in a microfluidic experiment allowing real-time multi-particle tracking at 70 Hz, achieving a detection rate which exceeds 94% and only 1% false-detection.

  12. Robust and highly performant ring detection algorithm for 3d particle tracking using 2d microscope imaging

    PubMed Central

    Afik, Eldad

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle tracking is an essential tool in studying dynamics under the microscope, namely, fluid dynamics in microfluidic devices, bacteria taxis, cellular trafficking. The 3d position can be determined using 2d imaging alone by measuring the diffraction rings generated by an out-of-focus fluorescent particle, imaged on a single camera. Here I present a ring detection algorithm exhibiting a high detection rate, which is robust to the challenges arising from ring occlusion, inclusions and overlaps, and allows resolving particles even when near to each other. It is capable of real time analysis thanks to its high performance and low memory footprint. The proposed algorithm, an offspring of the circle Hough transform, addresses the need to efficiently trace the trajectories of many particles concurrently, when their number in not necessarily fixed, by solving a classification problem, and overcomes the challenges of finding local maxima in the complex parameter space which results from ring clusters and noise. Several algorithmic concepts introduced here can be advantageous in other cases, particularly when dealing with noisy and sparse data. The implementation is based on open-source and cross-platform software packages only, making it easy to distribute and modify. It is implemented in a microfluidic experiment allowing real-time multi-particle tracking at 70 Hz, achieving a detection rate which exceeds 94% and only 1% false-detection. PMID:26329642

  13. Imaging Agonist-Induced D2/D3 Receptor Desensitization and Internalization In Vivo with PET/fMRI.

    PubMed

    Sander, Christin Y; Hooker, Jacob M; Catana, Ciprian; Rosen, Bruce R; Mandeville, Joseph B

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of dopamine receptor desensitization and internalization, thereby proposing a new technique for non-invasive, in vivo measurements of receptor adaptations. The D2/D3 agonist quinpirole, which induces receptor internalization in vitro, was administered at graded doses in non-human primates while imaging with simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A pronounced temporal divergence between receptor occupancy and fMRI signal was observed: occupancy remained elevated while fMRI responded transiently. Analogous experiments with an antagonist (prochlorperazine) and a lower-affinity agonist (ropinirole) exhibited reduced temporal dissociation between occupancy and function, consistent with a mechanism of desensitization and internalization that depends upon drug efficacy and affinity. We postulated a model that incorporates internalization into a neurovascular-coupling relationship. This model yielded in vivo desensitization/internalization rates (0.2/min for quinpirole) consistent with published in vitro measurements. Overall, these results suggest that simultaneous PET/fMRI enables characterization of dynamic neuroreceptor adaptations in vivo, and may offer a first non-invasive method for assessing receptor desensitization and internalization.

  14. A 2D systems approach to iterative learning control for discrete linear processes with zero Markov parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladowski, Lukasz; Galkowski, Krzysztof; Cai, Zhonglun; Rogers, Eric; Freeman, Chris T.; Lewin, Paul L.

    2011-07-01

    In this article a new approach to iterative learning control for the practically relevant case of deterministic discrete linear plants with uniform rank greater than unity is developed. The analysis is undertaken in a 2D systems setting that, by using a strong form of stability for linear repetitive processes, allows simultaneous consideration of both trial-to-trial error convergence and along the trial performance, resulting in design algorithms that can be computed using linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Finally, the control laws are experimentally verified on a gantry robot that replicates a pick and place operation commonly found in a number of applications to which iterative learning control is applicable.

  15. Magmatism vs mushmatism: 2D thermo-mechanical modelling of crustal mush processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roele, K.; Morgan, J. V.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of 'mushmatism'- that a magma chamber resides in a crystalline state for the majority of its life, has been suggested as a plausible mechanism for observed crustal melt evolution. It is proposed that as melt is generated, its composition evolves as it rises buoyantly, reacting chemically with the surrounding crystal mush at progressively lower temperatures. It is therefore possible to explain formation of granitic melts and observed mafic-felsic layering in the crust using mush processes. It has previously been assumed that a high influx rate of molten material is required for large volumes of crustal melt to be produced. This has been modelled in the past with repetitive sill intrusion at unrealistically high rates (>3x107 m3a-1) to cause a large enough thermal perturbation of the geotherm to sustain eruptible melt in the shallow crust. However, these models are purely thermal and neglect the effects of melt segregation and mush processes on longevity of melt volumes in the crust. We have developed an axisymmetric thermo-mechanical model that includes mass transport described by coupled matrix compaction and buoyant melt segregation during repeated sill intrusion. Results are consistent with thermal models in that they demonstrate dominance of crystalline mush processes in the transient magma chamber at low-to-moderate intrusion rates. However, addition of buoyant segregation leads to formation of discrete high melt fraction layers as melt ascends through the emplacement zone. This causes a decoupling in location of maximum temperature and melt fraction not observed by purely thermal models. Our results therefore have significant implications for current methods of interpretation of geophysical data, in particular, calculating melt volumes and determining the depth of the magma chamber. In addition, transient reservoirs are produced at lower emplacement rates by the thermo-mechanical model because accumulated magma is evolved and able to remain liquid

  16. Robust initialization of 2D-3D image registration using the projection-slice theorem and phase correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Bom, M. J. van der; Bartels, L. W.; Gounis, M. J.; Homan, R.; Timmer, J.; Viergever, M. A.; Pluim, J. P. W.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The image registration literature comprises many methods for 2D-3D registration for which accuracy has been established in a variety of applications. However, clinical application is limited by a small capture range. Initial offsets outside the capture range of a registration method will not converge to a successful registration. Previously reported capture ranges, defined as the 95% success range, are in the order of 4-11 mm mean target registration error. In this article, a relatively computationally inexpensive and robust estimation method is proposed with the objective to enlarge the capture range. Methods: The method uses the projection-slice theorem in combination with phase correlation in order to estimate the transform parameters, which provides an initialization of the subsequent registration procedure. Results: The feasibility of the method was evaluated by experiments using digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from in vivo 3D-RX data. With these experiments it was shown that the projection-slice theorem provides successful estimates of the rotational transform parameters for perspective projections and in case of translational offsets. The method was further tested on ex vivo ovine x-ray data. In 95% of the cases, the method yielded successful estimates for initial mean target registration errors up to 19.5 mm. Finally, the method was evaluated as an initialization method for an intensity-based 2D-3D registration method. The uninitialized and initialized registration experiments had success rates of 28.8% and 68.6%, respectively. Conclusions: The authors have shown that the initialization method based on the projection-slice theorem and phase correlation yields adequate initializations for existing registration methods, thereby substantially enlarging the capture range of these methods.

  17. Leveraging Nanocavity Harmonics for Control of Optical Processes in 2D Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Akselrod, Gleb M; Ming, Tian; Argyropoulos, Christos; Hoang, Thang B; Lin, Yuxuan; Ling, Xi; Smith, David R; Kong, Jing; Mikkelsen, Maiken H

    2015-05-13

    Optical cavities with multiple tunable resonances have the potential to provide unique electromagnetic environments at two or more distinct wavelengths--critical for control of optical processes such as nonlinear generation, entangled photon generation, or photoluminescence (PL) enhancement. Here, we show a plasmonic nanocavity based on a nanopatch antenna design that has two tunable resonant modes in the visible spectrum separated by 350 nm and with line widths of ∼60 nm. The importance of utilizing two resonances simultaneously is demonstrated by integrating monolayer MoS2, a two-dimensional semiconductor, into the colloidally synthesized nanocavities. We observe a 2000-fold enhancement in the PL intensity of MoS2--which has intrinsically low absorption and small quantum yield--at room temperature, enabled by the combination of tailored absorption enhancement at the first harmonic and PL quantum-yield enhancement at the fundamental resonance.

  18. Robust 3D–2D image registration: application to spine interventions and vertebral labeling in the presence of anatomical deformation

    PubMed Central

    Otake, Yoshito; Wang, Adam S; Stayman, J Webster; Uneri, Ali; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vogt, Sebastian; Khanna, A Jay; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    We present a framework for robustly estimating registration between a 3D volume image and a 2D projection image and evaluate its precision and robustness in spine interventions for vertebral localization in the presence of anatomical deformation. The framework employs a normalized gradient information similarity metric and multi-start covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy optimization with local-restarts, which provided improved robustness against deformation and content mismatch. The parallelized implementation allowed orders-of-magnitude acceleration in computation time and improved the robustness of registration via multi-start global optimization. Experiments involved a cadaver specimen and two CT datasets (supine and prone) and 36 C-arm fluoroscopy images acquired with the specimen in four positions (supine, prone, supine with lordosis, prone with kyphosis), three regions (thoracic, abdominal, and lumbar), and three levels of geometric magnification (1.7, 2.0, 2.4). Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of projection distance error (PDE) between the estimated and true target points in the projection image, including 14 400 random trials (200 trials on the 72 registration scenarios) with initialization error up to ±200 mm and ±10°. The resulting median PDE was better than 0.1 mm in all cases, depending somewhat on the resolution of input CT and fluoroscopy images. The cadaver experiments illustrated the tradeoff between robustness and computation time, yielding a success rate of 99.993% in vertebral labeling (with `success' defined as PDE <5 mm) using 1,718 664 ± 96 582 function evaluations computed in 54.0 ± 3.5 s on a mid-range GPU (nVidia, GeForce GTX690). Parameters yielding a faster search (e.g., fewer multi-starts) reduced robustness under conditions of large deformation and poor initialization (99.535% success for the same data registered in 13.1 s), but given good initialization (e.g., ±5 mm, assuming a robust initial run) the

  19. Robust 3D-2D image registration: application to spine interventions and vertebral labeling in the presence of anatomical deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Yoshito; Wang, Adam S.; Webster Stayman, J.; Uneri, Ali; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vogt, Sebastian; Khanna, A. Jay; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2013-12-01

    We present a framework for robustly estimating registration between a 3D volume image and a 2D projection image and evaluate its precision and robustness in spine interventions for vertebral localization in the presence of anatomical deformation. The framework employs a normalized gradient information similarity metric and multi-start covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy optimization with local-restarts, which provided improved robustness against deformation and content mismatch. The parallelized implementation allowed orders-of-magnitude acceleration in computation time and improved the robustness of registration via multi-start global optimization. Experiments involved a cadaver specimen and two CT datasets (supine and prone) and 36 C-arm fluoroscopy images acquired with the specimen in four positions (supine, prone, supine with lordosis, prone with kyphosis), three regions (thoracic, abdominal, and lumbar), and three levels of geometric magnification (1.7, 2.0, 2.4). Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of projection distance error (PDE) between the estimated and true target points in the projection image, including 14 400 random trials (200 trials on the 72 registration scenarios) with initialization error up to ±200 mm and ±10°. The resulting median PDE was better than 0.1 mm in all cases, depending somewhat on the resolution of input CT and fluoroscopy images. The cadaver experiments illustrated the tradeoff between robustness and computation time, yielding a success rate of 99.993% in vertebral labeling (with ‘success’ defined as PDE <5 mm) using 1,718 664 ± 96 582 function evaluations computed in 54.0 ± 3.5 s on a mid-range GPU (nVidia, GeForce GTX690). Parameters yielding a faster search (e.g., fewer multi-starts) reduced robustness under conditions of large deformation and poor initialization (99.535% success for the same data registered in 13.1 s), but given good initialization (e.g., ±5 mm, assuming a robust initial

  20. Robust 3D-2D image registration: application to spine interventions and vertebral labeling in the presence of anatomical deformation.

    PubMed

    Otake, Yoshito; Wang, Adam S; Webster Stayman, J; Uneri, Ali; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vogt, Sebastian; Khanna, A Jay; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2013-12-07

    We present a framework for robustly estimating registration between a 3D volume image and a 2D projection image and evaluate its precision and robustness in spine interventions for vertebral localization in the presence of anatomical deformation. The framework employs a normalized gradient information similarity metric and multi-start covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy optimization with local-restarts, which provided improved robustness against deformation and content mismatch. The parallelized implementation allowed orders-of-magnitude acceleration in computation time and improved the robustness of registration via multi-start global optimization. Experiments involved a cadaver specimen and two CT datasets (supine and prone) and 36 C-arm fluoroscopy images acquired with the specimen in four positions (supine, prone, supine with lordosis, prone with kyphosis), three regions (thoracic, abdominal, and lumbar), and three levels of geometric magnification (1.7, 2.0, 2.4). Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of projection distance error (PDE) between the estimated and true target points in the projection image, including 14 400 random trials (200 trials on the 72 registration scenarios) with initialization error up to ±200 mm and ±10°. The resulting median PDE was better than 0.1 mm in all cases, depending somewhat on the resolution of input CT and fluoroscopy images. The cadaver experiments illustrated the tradeoff between robustness and computation time, yielding a success rate of 99.993% in vertebral labeling (with 'success' defined as PDE <5 mm) using 1,718 664 ± 96 582 function evaluations computed in 54.0 ± 3.5 s on a mid-range GPU (nVidia, GeForce GTX690). Parameters yielding a faster search (e.g., fewer multi-starts) reduced robustness under conditions of large deformation and poor initialization (99.535% success for the same data registered in 13.1 s), but given good initialization (e.g., ±5 mm, assuming a robust initial run) the

  1. NanSat- A Scientist Friendly Python Toolbox for Processing 2D Satellite EO and Model Raster Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vines, Aleksander; Korosov, Anton; Hansen, Morten W.; Yamakawa, Asuka; Olaussen, Tor

    2016-08-01

    Nansat [1], the Nansen Center Satellite data processing toolbox, is an open source framework for processing 2D satellite EO and model raster data.The main goal of Nansat is to facilitate easy development and testing of scientific algorithms, easy analysis of geospatial data, and efficient operational processing.The main functions of Nansat are to read and export geospatial data, to assign discovery and use metadata to the datasets and to implement basic operations, such as reprojection and subsampling, and a few pixel functions, e.g. for calculating incident angles. In addition, it is designed to be easy to extend, allowing users to add new scientific algorithms or support for new data formats.Nansat supports a large number of different satellites/sensors out of the box, among others, data from Envisat, Radarsat and Sentinel-1, as well as model datasets stored in NetCDF [2] format.

  2. Image Processing Diagnostics: Emphysema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Alex

    2009-10-01

    Currently the computerized tomography (CT) scan can detect emphysema sooner than traditional x-rays, but other tests are required to measure more accurately the amount of affected lung. CT scan images show clearly if a patient has emphysema, but is unable by visual scan alone, to quantify the degree of the disease, as it appears merely as subtle, barely distinct, dark spots on the lung. Our goal is to create a software plug-in to interface with existing open source medical imaging software, to automate the process of accurately diagnosing and determining emphysema severity levels in patients. This will be accomplished by performing a number of statistical calculations using data taken from CT scan images of several patients representing a wide range of severity of the disease. These analyses include an examination of the deviation from a normal distribution curve to determine skewness, a commonly used statistical parameter. Our preliminary results show that this method of assessment appears to be more accurate and robust than currently utilized methods which involve looking at percentages of radiodensities in air passages of the lung.

  3. Computer image processing and recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, E. L.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic introduction to the concepts and techniques of computer image processing and recognition is presented. Consideration is given to such topics as image formation and perception; computer representation of images; image enhancement and restoration; reconstruction from projections; digital television, encoding, and data compression; scene understanding; scene matching and recognition; and processing techniques for linear systems.

  4. Image processing and recognition for biological images

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews image processing and pattern recognition techniques, which will be useful to analyze bioimages. Although this paper does not provide their technical details, it will be possible to grasp their main tasks and typical tools to handle the tasks. Image processing is a large research area to improve the visibility of an input image and acquire some valuable information from it. As the main tasks of image processing, this paper introduces gray-level transformation, binarization, image filtering, image segmentation, visual object tracking, optical flow and image registration. Image pattern recognition is the technique to classify an input image into one of the predefined classes and also has a large research area. This paper overviews its two main modules, that is, feature extraction module and classification module. Throughout the paper, it will be emphasized that bioimage is a very difficult target for even state-of-the-art image processing and pattern recognition techniques due to noises, deformations, etc. This paper is expected to be one tutorial guide to bridge biology and image processing researchers for their further collaboration to tackle such a difficult target. PMID:23560739

  5. Image processing and recognition for biological images.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Seiichi

    2013-05-01

    This paper reviews image processing and pattern recognition techniques, which will be useful to analyze bioimages. Although this paper does not provide their technical details, it will be possible to grasp their main tasks and typical tools to handle the tasks. Image processing is a large research area to improve the visibility of an input image and acquire some valuable information from it. As the main tasks of image processing, this paper introduces gray-level transformation, binarization, image filtering, image segmentation, visual object tracking, optical flow and image registration. Image pattern recognition is the technique to classify an input image into one of the predefined classes and also has a large research area. This paper overviews its two main modules, that is, feature extraction module and classification module. Throughout the paper, it will be emphasized that bioimage is a very difficult target for even state-of-the-art image processing and pattern recognition techniques due to noises, deformations, etc. This paper is expected to be one tutorial guide to bridge biology and image processing researchers for their further collaboration to tackle such a difficult target.

  6. Smart Image Enhancement Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J. (Inventor); Rahman, Zia-ur (Inventor); Woodell, Glenn A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Contrast and lightness measures are used to first classify the image as being one of non-turbid and turbid. If turbid, the original image is enhanced to generate a first enhanced image. If non-turbid, the original image is classified in terms of a merged contrast/lightness score based on the contrast and lightness measures. The non-turbid image is enhanced to generate a second enhanced image when a poor contrast/lightness score is associated therewith. When the second enhanced image has a poor contrast/lightness score associated therewith, this image is enhanced to generate a third enhanced image. A sharpness measure is computed for one image that is selected from (i) the non-turbid image, (ii) the first enhanced image, (iii) the second enhanced image when a good contrast/lightness score is associated therewith, and (iv) the third enhanced image. If the selected image is not-sharp, it is sharpened to generate a sharpened image. The final image is selected from the selected image and the sharpened image.

  7. IMAGES: An interactive image processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The IMAGES interactive image processing system was created specifically for undergraduate remote sensing education in geography. The system is interactive, relatively inexpensive to operate, almost hardware independent, and responsive to numerous users at one time in a time-sharing mode. Most important, it provides a medium whereby theoretical remote sensing principles discussed in lecture may be reinforced in laboratory as students perform computer-assisted image processing. In addition to its use in academic and short course environments, the system has also been used extensively to conduct basic image processing research. The flow of information through the system is discussed including an overview of the programs.

  8. Phase-rotation based receive-beamformer for miniaturized volumetric ultrasound imaging scanners using 2-D CMUT-on-ASIC arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bae-Hyung; Lee, Seunghun; Song, Jongkeun; Kim, Youngil; Jeon, Taeho; Cho, Kyungil

    2013-03-01

    Up-to-date capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technologies provide us unique opportunities to minimize the size and cost of ultrasound scanners by integrating front-end circuits into CMUT arrays. We describe a design prototype of a portable ultrasound scan-head probe using 2-D phased CMUT-on-ASIC arrays of 3-MHz 250 micrometer-pitch by fabricating and integrating front-end electronics with 2-D CMUT array elements. One of the objectives of our work is to design a receive beamformer architecture for the smart probe with compact size and comparable performance. In this work, a phase-rotation based receive beamformer using the sampling frequency of 4 times the center frequency and a hybrid beamforming to reduce the channel counts of the system-side are introduced. Parallel beamforming is considered for the purpose of saving power consumption of battery (by firing fewer times per image frame). This architecture has the advantage of directly obtaining I and Q components. By using the architecture, the interleaved I/Q data from the storage is acquired and I/Q demodulation for baseband processing is directly achieved without demodulators including sin and cosine lookup tables and mixers. Currently, we are extending the presented architecture to develop a true smart probe by including lower power devices and cooling systems, and bringing wireless data transmission into consideration.

  9. Impact of uncertainties in parameterized cloud-microphysical processes on the simulated development of an idealized 2-D squall line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Sara; Bao, Jian-Wen; Grell, Evelyn

    2016-04-01

    In this study, numerical model simulations of an idealized 2-D squall line are investigated using microphysics budget analysis. Four commonly-used microphysics schemes of various complexity are used in the simulations. Diagnoses of the source and sink terms of the hydrometeor budget equations reveal that the differences related to the assumptions of hydrometeor size-distributions between the schemes lead to the differences in the simulations due to the net effect of various microphysical processes on the interaction between latent heating/evaporative cooling and flow dynamics as the squall line develops. Results from this study also highlight the possibility that the advantage of double-moment formulations can be overshadowed by the uncertainties in the spectral definition of individual hydrometeor categories and spectrum-dependent microphysical processes.

  10. Simulating Dynamic Stall in a 2D VAWT: Modeling strategy, verification and validation with Particle Image Velocimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão Ferreira, C. J.; Bijl, H.; van Bussel, G.; van Kuik, G.

    2007-07-01

    The implementation of wind energy conversion systems in the built environment renewed the interest and the research on Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT), which in this application present several advantages over Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT). The VAWT has an inherent unsteady aerodynamic behavior due to the variation of angle of attack with the angle of rotation, perceived velocity and consequentially Reynolds number. The phenomenon of dynamic stall is then an intrinsic effect of the operation of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine at low tip speed ratios, having a significant impact in both loads and power. The complexity of the unsteady aerodynamics of the VAWT makes it extremely attractive to be analyzed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models, where an approximation of the continuity and momentum equations of the Navier-Stokes equations set is solved. The complexity of the problem and the need for new design approaches for VAWT for the built environment has driven the authors of this work to focus the research of CFD modeling of VAWT on: •comparing the results between commonly used turbulence models: URANS (Spalart-Allmaras and k-epsilon) and large eddy models (Large Eddy Simulation and Detached Eddy Simulation) •verifying the sensitivity of the model to its grid refinement (space and time), •evaluating the suitability of using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experimental data for model validation. The 2D model created represents the middle section of a single bladed VAWT with infinite aspect ratio. The model simulates the experimental work of flow field measurement using Particle Image Velocimetry by Simão Ferreira et al for a single bladed VAWT. The results show the suitability of the PIV data for the validation of the model, the need for accurate simulation of the large eddies and the sensitivity of the model to grid refinement.

  11. Watching Silica's Dance: Imaging the Structure and Dynamics of the Atomic (Re-) Arrangements in 2D Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, David

    2014-03-01

    Even though glasses are almost ubiquitous--in our windows, on our iPhones, even on our faces--they are also mysterious. Because glasses are notoriously difficult to study, basic questions like: ``How are the atoms arranged? Where and how do glasses break?'' are still under contention. We use aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to image the atoms in a new two-dimensional phase of silica glass - freestanding it becomes the world's thinnest pane of glass at only 3-atoms thick, and take a unique look into these questions. Using atom-by-atom imaging and spectroscopy, we are able to reconstruct the full structure and bonding of this 2D glass and identify it as a bi-tetrahedral layer of SiO2. Our images also strikingly resemble Zachariasen's original cartoon models of glasses, drawn in 1932. As such, our work realizes an 80-year-old vision for easily understandable glassy systems and introduces promising methods to test theoretical predictions against experimental data. We image atoms in the disordered solid and track their motions in response to local strain. We directly obtain ring statistics and pair distribution functions that span short-, medium-, and long-range order, and test these against long-standing theoretical predictions of glass structure and dynamics. We use the electron beam to excite atomic rearrangements, producing surprisingly rich and beautiful videos of how a glass bends and breaks, as well as the exchange of atoms at a solid/liquid interface. Detailed analyses of these videos reveal a complex dance of elastic and plastic deformations, phase transitions, and their interplay. These examples illustrate the wide-ranging and fundamental materials physics that can now be studied at atomic-resolution via transmission electron microscopy of two-dimensional glasses. Work in collaboration with: S. Kurasch, U. Kaiser, R. Hovden, Q. Mao, J. Kotakoski, J. S. Alden, A. Shekhawat, A. A. Alemi, J. P. Sethna, P. L. McEuen, A.V. Krasheninnikov

  12. Processing Visual Images

    SciTech Connect

    Litke, Alan

    2006-03-27

    The back of the eye is lined by an extraordinary biological pixel detector, the retina. This neural network is able to extract vital information about the external visual world, and transmit this information in a timely manner to the brain. In this talk, Professor Litke will describe a system that has been implemented to study how the retina processes and encodes dynamic visual images. Based on techniques and expertise acquired in the development of silicon microstrip detectors for high energy physics experiments, this system can simultaneously record the extracellular electrical activity of hundreds of retinal output neurons. After presenting first results obtained with this system, Professor Litke will describe additional applications of this incredible technology.

  13. Filter for biomedical imaging and image processing.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Partha P; Rajan, K; Ahmad, Imteyaz

    2006-07-01

    Image filtering techniques have numerous potential applications in biomedical imaging and image processing. The design of filters largely depends on the a priori, knowledge about the type of noise corrupting the image. This makes the standard filters application specific. Widely used filters such as average, Gaussian, and Wiener reduce noisy artifacts by smoothing. However, this operation normally results in smoothing of the edges as well. On the other hand, sharpening filters enhance the high-frequency details, making the image nonsmooth. An integrated general approach to design a finite impulse response filter based on Hebbian learning is proposed for optimal image filtering. This algorithm exploits the interpixel correlation by updating the filter coefficients using Hebbian learning. The algorithm is made iterative for achieving efficient learning from the neighborhood pixels. This algorithm performs optimal smoothing of the noisy image by preserving high-frequency as well as low-frequency features. Evaluation results show that the proposed finite impulse response filter is robust under various noise distributions such as Gaussian noise, salt-and-pepper noise, and speckle noise. Furthermore, the proposed approach does not require any a priori knowledge about the type of noise. The number of unknown parameters is few, and most of these parameters are adaptively obtained from the processed image. The proposed filter is successfully applied for image reconstruction in a positron emission tomography imaging modality. The images reconstructed by the proposed algorithm are found to be superior in quality compared with those reconstructed by existing PET image reconstruction methodologies.

  14. Reconstruction of 3D lung models from 2D planning data sets for Hodgkin's lymphoma patients using combined deformable image registration and navigator channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Angela; Nguyen, Thao-Nguyen; Moseley, Joanne L.; Hodgson, David C.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Late complications (cardiac toxicities, secondary lung, and breast cancer) remain a significant concern in the radiation treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). To address this issue, predictive dose-risk models could potentially be used to estimate radiotherapy-related late toxicities. This study investigates the use of deformable image registration (DIR) and navigator channels (NCs) to reconstruct 3D lung models from 2D radiographic planning images, in order to retrospectively calculate the treatment dose exposure to HL patients treated with 2D planning, which are now experiencing late effects. Methods: Three-dimensional planning CT images of 52 current HL patients were acquired. 12 image sets were used to construct a male and a female population lung model. 23 ''Reference'' images were used to generate lung deformation adaptation templates, constructed by deforming the population model into each patient-specific lung geometry using a biomechanical-based DIR algorithm, MORFEUS. 17 ''Test'' patients were used to test the accuracy of the reconstruction technique by adapting existing templates using 2D digitally reconstructed radiographs. The adaptation process included three steps. First, a Reference patient was matched to a Test patient by thorax measurements. Second, four NCs (small regions of interest) were placed on the lung boundary to calculate 1D differences in lung edges. Third, the Reference lung model was adapted to the Test patient's lung using the 1D edge differences. The Reference-adapted Test model was then compared to the 3D lung contours of the actual Test patient by computing their percentage volume overlap (POL) and Dice coefficient. Results: The average percentage overlapping volumes and Dice coefficient expressed as a percentage between the adapted and actual Test models were found to be 89.2{+-}3.9% (Right lung=88.8%; Left lung=89.6%) and 89.3{+-}2.7% (Right=88.5%; Left=90.2%), respectively. Paired T-tests demonstrated that the

  15. Imaging the Ferron Member of the Mancos Shale formation using reprocessed high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data: Emery County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Late in 1982 and early in 1983, Arco Exploration contracted with Rocky Mountain Geophysical to acquired four high-resolution 2-D multichannel seismic reflection lines in Emery County, Utah. The primary goal in acquiring this data was an attempt to image the Ferron Member of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale. Design of the high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data acquisition used both a short geophone group interval and a short sample interval. An explosive energy source was used which provided an input pulse with broad frequency content and higher frequencies than typical non-explosive Vibroseis?? sources. Reflections produced by using this high-frequency energy source when sampled at a short interval are usually able to resolve shallow horizons that are relatively thin compared to those that can be resolved using more typical oil and gas exploration seismic reflection methods.The U.S. Geological Survey-Energy Resources Program, Geophysical Processing Group used the processing sequence originally applied by Arco in 1984 as a guide and experimented with processing steps applied in a different order using slightly different parameters in an effort to improve imaging the Ferron Member horizon. As with the Arco processed data there are sections along all four seismic lines where the data quality cannot be improved upon, and in fact the data quality is so poor that the Ferron horizon cannot be imaged at all.Interpretation of the seismic and core hole data indicates that the Ferron Member in the study area represent a deltaic sequence including delta front, lower delta plain, and upper delta plain environments. Correlating the depositional environments for the Ferron Member as indicated in the core holes with the thickness of Ferron Member suggests the presence of a delta lobe running from the northwest to the southeast through the study area. The presence of a deltaic channel system within the delta lobe complex might prove to be an interesting conventional

  16. 2D discrete Fourier transform on sliding windows.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Su

    2015-03-01

    Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is the most widely used method for determining the frequency spectra of digital signals. In this paper, a 2D sliding DFT (2D SDFT) algorithm is proposed for fast implementation of the DFT on 2D sliding windows. The proposed 2D SDFT algorithm directly computes the DFT bins of the current window using the precalculated bins of the previous window. Since the proposed algorithm is designed to accelerate the sliding transform process of a 2D input signal, it can be directly applied to computer vision and image processing applications. The theoretical analysis shows that the computational requirement of the proposed 2D SDFT algorithm is the lowest among existing 2D DFT algorithms. Moreover, the output of the 2D SDFT is mathematically equivalent to that of the traditional DFT at all pixel positions.

  17. MR imaging features of idiopathic thoracic spinal cord herniations using combined 3D-fiesta and 2D-PC Cine techniques.

    PubMed

    Ferré, J C; Carsin-Nicol, B; Hamlat, A; Carsin, M; Morandi, X

    2005-03-01

    Idiopathic thoracic spinal cord herniation (TISCH) is a rare cause of surgically treatable progressive myelopathy. The authors report 3 cases of TISCH diagnosed based on conventional T1- and T2-weighted Spin-Echo (SE) MR images in one case, and T1- and T2-weighted SE images combined with 3D-FIESTA (Fast Imaging Employing Steady state Acquisition) and 2D-Phase-Contrast Cine MR imaging in 2 cases. Conventional MRI findings usually provided the diagnosis. 3D-FIESTA images confirmed it, showing the herniated cord in the ventral epidural space. Moreover, in combination with 2D-Phase Contrast cine technique, it was a sensitive method to for the detection of associated pre- or postoperative cerebrospinal fluid spaces abnormalities.

  18. A rapid and efficient 2D/3D nuclear segmentation method for analysis of early mouse embryo and stem cell image data.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xinghua; Kang, Minjung; Xenopoulos, Panagiotis; Muñoz-Descalzo, Silvia; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2014-03-11

    Segmentation is a fundamental problem that dominates the success of microscopic image analysis. In almost 25 years of cell detection software development, there is still no single piece of commercial software that works well in practice when applied to early mouse embryo or stem cell image data. To address this need, we developed MINS (modular interactive nuclear segmentation) as a MATLAB/C++-based segmentation tool tailored for counting cells and fluorescent intensity measurements of 2D and 3D image data. Our aim was to develop a tool that is accurate and efficient yet straightforward and user friendly. The MINS pipeline comprises three major cascaded modules: detection, segmentation, and cell position classification. An extensive evaluation of MINS on both 2D and 3D images, and comparison to related tools, reveals improvements in segmentation accuracy and usability. Thus, its accuracy and ease of use will allow MINS to be implemented for routine single-cell-level image analyses.

  19. Self-Calibration of Cone-Beam CT Geometry Using 3D-2D Image Registration: Development and Application to Task-Based Imaging with a Robotic C-Arm

    PubMed Central

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G.; Uneri, A.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Robotic C-arm systems are capable of general noncircular orbits whose trajectories can be driven by the particular imaging task. However obtaining accurate calibrations for reconstruction in such geometries can be a challenging problem. This work proposes a method to perform a unique geometric calibration of an arbitrary C-arm orbit by registering 2D projections to a previously acquired 3D image to determine the transformation parameters representing the system geometry. Methods Experiments involved a cone-beam CT (CBCT) bench system, a robotic C-arm, and three phantoms. A robust 3D-2D registration process was used to compute the 9 degree of freedom (DOF) transformation between each projection and an existing 3D image by maximizing normalized gradient information with a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of the 3D volume. The quality of the resulting “self-calibration” was evaluated in terms of the agreement with an established calibration method using a BB phantom as well as image quality in the resulting CBCT reconstruction. Results The self-calibration yielded CBCT images without significant difference in spatial resolution from the standard (“true”) calibration methods (p-value >0.05 for all three phantoms), and the differences between CBCT images reconstructed using the “self” and “true” calibration methods were on the order of 10−3 mm−1. Maximum error in magnification was 3.2%, and back-projection ray placement was within 0.5 mm. Conclusion The proposed geometric “self” calibration provides a means for 3D imaging on general non-circular orbits in CBCT systems for which a geometric calibration is either not available or not reproducible. The method forms the basis of advanced “task-based” 3D imaging methods now in development for robotic C-arms. PMID:26388661

  20. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration: development and application to tasked-based imaging with a robotic C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G.; Uneri, A.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Robotic C-arm systems are capable of general noncircular orbits whose trajectories can be driven by the particular imaging task. However obtaining accurate calibrations for reconstruction in such geometries can be a challenging problem. This work proposes a method to perform a unique geometric calibration of an arbitrary C-arm orbit by registering 2D projections to a previously acquired 3D image to determine the transformation parameters representing the system geometry. Methods: Experiments involved a cone-beam CT (CBCT) bench system, a robotic C-arm, and three phantoms. A robust 3D-2D registration process was used to compute the 9 degree of freedom (DOF) transformation between each projection and an existing 3D image by maximizing normalized gradient information with a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of the 3D volume. The quality of the resulting "self-calibration" was evaluated in terms of the agreement with an established calibration method using a BB phantom as well as image quality in the resulting CBCT reconstruction. Results: The self-calibration yielded CBCT images without significant difference in spatial resolution from the standard ("true") calibration methods (p-value >0.05 for all three phantoms), and the differences between CBCT images reconstructed using the "self" and "true" calibration methods were on the order of 10-3 mm-1. Maximum error in magnification was 3.2%, and back-projection ray placement was within 0.5 mm. Conclusion: The proposed geometric "self" calibration provides a means for 3D imaging on general noncircular orbits in CBCT systems for which a geometric calibration is either not available or not reproducible. The method forms the basis of advanced "task-based" 3D imaging methods now in development for robotic C-arms.

  1. Effects of x-ray and CT image enhancements on the robustness and accuracy of a rigid 3D/2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkoo; Yin, Fang-Fang; Zhao, Yang; Kim, Jae Ho

    2005-04-01

    A rigid body three-dimensional/two-dimensional (3D/2D) registration method has been implemented using mutual information, gradient ascent, and 3D texturemap-based digitally reconstructed radiographs. Nine combinations of commonly used x-ray and computed tomography (CT) image enhancement methods, including window leveling, histogram equalization, and adaptive histogram equalization, were examined to assess their effects on accuracy and robustness of the registration method. From a set of experiments using an anthropomorphic chest phantom, we were able to draw several conclusions. First, the CT and x-ray preprocessing combination with the widest attraction range was the one that linearly stretched the histograms onto the entire display range on both CT and x-ray images. The average attraction ranges of this combination were 71.3 mm and 61.3 deg in the translation and rotation dimensions, respectively, and the average errors were 0.12 deg and 0.47 mm. Second, the combination of the CT image with tissue and bone information and the x-ray images with adaptive histogram equalization also showed subvoxel accuracy, especially the best in the translation dimensions. However, its attraction ranges were the smallest among the examined combinations (on average 36 mm and 19 deg). Last the bone-only information on the CT image did not show convergency property to the correct registration.

  2. FORTRAN Algorithm for Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Hull, David R.

    1987-01-01

    FORTRAN computer algorithm containing various image-processing analysis and enhancement functions developed. Algorithm developed specifically to process images of developmental heat-engine materials obtained with sophisticated nondestructive evaluation instruments. Applications of program include scientific, industrial, and biomedical imaging for studies of flaws in materials, analyses of steel and ores, and pathology.

  3. Hydrodynamic study of freely swimming shark fish propulsion for marine vehicles using 2D particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Babu, Mannam Naga Praveen; Mallikarjuna, J M; Krishnankutty, P

    Two-dimensional velocity fields around a freely swimming freshwater black shark fish in longitudinal (XZ) plane and transverse (YZ) plane are measured using digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). By transferring momentum to the fluid, fishes generate thrust. Thrust is generated not only by its caudal fin, but also using pectoral and anal fins, the contribution of which depends on the fish's morphology and swimming movements. These fins also act as roll and pitch stabilizers for the swimming fish. In this paper, studies are performed on the flow induced by fins of freely swimming undulatory carangiform swimming fish (freshwater black shark, L = 26 cm) by an experimental hydrodynamic approach based on quantitative flow visualization technique. We used 2D PIV to visualize water flow pattern in the wake of the caudal, pectoral and anal fins of swimming fish at a speed of 0.5-1.5 times of body length per second. The kinematic analysis and pressure distribution of carangiform fish are presented here. The fish body and fin undulations create circular flow patterns (vortices) that travel along with the body waves and change the flow around its tail to increase the swimming efficiency. The wake of different fins of the swimming fish consists of two counter-rotating vortices about the mean path of fish motion. These wakes resemble like reverse von Karman vortex street which is nothing but a thrust-producing wake. The velocity vectors around a C-start (a straight swimming fish bends into C-shape) maneuvering fish are also discussed in this paper. Studying flows around flapping fins will contribute to design of bioinspired propulsors for marine vehicles.

  4. 2D segmentation of intervertebral discs and its degree of degeneration from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, José Maria; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2014-03-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a disorder suffered by a large population around the world. A key factor causing this illness is Intervertebral Disc (IVD) degeneration, whose early diagnosis could help in preventing this widespread condition. Clinicians base their diagnosis on visual inspection of 2D slices of Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, which is subject to large interobserver variability. In this work, an automatic classification method is presented, which provides the Pfirrmann degree of degeneration from a mid-sagittal MR slice. The proposed method utilizes Active Contour Models, with a new geometrical energy, to achieve an initial segmentation, which is further improved using fuzzy C-means. Then, IVDs are classified according to their degree of degeneration. This classification is attained by employing Adaboost on five specific features: the mean and the variance of the probability map of the nucleus using two different approaches and the eccentricity of the fitting ellipse to the contour of the IVD. The classification method was evaluated using a cohort of 150 intervertebral discs assessed by three experts, resulting in a mean specificity (93%) and sensitivity (83%) similar to the one provided by every expert with respect to the most voted value. The segmentation accuracy was evaluated using the Dice Similarity Index (DSI) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the point-to-contour distance. The mean DSI ± 2 standard deviation was 91:7% ±5:6%, the mean RMSE was 0:82mm and the 95 percentile was 1:36mm. These results were found accurate when compared to the state-of-the-art.

  5. The APL image processing laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. O.; Randolph, J. P.; Tilley, D. G.; Waters, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    The present and proposed capabilities of the Central Image Processing Laboratory, which provides a powerful resource for the advancement of programs in missile technology, space science, oceanography, and biomedical image analysis, are discussed. The use of image digitizing, digital image processing, and digital image output permits a variety of functional capabilities, including: enhancement, pseudocolor, convolution, computer output microfilm, presentation graphics, animations, transforms, geometric corrections, and feature extractions. The hardware and software of the Image Processing Laboratory, consisting of digitizing and processing equipment, software packages, and display equipment, is described. Attention is given to applications for imaging systems, map geometric correction, raster movie display of Seasat ocean data, Seasat and Skylab scenes of Nantucket Island, Space Shuttle imaging radar, differential radiography, and a computerized tomographic scan of the brain.

  6. Observation and simulation of heterogeneous 2D water and solute flow processes in ditch beds for subsequent catchment modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dages, Cecile; Samouelian, Anatja; Lanoix, Marthe; Dollinger, Jeanne; Chakkour, Sara; Chovelon, Gabrielle; Trabelsi, Khouloud; Voltz, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Ditches are involved in the transfer of pesticide to surface and groundwaters (e.g. Louchart et al., 2001). Soil horizons underlying ditch beds may present specific soil characteristics compared to neighbouring field soils due to erosion/deposition processes, to the specific biological activities (rooting dynamic and animal habitat) in the ditches (e.g. Vaughan et al., 2008) and to management practices (burning, dredging, mowing,...). Moreover, in contrast to percolation processes in field soils that can be assumed to be mainly 1D vertical, those occurring in the ditch beds are by essence 2D or even 3D. Nevertheless, due to a lake of knowledge, these specific aspects of transfer within ditch beds are generally omitted for hydrological simulation at the catchment scale (Mottes et al., 2014). Accordingly, the aims of this study were i) to characterize subsurface solute transfer through ditch beds and ii) to determine equivalent hydraulic parameters of the ditch beds for use in catchment scale hydrological simulations. A complementary aim was to evaluate the error in predictions performed when percolation in ditches is assumed to be similar to that in the neighbouring field soil. First, bromide transfer experiments were performed on undisturbed soil column (15 cm long with a 15 cm inner-diameter), horizontally and vertically sampled within each soil horizon underlying a ditch bed and within the neighboring field. Columns were sampled at the Roujan catchment (Hérault, France), which belongs to the long term Mediterranean hydrological observatory OMERE (Voltz and Albergel, 2002). Second, for each column, a set of parameters was determined by inverse optimization with mobile-immobile or dual permeability models, with CXTFIT (Toride et al., 1999) or with HYDRUS (Simunek et al., 1998). Third, infiltration and percolation in the ditch was simulated by a 2D flow domain approach considering the 2D variation in hydraulic properties of the cross section of a ditch bed. Last

  7. Digital breast tomosynthesis: application of 2D digital mammography CAD to detection of microcalcification clusters on planar projection image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) has the potential to aid radiologists in detection of microcalcification clusters (MCs). CAD for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can be developed by using the reconstructed volume, the projection views or other derivatives as input. We have developed a novel method of generating a single planar projection (PPJ) image from a regularized DBT volume to emphasize the high contrast objects such as microcalcifications while removing the anatomical background and noise. In this work, we adapted a CAD system developed for digital mammography (CADDM) to the PPJ image and compared its performance with our CAD system developed for DBT volumes (CADDBT) in the same set of cases. For microcalcification detection in the PPJ image using the CADDM system, the background removal preprocessing step designed for DM was not needed. The other methods and processing steps in the CADDM system were kept without modification while the parameters were optimized with a training set. The linear discriminant analysis classifier using cluster based features was retrained to generate a discriminant score to be used as decision variable. For view-based FROC analysis, at 80% sensitivity, an FP rate of 1.95/volume and 1.54/image were achieved, respectively, for CADDBT and CADDM in an independent test set. At a threshold of 1.2 FPs per image or per DBT volume, the nonparametric analysis of the area under the FROC curve shows that the optimized CADDM for PPJ is significantly better than CADDBT. However, the performance of CADDM drops at higher sensitivity or FP rate, resulting in similar overall performance between the two CAD systems. The higher sensitivity of the CADDM in the low FP rate region and vice versa for the CADDBT indicate that a joint CAD system combining detection in the DBT volume and the PPJ image has the potential to increase the sensitivity and reduce the FP rate.

  8. Tropical Convective Responses to Microphysical and Radiative Processes: A Sensitivity Study With a 2D Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Tao, W.-K.

    2004-01-01

    Prognostic cloud schemes are increasingly used in weather and climate models in order to better treat cloud-radiation processes. Simplifications are often made in such schemes for computational efficiency, like the scheme being used in the National Centers for Environment Prediction models that excludes some microphysical processes and precipitation-radiation interaction. In this study, sensitivity tests with a 2D cloud resolving model are carried out to examine effects of the excluded microphysical processes and precipitation-radiation interaction on tropical thermodynamics and cloud properties. The model is integrated for 10 days with the imposed vertical velocity derived from the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment. The experiment excluding the depositional growth of snow from cloud ice shows anomalous growth of cloud ice and more than 20% increase of fractional cloud cover, indicating that the lack of the depositional snow growth causes unrealistically large mixing ratio of cloud ice. The experiment excluding the precipitation-radiation interaction displays a significant cooling and drying bias. The analysis of heat and moisture budgets shows that the simulation without the interaction produces more stable upper troposphere and more unstable mid and lower troposphere than does the simulation with the interaction. Thus, the suppressed growth of ice clouds in upper troposphere and stronger radiative cooling in mid and lower troposphere are responsible for the cooling bias, and less evaporation of rain associated with the large-scale subsidence induces the drying in mid and lower troposphere.

  9. Validity of computational hemodynamics in human arteries based on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography and 2D electrocardiogram gated phase contrast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Xi; Chen, Rou; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Chen; Kralik, Stephen; Zhao, Ye

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the validity of 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) based on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) and 2-D electrocardiogram (ECG) gated phase contrast (PC) images. The mesoscale lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed to segment morphological arterial geometry from TOF MRA, to extract velocity profiles from ECG PC images, and to simulate fluid dynamics on a unified GPU accelerated computational platform. Two healthy volunteers are recruited to participate in the study. For each volunteer, a 3-D high resolution TOF MRA image and 10 2-D ECG gated PC images are acquired to provide the morphological geometry and the time-varying flow velocity profiles for necessary inputs of the PSCH. Validation results will be presented through comparisons of LBM vs. 4D Flow Software for flow rates and LBM simulation vs. MRA measurement for blood flow velocity maps. Indiana University Health (IUH) Values Fund.

  10. Preliminary 3d depth migration of a network of 2d seismic lines for fault imaging at a Pyramid Lake, Nevada geothermal prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Frary, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Eisses, A.

    2016-08-01

    Roxanna Frary, John N. Louie, Sathish Pullammanappallil, Amy Eisses, 2011, Preliminary 3d depth migration of a network of 2d seismic lines for fault imaging at a Pyramid Lake, Nevada geothermal prospect: presented at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, Dec. 5-9, abstract T13G-07.

  11. Cooperative processes in image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research into the role of cooperative, or relaxation, processes in image segmentation is surveyed. Cooperative processes can be employed at several levels of the segmentation process as a preprocessing enhancement step, during supervised or unsupervised pixel classification and, finally, for the interpretation of image segments based on segment properties and relations.

  12. Multidimensional energy operator for image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragos, Petros; Bovik, Alan C.; Quatieri, Thomas F.

    1992-11-01

    The 1-D nonlinear differential operator (Psi) (f) equals (f')2 - ff' has been recently introduced to signal processing and has been found very useful for estimating the parameters of sinusoids and the modulating signals of AM-FM signals. It is called an energy operator because it can track the energy of an oscillator source generating a sinusoidal signal. In this paper we introduce the multidimensional extension (Phi) (f) equals (parallel)DELf(parallel)2 - fDEL2f of the 1-D energy operator and briefly outline some of its applications to image processing. We discuss some interesting properties of the multidimensional operator and develop demodulation algorithms to estimate the amplitude envelope and instantaneous frequencies of 2-D spatially-varying AM-FM signals, which can model image texture. The attractive features of the multidimensional operator and the related amplitude/frequency demodulation algorithms are their simplicity, efficiency, and ability to track instantaneously- varying spatial modulation patterns.

  13. Continuous fabrication of scalable 2-dimensional (2D) micro- and nanostructures by sequential 1D mechanical patterning processes.

    PubMed

    Ok, Jong G; Panday, Ashwin; Lee, Taehwa; Jay Guo, L

    2014-12-21

    We present a versatile and simple methodology for continuous and scalable 2D micro/nano-structure fabrication via sequential 1D patterning strokes enabled by dynamic nano-inscribing (DNI) and vibrational indentation patterning (VIP) as well as a 'single-stroke' 2D patterning using a DNI tool in VIP.

  14. Computer-aided 2D and 3D quantification of human stem cell fate from in vitro samples using Volocity high performance image analysis software.

    PubMed

    Piltti, Katja M; Haus, Daniel L; Do, Eileen; Perez, Harvey; Anderson, A J; Cummings, B J

    2011-11-01

    Accurate automated cell fate analysis of immunostained human stem cells from 2- and 3-dimensional (2D-3D) images would improve efficiency in the field of stem cell research. Development of an accurate and precise tool that reduces variability and the time needed for human stem cell fate analysis will improve productivity and interpretability of the data across research groups. In this study, we have created protocols for high performance image analysis software Volocity® to classify and quantify cytoplasmic and nuclear cell fate markers from 2D-3D images of human neural stem cells after in vitro differentiation. To enhance 3D image capture efficiency, we optimized the image acquisition settings of an Olympus FV10i® confocal laser scanning microscope to match our quantification protocols and improve cell fate classification. The methods developed in this study will allow for a more time efficient and accurate software based, operator validated, stem cell fate classification and quantification from 2D and 3D images, and yield the highest ≥94.4% correspondence with human recognized objects.

  15. Position tracking of moving liver lesion based on real-time registration between 2D ultrasound and 3D preoperative images

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, Chijun; Hyun Nam, Woo; Lee, Duhgoon; Ra, Jong Beom; Lee, Jae Young

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Registration between 2D ultrasound (US) and 3D preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) (or computed tomography, CT) images has been studied recently for US-guided intervention. However, the existing techniques have some limits, either in the registration speed or the performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a real-time and fully automatic registration system between two intermodal images of the liver, and subsequently an indirect lesion positioning/tracking algorithm based on the registration result, for image-guided interventions. Methods: The proposed position tracking system consists of three stages. In the preoperative stage, the authors acquire several 3D preoperative MR (or CT) images at different respiratory phases. Based on the transformations obtained from nonrigid registration of the acquired 3D images, they then generate a 4D preoperative image along the respiratory phase. In the intraoperative preparatory stage, they properly attach a 3D US transducer to the patient’s body and fix its pose using a holding mechanism. They then acquire a couple of respiratory-controlled 3D US images. Via the rigid registration of these US images to the 3D preoperative images in the 4D image, the pose information of the fixed-pose 3D US transducer is determined with respect to the preoperative image coordinates. As feature(s) to use for the rigid registration, they may choose either internal liver vessels or the inferior vena cava. Since the latter is especially useful in patients with a diffuse liver disease, the authors newly propose using it. In the intraoperative real-time stage, they acquire 2D US images in real-time from the fixed-pose transducer. For each US image, they select candidates for its corresponding 2D preoperative slice from the 4D preoperative MR (or CT) image, based on the predetermined pose information of the transducer. The correct corresponding image is then found among those candidates via real-time 2D registration based on a

  16. Assessment of liver fibrosis with 2-D shear wave elastography in comparison to transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Ludmila; Kasper, Daniela; Fitting, Daniel; Knop, Viola; Vermehren, Annika; Sprinzl, Kathrin; Hansmann, Martin L; Herrmann, Eva; Bojunga, Joerg; Albert, Joerg; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) is an ultrasound-based elastography method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. It can evaluate larger regions of interest and, therefore, might be better at determining the overall fibrosis distribution. The aim of this prospective study was to compare 2-D SWE with the two best evaluated liver elastography methods, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (point SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse) imaging, in the same population group. The study included 132 patients with chronic hepatopathies, in which liver stiffness was evaluated using transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 2-D SWE. The reference methods were liver biopsy for the assessment of liver fibrosis (n = 101) and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (n = 31). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy, assessed as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), was found between the three elastography methods (2-D SWE, transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging) for the diagnosis of significant and advanced fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in the "per protocol" (AUROCs for fibrosis stages ≥2: 0.90, 0.95 and 0.91; for fibrosis stage [F] ≥3: 0.93, 0.95 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.92, 0.96 and 0.92) and "intention to diagnose" cohort (AUROCs for F ≥2: 0.87, 0.92 and 0.91; for F ≥3: 0.91, 0.93 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.88, 0.90 and 0.89). Therefore, 2-D SWE, ARFI imaging and transient elastography seem to be comparably good methods for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis.

  17. Pure & crystallized 2D Boron Nitride sheets synthesized via a novel process coupling both PDCs and SPS methods

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sheng; Linas, Sébastien; Journet, Catherine; Steyer, Philippe; Garnier, Vincent; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Brioude, Arnaud; Toury, Bérangère

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of emergent researches linked to graphene, it is well known that h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs), also referred as 2D BN, are considered as the best candidate for replacing SiO2 as dielectric support or capping layers for graphene. As a consequence, the development of a novel alternative source for highly crystallized h-BN crystals, suitable for a further exfoliation, is a prime scientific issue. This paper proposes a promising approach to synthesize pure and well-crystallized h-BN flakes, which can be easily exfoliated into BNNSs. This new accessible production process represents a relevant alternative source of supply in response to the increasing need of high quality BNNSs. The synthesis strategy to prepare pure h-BN is based on a unique combination of the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route with the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) process. Through a multi-scale chemical and structural investigation, it is clearly shown that obtained flakes are large (up to 30 μm), defect-free and well crystallized, which are key-characteristics for a subsequent exfoliation into relevant BNNSs. PMID:26843122

  18. Pure & crystallized 2D Boron Nitride sheets synthesized via a novel process coupling both PDCs and SPS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Sheng; Linas, Sébastien; Journet, Catherine; Steyer, Philippe; Garnier, Vincent; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Brioude, Arnaud; Toury, Bérangère

    2016-02-01

    Within the context of emergent researches linked to graphene, it is well known that h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs), also referred as 2D BN, are considered as the best candidate for replacing SiO2 as dielectric support or capping layers for graphene. As a consequence, the development of a novel alternative source for highly crystallized h-BN crystals, suitable for a further exfoliation, is a prime scientific issue. This paper proposes a promising approach to synthesize pure and well-crystallized h-BN flakes, which can be easily exfoliated into BNNSs. This new accessible production process represents a relevant alternative source of supply in response to the increasing need of high quality BNNSs. The synthesis strategy to prepare pure h-BN is based on a unique combination of the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route with the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) process. Through a multi-scale chemical and structural investigation, it is clearly shown that obtained flakes are large (up to 30 μm), defect-free and well crystallized, which are key-characteristics for a subsequent exfoliation into relevant BNNSs.

  19. Intraoperative evaluation of device placement in spine surgery using known-component 3D-2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Uneri, A; De Silva, T; Goerres, J; Jacobson, M W; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Khanna, A J; Osgood, G M; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2017-04-21

    Intraoperative x-ray radiography/fluoroscopy is commonly used to assess the placement of surgical devices in the operating room (e.g. spine pedicle screws), but qualitative interpretation can fail to reliably detect suboptimal delivery and/or breach of adjacent critical structures. We present a 3D-2D image registration method wherein intraoperative radiographs are leveraged in combination with prior knowledge of the patient and surgical components for quantitative assessment of device placement and more rigorous quality assurance (QA) of the surgical product. The algorithm is based on known-component registration (KC-Reg) in which patient-specific preoperative CT and parametric component models are used. The registration performs optimization of gradient similarity, removes the need for offline geometric calibration of the C-arm, and simultaneously solves for multiple component bodies, thereby allowing QA in a single step (e.g. spinal construct with 4-20 screws). Performance was tested in a spine phantom, and first clinical results are reported for QA of transpedicle screws delivered in a patient undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery. Simultaneous registration of ten pedicle screws (five contralateral pairs) demonstrated mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.1  ±  0.1 mm at the screw tip and 0.7  ±  0.4° in angulation when a prior geometric calibration was used. The calibration-free formulation, with the aid of component collision constraints, achieved TRE of 1.4  ±  0.6 mm. In all cases, a statistically significant improvement (p  <  0.05) was observed for the simultaneous solutions in comparison to previously reported sequential solution of individual components. Initial application in clinical data in spine surgery demonstrated TRE of 2.7  ±  2.6 mm and 1.5  ±  0.8°. The KC-Reg algorithm offers an independent check and quantitative QA of the surgical product using radiographic/fluoroscopic views

  20. MTF characterization in 2D and 3D for a high resolution, large field of view flat panel imager for cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jainil; Mann, Steve D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Richmond, Michelle; Zentai, George

    2014-03-01

    The 2D and 3D modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of a custom made, large 40x30cm2 area, 600- micron CsI-TFT based flat panel imager having 127-micron pixellation, along with the micro-fiber scintillator structure, were characterized in detail using various techniques. The larger area detector yields a reconstructed FOV of 25cm diameter with an 80cm SID in CT mode. The MTFs were determined with 1x1 (intrinsic) binning. The 2D MTFs were determined using a 50.8 micron tungsten wire and a solid lead edge, and the 3D MTF was measured using a custom made phantom consisting of three nearly orthogonal 50.8 micron tungsten wires suspended in an acrylic cubic frame. The 2D projection data was reconstructed using an iterative OSC algorithm using 16 subsets and 5 iterations. As additional verification of the resolution, along with scatter, the Catphan® phantom was also imaged and reconstructed with identical parameters. The measured 2D MTF was ~4% using the wire technique and ~1% using the edge technique at the 3.94 lp/mm Nyquist cut-off frequency. The average 3D MTF measured along the wires was ~8% at the Nyquist. At 50% MTF, the resolutions were 1.2 and 2.1 lp/mm in 2D and 3D, respectively. In the Catphan® phantom, the 1.7 lp/mm bars were easily observed. Lastly, the 3D MTF measured on the three wires has an observed 5.9% RMSD, indicating that the resolution of the imaging system is uniform and spatially independent. This high performance detector is integrated into a dedicated breast SPECT-CT imaging system.

  1. Industrial Applications of Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciora, Radu Adrian; Simion, Carmen Mihaela

    2014-11-01

    The recent advances in sensors quality and processing power provide us with excellent tools for designing more complex image processing and pattern recognition tasks. In this paper we review the existing applications of image processing and pattern recognition in industrial engineering. First we define the role of vision in an industrial. Then a dissemination of some image processing techniques, feature extraction, object recognition and industrial robotic guidance is presented. Moreover, examples of implementations of such techniques in industry are presented. Such implementations include automated visual inspection, process control, part identification, robots control. Finally, we present some conclusions regarding the investigated topics and directions for future investigation

  2. [Imaging center - optimization of the imaging process].

    PubMed

    Busch, H-P

    2013-04-01

    Hospitals around the world are under increasing pressure to optimize the economic efficiency of treatment processes. Imaging is responsible for a great part of the success but also of the costs of treatment. In routine work an excessive supply of imaging methods leads to an "as well as" strategy up to the limit of the capacity without critical reflection. Exams that have no predictable influence on the clinical outcome are an unjustified burden for the patient. They are useless and threaten the financial situation and existence of the hospital. In recent years the focus of process optimization was exclusively on the quality and efficiency of performed single examinations. In the future critical discussion of the effectiveness of single exams in relation to the clinical outcome will be more important. Unnecessary exams can be avoided, only if in addition to the optimization of single exams (efficiency) there is an optimization strategy for the total imaging process (efficiency and effectiveness). This requires a new definition of processes (Imaging Pathway), new structures for organization (Imaging Center) and a new kind of thinking on the part of the medical staff. Motivation has to be changed from gratification of performed exams to gratification of process quality (medical quality, service quality, economics), including the avoidance of additional (unnecessary) exams.

  3. Simple Fabrication Process for 2D ZnO Nanowalls and Their Potential Application as a Methane Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tse-Pu; Chang, Sheng-Po; Hung, Fei-Yi; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Hu, Zhan-Shuo; Chen, Kuan-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ZnO nanowalls were prepared on a glass substrate by a low-temperature thermal evaporation method, in which the fabrication process did not use a metal catalyst or the pre-deposition of a ZnO seed layer on the substrate. The nanowalls were characterized for their surface morphology, and the structural and optical properties were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence (PL). The fabricated ZnO nanowalls have many advantages, such as low growth temperature and good crystal quality, while being fast, low cost, and easy to fabricate. Methane sensor measurements of the ZnO nanowalls show a high sensitivity to methane gas, and rapid response and recovery times. These unique characteristics are attributed to the high surface-to-volume ratio of the ZnO nanowalls. Thus, the ZnO nanowall methane sensor is a potential gas sensor candidate owing to its good performance. PMID:23519350

  4. Multiple-Parameter Estimation Method Based on Spatio-Temporal 2-D Processing for Bistatic MIMO Radar.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shouguo; Li, Yong; Zhang, Kunhui; Tang, Weiping

    2015-12-14

    A novel spatio-temporal 2-dimensional (2-D) processing method that can jointly estimate the transmitting-receiving azimuth and Doppler frequency for bistatic multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar in the presence of spatial colored noise and an unknown number of targets is proposed. In the temporal domain, the cross-correlation of the matched filters' outputs for different time-delay sampling is used to eliminate the spatial colored noise. In the spatial domain, the proposed method uses a diagonal loading method and subspace theory to estimate the direction of departure (DOD) and direction of arrival (DOA), and the Doppler frequency can then be accurately estimated through the estimation of the DOD and DOA. By skipping target number estimation and the eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) of the data covariance matrix estimation and only requiring a one-dimensional search, the proposed method achieves low computational complexity. Furthermore, the proposed method is suitable for bistatic MIMO radar with an arbitrary transmitted and received geometrical configuration. The correction and efficiency of the proposed method are verified by computer simulation results.

  5. Multiple-Parameter Estimation Method Based on Spatio-Temporal 2-D Processing for Bistatic MIMO Radar

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shouguo; Li, Yong; Zhang, Kunhui; Tang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    A novel spatio-temporal 2-dimensional (2-D) processing method that can jointly estimate the transmitting-receiving azimuth and Doppler frequency for bistatic multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar in the presence of spatial colored noise and an unknown number of targets is proposed. In the temporal domain, the cross-correlation of the matched filters’ outputs for different time-delay sampling is used to eliminate the spatial colored noise. In the spatial domain, the proposed method uses a diagonal loading method and subspace theory to estimate the direction of departure (DOD) and direction of arrival (DOA), and the Doppler frequency can then be accurately estimated through the estimation of the DOD and DOA. By skipping target number estimation and the eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) of the data covariance matrix estimation and only requiring a one-dimensional search, the proposed method achieves low computational complexity. Furthermore, the proposed method is suitable for bistatic MIMO radar with an arbitrary transmitted and received geometrical configuration. The correction and efficiency of the proposed method are verified by computer simulation results. PMID:26694385

  6. Simple fabrication process for 2D ZnO nanowalls and their potential application as a methane sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tse-Pu; Chang, Sheng-Po; Hung, Fei-Yi; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Hu, Zhan-Shuo; Chen, Kuan-Jen

    2013-03-20

    Two-dimensional (2D) ZnO nanowalls were prepared on a glass substrate by a low-temperature thermal evaporation method, in which the fabrication process did not use a metal catalyst or the pre-deposition of a ZnO seed layer on the substrate. The nanowalls were characterized for their surface morphology, and the structural and optical properties were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence (PL). The fabricated ZnO nanowalls have many advantages, such as low growth temperature and good crystal quality, while being fast, low cost, and easy to fabricate. Methane sensor measurements of the ZnO nanowalls show a high sensitivity to methane gas, and rapid response and recovery times. These unique characteristics are attributed to the high surface-to-volume ratio of the ZnO nanowalls. Thus, the ZnO nanowall methane sensor is a potential gas sensor candidate owing to its good performance.

  7. SWNT Imaging Using Multispectral Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blades, Michael; Pirbhai, Massooma; Rotkin, Slava V.

    2012-02-01

    A flexible optical system was developed to image carbon single-wall nanotube (SWNT) photoluminescence using the multispectral capabilities of a typical CCD camcorder. The built in Bayer filter of the CCD camera was utilized, using OpenCV C++ libraries for image processing, to decompose the image generated in a high magnification epifluorescence microscope setup into three pseudo-color channels. By carefully calibrating the filter beforehand, it was possible to extract spectral data from these channels, and effectively isolate the SWNT signals from the background.

  8. Image processing with COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stobie, R. S.; Dodd, R. J.; MacGillivray, H. T.

    1981-12-01

    It is noted that astronomers have for some time been fascinated by the possibility of automatic plate measurement and that measuring engines have been constructed with an ever increasing degree of automation. A description is given of the COSMOS (CoOrdinates, Sizes, Magnitudes, Orientations, and Shapes) system at the Royal Observatory in Edinburgh. An automatic high-speed microdensitometer controlled by a minicomputer is linked to a very fast microcomputer that performs immediate image analysis. The movable carriage, whose position in two coordinates is controlled digitally to an accuracy of 0.5 micron (0.0005 mm) will take plates as large as 356 mm on a side. It is noted that currently the machine operates primarily in the Image Analysis Mode, in which COSMOS must first detect the presence of an image. It does this by scanning and digitizing the photograph in 'raster' fashion and then searching for local enhancements in the density of the exposed emulsion.

  9. Statistical Image Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-16

    spectral analysist texture image analysis and classification, __ image software package, automatic spatial clustering.ITWA domenit hi ba apa for...ICOLOR(256),IBW(256) 1502 FORMATO (30( CNO(N): fF12.1)) 1503 FORMAT(o *FMINo DMRGE:0f2E20.8) 1504 FORMAT(/o IMRGE:or15) 1505 FOR14ATV FIRST SUBIMAGE:v...1506 FORMATO ’ JOIN CLUSTER NL:0) 1507 FORMAT( NEW CLUSTER:O) 1508 FORMAT( LLBS.GE.600) 1532 FORMAT(15XoTHETA ,7X, SIGMA-SQUAREr3Xe MERGING-DISTANCE

  10. 3D behaviour of contamination in landfill sites using 2D resistivity/IP imaging: case studies in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinho, E.; Almeida, F.

    2006-04-01

    Aiming at defining a valid spatial contamination model, resistivity and induced polarization (IP) measurements were used to investigate contamination plumes in the vicinity of two municipal landfills (Ovar and Ílhavo). Previous geophysical surveys and underground water samples confirmed the contamination. However 2D resistivity/IP surveys enabled in obtaining a more accurate spatial model. The Ovar survey consisted of two profiles with nine Wenner soundings each; the Ílhavo survey was carried out along two individual lines using a Wenner standard pseudo-section. In both situations, negative IP values were found associated with positive IP values, which can be explained mainly by 2D or 3D geometric effects caused by the presence of the conductive plumes. The data were modelled using a 2D inversion program (RES2DINV) and the resulting resistivity and chargeability distributions were displayed as pseudo-sections. The resistivity and chargeability pseudo-sections define the contamination plumes and the sedimentary structure. These case studies illustrate the advantages of 2D resistivity/IP surveys for the mapping of shape and dimension of contamination associated with landfills.

  11. Industrial applications of process imaging and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, David M.; Sunshine, Gregg; Rosen, Lou; Jochen, Ed

    2001-02-01

    Process imaging is the art of visualizing events inside closed industrial processes. Image processing is the art of mathematically manipulating digitized images to extract quantitative information about such processes. Ongoing advances in camera and computer technology have made it feasible to apply these abilities to measurement needs in the chemical industry. To illustrate the point, this paper describes several applications developed at DuPont, where a variety of measurements are based on in-line, at-line, and off-line imaging. Application areas include compounding, melt extrusion, crystallization, granulation, media milling, and particle characterization. Polymer compounded with glass fiber is evaluated by a patented radioscopic (real-time X-ray imaging) technique to measure concentration and dispersion uniformity of the glass. Contamination detection in molten polymer (important for extruder operations) is provided by both proprietary and commercial on-line systems. Crystallization in production reactors is monitored using in-line probes and flow cells. Granulation is controlled by at-line measurements of granule size obtained from image processing. Tomographic imaging provides feedback for improved operation of media mills. Finally, particle characterization is provided by a robotic system that measures individual size and shape for thousands of particles without human supervision. Most of these measurements could not be accomplished with other (non-imaging) techniques.

  12. A computerized framework for monitoring four-dimensional dose distributions during stereotactic body radiation therapy using a portal dose image-based 2D/3D registration approach.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takahiro; Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Asumi; Hirose, Taka-Aki; Honda, Hiroshi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Hirata, Hideki

    2015-03-01

    A computerized framework for monitoring four-dimensional (4D) dose distributions during stereotactic body radiation therapy based on a portal dose image (PDI)-based 2D/3D registration approach has been proposed in this study. Using the PDI-based registration approach, simulated 4D "treatment" CT images were derived from the deformation of 3D planning CT images so that a 2D planning PDI could be similar to a 2D dynamic clinical PDI at a breathing phase. The planning PDI was calculated by applying a dose calculation algorithm (a pencil beam convolution algorithm) to the geometry of the planning CT image and a virtual water equivalent phantom. The dynamic clinical PDIs were estimated from electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dynamic images including breathing phase data obtained during a treatment. The parameters of the affine transformation matrix were optimized based on an objective function and a gamma pass rate using a Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. The proposed framework was applied to the EPID dynamic images of ten lung cancer patients, which included 183 frames (mean: 18.3 per patient). The 4D dose distributions during the treatment time were successfully obtained by applying the dose calculation algorithm to the simulated 4D "treatment" CT images. The mean±standard deviation (SD) of the percentage errors between the prescribed dose and the estimated dose at an isocenter for all cases was 3.25±4.43%. The maximum error for the ten cases was 14.67% (prescribed dose: 1.50Gy, estimated dose: 1.72Gy), and the minimum error was 0.00%. The proposed framework could be feasible for monitoring the 4D dose distribution and dose errors within a patient's body during treatment.

  13. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Chemical Characteristics at Micrometric Scale by Combining 2D SEM-EDX Data and 3D X-Ray CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Hapca, Simona; Baveye, Philippe C.; Wilson, Clare; Lark, Richard Murray; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant need to improve our understanding of the factors that control a number of critical soil processes by integrating physical, chemical and biological measurements on soils at microscopic scales to help produce 3D maps of the related properties. Because of technological limitations, most chemical and biological measurements can be carried out only on exposed soil surfaces or 2-dimensional cuts through soil samples. Methods need to be developed to produce 3D maps of soil properties based on spatial sequences of 2D maps. In this general context, the objective of the research described here was to develop a method to generate 3D maps of soil chemical properties at the microscale by combining 2D SEM-EDX data with 3D X-ray computed tomography images. A statistical approach using the regression tree method and ordinary kriging applied to the residuals was developed and applied to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron, and oxygen at the microscale. The spatial correlation between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the chemical maps made it possible to use a regression-tree model as an initial step to predict the 3D chemical composition. For chemical elements, e.g., iron, that are sparsely distributed in a soil sample, the regression-tree model provides a good prediction, explaining as much as 90% of the variability in some of the data. However, for chemical elements that are more homogenously distributed, such as carbon, silicon, or oxygen, the additional kriging of the regression tree residuals improved significantly the prediction with an increase in the R2 value from 0.221 to 0.324 for carbon, 0.312 to 0.423 for silicon, and 0.218 to 0.374 for oxygen, respectively. The present research develops for the first time an integrated experimental and theoretical framework, which combines geostatistical methods with imaging techniques to unveil the 3-D chemical structure of soil at very fine scales. The methodology presented

  14. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Chemical Characteristics at Micrometric Scale by Combining 2D SEM-EDX Data and 3D X-Ray CT Images.

    PubMed

    Hapca, Simona; Baveye, Philippe C; Wilson, Clare; Lark, Richard Murray; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant need to improve our understanding of the factors that control a number of critical soil processes by integrating physical, chemical and biological measurements on soils at microscopic scales to help produce 3D maps of the related properties. Because of technological limitations, most chemical and biological measurements can be carried out only on exposed soil surfaces or 2-dimensional cuts through soil samples. Methods need to be developed to produce 3D maps of soil properties based on spatial sequences of 2D maps. In this general context, the objective of the research described here was to develop a method to generate 3D maps of soil chemical properties at the microscale by combining 2D SEM-EDX data with 3D X-ray computed tomography images. A statistical approach using the regression tree method and ordinary kriging applied to the residuals was developed and applied to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron, and oxygen at the microscale. The spatial correlation between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the chemical maps made it possible to use a regression-tree model as an initial step to predict the 3D chemical composition. For chemical elements, e.g., iron, that are sparsely distributed in a soil sample, the regression-tree model provides a good prediction, explaining as much as 90% of the variability in some of the data. However, for chemical elements that are more homogenously distributed, such as carbon, silicon, or oxygen, the additional kriging of the regression tree residuals improved significantly the prediction with an increase in the R2 value from 0.221 to 0.324 for carbon, 0.312 to 0.423 for silicon, and 0.218 to 0.374 for oxygen, respectively. The present research develops for the first time an integrated experimental and theoretical framework, which combines geostatistical methods with imaging techniques to unveil the 3-D chemical structure of soil at very fine scales. The methodology presented

  15. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-07-03

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach.

  16. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach. PMID:26151203

  17. Evaluation of 2D resistivity imaging technique for delineating subsurface seepage of hydrocarbon-contaminated water southeast of Karbala city, Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Menshed, Firas H; Thabit, Jassim M

    2017-01-10

    2D imaging technique was applied in (8) transects near a pit of contaminated water near contaminated well southeast of Karbala city, Iraq. Each transect was 30 m long with 1 m electrode spacing. Data acquisition was fulfilled by using Wenner electrode array. The resistivity of water-contaminated zone is found less than 3Ω.m and the top dry zone recorded relatively high resistivity (more than 170Ω.m). It is found that the greatest amount of seepage was found moving towards northeast direction coincided with groundwater movement direction, whereas there was no movement towards northwest and southeast directions and restricted on the closest areas to the pit location. The outcomes suggested that the 2D imaging technique is a successful and powerful tool in separating contaminated zone from clear one and in detecting underground seepage depth and moving direction.

  18. Image processing: some challenging problems.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, T S; Aizawa, K

    1993-01-01

    Image processing can be broadly defined as the manipulation of signals which are inherently multidimensional. The most common such signals are photographs and video sequences. The goals of processing or manipulation can be (i) compression for storage or transmission; (ii) enhancement or restoration; (iii) analysis, recognition, and understanding; or (iv) visualization for human observers. The use of image processing techniques has become almost ubiquitous; they find applications in such diverse areas as astronomy, archaeology, medicine, video communication, and electronic games. Nonetheless, many important problems in image processing remain unsolved. It is the goal of this paper to discuss some of these challenging problems. In Section I, we mention a number of outstanding problems. Then, in the remainder of this paper, we concentrate on one of them: very-low-bit-rate video compression. This is chosen because it involves almost all aspects of image processing. PMID:8234312

  19. Image Processing: Some Challenging Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T. S.; Aizawa, K.

    1993-11-01

    Image processing can be broadly defined as the manipulation of signals which are inherently multidimensional. The most common such signals are photographs and video sequences. The goals of processing or manipulation can be (i) compression for storage or transmission; (ii) enhancement or restoration; (iii) analysis, recognition, and understanding; or (iv) visualization for human observers. The use of image processing techniques has become almost ubiquitous; they find applications in such diverse areas as astronomy, archaeology, medicine, video communication, and electronic games. Nonetheless, many important problems in image processing remain unsolved. It is the goal of this paper to discuss some of these challenging problems. In Section I, we mention a number of outstanding problems. Then, in the remainder of this paper, we concentrate on one of them: very-low-bit-rate video compression. This is chosen because it involves almost all aspects of image processing.

  20. Image processing for optical mapping.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Prabu; Gupta, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Optical Mapping is an established single-molecule, whole-genome analysis system, which has been used to gain a comprehensive understanding of genomic structure and to study structural variation of complex genomes. A critical component of Optical Mapping system is the image processing module, which extracts single molecule restriction maps from image datasets of immobilized, restriction digested and fluorescently stained large DNA molecules. In this review, we describe robust and efficient image processing techniques to process these massive datasets and extract accurate restriction maps in the presence of noise, ambiguity and confounding artifacts. We also highlight a few applications of the Optical Mapping system.

  1. Characteristics of spondylotic myelopathy on 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo and 2D fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Abdulhadi, Mike A; Perno, Joseph R; Melhem, Elias R; Nucifora, Paolo G P

    2014-01-01

    In patients with spinal stenosis, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine can be improved by using 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences to provide a high-resolution assessment of osseous and ligamentous structures. However, it is not yet clear whether 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences adequately evaluate the spinal cord itself. As a result, they are generally supplemented by additional 2D fast spin echo sequences, adding time to the examination and potential discomfort to the patient. Here we investigate the hypothesis that in patients with spinal stenosis and spondylotic myelopathy, 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences can characterize cord lesions equally well as 2D fast spin echo sequences. We performed a retrospective analysis of 30 adult patients with spondylotic myelopathy who had been examined with both 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences and 2D fast spin echo sequences at the same scanning session. The two sequences were inspected separately for each patient, and visible cord lesions were manually traced. We found no significant differences between 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo and 2D fast spin echo sequences in the mean number, mean area, or mean transverse dimensions of spondylotic cord lesions. Nevertheless, the mean contrast-to-noise ratio of cord lesions was decreased on 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences compared to 2D fast spin echo sequences. These findings suggest that 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences do not need supplemental 2D fast spin echo sequences for the diagnosis of spondylotic myelopathy, but they may be less well suited for quantitative signal measurements in the spinal cord.

  2. Image Processing REST Web Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    collections, deblurring, contrast enhancement, and super resolution. 2 1. Original Image with Target Chip to Super Resolve 2. Unenhanced...extracted target chip 3. Super-resolved target chip 4. Super-resolved, deblurred target chip 5. Super-resolved, deblurred and contrast...enhanced target chip Image 1. Chaining the image processing algorithms. 3 2. Resources There are two types of resources associated with these

  3. A neural network-based 2D/3D image registration quality evaluator for pediatric patient setup in external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Su, Zhong; Li, Zuofeng

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose was to develop a neural network-based registration quality evaluator (RQE) that can improve the 2D/3D image registration robustness for pediatric patient setup in external beam radiotherapy. Orthogonal daily setup X-ray images of six pediatric patients with brain tumors receiving proton therapy treatments were retrospectively registered with their treatment planning computed tomography (CT) images. A neural network-based pattern classifier was used to determine whether a registration solution was successful based on geometric features of the similarity measure values near the point-of-solution. Supervised training and test datasets were generated by rigidly registering a pair of orthogonal daily setup X-ray images to the treatment planning CT. The best solution for each registration task was selected from 50 optimizing attempts that differed only by the randomly generated initial transformation parameters. The distance from each individual solution to the best solution in the normalized parametrical space was compared to a user-defined error tolerance to determine whether that solution was acceptable. A supervised training was then used to train the RQE. Performance of the RQE was evaluated using test dataset consisting of registration results that were not used in training. The RQE was integrated with our in-house 2D/3D registration system and its performance was evaluated using the same patient dataset. With an optimized sampling step size (i.e., 5 mm) in the feature space, the RQE has the sensitivity and the specificity in the ranges of 0.865-0.964 and 0.797-0.990, respectively, when used to detect registration error with mean voxel displacement (MVD) greater than 1 mm. The trial-to-acceptance ratio of the integrated 2D/3D registration system, for all patients, is equal to 1.48. The final acceptance ratio is 92.4%. The proposed RQE can potentially be used in a 2D/3D rigid image registration system to improve the overall robustness by rejecting

  4. SOFT-1: Imaging Processing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Five levels of image processing software are enumerated and discussed: (1) logging and formatting; (2) radiometric correction; (3) correction for geometric camera distortion; (4) geometric/navigational corrections; and (5) general software tools. Specific concerns about access to and analysis of digital imaging data within the Planetary Data System are listed.

  5. Photographic image enhancement and processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Image processing techniques (computer and photographic) are described which are used within the JSC Photographic Technology Division. Two purely photographic techniques used for specific subject isolation are discussed in detail. Sample imagery is included.

  6. Sgraffito simulation through image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Roberto A.; Serón Arbeloa, Francisco J.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a tool for simulating the traditional Sgraffito technique through digital image processing. The tool is based on a digital image pile and a set of attributes recovered from the image at the bottom of the pile using the Streit and Buchanan multiresolution image pyramid. This technique tries to preserve the principles of artistic composition by means of the attributes of color, luminance and shape recovered from the foundation image. A couple of simulated scratching objects will establish how the recovered attributes have to be painted. Different attributes can be painted by using different scratching primitives. The resulting image will be a colorimetric composition reached from the image on the top of the pile, the color of the images revealed by scratching and the inner characteristics of each scratching primitive. The technique combines elements of image processing, art and computer graphics allowing users to make their own free compositions and providing a means for the development of visual communication skills within the user-observer relationship. The technique enables the application of the given concepts in non artistic fields with specific subject tools.

  7. [Generation and processing of digital images in radiodiagnosis].

    PubMed

    Bajla, I; Belan, V

    1993-05-01

    The paper describes universal principles of diagnostic imaging. The attention is focused particularly on digital image generation in medicine. The methodology of display visualization of measured data is discussed. The problems of spatial relation representation and visual perception of image brightness are mentioned. The methodological issues of digital image processing (DIP) are discussed, particularly the relation of DIP to the other related disciplines, fundamental tasks in DIP and classification of DIP operations from the computational viewpoint. The following examples of applying DIP operations in diagnostic radiology are overviewed: local contrast enhancement in digital image, spatial filtering, quantitative texture analysis, synthesis of the 3D pseudospatial image based on the 2D tomogram set, multimodal processing of medical images. New trends of application of DIP methods in diagnostic radiology are outlined: evaluation of the diagnostic efficiency of DIP operations by means of ROC analysis, construction of knowledge-based systems of DIP in medicine. (Fig. 12, Ref. 26.)

  8. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated. PMID:27605489

  9. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, Yongkeun

    2016-09-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated.

  10. Fuzzy image processing in sun sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobasser, S.; Liebe, C. C.; Howard, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper will describe how the fuzzy image processing is implemented in the instrument. Comparison of the Fuzzy image processing and a more conventional image processing algorithm is provided and shows that the Fuzzy image processing yields better accuracy then conventional image processing.

  11. Spreading and slope instability at the continental margin offshore Mt Etna, imaged by high-resolution 2D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Felix; Krastel, Sebastian; Behrmann, Jan-Hinrich; Papenberg, Cord; Geersen, Jacob; Ridente, Domenico; Latino Chiocci, Francesco; Urlaub, Morelia; Bialas, Jörg; Micallef, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Mount Etna is the largest active volcano in Europe. Its volcano edifice is located on top of continental crust close to the Ionian shore in east Sicily. Instability of the eastern flank of the volcano edifice is well documented onshore. The continental margin is supposed to deform as well. Little, however, is known about the offshore extension of the eastern volcano flank and its adjacent continental margin, which is a serious shortcoming in stability models. In order to better constrain the active tectonics of the continental margin offshore the eastern flank of the volcano, we acquired and processed a new marine high-resolution seismic and hydro-acoustic dataset. The data provide new detailed insights into the heterogeneous geology and tectonics of shallow continental margin structures offshore Mt Etna. In a similiar manner as observed onshore, the submarine realm is characterized by different blocks, which are controlled by local- and regional tectonics. We image a compressional regime at the toe of the continental margin, which is bound to an asymmetric basin system confining the eastward movement of the flank. In addition, we constrain the proposed southern boundary of the moving flank, which is identified as a right lateral oblique fault movement north of Catania Canyon. From our findings, we consider a major coupled volcano edifice instability and continental margin gravitational collapse and spreading to be present at Mt Etna, as we see a clear link between on- and offshore tectonic structures across the entire eastern flank. The new findings will help to evaluate hazards and risks accompanied by Mt Etna's slope- and continental margin instability and will be used as a base for future investigations in this region.

  12. Sub-glacial processes interpreted from 3D and high-resolution 2D seismic data from the Central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Francis

    2013-04-01

    A near complete record of Quaternary deposition, comprising more than 1000m of sediments, is preserved within the Central North Sea (CNS). This study presents evidence interpreted from seismic data of sub-glacial processes at a variety of scales for several Pleistocene glacial events. The study area has been the subject of hydrocarbon exploration since the mid 1960s and is covered by 3D seismic datasets up to 1000km2 as well as high-resolution 2D (HR2D) seismic datasets covering areas of 1-25km2. These data have been examined using a variety of techniques and attributes, including time-slicing, horizon slicing, topographic mapping and attribute analysis, to map erosion surfaces, depositional bodies, sedimentary textures and deformation events. An Early Pleistocene seismic event has been identified on 3D data, at 800-1000m MSL, within the southern part of the CNS, which marks the first appearance of iceberg ploughmarks. This event has been traced into the northern part of the study area, where iceberg ploughmarks are absent, but a set of mega-scale lineations at 700-800ms TWT are interpreted as ice-stream scour marks. A series of complex seismic events overlying the ice-scoured surface are interpreted as glacial deposits, at the top of which a network of channels, interpreted to be the result of glacial meltwaters, is associated with features interpreted as over-bank sand bodies. Higher in the sequence, timeslice images of Early to Middle Pleistocene deposits show trains of sub-parallel, curvi-linear, events, several km in length and 50-300m in width. Analysis of these events on HR2D data reveals them to consist of series of short, imbricated, dipping reflectors, terminated by complex, mounded structures. Individual sheets display up to 60ms TWT (55m) vertical displacement over horizontal distances of 200-250m. Two deformed packages are evident on HR2D data. A lower sequence, consisting of discrete thrust sheets lies above an erosion or dislocation surface (MP1

  13. Antenatal Diagnosis of a Large Immature Abdominal Wall Teratoma by 2D-3D Ultrasound Using HDlive and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Werner, Heron; Mocarzel, Carolina; Sá, Renato Augusto; Tonni, Gabriele; Novoa Y Novoa, Victoria Arruga; Avvad-Portari, Elyzabeth; Bonasoni, Paola; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first case of prenatally detected teratoma of the fetal abdomen wall using ultrasound and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A heterogeneous mass, partly solid and cystic, originating from the anterior abdominal wall of the fetus close to an omphalocele sac was detected by means of 2D/3D ultrasound and MRI. Amniodrainage was performed and due to sign of impending fetal risk, an emergency Cesarean section was performed. A bulky, crumbly and bleeding tumoral mass was confirmed at delivery. Ligation of the supplying artery to the tumor was complicated by uncontrollable hemorrhage and early neonatal death. Pathology identified the tumor as an immature teratoma of the anterior fetal abdominal wall. 2D/3D ultrasound, especially using HDlive application and MRI demonstrated accurate detection and characterization of this congenital tumor.

  14. Registration of 2D cardiac images to real-time 3D ultrasound volumes for 3D stress echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. Y. Esther; van Stralen, Marijn; Voormolen, Marco M.; van Burken, Gerard; Nemes, Attila; ten Cate, Folkert J.; Geleijnse, Marcel L.; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Bosch, Johan G.

    2006-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) stress echocardiography is a novel technique for diagnosing cardiac dysfunction, by comparing wall motion of the left ventricle under different stages of stress. For quantitative comparison of this motion, it is essential to register the ultrasound data. We propose an intensity based rigid registration method to retrieve two-dimensional (2D) four-chamber (4C), two-chamber, and short-axis planes from the 3D data set acquired in the stress stage, using manually selected 2D planes in the rest stage as reference. The algorithm uses the Nelder-Mead simplex optimization to find the optimal transformation of one uniform scaling, three rotation, and three translation parameters. We compared registration using the SAD, SSD, and NCC metrics, performed on four resolution levels of a Gaussian pyramid. The registration's effectiveness was assessed by comparing the 3D positions of the registered apex and mitral valve midpoints and 4C direction with the manually selected results. The registration was tested on data from 20 patients. Best results were found using the NCC metric on data downsampled with factor two: mean registration errors were 8.1mm, 5.4mm, and 8.0° in the apex position, mitral valve position, and 4C direction respectively. The errors were close to the interobserver (7.1mm, 3.8mm, 7.4°) and intraobserver variability (5.2mm, 3.3mm, 7.0°), and better than the error before registration (9.4mm, 9.0mm, 9.9°). We demonstrated that the registration algorithm visually and quantitatively improves the alignment of rest and stress data sets, performing similar to manual alignment. This will improve automated analysis in 3D stress echocardiography.

  15. Image processing using reconfigurable FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Lee

    1996-10-01

    The use of reconfigurable field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) for imaging applications show considerable promise to fill the gap that often occurs when digital signal processor chips fail to meet performance specifications. Single chip DSPs do not have the overall performance to meet the needs of many imaging applications, particularly in real-time designs. Using multiple DSPs to boost performance often presents major design challenges in maintaining data alignment and process synchronization. These challenges can impose serious cost, power consumption and board space penalties. Image processing requires manipulating massive amounts of data at high-speed. Although DSP chips can process data at high-speeds, their architectures can inhibit overall system performance in real-time imaging. The rate of operations can be increased when they are performed in dedicated hardware, such as special-purpose imaging devices and FPGAs, which provides the horsepower necessary to implement real-time image processing products successfully and cost-effectively. For many fixed applications, non-SRAM- based (antifuse or flash-based) FPGAs provide the raw speed to accomplish standard high-speed functions. However, in applications where algorithms are continuously changing and compute operations must be modified, only SRAM-based FPGAs give enough flexibility. The addition of reconfigurable FPGAs as a flexible hardware facility enables DSP chips to perform optimally. The benefits primarily stem from optimizing the hardware for the algorithms or the use of reconfigurable hardware to enhance the product architecture. And with SRAM-based FPGAs that are capable of partial dynamic reconfiguration, such as the Cache-Logic FPGAs from Atmel, continuous modification of data and logic is not only possible, it is practical as well. First we review the particular demands of image processing. Then we present various applications and discuss strategies for exploiting the capabilities of

  16. Integrating image processing in PACS.

    PubMed

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Neri, Emanuele; Cerri, Francesca; Turini, Francesca; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    Integration of RIS and PACS services into a single solution has become a widespread reality in daily radiological practice, allowing substantial acceleration of workflow with greater ease of work compared with older generation film-based radiological activity. In particular, the fast and spectacular recent evolution of digital radiology (with special reference to cross-sectional imaging modalities, such as CT and MRI) has been paralleled by the development of integrated RIS--PACS systems with advanced image processing tools (either two- and/or three-dimensional) that were an exclusive task of costly dedicated workstations until a few years ago. This new scenario is likely to further improve productivity in the radiology department with reduction of the time needed for image interpretation and reporting, as well as to cut costs for the purchase of dedicated standalone image processing workstations. In this paper, a general description of typical integrated RIS--PACS architecture with image processing capabilities will be provided, and the main available image processing tools will be illustrated.

  17. Assessment of a 2D electronic portal imaging devices-based dosimetry algorithm for pretreatment and in-vivo midplane dose verification

    PubMed Central

    Jomehzadeh, Ali; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Amouheidari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is a method for the dosimetric verification of radiotherapy plans, both pretreatment and in vivo. The aim of this study is to test a 2D EPID-based dosimetry algorithm for dose verification of some plans inside a homogenous and anthropomorphic phantom and in vivo as well. Materials and Methods: Dose distributions were reconstructed from EPID images using a 2D EPID dosimetry algorithm inside a homogenous slab phantom for a simple 10 × 10 cm2 box technique, 3D conformal (prostate, head-and-neck, and lung), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) prostate plans inside an anthropomorphic (Alderson) phantom and in the patients (one fraction in vivo) for 3D conformal plans (prostate, head-and-neck and lung). Results: The planned and EPID dose difference at the isocenter, on an average, was 1.7% for pretreatment verification and less than 3% for all in vivo plans, except for head-and-neck, which was 3.6%. The mean γ values for a seven-field prostate IMRT plan delivered to the Alderson phantom varied from 0.28 to 0.65. For 3D conformal plans applied for the Alderson phantom, all γ1% values were within the tolerance level for all plans and in both anteroposterior and posteroanterior (AP-PA) beams. Conclusion: The 2D EPID-based dosimetry algorithm provides an accurate method to verify the dose of a simple 10 × 10 cm2 field, in two dimensions, inside a homogenous slab phantom and an IMRT prostate plan, as well as in 3D conformal plans (prostate, head-and-neck, and lung plans) applied using an anthropomorphic phantom and in vivo. However, further investigation to improve the 2D EPID dosimetry algorithm for a head-and-neck case, is necessary. PMID:28028511

  18. Opportunities for Live Cell FT-Infrared Imaging: Macromolecule Identification with 2D and 3D Localization

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Eric C.; Aboualizadeh, Ebrahim; Barabas, Marie E.; Stucky, Cheryl L.; Hirschmugl, Carol J.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectromicroscopy, or chemical imaging, is an evolving technique that is poised to make significant contributions in the fields of biology and medicine. Recent developments in sources, detectors, measurement techniques and speciman holders have now made diffraction-limited Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging of cellular chemistry in living cells a reality. The availability of bright, broadband IR sources and large area, pixelated detectors facilitate live cell imaging, which requires rapid measurements using non-destructive probes. In this work, we review advances in the field of FTIR spectromicroscopy that have contributed to live-cell two and three-dimensional IR imaging, and discuss several key examples that highlight the utility of this technique for studying the structure and chemistry of living cells. PMID:24256815

  19. Opportunities for live cell FT-infrared imaging: macromolecule identification with 2D and 3D localization.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Eric C; Aboualizadeh, Ebrahim; Barabas, Marie E; Stucky, Cheryl L; Hirschmugl, Carol J

    2013-11-19

    Infrared (IR) spectromicroscopy, or chemical imaging, is an evolving technique that is poised to make significant contributions in the fields of biology and medicine. Recent developments in sources, detectors, measurement techniques and speciman holders have now made diffraction-limited Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging of cellular chemistry in living cells a reality. The availability of bright, broadband IR sources and large area, pixelated detectors facilitate live cell imaging, which requires rapid measurements using non-destructive probes. In this work, we review advances in the field of FTIR spectromicroscopy that have contributed to live-cell two and three-dimensional IR imaging, and discuss several key examples that highlight the utility of this technique for studying the structure and chemistry of living cells.

  20. Preliminary clinical results: an analyzing tool for 2D optical imaging in detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adi Aizudin Bin Radin Nasirudin, Radin; Meier, Reinhard; Ahari, Carmen; Sievert, Matti; Fiebich, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J.; No"l, Peter B.

    2011-03-01

    Optical imaging (OI) is a relatively new method in detecting active inflammation of hand joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). With the high number of people affected by this disease especially in western countries, the availability of OI as an early diagnostic imaging method is clinically highly relevant. In this paper, we present a newly in-house developed OI analyzing tool and a clinical evaluation study. Our analyzing tool extends the capability of existing OI tools. We include many features in the tool, such as region-based image analysis, hyper perfusion curve analysis, and multi-modality image fusion to aid clinicians in localizing and determining the intensity of inflammation in joints. Additionally, image data management options, such as the full integration of PACS/RIS, are included. In our clinical study we demonstrate how OI facilitates the detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. The preliminary clinical results indicate a sensitivity of 43.5%, a specificity of 80.3%, an accuracy of 65.7%, a positive predictive value of 76.6%, and a negative predictive value of 64.9% in relation to clinical results from MRI. The accuracy of inflammation detection serves as evidence to the potential of OI as a useful imaging modality for early detection of active inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. With our in-house developed tool we extend the usefulness of OI imaging in the clinical arena. Overall, we show that OI is a fast, inexpensive, non-invasive and nonionizing yet highly sensitive and accurate imaging modality.-

  1. FIRE: an open-software suite for real-time 2D/3D image registration for image guided radiotherapy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, H.; Gendrin, C.; Spoerk, J.; Steiner, E.; Underwood, T.; Kuenzler, T.; Georg, D.; Birkfellner, W.

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy treatments have changed at a tremendously rapid pace. Dose delivered to the tumor has escalated while organs at risk (OARs) are better spared. The impact of moving tumors during dose delivery has become higher due to very steep dose gradients. Intra-fractional tumor motion has to be managed adequately to reduce errors in dose delivery. For tumors with large motion such as tumors in the lung, tracking is an approach that can reduce position uncertainty. Tumor tracking approaches range from purely image intensity based techniques to motion estimation based on surrogate tracking. Research efforts are often based on custom designed software platforms which take too much time and effort to develop. To address this challenge we have developed an open software platform especially focusing on tumor motion management. FLIRT is a freely available open-source software platform. The core method for tumor tracking is purely intensity based 2D/3D registration. The platform is written in C++ using the Qt framework for the user interface. The performance critical methods are implemented on the graphics processor using the CUDA extension. One registration can be as fast as 90ms (11Hz). This is suitable to track tumors moving due to respiration (~0.3Hz) or heartbeat (~1Hz). Apart from focusing on high performance, the platform is designed to be flexible and easy to use. Current use cases range from tracking feasibility studies, patient positioning and method validation. Such a framework has the potential of enabling the research community to rapidly perform patient studies or try new methods.

  2. 2-D and 3-D Heliospheric Imaging from LEO, L1 and L5: Instruments, Vantage Points, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Heliospheric imaging has come of age scientifically, and multiple heliospheric imagers are either operating or being built to operate on scientific missions. Much study and effort has been put into the advantages of solar wind imaging for space weather prediction. For example, CME tracking (either in 3-D with polarization, or in an image plane from a vantage far from Earth) has the potential to greatly increase arrival time predictions. Likewise, higher spatial and temporal resolution could provide critical clues about the important N/S component of the entrained magnetic field, by connecting signed surface magnetograms of the Sun to particular structures observed in the corona and, later, in the ICME. I will discuss the current state of understanding of polarized and/or high resolution heliospheric imaging as it relates to space weather forecasting, the relative advantages of an instrument at LEO, L1, or L5, and desiderata to exploit currently-validated and under-consideration techniques in an operational, prototype, or scientific next-generation solar wind imaging experiment.

  3. Model-based measurement of food portion size for image-based dietary assessment using 3D/2D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Jia, Wenyan; Yue, Yaofeng; Li, Zhaoxin; Sun, Yung-Nien; Fernstrom, John D.; Sun, Mingui

    2013-10-01

    Dietary assessment is important in health maintenance and intervention in many chronic conditions, such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, there is currently a lack of convenient methods for measuring the volume of food (portion size) in real-life settings. We present a computational method to estimate food volume from a single photographic image of food contained on a typical dining plate. First, we calculate the food location with respect to a 3D camera coordinate system using the plate as a scale reference. Then, the food is segmented automatically from the background in the image. Adaptive thresholding and snake modeling are implemented based on several image features, such as color contrast, regional color homogeneity and curve bending degree. Next, a 3D model representing the general shape of the food (e.g., a cylinder, a sphere, etc) is selected from a pre-constructed shape model library. The position, orientation and scale of the selected shape model are determined by registering the projected 3D model and the food contour in the image, where the properties of the reference are used as constraints. Experimental results using various realistically shaped foods with known volumes demonstrated satisfactory performance of our image-based food volume measurement method even if the 3D geometric surface of the food is not completely represented in the input image.

  4. Model-based measurement of food portion size for image-based dietary assessment using 3D/2D registration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Jia, Wenyan; Yue, Yaofeng; Li, Zhaoxin; Sun, Yung-Nien; Fernstrom, John D.; Sun, Mingui

    2013-01-01

    Dietary assessment is important in health maintenance and intervention in many chronic conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. However, there is currently a lack of convenient methods for measuring the volume of food (portion size) in real-life settings. We present a computational method to estimate food volume from a single photographical image of food contained in a typical dining plate. First, we calculate the food location with respect to a 3D camera coordinate system using the plate as a scale reference. Then, the food is segmented automatically from the background in the image. Adaptive thresholding and snake modeling are implemented based on several image features, such as color contrast, regional color homogeneity and curve bending degree. Next, a 3D model representing the general shape of the food (e.g., a cylinder, a sphere, etc.) is selected from a pre-constructed shape model library. The position, orientation and scale of the selected shape model are determined by registering the projected 3D model and the food contour in the image, where the properties of the reference are used as constraints. Experimental results using various realistically shaped foods with known volumes demonstrated satisfactory performance of our image based food volume measurement method even if the 3D geometric surface of the food is not completely represented in the input image. PMID:24223474

  5. Model-based measurement of food portion size for image-based dietary assessment using 3D/2D registration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Jia, Wenyan; Yue, Yaofeng; Li, Zhaoxin; Sun, Yung-Nien; Fernstrom, John D; Sun, Mingui

    2013-10-01

    Dietary assessment is important in health maintenance and intervention in many chronic conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. However, there is currently a lack of convenient methods for measuring the volume of food (portion size) in real-life settings. We present a computational method to estimate food volume from a single photographical image of food contained in a typical dining plate. First, we calculate the food location with respect to a 3D camera coordinate system using the plate as a scale reference. Then, the food is segmented automatically from the background in the image. Adaptive thresholding and snake modeling are implemented based on several image features, such as color contrast, regional color homogeneity and curve bending degree. Next, a 3D model representing the general shape of the food (e.g., a cylinder, a sphere, etc.) is selected from a pre-constructed shape model library. The position, orientation and scale of the selected shape model are determined by registering the projected 3D model and the food contour in the image, where the properties of the reference are used as constraints. Experimental results using various realistically shaped foods with known volumes demonstrated satisfactory performance of our image based food volume measurement method even if the 3D geometric surface of the food is not completely represented in the input image.

  6. Enhanced imaging process for xeroradiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fender, William D.; Zanrosso, Eddie M.

    1993-09-01

    An enhanced mammographic imaging process has been developed which is based on the conventional powder-toner selenium technology used in the Xerox 125/126 x-ray imaging system. The process is derived from improvements in the amorphous selenium x-ray photoconductor, the blue powder toner and the aerosol powder dispersion process. Comparisons of image quality and x-ray dose using the Xerox aluminum-wedge breast phantom and the Radiation Measurements Model 152D breast phantom have been made between the new Enhanced Process, the standard Xerox 125/126 System and screen-film at mammographic x-ray exposure parameters typical for each modality. When comparing the Enhanced Xeromammographic Process with the standard 125/126 System, a distinct advantage is seen for the Enhanced equivalent mass detection and superior fiber and speck detection. The broader imaging latitude of enhanced and standard Xeroradiography, in comparison to film, is illustrated in images made using the aluminum-wedge breast phantom.

  7. SU-E-J-13: Six Degree of Freedom Image Fusion Accuracy for Cranial Target Localization On the Varian Edge Stereotactic Radiosurgery System: Comparison Between 2D/3D and KV CBCT Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H; Song, K; Chetty, I; Kim, J; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the 6 degree of freedom systematic deviations between 2D/3D and CBCT image registration with various imaging setups and fusion algorithms on the Varian Edge Linac. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with radio opaque targets embedded was scanned with CT slice thicknesses of 0.8, 1, 2, and 3mm. The 6 DOF systematic errors were assessed by comparing 2D/3D (kV/MV with CT) with 3D/3D (CBCT with CT) image registrations with different offset positions, similarity measures, image filters, and CBCT slice thicknesses (1 and 2 mm). The 2D/3D registration accuracy of 51 fractions for 26 cranial SRS patients was also evaluated by analyzing 2D/3D pre-treatment verification taken after 3D/3D image registrations. Results: The systematic deviations of 2D/3D image registration using kV- kV, MV-kV and MV-MV image pairs were within ±0.3mm and ±0.3° for translations and rotations with 95% confidence interval (CI) for a reference CT with 0.8 mm slice thickness. No significant difference (P>0.05) on target localization was observed between 0.8mm, 1mm, and 2mm CT slice thicknesses with CBCT slice thicknesses of 1mm and 2mm. With 3mm CT slice thickness, both 2D/3D and 3D/3D registrations performed less accurately in longitudinal direction than thinner CT slice thickness (0.60±0.12mm and 0.63±0.07mm off, respectively). Using content filter and using similarity measure of pattern intensity instead of mutual information, improved the 2D/3D registration accuracy significantly (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively). For the patient study, means and standard deviations of residual errors were 0.09±0.32mm, −0.22±0.51mm and −0.07±0.32mm in VRT, LNG and LAT directions, respectively, and 0.12°±0.46°, −0.12°±0.39° and 0.06°±0.28° in RTN, PITCH, and ROLL directions, respectively. 95% CI of translational and rotational deviations were comparable to those in phantom study. Conclusion: 2D/3D image registration provided on the Varian Edge radiosurgery, 6 DOF

  8. Image Processing Language. Phase 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    knowledge engineering of coherent collections of methodological tools as they appear in the literature, and the implementation of expert knowledge in...knowledge representation becomes even more desirable. The role of morphology ( Reference 30 as a knowledge formalization tool is another area which is...sets of image processing algorithms. These analyses are to be carried out in several modes including a complete translation to image algebra machine

  9. Digital processing of radiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. D.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    1973-01-01

    Some techniques are presented and the software documentation for the digital enhancement of radiographs. Both image handling and image processing operations are considered. The image handling operations dealt with are: (1) conversion of format of data from packed to unpacked and vice versa; (2) automatic extraction of image data arrays; (3) transposition and 90 deg rotations of large data arrays; (4) translation of data arrays for registration; and (5) reduction of the dimensions of data arrays by integral factors. Both the frequency and the spatial domain approaches are presented for the design and implementation of the image processing operation. It is shown that spatial domain recursive implementation of filters is much faster than nonrecursive implementations using fast fourier transforms (FFT) for the cases of interest in this work. The recursive implementation of a class of matched filters for enhancing image signal to noise ratio is described. Test patterns are used to illustrate the filtering operations. The application of the techniques to radiographic images of metallic structures is demonstrated through several examples.

  10. Image processing of galaxy photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arp, H.; Lorre, J.

    1976-01-01

    New computer techniques for analyzing and processing photographic images of galaxies are presented, with interesting scientific findings gleaned from the processed photographic data. Discovery and enhancement of very faint and low-contrast nebulous features, improved resolution of near-limit detail in nebulous and stellar images, and relative colors of a group of nebulosities in the field are attained by the methods. Digital algorithms, nonlinear pattern-recognition filters, linear convolution filters, plate averaging and contrast enhancement techniques, and an atmospheric deconvolution technique are described. New detail is revealed in images of NGC 7331, Stephan's Quintet, Seyfert's Sextet, and the jet in M87, via processes of addition of plates, star removal, contrast enhancement, standard deviation filtering, and computer ratioing to bring out qualitative color differences.

  11. FITS Liberator: Image processing software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg Christensen, Lars; Nielsen, Lars Holm; Nielsen, Kaspar K.; Johansen, Teis; Hurt, Robert; de Martin, David

    2012-06-01

    The ESA/ESO/NASA FITS Liberator makes it possible to process and edit astronomical science data in the FITS format to produce stunning images of the universe. Formerly a plugin for Adobe Photoshop, the current version of FITS Liberator is a stand-alone application and no longer requires Photoshop. This image processing software makes it possible to create color images using raw observations from a range of telescopes; the FITS Liberator continues to support the FITS and PDS formats, preferred by astronomers and planetary scientists respectively, which enables data to be processed from a wide range of telescopes and planetary probes, including ESO's Very Large Telescope, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, ESA's XMM-Newton Telescope and Cassini-Huygens or Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  12. Phase in Optical Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naughton, Thomas J.

    2010-04-01

    The use of phase has a long standing history in optical image processing, with early milestones being in the field of pattern recognition, such as VanderLugt's practical construction technique for matched filters, and (implicitly) Goodman's joint Fourier transform correlator. In recent years, the flexibility afforded by phase-only spatial light modulators and digital holography, for example, has enabled many processing techniques based on the explicit encoding and decoding of phase. One application area concerns efficient numerical computations. Pushing phase measurement to its physical limits, designs employing the physical properties of phase have ranged from the sensible to the wonderful, in some cases making computationally easy problems easier to solve and in other cases addressing mathematics' most challenging computationally hard problems. Another application area is optical image encryption, in which, typically, a phase mask modulates the fractional Fourier transformed coefficients of a perturbed input image, and the phase of the inverse transform is then sensed as the encrypted image. The inherent linearity that makes the system so elegant mitigates against its use as an effective encryption technique, but we show how a combination of optical and digital techniques can restore confidence in that security. We conclude with the concept of digital hologram image processing, and applications of same that are uniquely suited to optical implementation, where the processing, recognition, or encryption step operates on full field information, such as that emanating from a coherently illuminated real-world three-dimensional object.

  13. WE-AB-BRA-01: 3D-2D Image Registration for Target Localization in Spine Surgery: Comparison of Similarity Metrics Against Robustness to Content Mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, T; Ketcha, M; Siewerdsen, J H; Uneri, A; Reaungamornrat, S; Vogt, S; Kleinszig, G; Lo, S F; Wolinsky, J P; Gokaslan, Z L; Aygun, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In image-guided spine surgery, mapping 3D preoperative images to 2D intraoperative images via 3D-2D registration can provide valuable assistance in target localization. However, the presence of surgical instrumentation, hardware implants, and soft-tissue resection/displacement causes mismatches in image content, confounding existing registration methods. Manual/semi-automatic methods to mask such extraneous content is time consuming, user-dependent, error prone, and disruptive to clinical workflow. We developed and evaluated 2 novel similarity metrics within a robust registration framework to overcome such challenges in target localization. Methods: An IRB-approved retrospective study in 19 spine surgery patients included 19 preoperative 3D CT images and 50 intraoperative mobile radiographs in cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine regions. A neuroradiologist provided truth definition of vertebral positions in CT and radiography. 3D-2D registration was performed using the CMA-ES optimizer with 4 gradient-based image similarity metrics: (1) gradient information (GI); (2) gradient correlation (GC); (3) a novel variant referred to as gradient orientation (GO); and (4) a second variant referred to as truncated gradient correlation (TGC). Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) of the vertebral levels. Results: Conventional similarity metrics were susceptible to gross registration error and failure modes associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation: for GI, the median PDE and interquartile range was 33.0±43.6 mm; similarly for GC, PDE = 23.0±92.6 mm respectively. The robust metrics GO and TGC, on the other hand, demonstrated major improvement in PDE (7.6 ±9.4 mm and 8.1± 18.1 mm, respectively) and elimination of gross failure modes. Conclusion: The proposed GO and TGC similarity measures improve registration accuracy and robustness to gross failure in the presence of strong image content mismatch. Such

  14. Accelerated short-TE 3D proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging using 2D-SENSE with a 32-channel array coil.

    PubMed

    Otazo, Ricardo; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Posse, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with whole brain coverage in clinically feasible acquisition times still remains a major challenge. A combination of MRSI with parallel imaging has shown promise to reduce the long encoding times and 2D acceleration with a large array coil is expected to provide high acceleration capability. In this work a very high-speed method for 3D-MRSI based on the combination of proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) with regularized 2D-SENSE reconstruction is developed. Regularization was performed by constraining the singular value decomposition of the encoding matrix to reduce the effect of low-value and overlapped coil sensitivities. The effects of spectral heterogeneity and discontinuities in coil sensitivity across the spectroscopic voxels were minimized by unaliasing the point spread function. As a result the contamination from extracranial lipids was reduced 1.6-fold on average compared to standard SENSE. We show that the acquisition of short-TE (15 ms) 3D-PEPSI at 3 T with a 32 x 32 x 8 spatial matrix using a 32-channel array coil can be accelerated 8-fold (R = 4 x 2) along y-z to achieve a minimum acquisition time of 1 min. Maps of the concentrations of N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, and glutamate were obtained with moderate reduction in spatial-spectral quality. The short acquisition time makes the method suitable for volumetric metabolite mapping in clinical studies.

  15. Automatic organ localizations on 3D CT images by using majority-voting of multiple 2D detections based on local binary patterns and Haar-like features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Yamaguchi, Shoutarou; Zhou, Xinxin; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes an approach to accomplish the fast and automatic localization of the different inner organ regions on 3D CT scans. The proposed approach combines object detections and the majority voting technique to achieve the robust and quick organ localization. The basic idea of proposed method is to detect a number of 2D partial appearances of a 3D target region on CT images from multiple body directions, on multiple image scales, by using multiple feature spaces, and vote all the 2D detecting results back to the 3D image space to st