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Sample records for 2-d mhd code

  1. 2-D skin-current toroidal-MHD-equilibrium code

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Niland, R.A.; Coonrod, J.; Levine, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    A two-dimensional, toroidal, ideal MHD skin-current equilibrium computer code is described. The code is suitable for interactive implementation on a minicomptuer. Some examples of the use of the code for design and interpretation of toroidal cusp experiments are presented.

  2. Numerical MHD codes for modeling astrophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldoba, A. V.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Lii, P. S.; Comins, M. L.; Dyda, S.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a Godunov-type magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code based on the Miyoshi and Kusano (2005) solver which can be used to solve various astrophysical hydrodynamic and MHD problems. The energy equation is in the form of entropy conservation. The code has been implemented on several different coordinate systems: 2.5D axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates, 2D Cartesian coordinates, 2D plane polar coordinates, and fully 3D cylindrical coordinates. Viscosity and diffusivity are implemented in the code to control the accretion rate in the disk and the rate of penetration of the disk matter through the magnetic field lines. The code has been utilized for the numerical investigations of a number of different astrophysical problems, several examples of which are shown.

  3. On Regularity Criteria for the 2D Generalized MHD System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zaihong; Wang, Yanan; Zhou, Yong

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of regularity criteria for the 2D generalized MHD system with fractional dissipative terms {-Λ^{2α}u} for the velocity field and {-Λ^{2β}b} for the magnetic field respectively. Various regularity criteria are established to guarantee smoothness of solutions. It turns out that our regularity criteria imply previous global existence results naturally.

  4. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  5. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Atmospheric Outflows from Hot Jupiters: 2D MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, A.; Matsakos, T.; Konigl, A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of stellar hydrogen Ly-α line absorption during transits of some hot Jupiter exoplanets suggest the presence of a dense, fast wind that is blowing from planetary atmosphere tep{2003Natur.422..143V,2007ApJ...671L..61B}. Modeling efforts include 1D hydrodynamic models tep{2009ApJ...693...23M,2004Icar..170..167Y,2007P&SS...55.1426G} and 2D isothermal magnetized wind models tep{2014arXiv1404.5817T}, among others. In this work, we model the 2D structure of the irradiated upper atmosphere of a hot Jupiter planet and its interaction with the planetary magnetic field. We calculate self consistently the heating by stellar UV radiation and the cooling of the atmosphere by Ly-α emission. We solve for the ionization structure assuming a 100% hydrogen atmosphere, accounting for the radiative ionization, recombination and advection of the gas. We show the effect of stellar tides and planetary magnetic field on the planet outflow and calculate the Ly-α transmission spectra of the resulting atmosphere.

  7. Global small solutions of 2-D incompressible MHD system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fanghua; Xu, Li; Zhang, Ping

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the global wellposedness of 2-D incompressible magneto-hydrodynamical system with smooth initial data which is close to some non-trivial steady state. It is a coupled system between the Navier-Stokes equations and a free transport equation with a universal nonlinear coupling structure. The main difficulty of the proof lies in exploring the dissipative mechanism of the system. To achieve this and to avoid the difficulty of propagating anisotropic regularity for the free transport equation, we first reformulate our system (1.1) in the Lagrangian coordinates (2.19). Then we employ anisotropic Littlewood-Paley analysis to establish the key a prioriL1 (R+ ; Lip (R2)) estimate for the Lagrangian velocity field Yt. With this estimate, we can prove the global wellposedness of (2.19) with smooth and small initial data by using the energy method. We emphasize that the algebraic structure of (2.19) is crucial for the proofs to work. The global wellposedness of the original system (1.1) then follows by a suitable change of variables.

  8. OpenMHD: Godunov-type code for ideal/resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2016-04-01

    OpenMHD is a Godunov-type finite-volume code for ideal/resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). It is written in Fortran 90 and is parallelized by using MPI-2 and OpenMP. The code was originally developed for studying magnetic reconnection problems and has been made publicly available in the hope that others may find it useful.

  9. MHD Code Optimizations and Jets in Dense Gaseous Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaibler, Volker; Vigelius, Matthias; Krause, Martin; Camenzind, Max

    We have further optimized and extended the 3D-MHD-code NIRVANA. The magnetized part runs in parallel, reaching 19 Gflops per SX-6 node, and has a passively advected particle population. In addition, the code is MPI-parallel now - on top of the shared memory parallelization. On a 512^3 grid, we reach 561 Gflops with 32 nodes on the SX-8. Also, we have successfully used FLASH on the Opteron cluster. Scientific results are preliminary so far. We report one computation of highly resolved cocoon turbulence. While we find some similarities to earlier 2D work by us and others, we note a strange reluctancy of cold material to enter the low density cocoon, which has to be investigated further.

  10. Newtonian CAFE: a new ideal MHD code to study the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. J.; Guzmán, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present a new independent code designed to solve the equations of classical ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in three dimensions, submitted to a constant gravitational field. The purpose of the code centers on the analysis of solar phenomena within the photosphere-corona region. In special the code is capable to simulate the propagation of impulsively generated linear and non-linear MHD waves in the non-isothermal solar atmosphere. We present 1D and 2D standard tests to demonstrate the quality of the numerical results obtained with our code. As 3D tests we present the propagation of MHD-gravity waves and vortices in the solar atmosphere. The code is based on high-resolution shock-capturing methods, uses the HLLE flux formula combined with Minmod, MC and WENO5 reconstructors. The divergence free magnetic field constraint is controlled using the Flux Constrained Transport method.

  11. CAFE: A New Relativistic MHD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora-Clavijo, F. D.; Cruz-Osorio, A.; Guzmán, F. S.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce CAFE, a new independent code designed to solve the equations of relativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) in three dimensions. We present the standard tests for an RMHD code and for the relativistic hydrodynamics regime because we have not reported them before. The tests include the one-dimensional Riemann problems related to blast waves, head-on collisions of streams, and states with transverse velocities, with and without magnetic field, which is aligned or transverse, constant or discontinuous across the initial discontinuity. Among the two-dimensional (2D) and 3D tests without magnetic field, we include the 2D Riemann problem, a one-dimensional shock tube along a diagonal, the high-speed Emery wind tunnel, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, a set of jets, and a 3D spherical blast wave, whereas in the presence of a magnetic field we show the magnetic rotor, the cylindrical explosion, a case of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and a 3D magnetic field advection loop. The code uses high-resolution shock-capturing methods, and we present the error analysis for a combination that uses the Harten, Lax, van Leer, and Einfeldt (HLLE) flux formula combined with a linear, piecewise parabolic method and fifth-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory reconstructors. We use the flux-constrained transport and the divergence cleaning methods to control the divergence-free magnetic field constraint.

  12. ZEUS-2D: A radiation magnetohydrodynamics code for astrophysical flows in two space dimensions. I - The hydrodynamic algorithms and tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1992-06-01

    A detailed description of ZEUS-2D, a numerical code for the simulation of fluid dynamical flows including a self-consistent treatment of the effects of magnetic fields and radiation transfer is presented. Attention is given to the hydrodynamic (HD) algorithms which form the foundation for the more complex MHD and radiation HD algorithms. The effect of self-gravity on the flow dynamics is accounted for by an iterative solution of the sparse-banded matrix resulting from discretizing the Poisson equation in multidimensions. The results of an extensive series of HD test problems are presented. A detailed description of the MHD algorithms in ZEUS-2D is presented. A new method of computing the electromotive force is developed using the method of characteristics (MOC). It is demonstrated through the results of an extensive series of MHD test problems that the resulting hybrid MOC-constrained transport method provides for the accurate evolution of all modes of MHD wave families.

  13. Newtonian CAFE: a new ideal MHD code to study the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Avilés, J. J.; Cruz-Osorio, A.; Lora-Clavijo, F. D.; Guzmán, F. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new code designed to solve the equations of classical ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in three dimensions, submitted to a constant gravitational field. The purpose of the code centres on the analysis of solar phenomena within the photosphere-corona region. We present 1D and 2D standard tests to demonstrate the quality of the numerical results obtained with our code. As solar tests we present the transverse oscillations of Alfvénic pulses in coronal loops using a 2.5D model, and as 3D tests we present the propagation of impulsively generated MHD-gravity waves and vortices in the solar atmosphere. The code is based on high-resolution shock-capturing methods, uses the Harten-Lax-van Leer-Einfeldt (HLLE) flux formula combined with Minmod, MC, and WENO5 reconstructors. The divergence free magnetic field constraint is controlled using the Flux Constrained Transport method.

  14. 2D Radiation MHD K-shell Modeling of Single Wire Array Stainless Steel Experiments on the Z Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Apruzese, J. P.; Chong, Y. K.; Davis, J.; Dasgupta, A.; Whitney, K. G.; Clark, R. W.; Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    Many physical effects can produce unstable plasma behavior that affect K-shell emission from arrays. Such effects include: asymmetry in the initial density profile, asymmetry in power flow, thermal conduction at the boundaries, and non-uniform wire ablation. Here we consider how asymmetry in the radiation field also contributes to the generation of multidimensional plasma behavior that affects K-shell power and yield. To model this radiation asymmetry, we have incorporated into the MACH2 r-z MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE population kinetics based on radiation transport using multi-dimensional ray tracing. Such methodology is necessary for modeling the enhanced radiative cooling that occurs at the anode and cathode ends of the pinch during the run-in phase of the implosion. This enhanced radiative cooling is due to reduced optical depth at these locations producing an asymmetric flow of radiative energy that leads to substantial disruption of large initial diameter (>5 cm) pinches and drives 1D into 2D fluid (i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor like) flows. The impact of this 2D behavior on K-shell power and yield is investigated by comparing 1D and 2D model results with data obtained from a series of single wire array stainless steel experiments performed on the Z generator.

  15. Modified NASA-Lewis chemical equilibrium code for MHD applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacks, R. A.; Geyer, H. K.; Grammel, S. J.; Doss, E. D.

    1979-01-01

    A substantially modified version of the NASA-Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Code was recently developed. The modifications were designed to extend the power and convenience of the Code as a tool for performing combustor analysis for MHD systems studies. The effect of the programming details is described from a user point of view.

  16. In search of a 2-dB coding gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. H.; Vo, Q. D.

    1985-01-01

    A recent code search found a (15,1/5), a (14,1/6), and a (15,1/6) convolutional code which, when concatenated with a 10-bit (1023,959) Reed-Solomon (RS) code, achieves a bit-error rate (BER) of 0.000001 at a bit signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 0.50 dB, 0.47 dB and 0.42 B, respectively. All of these three codes outperform the Voyager communication system, our baseline, which achieves a BER of 10.000001 at bit SNR of 2.53 db, by more than 2 dB. The 2 dB coding improvement goal was exceeded.

  17. Validation and testing of the VAM2D computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. )

    1991-10-01

    This document describes two modeling studies conducted by HydroGeoLogic, Inc. for the US NRC under contract no. NRC-04089-090, entitled, Validation and Testing of the VAM2D Computer Code.'' VAM2D is a two-dimensional, variably saturated flow and transport code, with applications for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal. The computer code itself is documented in a separate NUREG document (NUREG/CR-5352, 1989). The studies presented in this report involve application of the VAM2D code to two diverse subsurface modeling problems. The first one involves modeling of infiltration and redistribution of water and solutes in an initially dry, heterogeneous field soil. This application involves detailed modeling over a relatively short, 9-month time period. The second problem pertains to the application of VAM2D to the modeling of a waste disposal facility in a fractured clay, over much larger space and time scales and with particular emphasis on the applicability and reliability of using equivalent porous medium approach for simulating flow and transport in fractured geologic media. Reflecting the separate and distinct nature of the two problems studied, this report is organized in two separate parts. 61 refs., 31 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. RAMSES-MHD: an AMR Godunov code for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromang, S.; Hennebelle, P.; Teyssier, R.

    2005-12-01

    Godunov methods have proved in recent years to be very efficient numerical schemes to solve the hydrodynamic equations. Here, we present an extension of the 3D adaptative Mesh Refinament (AMR) code RAMSES (Teyssier 2002) to the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The code uses the constrained transport scheme, which garantees that the divergence of the magnetic field is kept to zero to machine accuracy at all time. Different MHD Riemann solvers can be used, and the use of the MUSCL-Hancok approach combines a good accuracy with a fast exectution of the code. A variety of tests will illustrate the performances of the code and the possibilities offered by the AMR scheme. Future applications of the code are discussed.

  19. Recent update of the RPLUS2D/3D codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Y.-L. Peter

    1991-01-01

    The development of the RPLUS2D/3D codes is summarized. These codes utilize LU algorithms to solve chemical non-equilibrium flows in a body-fitted coordinate system. The motivation behind the development of these codes is the need to numerically predict chemical non-equilibrium flows for the National AeroSpace Plane Program. Recent improvements include vectorization method, blocking algorithms for geometric flexibility, out-of-core storage for large-size problems, and an LU-SW/UP combination for CPU-time efficiency and solution quality.

  20. AnisWave2D: User's Guide to the 2d Anisotropic Finite-DifferenceCode

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, Aoife

    2005-01-06

    This document describes a parallel finite-difference code for modeling wave propagation in 2D, fully anisotropic materials. The code utilizes a mesh refinement scheme to improve computational efficiency. Mesh refinement allows the grid spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, so that fine grid spacing can be used in low velocity zones where the seismic wavelength is short, and coarse grid spacing can be used in zones with higher material velocities. Over-sampling of the seismic wavefield in high velocity zones is therefore avoided. The code has been implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and allows large-scale models and models with large velocity contrasts to be simulated with ease.

  1. Global and Kinetic MHD Simulation by the Gpic-MHD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroshi, Naitou; Yusuke, Yamada; Kenji, Kajiwara; Wei-li, Lee; Shinji, Tokuda; Masatoshi, Yagi

    2011-10-01

    In order to implement large-scale and high-beta tokamak simulation, a new algorithm of the electromagnetic gyrokinetic PIC (particle-in-cell) code was proposed and installed on the Gpic-MHD code [Gyrokinetic PIC code for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation]. In the new algorithm, the vorticity equation and the generalized Ohm's law along the magnetic field are derived from the basic equations of the gyrokinetic Vlasov, Poisson, and Ampere system and are used to describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the field quantities of the electrostatic potential varphi and the longitudinal component of the vector potential Az. The basic algorithm is equivalent to solving the reduced-MHD-type equations with kinetic corrections, in which MHD physics related to Alfven modes are well described. The estimation of perturbed electron pressure from particle dynamics is dominant, while the effects of other moments are negligible. Another advantage of the algorithm is that the longitudinal induced electric field, ETz = -∂Az/∂t, is explicitly estimated by the generalized Ohm's law and used in the equations of motion. Furthermore, the particle velocities along the magnetic field are used (vz-formulation) instead of generalized momentums (pz-formulation), hence there is no problem of ‘cancellation', which would otherwise appear when Az is estimated from the Ampere's law in the pz-formulation. The successful simulation of the collisionless internal kink mode by the new Gpic-MHD with realistic values of the large-scale and high-beta tokamaks revealed the usefulness of the new algorithm.

  2. ZEUS-2D: A Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics Code for Astrophysical Flows in Two Space Dimensions. II. The Magnetohydrodynamic Algorithms and Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1992-06-01

    In this, the second of a series of three papers, we continue a detailed description of ZEUS-2D, a numerical code for the simulation of fluid dynamical flows in astrophysics including a self-consistent treatment of the effects of magnetic fields and radiation transfer. In this paper, we give a detailed description of the magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) algorithms in ZEUS-2D. The recently developed constrained transport (CT) algorithm is implemented for the numerical evolution of the components of the magnetic field for MHD simulations. This formalism guarantees the numerically evolved field components will satisfy the divergence-free constraint at all times. We find, however, that the method used to compute the electromotive forces must be chosen carefully to propagate accurately all modes of MHD wave families (in particular shear Alfvén waves). A new method of computing the electromotive force is developed using the method of characteristics (MOC). It is demonstrated through the results of an extensive series of MHD test problems that the resulting hybrid MOC-CT method provides for the accurate evolution of all modes of MHD wave families.

  3. ELLIPT2D: A Flexible Finite Element Code Written Python

    SciTech Connect

    Pletzer, A.; Mollis, J.C.

    2001-03-22

    The use of the Python scripting language for scientific applications and in particular to solve partial differential equations is explored. It is shown that Python's rich data structure and object-oriented features can be exploited to write programs that are not only significantly more concise than their counter parts written in Fortran, C or C++, but are also numerically efficient. To illustrate this, a two-dimensional finite element code (ELLIPT2D) has been written. ELLIPT2D provides a flexible and easy-to-use framework for solving a large class of second-order elliptic problems. The program allows for structured or unstructured meshes. All functions defining the elliptic operator are user supplied and so are the boundary conditions, which can be of Dirichlet, Neumann or Robbins type. ELLIPT2D makes extensive use of dictionaries (hash tables) as a way to represent sparse matrices.Other key features of the Python language that have been widely used include: operator over loading, error handling, array slicing, and the Tkinter module for building graphical use interfaces. As an example of the utility of ELLIPT2D, a nonlinear solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation is computed using a Newton iterative scheme. A second application focuses on a solution of the toroidal Laplace equation coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic stability code, a problem arising in the context of magnetic fusion research.

  4. CBEAM. 2-D: a two-dimensional beam field code

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, K.A.

    1985-05-01

    CBEAM.2-D is a two-dimensional solution of Maxwell's equations for the case of an electron beam propagating through an air medium. Solutions are performed in the beam-retarded time frame. Conductivity is calculated self-consistently with field equations, allowing sophisticated dependence of plasma parameters to be handled. A unique feature of the code is that it is implemented on an IBM PC microcomputer in the BASIC language. Consequently, it should be available to a wide audience.

  5. Vector processing efficiency of plasma MHD codes by use of the FACOM 230-75 APU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Naraoka, K.; Takizuka, T.; Tsunematsu, T.; Tokuda, S.; Azumi, M.; Kurita, G.; Takeda, T.

    1982-06-01

    In the framework of pipelined vector architecture, the efficiency of vector processing is assessed with respect to plasma MHD codes in nuclear fusion research. By using a vector processor, the FACOM 230-75 APU, the limit of the enhancement factor due to parallelism of current vector machines is examined for three numerical codes based on a fluid model. Reasonable speed-up factors of approximately 6,6 and 4 times faster than the highly optimized scalar version are obtained for ERATO (linear stability code), AEOLUS-R1 (nonlinear stability code) and APOLLO (1-1/2D transport code), respectively. Problems of the pipelined vector processors are discussed from the viewpoint of restructuring, optimization and choice of algorithms. In conclusion, the important concept of "concurrency within pipelined parallelism" is emphasized.

  6. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation.more » By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  7. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.

  8. Scaling Optimization of the SIESTA MHD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, Sudip; Hirshman, Steven; Perumalla, Kalyan

    2013-10-01

    SIESTA is a parallel three-dimensional plasma equilibrium code capable of resolving magnetic islands at high spatial resolutions for toroidal plasmas. Originally designed to exploit small-scale parallelism, SIESTA has now been scaled to execute efficiently over several thousands of processors P. This scaling improvement was accomplished with minimal intrusion to the execution flow of the original version. First, the efficiency of the iterative solutions was improved by integrating the parallel tridiagonal block solver code BCYCLIC. Krylov-space generation in GMRES was then accelerated using a customized parallel matrix-vector multiplication algorithm. Novel parallel Hessian generation algorithms were integrated and memory access latencies were dramatically reduced through loop nest optimizations and data layout rearrangement. These optimizations sped up equilibria calculations by factors of 30-50. It is possible to compute solutions with granularity N/P near unity on extremely fine radial meshes (N > 1024 points). Grid separation in SIESTA, which manifests itself primarily in the resonant components of the pressure far from rational surfaces, is strongly suppressed by finer meshes. Large problem sizes of up to 300 K simultaneous non-linear coupled equations have been solved on the NERSC supercomputers. Work supported by U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.

  9. Alfvén ionization in an MHD-gas interactions code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. D.; Diver, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical model of partially ionized plasmas is developed in order to capture their evolving ionization fractions as a result of Alfvén ionization (AI). The mechanism of, and the parameter regime necessary for, AI is discussed and an expression for the AI rate based on fluid parameters, from a gas-MHD model, is derived. This AI term is added to an existing MHD-gas interactions' code, and the result is a linear, 2D, two-fluid model that includes momentum transfer between charged and neutral species as well as an ionization rate that depends on the velocity fields of both fluids. The dynamics of waves propagating through such a partially ionized plasma are investigated, and it is found that AI has a significant influence on the fluid dynamics as well as both the local and global ionization fraction.

  10. Two-dimensional MHD generator model. [GEN code

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, H. K.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Doss, E. D.

    1980-09-01

    A steady state, two-dimensional MHD generator code, GEN, is presented. The code solves the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, using a Von Mises transformation and a local linearization of the equations. By splitting the source terms into a part proportional to the axial pressure gradient and a part independent of the gradient, the pressure distribution along the channel is easily obtained to satisfy various criteria. Thus, the code can run effectively in both design modes, where the channel geometry is determined, and analysis modes, where the geometry is previously known. The code also employs a mixing length concept for turbulent flows, Cebeci and Chang's wall roughness model, and an extension of that model to the effective thermal diffusities. Results on code validation, as well as comparisons of skin friction and Stanton number calculations with experimental results, are presented.

  11. Porting a Hall MHD Code to a Graphic Processing Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorelli, John C.

    2011-01-01

    We present our experience porting a Hall MHD code to a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). The code is a 2nd order accurate MUSCL-Hancock scheme which makes use of an HLL Riemann solver to compute numerical fluxes and second-order finite differences to compute the Hall contribution to the electric field. The divergence of the magnetic field is controlled with Dedner?s hyperbolic divergence cleaning method. Preliminary benchmark tests indicate a speedup (relative to a single Nehalem core) of 58x for a double precision calculation. We discuss scaling issues which arise when distributing work across multiple GPUs in a CPU-GPU cluster.

  12. Interpreting observations of molecular outflow sources: the MHD shock code mhd_vode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, D. R.; Pineau des Forêts, G.

    2015-06-01

    The planar MHD shock code mhd_vode has been developed in order to simulate both continuous (C) type shock waves and jump (J) type shock waves in the interstellar medium. The physical and chemical state of the gas in steady-state may also be computed and used as input to a shock wave model. The code is written principally in FORTRAN 90, although some routines remain in FORTRAN 77. The documented program and its input data are described and provided as supplementary material, and the results of exemplary test runs are presented. Our intention is to enable the interested user to run the code for any sensible parameter set and to comprehend the results. With applications to molecular outflow sources in mind, we have computed, and are making available as supplementary material, integrated atomic and molecular line intensities for grids of C- and J-type models; these computations are summarized in the Appendices. Appendix tables, a copy of the current version of the code, and of the two model grids are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/578/A63

  13. Adding Drift Kinetics to a Global MHD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J.; Merkin, V. G.; Zhang, B.; Ouellette, J.

    2015-12-01

    Global MHD models have generally been successful in describing thebehavior of the magnetosphere at large and meso-scales. An exceptionis the inner magnetosphere where energy dependent particle drifts areessential in the dynamics and evolution of the ring current. Even inthe tail particle drifts are a significant perturbation on the MHDbehavior of the plasma. The most common drift addition to MHD has beeninclusion of the Hall term in Faraday's Law. There have been attemptsin the space physics context to include gradient and curvature driftswithin a single fluid MHD picture. These have not been terriblysuccessful because the use of a single, Maxwellian distribution doesnot capture the energy dependent nature of the drifts. The advent ofmulti-fluid MHD codes leads to a reconsideration of this problem. TheVlasov equation can be used to define individual ``species'' whichcover a specific energy range. Each fluid can then be treated ashaving a separate evolution. We take the approach of the RiceConvection Model (RCM) that each energy channel can be described by adistribution that is essentially isotropic in the guiding centerpicture. In the local picture, this gives rise to drifts that can bedescribed in terms of the energy dependent inertial and diamagneticdrifts. By extending the MHD equations with these drifts we can get asystem which reduces to the RCM approach in the slow-flow innermagnetosphere but is not restricted to cases where the flow speed issmall. The restriction is that the equations can be expanded in theratio of the Larmor radius to the gradient scale lengths. At scalesapproaching di, the assumption of gyrotropic (or isotropic)distributions break down. In addition to the drifts, the formalism canalso be used to include finite Larmor radius effects on the pressuretensor (gyro-viscosity). We present some initial calculations with this method.

  14. A high performance spectral code for nonlinear MHD stability

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M.

    1992-09-01

    A new spectral code, NSTAB, has been developed to do nonlinear stability and equilibrium calculations for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in three dimensional toroidal geometries. The code has the resolution to test nonlinear stability by calculating bifurcated equilibria directly. These equilibria consist of weak solutions with current sheets near rational surfaces and other less localized modes. Bifurcated equilibria with a pronounced current sheet where the rotational transform crosses unity are calculated for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Bifurcated solutions with broader resonances are found for the LHD stellarator currently being built in Japan and an optimized configuration like the Wendelstein VII-X proposed for construction in Germany. The code is able to handle the many harmonics required to capture the high mode number of these instabilities. NSTAB builds on the highly successful BETAS code, which applies the spectral method to a flux coordinate formulation of the variational principle associated with the MHD equilibrium equations. However, a new residue condition for the location of the magnetic axis has been developed and implemented. This condition is based on the weak formulation of the equations and imposes no constraints on the inner flux surfaces.

  15. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT`S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field (``port approximation``). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  16. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT'S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field ( port approximation''). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  17. Benchmarking a hybrid MHD/kinetic code with C-2 experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Richard; Clary, Ryan; Dettrick, Sean; Korepanov, Sergey; Onofri, Marco; Smirnov, Artem; TAE Team

    2013-10-01

    The C-2 device creates field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas via the dynamic merging of two compact toroids and heated with neutral beams. Simulations of these plasmas are performed with Q2D - a hybrid MHD/Monte Carlo code that evolves the plasma according to the resistive MHD equations and treats the neutral beam injected fast ions as a minority kinetic species. Recent Q2D runs have resulted in testable predictions, namely that the axial profile of the fast ions is double-peaked, and charge-exchange neutrals are localized in pitch-angle. In some simulations, the fast particle population can induce magnetic fluctuations. These fluctuations are largest in the radial component, have a characteristic frequency approximately equal to the fast ion bounce frequency (f ~ 150 kHz), and a broad k spectrum. These fluctuations have the beneficial effect of smoothing out the double-peaked axial fast ion density profile, resulting in an increased fast ion density at the mid-plane. We will present results from a benchmarking study to quantitatively compare the results of Q2D runs to existing C-2 experimental data.

  18. GRADSPMHD: A parallel MHD code based on the SPH formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaverbeke, S.; Keppens, R.; Poedts, S.

    2014-03-01

    We present GRADSPMHD, a completely Lagrangian parallel magnetohydrodynamics code based on the SPH formalism. The implementation of the equations of SPMHD in the “GRAD-h” formalism assembles known results, including the derivation of the discretized MHD equations from a variational principle, the inclusion of time-dependent artificial viscosity, resistivity and conductivity terms, as well as the inclusion of a mixed hyperbolic/parabolic correction scheme for satisfying the ∇ṡB→ constraint on the magnetic field. The code uses a tree-based formalism for neighbor finding and can optionally use the tree code for computing the self-gravity of the plasma. The structure of the code closely follows the framework of our parallel GRADSPH FORTRAN 90 code which we added previously to the CPC program library. We demonstrate the capabilities of GRADSPMHD by running 1, 2, and 3 dimensional standard benchmark tests and we find good agreement with previous work done by other researchers. The code is also applied to the problem of simulating the magnetorotational instability in 2.5D shearing box tests as well as in global simulations of magnetized accretion disks. We find good agreement with available results on this subject in the literature. Finally, we discuss the performance of the code on a parallel supercomputer with distributed memory architecture. Catalogue identifier: AERP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 620503 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 19837671 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 90/MPI. Computer: HPC cluster. Operating system: Unix. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, parallelized using MPI. RAM: ˜30 MB for a

  19. The Athena Astrophysical MHD Code in Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, M. A.; Ostriker, E. C.

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a method for implementing cylindrical coordinates in the Athena MHD code (Skinner & Ostriker 2010). The extension has been designed to alter the existing Cartesian-coordinates code (Stone et al. 2008) as minimally and transparently as possible. The numerical equations in cylindrical coordinates are formulated to maintain consistency with constrained transport, a central feature of the Athena algorithm, while making use of previously implemented code modules such as the eigensystems and Riemann solvers. Angular-momentum transport, which is critical in astrophysical disk systems dominated by rotation, is treated carefully. We describe modifications for cylindrical coordinates of the higher-order spatial reconstruction and characteristic evolution steps as well as the finite-volume and constrained transport updates. Finally, we have developed a test suite of standard and novel problems in one-, two-, and three-dimensions designed to validate our algorithms and implementation and to be of use to other code developers. The code is suitable for use in a wide variety of astrophysical applications and is freely available for download on the web.

  20. Development of the PARVMEC Code for Rapid Analysis of 3D MHD Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, Sudip; Hirshman, Steven; Cianciosa, Mark; Wingen, Andreas; Unterberg, Ezekiel; Wilcox, Robert; ORNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The VMEC three-dimensional (3D) MHD equilibrium has been used extensively for designing stellarator experiments and analyzing experimental data in such strongly 3D systems. Recent applications of VMEC include 2D systems such as tokamaks (in particular, the D3D experiment), where application of very small (delB/B ~ 10-3) 3D resonant magnetic field perturbations render the underlying assumption of axisymmetry invalid. In order to facilitate the rapid analysis of such equilibria (for example, for reconstruction purposes), we have undertaken the task of parallelizing the VMEC code (PARVMEC) to produce a scalable and temporally rapidly convergent equilibrium code for use on parallel distributed memory platforms. The parallelization task naturally splits into three distinct parts 1) radial surfaces in the fixed-boundary part of the calculation; 2) two 2D angular meshes needed to compute the Green's function integrals over the plasma boundary for the free-boundary part of the code; and 3) block tridiagonal matrix needed to compute the full (3D) pre-conditioner near the final equilibrium state. Preliminary results show that scalability is achieved for tasks 1 and 3, with task 2 still nearing completion. The impact of this work on the rapid reconstruction of D3D plasmas using PARVMEC in the V3FIT code will be discussed. Work supported by U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.

  1. 50 CFR Table 2d to Part 679 - Species Codes-Non-FMP Species

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Species Codes-Non-FMP Species 2d Table 2d to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 2d Table 2d to Part...

  2. 50 CFR Table 2d to Part 679 - Species Codes-Non-FMP Species

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Species Codes-Non-FMP Species 2d Table 2d to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 2d Table 2d to Part 679—Species Codes—Non-FMP Species General use...

  3. 50 CFR Table 2d to Part 679 - Species Codes-Non-FMP Species

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Species Codes-Non-FMP Species 2d Table 2d to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 2d Table 2d to Part 679—Species Codes—Non-FMP Species General use...

  4. Devolopment of an AMR MHD module for the code Enzo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. C.; Norman, M. L.

    2004-12-01

    The importance of astrophysical magnetic fields is indisputable. From their primordial origins to their role in star formation, magnetic fields present some of the most formidable challenges in modern astrophysics. Unfortunately, due to the difficulty in analytic modeling and observation, the role of said magnetic fields is still largely unresolved. To aid in solving these problems, we have implemented magnetic mields into the Enzo code. Enzo is an Adaptive Mesh Hydrodynamics code, originally written in 1994 by Greg Bryan. I will discuss the algorithms and implementation of MHD in this code and present preliminary benchmarks. We have used the TVD linearized Riemann solver described by D. Ryu and T.W. Jones for the base solver. In addition to the base solver we have employed the magnetic field advancement as described by D. Balsara. For interpolation to fine grids we have used a divergence free quadratic reconstruction, also described by Balsara. The benchmarks we will present include the Magnetized Shock Tube of Brio and Wu, the magnetized Sedov-Taylor blast wave, and the Orszag-Tang vortex problem.

  5. Comparison of inversion codes for polarized line formation in MHD simulations. I. Milne-Eddington codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrero, J. M.; Lites, B. W.; Lagg, A.; Rezaei, R.; Rempel, M.

    2014-12-01

    Milne-Eddington (M-E) inversion codes for the radiative transfer equation are the most widely used tools to infer the magnetic field from observations of the polarization signals in photospheric and chromospheric spectral lines. Unfortunately, a comprehensive comparison between the different M-E codes available to the solar physics community is still missing, and so is a physical interpretation of their inferences. In this contribution we offer a comparison between three of those codes (VFISV, ASP/HAO, and HeLIx+). These codes are used to invert synthetic Stokes profiles that were previously obtained from realistic non-grey three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (3D MHD) simulations. The results of the inversion are compared with each other and with those from the MHD simulations. In the first case, the M-E codes retrieve values for the magnetic field strength, inclination and line-of-sight velocity that agree with each other within σB ≤ 35 (Gauss), σγ ≤ 1.2°, and σv ≤ 10 m s-1, respectively. Additionally, M-E inversion codes agree with the numerical simulations, when compared at a fixed optical depth, within σB ≤ 130 (Gauss), σγ ≤ 5°, and σv ≤ 320 m s-1. Finally, we show that employing generalized response functions to determine the height at which M-E codes measure physical parameters is more meaningful than comparing at a fixed geometrical height or optical depth. In this case the differences between M-E inferences and the 3D MHD simulations decrease to σB ≤ 90 (Gauss), σγ ≤ 3°, and σv ≤ 90 m s-1.

  6. Global existence and uniqueness theorem to 2-D incompressible non-resistive MHD system with non-equilibrium background magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Cuili; Zhang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we consider the global existence and uniqueness of the solution to the 2D incompressible non-resistive MHD system with non-equilibrium background magnetic field. Our result implies that a strong enough non-equilibrium background magnetic field will guarantee the stability of the nonlinear MHD system. Beside the classical energy method, the interpolation inequalities and the algebraic structure of the equations coming from the incompressibility of the fluid are crucial in our arguments.

  7. Development and Application of a Parallel MHD code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterkin, , Jr.

    1997-08-01

    Over the past few years, we (In collaboration with S. Colella, M. H. Frese, D. E. Lileikis and U. Shumlak.) have built a general purpose, portable, scalable three-dimensional finite volume magnetohydrodynamic code, called uc(mach3,) based on an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian fluid algorithm to simulate time-dependent MHD phenomena for real materials. The physical domain of integration on which uc(mach3) works is decomposed into a patchwork of rectangular logical blocks that represent hexadedral physical subdomains. This block domain decomposition technique gives us a natural framework in which to implement coarse parallelization via message passing with the single program, multiple data (SPMD) model. Portability is achieved by using a parallel library that is separate from the physics code. At present, we are using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) because it is one of the industry standards, and because its Derived Data Type supports the sending and receiving of data with an arbitrary stride in memory. This feature is consistent with the manner in which boundary data is exchanged between connected block domains via ghost cells in the serial version of uc(mach3.) In this talk, we discuss the details of the uc(mach3) algorithm. In addition, we present results from some simple test problems as well as from complex 3-D time-dependent simulations including magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters, fast z-pinches, and magnetic flux compression generators.

  8. MHD stability module for the National Transport Code Collaboration Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletzer, A.; Manickam, J.; Jardin, S. C.; McCune, D.; Ludescher, Ch.; Klasky, S.; Randerson, L.

    1999-11-01

    There is a need to provide numerical tools to the fusion community that are robust, portable, easy to use, documented, and reviewed by independent peers. A web site (http://w3.pppl.gov/NTCC) where modules can be freely downloaded has been set up for that purpose [Status of the NTCC Modules Library (D McCune)]. The existence of such a library is in addition motivated by the increasing demand for programs that can be plugged into large packages with minimal effort. In particular, there has been some requests to make MHD stability codes such as the PEST, which are capable of simulating large scale plasma phenomena, available at the NTCC module library. Progress on the work to convert PEST to satisfy the NTCC module standards is presented. The resulting, new PEST interface is a collection of subroutines, which initialize, modify and extract data. Dynamic memory allocation is introduced to minimize memory requirements and allow for multiple runs. Embedded graphics routines are disabled and dependence on native binary files replaced by portable NetCDF files. To illustrate the flexibility of the module approach, numerical results obtained by integrating PEST-3, the mapping code DMAP and the equilibrium JSOLVER modules into a C++ and Java environment with remote database connectivity are presented.

  9. First results from ideal 2-D MHD reconstruction: magnetopause reconnection event seen by Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, W.-L.; Ã-. Sonnerup, B. U.

    2008-09-01

    We have applied a new reconstruction method (Sonnerup and Teh, 2008), based on the ideal single-fluid MHD equations in a steady-state, two-dimensional geometry, to a reconnection event observed by the Cluster-3 (C3) spacecraft on 5 July 2001, 06:23 UT, at the dawn-side Northern-Hemisphere magnetopause. The event has been previously studied by use of Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction, performed in the deHoffmann-Teller frame, and using the assumption that the flow effects were either negligible or the flow was aligned with the magnetic field. Our new method allows the reconstruction to be performed in the frame of reference moving with the reconnection site (the X-line). In the event studied, this motion is tailward/equatorward at 140 km/s. The principal result of the study is that the new method functions well, generating a magnetic field map that is qualitatively similar to those obtained in the earlier GS-based reconstructions but now includes the reconnection site itself. In comparison with the earlier map by Hasegawa et al. (2004), our new map has a slightly improved ability (cc=0.979 versus cc=0.975) to predict the fields measured by the other three Cluster spacecraft, at distances from C3 ranging from 2132 km (C1) to 2646 km (C4). The new field map indicates the presence of a magnetic X-point, located some 5300 km tailward/equatorward of C3 at the time of its traversal of the magnetopause. In the immediate vicinity of the X-point, the ideal-MHD assumption breaks down, i.e. resistive and/or other effects should be included. We have circumvented this problem by an ad-hoc procedure in which we allow the axial part of convection electric field to be non-constant near the reconnection site. The new reconstruction method also provides a map of the velocity field, in which the inflow into the wedge of reconnected field lines and the plasma jet within it can be seen, and maps of the electric potential and of the electric current distribution. Even though the

  10. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Compression Corners and Hypersonic Inlet Flows Using the RPLUS2D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational code, PRLUS2D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for two-dimensional shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions. The problem of compression corners at supersonic speeds was solved using the RPLUS2D code. To validate the RPLUS2D code for hypersonic speeds, it was applied to a realistic hypersonic inlet geometry. Both the Baldwin-Lomax and the Chien two-equation turbulence models were used. Computational results showed that the RPLUS2D code compared very well with experimentally obtained data for supersonic compression corner flows, except in the case of large separated flows resulting from the interactions between the shock wave and turbulent boundary layer. The computational results compared well with the experiment results in a hypersonic NASA P8 inlet case, with the Chien two-equation turbulence model performing better than the Baldwin-Lomax model.

  11. TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. B.; Edwards, A. L.

    1990-05-01

    TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available.

  12. 2D Resistive Magnetohydrodynamics Calculations with an Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, C. L.; Gianakon, T. A.; Lipnikov, K. N.; Nelson, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    Single fluid resistive MHD is useful for modeling Z-pinch configurations in cylindrical geometry. One such example is thin walled liners for shock physics or HEDP experiments driven by capacitor banks such as the LANL's PHELIX or Sandia-Z. MHD is also useful for modeling high-explosive-driven flux compression generators (FCGs) and their high-current switches. The resistive MHD in our arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) code operates in one and two dimensions in both Cartesian and cylindrical geometry. It is implemented as a time-step split operator, which consists of, ideal MHD connected to the explicit hydro momentum and energy equations and a second order mimetic discretization solver for implicit solution of the magnetic diffusion equation. In a staggered grid scheme, a single-component of cell-centered magnetic flux is conserved in the Lagrangian frame exactly, while magnetic forces are accumulated at the nodes. Total energy is conserved to round off. Total flux is conserved under the ALE relaxation and remap. The diffusion solver consistently computes Ohmic heating. Both Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions are available with coupling to external circuit models. Example calculations will be shown.

  13. Automatic differentiation of the TACO2D finite element code using ADIFOR

    SciTech Connect

    Carle, A.; Fagan, M.

    1996-04-01

    The need for sensitivities in particular applications is becoming increasingly important in problems such as optimal design or control. In this study, the authors use ADIFOR to generate derivative code for TACO2D, a finite element heat transfer code. The study of TACO2D indicates that ADIFOR-generated derivatives yield accurate derivatives at a fraction of the time requirements of finite difference approximations, and space requirements proportional to the number of variables. The primary focus on TACO2D was for the design of chemical vapor deposition reactors.

  14. TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Edwards, A.L.

    1990-05-01

    TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available. The material thermal property data base, Chapter 4, included in this manual was originally published in 1969 by Art Edwards for use with his TRUMP finite difference heat transfer code. The format of the data has been altered to be compatible with TOPAZ2D. Bob Bailey is responsible for adding the high explosive thermal property data.

  15. Global well-posedness for the 2D MHD equations without magnetic diffusion in a strip domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Zhaoyin; Zhang, Zhifei

    2016-04-01

    We study the initial boundary value problem of two dimensional MHD equations without magnetic diffusion in a strip domain. It was proved that the MHD equations have a unique global strong solution around the equilibrium state ≤ft(0,{{\\mathbf{e}}1}\\right) for both the non-slip boundary condition and Navier slip boundary condition on the velocity.

  16. PiCode: A New Picture-Embedding 2D Barcode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changsheng; Huang, Wenjian; Zhou, Baojian; Liu, Chenchen; Mow, Wai Ho

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, 2D barcodes have been widely used as an interface to connect potential customers and advertisement contents. However, the appearance of a conventional 2D barcode pattern is often too obtrusive for integrating into an aesthetically designed advertisement. Besides, no human readable information is provided before the barcode is successfully decoded. This paper proposes a new picture-embedding 2D barcode, called PiCode, which mitigates these two limitations by equipping a scannable 2D barcode with a picturesque appearance. PiCode is designed with careful considerations on both the perceptual quality of the embedded image and the decoding robustness of the encoded message. Comparisons with the existing beautified 2D barcodes show that PiCode achieves one of the best perceptual qualities for the embedded image, and maintains a better tradeoff between image quality and decoding robustness in various application conditions. PiCode has been implemented in the MATLAB on a PC and some key building blocks have also been ported to Android and iOS platforms. Its practicality for real-world applications has been successfully demonstrated. PMID:27249833

  17. A numerical code for a three-dimensional magnetospheric MHD equilibrium model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, G.-H.

    1992-01-01

    Two dimensional and three dimensional MHD equilibrium models were begun for Earth's magnetosphere. The original proposal was motivated by realizing that global, purely data based models of Earth's magnetosphere are inadequate for studying the underlying plasma physical principles according to which the magnetosphere evolves on the quasi-static convection time scale. Complex numerical grid generation schemes were established for a 3-D Poisson solver, and a robust Grad-Shafranov solver was coded for high beta MHD equilibria. Thus, the effects were calculated of both the magnetopause geometry and boundary conditions on the magnetotail current distribution.

  18. 2D MIMO Network Coding with Inter-Route Interference Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Gia Khanh; Sakaguchi, Kei; Ono, Fumie; Araki, Kiyomichi

    Infrastructure wireless mesh network has been attracting much attention due to the wide range of its application such as public wireless access, sensor network, etc. In recent years, researchers have shown that significant network throughput gain can be achieved by employing network coding in a wireless environment. For further improvement of network throughput in one dimensional (1D) topology, Ono et al. proposed to use multiple antenna technique combined with network coding. In this paper, being inspired by MIMO network coding in 1D topology, the authors establish a novel MIMO network coding algorithm for a 2D topology consisting of two crossing routes. In this algorithm, multiple network coded flows are spatially multiplexed. Owing to the efficient usage of radio resource of network coding and co-channel interference cancellation ability of MIMO, the proposed algorithm shows an 8-fold gain in network capacity compared to conventional methods in the best-case scenario.

  19. Calculation of Magnetospheric Equilibria and Evolution of Plasma Bubbles with a New Finite-Volume MHD/Magnetofriction Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silin, I.; Toffoletto, F.; Wolf, R.; Sazykin, S. Y.

    2013-12-01

    We present a finite-volume MHD code for simulations of magnetospheric dynamics of the plasma sheet and the inner magnetosphere. The code uses staggered non-uniform Cartesian grids to preserve the divergence-free magnetic fields, along with various numerical approximations and flux limiters for the plasma variables. The code can be initialized with empirical magnetic field models, such as the Tsyganenko models along with pressure information from either the Tsyganenko-Mukai models, or observational data, such as DMSP pressure maps. Artificial "friction term" can be added to the momentum equation, which turns the MHD code into "magnetofriction" code which can be used to construct approximate equilibrium solutions. We demonstrate some applications for our code, in both the "magnetofriction" and MHD mode, including relaxation of the empirical models to equilibrium and the evolution of a plasma bubble in the near magnetotail. The latter MHD simulation results exhibit oscillations about their equilibrium position in agreement with recent observations.

  20. Snapshot 2D tomography via coded aperture x-ray scatter imaging

    PubMed Central

    MacCabe, Kenneth P.; Holmgren, Andrew D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Brady, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a fan beam coded aperture x-ray scatter imaging system which acquires a tomographic image from each snapshot. This technique exploits cylindrical symmetry of the scattering cross section to avoid the scanning motion typically required by projection tomography. We use a coded aperture with a harmonic dependence to determine range, and a shift code to determine cross-range. Here we use a forward-scatter configuration to image 2D objects and use serial exposures to acquire tomographic video of motion within a plane. Our reconstruction algorithm also estimates the angular dependence of the scattered radiance, a step toward materials imaging and identification. PMID:23842254

  1. FEMHD: An adaptive finite element method for MHD and edge modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the code FEMHD, an adaptive finite element MHD code, which is applied in a number of different manners to model MHD behavior and edge plasma phenomena on a diverted tokamak. The code uses an unstructured triangular mesh in 2D and wedge shaped mesh elements in 3D. The code has been adapted to look at neutral and charged particle dynamics in the plasma scrape off region, and into a full MHD-particle code.

  2. Field depth extension of 2D barcode scanner based on wavefront coding and projection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingyu; Ye, Zi; Zhang, Wenzi; Huang, Weiwei; Yu, Feihong

    2008-03-01

    Wavefront coding (WFC) used in 2D barcode scanners can extend the depth of field into a great extent with simpler structure compared to the autofocus microscope system. With a cubic phase mask (CPM) employed in the STOP, blurred images will be obtained in charge coupled device (CCD), which can be restored by digital filters. Direct methods are used widely in real-time restoration with good computational efficiency but with details smoothed. Here, the results of direct method are firstly filtered by hard-threshold function. The positions of the steps can be detected by simple differential operators. With the positions corrected by projection algorithm, the exact barcode information is restored. A wavefront coding system with 7mm effective focal length and 6 F-number is designed as an example. Although with the different magnification, images of different object distances can be restored by one point spread function (PSF) with 200mm object distance. A QR code (Quickly Response Code) of 31mm X 27mm is used as a target object. The simulation results showed that the sharp imaging objective distance is from 80mm to 355mm. The 2D barcode scanner with wavefront coding extends field depth with simple structure, low cost and large manufacture tolerance. This combination of the direct filter and projection algorithm proposed here could get the exact 2D barcode information with good computational efficiency.

  3. A technique for importing an arbitrary distribution of mass and magnetic field from an MHD code into a PIC code.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Oliver, B. V.; Grossmann, J. M.; Smithe, D.; Ludeking, L.

    1996-11-01

    The current understanding of plasma opening switch (POS) operation is as follows. During the conduction phase the switch plasma is redistributed by MHD forces. This redistribution of mass leads to the formation of a low density region in the switch where a 1-3 mm gap in the plasma is believed to form as the switch opens and magnetic energy is transferred between the primary storage inductor and the load. The processes of gap formation and power delivery are not very well understood. It is generally accepted that the assumptions of MHD theory are not valid during the gap formation and power delivery processes because electron inertia and the lack of space-charge neutrality are expected to play a key role. To study non-MHD processes during the gap formation process and power delivery phase of the POS, we have developed a technique for importing an arbitrary state of an MHD code into the PIC code MAGIC. At present the plasma kinetic pressure is ignored during the initialization of particles. Work supported by Defense Nuclear Agency. ^ JAYCOR, Vienna, VA 22102. ^ NRL-NRC Research Associate.

  4. Wall surface temperature calculation in the SolEdge2D-EIRENE transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, J.; Pégourié, B.; Bucalossi, J.; Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Gardarein, J.-L.; Gaspar, J.; Grisolia, C.; Hodille, E.; Missirlian, M.; Serre, E.; Tamain, P.

    2016-02-01

    A thermal wall model is developed for the SolEdge2D-EIRENE edge transport code for calculating the surface temperature of the actively-cooled vessel components in interaction with the plasma. This is a first step towards a self-consistent evaluation of the recycling of particles, which depends on the wall surface temperature. The proposed thermal model is built to match both steady-state temperature and time constant of actively-cooled plasma facing components. A benchmark between this model and the Finite Element Modelling code CAST3M is performed in the case of an ITER-like monoblock. An example of application is presented for a SolEdge2D-EIRENE simulation of a medium-power discharge in the WEST tokamak, showing the steady-state wall temperature distribution and the temperature cycling due to an imposed Edge Localised Mode-like event.

  5. WhiskyMHD: Numerical Code for General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiotti, Luca; Giacomazzo, Bruno; Hawke, Ian; et al.

    2010-10-01

    Whisky is a code to evolve the equations of general relativistic hydrodynamics (GRHD) and magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) in 3D Cartesian coordinates on a curved dynamical background. It was originally developed by and for members of the EU Network on Sources of Gravitational Radiation and is based on the Cactus Computational Toolkit. Whisky can also implement adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) if compiled together with Carpet. Whisky has grown from earlier codes such as GR3D and GRAstro_Hydro, but has been rewritten to take advantage of some of the latest research performed here in the EU. The motivation behind Whisky is to compute gravitational radiation waveforms for systems that involve matter. Examples would include the merger of a binary system containing a neutron star, which are expected to be reasonably common in the universe and expected to produce substantial amounts of radiation. Other possible sources are given in the projects list.

  6. A velocity-dependent anomalous radial transport model for (2-D, 2-V) kinetic transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Kowsik; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Cohen, Ron; Rognlien, Tom

    2008-11-01

    Plasma turbulence constitutes a significant part of radial plasma transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This turbulent transport is modeled in the form of anomalous convection and diffusion coefficients in fluid transport codes. There is a need to model the same in continuum kinetic edge codes [such as the (2-D, 2-V) transport version of TEMPEST, NEO, and the code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory] with non-Maxwellian distributions. We present an anomalous transport model with velocity-dependent convection and diffusion coefficients leading to a diagonal transport matrix similar to that used in contemporary fluid transport models (e.g., UEDGE). Also presented are results of simulations corresponding to radial transport due to long-wavelength ExB turbulence using a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. A BGK collision model is used to enable comparison with fluid transport codes.

  7. Application of rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA) to intermittent fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows, 2D MHD simulation and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Chang, T.

    2010-12-01

    A new method in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events was introduced by Cheng and Wu [Chang T. and Wu C.C., Physical Rev, E77, 045401(R), 2008]. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has been demonstrated using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. It has also been successfully applied to in-situ solar wind observations [Chang T., Wu, C.C. and Podesta, J., AIP Conf Proc. 1039, 75, 2008], and the broadband electric field oscillations from the auroral zone [Tam, S.W.Y. et al., Physical Rev, E81, 036414, 2010]. We take the next step in this procedure. By using the ROMA spectra and the scaled probability distribution functions (PDFs), raw PDFs can be calculated, which can be compared directly with PDFs from observations or simulation results. In addition to 2D MHD simulation results and in-situ solar wind observation, we show clearly using the ROMA analysis the multifractal character of the 3D fluid simulation data obtained from the JHU turbulence database cluster at http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu. In particular, we show the scaling of the non-symmetrical PDF for the parallel-velocity fluctuations of this 3D fluid data.

  8. INCORPORATING AMBIPOLAR AND OHMIC DIFFUSION IN THE AMR MHD CODE RAMSES

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, J.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Chabrier, G.; Teyssier, R.

    2012-08-01

    We have implemented non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) effects in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, namely, ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation, as additional source terms in the ideal MHD equations. We describe in details how we have discretized these terms using the adaptive Cartesian mesh, and how the time step is diminished with respect to the ideal case, in order to perform a stable time integration. We have performed a large suite of test runs, featuring the Barenblatt diffusion test, the Ohmic diffusion test, the C-shock test, and the Alfven wave test. For the latter, we have performed a careful truncation error analysis to estimate the magnitude of the numerical diffusion induced by our Godunov scheme, allowing us to estimate the spatial resolution that is required to address non-ideal MHD effects reliably. We show that our scheme is second-order accurate, and is therefore ideally suited to study non-ideal MHD effects in the context of star formation and molecular cloud dynamics.

  9. FARGO3D: A New GPU-oriented MHD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez-Llambay, Pablo; Masset, Frédéric S.

    2016-03-01

    We present the FARGO3D code, recently publicly released. It is a magnetohydrodynamics code developed with special emphasis on the physics of protoplanetary disks and planet-disk interactions, and parallelized with MPI. The hydrodynamics algorithms are based on finite-difference upwind, dimensionally split methods. The magnetohydrodynamics algorithms consist of the constrained transport method to preserve the divergence-free property of the magnetic field to machine accuracy, coupled to a method of characteristics for the evaluation of electromotive forces and Lorentz forces. Orbital advection is implemented, and an N-body solver is included to simulate planets or stars interacting with the gas. We present our implementation in detail and present a number of widely known tests for comparison purposes. One strength of FARGO3D is that it can run on either graphical processing units (GPUs) or central processing units (CPUs), achieving large speed-up with respect to CPU cores. We describe our implementation choices, which allow a user with no prior knowledge of GPU programming to develop new routines for CPUs, and have them translated automatically for GPUs.

  10. Using Automated Code Generation to Support High Performance Extended MHD Integration in OpenGGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaschewski, K.; Raeder, J.

    2011-10-01

    Automatic code generation is a technique that takes the specification of an algorithm at a high abstraction level and turns it into a well-tuned computer code. For finite-volume / finite-difference based discretizations, this higher abstraction level can be a stencil computation. At the backend, the code generator features modules which generate optimal code for specific hardware architectures, for example conventional architectures (x86) using SIMD instructions (e.g. SSE2), or heterogeneous architectures like the Cell processor or GPGPUs. The definition of the computation is agnostic to the actual hardware used, as a high-performance implementation tailored to the specific architecture will be generated automatically. The OpenGGCM code, a global magnetosphere model, has been converted to use an automatically generated implementation of its magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) integrator. The new version enables us to take advantage of the Cell processor's computational capability and also shows performance improvements of up to 2.3× on a conventional Intel processor. The code generation approach also facilitated the recent extension of the MHD model to incorporate Hall physics.

  11. CAS2D- NONROTATING BLADE-TO-BLADE, STEADY, POTENTIAL TRANSONIC CASCADE FLOW ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    An exact, full-potential-equation model for the steady, irrotational, homoentropic, and homoenergetic flow of a compressible, inviscid fluid through a two-dimensional planar cascade together with its appropriate boundary conditions has been derived. The CAS2D computer program numerically solves an artificially time-dependent form of the actual full-potential-equation, providing a nonrotating blade-to-blade, steady, potential transonic cascade flow analysis code. Comparisons of results with test data and theoretical solutions indicate very good agreement. In CAS2D, the governing equation is discretized by using type-dependent, rotated finite differencing and the finite area technique. The flow field is discretized by providing a boundary-fitted, nonuniform computational mesh. This mesh is generated by using a sequence of conformal mapping, nonorthogonal coordinate stretching, and local, isoparametric, bilinear mapping functions. The discretized form of the full-potential equation is solved iteratively by using successive line over relaxation. Possible isentropic shocks are captured by the explicit addition of an artificial viscosity in a conservative form. In addition, a four-level, consecutive, mesh refinement feature makes CAS2D a reliable and fast algorithm for the analysis of transonic, two-dimensional cascade flows. The results from CAS2D are not directly applicable to three-dimensional, potential, rotating flows through a cascade of blades because CAS2D does not consider the effects of the Coriolis force that would be present in the three-dimensional case. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 200K of 8 bit bytes. The CAS2D program was developed in 1980.

  12. Reliability of astrophysical jet simulations in 2D. On inter-code reliability and numerical convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, M.; Camenzind, M.

    2001-12-01

    In the present paper, we examine the convergence behavior and inter-code reliability of astrophysical jet simulations in axial symmetry. We consider both pure hydrodynamic jets and jets with a dynamically significant magnetic field. The setups were chosen to match the setups of two other publications, and recomputed with the MHD code NIRVANA. We show that NIRVANA and the two other codes give comparable, but not identical results. We explain the differences by the different application of artificial viscosity in the three codes and numerical details, which can be summarized in a resolution effect, in the case without magnetic field: NIRVANA turns out to be a fair code of medium efficiency. It needs approximately twice the resolution as the code by Lind (Lind et al. 1989) and half the resolution as the code by Kössl (Kössl & Müller 1988). We find that some global properties of a hydrodynamical jet simulation, like e.g. the bow shock velocity, converge at 100 points per beam radius (ppb) with NIRVANA. The situation is quite different after switching on the toroidal magnetic field: in this case, global properties converge even at 10 ppb. In both cases, details of the inner jet structure and especially the terminal shock region are still insufficiently resolved, even at our highest resolution of 70 ppb in the magnetized case and 400 ppb for the pure hydrodynamic jet. The magnetized jet even suffers from a fatal retreat of the Mach disk towards the inflow boundary, which indicates that this simulation does not converge, in the end. This is also in definite disagreement with earlier simulations, and challenges further studies of the problem with other codes. In the case of our highest resolution simulation, we can report two new features: first, small scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities are excited at the contact discontinuity next to the jet head. This slows down the development of the long wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and its turbulent cascade to smaller

  13. A 2-dimensional MHD code & survey of the ``buckling'' phenomenon in cylindrical magnetic flux compression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo; Wang, Ganghua; Gu, Zhuowei; Computational Physics Team

    2015-11-01

    We made a 2-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamics Lagrangian code. The code handles two kinds of magnetic configuration, a (x-y) plane with z-direction magnetic field Bz and a (r-z) plane with θ-direction magnetic field Bθ. The solving of the MHD equations is split into a pure dynamical step (i.e., ideal MHD) and a diffusion step. In the diffusion step, the Joule heat is calculated with a numerical scheme based on an specific form of the Joule heat production equation, ∂eJ/∂t = ∇ . (η/μ0 º × (∇ × º)) -∂/∂t (1/2μ0 B2) , where the term ∂/∂t (1/2μ0 B2) is the magnetic field energy variation caused solely by diffusion. This scheme insures the equality of the total Joule heat produced and the total electromagnetic energy lost in the system. Material elastoplasticity is considered in the code. An external circuit is coupled to the magneto-hydrodynamics and a detonation module is also added to enhance the code's ability for simulating magnetically-driven compression experiments. As a first application, the code was utilized to simulate a cylindrical magnetic flux compression experiment. The origin of the ``buckling'' phenomenon observed in the experiment is explored.

  14. Coding in 2D: Using Intentional Dispersity to Enhance the Information Capacity of Sequence-Coded Polymer Barcodes.

    PubMed

    Laure, Chloé; Karamessini, Denise; Milenkovic, Olgica; Charles, Laurence; Lutz, Jean-François

    2016-08-26

    A 2D approach was studied for the design of polymer-based molecular barcodes. Uniform oligo(alkoxyamine amide)s, containing a monomer-coded binary message, were synthesized by orthogonal solid-phase chemistry. Sets of oligomers with different chain-lengths were prepared. The physical mixture of these uniform oligomers leads to an intentional dispersity (1st dimension fingerprint), which is measured by electrospray mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the monomer sequence of each component of the mass distribution can be analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (2nd dimension sequencing). By summing the sequence information of all components, a binary message can be read. A 4-bytes extended ASCII-coded message was written on a set of six uniform oligomers. Alternatively, a 3-bytes sequence was written on a set of five oligomers. In both cases, the coded binary information was recovered. PMID:27484303

  15. Relativistic modeling capabilities in PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for HED plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D.; Seyler, Charles E.

    2014-12-15

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest hybrid X-pinch simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. By suitable formulation of the relativistic generalized Ohm’s law as an evolution equation, we have reduced the recovery of primitive variables, a major technical challenge in relativistic codes, to a straightforward algebraic computation. Our code recovers expected results in the non-relativistic limit, and reveals new physics in the modeling of electron beam acceleration following an X-pinch. Through the use of a relaxation scheme, relativistic PERSEUS is able to handle nine orders of magnitude in density variation, making it the first fluid code, to our knowledge, that can simulate relativistic HED plasmas.

  16. The STD/MHD codes - Comparison of analyses with experiments at AEDC/HPDE, Reynolds Metal Co., and Hercules, Inc. [for MHD generator flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, A. A.; Maxwell, C. D.; Swean, T. F., Jr.; Demetriades, S. T.; Oliver, D. A.; Bangerter, C. D.

    1981-01-01

    Data from sufficiently well-instrumented, short-duration experiments at AEDC/HPDE, Reynolds Metal Co., and Hercules, Inc., are compared to analyses with multidimensional and time-dependent simulations with the STD/MHD computer codes. These analyses reveal detailed features of major transient events, severe loss mechanisms, and anomalous MHD behavior. In particular, these analyses predicted higher-than-design voltage drops, Hall voltage overshoots, and asymmetric voltage drops before the experimental data were available. The predictions obtained with these analyses are in excellent agreement with the experimental data and the failure predictions are consistent with the experiments. The design of large, high-interaction or advanced MHD experiments will require application of sophisticated, detailed and comprehensive computational procedures in order to account for the critical mechanisms which led to the observed behavior in these experiments.

  17. Multipacting Simulation Study for 56 MHz Quarter Wave Resonator using 2D Code

    SciTech Connect

    Naik,D.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2009-01-02

    A beam excited 56 MHz Radio Frequency (RF) Niobium Quarter Wave Resonator (QWR) has been proposed to enhance RHIC beam luminosity and bunching. Being a RF cavity, multipacting is expected; therefore an extensive study was carried out with the Multipac 2.1 2D simulation code. The study revealed that multipacting occurs in various bands up to peak surface electric field 50 kV/m and is concentrated mostly above the beam gap and on the outer conductor. To suppress multipacting, a ripple structure was introduced to the outer conductor and the phenomenon was successfully eliminated from the cavity.

  18. Automated design of coupled RF cavities using 2-D and 3-D codes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Peter; Christiansen, D. W.; Greninger, P. T.; Spalek, G.

    2001-01-01

    Coupled RF cavities in the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project have been designed using a procedure in which a 2-D code (CCT) searches for a design that meets frequency and coupling requirements, while a 3-D code (HFSS) is used to obtain empirical factors used by CCT to characterize the coupling slot between cavities. Using assumed values of the empirical factors, CCT runs the Superfish code iteratively to solve for a trial cavity design that has a specified frequency and coupling. The frequency shifts and the coupling constant k of the slot are modeled in CCT using a perturbation theory, the results of which are adjusted using the empirical factors. Given a trial design, HFSS is run using periodic boundary conditions to obtain a mode spectrum. The mode spectrum is processed using the DISPER code to obtain values of the coupling and the frequencies with slots. These results are used to calculate a new set of empirical factors, which are fed back into CCT for another design iteration. Cold models have been fabricated and tested to validate the codes, and results will be presented.

  19. Development of a MHD code satisfying solenoidal magnetic field condition and its application to Mercury's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, M.; Seki, K.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The MHD simulation is one of the powerful methods to understand global structure of the magnetosphere. However, in the Mercury's magnetosphere, kinetic effects of plasma might not be negligible because of its small scale. Statistical trajectory tracing of test particles is an important scheme to investigate the kinetic effects of particles. Previous studies by Delcourt et al. [2003; 2005] used analytical models of electric and magnetic fields that are obtained by rescaling the Earth's magnetosphere and calculated the motion of planetary sodium ions. While this approach is efficient to see the dynamics of heavy ions, resultant properties largely depend on the field models. In order to verify the particle dynamics in the more realistic global configuration of the Mercury's magnetosphere, a self-consistent electric and magnetic field configuration such as that obtained from MHD simulations is required. For studies of the kinetic effects, it is important that the resultant magnetic field (B) satisfies solenoidal condition, i.e., divB=0, to avoid artificial acceleration/deceleration. Aiming at global simulation of the Mercury's magnetosphere, we developed a MHD simulation code that automatically satisfies solenoidal condition for B. To implement the condition, we used vector potential (A) instead of magnetic field itself in the MHD equations. The usage of A automatically guaranteed divB=div(rotA)=0. For an accurate simulation of high Reynolds number magnetofluid, we adopted R-CIP algorithm [Yabe et al., 1991; Xiao et al., 1996] to solve the advection term in the simulation code. The non-advection terms are solved by 4th order Runge-Kutta method or 3rd order Adams-Moulton predictor-corrector method. The code assessment by comparison with previous simulations with TVD algorithm or analytical solutions shows reasonably good ability of energy and mass conservation, and description of MHD discontinuities. A remarkable feature of the new code with A is the precise description

  20. Assessment of the 2D MOC solver in MPACT: Michigan parallel characteristics transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, B.; Kochunas, B.; Downar, T.

    2013-07-01

    MPACT (Michigan Parallel Characteristics Transport Code) is a new reactor analysis tool being developed by researchers at the University of Michigan as an advanced pin-resolved transport capability within VERA (Virtual Environment for Reactor Analysis). VERA is the end-user reactor simulation tool being developed by the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The MPACT development project is itself unique for the way it is changing how students perform research to achieve the instructional and research goals of an academic institution, while providing immediate value to the industry. One of the major computational pieces in MPACT is the 2D MOC solver. It is critical that the 2D MOC solver provide an efficient, accurate, and robust solution over a broad range of reactor operating conditions. The C5G7 benchmark is first used to test the accuracy of the method with a fixed set of cross-sections. The VERA Core Physics Progression Problems are then used to compare the accuracy of both the 2D transport solver and also the cross-section treatments. (authors)

  1. 2D/3D electron temperature fluctuations near explosive MHD instabilities accompanied by minor and major disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Lee, K. D.; Ko, W.-H.; Park, Y.-S.; Park, B. H.; In, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Minor and major disruptions by explosive MHD instabilities were observed with the novel quasi 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system in the KSTAR plasma. The fine electron temperature (T e) fluctuation images revealed two types of minor disruptions: a small minor disruption is a q∼ 2 localized fast transport event due to a single m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth, while a large minor disruption is partial collapse of the q≤slant 2 region with two successive fast heat transport events by the correlated m/n  =  2/1 and m/n  =  1/1 instabilities. The m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth during the minor disruption is normally limited below the saturation width. However, as the additional interchange-like perturbation grows near the inner separatrix of the 2/1 island, the 2/1 island can expand beyond the limit through coupling with the cold bubble formed by the interchange-like perturbation.

  2. New insights into the generalized Rutherford equation for nonlinear neoclassical tearing mode growth from 2D reduced MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhof, E.; de Blank, H. J.; Pratt, J.

    2016-03-01

    Two dimensional reduced MHD simulations of neoclassical tearing mode growth and suppression by ECCD are performed. The perturbation of the bootstrap current density and the EC drive current density perturbation are assumed to be functions of the perturbed flux surfaces. In the case of ECCD, this implies that the applied power is flux surface averaged to obtain the EC driven current density distribution. The results are consistent with predictions from the generalized Rutherford equation using common expressions for Δ \\text{bs}\\prime and Δ \\text{ECCD}\\prime . These expressions are commonly perceived to describe only the effect on the tearing mode growth of the helical component of the respective current perturbation acting through the modification of Ohm’s law. Our results show that they describe in addition the effect of the poloidally averaged current density perturbation which acts through modification of the tearing mode stability index. Except for modulated ECCD, the largest contribution to the mode growth comes from this poloidally averaged current density perturbation.

  3. A parallel finite-volume MHD code for plasma thrusters with an applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norgaard, Peter; Choueiri, Edgar; Jardin, Stephen

    2006-10-01

    The Princeton Code for Advanced Plasma Propulsion Simulation (PCAPPS) is a recently developed parallel finite volume code that solves the resistive MHD equations in axisymmetric form. It is intended for simulating complex plasma flows, especially those in plasma thrusters. The code uses a flux function to represent the poloidal field. It allows for externally applied magnetic fields, necessary for efficient operation of magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters (MPDT) at low power. Separate electron and heavy species energy equations are employed, and model closure is achieved by a multi-level equilibrium ionization equation of state. We provide results from various validation tests, along with solver accuracy and parallel efficiency studies. Preliminary numerical studies of a lithium-fed MPDT are also presented.

  4. Modelling 2001 lahars at Popocatépetl volcano using FLO2D numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2013-12-01

    Popocatépetl volcano is located on the central part of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt. It is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico and endanger more than 25 million people that lives in its surroundings. In the last months, the renewal of its volcanic activity put into alert scientific community. One of the possible scenarios is the 2001 explosive activity, which was characterized by a 8 km eruptive column and the subsequent formation of pumice flows up to 4 km from the crater. Lahars were generated few hours after, remobilizing the new deposits towards NE flank of the volcano, along Huiloac Gorge, almost reaching Santiago Xalitzintla town (Capra et al., 2004). The occurrence of a similar scenario makes very important to reproduce this event to delimitate accurately lahar hazard zones. In this work, 2001 lahar deposit is modeled using FLO2D numerical code. Geophone data is used to reconstruct initial hydrograph and sediment concentration. Sensitivity study of most important parameters used by this code like Manning, and α and β coefficients was conducted in order to achieve a good simulation. Results obtained were compared with field data and demonstrated a good agreement in thickness and flow distribution. A comparison with previously published data with laharZ program (Muñoz-Salinas, 2009) is also made. Additionally, lahars with fluctuating sediment concentrations but with similar volume are simulated to observe the influence of the rheological behavior on lahar distribution.

  5. Embedded morphological dilation coding for 2D and 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, Fabio; Signoroni, Alberto; Leonardi, Riccardo

    2002-01-01

    Current wavelet-based image coders obtain high performance thanks to the identification and the exploitation of the statistical properties of natural images in the transformed domain. Zerotree-based algorithms, as Embedded Zerotree Wavelets (EZW) and Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Trees (SPIHT), offer high Rate-Distortion (RD) coding performance and low computational complexity by exploiting statistical dependencies among insignificant coefficients on hierarchical subband structures. Another possible approach tries to predict the clusters of significant coefficients by means of some form of morphological dilation. An example of a morphology-based coder is the Significance-Linked Connected Component Analysis (SLCCA) that has shown performance which are comparable to the zerotree-based coders but is not embedded. A new embedded bit-plane coder is proposed here based on morphological dilation of significant coefficients and context based arithmetic coding. The algorithm is able to exploit both intra-band and inter-band statistical dependencies among wavelet significant coefficients. Moreover, the same approach is used both for two and three-dimensional wavelet-based image compression. Finally we the algorithms are tested on some 2D images and on a medical volume, by comparing the RD results to those obtained with the state-of-the-art wavelet-based coders.

  6. Coronal extension of the MURaM radiative MHD code: From quiet sun to flare simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, Matthias D.; Cheung, Mark

    2016-05-01

    We present a new version of the MURaM radiative MHD code, which includes a treatment of the solar corona in terms of MHD, optically thin radiative loss and field-aligned heat conduction. In order to relax the severe time-step constraints imposed by large Alfven velocities and heat conduction we use a combination of semi-relativistic MHD with reduced speed of light ("Boris correction") and a hyperbolic formulation of heat conduction. We apply the numerical setup to 4 different setups including a mixed polarity quiet sun, an open flux region, an arcade solution and an active region setup and find all cases an amount of coronal heating sufficient to maintain a corona with temperatures from 1 MK (quiet sun) to 2 MK (active region, arcade). In all our setups the Poynting flux is self-consistently created by photospheric and sub-photospheric magneto-convection in the lower part of our simulation domain. Varying the maximum allowed Alfven velocity ("reduced speed of light") leads to only minor changes in the coronal structure as long as the limited Alfven velocity remains larger than the speed of sound and about 1.5-3 times larger than the peak advection velocity. We also found that varying details of the numerical diffusivities that govern the resistive and viscous energy dissipation do not strongly affect the overall coronal heating, but the ratio of resistive and viscous energy dependence is strongly dependent on the effective numerical magnetic Prandtl number. We use our active region setup in order to simulate a flare triggered by the emergence of a twisted flux rope into a pre-existing bipolar active region. Our simulation yields a series of flares, with the strongest one reaching GOES M1 class. The simulation reproduces many observed properties of eruptions such as flare ribbons, post flare loops and a sunquake.

  7. MHD Simulation of Magnetic Nozzle Plasma with the NIMROD Code: Applications to the VASIMR Advanced Space Propulsion Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarditi, Alfonso G.; Shebalin, John V.

    2002-11-01

    A simulation study with the NIMROD code [1] is being carried on to investigate the efficiency of the thrust generation process and the properties of the plasma detachment in a magnetic nozzle. In the simulation, hot plasma is injected in the magnetic nozzle, modeled as a 2D, axi-symmetric domain. NIMROD has two-fluid, 3D capabilities but the present runs are being conducted within the MHD, 2D approximation. As the plasma travels through the magnetic field, part of its thermal energy is converted into longitudinal kinetic energy, along the axis of the nozzle. The plasma eventually detaches from the magnetic field at a certain distance from the nozzle throat where the kinetic energy becomes larger than the magnetic energy. Preliminary NIMROD 2D runs have been benchmarked with a particle trajectory code showing satisfactory results [2]. Further testing is here reported with the emphasis on the analysis of the diffusion rate across the field lines and of the overall nozzle efficiency. These simulation runs are specifically designed for obtaining comparisons with laboratory measurements of the VASIMR experiment, by looking at the evolution of the radial plasma density and temperature profiles in the nozzle. VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket, [3]) is an advanced space propulsion concept currently under experimental development at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center. A plasma (typically ionized Hydrogen or Helium) is generated by a RF (Helicon) discharge and heated by an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating antenna. The heated plasma is then guided into a magnetic nozzle to convert the thermal plasma energy into effective thrust. The VASIMR system has no electrodes and a solenoidal magnetic field produced by an asymmetric mirror configuration ensures magnetic insulation of the plasma from the material surfaces. By powering the plasma source and the heating antenna at different levels it is possible to vary smoothly of the

  8. The 3D MHD code GOEMHD3 for astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers. Code description, verification, and computational performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, J.; Baruffa, F.; Büchner, J.; Rampp, M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The numerical simulation of turbulence and flows in almost ideal astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers motivates the implementation of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) computer codes with low resistivity. They need to be computationally efficient and scale well with large numbers of CPU cores, allow obtaining a high grid resolution over large simulation domains, and be easily and modularly extensible, for instance, to new initial and boundary conditions. Aims: Our aims are the implementation, optimization, and verification of a computationally efficient, highly scalable, and easily extensible low-dissipative MHD simulation code for the numerical investigation of the dynamics of astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers in three dimensions (3D). Methods: The new GOEMHD3 code discretizes the ideal part of the MHD equations using a fast and efficient leap-frog scheme that is second-order accurate in space and time and whose initial and boundary conditions can easily be modified. For the investigation of diffusive and dissipative processes the corresponding terms are discretized by a DuFort-Frankel scheme. To always fulfill the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability criterion, the time step of the code is adapted dynamically. Numerically induced local oscillations are suppressed by explicit, externally controlled diffusion terms. Non-equidistant grids are implemented, which enhance the spatial resolution, where needed. GOEMHD3 is parallelized based on the hybrid MPI-OpenMP programing paradigm, adopting a standard two-dimensional domain-decomposition approach. Results: The ideal part of the equation solver is verified by performing numerical tests of the evolution of the well-understood Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and of Orszag-Tang vortices. The accuracy of solving the (resistive) induction equation is tested by simulating the decay of a cylindrical current column. Furthermore, we show that the computational performance of the code scales very

  9. Icarus: A 2-D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) Code for Multi-Processor Computers

    SciTech Connect

    BARTEL, TIMOTHY J.; PLIMPTON, STEVEN J.; GALLIS, MICHAIL A.

    2001-10-01

    Icarus is a 2D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code which has been optimized for the parallel computing environment. The code is based on the DSMC method of Bird[11.1] and models from free-molecular to continuum flowfields in either cartesian (x, y) or axisymmetric (z, r) coordinates. Computational particles, representing a given number of molecules or atoms, are tracked as they have collisions with other particles or surfaces. Multiple species, internal energy modes (rotation and vibration), chemistry, and ion transport are modeled. A new trace species methodology for collisions and chemistry is used to obtain statistics for small species concentrations. Gas phase chemistry is modeled using steric factors derived from Arrhenius reaction rates or in a manner similar to continuum modeling. Surface chemistry is modeled with surface reaction probabilities; an optional site density, energy dependent, coverage model is included. Electrons are modeled by either a local charge neutrality assumption or as discrete simulational particles. Ion chemistry is modeled with electron impact chemistry rates and charge exchange reactions. Coulomb collision cross-sections are used instead of Variable Hard Sphere values for ion-ion interactions. The electro-static fields can either be: externally input, a Langmuir-Tonks model or from a Green's Function (Boundary Element) based Poison Solver. Icarus has been used for subsonic to hypersonic, chemically reacting, and plasma flows. The Icarus software package includes the grid generation, parallel processor decomposition, post-processing, and restart software. The commercial graphics package, Tecplot, is used for graphics display. All of the software packages are written in standard Fortran.

  10. Differential Sensitivity Theory applied to the MESA2D code for multi-material problems

    SciTech Connect

    Henninger, R.J.; Maudlin, P.J.; Harstad, E.N.

    1996-05-01

    The technique called Differential Sensitivity Theory (DST) is extended to the multi-component system of equations solved by the MESA2D hydrocode. DST uses adjoint techniques to determine exact sensitivity derivatives, i.e., if R is a calculation result of interest (response R) and {alpha}{sub i} is a calculation input (parameter {alpha}{sub i}), then {partial_derivative}R/{partial_derivative}{alpha}{sub i} is defined as the sensitivity. The advantage of using DST is that for an n-parameter problem {ital all} n sensitivities can be obtained by integrating the solutions from only {ital two} calculations, a MESA calculation and its corresponding adjoint calculation using an Adjoint Continuum Mechanics (ACM) code. Previous papers have described application of the technique to one-dimensional, single-material problems. This work presents the derivation and solution of the additional adjoint equations for the purpose of computing sensitivities for two-dimensional, multi-component problems. As an example, results for a multi-material flyer plate impact problem featuring an oblique impact are given. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Differential Sensitivity Theory applied to the MESA2D code for multi-material problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, R. J.; Maudlin, P. J.; Harstad, E. N.

    1996-05-01

    The technique called Differential Sensitivity Theory (DST) is extended to the multi-component system of equations solved by the MESA2D hydrocode. DST uses adjoint techniques to determine exact sensitivity derivatives, i.e., if R is a calculation result of interest (response R) and αi is a calculation input (parameter αi), then ∂R/∂αi is defined as the sensitivity. The advantage of using DST is that for an n-parameter problem all n sensitivities can be obtained by integrating the solutions from only two calculations, a MESA calculation and its corresponding adjoint calculation using an Adjoint Continuum Mechanics (ACM) code. Previous papers have described application of the technique to one-dimensional, single-material problems. This work presents the derivation and solution of the additional adjoint equations for the purpose of computing sensitivities for two-dimensional, multi-component problems. As an example, results for a multi-material flyer plate impact problem featuring an oblique impact are given.

  12. Differential sensitivity theory applied to the MESA2D code for multi-material problems

    SciTech Connect

    Henninger, R.J.; Maudlin, P.J.; Harstad, E.N.

    1995-09-01

    The technique called Differential Sensitivity Theory (DST) is extended to the multi-component system of equations solved by the MESA2D hydrocode. DST uses adjoint techniques to determine exact sensitivity derivatives, i.e., if R is a calculation result of interest (response R) and {alpha}{sub i} is a calculation input (parameter {alpha}{sub i}), then {partial_derivative}R/{partial_derivative}{alpha}{sub i} is defined as the sensitivity. The advantage of using DST is that for an n-parameter problem all n sensitivities can be obtained by integrating the solutions from only two calculations, a MESA calculation and its corresponding adjoint calculation using an Adjoint Continuum Mechanics (ACM) code. Previous papers have described application of the technique to one-dimensional, single-material problems. This work presents the derivation and solution of the additional adjoint equations for the purpose of computing sensitivities for two-dimensional, multi-component problems. As an example, results for a multi-material flyer plate impact problem featuring an oblique impact are given.

  13. Relativistic Modeling Capabilities in PERSEUS Extended-MHD Simulation Code for HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel; Seyler, Charles

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as hybrid X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. We have overcome a major challenge of a relativistic fluid implementation, namely the recovery of primitive variables (density, velocity, pressure) from conserved quantities at each time step of a simulation. Our code recovers non-relativistic results along with important features of published Particle-In-Cell simulation results for a laser penetrating a super-critical hydrogen gas with Fast Ignition applications. In particular, we recover the penetration of magnetized relativistic electron jets ahead of the laser. Our code also reveals new physics in the modeling of a laser incident on a thin foil. This work is supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration stewardship sciences academic program under Department of Energy cooperative agreements DE-FOA-0001153 and DE-NA0001836.

  14. MULTI2D - a computer code for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramis, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Ramírez, J.

    2009-06-01

    Simulation of radiation hydrodynamics in two spatial dimensions is developed, having in mind, in particular, target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement energy (IFE) and the interpretation of related experiments. Intense radiation pulses by laser or particle beams heat high-Z target configurations of different geometries and lead to a regime which is optically thick in some regions and optically thin in others. A diffusion description is inadequate in this situation. A new numerical code has been developed which describes hydrodynamics in two spatial dimensions (cylindrical R-Z geometry) and radiation transport along rays in three dimensions with the 4 π solid angle discretized in direction. Matter moves on a non-structured mesh composed of trilateral and quadrilateral elements. Radiation flux of a given direction enters on two (one) sides of a triangle and leaves on the opposite side(s) in proportion to the viewing angles depending on the geometry. This scheme allows to propagate sharply edged beams without ray tracing, though at the price of some lateral diffusion. The algorithm treats correctly both the optically thin and optically thick regimes. A symmetric semi-implicit (SSI) method is used to guarantee numerical stability. Program summaryProgram title: MULTI2D Catalogue identifier: AECV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 151 098 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 889 622 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: PC (32 bits architecture) Operating system: Linux/Unix RAM: 2 Mbytes Word size: 32 bits Classification: 19.7 External routines: X-window standard library (libX11.so) and corresponding heading files (X11/*.h) are

  15. A novel 2D wavelength-time chaos code in optical CDMA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Xin, Xiangjun; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Lijia; Yu, Chongxiu; Meng, Nan; Wang, Houtian

    2012-11-01

    Two-dimensional wavelength-time chaos code is proposed and constructed for a synchronous optical code division multiple access system. The access performance is compared between one-dimensional chaos code, WDM/chaos code and the proposed code. Comparison shows that two-dimensional wavelength-time chaos code possesses larger capacity, better spectral efficiency and bit-error ratio than WDM/chaos combinations and one-dimensional chaos code.

  16. An MHD Code for the Study of Magnetic Structures in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, J. C.; MacNeice, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a 2.5D MHD code designed to study how the solar wind influences the evolution of transient events in the solar corona and inner heliosphere. The code includes thermal conduction, coronal heating and radiative cooling. Thermal conduction is assumed to be magnetic field-aligned in the inner corona and transitions to a collisionless formulation in the outer corona. We have developed a stable method to handle field-aligned conduction around magnetic null points. The inner boundary is placed in the upper transition region, and the mass flux across the boundary is determined from 1D field-aligned characteristics and a 'radiative energy balance' condition. The 2.5D nature of this code makes it ideal for parameter studies not yet possible with 3D codes. We have made this code publicly available as a tool for the community. To this end we have developed a graphical interface to aid in the selection of appropriate options and a graphical interface that can process and visualize the data produced by the simulation. As an example, we show a simulation of a dipole field stretched into a helmet streamer by the solar wind. Plasmoids periodically erupt from the streamer, and we perform a parameter study of how the frequency and location of these eruptions changed in response to different levels of coronal heating. As a further example, we show the solar wind stretching a compact multi-polar flux system. This flux system will be used to study breakout coronal mass ejections in the presence of the solar wind.

  17. Investigations on Sawtooth Reconnection in ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak Discharges Using the 3D Non-linear Two-fluid MHD Code M3D-C1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, Isabel; Jardin, Stephen C.; Igochine, Valentin; Guenter, Sibylle; Hoelzl, Matthias; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-10-01

    We study sawtooth reconnection in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak plasmas by means of 3D non-linear two-fluid MHD simulations in toroidal geometry using the high-order finite element code M3D-C1. Parameters and equilibrium of the simulations are based on typical sawtoothing ASDEX Upgrade discharges. The simulation results are compared to features of the experimental observations such as the sawtooth crash time and frequency, the evolution of the safety factor profile and the 3D evolution of the temperature. 2D ECE imaging measurements during sawtooth crashes in ASDEX Upgrade indicate that the heat is transported out of the core through a narrow poloidally localized region. We investigate if incomplete sawtooth reconnection can be seen in the simulations which is suggested by soft X-ray tomography measurements in ASDEX Upgrade showing that an (m = 1, n = 1) perturbation is typically observed to survive the sawtooth crash and approximately maintain its radial position.

  18. Process to generate a synthetic diagnostic for microwave imaging reflectometry with the full-wave code FWR2D.

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Domier, C W; Kramer, G; Luhmann, N C; Muscatello, C M; Shi, L; Tobias, B J; Valeo, E

    2014-11-01

    A synthetic microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) diagnostic employing the full-wave reflectometer code (FWR2D) has been developed and is currently being used to guide the design of real systems, such as the one recently installed on DIII-D. The FWR2D code utilizes real plasma profiles as input, and it is combined with optical simulation tools for synthetic diagnostic signal generation. A detailed discussion of FWR2D and the process to generate the synthetic signal are presented in this paper. The synthetic signal is also compared to a prescribed density fluctuation spectrum to quantify the imaging quality. An example is presented with H-mode-like plasma profiles derived from a DIII-D discharge, where the MIR focal is located in the pedestal region. It is shown that MIR is suitable for diagnosing fluctuations with poloidal wavenumber up to 2.0 cm(-1) and fluctuation amplitudes less than 5%. PMID:25430276

  19. Solwnd: A 3D Compressible MHD Code for Solar Wind Studies. Version 1.0: Cartesian Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, Anil E.

    1996-01-01

    Solwnd 1.0 is a three-dimensional compressible MHD code written in Fortran for studying the solar wind. Time-dependent boundary conditions are available. The computational algorithm is based on Flux Corrected Transport and the code is based on the existing code of Zalesak and Spicer. The flow considered is that of shear flow with incoming flow that perturbs this base flow. Several test cases corresponding to pressure balanced magnetic structures with velocity shear flow and various inflows including Alfven waves are presented. Version 1.0 of solwnd considers a rectangular Cartesian geometry. Future versions of solwnd will consider a spherical geometry. Some discussions of this issue is presented.

  20. Development of models for the two-dimensional, two-fluid code for sodium boiling NATOF-2D. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.G.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1981-09-01

    Several features were incorporated into NATOF-2D, a two-dimensional, two fluid code developed at MIT for the purpose of analysis of sodium boiling transients under LMFBR conditions. They include improved interfacial mass, momentum and energy exchange rate models, and a cell-to-cell radial heat conduction mechanism which was calibrated by simulation of Westinghouse Blanket Heat Transfer Test Program Runs 544 and 545. Finally, a direct method of pressure field solution was implemented into a direct method of pressure field solution was implemented into NATOF-2D, replacing the iterative technique previously available, and resulted in substantially reduced computational costs.

  1. Implementation of 2D domain decomposition in the UCAN gyrokinetic PIC code for non-diffusive transport studies in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboeuf, Jean-Noel; Decyk, Viktor; Newman, David; Sanchez, Raul

    2012-03-01

    The massively parallel, nonlinear, 3D, toroidal, electrostatic, gyrokinetic, PIC, Cartesian geometry UCAN code, with particle ions and adiabatic electrons, has been successfully exercised to identify non-diffusive transport characteristics in DIII-D-like tokamak discharges. The limitation in applying UCAN to larger scale discharges is the 1D domain decomposition in the toroidal (or z-) direction for massively parallel implementation using MPI which has restricted the calculations to a few hundred ion Larmor radii per minor radius. To exceed these sizes, we have implemented 2D domain decomposition in UCAN with the addition of the y-direction to the processor mix. This has been facilitated by use of relevant components in the 2D domain decomposed PLIB2 library of field and particle management routines developed for UCLA's UPIC framework of conventional PIC codes. The gyro-averaging in gyrokinetic codes has necessitated the use of replicated arrays for efficient charge accumulation and particle push. The 2D domain-decomposed UCAN2 code reproduces the original 1D domain results within roundoff. Production calculations at large system sizes have been performed with UCAN2 on 131072 processors of the Cray XE6 at NERSC.

  2. 3D relaxation MHD modeling with FOI-PERFECT code for electromagnetically driven HED systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ganghua; Duan, Shuchao; Xie, Weiping; Kan, Mingxian; Institute of Fluid Physics Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    One of the challenges in numerical simulations of electromagnetically driven high energy density (HED) systems is the existence of vacuum region. The electromagnetic part of the conventional model adopts the magnetic diffusion approximation (magnetic induction model). The vacuum region is approximated by artificially increasing the resistivity. On one hand the phase/group velocity is superluminal and hence non-physical in the vacuum region, on the other hand a diffusion equation with large diffusion coefficient can only be solved by implicit scheme. Implicit method is usually difficult to parallelize and converge. A better alternative is to solve the full electromagnetic equations for the electromagnetic part. Maxwell's equations coupled with the constitutive equation, generalized Ohm's law, constitute a relaxation model. The dispersion relation is given to show its transition from electromagnetic propagation in vacuum to resistive MHD in plasma in a natural way. The phase and group velocities are finite for this system. A better time stepping is adopted to give a 3rd full order convergence in time domain without the stiff relaxation term restriction. Therefore it is convenient for explicit & parallel computations. Some numerical results of FOI-PERFECT code are also given. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11172277,11205145).

  3. A 2-D orientation-adaptive prediction filter in lifting structures for image coding.

    PubMed

    Gerek, Omer N; Cetin, A Enis

    2006-01-01

    Lifting-style implementations of wavelets are widely used in image coders. A two-dimensional (2-D) edge adaptive lifting structure, which is similar to Daubechies 5/3 wavelet, is presented. The 2-D prediction filter predicts the value of the next polyphase component according to an edge orientation estimator of the image. Consequently, the prediction domain is allowed to rotate +/-45 degrees in regions with diagonal gradient. The gradient estimator is computationally inexpensive with additional costs of only six subtractions per lifting instruction, and no multiplications are required. PMID:16435541

  4. Performance analysis of 2D asynchronous hard-limiting optical code-division multiple access system through atmospheric scattering channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yaqin; Zhong, Xin; Wu, Di; Zhang, Ye; Ren, Guanghui; Wu, Zhilu

    2013-09-01

    Optical code-division multiple access (OCDMA) systems usually allocate orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal codes to the active users. When transmitting through atmospheric scattering channel, the coding pulses are broadened and the orthogonality of the codes is worsened. In truly asynchronous case, namely both the chips and the bits are asynchronous among each active user, the pulse broadening affects the system performance a lot. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of a 2D asynchronous hard-limiting wireless OCDMA system through atmospheric scattering channel. The probability density function of multiple access interference in truly asynchronous case is given. The bit error rate decreases as the ratio of the chip period to the root mean square delay spread increases and the channel limits the bit rate to different levels when the chip period varies.

  5. ZORNOC: a 1 1/2-D tokamak data analysis code for studying noncircular high beta plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zurro, B.; Wieland, R.M.; Murakami, M.; Swain, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    A new tokamak data analysis code, ZORNOC, was developed to study noncircular, high beta plasmas in the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B). These plasmas exhibit significant flux surface shifts and elongation in both ohmically heated and beam-heated discharges. The MHD equilibrium flux surface geometry is determined by solving the Grad-Shafranov equation based on: (1) the shape of the outermost flux surface, deduced from the magnetic loop probes; (2) a pressure profile, deduced by means of Thomson scattering data (electrons), charge exchange data (ions), and a Fokker-Planck model (fast ions); and (3) a safety factor profile, determined from the experimental data using a simple model (Z/sub eff/ = const) that is self-consistently altered while the plasma equilibrium is iterated. For beam-heated discharches the beam deposition profile is determined by means of a Monte Carlo scheme and the slowing down of the fast ions by means of an analytical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. The code also carries out an electron power balance and calculates various confinement parameters. The code is described and examples of its operation are given.

  6. MHD simulations on an unstructured mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.; Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Longcope, D.W.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    Two reasons for using an unstructured computational mesh are adaptivity, and alignment with arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Two codes which use finite element discretization on an unstructured mesh are described. FEM3D solves 2D and 3D RMHD using an adaptive grid. MH3D++, which incorporates methods of FEM3D into the MH3D generalized MHD code, can be used with shaped boundaries, which might be 3D.

  7. Investigation of island formation due to RMPs in DIII-D plasmas with the SIESTA resistive MHD equilibrium code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshman, S. P.; Shafer, M. W.; Seal, S. K.; Canik, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    > The SIESTA magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium code has been used to compute a sequence of ideally stable equilibria resulting from numerical variation of the helical resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) applied to an axisymmetric DIII-D plasma equilibrium. Increasing the perturbation strength at the dominant , resonant surface leads to lower MHD energies and increases in the equilibrium island widths at the (and sidebands) surfaces, in agreement with theoretical expectations. Island overlap at large perturbation strengths leads to stochastic magnetic fields which correlate well with the experimentally inferred field structure. The magnitude and spatial phase (around the dominant rational surfaces) of the resonant (shielding) component of the parallel current are shown to change qualitatively with the magnetic island topology.

  8. Large Scale Earth's Bow Shock with Northern IMF as Simulated by PIC Code in Parallel with MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraka, Suleiman

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a 3D kinetic model (particle-in-cell, PIC) for the description of the large scale Earth's bow shock. The proposed version is stable and does not require huge or extensive computer resources. Because PIC simulations work with scaled plasma and field parameters, we also propose to validate our code by comparing its results with the available MHD simulations under same scaled solar wind (SW) and (IMF) conditions. We report new results from the two models. In both codes the Earth's bow shock position is found to be ≈14.8 R E along the Sun-Earth line, and ≈29 R E on the dusk side. Those findings are consistent with past in situ observations. Both simulations reproduce the theoretical jump conditions at the shock. However, the PIC code density and temperature distributions are inflated and slightly shifted sunward when compared to the MHD results. Kinetic electron motions and reflected ions upstream may cause this sunward shift. Species distributions in the foreshock region are depicted within the transition of the shock (measured ≈2 c/ ω pi for Θ Bn = 90° and M MS = 4.7) and in the downstream. The size of the foot jump in the magnetic field at the shock is measured to be (1.7 c/ ω pi ). In the foreshocked region, the thermal velocity is found equal to 213 km s-1 at 15 R E and is equal to 63 km s -1 at 12 R E (magnetosheath region). Despite the large cell size of the current version of the PIC code, it is powerful to retain macrostructure of planets magnetospheres in very short time, thus it can be used for pedagogical test purposes. It is also likely complementary with MHD to deepen our understanding of the large scale magnetosphere.

  9. 50 CFR Table 2d to Part 679 - Species Codes-Non-FMP Species

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (unspecified) 625 Lamprey, pacific 600 Lingcod 130 Lumpsucker 216 Pacific flatnose 260 Pacific hagfish 212 Pacific hake 112 Pacific lamprey 600 Pacific saury 220 Pacific tomcod 250 Poacher (Family Algonidae) 219... description Code Arctic char, anadromous 521 Dolly varden, anadromous 531 Eels or eel-like fish 210 Eel,...

  10. TOPAZ - a finite element heat conduction code for analyzing 2-D solids

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1984-03-01

    TOPAZ is a two-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat conduction analysis. This report provides a user's manual for TOPAZ and a description of the numerical algorithms used. Sample problems with analytical solutions are presented. TOPAZ has been implemented on the CRAY and VAX computers.

  11. Radioactive Sediment Transport on Ogaki Dam Reservoir in Fukushima Evacuated Zone: Numerical Simulation Studies by 2-D River Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Susumu; Kitamura, Akihiro; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Machida, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on March 2011 released significant quantities of radionuclides to atmosphere. The most significant nuclide is radioactive cesium isotopes. Therefore, the movement of the cesium is one of the critical issues for the environmental assessment. Since the cesium is strongly sorbed by soil particles, the cesium transport can be regarded as the sediment transport which is mainly brought about by the aquatic system such as a river and a lake. In this research, our target is the sediment transport on Ogaki dam reservoir which is located in about 16 km northwest from FDNPP. The reservoir is one of the principal irrigation dam reservoirs in Fukushima Prefecture and its upstream river basin was heavily contaminated by radioactivity. We simulate the sediment transport on the reservoir using 2-D river simulation code named Nays2D originally developed by Shimizu et al. (The latest version of Nays2D is available as a code included in iRIC (http://i-ric.org/en/), which is a river flow and riverbed variation analysis software package). In general, a 2-D simulation code requires a huge amount of calculation time. Therefore, we parallelize the code and execute it on a parallel computer. We examine the relationship between the behavior of the sediment transport and the height of the reservoir exit. The simulation result shows that almost all the sand that enter into the reservoir deposit close to the entrance of the reservoir for any height of the exit. The amounts of silt depositing within the reservoir slightly increase by raising the height of the exit. However, that of the clay dramatically increases. Especially, more than half of the clay deposits, if the exit is sufficiently high. These results demonstrate that the water level of the reservoir has a strong influence on the amount of the clay discharged from the reservoir. As a result, we conclude that the tuning of the water level has a possibility for controlling the

  12. EXTRAPOLATION OF THE SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD FROM SDO/HMI MAGNETOGRAM BY A CESE-MHD-NLFFF CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Chaowei; Feng Xueshang E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2013-06-01

    Due to the absence of direct measurement, the magnetic field in the solar corona is usually extrapolated from the photosphere in a numerical way. At the moment, the nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) model dominates the physical models for field extrapolation in the low corona. Recently, we have developed a new NLFFF model with MHD relaxation to reconstruct the coronal magnetic field. This method is based on CESE-MHD model with the conservation-element/solution-element (CESE) spacetime scheme. In this paper, we report the application of the CESE-MHD-NLFFF code to Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI) data with magnetograms sampled for two active regions (ARs), NOAA AR 11158 and 11283, both of which were very non-potential, producing X-class flares and eruptions. The raw magnetograms are preprocessed to remove the force and then inputted into the extrapolation code. Qualitative comparison of the results with the SDO/AIA images shows that our code can reconstruct magnetic field lines resembling the EUV-observed coronal loops. Most important structures of the ARs are reproduced excellently, like the highly sheared field lines that suspend filaments in AR 11158 and twisted flux rope which corresponds to a sigmoid in AR 11283. Quantitative assessment of the results shows that the force-free constraint is fulfilled very well in the strong-field regions but apparently not that well in the weak-field regions because of data noise and numerical errors in the small currents.

  13. COLLAPSE AND FRAGMENTATION OF MAGNETIC MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES WITH THE ENZO AMR MHD CODE. I. UNIFORM DENSITY SPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2013-02-20

    Magnetic fields are important contributors to the dynamics of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and can have a major effect on whether collapse results in a single protostar or fragmentation into a binary or multiple protostar system. New models are presented of the collapse of magnetic cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.0. The code was used to calculate the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of initially spherical, uniform density, and rotation clouds with density perturbations, i.e., the Boss and Bodenheimer standard isothermal test case for three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics codes. After first verifying that Enzo reproduces the binary fragmentation expected for the non-magnetic test case, a large set of models was computed with varied initial magnetic field strengths and directions with respect to the cloud core axis of rotation (parallel or perpendicular), density perturbation amplitudes, and equations of state. Three significantly different outcomes resulted: (1) contraction without sustained collapse, forming a denser cloud core; (2) collapse to form a single protostar with significant spiral arms; and (3) collapse and fragmentation into binary or multiple protostar systems, with multiple spiral arms. Comparisons are also made with previous MHD calculations of similar clouds with a barotropic equations of state. These results for the collapse of initially uniform density spheres illustrate the central importance of both magnetic field direction and field strength for determining the outcome of dynamic protostellar collapse.

  14. 2-D Circulation Control Airfoil Benchmark Experiments Intended for CFD Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Allan, Brian G.; Lin, Johb C.

    2009-01-01

    A current NASA Research Announcement (NRA) project being conducted by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) personnel and NASA collaborators includes the development of Circulation Control (CC) blown airfoils to improve subsonic aircraft high-lift and cruise performance. The emphasis of this program is the development of CC active flow control concepts for both high-lift augmentation, drag control, and cruise efficiency. A collaboration in this project includes work by NASA research engineers, whereas CFD validation and flow physics experimental research are part of NASA s systematic approach to developing design and optimization tools for CC applications to fixed-wing aircraft. The design space for CESTOL type aircraft is focusing on geometries that depend on advanced flow control technologies that include Circulation Control aerodynamics. The ability to consistently predict advanced aircraft performance requires improvements in design tools to include these advanced concepts. Validation of these tools will be based on experimental methods applied to complex flows that go beyond conventional aircraft modeling techniques. This paper focuses on recent/ongoing benchmark high-lift experiments and CFD efforts intended to provide 2-D CFD validation data sets related to NASA s Cruise Efficient Short Take Off and Landing (CESTOL) study. Both the experimental data and related CFD predictions are discussed.

  15. Efficient simulation of pitch angle collisions in a 2+2-D Eulerian Vlasov code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Jeff; Berger, R.; Brunner, S.; Tran, T.

    2014-10-01

    Here we discuss pitch angle scattering collisions in the context of the Eulerian-based kinetic code LOKI that evolves the Vlasov-Poisson system in 2+2-dimensional phase space. The collision operator is discretized using 4th order accurate conservative finite-differencing. The treatment of the Vlasov operator in phase-space uses an approach based on a minimally diffuse, fourth-order-accurate discretization (Banks and Hittinger, IEEE T. Plasma Sci. 39, 2198). The overall scheme is therefore discretely conservative and controls unphysical oscillations. Some details of the numerical scheme will be presented, and the implementation on modern highly concurrent parallel computers will be discussed. We will present results of collisional effects on linear and non-linear Landau damping of electron plasma waves (EPWs). In addition we will present initial results showing the effect of collisions on the evolution of EPWs in two space dimensions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the LDRD program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-061.

  16. A 2D forward and inverse code for streaming potential problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Jardani, A.; Revil, A.

    2013-12-01

    The self-potential method corresponds to the passive measurement of the electrical field in response to the occurrence of natural sources of current in the ground. One of these sources corresponds to the streaming current associated with the flow of the groundwater. We can therefore apply the self- potential method to recover non-intrusively some information regarding the groundwater flow. We first solve the forward problem starting with the solution of the groundwater flow problem, then computing the source current density, and finally solving a Poisson equation for the electrical potential. We use the finite-element method to solve the relevant partial differential equations. In order to reduce the number of (petrophysical) model parameters required to solve the forward problem, we introduced an effective charge density tensor of the pore water, which can be determined directly from the permeability tensor for neutral pore waters. The second aspect of our work concerns the inversion of the self-potential data using Tikhonov regularization with smoothness and weighting depth constraints. This approach accounts for the distribution of the electrical resistivity, which can be independently and approximately determined from electrical resistivity tomography. A numerical code, SP2DINV, has been implemented in Matlab to perform both the forward and inverse modeling. Three synthetic case studies are discussed.

  17. Validation and Comparison of 2D and 3D Codes for Nearshore Motion of Long Waves Using Benchmark Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velioǧlu, Deniz; Cevdet Yalçıner, Ahmet; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Tsunamis are huge waves with long wave periods and wave lengths that can cause great devastation and loss of life when they strike a coast. The interest in experimental and numerical modeling of tsunami propagation and inundation increased considerably after the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake. In this study, two numerical codes, FLOW 3D and NAMI DANCE, that analyze tsunami propagation and inundation patterns are considered. Flow 3D simulates linear and nonlinear propagating surface waves as well as long waves by solving three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (3D-NS) equations. NAMI DANCE uses finite difference computational method to solve 2D depth-averaged linear and nonlinear forms of shallow water equations (NSWE) in long wave problems, specifically tsunamis. In order to validate these two codes and analyze the differences between 3D-NS and 2D depth-averaged NSWE equations, two benchmark problems are applied. One benchmark problem investigates the runup of long waves over a complex 3D beach. The experimental setup is a 1:400 scale model of Monai Valley located on the west coast of Okushiri Island, Japan. Other benchmark problem is discussed in 2015 National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) Annual meeting in Portland, USA. It is a field dataset, recording the Japan 2011 tsunami in Hilo Harbor, Hawaii. The computed water surface elevation and velocity data are compared with the measured data. The comparisons showed that both codes are in fairly good agreement with each other and benchmark data. The differences between 3D-NS and 2D depth-averaged NSWE equations are highlighted. All results are presented with discussions and comparisons. Acknowledgements: Partial support by Japan-Turkey Joint Research Project by JICA on earthquakes and tsunamis in Marmara Region (JICA SATREPS - MarDiM Project), 603839 ASTARTE Project of EU, UDAP-C-12-14 project of AFAD Turkey, 108Y227, 113M556 and 213M534 projects of TUBITAK Turkey, RAPSODI (CONCERT_Dis-021) of CONCERT

  18. User's manual for DYNA2D: an explicit two-dimensional hydrodynamic finite-element code with interactive rezoning

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1982-02-01

    This revised report provides an updated user's manual for DYNA2D, an explicit two-dimensional axisymmetric and plane strain finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 4-node solid elements, and the equations-of motion are integrated by the central difference method. An interactive rezoner eliminates the need to terminate the calculation when the mesh becomes too distorted. Rather, the mesh can be rezoned and the calculation continued. The command structure for the rezoner is described and illustrated by an example.

  19. Verification and benchmarking of MAGNUM-2D: a finite element computer code for flow and heat transfer in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Budden, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    The objective of this work is to assess prediction capabilities and features of the MAGNUM-2D computer code in relation to its intended use in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). This objective is accomplished through a code verification and benchmarking task. Results are documented which support correctness of prediction capabilities in areas of intended model application. 10 references, 43 figures, 11 tables.

  20. Method of rapid determination of MHD equilibrium properties with the modified version of the SURFAS code

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.K.; Hirshman, S.P.; Okabayashi, M.; Reusch, M.F.; Sun, Y.C.

    1993-09-01

    Rapid determination of MHD eqilibrium properties of tokamak plasmas is carried out by means of an approximation method based on the use of database files. These are computed a priori from MHD equilibrium solutions obtained by performing reconstruction to match experimental measurements, which include motional Stark effect (MSE) data. The procedure carries out a single iteration of Newton`s method to determine the poloidal variation of the toroidal plasma current density in the equilibrium form j{sub {phi}} = {minus}2{pi}({mu}{sub 0}Rp{prime} + FF{prime}/R) by representing p{prime}({psi}) and F({psi})F{prime}({psi}) in series expansions of Chebyshev polynomials. The polynominal expansion coefficients are obtained through a least-squares data fitting process similar to that used in the equilibrium reconstruction. Knowing the current density j{phi} allows the determination of the internal q-profile from the MSE data. This important stability parameter is generally unavailable from a current filament model. Numerical results calculated in this approach are compared with those determined from an accurate solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation, subject to a similar set of magnetic and pressure measurement constraints.

  1. Comparison of two-dimensional and three-dimensional MHD equilibrium and stability codes

    SciTech Connect

    Herrnegger, F.; Merkel, P.; Johnson, J.L.

    1986-02-01

    Stability results obtained with the fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic code BETA, the helically invariant code HERA, and the asymptotic stellarator expansion code STEP agree well for a straight l = 2, M = 5 stellarator model. This good agreement between the BETA and STEP codes persists as toroidal curvature is introduced. This validation provides justification for confidence in work with these models. 20 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Linear hybrid kinetic-MHD model of rotating plasmas via the interface of MINERVA stability and VENUS-LEVIS delta-f PIC codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferle, David; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Graves, Jonathan P.; Cooper, Wilfred A.

    2014-10-01

    In the framework of hybrid kinetic-MHD with plasma rotation, this project focuses on computing, via a delta-f PIC scheme, the non-adiabatic contribution to the MHD pressure tensor from supra-thermal populations. The orbit code VENUS-LEVIS is employed to evolve an ensemble of weighted markers in the rotating magnetic equilibria produced by the MHD stability code MINERVA. The linearly perturbed Vlasov equation is solved by evolving the marker weights in the presence of MINERVA's most unstable MHD modes. Moments of the perturbed distribution are sequenced to yield the hot ion kinetic response. The Laplace transform of the perturbed parallel and perpendicular pressure is calculated at the resonance as a function of the radial position and the poloidal and toroidal mode number. The resulting profiles are fed back into MINERVA as an additional source term in the MHD force balance equation. The mode structure, the frequency and the growth rate of the perturbations are modified due to resonances with the hot particles' bounce/transit motion and their toroidal precession drift. The effect of toroidal plasma rotation on the mode stability is assessed.

  3. Implicit Predictor-Corrector finite difference scheme for the ideal MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, T.; Yu, H.; Lai, S.

    2012-12-01

    A innovative simulation code for ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is developed. We present a multiple-dimensional MHD code based on high-order implicit predictor-corrector finite difference scheme (high-order IPCFD scheme). High-order IPCFD scheme adopts high-order predictor-corrector scheme for the time integration and high-order central difference method as the spatial derivative solver. We use Elimination-of-the-Runoff-Errors (ERE) technology to avoid the numerical oscillations and numerical instability in the simulation results. In one-dimensional MHD problem, our simulation results show good agreement with the Brio & Wu MHD shock tube problem. The divergent B constraint remains fully satisfied, that is the divergent B equals to zero throughout the simulation. When solving the two-dimensional (2D) linear wave in MHD plasma, we clearly obtain the group-velocity Friedrichs diagrams of the MHD waves. Here we demonstrate 2D simulation results of rotor problem, Orszag-Tang vortex system, vortex type K-H instability, and kink type K-H instability by using our IPCFD MHD code and discuss the advantage of our simulation code.

  4. Modelling of ELM-averaged power exhaust on JET using the EDGE2D code with variable transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirnev, G.; Fundamenski, W.; Corrigan, G.

    2007-06-01

    The scrape-off layer (SOL) of the JET tokamak has been modelled using a two-dimensional plasma/neutral code, EDGE2D/NIMBUS, with variable transport coefficients, chosen according to nine candidate theories for radial heat transport in the SOL. Comparison of the radial power width on the outer divertor plates, λq, predicted by modelling and measured experimentally in L-mode and ELM-averaged H-mode at JET is presented. Transport coefficients based on classical and neo-classical ion conduction are found to offer the best agreement with experimentally measured λq magnitude and scaling with target power, upstream density and toroidal field. These results reinforce the findings of an earlier study, based on a simplified model of the SOL (Chankin 1997 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 39 1059), and support the earlier estimate of the power width at the entrance of the outer divertor volume in ITER, λq ap 4 mm mapped to the outer mid-plane (Fundamenski et al 2004 Nucl. Fusion 44 20).

  5. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2014-10-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Initial results of the code parallelization will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  6. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2013-10-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Preliminary results of the code parallelization will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  7. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2015-11-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Results of MARS parallelization and of the development of a new fix boundary equilibrium code adapted for MARS input will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  8. 3D MHD Simulations of Tokamak Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James

    2014-10-01

    Two disruption scenarios are modeled numerically by use of the CORSICA 2D equilibrium and NIMROD 3D MHD codes. The work follows the simulations of pressure-driven modes in DIII-D and VDEs in ITER. The aim of the work is to provide starting points for simulation of tokamak disruption mitigation techniques currently in the CDR phase for ITER. Pressure-driven instability growth rates previously observed in simulations of DIIID are verified; Halo and Hiro currents produced during vertical displacements are observed in simulations of ITER with implementation of resistive walls in NIMROD. We discuss plans to exercise new code capabilities and validation.

  9. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all <1%. The results validate the accuracy of the new code, which is a useful tool in scintillation detector optimization. PMID:24600168

  10. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all <1%. The results validate the accuracy of the new code, which is a useful tool in scintillation detector optimization. PMID:24600168

  11. Numerical model of water flow and solute accumulation in vertisols using HYDRUS 2D/3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Tomáš; Dahan, Ofer; Turkeltub, Tuvia

    2015-04-01

    boundary to the wall of the crack (so that the solute can accumulate due to evaporation on the crack block wall, and infiltrating fresh water can push the solute further down) - in order to do so, HYDRUS 2D/3D code had to be modified by its developers. Unconventionally, the main fitting parameters were: parameter a and n in the soil water retention curve and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The amount of infiltrated water (within a reasonable range), the infiltration function in the crack and the actual evaporation from the crack were also used as secondary fitting parameters. The model supports the previous findings that significant amount (~90%) of water from rain events must infiltrate through the crack. It was also noted that infiltration from the crack has to be increasing with depth and that the highest infiltration rate should be somewhere between 1-3m. This paper suggests a new way how to model vertisols in semi-arid regions. It also supports the previous findings about vertisols: especially, the utmost importance of soil cracks as preferential pathways for water and contaminants and soil cracks as deep evaporators.

  12. One-dimensional code to predict the thermal behavior of the UTSI MHD radiant furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Galanga, F.L.

    1984-03-01

    An analytical model of the thermal behavior of the radiant furnace components installed in the CFFF has been developed. Efforts have been primarily directed towards obtaining a representative global evaluation of the heat recovery of the major downstream components. An overall review of the heat transfer code developed specifically for the DOE CFFF downstream components is presented. The basic methods by which the gas state, transport properties, and the thermal radiative and convective properties are calculated are delineated. Since the thermal behavior of the furnace is radiation dominated, a greater emphasis was placed on this mode of heat transfer. The heat transfer model employs a single zone approximation to the physical problem. The results of the code show good agreement with the experimental data. A more rigorous approach to the problem requires the use of a multi-zone analysis which is presently under consideration. 21 references. (WHK)

  13. Modeling of MHD edge containment in strip casting with ELEKTRA and CaPS-EM codes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F. C.

    2000-01-12

    This paper presents modeling studies of magnetohydrodynamics analysis in twin-roll casting. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and ISPAT Inland Inc. (Inland), formerly Inland Steel Co., have worked together to develop a three-dimensional (3-D) computer model that can predict eddy currents, fluid flows, and liquid metal containment of an electromagnetic (EM) edge containment device. The model was verified by comparing predictions with experimental results of liquid metal containment and fluid flow in EM edge dams (EMDs) that were designed at Inland for twin-roll casting. This mathematical model can significantly shorten casting research on the use of EM fields for liquid metal containment and control. The model can optimize the EMD design so it is suitable for application, and minimize expensive time-consuming full-scale testing. Numerical simulation was performed by coupling a 3-D finite-element EM code (ELEKTRA) and a 3-D finite-difference fluids code (CaPS-EM) to solve heat transfer, fluid flow, and turbulence transport in a casting process that involves EM fields. ELEKTRA can predict the eddy-current distribution and the EM forces in complex geometries. CaPS-EM can model fluid flows with free surfaces. The computed 3-D magnetic fields and induced eddy currents in ELEKTRA are used as input to temperature- and flow-field computations in CaPS-EM. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from both static and dynamic tests.

  14. Coupled 2-dimensional cascade theory for noise an d unsteady aerodynamics of blade row interaction in turbofans. Volume 2: Documentation for computer code CUP2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    A two dimensional linear aeroacoustic theory for rotor/stator interaction with unsteady coupling was derived and explored in Volume 1 of this report. Computer program CUP2D has been written in FORTRAN embodying the theoretical equations. This volume (Volume 2) describes the structure of the code, installation and running, preparation of the input file, and interpretation of the output. A sample case is provided with printouts of the input and output. The source code is included with comments linking it closely to the theoretical equations in Volume 1.

  15. LIGKA: A linear gyrokinetic code for the description of background kinetic and fast particle effects on the MHD stability in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Lauber, Ph. Guenter, S.; Koenies, A.; Pinches, S.D.

    2007-09-10

    In a plasma with a population of super-thermal particles generated by heating or fusion processes, kinetic effects can lead to the additional destabilisation of MHD modes or even to additional energetic particle modes. In order to describe these modes, a new linear gyrokinetic MHD code has been developed and tested, LIGKA (linear gyrokinetic shear Alfven physics) [Ph. Lauber, Linear gyrokinetic description of fast particle effects on the MHD stability in tokamaks, Ph.D. Thesis, TU Muenchen, 2003; Ph. Lauber, S. Guenter, S.D. Pinches, Phys. Plasmas 12 (2005) 122501], based on a gyrokinetic model [H. Qin, Gyrokinetic theory and computational methods for electromagnetic perturbations in tokamaks, Ph.D. Thesis, Princeton University, 1998]. A finite Larmor radius expansion together with the construction of some fluid moments and specification to the shear Alfven regime results in a self-consistent, electromagnetic, non-perturbative model, that allows not only for growing or damped eigenvalues but also for a change in mode-structure of the magnetic perturbation due to the energetic particles and background kinetic effects. Compared to previous implementations [H. Qin, mentioned above], this model is coded in a more general and comprehensive way. LIGKA uses a Fourier decomposition in the poloidal coordinate and a finite element discretisation in the radial direction. Both analytical and numerical equilibria can be treated. Integration over the unperturbed particle orbits is performed with the drift-kinetic HAGIS code [S.D. Pinches, Ph.D. Thesis, The University of Nottingham, 1996; S.D. Pinches et al., CPC 111 (1998) 131] which accurately describes the particles' trajectories. This allows finite-banana-width effects to be implemented in a rigorous way since the linear formulation of the model allows the exchange of the unperturbed orbit integration and the discretisation of the perturbed potentials in the radial direction. Successful benchmarks for toroidal Alfven

  16. FACET: a radiation view factor computer code for axisymmetric, 2D planar, and 3D geometries with shadowing

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1983-08-01

    The computer code FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors for input to finite-element heat-transfer analysis codes. The first section of this report is a brief review of previous radiation-view-factor computer codes. The second section presents the defining integral equation for the geometric view factor between two surfaces and the assumptions made in its derivation. Also in this section are the numerical algorithms used to integrate this equation for the various geometries. The third section presents the algorithms used to detect self-shadowing and third-surface shadowing between the two surfaces for which a view factor is being calculated. The fourth section provides a user's input guide followed by several example problems.

  17. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  18. Construction and Analysis of a Novel 2-D Optical Orthogonal Codes Based on Modified One-coincidence Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jianhua; Wang, Yanfen; Wang, Ke; Xu, Ming; Zhang, Zhipeng; Yang, Shuwen

    2013-09-01

    A new two-dimensional OOC (optical orthogonal codes) named PC/MOCS is constructed, using PC (prime code) for time spreading and MOCS (modified one-coincidence sequence) for wavelength hopping. Compared with PC/PC, the number of wavelengths for PC/MOCS is not limited to a prime number. Compared with PC/OCS, the length of MOCS need not be expanded to the same length of PC. PC/MOCS can be constructed flexibly, and also can use available wavelengths effectively. Theoretical analysis shows that PC/MOCS can reduce the bit error rate (BER) of OCDMA system, and can support more users than PC/PC and PC/OCS.

  19. TRAC code assessment using data from SCTF Core-III, a large-scale 2D/3D facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B.E.; Shire, P.R.; Harmony, S.C.; Rhee, G.

    1988-01-01

    Nine tests from the SCTF Core-III configuration have been analyzed using TRAC-PF1/MOD1. The objectives of these assessment activities were to obtain a better understanding of the phenomena occurring during the refill and reflood phases of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident, to determine the accuracy to which key parameters are calculated, and to identify deficiencies in key code correlations and models that provide closure for the differential equations defining thermal-hydraulic phenomena in pressurized water reactors. Overall, the agreement between calculated and measured values of peak cladding temperature is reasonable. In addition, TRAC adequately predicts many of the trends observed in both the integral effect and separate effect tests conducted in SCTF Core-III. The importance of assessment activities that consider potential contributors to discrepancies between the measured and calculated results arising from three sources are described as those related to (1) knowledge about the facility configuration and operation, (2) facility modeling for code input, and (3) deficiencies in code correlations and models. An example is provided. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. PM2D code simulation of electronic dynamics and electro-magnetic fields generation by ultra-short laser pulses interaction with matter

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, I. A.; Lykov, V. A.

    1997-04-15

    The results of numerical simulation of fast electrons motion and generated electro-magnetic fields at the picosecond pulse laser interaction with flat target are presented. The calculations were performed with PM2D code, where relativistic equation of electron motion joint with Maxwell equations is solved by particle method in cells. The efficiency of fast electrons energy conversion to the transverse electromagnetic wave of picosecond duration can reach the value 10{sup -4} for the intensity of ultrashort laser pulse at the target 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}.

  1. HT2DINV: A 2D forward and inverse code for steady-state and transient hydraulic tomography problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Jardani, A.; Revil, A.; Dupont, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography is a technique used to characterize the spatial heterogeneities of storativity and transmissivity fields. The responses of an aquifer to a source of hydraulic stimulations are used to recover the features of the estimated fields using inverse techniques. We developed a 2D free source Matlab package for performing hydraulic tomography analysis in steady state and transient regimes. The package uses the finite elements method to solve the ground water flow equation for simple or complex geometries accounting for the anisotropy of the material properties. The inverse problem is based on implementing the geostatistical quasi-linear approach of Kitanidis combined with the adjoint-state method to compute the required sensitivity matrices. For undetermined inverse problems, the adjoint-state method provides a faster and more accurate approach for the evaluation of sensitivity matrices compared with the finite differences method. Our methodology is organized in a way that permits the end-user to activate parallel computing in order to reduce the computational burden. Three case studies are investigated demonstrating the robustness and efficiency of our approach for inverting hydraulic parameters.

  2. A New Cell-Centered Implicit Numerical Scheme for Ions in the 2-D Axisymmetric Code Hall2de

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez Ortega, Alejandro; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new algorithm in the Hall2De code to simulate the ion hydrodynamics in the acceleration channel and near plume regions of Hall-effect thrusters. This implementation constitutes an upgrade of the capabilities built in the Hall2De code. The equations of mass conservation and momentum for unmagnetized ions are solved using a conservative, finite-volume, cell-centered scheme on a magnetic-field-aligned grid. Major computational savings are achieved by making use of an implicit predictor/multi-corrector algorithm for time evolution. Inaccuracies in the prediction of the motion of low-energy ions in the near plume in hydrodynamics approaches are addressed by implementing a multi-fluid algorithm that tracks ions of different energies separately. A wide range of comparisons with measurements are performed to validate the new ion algorithms. Several numerical experiments with the location and value of the anomalous collision frequency are also presented. Differences in the plasma properties in the near-plume between the single fluid and multi-fluid approaches are discussed. We complete our validation by comparing predicted erosion rates at the channel walls of the thruster with measurements. Erosion rates predicted by the plasma properties obtained from simulations replicate accurately measured rates of erosion within the uncertainty range of the sputtering models employed.

  3. A MARS-based method for estimating regional 2-D ionospheric VTEC and receiver differential code bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Szu-Pyng; Chen, Yao-Chung; Ning, Fang-Shii

    2014-01-01

    The geometry-free linear combination of dual-frequency GNSS reference station ground observations are currently used to build the Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) model of the ionosphere. As it is known, besides ionospheric delays, there are differential code bias (DCB) of satellite (SDCB) and receiver (RDCB) in the geometry-free observation equation. The SDCB can be obtained using the International GNSS Service (IGS) analysis centers, but the RDCB for regional and local network receivers are not provided. Therefore, estimating the RDCB and VTEC model accurately and simultaneously is a critical factor investigated by researchers. This study uses Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) to estimate the VTEC approximate model and then substitutes this model in the observation equation to form the normal equation. The least squares method is used to solve the RDCB and VTEC model together. The research findings show that this method has good modeling effectiveness and the estimated RDCB has good reliability. The estimated VTEC model applied to GPS single-frequency precise point positioning has better positioning accuracy in comparison to the IGS global ionosphere map (GIM).

  4. Vlasov simulation of 2D Modulational Instability of Ion Acoustic Waves and Prospects for Modeling such instabilities in Laser Propagation Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Richard; Chapman, T.; Banks, J. W.; Brunner, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present 2D+2V Vlasov simulations of Ion Acoustic waves (IAWs) driven by an external traveling-wave potential, ϕ0 (x , t) , with frequency, ω, and wavenumber, k, obeying the kinetic dispersion relation. Both electrons and ions are treated kinetically. Simulations with ϕ0 (x , t) , localized transverse to the propagation direction, model IAWs driven in a laser speckle. The waves bow with a positive or negative curvature of the wave fronts that depends on the sign of the nonlinear frequency shift ΔωNL , which is in turn determined by the magnitude of ZTe /Ti where Z is the charge state and Te , i is the electron, ion temperature. These kinetic effects result can cause modulational and self-focusing instabilities that transfer wave energy to kinetic energy. Linear dispersion properties of IAWs are used in laser propagation codes that predict the amount of light reflected by stimulated Brillouin scattering. At high enough amplitudes, the linear dispersion is invalid and these kinetic effects should be incorporated. Including the spatial and time scales of these instabilities is computationally prohibitive. We report progress including kinetic models in laser propagation codes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 15.

  5. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  6. Icarus: A 2D direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code for parallel computers. User`s manual - V.3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, T.; Plimpton, S.; Johannes, J.; Payne, J.

    1996-10-01

    Icarus is a 2D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code which has been optimized for the parallel computing environment. The code is based on the DSMC method of Bird and models from free-molecular to continuum flowfields in either cartesian (x, y) or axisymmetric (z, r) coordinates. Computational particles, representing a given number of molecules or atoms, are tracked as they have collisions with other particles or surfaces. Multiple species, internal energy modes (rotation and vibration), chemistry, and ion transport are modelled. A new trace species methodology for collisions and chemistry is used to obtain statistics for small species concentrations. Gas phase chemistry is modelled using steric factors derived from Arrhenius reaction rates. Surface chemistry is modelled with surface reaction probabilities. The electron number density is either a fixed external generated field or determined using a local charge neutrality assumption. Ion chemistry is modelled with electron impact chemistry rates and charge exchange reactions. Coulomb collision cross-sections are used instead of Variable Hard Sphere values for ion-ion interactions. The electrostatic fields can either be externally input or internally generated using a Langmuir-Tonks model. The Icarus software package includes the grid generation, parallel processor decomposition, postprocessing, and restart software. The commercial graphics package, Tecplot, is used for graphics display. The majority of the software packages are written in standard Fortran.

  7. Initial simulation of MHD instabilites in a high speed plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Hughes, Tom; Thio, Francis

    2005-10-01

    High density, high Mach number plasma jets are under development for a variety of critical fusion applications. These applications include fueling, rotation driving, and disruption mitigation in magnetic fusion devices. They also include a range of innovative approaches to high energy density plasmas. FAR-TECH, Inc. has begun 3D MHD simulations using the LSP code [1] to examine such high speed plasma jets. An initial study to benchmark the code is currently underway. The blow-by instability will be simulated in a coaxial plasma accelerator using the 3D LSP code and compared with the 2D MACH2 code results. [1] LSP-Manual-MRC-ABQ-R-1942.pdf

  8. Spatially Resolved Synthetic Spectra from 2D Simulations of Stainless Steel Wire Array Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Chong, Y. K.; Dasgupta, A.; Davis, J.

    2009-01-21

    A 2D radiation MHD model has been developed to investigate stainless steel wire array implosion experiments on the Z and refurbished Z machines. This model incorporates within the Mach2 MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE kinetics and ray trace based radiation transport. Such a method is necessary in order to account for opacity effects in conjunction with ionization kinetics of K-shell emitting plasmas. Here the model is used to investigate multi-dimensional effects of stainless steel wire implosions. In particular, we are developing techniques to produce non-LTE, axially and/or radially resolved synthetic spectra based upon snapshots of our 2D simulations. Comparisons between experimental spectra and these synthetic spectra will allow us to better determine the state of the experimental pinches.

  9. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  10. 3D simulation studies of tokamak plasmas using MHD and extended-MHD models

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The M3D (Multi-level 3D) tokamak simulation project aims at the simulation of tokamak plasmas using a multi-level tokamak code package. Several current applications using MHD and Extended-MHD models are presented; high-{beta} disruption studies in reversed shear plasmas using the MHD level MH3D code, {omega}{sub *i} stabilization and nonlinear island saturation of TAE mode using the hybrid particle/MHD level MH3D-K code, and unstructured mesh MH3D{sup ++} code studies. In particular, three internal mode disruption mechanisms are identified from simulation results which agree which agree well with experimental data.

  11. Ideal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, Jeffrey P.

    2014-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. The ideal MHD model; 3. General properties of ideal MHD; 5. Equilibrium: one-dimensional configurations; 6. Equilibrium: two-dimensional configurations; 7. Equilibrium: three-dimensional configurations; 8. Stability: general considerations; 9. Alternate MHD models; 10. MHD stability comparison theorems; 11. Stability: one-dimensional configurations; 12. Stability: multi-dimensional configurations; Appendix A. Heuristic derivation of the kinetic equation; Appendix B. The Braginskii transport coefficients; Appendix C. Time derivatives in moving plasmas; Appendix D. The curvature vector; Appendix E. Overlap limit of the high b and Greene-Johnson stellarator models; Appendix F. General form for q(y); Appendix G. Natural boundary conditions; Appendix H. Upper and lower bounds on dQKIN.

  12. Simulations of magnetic reconnection with Parsek2D-MLMD, a new Multi Level Multi Domain (MLMD) Implicit Moment Method (IMM) Particle in Cell (PIC) code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M.; Beck, A.; Lapenta, G.; Markidis, S.

    2012-12-01

    The kinetic simulation of intrinsically multi scale processes such as magnetic reconnection events with realistic mass ratios is a daunting task for explicit Particle In Cell (PIC) codes, which require to use resolutions of the order of the electron Debye length even when simulating dramatically bigger domains. As an example, a simulation of reconnection in the magnetotail, with domain sizes of the order of 20 di x 10 di (˜ 7.2 106 m x 3.6 106 m, with di being the ion skin depth) and a resolution of λD,e= 687 m, with λD,e the electron Debye length, requires the astounding number of 10500 x 5240 cells. Higher grid spacings can be used if the simulation is performed with an implicit PIC code, which substitutes a much less strict accuracy constraint to the stability constraint of explicit PIC codes. The same reconnection problem as before can be simulated, with an implicit PIC code resolving the scale of interest of de /2 instead of the electron Debye length (de is the electron skin depth), with the much more manageable number of 1920 x 958 cells. However, an even smaller number of cells can be used if, instead of using the same, high resolution on the entire domain, the domain to simulate is divided into subdomains each resolved with a grid spacing related to the physical scale of interest in the specific subdomain. In the case of reconnection, the division which immediately springs to mind is between electron diffusion region, ion diffusion region and outer region, where resolutions respectively of the order of fractions of the electron skin depth, of the ion skin depth and bigger can be used. We present here a new Multi Level Multi Domain (MLMD) Implicit Moment Method (IMM) Particle In Cell (PIC) code, Parsek2D-MLMD, able to perform simulations of magnetic reconnection where the expensive high resolutions are used only when needed, while the rest of the domain is simulated with grid spacings chosen according to the local scales of interest. The major difference

  13. MARE2DEM: an open-source code for anisotropic inversion of controlled-source electromagnetic and magnetotelluric data using parallel adaptive 2D finite elements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, K.

    2013-12-01

    This work announces the public release of an open-source inversion code named MARE2DEM (Modeling with Adaptively Refined Elements for 2D Electromagnetics). Although initially designed for the rapid inversion of marine electromagnetic data, MARE2DEM now supports a wide variety of acquisition configurations for both offshore and onshore surveys that utilize electric and magnetic dipole transmitters or magnetotelluric plane waves. The model domain is flexibly parameterized using a grid of arbitrarily shaped polygonal regions, allowing for complicated structures such as topography or seismically imaged horizons to be easily assimilated. MARE2DEM efficiently solves the forward problem in parallel by dividing the input data parameters into smaller subsets using a parallel data decomposition algorithm. The data subsets are then solved in parallel using an automatic adaptive finite element method that iterative solves the forward problem on successively refined finite element meshes until a specified accuracy tolerance is met, thus freeing the end user from the burden of designing an accurate numerical modeling grid. Regularized non-linear inversion for isotropic or anisotropic conductivity is accomplished with a new implementation of Occam's method referred to as fast-Occam, which is able to minimize the objective function in much fewer forward evaluations than the required by the original method. This presentation will review the theoretical considerations behind MARE2DEM and use a few recent offshore EM data sets to demonstrate its capabilities and to showcase the software interface tools that streamline model building and data inversion.

  14. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  15. MHD Simulation Heliospheric Magnetic Fields and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2005-01-01

    This talk will present a summary of our results on simulations of heliospheric structure and dynamics. We use a three-dimensional MHD code in spherical coordinates to produce a solar wind containing a rotating, tilted heliospheric current sheet, fast-slow stream and microstream shear layers, waves, 2-D turbulence, and pressure balanced structures that are input to the inner (superAlfvenic) boundary. The evolution of various combinations of these has led to a deeper understanding of sector structure, magnetic holes, fluctuation anisotropies, and general turbulent evolution. We show how the sectors are likely to be connected, how spiral fields can arise, and how field line diffusion can be caused by waves with transverse structure and microstream shears.

  16. Nonlinear Alfvén wave dynamics at a 2D magnetic null point: ponderomotive force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, J. O.; McLaughlin, J. A.

    2013-07-01

    Context. In the linear, β = 0 MHD regime, the transient properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the vicinity of 2D null points are well known. The waves are decoupled and accumulate at predictable parts of the magnetic topology: fast waves accumulate at the null point; whereas Alfvén waves cannot cross the separatricies. However, in nonlinear MHD mode conversion can occur at regions of inhomogeneous Alfvén speed, suggesting that the decoupled nature of waves may not extend to the nonlinear regime. Aims: We investigate the behaviour of low-amplitude Alfvén waves about a 2D magnetic null point in nonlinear, β = 0 MHD. Methods: We numerically simulate the introduction of low-amplitude Alfvén waves into the vicinity of a magnetic null point using the nonlinear LARE2D code. Results: Unlike in the linear regime, we find that the Alfvén wave sustains cospatial daughter disturbances, manifest in the transverse and longitudinal fluid velocity, owing to the action of nonlinear magnetic pressure gradients (viz. the ponderomotive force). These disturbances are dependent on the Alfvén wave and do not interact with the medium to excite magnetoacoustic waves, although the transverse daughter becomes focused at the null point. Additionally, an independently propagating fast magnetoacoustic wave is generated during the early stages, which transports some of the initial Alfvén wave energy towards the null point. Subsequently, despite undergoing dispersion and phase-mixing due to gradients in the Alfvén-speed profile (∇cA ≠ 0) there is no further nonlinear generation of fast waves. Conclusions: We find that Alfvén waves at 2D cold null points behave largely as in the linear regime, however they sustain transverse and longitudinal disturbances - effects absent in the linear regime - due to nonlinear magnetic pressure gradients.

  17. MHD properties of magnetosheath flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Crooker, N. U.; Erickson, G. M.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.; Maynard, N. C.; Schoendorf, J. A.; Siebert, K. D.; Weimer, D. R.; White, W. W.; Wilson, G. R.

    2002-04-01

    We discuss four aspects of magnetosheath flow that require MHD for their calculation and understanding. We illustrate these aspects with computations using a numerical MHD code that simulates the global magnetosphere and its magnetosheath. The four inherently MHD aspects of magnetosheath flow that we consider are the depletion layer, the magnetospheric sash, MHD flow deflections, and the magnetosheath's slow-mode expansion into the magnetotail. We introduce new details of these aspects or illustrate known details in a new way, including the dependence of the depletion layer on interplanetary magnetic filed clock angle; agreement between the locations of the antiparallel regions of Luhmann et al. (J. Geophys. Res. 89 (1984) 1739) and the magnetospheric sash, and deflections corresponding separately to a stagnation line and magnetic reconnection.

  18. Problems in nonlinear resistive MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, A.D.; Strait, E.J.; La Haye, R.J.; Chu, M.S.; Miller, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    Two experimentally relevant problems can relatively easily be tackled by nonlinear MHD codes. Both problems require plasma rotation in addition to the nonlinear mode coupling and full geometry already incorporated into the codes, but no additional physics seems to be crucial. These problems discussed here are: (1) nonlinear coupling and interaction of multiple MHD modes near the B limit and (2) nonlinear coupling of the m/n = 1/1 sawtooth mode with higher n gongs and development of seed islands outside q = 1.

  19. MHD simple waves and the divergence wave

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-25

    In this paper we investigate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simple divergence waves in MHD, for models in which nablacentre dotBnot =0. These models are related to the eight wave Riemann solvers in numerical MHD, in which the eighth wave is the divergence wave associated with nablacentre dotBnot =0. For simple wave solutions, all physical variables (the gas density, pressure, fluid velocity, entropy, and magnetic field induction in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function phi. We consider the form of the MHD equations used by both Powell et al. and Janhunen. It is shown that the Janhunen version of the equations possesses fully nonlinear, exact simple wave solutions for the divergence wave, but no physically meaningful simple divergence wave solution exists for the Powell et al. system. We suggest that the 1D simple, divergence wave solution for the Janhunen system, may be useful for the testing and validation of numerical MHD codes.

  20. Collapse and fragmentation of magnetic molecular cloud cores with the Enzo AMR MHD code. II. Prolate and oblate cores

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2014-10-10

    We present the results of a large suite of three-dimensional models of the collapse of magnetic molecular cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.2 in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics approximation. The cloud cores are initially either prolate or oblate, centrally condensed clouds with masses of 1.73 or 2.73 M {sub ☉}, respectively. The radial density profiles are Gaussian, with central densities 20 times higher than boundary densities. A barotropic equation of state is used to represent the transition from low density isothermal phases, to high density optically thick phases. The initial magnetic field strength ranges from 6.3 to 100 μG, corresponding to clouds that are strongly to marginally supercritical, respectively, in terms of the mass to magnetic flux ratio. The magnetic field is initially uniform and aligned with the clouds' rotation axes, with initial ratios of rotational to gravitational energy ranging from 10{sup –4} to 0.1. Two significantly different outcomes for collapse result: (1) formation of single protostars with spiral arms, and (2) fragmentation into multiple protostar systems. The transition between these two outcomes depends primarily on the initial magnetic field strength, with fragmentation occurring for mass to flux ratios greater than about 14 times the critical ratio for prolate clouds. Oblate clouds typically fragment into several times more clumps than prolate clouds. Multiple, rather than binary, system formation is the general rule in either case, suggesting that binary stars are primarily the result of the orbital dissolution of multiple protostar systems.

  1. STEALTH - a Lagrange explicit finite-difference code for solid, structural, and thermohydraulic analysis. Volume 8A: STEALTH/WHAMSE - a 2-D fluid-structure interaction code. Computer code manual

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.B.

    1984-10-01

    STEALTH is a family of computer codes that can be used to calculate a variety of physical processes in which the dynamic behavior of a continuum is involved. The version of STEALTH described in this volume is designed for calculations of fluid-structure interaction. This version of the program consists of a hydrodynamic version of STEALTH which has been coupled to a finite-element code, WHAMSE. STEALTH computes the transient response of the fluid continuum, while WHAMSE computes the transient response of shell and beam structures under external fluid loadings. The coupling between STEALTH and WHAMSE is performed during each cycle or step of a calculation. Separate calculations of fluid response and structural response are avoided, thereby giving a more accurate model of the dynamic coupling between fluid and structure. This volume provides the theoretical background, the finite-difference equations, the finite-element equations, a discussion of several sample problems, a listing of the input decks for the sample problems, a programmer's manual and a description of the input records for the STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program.

  2. The use of FLO2D numerical code in lahar hazard evaluation at Popocatépetl volcano: a 2001-lahar scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2014-07-01

    Lahar modelling represents an excellent tool to design hazard maps. It allows the definition of potential inundation zones for different lahar magnitude scenarios and sediment concentrations. Here we present the results obtained for the 2001 syneruptive lahar at Popocatépetl volcano, based on simulations performed with FLO2D software. An accurate delineation of this event is needed since it is one of the possible scenarios considered during a volcanic crisis. One of the main issues for lahar simulation using FLO2D is the calibration of the input hydrograph and rheologic flow properties. Here we verified that geophone data can be properly calibrated by means of peak discharge calculations obtained by superelevation method. Simulation results clearly show the influence of concentration and rheologic properties on lahar depth and distribution. Modifying rheologic properties during lahar simulation strongly affect lahar distribution. More viscous lahars have a more restricted aerial distribution, thicker depths, and resulting velocities are noticeable smaller. FLO2D proved to be a very successful tool to delimitate lahar inundation zones as well as to generate different lahar scenarios not only related to lahar volume or magnitude but also to take into account different sediment concentrations and rheologies widely documented to influence lahar prone areas.

  3. The use of FLO2D numerical code in lahar hazard evaluation at Popocatépetl volcano: a 2001 lahar scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2014-12-01

    Lahar modeling represents an excellent tool for designing hazard maps. It allows the definition of potential inundation zones for different lahar magnitude scenarios and sediment concentrations. Here, we present the results obtained for the 2001 syneruptive lahar at Popocatépetl volcano, based on simulations performed with FLO2D software. An accurate delineation of this event is needed, since it is one of the possible scenarios considered if magmatic activity increases its magnitude. One of the main issues for lahar simulation using FLO2D is the calibration of the input hydrograph and rheological flow properties. Here, we verified that geophone data can be properly calibrated by means of peak discharge calculations obtained by the superelevation method. Digital elevation model resolution also resulted as an important factor in defining the reliability of the simulated flows. Simulation results clearly show the influence of sediment concentrations and rheological properties on lahar depth and distribution. Modifying rheological properties during lahar simulation strongly affects lahar distribution. More viscous lahars have a more restricted aerial distribution and thicker depths, and resulting velocities are noticeably smaller. FLO2D proved to be a very successful tool for delimitating lahar inundation zones as well as generating different lahar scenarios not only related to lahar volume or magnitude, but also taking into account different sediment concentrations and rheologies widely documented as influencing lahar-prone areas.

  4. FLIP MHD - A particle-in-cell method for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, J. U.

    1991-01-01

    The fluid-implicit-particle, or 'FLIP' method presently extended to 2D and 3D MHD flow incorporates a Lagrangian field representation and yields a grid magnetic Reynolds number of up to 16 while preserving contact continuities that retain the Galilean invariance of the MHD flow equations. Analytical arguments and numerical examples demonstrate the conservation of mass, momentum, magnetic flux, and energy; 2D calculation results for the illustrative cases of contact discontinuity convection, Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flow.

  5. Ruggedness of 2D code printed on grain tracers for implementing a prospective grain traceability system to the bulk grain delivery system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food-grade tracers were printed with two-dimensional Data Matrix (DM) barcode so that they could carry simulated identifying information about grain as part of a prospective traceability system. The key factor in evaluating the tracers was their ability to be read with a code scanner after being rem...

  6. Scaling in the 2D SU(3) × SU(3) spin model as a test of a new coding method for SU(3) matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunk, B.; Sommer, R.

    1985-02-01

    We present a Monte Carlo measurement of the magnetic susceptibility in the SU(3) × SU(3) spin model in two dimensions. Asymptotic scaling is verified on a 20 × 20 lattice. This laboratory is then used to test a new method for coding SU(3) variables in one (60 bit)- word of computer memory. In this approach, real numbers are truncated to fit into a 5-bit representation.

  7. Adapting hierarchical bidirectional inter prediction on a GPU-based platform for 2D and 3D H.264 video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Rafael; Martínez, José Luis; Cock, Jan De; Fernández-Escribano, Gerardo; Pieters, Bart; Sánchez, José L.; Claver, José M.; de Walle, Rik Van

    2013-12-01

    The H.264/AVC video coding standard introduces some improved tools in order to increase compression efficiency. Moreover, the multi-view extension of H.264/AVC, called H.264/MVC, adopts many of them. Among the new features, variable block-size motion estimation is one which contributes to high coding efficiency. Furthermore, it defines a different prediction structure that includes hierarchical bidirectional pictures, outperforming traditional Group of Pictures patterns in both scenarios: single-view and multi-view. However, these video coding techniques have high computational complexity. Several techniques have been proposed in the literature over the last few years which are aimed at accelerating the inter prediction process, but there are no works focusing on bidirectional prediction or hierarchical prediction. In this article, with the emergence of many-core processors or accelerators, a step forward is taken towards an implementation of an H.264/AVC and H.264/MVC inter prediction algorithm on a graphics processing unit. The results show a negligible rate distortion drop with a time reduction of up to 98% for the complete H.264/AVC encoder.

  8. 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of SATURN imploding Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, J.H.; Eddleman, J.L.; Springer, P.T.

    1995-11-06

    Z-pinch implosions driven by the SATURN device at Sandia National Laboratory are modeled with a 2D radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, showing strong growth of magneto-Rayleigh Taylor (MRT) instability. Modeling of the linear and nonlinear development of MRT modes predicts growth of bubble-spike structures that increase the time span of stagnation and the resulting x-ray pulse width. Radiation is important in the pinch dynamics keeping the sheath relatively cool during the run-in and releasing most of the stagnation energy. The calculations give x-ray pulse widths and magnitudes in reasonable agreement with experiments, but predict a radiating region that is too dense and radially localized at stagnation. We also consider peaked initial density profiles with constant imploding sheath velocity that should reduce MRT instability and improve performance. 2D krypton simulations show an output x-ray power > 80 TW for the peaked profile.

  9. MHD Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R F; Fasoli, A; Testa, D; Sharapov, S; Berk, H L; Breizman, B; Gondhalekar, A; Mantsinen, M

    2004-03-23

    Experiments are conducted on the JET tokamak to assess the diagnostic potential of MHD active and passive spectroscopy, for the plasma bulk and its suprathermal components, using Alfv{acute e}n Eigenmodes (AEs) excited by external antennas and by energetic particles. The measurements of AE frequencies and mode numbers give information on the bulk plasma. Improved equilibrium reconstruction, in particular in terms of radial profiles of density and safety factor, is possible from the comparison between the antenna driven spectrum and that calculated theoretically. Details of the time evolution of the non-monotonic safety factor profile in advanced scenarios can be reconstructed from the frequency of ICRH-driven energetic particle modes. The plasma effective mass can be inferred from the resonant frequency of externally driven AEs in discharges with similar equilibrium profiles. The stability thresholds and the nonlinear development of the instabilities can give clues on energy and spatial distribution of the fast particle population. The presence of unstable AEs provides lower limits in the energy of ICRH generated fast ion tails. Fast ion pressure gradients and their evolution can be inferred from the stability of AEs at different plasma radial positions. Finally, the details of the AE spectrum in the nonlinear stage can be used to obtain information about the fast particle velocity space diffusion.

  10. A 2D model to design MHD induction pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, R.; Zeininger, J.

    2006-09-01

    Technical liquid metal systems accompanied by a thermal transfer of energy such as reactor systems, metallurgical processes, metal refinement, casting, etc., require a forced convection of the fluid. The increased temperatures and more often the environmental conditions as, e.g., in a nuclear environment, pumping principles are required, in which rotating parts are absent. Additionally, in many applications a controlled atmosphere is indispensable, in order to ensure the structural integrity of the duct walls. An interesting option to overcome the sealing problem of a mechanical pump towards the surrounding is offered by induction systems. Although their efficiency compared to that of turbo machines is quite low, they have several advantages, which are attractive to the specific requirements in liquid metal applications such as: - low maintenance costs due to the absence of sealings, bearings and moving parts; - low degradation rate of the structural material; - simple replacement of the inductor without cut of the piping system; - fine regulation of flow rate by different inductor connections; - change of pump characteristics without change of the mechanical set-up. Within the article, general design requirements of electromagnetic pumps (EMP) are elaborated. The design of two annular linear induction pumps operating with sodium and lead-bismuth are presented and the calculated pump characteristics and experimentally obtained data are compared. In this context, physical effects leading to deviations between the model and the real data are addressed. Finally, the main results are summarized. Tables 4, Figs 4, Refs 12.

  11. Applications of the computer codes FLUX2D and PHI3D for the electromagnetic analysis of compressed magnetic field generators and power flow channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgdon, M.L.; Oona, H.; Martinez, A.R.; Salon, S.; Wendling, P.; Krahenbuhl, L.; Nicolas, A.; Nicolas, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present herein the results of three electromagnetic field problems for compressed magnetic field generators and their associated power flow channels. The first problem is the computation of the transient magnetic field in a two-dimensional model of helical generator during loading. The second problem is the three-dimensional eddy current patterns in a section of an armature beneath a bifurcation point of a helical winding. Our third problem is the calculation of the three-dimensional electrostatic fields in a region known as the post-hole convolute in which a rod connects the inner and outer walls of a system of three concentric cylinders through a hole in the middle cylinder. While analytic solutions exist for many electromagnetic field problems in cases of special and ideal geometries, the solutions of these and similar problems for the proper analysis and design of compressed magnetic field generators and their related hardware require computer simulations. In earlier studies, computer models have been proposed, several based on research oriented hydrocodes to which uncoupled or partially coupled Maxwell's equations solvers are added. Although the hydrocode models address the problem of moving, deformable conductors, they are not useful for electromagnetic analysis, nor can they be considered design tools. For our studies, we take advantage of the commercial, electromagnetic computer-aided design software packages FLUX2D nd PHI3D that were developed for motor manufacturers and utilities industries. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  12. MHD Power Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Arthur; Rosa, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the operation of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator and advantages of the system over coal, oil or nuclear powered generators. Details the development of MHD generators in the United States and Soviet Union. (CP)

  13. The Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) : LST, Linear and Nonlinear PSE for 2-D, Axisymmetric, and Infinite Swept Wing Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2003-01-01

    During the past two decades, our understanding of laminar-turbulent transition flow physics has advanced significantly owing to, in a large part, the NASA program support such as the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), High-speed Civil Transport (HSCT), and Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST). Experimental, theoretical, as well as computational efforts on various issues such as receptivity and linear and nonlinear evolution of instability waves take part in broadening our knowledge base for this intricate flow phenomenon. Despite all these advances, transition prediction remains a nontrivial task for engineers due to the lack of a widely available, robust, and efficient prediction tool. The design and development of the LASTRAC code is aimed at providing one such engineering tool that is easy to use and yet capable of dealing with a broad range of transition related issues. LASTRAC was written from scratch based on the state-of-the-art numerical methods for stability analysis and modem software technologies. At low fidelity, it allows users to perform linear stability analysis and N-factor transition correlation for a broad range of flow regimes and configurations by using either the linear stability theory (LST) or linear parabolized stability equations (LPSE) method. At high fidelity, users may use nonlinear PSE to track finite-amplitude disturbances until the skin friction rise. Coupled with the built-in receptivity model that is currently under development, the nonlinear PSE method offers a synergistic approach to predict transition onset for a given disturbance environment based on first principles. This paper describes the governing equations, numerical methods, code development, and case studies for the current release of LASTRAC. Practical applications of LASTRAC are demonstrated for linear stability calculations, N-factor transition correlation, non-linear breakdown simulations, and controls of stationary crossflow instability in supersonic swept wing boundary

  14. Broken Ergodicity in MHD Turbulence in a Spherical Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.; wang, Yifan

    2011-01-01

    Broken ergodicity (BE) occurs in Fourier method numerical simulations of ideal, homogeneous, incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Although naive statistical theory predicts that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic field are zero-mean random variables, numerical simulations clearly show that low-wave-number coefficients have non-zero mean values that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. In other words, large-scale coherent structure (i.e., broken ergodicity) in homogeneous MHD turbulence can spontaneously grow out of random initial conditions. Eigenanalysis of the modal covariance matrices in the probability density functions of ideal statistical theory leads to a theoretical explanation of observed BE in homogeneous MHD turbulence. Since dissipation is minimal at the largest scales, BE is also relevant for resistive magnetofluids, as evidenced in numerical simulations. Here, we move beyond model magnetofluids confined by periodic boxes to examine BE in rotating magnetofluids in spherical domains using spherical harmonic expansions along with suitable boundary conditions. We present theoretical results for 3-D and 2-D spherical models and also present computational results from dynamical simulations of 2-D MHD turbulence on a rotating spherical surface. MHD turbulence on a 2-D sphere is affected by Coriolus forces, while MHD turbulence on a 2-D plane is not, so that 2-D spherical models are a useful (and simpler) intermediate stage on the path to understanding the much more complex 3-D spherical case.

  15. Exact Magnetic Diffusion Solutions for Magnetohydrodynamic Code Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D S

    2010-12-03

    In this paper, the authors present several new exact analytic space and time dependent solutions to the problem of magnetic diffusion in R-Z geometry. These problems serve to verify several different elements of an MHD implementation: magnetic diffusion, external circuit time integration, current and voltage energy sources, spatially dependent conductivities, and ohmic heating. The exact solutions are shown in comparison with 2D simulation results from the Ares code.

  16. 2-D Imaging of Electron Temperature in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    T. Munsat; E. Mazzucato; H. Park; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-07-08

    By taking advantage of recent developments in millimeter wave imaging technology, an Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) instrument, capable of simultaneously measuring 128 channels of localized electron temperature over a 2-D map in the poloidal plane, has been developed for the TEXTOR tokamak. Data from the new instrument, detailing the MHD activity associated with a sawtooth crash, is presented.

  17. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing–Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing–Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  18. Mesh2d

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Flach, Frank Smith

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assigns an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.

  19. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  20. MHD Modeling in Complex 3D Geometries: Towards Predictive Simulation of SIHI Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Christopher James

    The HIT-SI experiment studies Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI) for the purpose of forming and sustaining a spheromak plasma. A spheromak is formed in a nearly axisymmetric flux conserver, with a bow tie cross section, by means of two semi-toroidal injectors. The plasma-facing surfaces of the device, which are made of copper for its low resistivity, are covered in an insulating coating in order to operate in a purely inductive manner. Following formation, the spheromak flux and current are increased during a quiescent period marked by a decrease in the global mode activity. A proposed mechanism, Imposed Dynamo Current Drive (IDCD), is expected to be responsible for this phase of quiescent current drive. Due to the geometric complexity of the experiment, previous numerical modeling efforts have used a simplified geometry that excludes the injector volumes from the simulated domain. The effect of helicity injection is then modeled by boundary conditions on this reduced plasma volume. The work presented here has explored and developed more complete computational models of the HIT-SI device. This work is separated into 3 distinct but complementary areas: 1) Development of a 3D MHD equilibrium code that can incorporate the non-axisymmetric injector fields present in HIT-SI and investigation of equilibria of interest during spheromak sustainment. 2) A 2D axisymmetric MHD equilibrium code that was used to explore reduced order models for mean-field evolution using equations derived from IDCD theory including coupling to 3D equilibria. 3) A 3D time-dependent non-linear MHD code that is capable of modeling the entire plasma volume including dynamics within the injectors. Although HIT-SI was the motivation for, and experiment studied in this research, the tools and methods developed are general --- allowing their application to a broad range of magnetic confinement experiments. These tools constitute a significant advance for modeling plasma dynamics in devices with

  1. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  2. The First Generation NIMROD Production Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovinec, C. R.

    1997-11-01

    The NIMROD code (Non-Ideal, MHD with Rotation, an Open Discussion project) is a numerical tool for studying nonlinear three-dimensional, low-frequency plasma behavior. It has been written with modular Fortran 90 programming to maximize geometric and mathematical flexibility. The spatial representation consists of 2D finite elements for the poloidal plane and Fourier series for the perpendicular direction, which is assumed to be periodic (either toroidal or linear). The plane of finite elements is decomposed into an unstructured collection of blocks, where each contains either structured quadrilateral elements (for efficiency) or unstructured triangular elements (for geometric flexibility). The block decomposition also permits computing on parallel machines with message-passing architecture. The present implementation is a time-split, semi-implicit algorithm based on generalized single-fluid equations that are analytically equivalent to a two-fluid system. Neoclassical effects in tokamaks are computed with an analytic form of the parallel viscous stress for the Braginskii and plateau regimes.(S. P. Hirschman and D. J. Sigmar, Nucl. Fusion 9, 1079 (1981).) The code has been validated on MHD instabilities in addition to MHD and whistler waves. Nonlinear benchmarking includes comparison of mode saturation for tokamak and reversed-field pinch (RFP) safety factor profiles.

  3. Dynamo theory and liquid metal MHD experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lielausis, O.

    1994-06-01

    High values of magnetic Reynolds number Rm are characteristic not only to astrophysics, but also to other interesting objects, including liquid metal (LM) flows. LM experiments have been performed illustrating important predictions of the dynamo theory, for example, about the existence and features of the alpha effect. Consideration of so called 'laminar' dynamos provides a theoretical base for direct experimental realization and examination of the dynamo process. First step results, gathered a subcritical conditions, confirm the statement that self-excitation in LM experiments can be achieved practically today. In such devices as LM (sodium) cooled fast breeders Rm can reach values of up to 50 and specific MHD phenomena have been observed in operating fast reactors. Cautions against crisis like processes have been expressed. It is important for the dynamo theory to understand what kind of perturbed motion is able to coexist with the generated magnetic field. Fundamentally new ideas here are issuing from the theory of 2D MHD turbulence. LM MHD served for the first direct proves, confirming, that the predicted surprising features of 2D turbulence can be observed in reality. It is worth incorporating these already not new ideas in the dynamo theory. In such a way a field for new solutions could be established.

  4. Multiphysics/Multiscale Coupling of Microturbulence and MHD Equiliria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. W.; Startsev, E. A.; Hudson, S. R.; Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.

    2015-11-01

    We propose to investigate the multiphysics and multiscale coupling between a time-dependent gyrokinetic ``microscopic'' code for studying gyroradius-scale turbulence, associated with global ion-acoustic and shear-Alfven waves, and a ``macroscopic'' code for computing large-scale global equilibria based on the time-independent MHD equations, in order to identify a family of self-consistent global MHD equilibria that can minimize the electrostatic potentials responsible for turbulent transport by passing global parameters between the two codes. The codes involved are 1) the electromagnetic version of the GTS code for studying microturbulence, and 2) the SPEC code for calculating three-dimensional MHD equilibria with or without chaotic fields. This concept is based on a newly found correlation between the gyrokinetic evolution and the MHD equilibrium when the electrostatic potential vanishes. The proposed work involves the scales ranging from the electron skin depth to the machine size, and includes the physics of both gyrokinetics and MHD. This work is supported by US DoE # DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  6. Identification of standing MHD modes in MHD simulations of planetary magnetospheres. Application to Mercury.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griton, Léa; Pantellini, Filippo; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    We present 3D simulations of the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury's magnetosphere using the magnetohydrodynamic code AMRVAC. A procedure for the identification of standing MHD modes has been applied to these simulations showing that large scale standing slow mode structures may exist in Mercury's magnetosheath. The identification is mostly based on relatively simple approximate analytical solutions to the old problem of determining the family of all standing linear plane MHD waves in a flowing plasma. The question of the identification of standing slow mode structures using in situ measurements such as the future BepiColombo MMO mission to Mercury will be discussed as well.

  7. Analytical investigation of critical MHD phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Development and analysis of schemes for suppression of the startup overvoltage transient in the AEDC High Performance Demonstration Experiment (HPDE), analysis of performance enhancement due to electrode voltage drop reduction by use of pyrolytic graphites in the HPDE, prediction of optimal loading schemes for the HPDE, prediction of PHDE performance with a diagonal electrical connection, and predictions of the likelihood and effects of axial current leakage between adjacent electrodes in the HPDE are reviewed. Simulations of tests at the AEDC/HPDE with STD Research Corporation multidimensional and time dependent computer codes provided additional validation for the computer codes and shed light on physical mechanisms which govern performance and durability of MHD power generators. The magnetoaerothermal effect was predicted by STD Research Corporation to have a significant effect on the HPDE/MHD generator performance at high interaction.

  8. Survey of MHD plant applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, J. J.; Seikel, G. R.; Cutting, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Open-cycle MHD is one of the major R&D efforts in the Department of Energy's program to meet the national goal of reducing U.S. dependence on oil through increased utilization of coal. MHD offers an effective way to use coal to produce electric power at low cost in a highly efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. Open-cycle MHD plants are categorized by the MHD combustor oxidizer, its temperature and the method of preheat. The paper discusses MHD baseline plant design, open-cycle MHD plant in the Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), early commercial MHD plants, conceptual studies of the engineering test facility, retrofit (addition of an MHD topping cycle to an existing steam plant), and other potential applications and concepts. Emphasis is placed on a survey of both completed and ongoing studies to define both commercial and pilot plant design, cost, and performance.

  9. NUBOW-2D Inelastic

    2002-01-31

    This program solves the two-dimensional mechanical equilbrium configuration of a core restraint system, which is subjected to radial temperature and flux gradients, on a time increment basis. At each time increment, the code calculates the irradiation creep and swelling strains for each duct from user-specified creep and swelling correlations. Using the calculated thermal bowing, inelastic bowing and the duct dilation, the corresponding equilibrium forces, beam deflections, total beam displacements, and structural reactivity changes are calculated.

  10. Extended MHD Simulations of Spheromaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2012-10-01

    Nonlinear extended MHD simulations of a spheromak in a cylindrical flux conserver are performed using the NIMROD code (JCP 195, 2004). An idealized series of simulations starting from a Grad-Shafranov equilibrium and small non-axisymmetric perturbations are performed to model the sustained decay phase. The resulting confinement leads to steep resistivity gradients. Strong current gradients develop, driving tearing modes that dominate the evolution of the spheromak. Absent in these simulations are the remains of n=1 fluctuations created during the formation process. A second series of simulations start from vacuum fields and model the full spheromak evolution, including the formation process where the n=1 fluctuations dominate. To understand the role of pressure driven instabilities in the evolution of the spheromak, a numerical diagnostic is developed to calculate the Mercier stability criterion from the axisymmetric fields.

  11. Cosmological AMR MHD with Enzo

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hao; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we present EnzoMHD, the extension of the cosmological code Enzoto include magnetic fields. We use the hyperbolic solver of Li et al. (2008) for the computation of interface fluxes. We use constrained transport methods of Balsara & Spicer (1999) and Gardiner & Stone (2005) to advance the induction equation, the reconstruction technique of Balsara (2001) to extend the Adaptive Mesh Refinement of Berger & Colella (1989) already used in Enzo, though formulated in a slightly different way for ease of implementation. This combination of methods preserves the divergence of the magnetic field to machine precision. We use operator splitting to include gravity and cosmological expansion. We then present a series of cosmological and non cosmologjcal tests problems to demonstrate the quality of solution resulting from this combination of solvers.

  12. Extended-MHD modeling of diamagnetic-drift tearing instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jacob; Kruger, Scott

    2012-03-01

    We use analytics and computations with the NIMROD code to examine tearing stability in large-guide-field slab cases with a nonzero equilibrium pressure gradient. A well known result from drift-reduced MHD is the diamagnetic drift associated with the pressure gradient has a stabilizing influence were the dispersion relation becomes (γ+iφ*e)^3γ(γ+iφ*i)=γrMHD^5 [1]. Here φ*i and φ*e are the ion- and electron-diamagnetic frequencies and γrMHD is the tearing growth rate with a resistive-MHD model. Preliminary computational results with an unreduced extended-MHD model do not produce the expected drift-reduced result. For moderate values of φ*i (φ*i<=3γrMHD), the computations follow the dispersion relation that would result if the ∇pe term were not included in the drift-reduced parallel Ohm's law: (γ+iφ*e)^4(γ+iφ*i)=γrMHD^5. Analytics, guided by computational diagnostics, are used to examine the significant terms in the flux evolution equation and investigate the discrepancy with the drift-reduced result.[4pt] [1] For example Coppi, PoF 7, 1501 (1964); Biskamp, NF 18, 1059 (1978).

  13. Generalized reduced MHD equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.; Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.

    1998-07-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general toroidal configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson.

  14. MHD Generating system

    DOEpatents

    Petrick, Michael; Pierson, Edward S.; Schreiner, Felix

    1980-01-01

    According to the present invention, coal combustion gas is the primary working fluid and copper or a copper alloy is the electrodynamic fluid in the MHD generator, thereby eliminating the heat exchangers between the combustor and the liquid-metal MHD working fluids, allowing the use of a conventional coalfired steam bottoming plant, and making the plant simpler, more efficient and cheaper. In operation, the gas and liquid are combined in a mixer and the resulting two-phase mixture enters the MHD generator. The MHD generator acts as a turbine and electric generator in one unit wherein the gas expands, drives the liquid across the magnetic field and thus generates electrical power. The gas and liquid are separated, and the available energy in the gas is recovered before the gas is exhausted to the atmosphere. Where the combustion gas contains sulfur, oxygen is bubbled through a side loop to remove sulfur therefrom as a concentrated stream of sulfur dioxide. The combustor is operated substoichiometrically to control the oxide level in the copper.

  15. Disk MHD generator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Retallick, F. D.

    1980-01-01

    Directly-fired, separately-fired, and oxygen-augmented MHD power plants incorporating a disk geometry for the MHD generator were studied. The base parameters defined for four near-optimum-performance MHD steam power systems of various types are presented. The finally selected systems consisted of (1) two directly fired cases, one at 1920 K (2996F) preheat and the other at 1650 K (2500 F) preheat, (2) a separately-fired case where the air is preheated to the same level as the higher temperature directly-fired cases, and (3) an oxygen augmented case with the same generator inlet temperature of 2839 (4650F) as the high temperature directly-fired and separately-fired cases. Supersonic Mach numbers at the generator inlet, gas inlet swirl, and constant Hall field operation were specified based on disk generator optimization. System pressures were based on optimization of MHD net power. Supercritical reheat stream plants were used in all cases. Open and closed cycle component costs are summarized and compared.

  16. Solar Wind Prediction at Pluto During the New Horizons Flyby: Results From a Two-Dimensional Multi-fluid MHD Model of the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, B.; Toth, G.; Opher, M.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-12-01

    We adapted the outer heliosphere (OH) component of the Space Weather Modeling Framework, which is a 3-D global multi-fluid MHD model of the outer heliosphere with one ion fluid and four neutral populations, for time-dependent 2-D multi-fluid MHD simulations of solar wind propagation from a heliocentric distance of 1 AU up to 50 AU. We used this model to predict the solar wind plasma parameters as well as the interplanetary magnetic field components at Pluto and along the New Horizons trajectory during the whole calendar year of 2015 including the closest approach on July 14. The simulation is run in the solar equatorial plane in the heliographic inertial frame (HGI). The inner boundary conditions along a circle of 1 AU radius are set by near-Earth solar wind observations (hourly OMNI data), assuming that the global solar wind distribution does not change much during a Carrington rotation (27.2753 days). Our 2-D multi-fluid MHD code evolves one ion fluid and two neutral fluids, which are the primary interstellar neutral atoms and the interstellar neutral atoms deflected in the outer heliosheath between the slow bow shock and the heliopause. Spherical expansion effects are properly taken into account for the ions and the solar magnetic field. The inflow parameters of the two neutral fluids (density, temperature, and velocity components) are set at the negative X (HGI) boundary at 50 AU distance, which are taken from previous 3-D global multi-fluid MHD simulations of the heliospheric interface in a much larger simulation box (1500x1500x1500 AU). The inflow velocity vectors of the two neutral fluids define the so-called hydrogen deflection plane. The solar wind ions and the interstellar neutrals interact through charge exchange source terms included in the multi-fluid MHD equations, so the two neutral populations are evolved self-consistently. We validate our model with the available plasma data from New Horizons as well as with Voyager 2 plasma and magnetic field

  17. Three Dimensional Simulations of Compressible Hall MHD Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-15

    We have developed three dimensional, time dependent, compressible, non-adiabatic, driven and massively parallelized Hall magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate turbulent spectral cascades in a regime where characteristic lengthscales associated with plasma fluctuations are smaller than ion gyro radii. Such regime is ubiquitously present in solar wind and many other collisionless space plasmas. Particularly in the solar wind, the high time resolution databases identify a spectral break at the end of MHD inertial range spectrum that corresponds to a high frequency regime. In the regime, turbulent cascades cannot be explained by the usual MHD models. With the help of our 3D Hall MHD code, we find that characteristic turbulent interactions in the high frequency regime evolve typically on kinetic Alfven time scales. The turbulent fluctuation associated with kinetic Alfven interactions are compressive and anisotropic and possess equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energies.

  18. High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Eustis, R. H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S. A.; Koester, J. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1981-07-01

    Progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields is described. The areas of research include nonuniformity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the study of the effects of nonuniformities, experiments were performed to test a multi-channel, fiber optics diagnostic system that yields time-resolved temperature profiles in an MHD chanel. For the study of magneto-acoustic fluctuation phenomena, a one dimensional model was developed to describe the performance of a non-ideal MHD generator with a generalized electrical configuration. A two dimensional MHD computer code was developed which predicts the dependence on electrode and insulator dimensions of the onset of interelectrode Hall field breakdown, as initiated either by breakdown in the insulator or in the plasma.

  19. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  20. An advanced implicit solver for MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udrea, Bogdan

    A new implicit algorithm has been developed for the solution of the time-dependent, viscous and resistive single fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The algorithm is based on an approximate Riemann solver for the hyperbolic fluxes and central differencing applied on a staggered grid for the parabolic fluxes. The algorithm employs a locally aligned coordinate system that allows the solution to the Riemann problems to be solved in a natural direction, normal to cell interfaces. The result is an original scheme that is robust and reduces the complexity of the flux formulas. The evaluation of the parabolic fluxes is also implemented using a locally aligned coordinate system, this time on the staggered grid. The implicit formulation employed by WARP3 is a two level scheme that was applied for the first time to the single fluid MHD model. The flux Jacobians that appear in the implicit scheme are evaluated numerically. The linear system that results from the implicit discretization is solved using a robust symmetric Gauss-Seidel method. The code has an explicit mode capability so that implementation and test of new algorithms or new physics can be performed in this simpler mode. Last but not least the code was designed and written to run on parallel computers so that complex, high resolution runs can be per formed in hours rather than days. The code has been benchmarked against analytical and experimental gas dynamics and MHD results. The benchmarks consisted of one-dimensional Riemann problems and diffusion dominated problems, two-dimensional supersonic flow over a wedge, axisymmetric magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster simulation and three-dimensional supersonic flow over intersecting wedges and spheromak stability simulation. The code has been proven to be robust and the results of the simulations showed excellent agreement with analytical and experimental results. Parallel performance studies showed that the code performs as expected when run on parallel

  1. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  2. TACO (2D AND 3D). Taco

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1983-03-01

    A set of finite element codes for the solution of nonlinear, two-dimensional (TACO2D) and three-dimensional (TACO3D) heat transfer problems. Performs linear and nonlinear analyses of both transient and steady state heat transfer problems. Has the capability to handle time or temperature dependent material properties. Materials may be either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, radiation, and internal heat generation.

  3. Hyperbolic Divergence Cleaning for the MHD Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedner, A.; Kemm, F.; Kröner, D.; Munz, C.-D.; Schnitzer, T.; Wesenberg, M.

    2002-01-01

    In simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes the violation of the divergence constraint causes severe stability problems. In this paper we develop and test a new approach to the stabilization of numerical schemes. Our technique can be easily implemented in any existing code since there is no need to modify the solver for the MHD equations. It is based on a modified system in which the divergence constraint is coupled with the conservation laws by introducing a generalized Lagrange multiplier. We suggest a formulation in which the divergence errors are transported to the domain boundaries with the maximal admissible speed and are damped at the same time. This corrected system is hyperbolic and the density, momentum, magnetic induction, and total energy density are still conserved. In comparison to results obtained without correction or with the standard “divergence source terms,” our approach seems to yield more robust schemes with significantly smaller divergence errors.

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on nonlinear MHD and extended MHD

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Nonlinear MHD simulations have proven their value in interpreting experimental results over the years. As magnetic fusion experiments reach higher performance regimes, more sophisticated experimental diagnostics coupled with ever expanding computer capabilities have increased both the need for and the feasibility of nonlinear global simulations using models more realistic than regular ideal and resistive MHD. Such extended-MHD nonlinear simulations have already begun to produce useful results. These studies are expected to lead to ever more comprehensive simulation models in the future and to play a vital role in fully understanding fusion plasmas. Topics include the following: (1) current state of nonlinear MHD and extended-MHD simulations; (2) comparisons to experimental data; (3) discussions between experimentalists and theorists; (4) /equations for extended-MHD models, kinetic-based closures; and (5) paths toward more comprehensive simulation models, etc. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Inversion methods for the measurements of MHD-like density fluctuations by Heavy Ion Beam Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaquias, A.; Henriques, R. B.; Nedzelsky, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    We report here on the recent developments in the deconvolution of the path integral effects for the study of MHD pressure-like fluctuations measured by Heavy Ion Beam Diagnostic. In particular, we develop improved methods to account for and remove the path integral effect on the determination of the ionization generation factors, including the double ionization of the primary beam. We test the method using the HIBD simulation code which computes the real beam trajectories and attenuations due to electron impact ionization for any selected synthetic profiles of plasma current, plasma potential, electron temperature and density. Simulations have shown the numerical method to be highly effective in ISTTOK within an overall accuracy of a few percent (< 3%). The method here presented can effectively reduce the path integral effects and may serve as the basis to develop improved retrieving techniques for plasma devices working even in higher density ranges. The method is applied to retrieve the time evolution and spatial structure of m=1 and m=2 modes. The 2D MHD mode-like structure is reconstructed by means of a spatial projection of all 1D measurements obtained during one full rotation of the mode. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  6. A pressure-based high resolution numerical method for resistive MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xisto, Carlos M.; Páscoa, José C.; Oliveira, Paulo J.

    2014-10-01

    In the paper we describe in detail a numerical method for the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations involving viscous flow and report the results of application to a number of typical MHD test cases. The method is of the finite volume type but mixes aspects of pressure-correction and density based solvers; the algorithm arrangement is patterned on the well-known PISO algorithm, which is a pressure method, while the flux computation makes use of the AUSM-MHD scheme, which originates from density based methods. Five groups of test cases are addressed to verify and validate the method. We start with two resistive MHD cases, namely the Shercliff and Hunt flow problems, which are intended to validate the method for low-speed resistive MHD flows. The remaining three test cases, namely the cloud-shock interaction, the MHD rotor and the MHD blast wave, are standard 2D ideal MHD problems that serve to validate the method under high-speed flow and complex interaction of MHD shocks. Finally, we demonstrate the method with a more complex application problem, and discuss results of simulation for a quasi-bi-dimensional self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster, for which we study the effect of cathode length upon the electromagnetic nozzle performance.

  7. Simulating solar MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüssler, M.

    1999-05-01

    Two aspects of solar MHD are discussed in relation to the work of the MHD simulation group at KIS. Photospheric magneto-convection, the nonlinear interaction of magnetic field and convection in a strongly stratified, radiating fluid, is a key process of general astrophysical relevance. Comprehensive numerical simulations including radiative transfer have significantly improved our understanding of the processes and have become an important tool for the interpretation of observational data. Examples of field intensification in the solar photosphere ('convective collapse') are shown. The second line of research is concerned with the dynamics of flux tubes in the convection zone, which has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the solar dynamo. Simulations indicate that the field strength in the region where the flux is stored before erupting to form sunspot groups is of the order of 105 G, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on equipartition with the kinetic energy of convective flows.

  8. Reduced Extended MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, P. J.; Abdelhamid, H. M.; Grasso, D.; Hazeltine, R. D.; Lingam, M.; Tassi, E.

    2015-11-01

    Over the years various reduced fluid models have been obtained for modeling plasmas, with the goal of capturing important physics while maintaining computability. Such models have included the physics contained in various generalizations of Ohm's law, including Hall drift and electron inertia. In a recent publication it was shown that full 3D extended MHD is a Hamiltonian system by finding its noncanonical Poisson bracket. Subsequently, this bracket was shown to be derivable from that for Hall MHD by a series of remarkable transformations, which greatly simplifies the proof of the Jacobi identity and allows one to immediately obtain generalizations of the helicity and cross helicity. In this poster we use this structure to obtain exact reduced fluid models with the effects of full two-fluid theory. Results of numerical computations of collisionless reconnection using an exact reduced 4-field model will be presented and analytical comparisons of mode structure of previous reduced models will be made.

  9. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  10. Outline of fast analyzer for MHD equilibrium FAME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Shinya; Haginoya, Hirofumi; Tsuruoka, Takuya; Aoyagi, Tetsuo; Saito, Naoyuki; Harada, Hiroo; Tani, Keiji; Watanabe, Hideto

    1994-02-01

    The FAME (Fast Analyzer for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Equilibrium) system has been developed in order to provide more than 100 MHD equilibria in time series which are enough for the non-stationary analysis of the experimental data of JT-60 within about 20 minutes shot interval. The FAME is an MIMD type small scale parallel computer with 20 microprocessors which are connected by a multi-stage switching system. The maximum theoretical speed is 250 MFLOPS. For the software system of FAME, MHD equilibrium analysis code SELENE and its input data production code FBI are tuned up taking the parallel processing into consideration. Consequently, the computational performance of the FAME system becomes more than 7 times faster than the existing general purpose computer FACOM M780-10s. This report summarizes the outline of the FAME system including hardware, soft-ware and peripheral equipments.

  11. Perturbed Stability Analysis of External Ideal MHD Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Garstka, G. D.; Turnbull, A. D.; Garofalo, A. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2002-11-01

    Traditionally, numerical parameter scans are performed to study the effects of equilibrium shaping and profiles on long wavelength ideal MHD instabilities. Previously, we introduced a new perturbative technique to more efficiently explore these dependencies: changes in delta-W due to small equilibrium variations are found using a perturbation of the energy principle rather than with an eigenvalue-solver instability code. With this approach, the stability properties of similar equilibria can be efficiently explored without generating complete numerical results for every set of parameters (which is time-intensive for accurate representations of several configurations). Here, we apply this approach to toroidal geometry using GATO (an ideal MHD stability code) and experimental equilibria. In particular, we explore ideal MHD stability of external kink modes in the spherical tokamak Pegasus and resistive wall modes in DIII-D.

  12. Energetic particle effects on global MHD modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of energetic particles on MHD type modes are studied by analytical theories and the nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K). In particular we address the problems of (1) the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of resonant fishbone'' internal modes and (2) the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances. Analytical theories are presented to help explain the NOVA-K results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral-beam injection (NBI) or ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), a stability window for the n=1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beat space exists even in the absence of core ion finite Larmor radius effect (finite {omega}{sub *i}). On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to resonantly excite instability of the n=1 internal mode and can lower the critical beta threshold. The circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha particle pressure. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Output from MHD Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahakis, Nektarios

    2010-03-01

    Outflows emanating from the environment of stellar or galactic objects are a widespread phenomenon in astrophysics. Their morphology ranges from nearly spherically symmetric winds to highly collimated jets. In some cases, e.g., in jets associated with young stellar objects, the bulk outflow speeds are nonrelativistic, while in others, e.g., in jets associated with active galactic nuclei or gamma-ray bursts, it can even be highly relativistic. The main driving mechanism of collimated outflows is likely related to magnetic fields. These fields are able to tap the rotational energy of the compact object or disk, accelerate, and collimate matter ejecta. To zeroth order these outflows can be described by the highly intractable theory of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Even in systems where the assumptions of zero resistivity (ideal MHD), steady state, axisymmetry, one fluid description, and polytropic equation of state are applicable, the problem remains difficult. In this case the problem reduces to only two equations, corresponding to the two components of the momentum equation along the flow and in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field (transfield direction). The latter equation is the most difficult to solve, but also the most important. It answers the question on the degree of the collimation, but also crucially affects the solution of the first, the acceleration efficiency and the bulk velocity of the flow. The first and second parts of this chapter refer to nonrelativistic and relativistic flows, respectively. These Parts can be read independently. In each one, the governing equations are presented and discussed, focusing on the case of flows that are magnetically dominated near the central source. The general characteristics of the solutions in relation to the acceleration and collimation mechanisms are analyzed. As specific examples of exact solutions of the full system of the MHD equations that satisfy all the analyzed general characteristics, self

  14. Commercialization of MHD power technology

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, D.J.; Jensen, A.D.; Probert, P.B.

    1984-08-01

    This paper presents an approach to the commercialization of Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) technology from the perspective of an equipment manufacturer. It discusses and recommends actions to be taken in solving technical problems and mitigating risk for the first commercial MHD power plant.

  15. Stability of a two-volume MRxMHD model in slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuen, Li Huey; Hole, Matthew; Dewar, Robert; Dennis, Graham

    2015-11-01

    Ideal MHD models are inadequate to describe various physical attributes of toroidal plasmas with no continuous symmetry, such as magnetic islands and stochastic regions. A new MHD formulation, MRxMHD, uses only a finite number of ideal-MHD flux surface interfaces, with relaxed plasma regions in between, thus allowing a stepped-pressure profile, magnetic islands, and stochastic regions. In toroidally asymmetric plasma, the existence of interfaces in MRxMHD is contingent on the field pitch, or rotational transform, of flux surfaces being irrational; a KAM argument shows that some good equilibrium flux surfaces continue to exist for small perturbations to an integrable system (foliated by flux surfaces), provided that the rotational transforms on both sides of each interface are sufficiently irrational. Building upon the MRxMHD stability model by Hole, we study the effects of irrationality of the rotational transform at interfaces in MRxMHD on plasma stability. Investigating the plasma stability of a two-volume MRxMHD periodic-slab, we find that the 2D system stability conditions are dependent on the interface and resonance layer magnetic field pitch at minimised energy states. While tearing instabilities exist at low order rational resonances, investigating instability of high-order rationals requires study of pressure-driven instabilities.

  16. Simulating solar MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüssler, M.

    1999-05-01

    Two aspects of solar MHD are discussed in relation to the work of the MHD simulation group at KIS. Photospheric magneto-convection, the nonlinear interaction of magnetic field and convection in a strongly stratified, radiating fluid, is a key process of general astrophysical relevance. Comprehensive numerical simulations including radiative transfer have significantly improved our understanding of the processes and have become an important tool for the interpretation of observational data. Examples of field intensification in the solar photosphere ('convective collapse') are shown. The second line of research is concerned with the dynamics of flux tubes in the convection zone, which has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the solar dynamo. Simulations indicate that the field strength in the region where the flux is stored before erupting to form sunspot groups is of the order of 105 G, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on equipartition with the kinetic energy of convective flows.Key words. Solar physics · astrophysics and astronomy (photosphere and chromosphere; stellar interiors and dynamo theory; numerical simulation studies).

  17. Cometary MHD and chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegmann, R.; Schmidt, H. U.; Huebner, W. F.; Boice, D. C.

    1987-01-01

    An MHD and chemical comet-coma model was developed, applying the computer program of Huebner (1985) for the detailed chemical evolution of a spherically expanding coma and the program of Schmidt and Wegman (1982) and Wegman (1987) for the MHD flow of plasma and magnetic field in a comet to the Giotto-mission data on the ion abundances measured by the HIS ion mass spectrometer. The physics and chemistry of the coma are modeled in great detail, including photoprocesses, gas-phase chemical kinetics, energy balance with a separate electron temperature, multifluid hydrodynamics with a transition to free molecular flow, fast-streaming atomic and molecular hydrogen, counter and cross streaming of the ionized species relative to the neutral species in the coma-solar wind interaction region with momentum exchange by elastic collisions, mass-loading through ion pick-up, and Lorentz forces of the advected magnetic field. The results, both inside and outside of the contact surface, are discussed and compared with the relevant HIS ion mass spectra.

  18. Numerical simulation of surface wave dynamics of liquid metal MHD flow on an inclined plane in a magnetic field with spatial variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Donghong

    Interest in utilizing liquid metal film flows to protect the plasma-facing solid structures places increasing demand on understanding the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of such flows in a magnetic field with spatial variation. The field gradient effect is studied by a two-dimensional (2D) model in Cartesian coordinates. The thin film flow down an inclined plane in spanwise (z-direction) magnetic field with constant streamwise gradient and applied current is analyzed. The solution to the equilibrium flow shows forcefully the M-shaped velocity profile and dependence of side layer thickness on Ha-1/2 whose definition is based on field gradient. The major part of the dissertation is the numerical simulation of free surface film flows and understanding the results. The VOF method is employed to track the free surface, and the CSF model is combined with VOF method to account for surface dynamics condition. The code is validated with respect to Navier-Stokes solver and MHD implementation by computations of ordinary wavy films, MHD flat films and a colleague proposed film flow. The comparisons are performed against respective experimental, theoretical or numerical solutions, and the results are well matched with them. It is found for the ordinary water falling films, at low frequency and high flowrate, the small forcing disturbance at inlet flowrate develops into big roll waves preceded by small capillary bow waves; at high frequency and low Re, it develops into nearly sinusoidal waves with small amplitude and without fore-running capillary waves. The MHD surface instability is investigated for two kinds of film flows in constant streamwise field gradient: one with spatial disturbance and without surface tension, the other with inlet forcing disturbance and with surface tension. At no surface tension condition, the finite amplitude disturbance is rapidly amplified and degrades to irregular shape. With surface tension to maintain smooth interface, finite amplitude regular waves

  19. Defragged Binary I Ching Genetic Code Chromosomes Compared to Nirenberg’s and Transformed into Rotating 2D Circles and Squares and into a 3D 100% Symmetrical Tetrahedron Coupled to a Functional One to Discern Start From Non-Start Methionines through a Stella Octangula

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chavez, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Background Three binary representations of the genetic code according to the ancient I Ching of Fu-Xi will be presented, depending on their defragging capabilities by pairing based on three biochemical properties of the nucleic acids: H-bonds, Purine/Pyrimidine rings, and the Keto-enol/Amino-imino tautomerism, yielding the last pair a 32/32 single-strand self-annealed genetic code and I Ching tables. Methods Our working tool is the ancient binary I Ching's resulting genetic code chromosomes defragged by vertical and by horizontal pairing, reverse engineered into non-binaries of 2D rotating 4×4×4 circles and 8×8 squares and into one 3D 100% symmetrical 16×4 tetrahedron coupled to a functional tetrahedron with apical signaling and central hydrophobicity (codon formula: 4[1(1)+1(3)+1(4)+4(2)]; 5:5, 6:6 in man) forming a stella octangula, and compared to Nirenberg's 16×4 codon table (1965) pairing the first two nucleotides of the 64 codons in axis y. Results One horizontal and one vertical defragging had the start Met at the center. Two, both horizontal and vertical pairings produced two pairs of 2×8×4 genetic code chromosomes naturally arranged (M and I), rearranged by semi-introversion of central purines or pyrimidines (M' and I') and by clustering hydrophobic amino acids; their quasi-identity was disrupted by amino acids with odd codons (Met and Tyr pairing to Ile and TGA Stop); in all instances, the 64-grid 90° rotational ability was restored. Conclusions We defragged three I Ching representations of the genetic code while emphasizing Nirenberg's historical finding. The synthetic genetic code chromosomes obtained reflect the protective strategy of enzymes with a similar function, having both humans and mammals a biased G-C dominance of three H-bonds in the third nucleotide of their most used codons per amino acid, as seen in one chromosome of the i, M and M' genetic codes, while a two H-bond A-T dominance was found in their complementary chromosome, as seen

  20. Adaptive entropy coded subband coding of images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Modestino, J W

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe a design approach, called 2-D entropy-constrained subband coding (ECSBC), based upon recently developed 2-D entropy-constrained vector quantization (ECVQ) schemes. The output indexes of the embedded quantizers are further compressed by use of noiseless entropy coding schemes, such as Huffman or arithmetic codes, resulting in variable-rate outputs. Depending upon the specific configurations of the ECVQ and the ECPVQ over the subbands, many different types of SBC schemes can be derived within the generic 2-D ECSBC framework. Among these, the authors concentrate on three representative types of 2-D ECSBC schemes and provide relative performance evaluations. They also describe an adaptive buffer instrumented version of 2-D ECSBC, called 2-D ECSBC/AEC, for use with fixed-rate channels which completely eliminates buffer overflow/underflow problems. This adaptive scheme achieves performance quite close to the corresponding ideal 2-D ECSBC system. PMID:18296138

  1. Parametric study of potential early commercial power plants Task 3-A MHD cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The development of costs for an MHD Power Plant and the comparison of these costs to a conventional coal fired power plant are reported. The program is divided into three activities: (1) code of accounts review; (2) MHD pulverized coal power plant cost comparison; (3) operating and maintenance cost estimates. The scope of each NASA code of account item was defined to assure that the recently completed Task 3 capital cost estimates are consistent with the code of account scope. Improvement confidence in MHD plant capital cost estimates by identifying comparability with conventional pulverized coal fired (PCF) power plant systems is undertaken. The basis for estimating the MHD plant operating and maintenance costs of electricity is verified.

  2. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamics dynamical relaxation of coronal magnetic fields . I. Parallel untwisted magnetic fields in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Fernández, J.; Parnell, C. E.; Hood, A. W.

    2010-05-01

    Context. For the last thirty years, most of the studies on the relaxation of stressed magnetic fields in the solar environment have only considered the Lorentz force, neglecting plasma contributions, and therefore, limiting every equilibrium to that of a force-free field. Aims: Here we begin a study of the non-resistive evolution of finite beta plasmas and their relaxation to magnetohydrostatic states, where magnetic forces are balanced by plasma-pressure gradients, by using a simple 2D scenario involving a hydromagnetic disturbance to a uniform magnetic field. The final equilibrium state is predicted as a function of the initial disturbances, with aims to demonstrate what happens to the plasma during the relaxation process and to see what effects it has on the final equilibrium state. Methods: A set of numerical experiments are run using a full MHD code, with the relaxation driven by magnetoacoustic waves damped by viscous effects. The numerical results are compared with analytical calculations made within the linear regime, in which the whole process must remain adiabatic. Particular attention is paid to the thermodynamic behaviour of the plasma during the relaxation. Results: The analytical predictions for the final non force-free equilibrium depend only on the initial perturbations and the total pressure of the system. It is found that these predictions hold surprisingly well even for amplitudes of the perturbation far outside the linear regime. Conclusions: Including the effects of a finite plasma beta in relaxation experiments leads to significant differences from the force-free case.

  4. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  5. Observational Tests of Recent MHD Turbulence Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy

    2001-06-01

    This grant seeks to analyze the Heliospheric Missions data to test current theories on the angular dependence (with respect to mean magnetic field direction) of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind. Solar wind turbulence may be composed of two or more dynamically independent components. Such components include magnetic pressure-balanced structures, velocity shears, quasi-2D turbulence, and slab (Alfven) waves. We use a method, developed during the first two years of this grant, for extracting the individual reduced spectra of up to three separate turbulence components from a single spacecraft time series. The method has been used on ISEE-3 data, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Ulysses, and Voyager data samples. The correlation of fluctuations as a function of angle between flow direction and magnetic-field direction is the focus of study during the third year.

  6. Observational Tests of Recent MHD Turbulence Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Guhathakurta, M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This grant seeks to analyze the Heliospheric Missions data to test current theories on the angular dependence (with respect to mean magnetic field direction) of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind. Solar wind turbulence may be composed of two or more dynamically independent components. Such components include magnetic pressure-balanced structures, velocity shears, quasi-2D turbulence, and slab (Alfven) waves. We use a method, developed during the first two years of this grant, for extracting the individual reduced spectra of up to three separate turbulence components from a single spacecraft time series. The method has been used on ISEE-3 data, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Ulysses, and Voyager data samples. The correlation of fluctuations as a function of angle between flow direction and magnetic-field direction is the focus of study during the third year.

  7. Quasi-static MHD processes in earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, Gerd-Hannes

    1988-01-01

    An attempt is made to use the MHD equilibrium theory to describe the global magnetic field configuration of earth's magnetosphere and its time evolution under the influence of magnetospheric convection. To circumvent the difficulties inherent in today's MHD codes, use is made of a restriction to slowly time-dependent convection processes with convective velocities well below the typical Alfven speed. This restriction leads to a quasi-static MHD theory. The two-dimensional theory is outlined, and it is shown how sequences of two-dimensional equilibria evolve into a steady state configuration that is likely to become tearing mode unstable. It is then concluded that magnetospheric substorms occur periodically in earth's magnetosphere, thus being an integral part of the entire convection cycle.

  8. Evaluation of materials for the MHD steam bottoming plant

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Swift, W.M.

    1989-05-01

    Test data have been obtained on the corrosion of several commercial ASME-coded alloys and their weldments by exposing internally cooled ring specimens to simulated magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) environments. The specimens, coated with a K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-rich deposit, were exposed for times up to 2000 h at metal temperatures of 762, 593, and 567/degree/C to simulated MHD conditions for the intermediate-temperature air heater (ITAH), ITAH transition region (transition from a low- to medium-chromium alloy to a high-chromium steel), and secondary superheater (SSH), respectively. This paper discusses, in detail, the observed corrosion scale morphologies of various exposed specimens. Data on scale thickness, depth of intergranular penetration, and metal recession are presented, and the results are used to assess the corrosion behavior of various materials for application in the MHD steam bottoming plant. 6 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. AEST: Adaptive Eigenvalue Stability Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.-J.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Waelbroeck, F.; van Dam, J. W.; Berk, H.

    2002-11-01

    An adaptive eigenvalue linear stability code is developed. The aim is on one hand to include the non-ideal MHD effects into the global MHD stability calculation for both low and high n modes and on the other hand to resolve the numerical difficulty involving MHD singularity on the rational surfaces at the marginal stability. Our code follows some parts of philosophy of DCON by abandoning relaxation methods based on radial finite element expansion in favor of an efficient shooting procedure with adaptive gridding. The δ W criterion is replaced by the shooting procedure and subsequent matrix eigenvalue problem. Since the technique of expanding a general solution into a summation of the independent solutions employed, the rank of the matrices involved is just a few hundreds. This makes easier to solve the eigenvalue problem with non-ideal MHD effects, such as FLR or even full kinetic effects, as well as plasma rotation effect, taken into account. To include kinetic effects, the approach of solving for the distribution function as a local eigenvalue ω problem as in the GS2 code will be employed in the future. Comparison of the ideal MHD version of the code with DCON, PEST, and GATO will be discussed. The non-ideal MHD version of the code will be employed to study as an application the transport barrier physics in tokamak discharges.

  10. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Revolutionary rather than evolutionary changes in propulsion systems are most likely to decrease cost of space transportation and to provide a global range capability. Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion is a revolutionary propulsion system. The performance of scramjet engines can be improved by the AJAX energy management concept. A magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) generator controls the flow and extracts flow energy in the engine inlet and a MHD accelerator downstream of the combustor accelerates the nozzle flow. A progress report toward developing the MHD technology is presented herein. Recent theoretical efforts are reviewed and ongoing experimental efforts are discussed. The latter efforts also include an ongoing collaboration between NASA, the US Air Force Research Laboratory, US industry, and Russian scientific organizations. Two of the critical technologies, the ionization of the air and the MHD accelerator, are briefly discussed. Examples of limiting the combustor entrance Mach number to a low supersonic value with a MHD energy bypass scheme are presented, demonstrating an improvement in scramjet performance. The results for a simplified design of an aerospace plane show that the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Equilibrium ionization and non-equilibrium ionization are discussed. The thermodynamic condition of air at the entrance of the engine inlet determines the method of ionization. The required external power for non-equilibrium ionization is computed. There have been many experiments in which electrical power generation has successfully been achieved by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) means. However, relatively few experiments have been made to date for the reverse case of achieving gas acceleration by the MHD means. An experiment in a shock tunnel is described in which MHD acceleration is investigated experimentally. MHD has several

  11. MHD Wave in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, Robert

    2016-02-01

    The study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations in the solar atmosphere is one of the fastest developing fields in solar physics, and lies in the mainstream of using solar instrumentation data. This chapter first addresses the spatial frequency morphology of sources of sunspot oscillations and waves, including their localization, size, oscillation periods, and height localization with the mechanism of cutoff frequency that forms the observed emission variability. Then, it presents a review dynamic of sunspot wave processes, provides the information about the structure of wave fronts and their time variations, and investigates the oscillation frequency transformation depending on the wave energy. The chapter also addresses the initializing solar flares caused by trigger agents like magnetoacoustic waves, accelerated particle beams, and shocks. Special attention is paid to the relation between the flare reconnection periodic initialization and the dynamics of sunspot slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  12. Production of MHD fluid

    DOEpatents

    Lacey, James J.; Kurtzrock, Roy C.; Bienstock, Daniel

    1976-08-24

    A hot gaseous fluid of low ash content, suitable for use in open-cycle MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) power generation, is produced by means of a three-stage process comprising (1) partial combustion of a fossil fuel to produce a hot gaseous product comprising CO.sub.2 CO, and H.sub.2 O, (2) reformation of the gaseous product from stage (1) by means of a fluidized char bed, whereby CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O are converted to CO and H.sub.2, and (3) combustion of CO and H.sub.2 from stage (2) to produce a low ash-content fluid (flue gas) comprising CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O and having a temperature of about 4000.degree. to 5000.degree.F.

  13. MHD channel performance for potential early commercial MHD power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swallom, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    The commercial viability of full and part load early commercial MHD power plants is examined. The load conditions comprise a mass flow of 472 kg/sec in the channel, Rosebud coal, 34% by volume oxygen in the oxidizer preheated to 922 K, and a one percent by mass seeding with K. The full load condition is discussed in terms of a combined cycle plant with optimized electrical output by the MHD channel. Various electrical load parameters, pressure ratios, and magnetic field profiles are considered for a baseload MHD generator, with a finding that a decelerating flow rate yields slightly higher electrical output than a constant flow rate. Nominal and part load conditions are explored, with a reduced gas mass flow rate and an enriched oxygen content. An enthalpy extraction of 24.6% and an isentropic efficiency of 74.2% is predicted for nominal operation of a 526 MWe MHD generator, with higher efficiencies for part load operation.

  14. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  15. MHD technology in aluminum casting

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinichenko, I.

    1984-08-01

    The use of MHD technology in aluminum casting is discussed. Associates of the Latvian Academy of Sciences Institute of Physics developed magnetohydrodynamic units for the Siberian plant. A MHD unit made it possible to free five persons from heavy work at the plant. Labor productivity doubled in this section. With the aid of the magnetic field, the alloy silumin is obtained in only three hours. Specialists of the Irkutsk affiliate of the All-Union Scientific Research and Design Institute of the Aluminum, Magnesium and Electrode Industry are convinced that MHD technology has a bright future. However, this will necessitate the development of new MHD technology for different types of casting facilities, with their specific features taken into account.

  16. A hybrid numerical fluid dynamics code for resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    2006-04-01

    Spasmos is a computational fluid dynamics code that uses two numerical methods to solve the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in compressible, inviscid, conducting media[1]. The code is implemented as a set of libraries for the Python programming language[2]. It represents conducting and non-conducting gases and materials with uncomplicated (analytic) equations of state. It supports calculations in 1D, 2D, and 3D geometry, though only the 1D configuation has received significant testing to date. Becausemore » it uses the Python interpreter as a front end, users can easily write test programs to model systems with a variety of different numerical and physical parameters. Currently, the code includes 1D test programs for hydrodynamics (linear acoustic waves, the Sod weak shock[3], the Noh strong shock[4], the Sedov explosion[5], magnetic diffusion (decay of a magnetic pulse[6], a driven oscillatory "wine-cellar" problem[7], magnetic equilibrium), and magnetohydrodynamics (an advected magnetic pulse[8], linear MHD waves, a magnetized shock tube[9]). Spasmos current runs only in a serial configuration. In the future, it will use MPI for parallel computation.« less

  17. Mathematical modelling in MHD technology

    SciTech Connect

    Scheindlin, A.E.; Medin, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The technological scheme and the general parameters of the commercial scale pilot MHD power plant are described. The characteristics of the flow train components and the electrical equipment are discussed. The basic ideas of the mathematical modelling of the processes and the devices operation in MHD systems are considered. The application of different description levels in computer simulation is analyzed and the examples of typical solutions are presented.

  18. Stacking up 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Louise

    2016-05-01

    Graphene might be the most famous example, but there are other 2D materials and compounds too. Louise Mayor explains how these atomically thin sheets can be layered together to create flexible “van der Waals heterostructures”, which could lead to a range of novel applications.

  19. EM 2dV1.0.F

    2012-01-05

    Code is for a layered electric medium with 2d structure. Includes air-earth interface at node z=2.. The electric ex and ez fields are calculated on edges of elemental grid and magnetic field hy is calculated on the face of the elemental grid. The code allows for a layered earth with 2d structures. Solutions of coupled first order Maxwell's equations are solved in the two dimensional environment using a finite- difference scheme on a staggered spationamore » and temporal grid.« less

  20. An MHD Study of the Interaction Between the Solar Wind and the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The overall objective of this research program is to obtain a better understanding of the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium through the use of numerical solutions of the time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The simulated results have been compared with observations where possible and with the results from previous analytic and numerical studies. The primary accomplishment of this project has been the development of codes for 2-D models in both spherical and cylindrical coordinates and the application of the codes to the solar wind/interstellar medium interaction. Computations have been carried out for both a relatively simple gas-dynamic interaction and a flow-aligned interstellar magnetic field. The results have been shown to compare favorably with models that use more approximations and to modify and extend the previous results as would be expected. The simulations have also been used along with a data analysis study to provide a quantitative estimate of the distance to the termination and bow shocks. Some of the specific topics that have been studied are: (1) gas dynamic models of the solar wind/interstellar medium interaction, (2) termination shock response to large-scale solar wind fluctuations, and (3) distances to the termination shock and heliopause. The main results from each of these studies are summarized. The results were published in three papers which are included as attachments.

  1. Particle-based closure relations for Neoclassical MHD Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, D.; Hirshman, S. P.; Del-Castillo Negrete, D.; D'Azevedo, E.; Mills, R.; Fahey, M.

    2006-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of neoclassical MHD tearing modes (NTM) are significantly influenced by the variation of the local (perturbed) bootstrap current within magnetic tearing mode island regions. The bootstrap current is introduced into the MHD equations through closure relations involving the parallel component of the pressure tensor. The three-dimensional magnetic field structure within island regions, coupled with the need to retain one and possibly tw velocity dimensions motivates the use of Monte Carlo methods. We have adapted the DELTA5D stellarator particle code for the calculation of such closure relations. A new delta-f partitioning has been used so that plasma flows and gradients can be held constant while viscous coefficients are calculated by the particle code. This method has been successfully tested against the DKES code for axisymmetric equilibria. Second, an improved compressed representation of the magnetic field data has been developed using principal orthogonal decomposition methods and singular value decomposition. This has been applied to data from the M3D MHD code and should lead to improved performance and a decreased memory footprint for the particle calculation.

  2. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  3. TRIM: A finite-volume MHD algorithm for an unstructured adaptive mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, D.D.; Lottati, I.; Mikic, Z.

    1995-07-01

    The authors describe TRIM, a MHD code which uses finite volume discretization of the MHD equations on an unstructured adaptive grid of triangles in the poloidal plane. They apply it to problems related to modeling tokamak toroidal plasmas. The toroidal direction is treated by a pseudospectral method. Care was taken to center variables appropriately on the mesh and to construct a self adjoint diffusion operator for cell centered variables.

  4. Implicit adaptive mesh refinement for 2D reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby; Chacón, Luis; Pernice, Michael

    2008-10-01

    An implicit structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) solver for 2D reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is described. The time-implicit discretization is able to step over fast normal modes, while the spatial adaptivity resolves thin, dynamically evolving features. A Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method is used for the nonlinear solver engine. For preconditioning, we have extended the optimal "physics-based" approach developed in [L. Chacón, D.A. Knoll, J.M. Finn, An implicit, nonlinear reduced resistive MHD solver, J. Comput. Phys. 178 (2002) 15-36] (which employed multigrid solver technology in the preconditioner for scalability) to SAMR grids using the well-known Fast Adaptive Composite grid (FAC) method [S. McCormick, Multilevel Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations, SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 1989]. A grid convergence study demonstrates that the solver performance is independent of the number of grid levels and only depends on the finest resolution considered, and that it scales well with grid refinement. The study of error generation and propagation in our SAMR implementation demonstrates that high-order (cubic) interpolation during regridding, combined with a robustly damping second-order temporal scheme such as BDF2, is required to minimize impact of grid errors at coarse-fine interfaces on the overall error of the computation for this MHD application. We also demonstrate that our implementation features the desired property that the overall numerical error is dependent only on the finest resolution level considered, and not on the base-grid resolution or on the number of refinement levels present during the simulation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the tool on several challenging problems.

  5. Equilibrium and MHD Activity in PEGASUS Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garstka, G. D.

    2000-10-01

    The primary research goals of the PEGASUS toroidal experiment involve the exploration of MHD stability boundaries at high beta and extremely low aspect ratio. A novel nonlinear least-squares fitting technique is used to reconstruct equilibria; the more conventional TokaMac equilibrium code is used as well. The continuous resistive vacuum vessel is modeled as a set of inductively coupled coils for the purpose of the reconstructions. A variety of MHD phenomena have been observed on PEGASUS ohmic discharges. Internal reconnection events (IREs) are often seen. The characteristics of these events match those observed on other STs: they are observed more frequently when the machine is dirty and when the plasma is overdriven into the central column. An n=1 mode with a frequency of 3-8 kHz is often present throughout the discharge. This mode is associated with fast current ramps (> 30 MA/s) and can limit the discharge evolution. There is also substantial evidence of double tearing modes during fast current ramps. Present work involves the exploration of the edge kink stability boundary at near-unity aspect ratio.

  6. Extended MHD Stabiliy Calculations of Spheromak Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2013-10-01

    Linear extended MHD calculations of spheromak equilibria in a cylindrical flux conserver are performed using the NIMROD code (Sovinec et al., JCP 195, 2004). A series of Grad-Sharfranov equilibria are generated with β ranging from 0 . 4 % to 4 . 2 % , corresponding to peak electron temperatures ranging 50 to 300 eV. These equilibria use a λ profile representative of SSPX shot 14590, which measured a peak electron temperature of 325 eV (McLean et al., POP 13, 2006). Resistive MHD calculations find that the β = 0 . 4 % case is unstable to resonant resistive interchange modes with γτA <= 2 . 3 % . These modes transition to ideal interchange as the equilibrium pressure is increased. Growth rates as large as γτA = 20 % are calculated for the 4 . 2 % β case. Calculations including ion-gyroviscosity show a minimal reduction of growth rate. Effects from including the Hall and Electron pressure terms in Ohm's Law and the cross-field diamagnetic heat flux are investigated. Results of related nonlinear simulations are also presented. Work Supported by US DOE.

  7. Multidimensional MHD Simulations Of DSA Using AstroBEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmon, Paul; Jones, T.; Mitran, S.; Cunningham, A.; Frank, A.

    2009-05-01

    We present a modification to the AstroBEAR (Astronomical Boundary Embedded Adaptive Refinement) MHD code (Cunningham et. al. 2007) that allows it to treat time dependent Diffusive Shock Acceleration (DSA) of cosmic rays in multiple dimensions including dynamical feedback from the cosmic rays. Utilizing the power of Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) in tandem with efficient methods for cosmic ray diffusion and advection, this allows us for the first time to explore the evolution of modified MHD shocks in more than one spatial dimension. Among the early applications of the code will be investigations of colliding and clumpy stellar winds, type II supernova remnants and cosmic ray driven instabilities. This work is supported at the University of Minnesota by NSF, NASA and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  8. Off-design performance analysis of MHD generator channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. R.; Williams, T. S.

    1980-01-01

    A computer code for performing parametric design point calculations, and evaluating the off-design performance of MHD generators has been developed. The program is capable of analyzing Faraday, Hall, and DCW channels, including the effect of electrical shorting in the gas boundary layers and coal slag layers. Direct integration of the electrode voltage drops is included. The program can be run in either the design or off-design mode. Details of the computer code, together with results of a study of the design and off-design performance of the proposed ETF MHD generator are presented. Design point variations of pre-heat and stoichiometry were analyzed. The off-design study included variations in mass flow rate and oxygen enrichment.

  9. Linear MHD Stability Analysis of the SSPX Spheromak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, R.; Cohen, B. I.; Hooper, E. B.; Lodestro, L. L.; McLean, H. S.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Wood, R.; Turnbull, A. D.; Sovinec, C.

    2007-11-01

    Good correlation between the toroidal mode numbers of measured magnetic fluctuations in high temperature SSPX plasmas and presence of low-order rational surfaces in the reconstructed q profiles, suggests that the quality of magnetic surfaces in SSPX is sufficiently good for applying standard linear MHD stability analyses. Previously we have reported on benchmarking the code NIMROD against GATO, with good agreement in growth rates for ideal-MHD internal kinks and an external kinks with no current on open field lines (for equilibria imported from the code Corsica). Recent stability analyses also show that presence of low order rational surfaces causes internal modes to become unstable. We will report on the progress in applying these tools for assessing beta limits in SSPX, using NIMROD analyses including current on open field lines and for comparison with experiments.

  10. Efficiently Finding Trends in Macroscopic MHD Stability Using Perturbed Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Turnbull, A. D.; Cowley, S. C.

    2001-10-01

    The effects of equilibrium shaping and profiles on long wavelength ideal MHD instabilities in toroidal plasmas are traditionally studied using numerical parameter scans. Previously, we introduced a new perturbative technique to explore these dependencies: assuming small equilibrium variations, new stability properties are found using a perturbation of the energy principle rather than with a traditional stability code. With this approach, stability dependencies can be efficiently examined without numerically generating complete MHD stability results for every set of parameters (which can be time-intensive for accurate representations of several configurations). Here, we briefly expand on previous successful perturbed stability analyses for screw pinch equilibria by discussing cases where the approach fails. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using the GATO and TOQ codes, and present cases that both validate the approach and suggest caution in its application.

  11. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  12. Nanoimprint lithography: 2D or not 2D? A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schift, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is more than a planar high-end technology for the patterning of wafer-like substrates. It is essentially a 3D process, because it replicates various stamp topographies by 3D displacement of material and takes advantage of the bending of stamps while the mold cavities are filled. But at the same time, it keeps all assets of a 2D technique being able to pattern thin masking layers like in photon- and electron-based traditional lithography. This review reports about 20 years of development of replication techniques at Paul Scherrer Institut, with a focus on 3D aspects of molding, which enable NIL to stay 2D, but at the same time enable 3D applications which are "more than Moore." As an example, the manufacturing of a demonstrator for backlighting applications based on thermally activated selective topography equilibration will be presented. This technique allows generating almost arbitrary sloped, convex and concave profiles in the same polymer film with dimensions in micro- and nanometer scale.

  13. MHD Advanced Power Train Phase I, Final Report, Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    A. R. Jones

    1985-08-01

    This appendix provides additional data in support of the MHD/Steam Power Plant Analyses reported in report Volume 5. The data is in the form of 3PA/SUMARY computer code printouts. The order of presentation in all four cases is as follows: (1) Overall Performance; (2) Component/Subsystem Information; (3) Plant Cost Accounts Summary; and (4) Plant Costing Details and Cost of Electricity.

  14. MHD stability of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, M.S. Sun, Y.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Okabayashi, M.

    1992-08-01

    This paper will give an overview of the some of the methods which are used to simulate the ideal MHD properties of tokamak plasmas. A great deal of the research in this field is necessarily numerical and the substantial progress made during the past several years has roughly paralleled the continuing availability of more advanced supercomputers. These have become essential to accurately model the complex configurations necessary for achieving MHD stable reactor grade conditions. Appropriate tokamak MHD equilibria will be described. Then the stability properties is discussed in some detail, emphasizing the difficulties of obtaining stable high {beta} discharges in plasmas in which the current is mainly ohmically driven and thus demonstrating the need for tailoring the current and pressure profiles of the plasma away from the ohmic state. The outline of this paper will roughly follow the physics development to attain the second region of stability in the PBX-M device at The Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory.

  15. RADMC: A 2-D Continuum Radiative Transfer Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullemond, C. P.

    2011-08-01

    RADMC is a 2-D Monte-Carlo code for dust continuum radiative transfer circumstellar disks and envelopes. It is based on the method of Bjorkman & Wood (ApJ 2001, 554, 615), but with several modifications to produce smoother results with fewer photon packages.

  16. The Biermann catastrophe of numerical MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, C.; Tzeferacos, P.; Lee, D.; Lamb, D. Q.; Weide, K.; Fatenejad, M.; Miller, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Biermann Battery effect is frequently invoked in cosmic magnetogenesis and studied in High-Energy Density laboratory physics experiments. Unfortunately, direct implementation of the Biermann effect in MHD codes is known to produce unphysical magnetic fields at shocks whose value does not converge with resolution. We show that this convergence breakdown is due to naive discretization, which fails to account for the fact that discretized irrotational vector fields have spurious solenoidal components that grow without bound near a discontinuity. We show that careful consideration of the kinetics of ion viscous shocks leads to a formulation of the Biermann effect that gives rise to a convergent algorithm. We note a novel physical effect a resistive magnetic precursor in which Biermann-generated field in the shock “leaks” resistively upstream. The effect appears to be potentially observable in experiments at laser facilities.

  17. Alpha-Driven MHD and MHD-Induced Alpha Loss in TFTR DT Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zuoyang

    1996-11-01

    Theoretical calculation and numerical simulation indicate that there can be interesting interactions between alpha particles and MHD activity which can adversely affect the performance of a tokamak reactor (e.g., ITER). These interactions include alpha-driven MHD, like the toroidicity-induced-Alfven-eigenmode (TAE) and MHD induced alpha particle losses or redistribution. Both phenomena have been observed in recent TFTR DT experiments. Weak alpha-driven TAE activity was observed in a NBI-heated DT experiment characterized by high q0 ( >= 2) and low core magnetic shear. The TAE mode appears at ~30-100 ms after the neutral beam turning off approximately as predicted by theory. The mode has an amplitude measured by magnetic coils at the edge tildeB_p ~1 mG, frequency ~150-190 kHz and toroidal mode number ~2-3. It lasts only ~ 30-70 ms and has been seen only in DT discharges with fusion power level about 1.5-2.0 MW. Numerical calculation using NOVA-K code shows that this type of plasma has a big TAE gap. The calculated TAE frequency and mode number are close to the observation. (2) KBM-induced alpha particle loss^1. In some high-β, high fusion power DT experiments, enhanced alpha particle losses were observed to be correlated to the high frequency MHD modes with f ~100-200 kHz (the TAE frequency would be two-times higher) and n ~5-10. These modes are localized around the peak plasma pressure gradient and have ballooning characteristics. Alpha loss increases by 30-100% during the modes. Particle orbit simulations show the added loss results from wave-particle resonance. Linear instability analysis indicates that the plasma is unstable to the kinetic MHD ballooning modes (KBM) driven primarily by strong local pressure gradients. ----------------- ^1Z. Chang, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 1071. In collaberation with R. Nazikian, G.-Y. Fu, S. Batha, R. Budny, L. Chen, D. Darrow, E. Fredrickson, R. Majeski, D. Mansfield, K. McGuire, G. Rewoldt, G. Taylor, R. White, K

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) channel corner seal

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1980-01-01

    A corner seal for an MHD duct includes a compressible portion which contacts the duct walls and an insulating portion which contacts the electrodes, sidewall bars and insulators. The compressible portion may be a pneumatic or hydraulic gasket or an open-cell foam rubber. The insulating portion is segmented into a plurality of pieces of the same thickness as the electrodes, insulators and sidewall bars and aligned therewith, the pieces aligned with the insulator being of a different size from the pieces aligned with the electrodes and sidewall bars to create a stepped configuration along the corners of the MHD channel.

  19. On 2-D Boussinesq equations for MHD convection with stratification effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Dongfen; Gui, Guilong

    2016-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics-Boussinesq system with the temperature-dependent viscosity, thermal diffusivity and electrical conductivity. The first progress on this topic was made independently by Chae and Hou-Li [8,26] where the Boussinesq system with partial constant viscosity is obtained. Recently, Wang-Zhang [45] considered the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal diffusivity, and Li-Xu [16] generalized the Wang-Zhang's result to the inviscid case with temperature-dependent thermal diffusivity. In this paper, we include the stratification and magnetic effects and consider the full system, in the framework of low regularity. We prove that, without any smallness assumption on the initial data, the full system is globally well-posed. Moreover, by applying the uniformly bounded generalized Oseen operator, time decay estimate of the solution is obtained.

  20. FPCAS2D user's guide, version 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.

    1994-12-01

    The FPCAS2D computer code has been developed for aeroelastic stability analysis of bladed disks such as those in fans, compressors, turbines, propellers, or propfans. The aerodynamic analysis used in this code is based on the unsteady two-dimensional full potential equation which is solved for a cascade of blades. The structural analysis is based on a two degree-of-freedom rigid typical section model for each blade. Detailed explanations of the aerodynamic analysis, the numerical algorithms, and the aeroelastic analysis are not given in this report. This guide can be used to assist in the preparation of the input data required by the FPCAS2D code. A complete description of the input data is provided in this report. In addition, four test cases, including inputs and outputs, are provided.

  1. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, R.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pollina, R.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Avco-Everett Research Lab., Everett, MA )

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of MHD materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues; sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate.

  2. Open cycle gas fired MHD power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, S.A. ); Negrini, F. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the main objectives for the present development of gas fired MHD power generation are considered. The state of the world-wide natural gas consumption and its utilization for electricity production is analyzed. The experimental efforts in gas-fired MHD studies are briefly described. The essential features of the two major world gas-fired MHD project - the Ryazan MHDES-580 (U-500) power plant and the Italian 230 MWt retrofit are presented. New suggestions for improving the efficiency of MHD systems and the theoretical and experimental aspects of MHD development are discussed.

  3. MHD integrated topping cycle project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to design and construct prototypical hardware for an integrated MHD topping cycle, and conduct long duration proof-of-concept tests of integrated system at the US DOE Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering design data base on MHD power train reliability, availability, maintainability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up the topping cycle design to the next level of development, an early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include: A slagging coal combustor with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with an Eastern (Illinois no. 6) or Western (Montana Rosebud) coal, a segmented supersonic nozzle, a supersonic MHD channel capable of generating at least 1.5 MW of electrical power, a segmented supersonic diffuser section to interface the channel with existing facility quench and exhaust systems, a complete set of current control circuits for local diagonal current control along the channel, and a set of current consolidation circuits to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

  4. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to design and construct prototypical hardware for an integrated MHD topping cycle, and conduct long duration proof-of-concept tests of integrated system at the US DOE Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering design data base on MHD power train reliability, availability, maintainability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up the topping cycle design to the next level of development, an early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include: A slagging coal combustor with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with an Eastern (Illinois {number sign}6) or Western (Montana Rosebud) coal, a segmented supersonic nozzle, a supersonic MHD channel capable of generating at least 1.5 MW of electrical power, a segmented supersonic diffuser section to interface the channel with existing facility quench and exhaust systems, a complete set of current control circuits for local diagonal current control along the channel, and a set of current consolidation circuits to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

  5. Resistive MHD studies of high-beta Tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, V. E.; Hicks, H. R.; Holmes, J. A.; Carreras, B. A.; Garcia, L.

    1982-02-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in high beta Tokamaks such as ISX-B was calculated. These initial value calculations are built on earlier low beta techniques, but the beta effects create several new numerical issues. In addition to time stepping modules, the system of computer codes includes equilibrium solvers (used to provide an initial condition) and output modules, such as a magnetic field line follower and an X-ray diagnostic code. The transition from current driven modes a low beta to predominantly pressure driven modes at high beta is described. The nonlinear studies yield X-ray emissivity plots which are compared with experiment.

  6. Variational Integration for Ideal MHD with Built-in Advection Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yao; Qin, Hong; Burby, J. W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2014-08-05

    Newcomb's Lagrangian for ideal MHD in Lagrangian labeling is discretized using discrete exterior calculus. Variational integrators for ideal MHD are derived thereafter. Besides being symplectic and momentum preserving, the schemes inherit built-in advection equations from Newcomb's formulation, and therefore avoid solving them and the accompanying error and dissipation. We implement the method in 2D and show that numerical reconnection does not take place when singular current sheets are present. We then apply it to studying the dynamics of the ideal coalescence instability with multiple islands. The relaxed equilibrium state with embedded current sheets is obtained numerically.

  7. Free-boundary ideal MHD stability of W7-X divertor equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nührenberg, C.

    2016-07-01

    Plasma configurations describing the stellarator experiment Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) are computationally established taking into account the geometry of the test-divertor unit and the high-heat-flux divertor which will be installed in the vacuum chamber of the device (Gasparotto et al 2014 Fusion Eng. Des. 89 2121). These plasma equilibria are computationally studied for their global ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability properties. Results from the ideal MHD stability code cas3d (Nührenberg 1996 Phys. Plasmas 3 2401), stability limits, spatial structures and growth rates are presented for free-boundary perturbations. The work focusses on the exploration of MHD unstable regions of the W7-X configuration space, thereby providing information for future experiments in W7-X aiming at an assessment of the role of ideal MHD in stellarator confinement.

  8. Technical support for open-cycle MHD program. Progress report, January-June 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Bomkamp, D. H.

    1980-07-01

    The support program for open-cycle MHD at the Argonne National Laboratory consists of developing the analytical tools needed for investigation of the performance of the major components in the combined-cycle MHD/steam power system. The analytical effort is centered on the primary components of the system that are unique to MHD and, also, on the integration of these analytical models into a model of the entire power-producing system. The present project activities include modeling of the combustor, generator, seed deposition, and formation and decomposition of NO. Parametric studies were performed to evaluate the performance of the U-25B generator and to support the design of the US U-25B generator. Refinements and improvements to the MHD systems code and executive program are described.

  9. Experimental validation of equations for 2D DIC uncertainty quantification.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) equations have been derived for predicting matching uncertainty in two-dimensional image correlation a priori. These equations include terms that represent the image noise and image contrast. Researchers at the University of South Carolina have extended previous 1D work to calculate matching errors in 2D. These 2D equations have been coded into a Sandia National Laboratories UQ software package to predict the uncertainty for DIC images. This paper presents those equations and the resulting error surfaces for trial speckle images. Comparison of the UQ results with experimentally subpixel-shifted images is also discussed.

  10. AGN Unification, X-Ray Absorbers and Accretion Disk MHD Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2011-01-01

    We present the 2D photoionization structure of the MHD winds of AGN accretion disks. We focus our attention on a specific subset of winds, those with poloidal currents that lead to density profiles n(r) \\propto 1/r. We employ the code XSTAR to compute the local ionization balance, emissivities and opacity which are then used in the self-consistent transfer of radiation and ionization of a host of ionic species of a large number of elements over then entire poloidal plane. Particular attention is paid to the Absorption Measure Distribution (AMD), namely their hydrogen-equivalent column of these ions per logarithmic 7 interval, dN_H/dlog ? (? = L/n(r)r(sup 2) is the ionization parameter), which provides a measure of the winds' radial density profiles. For the given density profile, AMD is found to be independent of ?, in good agreement with analyses of Chandra and XMM data, suggesting the specific profile as a fundamental AGN property. Furthermore, the ratio of equatorial to polar column densities of these winds is \\simeq 10(exp 4); as such, it is shown they serve as the "torus" necessary for AGN unification with phenomenology consistent with the observations. The same winds are also shown to reproduce the observed columns and velocities of C IV and Fe XXV of SAL QSOs once the proper ionizing spectra and inclination angles are employed.

  11. Attempts to Simulate Anisotropies of Solar Wind Fluctuations Using MHD with a Turning Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    We examine a "two-component" model of the solar wind to see if any of the observed anisotropies of the fields can be explained in light of the need for various quantities, such as the magnetic minimum variance direction, to turn along with the Parker spiral. Previous results used a 3-D MHD spectral code to show that neither Q2D nor slab-wave components will turn their wave vectors in a turning Parker-like field, and that nonlinear interactions between the components are required to reproduce observations. In these new simulations we use higher resolution in both decaying and driven cases, and with and without a turning background field, to see what, if any, conditions lead to variance anisotropies similar to observations. We focus especially on the middle spectral range, and not the energy-containing scales, of the simulation for comparison with the solar wind. Preliminary results have shown that it is very difficult to produce the required variances with a turbulent cascade.

  12. Comparison of three artificial models of the MHD effect on the electrocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Julien; Llinares, Raul; Payne, Stephen; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Schmidt, Ehud Jeruham; Clifford, Gari D.

    2013-01-01

    The Electrocardiogram (ECG) is often acquired during Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for both image acquisition synchronisation with heart activity and patient monitoring to alert for life-threatening events. Accurate ECG analysis is mandatory for cutting-edge applications, such as MRI guided interventions. Nevertheless, the majority of the clinical analysis of ECG acquired inside MRI is made difficult by the superposition of a voltage called the MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) effect. MHD is induced by the flow of electrically charged particles in the blood perpendicular to the static magnetic field, which creates a potential of the order of magnitude of the ECG and temporally coincident with the repolatisation period. In this study, a new MHD model is proposed which is an extension of several existing models and incorporates MRI-based blood flow measurements made across the aortic arch. The model is extended to several cardiac cycles to allow the simulation of a realistic ECG acquisition during MRI examination and the quality assessment of MHD suppression techniques. A comparison of two existing models is made with our new model and with an estimate of the MHD voltage observed during a real MRI scan. Results indicate a good agreement between our proposed model and the estimated MHD for most leads, although there are clearly some descrepencies with the observed signal which are likely to be due to remaining deficiencies in the model. However, the results demonstrate that our new model provides a closer approximation to observed MHD effects and a better depiction of the complexity of the MHD effect compared to the previously published models. The source code will be made freely available under and open source license to facilitate collaboration and allow more rapid development of more accurate models of the MHD effect. PMID:24761753

  13. Nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic wave propagation in the neighbourhood of a 2D magnetic X-point: oscillatory reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, J. A.; De Moortel, I.; Hood, A. W.; Brady, C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: This paper extends the models of Craig & McClymont (1991, ApJ, 371, L41) and McLaughlin & Hood (2004, A&A, 420, 1129) to include finite β and nonlinear effects. Aims: We investigate the nature of nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic waves about a 2D magnetic X-point. Methods: We solve the compressible and resistive MHD equations using a Lagrangian remap, shock capturing code (Arber et al. 2001, J. Comp. Phys., 171, 151) and consider an initial condition in {v}×{B} \\cdot {hat{z}} (a natural variable of the system). Results: We observe the formation of both fast and slow oblique magnetic shocks. The nonlinear wave deforms the X-point into a “cusp-like” point which in turn collapses to a current sheet. The system then evolves through a series of horizontal and vertical current sheets, with associated changes in connectivity, i.e. the system exhibits oscillatory reconnection. Our final state is non-potential (but in force balance) due to asymmetric heating from the shocks. Larger amplitudes in our initial condition correspond to larger values of the final current density left in the system. Conclusions: The inclusion of nonlinear terms introduces several new features to the system that were absent from the linear regime. A movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. MHD Turbulence and Magnetic Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  15. 2D barcodes: a novel and simple method for denture identification.

    PubMed

    Sudheendra, Udyavara S; Sowmya, Kasetty; Vidhi, Mathur; Shreenivas, Kallianpur; Prathamesh, Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Several methods of denture marking have been described in the literature. However, most of them are expensive, time-consuming, and do not permit the incorporation of large amounts of information. We propose a novel and simple method incorporating 2D codes which has several advantages over the existing methods. A 2D code was generated in the dental office and inserted into a maxillary denture. The code was then read using software downloaded into a mobile phone giving access to the website containing details about the patient. The denture was also subjected to durability tests, which did not hamper the efficacy of the 2D code. 2D coding for dentures is a simple, less expensive method with the potential of storing a large amount of information that can be accessed on-site by the forensic investigator, thus allowing quick identification of the denture wearer. PMID:22971078

  16. Coupling MHD Simulations of CMEs to SEP Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torok, T.; Gorby, M.; Linker, J.; Schwadron, N.

    2015-12-01

    Large Solar Energetic Particle events (SEPs) are a main space weather hazard and extremely dangerous to astronauts and electronic equipmentin space. They are typically associated with fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Recent results indicate that SEPs can be generated already inthe early phase of CME expansion low in the corona, but the underlyingphysical mechanisms are not yet well understood. State-of-the-artmagnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of CME initiation and evolution,combined with numerical models of particle acceleration and propagation,provide a powerful tool to investigate these mechanisms. In this talk, we present recent developments in the coupling of CORHEL/MAS thermodynamicMHD simulations of fast CMEs to the EPREM particle code, and we discuss the insights that can be gained from such a combined modeling approach.

  17. Corrosion behavior of materials for MHD steam bottoming plant

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Swift, W.M.

    1989-04-01

    Test data have been developed for the corrosion of several commercial ASME-coded alloys and their weldments by exposing internally cooled ring specimens to simulated MHD environments. The specimens, coated with a K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-rich deposit, were exposed for times up to 2000 h at metal temperatures of 762,593, and 567/degree/C to simulate intermediate-temperature air heater (ITAH), transition region and secondary superheater (SSH) conditions, respectively. This report discusses the observed corrosion scale morphologies of various exposed specimens. Data on scale thickness, depth of intergranular penetration, and metal recession are presented and the results are used to assess the corrosion behavior of various materials for application in the MHD steam bottoming plant. 9 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Broken Ergodicity in MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence may be represented by finite Fourier series, where the inherent periodic box serves as a surrogate for a bounded astrophysical plasma. Independent Fourier coefficients form a canonical ensemble described by a Gaussian probability density function containing a Hermitian covariance matrix with positive eigenvalues. The eigenvalues at lowest wave number can be very small, resulting in a large-scale coherent structure: a turbulent dynamo. This is seen in computations and a theoretical explanation in terms of 'broken ergodicity' contains Taylor s theory of force-free states. An important problem for future work is the case of real, i.e., dissipative flows. In real flows, broken ergodicity and coherent structure are still expected to occur in MHD turbulence at the largest scale, as suggested by low resolution simulations. One challenge is to incorporate coherent structure at the largest scale into the theory of turbulent fluctuations at smaller scales.

  19. 2D bifurcations and Newtonian properties of memristive Chua's circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marszalek, W.; Podhaisky, H.

    2016-01-01

    Two interesting properties of Chua's circuits are presented. First, two-parameter bifurcation diagrams of Chua's oscillatory circuits with memristors are presented. To obtain various 2D bifurcation images a substantial numerical effort, possibly with parallel computations, is needed. The numerical algorithm is described first and its numerical code for 2D bifurcation image creation is available for free downloading. Several color 2D images and the corresponding 1D greyscale bifurcation diagrams are included. Secondly, Chua's circuits are linked to Newton's law φ ''= F(t,φ,φ')/m with φ=\\text{flux} , constant m > 0, and the force term F(t,φ,φ') containing memory terms. Finally, the jounce scalar equations for Chua's circuits are also discussed.

  20. Shear-induced instability and arch filament eruption - A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Song, M. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Dryer, M.

    1991-01-01

    A situation wherein a bipolar magnetic field embedded in a stratified solar atmosphere undergoes symmetrical shear motion at the footpoints is investigated via a 2D (nonplanar) MHD simulation. It was found that the vertical plasma flow velocities grow exponentially, leading to a new type of global MHD instability. The growth rate increases almost linearly until it reaches the same order of magnitude as the Alfven speed. Then a nonlinear MHD instability occurs beyond this point. It was found that the central loops are pinched by opposing Lorentz forces, and the outer closed loops stretch upward with the vertically-rising mass flow. The nonlinear dynamical shearing instability is illustrated by a numerical example that is given for three different values of the plasma beta that span several orders of magnitude.

  1. MHD Contractors' Review Meeting: Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The objectives of the Integrated Topping Cycle project are to design, construct, and deliver all prototypical hardware necessary to conduct long duration integrated MHD topping cycle proof-of-concept tests at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering data base on MHD power train reliability, maintainability, durability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up to the early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include the following three systems: (1) a slagging coal combustion subsystem with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with eastern (Illinois) or western (Montana Rosebud) coal; (2) a channel subsystem consisting of a segmented supersonic nozzle, channel (with current controls), and diffuser, capable of power output of 1.5 MW(sub e); and (3) a current consolidation subsystem to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

  2. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  3. Constrained-transport Hall-MHD simulations using CWENO reconstruction with libMRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liwei; Germaschewski, Kai; Abbott, Stephen; Maynard, Kris; Raeder, Jimmy

    2013-10-01

    We present a new CWENO (Centrally-Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) reconstruction based extended MHD (XMHD) solver that has been built for libMRC. libMRC is a library for creating efficient parallel PDE solvers on structured grids, which is used in the MRC (Magnetic Reconnection Code), OpenGGCM (Open Global Geospace Circulation Model) and PSC (Plasma Simulation Code) codes. The use of libMRC gives us access to its core functionality of providing an automated code generation framework which takes a user provided PDE right hand side in symbolic form to generate an efficient, computer-architecture specific, parallel code. libMRC also supports block-structured adaptive mesh refinement, and implicit-time stepping through integration with the PETSc library. We demonstrate validation of the new CWENO MHD solver against existing solvers both in standard test problems as well as in 3D global magnetosphere simulations.

  4. Ideal MHD Stability Prediction and Required Power for EAST Advanced Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junjie; Li, Guoqiang; Qian, Jinping; Liu, Zixi

    2012-11-01

    The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is the first fully superconducting tokamak with a D-shaped cross-sectional plasma presently in operation. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and required power for the EAST advanced tokamak (AT) scenario with negative central shear and double transport barrier (DTB) are investigated. With the equilibrium code TOQ and stability code GATO, the ideal MHD stability is analyzed. It is shown that a moderate ratio of edge transport barriers' (ETB) height to internal transport barriers' (ITBs) height is beneficial to ideal MHD stability. The normalized beta βN limit is about 2.20 (without wall) and 3.70 (with ideal wall). With the scaling law of energy confinement time, the required heating power for EAST AT scenario is calculated. The total heating power Pt increases as the toroidal magnetic field BT or the normalized beta βN is increased.

  5. FRANC2D: A two-dimensional crack propagation simulator. Version 2.7: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wawrzynek, Paul; Ingraffea, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    FRANC 2D (FRacture ANalysis Code, 2 Dimensions) is a menu driven, interactive finite element computer code that performs fracture mechanics analyses of 2-D structures. The code has an automatic mesh generator for triangular and quadrilateral elements. FRANC2D calculates the stress intensity factor using linear elastic fracture mechanics and evaluates crack extension using several methods that may be selected by the user. The code features a mesh refinement and adaptive mesh generation capability that is automatically developed according to the predicted crack extension direction and length. The code also has unique features that permit the analysis of layered structure with load transfer through simulated mechanical fasteners or bonded joints. The code was written for UNIX workstations with X-windows graphics and may be executed on the following computers: DEC DecStation 3000 and 5000 series, IBM RS/6000 series, Hewlitt-Packard 9000/700 series, SUN Sparc stations, and most Silicon Graphics models.

  6. Rapporteur report: MHD electric power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seikel, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Five US papers from the Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on MHD Electrical Power Generation at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are summarized. Results of the initial parametric phase of the US effort on the study of potential early commercial MHD plants are reported and aspects of the smaller commercial prototype plant termed the Engineering Test Facility are discussed. The alternative of using a disk geometry generator rather than a linear generator in baseload MHD plants is examined. Closed-cycle as well as open-cycle MHD plants are considered.

  7. MHD-EPIC: Extended Magnetohydrodynamics with Embedded Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Ganymede's Magnetosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Jia, X.; Gombosi, T. I.; Lapenta, G.

    2014-12-01

    We have recently developed a new modeling capability to embed theimplicit Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model iPIC3D into the BATS-R-USmagnetohydrodynamic model. The PIC domain can cover the regions wherekinetic effects are most important, such as reconnection sites. TheBATS-R-US code, on the other hand, can efficiently handle the rest ofthe computational domain where the MHD or Hall MHD description issufficient. As one of the very first applications of the MHD-EPICalgorithm (Daldorff et al. 2014, JCP, 268, 236) we simulate theinteraction between Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma with Ganymede'smagnetosphere, where the separation of kinetic and global scalesappears less severe than for the Earth's magnetosphere. Because theexternal Jovian magnetic field remains in an anti-parallel orientationwith respect to Ganymede's intrinsic magnetic field, magneticreconnection is believed to be the major process that couples the twomagnetospheres. As the PIC model is able to describe self-consistentlythe electron behavior, our coupled MHD-EPIC model is well suited forinvestigating the nature of magnetic reconnection in thisreconnection-driven mini-magnetosphere. We will compare the MHD-EPICsimulations with pure Hall MHD simulations and compare both modelresults with Galileo plasma and magnetic field measurements to assess therelative importance of ion and electron kinetics in controlling theconfiguration and dynamics of Ganymede's magnetosphere.

  8. BOXER: Fine-flux Cross Section Condensation, 2D Few Group Diffusion and Transport Burnup Calculations

    2010-02-01

    Neutron transport, calculation of multiplication factor and neutron fluxes in 2-D configurations: cell calculations, 2-D diffusion and transport, and burnup. Preparation of a cross section library for the code BOXER from a basic library in ENDF/B format (ETOBOX).

  9. Accurate, finite-volume methods for 3D MHD on unstructured Lagrangian meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.C.; Rousculp, C.L.

    1998-10-01

    Previous 2D methods for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) have contributed both to development of core code capability and to physics applications relevant to AGEX pulsed-power experiments. This strategy is being extended to 3D by development of a modular extension of an ASCI code. Extension to 3D not only increases complexity by problem size, but also introduces new physics, such as magnetic helicity transport. The authors have developed a method which incorporates all known conservation properties into the difference scheme on a Lagrangian unstructured mesh. Because the method does not depend on the mesh structure, mesh refinement is possible during a calculation to prevent the well known problem of mesh tangling. Arbitrary polyhedral cells are decomposed into tetrahedrons. The action of the magnetic vector potential, A {center_dot} {delta}l, is centered on the edges of this extended mesh. For ideal flow, this maintains {del} {center_dot} B = 0 to round-off error. Vertex forces are derived by the variation of magnetic energy with respect to vertex positions, F = {minus}{partial_derivative}W{sub B}/{partial_derivative}r. This assures symmetry as well as magnetic flux, momentum, and energy conservation. The method is local so that parallelization by domain decomposition is natural for large meshes. In addition, a simple, ideal-gas, finite pressure term has been included. The resistive diffusion part is calculated using the support operator method, to obtain an energy conservative, symmetric method on an arbitrary mesh. Implicit time difference equations are solved by preconditioned, conjugate gradient methods. Results of convergence tests are presented. Initial results of an annular Z-pinch implosion problem illustrate the application of these methods to multi-material problems.

  10. A simple unsplit Godunov method for multidimensional MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Gardiner, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    We describe a numerical algorithm based on Godunov methods for integrating the equations of compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in multidimensions. It combines a simple, dimensionally-unsplit integration method with the constrained transport (CT) discretization of the induction equation to enforce the divergence-free constraint. We present the results of a series of fully three-dimensional tests which indicate the method is second-order accurate for smooth solutions in all MHD wave families, and captures shocks, contact and rotational discontinuities well. However, it is also more diffusive than other more complex unsplit integrators combined with CT. Thus, the primary advantage of the method is its simplicity. It does not require a characteristic tracing step to construct interface values for the Riemann solver, it is straightforward to extend with additional physics, and it is suitable for use with nested and adaptive meshes. The method is implemented as one of two dimensionally unsplit MHD integrators in the Athena code, which is freely available for download from the web.

  11. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  12. Magnetic turbulence and resistive MHD instabilities in a 0. 6 < q < 3 poloidal divertor tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Agim, Y.Z.; Callen, J.D.; Chang, Z.; Dexter, R.N.; Goetz, J.A.; Graessle, D.E.; Haines, E.; Kortbawi, D.; LaPointe, M.A.; Moyer, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Detailed statistical properties of internal magnetic turbulence, and internal disruptions in magnetically- and materially-limited discharges, are studied in the Tokapole II poloidal divertor tokamak over the safety factor range 0.6 < q{sub a} < 3. A nonlinear MHD code treats tearing modes in the divertor geometry. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Kinematic MHD Models of Collapsing Magnetic Traps: Extension to 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, Keith J.; Neukirch, Thomas

    2009-02-16

    We show how fully 3D kinematic MHD models of collapsing magnetic traps (CMTs) can be constructed, thus extending previous work on 2D trap models. CMTs are thought to form in the relaxing magnetic field lines in solar flares and it has been proposed that they play an important role in the acceleration of high-energy particles. This work is a first step to understanding the physics of CMTs better.

  14. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  15. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This eighteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1991 to January 31, 1992. The precombustor is fully assembled. Manufacturing of all slagging stage components has been completed. All cooling panels were welded in place and the panel/shell gap was filled with RTV. Final combustor assembly is in progress. The low pressure cooling subsystem (LPCS) was delivered to the CDIF. Second stage brazing issues were resolved. The construction of the two anode power cabinets was completed.

  16. Ceramic component for MHD electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Bates, Junior L.

    1981-01-01

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf.sub.x In.sub.y A.sub.z O.sub.2 where x=0.1 to 0.4, y=0.3 to 0.6, z=0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  17. Ceramic components for MHD electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, D.D.

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf/sub x/In/sub y/A/sub z/O/sub 2/ where x = 0.1 to 0.4, y = 0.3 to 0.6, z = 0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  18. Numerical simulation of the operation of a MHD generator in transient regimes in MHD power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Bityurin, V.A.; Ivanov, P.P.; Koryagina, G.M.; Lyubimov, G.A.; Medin, S.A.; Morozov, G.N.; Prokop, A.S.

    1982-09-01

    Transient regimes of a MHD generator operating in combination with equipment in a MHD power station are analzyed with the help of a numerical model. The MHD generator, whose flow-through part consists of a nozzle, a channel, and a diffuser, is regulated by changing the flow rate and the load. Three types of MHD channels are studied: Faraday supersonic and subsonic, and diagonal supersonic. Their characteristics are presented and the efficiency of the MHD power station under nonrated regimes is determined. It is established that a MHD generator and the MHD power station as a whole admit quite efficient and deep regulation of the change in the flow rate of the working body.

  19. Workshop on Feedback Stabilization of MHD Stabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R.; Mauel, M.; Nevins, W.; Prager, S.

    1996-12-31

    The feedback stabilization of MHD instabilities is an area of research that is critical for improving the performance and economic attractiveness of magnetic confinement devices. A Workshop dedicated to feedback stabilization of MHD instabilities was held from December 11-13, 1996 at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton NJ, USA. The resulting presentations, conclusions, and recommendations are summarized.

  20. MHD (Magnetohydrodynamics) Program Plan, FY 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-05-01

    The essential elements of the current program, which is a continuation of the program outlined in the FY 1988 MHD Program Plan, are to: develop technical and environmental data for the integrated MHD topping cycle system through long-term (1000 hours) proof of concept (POC) testing; develop technical and environmental data for the integrated MHD bottoming cycle subsystem through long-term (4000 hours) POC testing; design and construct a seed regeneration system capable of independent operation, using spent seed materials from the MHD process; prepare a conceptual design for an MHD retrofit plant; and continue system studies and supporting research necessary for system testing. Results of the topping cycle POC tests at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF), coupled with the bottoming cycle POC test results obtained at the Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), and the seed regeneration POC effort will provide the critical engineering data base for the private sector's final decision on proceeding with the design, construction, and operation of an MHD retrofit. The development schedule, decision points, and resource requirements are discussed. As part of the MHD program, international activities of several nations are monitored and evaluated through contact with the international MHD scientific and technical community.

  1. Global MHD simulations of plasmaspheric plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J.; Ouellette, J.; Merkin, V. G.

    2015-12-01

    The plasmasphere represents a separate population from the rest of themagnetosphere, generally high density but cold. When the solar windturns strongly southward this plasma is convected toward the daysidemagnetopause and affects the interaction of the solar wind with themagnetosphere. We have used multi-fluid simulations using the LFMglobal MHD code to model this interaction. The plasmasphere isinitialized as a cold (~1eV) hydrogen plasma in a quiet northward IMFstate with a density distribution appropriate for K_p = 1. Thecorotation potential from the ionosphere spins up the plasmasphereinto rough corotation. After a initialization period of hours, asouthward IMF is introduced and the enhanced convection initiates asurge of plasmaspheric density to the dayside. We discuss two aspectsof this interaction, the effects on dayside reconnection and on theKelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). We find that the mass loading ofmagnetospheric flux tubes slows local reconnection rates, though notas much as predicted by Borovsky et al. [2013]. We findthat the total reconnection rate is reduced, although not as much aswould be predicted by just the sub-solar reconnection rate. The KHIis somewhat reduced by the plasmaspheric loading of density in the lowlatitude boundary layer. It has been suggested that the presence ofthe plasmasphere may lead to enhanced ULF wave power in the interiorof the magnetosphere from the KHI waves. We find only a minimal effect during northward IMF. For southward IMF, the situation is complicated by the interaction of KHI with non-steady reconnection.

  2. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  3. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  4. MHD Turbulence through the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, P.

    Velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in a wide range of space and time scales have been directly detected in the interplanetary medium In the solar corona the presence of MHD turbulence is naturally generated by the mechanical and magnetic energy input from the photosphere and it could be related to coronal heating as well as to energy release events like micro and nanoflares A certain amount of fluctuations from the solar corona arrives in the solar wind mainly as Alfvénic turbulence i e strongly correlated velocity and magnetic field fluctuations with a very low level of compressible density magnetic field intensity temperature fluctuations The whole system formed by the solar corona and the solar wind represents a sort of wind tunnel extremely useful to study the MHD turbulence properties The presence of magnetic turbulence in the heliosphere is identified as the source of charged particle collisionless diffusion which according the values of parameters like the energy level on magnetic fluctuations or the turbulence correlation length can display both a normal gaussian random walk and an anomalous subdiffusive or super diffusive behavior The former case is obtained in a situation of global stochasticity high level of fluctuation energy while the latter in a situation of weak chaos low level of fluctuation energy The talk will discuss turbulence generation at photospheric level its propagation and its interaction with heliospheric structures and its effects on anomalous transport processes of charged

  5. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D. ); Sikes, W.C. )

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  6. Cusp geometry in MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, George; Crooker, Nancy; Siebert, Keith; Maynard, Nelson; Weimer, Daniel; White, Willard

    2005-01-01

    The MHD simulations described here show that the latitude of the high-altitude cusp decreases as the IMF swings from North to South, that there is a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at high-altitude associated with a dawn dusk component of the IMF, and that at the same time there is also a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at low-altitude. The simulations generate a feature that represents what has been called the cleft. It appears as a tail (when the IMF has a By component) attached to the cusp, extending either toward the dawn flank or the dusk flank depending on the dawn dusk orientation of the IMF. This one-sided cleft connects the cusp to the magnetospheric sash. We compare cusp geometry predicted by MHD simulations against published observations based on Hawkeye and DMSP data. Regarding the high-altitude predictions, the comparisons are not definitive, mainly because the observations are incomplete or mutually inconsistent. Regarding the low-altitude prediction of a strong dawn dusk asymmetry, the observations are unambiguous and are in good qualitative agreement with the prediction.

  7. Research and development studies for MHD/coal power flow train components. Part II. Diagnostics and instrumentation MHD channel combutor. Progres report. [Flow calculations for combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, M.H.; Lederman, S.; Sforza, P.; Matalon, M.

    1980-01-01

    This is Part II of the Technical Progress Report on Tasks II-IV of the subject contract. It deals sequentially with Diagnostics and Instrumentation, the MHD Channel and the Combustor. During this period, a significant effort has gone into establishing a schematic design of a laser diagnostic system which can be applied to the flow-train of the MHD system, and to acquiring, assembling and shaking down a laboratory set-up upon which a prototype can be based. With further reference to the MHD Channel, a model analysis has been initiated of the two-dimensional MHD boundary layer between two electrodes in the limit of small magnetic Reynolds numbers with negligible effect of the flow on the applied magnetic field. An objective of this model study is the assessment of variations in initial conditions on the boundary layer behavior. Finally, the problem of combustion modeling has been studied on an initial basis. The open reports on this subject depict a high degree of empiricism, centering attention on global behavior mainly. A quasi-one-dimensional model code has been set-up to check some of the existing estimates. Also a code for equilibrium combustion has been activated.

  8. Assessment and Validation of MHD Models for the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, L.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Kohl, J. L.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Raymond, J. R.; van Ballegooijen, A.

    2007-12-01

    We describe the status of a model assessment and validation project for testing MHD codes that simulate the solar corona and inner heliosphere. The goal of the project is to test MHD codes by applying firm empirical constraints to their boundary conditions in the corona and at 1 AU. The project has produced a database of coronal and solar wind observations from SOHO, ACE, Wind, and Ulysses. In addition to the database, software tools for comparing these data sets to the outputs for the MHD model codes under test will be demonstrated. The first step is to take the plasma parameters that are produced from the model codes and apply forward modeling to simulate the coronal observations of emission lines (H I Lyman alpha and O VI 103.2 nm). In situ solar wind data are used not only to provide benchmarks near 1 AU but also to provide coronal constraints for the coronal source regions of the solar wind. Future stages will involve making more direct comparisons of the plasma properties predicted from the model codes through the use of empirical coronal and solar wind models. We also describe a set of metrics that are used for making comparisons between the model code outputs and the empirical data. This work is supported by NASA under Grants NNX07AB98G to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and NNX07AB99G to the University of Michigan.

  9. Initial Studies of Validation of MHD Models for MST Reversed Field Pinch Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, C. M.; Almagri, A. F.; Craig, D.; McCollam, K. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Sauppe, J. P.; Sovinec, C. R.; Triana, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative validation of visco-resistive MHD models for RFP plasmas takes advantage of MST's advanced diagnostics. These plasmas are largely governed by MHD relaxation activity, so that a broad range of validation metrics can be evaluated. Previous nonlinear simulations using the visco-resistive MHD code DEBS at Lundquist number S = 4 ×106 produced equilibrium relaxation cycles in qualitative agreement with experiment, but magnetic fluctuation amplitudes b~ were at least twice as large as in experiment. The extended-MHD code NIMROD previously suggested that a two-fluid model may be necessary to produce b~ in agreement with experiment. For best comparisons with DEBS and to keep computational expense tractable, NIMROD is run in single-fluid mode at low S. These simulations are complemented by DEBS at higher S in cylindrical geometry, which will be used to examine b~ as a function of S. Experimental measurements are used with results from these simulations to evaluate validation metrics. Convergence tests of previous high S DEBS simulations are also discussed, along with benchmarking of DEBS and NIMROD with the SPECYL and PIXIE3D codes. Work supported by U.S. DOE and NSF.

  10. MHD seawater thruster performance: A comparison of predictions with experimental results from a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Picologlou, B.F.; Doss, E.D.; Geyer, H.K. ); Sikes, W.C.; Ranellone, R.F. )

    1992-01-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate a design oriented MHD thruster performance computer code. The thruster performance code consists of a one-dimensional MHD hydrodynamic model coupled to a two-dimensional electrical model. The code includes major loss mechanisms affecting the performance of the thruster. Among these losses are the joule dissipation losses, frictional losses, electrical end losses, and single electrode potential losses. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  11. Light field morphing using 2D features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Lin, Stephen; Lee, Seungyong; Guo, Baining; Shum, Heung-Yeung

    2005-01-01

    We present a 2D feature-based technique for morphing 3D objects represented by light fields. Existing light field morphing methods require the user to specify corresponding 3D feature elements to guide morph computation. Since slight errors in 3D specification can lead to significant morphing artifacts, we propose a scheme based on 2D feature elements that is less sensitive to imprecise marking of features. First, 2D features are specified by the user in a number of key views in the source and target light fields. Then the two light fields are warped view by view as guided by the corresponding 2D features. Finally, the two warped light fields are blended together to yield the desired light field morph. Two key issues in light field morphing are feature specification and warping of light field rays. For feature specification, we introduce a user interface for delineating 2D features in key views of a light field, which are automatically interpolated to other views. For ray warping, we describe a 2D technique that accounts for visibility changes and present a comparison to the ideal morphing of light fields. Light field morphing based on 2D features makes it simple to incorporate previous image morphing techniques such as nonuniform blending, as well as to morph between an image and a light field. PMID:15631126

  12. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  13. Inertial solvation in femtosecond 2D spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybl, John; Albrecht Ferro, Allison; Farrow, Darcie; Jonas, David

    2001-03-01

    We have used 2D Fourier transform spectroscopy to investigate polar solvation. 2D spectroscopy can reveal molecular lineshapes beneath ensemble averaged spectra and freeze molecular motions to give an undistorted picture of the microscopic dynamics of polar solvation. The transition from "inhomogeneous" to "homogeneous" 2D spectra is governed by both vibrational relaxation and solvent motion. Therefore, the time dependence of the 2D spectrum directly reflects the total response of the solvent-solute system. IR144, a cyanine dye with a dipole moment change upon electronic excitation, was used to probe inertial solvation in methanol and propylene carbonate. Since the static Stokes' shift of IR144 in each of these solvents is similar, differences in the 2D spectra result from solvation dynamics. Initial results indicate that the larger propylene carbonate responds more slowly than methanol, but appear to be inconsistent with rotational estimates of the inertial response. To disentangle intra-molecular vibrations from solvent motion, the 2D spectra of IR144 will be compared to the time-dependent 2D spectra of the structurally related nonpolar cyanine dye HDITCP.

  14. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  15. MHD waves and instabilities for gravitating, magnetized configurations in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, Rony; Goedbloed, Hans J. P.

    Seismic probing of equilibrium configurations is of course well-known from geophysics, but has also been succesfully used to determine the internal structure of the Sun to an amazing accuracy. The results of helioseismology are quite impressive, although they only exploit an equilibrium structure where inward gravity is balanced by a pressure gradient in a 1D radial fashion. In principle, one can do the same for stationary, gravitating, magnetized plasma equilibria, as needed to perform MHD seismology in astrophysical jets or accretion disks. The introduction of (sheared) differential rotation does require the important switch from diagnosing static to stationary equilibrium configurations. The theory to describe all linear waves and instabilities in ideal MHD, given an exact stationary, gravitating, magnetized plasma equilibrium, in any dimensionality (1D, 2D, 3D) has been known since 1960, and is governed by the Frieman-Rotenberg equation. The full (mathematical) power of spectral theory governing physical eigenmode determination comes into play when using the Frieman-Rotenberg equation for moving equilibria, as applicable to astrophysical jets, accretion disks, but also solar flux ropes with stationary flow patterns. I will review exemplary seismic studies of flowing equilibrium configurations, covering solar to astrophysical configurations in motion. In that case, even essentially 1D configurations require quantification of the spectral web of eigenmodes, organizing the complex eigenfrequency plane.

  16. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, R. J.; Pollina, R. J.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of MHD materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues; sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate. Two phenomena that can effect the analysis of slag leakage current have been investigated and found significant. These are: (1) transverse current along the slag layer in the insulator walls of an MHD duct, and (2) electrode surface voltage drops. Both tend to reduce the value inferred for average plasma conductivity and increase the value inferred for axial leakage current. These two effects in combination are potentially capable of explaining the high leakage inferred. Corrosion on the water side of metal MHD duct wall elements has been examined in CDIF and Mark 7 generators. It appears to be controllable by adjusting the pH of the water and/or by controlling the dissolved oxygen content.

  17. Graphical representations of DNA as 2-D map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan

    2004-03-01

    We describe a modification of the compact representation of DNA sequences which transforms the sequence into a 2-D diagram in which the 'spots' have integer coordinates. As a result the accompanying numerical characterization of DNA is quite simple and straightforward. This is an important advantage, particularly when considering DNA sequences having thousands of nucleic bases. The approach starts with the compact representation of DNA based on zigzag spiral template used for placing 'spots' associated with binary codes of the nucleic acids and subsequent suppression of the underlying zigzag curve. As a result, a 2-D map is formed in which all 'spots' have integer coordinates. By using only distances between spots having the same x or the same y coordinate one can construct a 'map profile' using integer arithmetic. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin.

  18. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee's activities to date have focused primarily on the technology transfer'' aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

  19. MHD Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae with Cosmos++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Shizuka; Salmonson, Jay

    2010-10-01

    We performed 2D, axisymmetric, MHD simulations with Cosmos++ in order to examine the growth of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in core-collapse supernovae. We have initialized a non-rotating 15 Msolar progenitor, infused with differential rotation and poloidal magnetic fields. The collapse of the iron core is simulated with the Shen EOS, and the parametric Ye and entropy evolution. The wavelength of the unstable mode in the post-collapse environment is expected to be only ~200 m. In order to achieve the fine spatial resolution requirement, we employed remapping technique after the iron core has collapsed and bounced. The MRI unstable region appears near the equator and angular momentum and entropy are transported outward. Higher resolution remap run display more vigorous overturns and stronger transport of angular momentum and entropy. Our results are in agreement with the earlier work by Akiyama et al. [1] and Obergaulinger et al. [2].

  20. Numerical Simulation of MHD Effect in Liquid Metal Blankets with Flow Channel Insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Pan, H. C.

    2011-09-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic effect in liquid metal blankets with flow channel insert and pressure equalization slot for fusion liquid metal blanket is studied by numerical simulation based on two dimensional fully developed flow model. The code is verified by comparing analytical solution and numerical solution of Hunt Case II. The velocity field and MHD pressure drop varying with electric conductivity of the FCI is analyzed. The result shows that the average velocity in central area of the cross section decreases with the increase of the electric conductivity of FCI. While the average velocity in gap zone is reverse. Comparing with MHD duct flow without FCI, MHD pressure drop is reduced significantly when the FCI material is electrically insulating.

  1. Ideal MHD stability of double transport barrier plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. Q.; Wang, S. J.; Lao, L. L.; Turnbull, A. D.; Chu, M. S.; Brennan, D. P.; Groebner, R. J.; Zhao, L.

    2008-01-01

    The ideal MHD stability for double transport barrier (DTB or DB) plasmas with varying edge and internal barrier width and height was investigated, using the ideal MHD stability code GATO. A moderate ratio of edge transport barriers (ETB) height to internal transport barriers (ITBs) height is found to be beneficial to MHD stability and the βN is limited by global low n instabilities. For moderate ITB width DB plasmas, if the ETB is weak, the stability is limited by n = 1 (n is the toroidal mode number) global mode; whereas if the ETB is strong it is limited by intermediate-n edge peeling-ballooning modes. Broadening the ITB can improve stability if the ITB half width wi lsim 0.3. For very broad ITB width plasmas the stability is limited by stability to a low n (n > 1) global mode.

  2. Application of Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and Recent Research Trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Nobuhiro

    As the applications of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion, research and development for high-efficiency and low emission electric power generation system, MHD accelerations and/or MHD thrusters, and flow control around hypersonic and re-entry vehicles are introduced. For closed cycle MHD power generation, high-efficiency MHD single system is the most hopeful system and space power system using mixed inert gas (MIG) working medium is proposed. For open cycle MHD, high-efficiency coal fired MHD system with CO2 recovery has been proposed. As inverse process of MHD power generation, MHD accelerators/thrusters are expected as the next generation propulsion system. Heat flux reduction to protect re-entry vehicles is expected by an MHD process for safety return from space missions.

  3. Analysis and gyrokinetic simulation of MHD Alfven wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Kevin Derek

    The study of low-frequency turbulence in magnetized plasmas is a difficult problem due to both the enormous range of scales involved and the variety of physics encompassed over this range. Much of the progress that has been made in turbulence theory is based upon a result from incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), in which energy is only transferred from large scales to small via the collision of Alfven waves propagating oppositely along the mean magnetic field. Improvements in laboratory devices and satellite measurements have demonstrated that, while theories based on this premise are useful over inertial ranges, describing turbulence at scales that approach particle gyroscales requires new theory. In this thesis, we examine the limits of incompressible MHD theory in describing collisions between pairs of Alfven waves. This interaction represents the fundamental unit of plasma turbulence. To study this interaction, we develop an analytic theory describing the nonlinear evolution of interacting Alfven waves and compare this theory to simulations performed using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. Gyrokinetics captures a much richer set of physics than that described by incompressible MHD, and is well-suited to describing Alfvenic turbulence around the ion gyroscale. We demonstrate that AstroGK is well suited to the study of physical Alfven waves by reproducing laboratory Alfven dispersion data collected using the LAPD. Additionally, we have developed an initialization alogrithm for use with AstroGK that allows exact Alfven eigenmodes to be initialized with user specified amplitudes and phases. We demonstrate that our analytic theory based upon incompressible MHD gives excellent agreement with gyrokinetic simulations for weakly turbulent collisions in the limit that k⊥rho i << 1. In this limit, agreement is observed in the time evolution of nonlinear products, and in the strength of nonlinear interaction with respect to polarization and scale. We also examine the

  4. MHD Simulations of Plasma Dynamics with Non-Axisymmetric Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Chris; Levesque, Jeffrey; Morgan, Kyle; Jarboe, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The arbitrary geometry, 3D extended MHD code PSI-TET is applied to linear and non-linear simulations of MCF plasmas with non-axisymmetric boundaries. Progress and results from simulations on two experiments will be presented: 1) Detailed validation studies of the HIT-SI experiment with self-consistent modeling of plasma dynamics in the helicity injectors. Results will be compared to experimental data and NIMROD simulations that model the effect of the helicity injectors through boundary conditions on an axisymmetric domain. 2) Linear studies of HBT-EP with different wall configurations focusing on toroidal asymmetries in the adjustable conducting wall. HBT-EP studies the effect of active/passive stabilization with an adjustable ferritic wall. Results from linear verification and benchmark studies of ideal mode growth with and without toroidal asymmetries will be presented and compared to DCON predictions. Simulations of detailed experimental geometries are enabled by use of the PSI-TET code, which employs a high order finite element method on unstructured tetrahedral grids that are generated directly from CAD models. Further development of PSI-TET will also be presented including work to support resistive wall regions within extended MHD simulations. Work supported by DoE.

  5. MHD simulation studies of z-pinch shear flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, I.; Bauer, B. S.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Makhin, V.; Siemon, R. E.

    2003-10-01

    The development of the m=0 instability in a z-pinch in the presence of sheared plasma flows is investigated with the aid of a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation code (MHRDR). The linear growth rates are compared to the results obtained by solving the ideal MHD linearized equations [1] and to the results obtained using a 3D hybrid simulation code [2]. The instability development is followed into the nonlinear regime where its growth and saturation are examined. [1] V.I. Sotnikov, I. Paraschiv, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, J.-N. Leboeuf, and J.M. Dawson, "Linear analysis of sheared flow stabilization of global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities based on the Hall fluid mode", Phys. Plasmas 9, 913 (2002). [2] V.I. Sotnikov, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, P. Hellinger, P. Travnicek, V. Fiala, J.-N. Leboeuf, "Hybrid Simulations of Current-Carrying Instabilities in Z-pinch Plasmas with Sheared Axial Flow", AIP Conference Proceedings, Volume 651, Dense Z-Pinches: 5th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches, edited by J. Davis et al., page 396, June 2002.

  6. Alfven Wave Tomography for Cold MHD Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch

    2001-09-07

    Alfven waves propagation in slightly nonuniform cold plasmas is studied by means of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) nonlinear equations. The evolution of the MHD spectrum is shown to be governed by a matrix linear differential equation with constant coefficients determined by the spectrum of quasi-static plasma density perturbations. The Alfven waves are shown not to affect the plasma density inhomogeneities, as they scatter off of them. The application of the MHD spectrum evolution equation to the inverse scattering problem allows tomographic measurements of the plasma density profile by scanning the plasma volume with Alfven radiation.

  7. Local structures of homogeneous Hall MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, H.; Araki, K.

    2011-12-01

    Local structures of decaying homogeneous and isotropic Hall MHD turbulence are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. Regions of strong vorticity and strong current density in Hall MHD turbulence are compared to those of single-fluid MHD turbulence. An analysis by the use of a low-pass filter reveals that the introduction of the Hall term can modify not only small-scale structures of the current density but also structures of the vorticity field, especially at the scales smaller than the ion skin depth.

  8. SSX MHD plasma wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael R.; Schaffner, David A.

    2015-06-01

    A new turbulent plasma source at the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) facility is described. The MHD wind tunnel configuration employs a magnetized plasma gun to inject high-beta plasma into a large, well-instrumented, vacuum drift region. This provides unique laboratory conditions approaching that in the solar wind: there is no applied background magnetic field in the drift region and has no net axial magnetic flux; the plasma flow speed is on the order of the local sound speed (M ~ 1), so flow energy density is comparable to thermal energy density; and the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure is of order unity (plasma β ~ 1) so thermal energy density is also comparable to magnetic energy density. Results presented here and referenced within demonstrate the new capabilities and show how the new platform is proving useful for fundamental plasma turbulence studies.

  9. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This seventeenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period August 1, 1991 to October 31, 1991. Manufacturing of the prototypical combustor pressure shell has been completed including leak, proof, and assembly fit checking. Manufacturing of forty-five cooling panels was also completed including leak, proof, and flow testing. All precombustor internal components (combustion can baffle and swirl box) were received and checked, and integration of the components was initiated. A decision was made regarding the primary and backup designs for the 1A4 channel. The assembly of the channel related prototypical hardware continued. The cathode wall electrical wiring is now complete. The mechanical design of the diffuser has been completed.

  10. MHD seed recovery and regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-10-01

    The TRW Econoseed MHD Seed Regeneration Process is based on the reaction of calcium formate with potassium sulfate spent seed from an MHD electric power generation plant. The process was tested at bench scale, design a proof of concept (POC) test plant, plan and cost a Phase 2 project for a POC plant evaluation and prepare a conceptual design of a 300 MW (t) commercial plant. The results of the project are as follows: (1) each of the unit operations is demonstrated, and (2) the data are incorporated into a POC plant design and project cost, as well as a 300 MW (t) commercial retrofit plant design and cost estimate. Specific results are as follows: (1) calcium formate can be produced at 100 percent yield in a total retention time of less than 5 minutes, (2) utilizing the calcium formate, spent seed can quantitatively be converted to potassium formate, potassium carbonate or mixtures of these with potassium sulfate as per the commercial design without measurable loss of potassium to insolubles at a total retention time under 20 minutes and ambient pressure, (3) the solid rejects form the process meet RCRA EP Toxicity requirements for safe disposal, and (4) filtration and evaporation data, as well as reaction data cited above, show that the Econoseed technology is ready for scale up to POC plant scale. Economics forecast studies show that the total cost per unit of potassium for seed regeneration by the Econoseed Process is in the range of $0.23 to $0.27/lb, a cost which is less than half the potassium cost of $0.63/lb for purchasing new potassium carbonate.

  11. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    A summary of the work is excerpted here. Final design of an MHD channel for the ITC program POC test has been completed. The channel was designed to be capable of 1.5 MW {sub e} power output and a lifetime of 2000 hours. Emphasis was placed upon durability and reliability. Hence, specific measures were taken to design against channel damage due to electric faults. The life-limiting issues associated with electrochemical corrosion and erosion of gas-side surfaces were addressed by the use of various materials with proven wear characteristics in a coal-fired MHD channel environment. Pitting of prototypical sidewall coupons was observed in the CDIF workhorse testing. The most likely cause of the observed pitting, water leaks resulting from cooling water tube braze failures, has been remedied. New brazing procedures and isolation of the sidebar gas-side material from water contact will prevent sidebar pitting in the prototypical channel. Water-side corrosion tests reported in this quarterly report include the latest results of tungsten-copper elements at controlled pH, heat flux and voltage levels. In the combustion subsystem, efforts continued to focus on understanding and improving the current levels of slag recovery and seed utilization achieved by the combustor. Analytical support was also provided in the areas of slag rejection system operation, precombustor operation, and oil burner design modification. Channel data analysis activities continued in support of prototypical coupon testing at the CDIF. Analyses are presented on channel wall slagging behavior and sidewall voltage distributions.

  12. Examination of instability growth in solid liner surfaces using comparisons of two dimensional MHD calculations and measured data

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, W.L.; Faehl, R.J.; Morgan, D.V.; Reinovsky, R.E.

    1997-10-01

    Experiments being conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus facility are examining stability issues for driving an aluminum liner with a pulsed magnetic field. The Pegasus facility provides a current of 5 to 8 Megamperes to compress a cylindrical liner. Liners of various size and thickness are used, depending on the specific experimental objectives. In several of these experiments, the outer surface clearly develops perturbations in the mass distribution. These perturbations are strongest when the aluminum is suspected to have melted and in some cases partially vaporized. A series of specific experiments was designed to examine the growth rate of these instabilities. These experiments involved machining a sine wave onto the outer surface of the liner to seed a given wavelength. Two-dimensional MHD calculations, using the measured current profile, were performed to model the behavior of the liner under magnetic field compression. These predictions were made with a 2D Eulerian code complete with a Steinburg-Guinan strength model. The results of these calculations will be discussed in this paper. The density contours at specific times will be compared with the processed radiography.

  13. Predictive radiation-MHD simulations with FLASH: Magnetic field generation and turbulent amplification experiments with the Omega EP laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Daley, Christopher; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, Donald Q.; Lee, Dongwook; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus; Doyle, Hugo; Gregori, Gianluca; Meinecke, Jena; Reville, Brian; Miniati, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    The process of generation and amplification of Biermann battery magnetic fields is closely linked to the development of turbulence. In an astrophysical environment, a small seed field can be formed in asymmetric supernova remnant blast waves due to misaligned pressure and density gradients. Inhomogeneities in the density distribution can cause the flow to become turbulent and the B-field can be amplified via dynamo action. In this context, the COSMOLAB team will perform experiments using the Omega EP laser at LLE, that represent a scaled-down model of the astrophysical process in a controlled environment. The experiments involve the illumination of a slab-like target, which produces a plasma flow and a Biermann battery field. The flow then propagates through a grid that creates turbulence and amplifies the field. In this study we describe 2D and 3D radiative MHD simulations of the experimental setup, carried out using the FLASH code on Mira (BG/Q) at ALCF. The objective of these simulations is to explore the morphology and strength of the B-fields generated by ablation of target material by the laser, and their amplification due to the grid. This work was supported by DOE NNSA ASC.

  14. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  15. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  16. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  17. Propagation of MHD disturbance in numerical modelling: Accuracy issues and condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Im; Lee, Dong-Hun; Jang, Jae-Jin; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Jaehun

    2016-07-01

    In space weather studies, MHD numerical models are often used to study time-dependent simulations over relatively long time period and large size space, which include many examples from the solar origin to the Earth impact in the heliosphere. There have been rising questions on whether many different numerical codes are consistent with each other and how we can confirm the validity of simulation results for a given event. In this study, we firstly introduce a class of exact analytic solutions of MHD when the boundary is driven by certain impulsive impacts. Secondly we test and compare MHD numerical models with the exact full MHD solution above to check whether the simulations are sufficiently accurate. Our results show 1) that numerical errors are very significant in the problems of MHD disturbance propagation in the interplanetary space, 2) that typical spatial and temporal resolutions, which are widely used in numerical modelling, are found to easily produce more than a few hours up to 10 hours in arrival timing at the near-Earth space, and 3) how we can avoid serious errors by optimizing the model parameters in advance via studying with an exact solution.

  18. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  19. Extended 2D generalized dilaton gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, R. O.

    2008-09-01

    We show that an anomaly-free description of matter in (1+1) dimensions requires a deformation of the 2D relativity principle, which introduces a non-trivial centre in the 2D Poincaré algebra. Then we work out the reduced phase space of the anomaly-free 2D relativistic particle, in order to show that it lives in a noncommutative 2D Minkowski space. Moreover, we build a Gaussian wave packet to show that a Planck length is well defined in two dimensions. In order to provide a gravitational interpretation for this noncommutativity, we propose to extend the usual 2D generalized dilaton gravity models by a specific Maxwell component, which guages the extra symmetry associated with the centre of the 2D Poincaré algebra. In addition, we show that this extension is a high energy correction to the unextended dilaton theories that can affect the topology of spacetime. Further, we couple a test particle to the general extended dilaton models with the purpose of showing that they predict a noncommutativity in curved spacetime, which is locally described by a Moyal star product in the low energy limit. We also conjecture a probable generalization of this result, which provides strong evidence that the noncommutativity is described by a certain star product which is not of the Moyal type at high energies. Finally, we prove that the extended dilaton theories can be formulated as Poisson Sigma models based on a nonlinear deformation of the extended Poincaré algebra.

  20. Resistive MHD studies of high-. beta. -tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, V.E.; Carreras, B.A.; Hicks, H.R.; Holmes, J.A.; Garcia, L.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical calculations have been performed to study the MHD activity in high-..beta.. tokamaks such as ISX-B. These initial value calculations built on earlier low ..beta.. techniques, but the ..beta.. effects create several new numerical issues. These issues are discussed and resolved. In addition to time-stepping modules, our system of computer codes includes equilibrium solvers (used to provide an initial condition) and output modules, such as a magnetic field line follower and an X-ray diagnostic code. The transition from current driven modes at low ..beta.. to predominantly pressure driven modes at high ..beta.. is described. The nonlinear studies yield X-ray emissivity plots which are compared with experiment.

  1. Quantifying Therapeutic and Diagnostic Efficacy in 2D Microvascular Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Vickerman, Mary B.; Keith, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    VESGEN is a newly automated, user-interactive program that maps and quantifies the effects of vascular therapeutics and regulators on microvascular form and function. VESGEN analyzes two-dimensional, black and white vascular images by measuring important vessel morphology parameters. This software guides the user through each required step of the analysis process via a concise graphical user interface (GUI). Primary applications of the VESGEN code are 2D vascular images acquired as clinical diagnostic images of the human retina and as experimental studies of the effects of vascular regulators and therapeutics on vessel remodeling.

  2. Open Boundary Conditions for Dissipative MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, E T

    2011-11-10

    In modeling magnetic confinement, astrophysics, and plasma propulsion, representing the entire physical domain is often difficult or impossible, and artificial, or 'open' boundaries are appropriate. A novel open boundary condition (BC) for dissipative MHD, called Lacuna-based open BC (LOBC), is presented. LOBC, based on the idea of lacuna-based truncation originally presented by V.S. Ryaben'kii and S.V. Tsynkov, provide truncation with low numerical noise and minimal reflections. For hyperbolic systems, characteristic-based BC (CBC) exist for separating the solution into outgoing and incoming parts. In the hyperbolic-parabolic dissipative MHD system, such separation is not possible, and CBC are numerically unstable. LOBC are applied in dissipative MHD test problems including a translating FRC, and coaxial-electrode plasma acceleration. Solution quality is compared to solutions using CBC and zero-normal derivative BC. LOBC are a promising new open BC option for dissipative MHD.

  3. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. [Threshold unstable MHD activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical predictions were compared with available data from JET on the threshold unstable MHD activity in toroidal confinement devices. In particular, questions arising as to Hartmans number and the selection of a kinematic viscosity are discussed.

  4. Towards a Scalable Fully-Implicit Fully-coupled Resistive MHD Formulation with Stabilized FE Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J N; Pawlowski, R P; Banks, J W; Chacon, L; Lin, P T; Tuminaro, R S

    2009-06-03

    This paper presents an initial study that is intended to explore the development of a scalable fully-implicit stabilized unstructured finite element (FE) capability for low-Mach-number resistive MHD. The discussion considers the development of the stabilized FE formulation and the underlying fully-coupled preconditioned Newton-Krylov nonlinear iterative solver. To enable robust, scalable and efficient solution of the large-scale sparse linear systems generated by the Newton linearization, fully-coupled algebraic multilevel preconditioners are employed. Verification results demonstrate the expected order-of-acuracy for the stabilized FE discretization of a 2D vector potential form for the steady and transient solution of the resistive MHD system. In addition, this study puts forth a set of challenging prototype problems that include the solution of an MHD Faraday conduction pump, a hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Bernard linear stability calculation, and a magnetic island coalescence problem. Initial results that explore the scaling of the solution methods are presented on up to 4096 processors for problems with up to 64M unknowns on a CrayXT3/4. Additionally, a large-scale proof-of-capability calculation for 1 billion unknowns for the MHD Faraday pump problem on 24,000 cores is presented.

  5. Solar driven liquid metal MHD power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1983-06-01

    A solar energy collector focuses solar energy onto a solar oven which is attached to a mixer which in turn is attached to the channel of a MHD generator. Gas enters the oven and a liquid metal enters the mixer. The gas/liquid metal mixture is heated by the collected solar energy and moves through the MHD generator thereby generating electrical power. The mixture is then separated and recycled.

  6. Solar driven liquid metal MHD power generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A solar energy collector focuses solar energy onto a solar oven which is attached to a mixer which in turn is attached to the channel of a MHD generator. Gas enters the oven and a liquid metal enters the mixer. The gas/liquid metal mixture is heated by the collected solar energy and moves through the MHD generator thereby generating electrical power. The mixture is then separated and recycled.

  7. MHD technology transfer, integration, and review committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-05-01

    As part of Task 8 of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The TTIRC consists of an Executive Committee (EC) which acts as the governing body, and a General Committee (GC), also referred to as the main or full committee, consisting of representatives from the various POC contractors, participating universities and national laboratories, utilities, equipment suppliers, and other potential MHD users or investors. The purpose of the TTIRC is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the U.S. MHD Program. There are seven sections: introduction; Executive Committee and General Committee activity; Committee activities related to technology transfer; ongoing POC integration activities being performed under the auspices of the Executive Committee; recommendations passed on to the DOE by the Executive Committee; Planned activities for the next six months.

  8. MHD simulations of supernova driven ISM turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressel, Oliver; Ziegler, Udo

    The dynamic evolution of the (stratified) turbulent interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated utilizing a three-dimensional MHD model including various physical effects. The computational domain covers a box of 0.5x0.5x2.0 kpc at a resolution of typically 128x128x1024 grid cells. The model includes (constant kinematic) viscosity and magnetic diffusivity. The adiabatic equation of state is supplemented by a parameterized heating- and cooling-function allowing for thermal instability (TI). The update due to heating and cooling is implemented implicitly using a Patankar-type discretization. Turbulence is driven by supernova explosions which are modelled as local injections of thermal energy, smeared over three standard-deviations of a Gaussian support with FWHM of 20pc. Supernova rates are adopted for typical cited values. Within our model we make a distinction between Type I and Type II SNe. Latter are statistically clustered by the (artificial) constraint that the density at the explosion site be above average (with respect to a horizontal slab) - former are spatially uncorrelated. The dual-energy feature of the conservative NIRVANA-code is used to tackle the extreme ratio of kinetic to internal energy that arises from the violent energy input. We stress the importance of using a conservative scheme to properly transfer the injected energy to kinetic motion. The model also includes a differentially rotating background (with shearing boundary conditions in radial direction) as well as vertical stratification. The initial density and pressure profiles are in hydrostatic equilibrium with respect to the equation of state given by the radiative equilibrium. Including z-dependent heating rates this leads to a considerable deviation from usual isothermal initial models. The primary focus of this work is on the galactic dynamo and the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. As a secondary target we are also interested in general properties of the ISM that are of importance

  9. Understanding Accretion Disks through Three Dimensional Radiation MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei

    I study the structures and thermal properties of black hole accretion disks in the radiation pressure dominated regime. Angular momentum transfer in the disk is provided by the turbulence generated by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI), which is calculated self-consistently with a recently developed 3D radiation magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) code based on Athena. This code, developed by my collaborators and myself, couples both the radiation momentum and energy source terms with the ideal MHD equations by modifying the standard Godunov method to handle the stiff radiation source terms. We solve the two momentum equations of the radiation transfer equations with a variable Eddington tensor (VET), which is calculated with a time independent short characteristic module. This code is well tested and accurate in both optically thin and optically thick regimes. It is also accurate for both radiation pressure and gas pressure dominated flows. With this code, I find that when photon viscosity becomes significant, the ratio between Maxwell stress and Reynolds stress from the MRI turbulence can increase significantly with radiation pressure. The thermal instability of the radiation pressure dominated disk is then studied with vertically stratified shearing box simulations. Unlike the previous results claiming that the radiation pressure dominated disk with MRI turbulence can reach a steady state without showing any unstable behavior, I find that the radiation pressure dominated disks always either collapse or expand until we have to stop the simulations. During the thermal runaway, the heating and cooling rates from the simulations are consistent with the general criterion of thermal instability. However, details of the thermal runaway are different from the predictions of the standard alpha disk model, as many assumptions in that model are not satisfied in the simulations. We also identify the key reasons why previous simulations do not find the instability. The thermal

  10. Oblique MHD cosmic-ray modified shocks: Two-fluid numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Adam; Jones, T. W.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1991-01-01

    We present the first results of time dependent, two-fluid, cosmic-ray (CR) modified, MHD shock simulations. The calculations were carried out with a new numerical code for 1-D ideal MHD. By coupling this code with the CR energy transport equation we can simulate the time-dependent evolution of MHD shocks including the acceleration of the CR and their feedback on the shock structures. We report tests of the combined numerical method including comparisons with analytical steady state results published earlier by Webb, as well as internal consistency checks for more general MHD CR shock structures after they appear to have converged to dynamical steady states. We also present results from an initial time dependent simulation which extend the parameter space domain of previous analytical models. These new results support Webb's suggestion that equilibrium oblique shocks are less effective than parallel shocks in the acceleration of CR. However, for realistic models of anisotropic CR diffusion, oblique shocks may achieve dynamical equilibrium on shorter timescale than parallel shocks.

  11. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  12. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  13. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  14. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W.; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Tobias, B. J.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  15. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program. PMID:25430247

  16. 2D-Crystal-Based Functional Inks.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bartolotta, Antonino; Coleman, Jonathan N; Backes, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    The possibility to produce and process graphene, related 2D crystals, and heterostructures in the liquid phase makes them promising materials for an ever-growing class of applications as composite materials, sensors, in flexible optoelectronics, and energy storage and conversion. In particular, the ability to formulate functional inks with on-demand rheological and morphological properties, i.e., lateral size and thickness of the dispersed 2D crystals, is a step forward toward the development of industrial-scale, reliable, inexpensive printing/coating processes, a boost for the full exploitation of such nanomaterials. Here, the exfoliation strategies of graphite and other layered crystals are reviewed, along with the advances in the sorting of lateral size and thickness of the exfoliated sheets together with the formulation of functional inks and the current development of printing/coating processes of interest for the realization of 2D-crystal-based devices. PMID:27273554

  17. The 2D lingual appliance system.

    PubMed

    Cacciafesta, Vittorio

    2013-09-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) lingual bracket system represents a valuable treatment option for adult patients seeking a completely invisible orthodontic appliance. The ease of direct or simplified indirect bonding of 2D lingual brackets in combination with low friction mechanics makes it possible to achieve a good functional and aesthetic occlusion, even in the presence of a severe malocclusion. The use of a self-ligating bracket significantly reduces chair-side time for the orthodontist, and the low-profile bracket design greatly improves patient comfort. PMID:24005953

  18. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  19. Measurement of 2D birefringence distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Masato; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohno, Masahiro; Tachihara, Satoru

    1992-10-01

    A new measuring method of 2-D birefringence distribution has been developed. It has not been an easy job to get a birefringence distribution in an optical element with conventional ellipsometry because of its lack of scanning means. Finding an analogy between the rotating analyzer method in ellipsometry and the phase-shifting method in recently developed digital interferometry, we have applied the phase-shifting algorithm to ellipsometry, and have developed a new method that makes the measurement of 2-D birefringence distribution easy and possible. The system contains few moving parts, assuring reliability, and measures a large area of a sample at one time, making the measuring time very short.

  20. Toroidal Theory of MHD Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Goedbloed, J.P.

    2004-03-15

    We continue with the adventures of the Alfven wave and its two magnetosonic companions as they travel in the curved space of magnetic surfaces and field lines (Sec. 2), find themselves trapped in singularities of an unprecedented richness (Sec. 3), decide to get themselves better maps of the landscape to do the required twisting while some of their youthful energy is leaking away (Sec. 4), cause trouble at the edge of a powerful empire (Sec. 5), and finally see the light in a distant future (Sec. 6). Needed on the trip are the evolution equations of both ideal and resistive MHD 'derived' in reference [1], the solutions to the toroidal equilibrium equations discussed in reference [2], the general background on spectral theory of inhomogeneous plasmas presented in reference [3], which is extended in the two directions of toroidal geometry and resistivity in this lecture [4]. This leads to such intricate dynamics that numerical techniques are virtually the only way to proceed. This aspect is further elaborated in reference [5] on numerical techniques.

  1. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This fourteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1990 to January 31, 1991. Testing of the High Pressure Cooling Subsystem electrical isolator was completed. The PEEK material successfully passed the high temperature, high pressure duration tests (50 hours). The Combustion Subsystem drawings were CADAM released. The procurement process is in progress. An equipment specification and RFP were prepared for the new Low Pressure Cooling System (LPCS) and released for quotation. Work has been conducted on confirmation tests leading to final gas-side designs and studies to assist in channel fabrication.The final cathode gas-side design and the proposed gas-side designs of the anode and sidewall are presented. Anode confirmation tests and related analyses of anode wear mechanisms used in the selection of the proposed anode design are presented. Sidewall confirmation tests, which were used to select the proposed gas-side design, were conducted. The design for the full scale CDIF system was completed. A test program was initiated to investigate the practicality of using Avco current controls for current consolidation in the power takeoff (PTO) regions and to determine the cause of past current consolidation failures. Another important activity was the installation of 1A4-style coupons in the 1A1 channel. A description of the coupons and their location with 1A1 channel is presented herein.

  2. Basic Bell-MHD turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2014-06-20

    Nonresonant current instability was identified by Bell as an important mechanism for magnetic field amplification in supernova remnants. In this paper we focus on studying the nonlinear stage of this instability using the incompressible MHD formulation. We demonstrate that the evolution of magnetic turbulence driven by the Bell instability resembles turbulence driven on large scales. More importantly, we demonstrate that the energy-containing scale for magnetic fields is proportional to the square root of the magnetic energy density. Given the observational constraints of the possible field amplification, this new relation allows us to directly estimate the maximum energy of particles scattered by such fields, and this estimate is normally below the average particle energy. This implies that, without taking into account the feedback to cosmic rays (CRs), the typical scales of Bell fields, in either the linear or nonlinear regime, will be too small to affect high-energy particle acceleration. We mention several scenarios of back reaction to CRs that could be important.

  3. MHD waveguides in space plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, N. G.; Fedorov, E. N.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2010-07-15

    The waveguide properties of two characteristic formations in the Earth's magnetotail-the plasma sheet and the current (neutral) sheet-are considered. The question of how the domains of existence of different types of MHD waveguide modes (fast and slow, body and surface) in the (k, {omega}) plane and their dispersion properties depend on the waveguide parameters is studied. Investigation of the dispersion relation in a number of particular (limiting) cases makes it possible to obtain a fairly complete qualitative pattern of all the branches of the dispersion curve. Accounting for the finite size of perturbations across the wave propagation direction reveals new additional effects such as a change in the critical waveguide frequencies, the excitation of longitudinal current at the boundaries of the sheets, and a change in the symmetry of the fundamental mode. Knowledge of the waveguide properties of the plasma and current sheets can explain the occurrence of preferred frequencies in the low-frequency fluctuation spectra in the magnetotail. In satellite observations, the type of waveguide mode can be determined from the spectral properties, as well as from the phase relationships between plasma oscillations and magnetic field oscillations that are presented in this paper.

  4. Evaluation of technical feasibility of closed-cycle non-equilibrium MHD power generation with direct coal firing. Final report, Task I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    Program accomplishments in a continuing effort to demonstrate the feasibility of direct coal-fired, closed-cycle MHD power generation are reported. This volume contains the following appendices: (A) user's manual for 2-dimensional MHD generator code (2DEM); (B) performance estimates for a nominal 30 MW argon segmented heater; (C) the feedwater cooled Brayton cycle; (D) application of CCMHD in an industrial cogeneration environment; (E) preliminary design for shell and tube primary heat exchanger; and (F) plant efficiency as a function of output power for open and closed cycle MHD power plants. (WHK)

  5. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  6. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits. PMID:26813882

  7. Baby universes in 2d quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, Jan; Jain, Sanjay; Thorleifsson, Gudmar

    1993-06-01

    We investigate the fractal structure of 2d quantum gravity, both for pure gravity and for gravity coupled to multiple gaussian fields and for gravity coupled to Ising spins. The roughness of the surfaces is described in terms of baby universes and using numerical simulations we measure their distribution which is related to the string susceptibility exponent γstring.

  8. Global Hall-MHD simulations of magnetorotational instability in a plasma Couette flow experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahimi, F.; Lefebvre, B.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Forest, C. B.

    2011-06-15

    Global MHD and Hall-MHD numerical simulations relevant to the Madison plasma Couette flow experiment (MPCX) have been performed using the extended MHD code NIMROD. The MPCX has been constructed to study the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a plasma. The two-fluid Hall effect, which is relevant to some astrophysical situations such as protostellar disks, is also expected to be important in the MPCX. Here, we first derive the local Hall dispersion relation including viscosity, extending earlier work by Balbus and Terquem [Astrophys. J. 552, 235 (2001)]. The predictions of the local analysis are then compared with nonlocal calculations of linear stability of the MRI for a parameter range relevant to the MPCX. It is found that the MHD stability limit and mode structure are altered by the Hall term, and nonlocal analysis is necessary to obtain quantitatively reliable predictions for MPCX. Two-fluid physics also significantly changes the nonlinear evolution and saturation of the axisymmetric MRI. Both the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses contribute significantly to momentum transport. In the Hall regime, when the magnetic field is parallel to the rotation axis, the Maxwell stress is larger than the Reynolds stress (similar to the MHD regime). However, when the magnetic field is antiparallel to the rotation axis in the Hall regime, the Reynolds stress is much larger than the Maxwell stress. To further study the role of non-axisymmetric modes, we have also carried out fully nonlinear MHD computations. Non-axisymmetric modes play an increasingly important role as the magnetic Reynolds number increases and grow to large amplitudes in a saturated turbulent state.

  9. Two-fluid MHD Regime of Drift Wave Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shang-Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Xie, Jin-Lin; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Drift wave instabilities contribute to the formation of edge turbulence and zonal flows, and thus are believed to play essential roles in the anomalous transport processes in tokamaks. Whereas drift waves are generally assumed to be local and electrostatic, experiments have often found regimes where the spatial scales and the magnetic components of drift waves approach those of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes. In this work we study such a drift wave regime in a cylindrical magnetized plasma using a full two-fluid MHD model implemented in the NIMROD code. The linear dependency of growth rates on resistivity and the dispersion relation found in the NIMROD calculations qualitatively agree with theoretical analysis. As the azimuthal mode number increases, the drift modes become highly localized radially; however, unlike the conventional local approximation, the radial profile of the drift mode tends to shift toward the edge away from the center of the density gradient slope, suggesting the inhomogeneity of two-fluid effects. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11275200 and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant 2014GB124002.

  10. Computational Investigation of Extended-MHD Effects on Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jacob R.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2013-10-01

    We present studies with the extended-MHD NIMROD code of the tearing instability and edge-localized modes (ELMs). In our first study we use analytics and computations to examine tearing in a large-guide field with a nonzero pressure gradient where previous results show drift effects are stabilizing [Coppi, PoF (1964)]. Our work finds three new results: (1) At moderately large ion gyroradius the mode rotates at the electron drift velocity and there is no stabilization. (2) With collision-less drift reconnection, computations must also include electron gyroviscosity and advection. And (3) we derive a dispersion relation that exhibits diamagnetic stabilization and describes the transition between the electron-fluid-mediated regime of (1) and the semi-collisional regime [Drake and Lee, PoF (1977)]. Our second study investigates the transition from an ideal- to an extended-MHD model in an ELM unstable tokamak configuration. With the inclusion of a full generalized Ohm's law the growth rate is enhanced at intermediate wave-numbers and cut-off at large wave-numbers by diamagnetic effects consistent with analytics [Hastie et al., PoP (2003)]. Adding ion gyroviscosity to the model is stabilizing at large wave-numbers consistent with recent results [Xu et al., PoP (2013)]. Support provided by US DOE.

  11. MHD Modeling of Conductors at Ultra-High Current Density

    SciTech Connect

    ROSENTHAL,STEPHEN E.; DESJARLAIS,MICHAEL P.; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.; ASAY,JAMES R.; DOUGLAS,M.R.; HALL,C.A.; FRESE,M.H.; MORSE,R.L.; REISMAN,D.B.

    2000-08-29

    In conjunction with ongoing high-current experiments on Sandia National Laboratories' Z accelerator, the authors have revisited a problem first described in detail by Heinz Knoepfel. Unlike the 1-Tesla MITLs of pulsed power accelerators used to produce intense particle beams, Z's disc transmission line (downstream of the current addition) is in a 100--1,200 Tesla regime, so its conductors cannot be modeled simply as static infinite conductivity boundaries. Using the MHD code MACH2 they have been investigating the conductor hydrodynamics, characterizing the joule heating, magnetic field diffusion, and material deformation, pressure, and velocity over a range of current densities, current rise-times, and conductor materials. Three purposes of this work are (1) to quantify power flow losses owing to ultra-high magnetic fields, (2) to model the response of VISAR diagnostic samples in various configurations on Z, and (3) to incorporate the most appropriate equation of state and conductivity models into the MHD computations. Certain features are strongly dependent on the details of the conductivity model.

  12. The MHD spectral web: Connecting all instabilities of stationary plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goedbloed, Hans

    2015-11-01

    Quite a lot is known about the spectra of MHD instabilities in plasmas with background flow, in particular through numerical studies. They exhibit bewildering distributions of the complex eigenvalues, with isolated global modes as well as local modes clustering towards complicated continuous spectra. This calls for the development of a general theory generating physically meaningful structures in the complex ω-plane connecting the eigenvalues. Whereas the simplicity of the energy principle of static equilibria no longer applies, proper consideration of the two quadratic forms of the potential energy and the averaged Doppler-Coriolis shift leads a new approach to the analysis of stationary plasmas, called the spectral web, that provides the desired structures. Thus, for the first time, the full complex spectrum of stationary plasmas is obtained together with a connecting structure. This permits to consider the enormous diversity of MHD instabilities of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas with arbitrary flow and rotation profiles from a single unifying view point. I will illustrate that with results obtained on these instabilities with the new spectral code ROC.

  13. Kinetic Effects of Energetic Particles on Resistive MHD Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, R.; Brennan, D. P.; Kim, C. C.

    2009-04-03

    We show that the kinetic effects of energetic particles can play a crucial role in the stability of the m/n=2/1 tearing mode in tokamaks (e.g., JET, JT-60U, and DIII-D), where the fraction of energetic particle {beta}{sub frac} is high. Using model equilibria based on DIII-D experimental reconstructions, the nonideal MHD linear stability of cases unstable to the 2/1 mode is investigated including a {delta}f particle-in-cell model for the energetic particles coupled to the nonlinear 3D resistive MHD code NIMROD[C. C. Kim et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 072507 (2008)]. It is observed that energetic particles have significant damping and stabilizing effects at experimentally relevant {beta}, {beta}{sub frac}, and S, and excite a real frequency of the 2/1 mode. Extrapolation of the results is discussed for implications to JET and ITER, where the effects are projected to be significant.

  14. Relativistic MHD simulations of stellar core collapse and magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, José A.; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Gabler, Michael; Müller, Ewald; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2011-02-01

    We present results from simulations of magneto-rotational stellar core collapse along with Alfvén oscillations in magnetars. These simulations are performed with the CoCoA/CoCoNuT code, which is able to handle ideal MHD flows in dynamical spacetimes in general relativity. Our core collapse simulations highlight the importance of genuine magnetic effects, like the magneto-rotational instability, for the dynamics of the flow. For the modelling of magnetars we use the anelastic approximation to general relativistic MHD, which allows for an effective suppression of fluid modes and an accurate description of Alfvén waves. We further compute Alfvén oscillation frequencies along individual magnetic field lines with a semi-analytic approach. Our work confirms previous results based on perturbative approaches regarding the existence of two families of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), with harmonics at integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. Additional material is presented in the accompanying contribution by Gabler et al (2010b) in these proceedings.

  15. Scale-Dependent Alignment of Velocity and Magnetic Fluctuations in Anisotropic MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Bigot, B.; Ponty, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The tendency of alignment between velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in MHD turbulence has been a subject of great interest theoretically [Grappin et al. 1983, Matthaeus et al. 1983, Pouquet et al. 1988] as well as observationally over many years. There has been recent theoretical interest in the effect of scale-dependent alignment of velocity and magnetic fluctuations in 3D anisotropic MHD turbulence with a large-scale magnetic field [Boldyrev 2005, 2006]. This theory predicts that the angle θ between the velocity and magnetic fluctuation vectors has a scaling of θ ∝ λ1/4, where λ is the spatial scale of the fluctuations. There have also been simulations on 3D forced MHD turbulence that supports this prediction [Mason et al. 2006, 2007]. In this paper, we demonstrate that the feature of scale-dependent alignment and the scaling of θ ∝ λ1/4 also occurs in 2D within a range of time interval and spatial scales, despite the fact that Boldyrev’s phenomenological theory appears to rely on physical mechanisms operative in fully 3D turbulence in the presence of a strong external field. High-resolution pseudo-spectral simulations and scaling analysis, based on pseudo-Alfven waves in 2D, will be presented. These findings suggests that the phenomenon of scale-dependent alignment may be a more universal feature of MHD turbulence than has been thought recently, independent of dimensionality, whether the turbulence is balanced or imbalanced. Implications for solar wind turbulence observations will be discussed. This work is supported by DOE and NASA.

  16. Doubled Color Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravyi, Sergey

    Combining protection from noise and computational universality is one of the biggest challenges in the fault-tolerant quantum computing. Topological stabilizer codes such as the 2D surface code can tolerate a high level of noise but implementing logical gates, especially non-Clifford ones, requires a prohibitively large overhead due to the need of state distillation. In this talk I will describe a new family of 2D quantum error correcting codes that enable a transversal implementation of all logical gates required for the universal quantum computing. Transversal logical gates (TLG) are encoded operations that can be realized by applying some single-qubit rotation to each physical qubit. TLG are highly desirable since they introduce no overhead and do not spread errors. It has been known before that a quantum code can have only a finite number of TLGs which rules out computational universality. Our scheme circumvents this no-go result by combining TLGs of two different quantum codes using the gauge-fixing method pioneered by Paetznick and Reichardt. The first code, closely related to the 2D color code, enables a transversal implementation of all single-qubit Clifford gates such as the Hadamard gate and the π / 2 phase shift. The second code that we call a doubled color code provides a transversal T-gate, where T is the π / 4 phase shift. The Clifford+T gate set is known to be computationally universal. The two codes can be laid out on the honeycomb lattice with two qubits per site such that the code conversion requires parity measurements for six-qubit Pauli operators supported on faces of the lattice. I will also describe numerical simulations of logical Clifford+T circuits encoded by the distance-3 doubled color code. Based on a joint work with Andrew Cross.

  17. MHD and heat transfer benchmark problems for liquid metal flow in rectangular ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorenkov, S.I.; Hua, T.Q.; Araseki, H.

    1994-12-31

    Liquid metal cooling systems of a self-cooled blanket in a tokamak reactor will likely include channels of rectangular cross section where liquid metal is circulated in the presence of strong magnetic fields. MHD pressure drop, velocity distribution and heat transfer characteristics are important issues in the engineering design considerations. Computer codes for the reliable solution of three-dimensional MHD flow problems are needed for fusion relevant conditions. Argonne National Laboratory and The Efremov Institute have jointly defined several benchmark problems for code validation. The problems, described in this paper, are based on two series of rectangular duct experiments conducted at ANL; one of the series is a joint ANL/Efremov experiment. The geometries consist of variation of aspect ratio and wall thickness (thus wall conductance ratio). The transverse magnetic fields are uniform and nonuniform in the axial direction.

  18. MHD Stability Trends from Perturbed Equilibria: Possible Limitations with Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Turnbull, A. D.; Cowley, S.

    2003-10-01

    The effects of equilibrium changes on ideal MHD properties are usually studied using numerical parameter scans. Previously, we introduced a new technique to explore these dependencies: changes in the potential energy δ W due to equilibrium changes are found with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than an eigenvalue-solver code. Validation of the approach in toroidal geometry attempted to use GATO (an ideal MHD stability code) and DIII-D shot 87009. The approach should succeed with the global modes of 87009; however, ˜ 0.1% changes to qo predicted δ W rapidly increasing. Perturbing β of other toroidal equilibria resulted in similar behavior. We first review results for a cylindrical equilibrium and for 87009. Between the cylindrical case and 87009 lie several other equilibria, which should produce intermediate results. We examine several of these intermediate equilibria, starting with the cylindrical case and changing aspect ratio, shape and profiles until ending at 87009.

  19. Computation of the MHD modes with rotation and kinetic effects: AEGIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.-J.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Turnbull, A.; Waelbroeck, F.; van Dam, J. W.; Berk, H.

    2003-10-01

    A new linear MHD eigenvalue code called AEGIS (Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Shooting) is being developed at the IFS. The benchmarking of AEGIS with GATO is underway and will be presented. Plasma rotation is being included, with the effect of rotation-enhanced plasma compressibility also taken into account. As a first step in including rotational effects, the ideal MHD model is being employed. Details of the numerical scheme will be described, along with preliminary numerical results. The plan to include kinetic compressiblity will be discussed. With this new code, rotational stabilization of resistive wall modes can be rigorously calculated for the first time. The algorithm also allows FLR effects to be included. Many helpful suggestions from A. Glasser are acknowledged.

  20. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, R. J.; Pollina, R. J.

    1990-07-01

    The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of MHD materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues; sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate. The work performed to date in the analysis of channel gas side materials has served to identify and clarify the respective environments to which the various materials are subjected and identified a performance ranking of materials. For high voltage intercathode gaps, which show the most severe wear, the materials rank in the order from best to worst: W, Mo, 90WCu, 97W2Fe1Ni, 75WCu, and Cr. We have shown data which indicates that lifetime is sensitive to gap voltage. Therefore for conditions under which iron oxide addition maintains low voltage intercathode gaps 75WCu becomes an excellent cathode material.

  1. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, R.J.; Pollina, R.J.

    1990-04-27

    The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of MHD materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues: sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate. The detailed correlation and analysis of data obtained from nearly all of the CDIF tests performed since 1986 has shown that the apparent leakage current flowing through the slag on the channel walls depends upon channel operating parameters in an unexpected way. A comprehensive report of the results obtained to date and a first attempt at their interpretation has been prepared and a copy is attached. The second activity has concerned the examination of electrodes (platinum anodes/tungsten cathodes) by SEM and EDX techniques to determine the nature of the surface degradation. Results of these examinations are reported.

  2. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Richard J.; Pollina, Richard J.

    1990-04-01

    The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues: sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate. The detailed correlation and analysis of data obtained from nearly all of the tests performed since 1986 has shown that the apparent leakage current flowing through the slag on the channel walls depends upon channel operating parameters in an unexpected way. A comprehensive report of the results obtained to date and a first attempt at their interpretation has been prepared and a copy is attached. The second activity has concerned the examination of electrodes (platinum anodes/tungsten cathodes) by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x ray spectroscopy of the surface degradation. Results of these examinations are reported.

  3. Dipole Alignment in Rotating MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.; Fu, Terry; Morin, Lee

    2012-01-01

    We present numerical results from long-term CPU and GPU simulations of rotating, homogeneous, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, and discuss their connection to the spherically bounded case. We compare our numerical results with a statistical theory of geodynamo action that has evolved from the absolute equilibrium ensemble theory of ideal MHD turbulence, which is based on the ideal MHD invariants are energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity. However, for rotating MHD turbulence, the cross helicity is no longer an exact invariant, although rms cross helicity becomes quasistationary during an ideal MHD simulation. This and the anisotropy imposed by rotation suggests an ansatz in which an effective, nonzero value of cross helicity is assigned to axisymmetric modes and zero cross helicity to non-axisymmetric modes. This hybrid statistics predicts a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field due to broken ergodicity , as well as dipole vector alignment with the rotation axis, both of which are observed numerically. We find that only a relatively small value of effective cross helicity leads to the prediction of a dipole moment vector that is closely aligned (less than 10 degrees) with the rotation axis. We also discuss the effect of initial conditions, dissipation and grid size on the numerical simulations and statistical theory.

  4. An F2D analysis of the Flow Instability Test (FIT) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-10-01

    The F2D code was used to analyze the Flow-Instability-Test (FIT) experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratories. A one-dimensional analysis of the experiment indicated that at the higher temperature levels the element should be unstable. The experimental data corroborated this theory. The two-dimensional simulation behaved in a manner that was very similar to the experimentally measured behavior. In conclusion, the FIT experimental analysis yields partial code validation of F2D, and it also validates the methodology that is used in analyzing thermal flow stability.

  5. Cavities of Weak Magnetic Field Strength in the Wake of FTEs: Results from Global Magnetospheric MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Hesse, M.; Wang, Y.; Rastaetter, L.; Toth, G.; Ridley, A.

    2009-01-01

    We use the global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code BATS-R-US to model multipoint observations of Flux Transfer Event (FTE) signatures. Simulations with high spatial and temporal resolution predict that cavities of weak magnetic field strength protruding into the magnetosphere trail FTEs. These predictions are consistent with recently reported multi-point Cluster observations of traveling magnetopause erosion regions (TMERs).

  6. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  7. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  8. Power generator design for the billings MHD demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Pian, C.C.P.; Kessler, R.; Schmitt, E.W.; Morrison, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    The proposed design of the MHD Power generator for the Billings MHD Demonstration Project is presented. The Billings MHD Demonstration Project, proposed by the MHD Development Corporation (MDC) for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology V Program, will demonstrate the significant environmental advantages and efficiency potential of MHD electric power generation. A diagonally-loaded, supersonic MHD generator channel is proposed. The generator channel has a thermal input of 250 MW, is 11 meters long and produces 28.5 MW gross power output at the nominal design operating condition. The gasdynamic, gas-side, and mechanical designs of the proposed generator are derived from the design of the 50 MW{sub t} proof-of-concept MHD generator, currently undergoing long duration testing at the CDIF test facility. The design and operation of the proposed generator will be typical of those anticipated in future commercial MHD generator channels.

  9. Viriato: A Fourier-Hermite spectral code for strongly magnetized fluid-kinetic plasma dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, N. F.; Dorland, W.; Fazendeiro, L.; Kanekar, A.; Mallet, A.; Vilelas, M. S.; Zocco, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the algorithms and numerical methods used in Viriato, a novel fluid-kinetic code that solves two distinct sets of equations: (i) the Kinetic Reduced Electron Heating Model (KREHM) equations (Zocco and Schekochihin, 2011) (which reduce to the standard Reduced-MHD equations in the appropriate limit) and (ii) the kinetic reduced MHD (KRMHD) equations (Schekochihin et al., 2009). Two main applications of these equations are magnetized (Alfvénic) plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection. Viriato uses operator splitting (Strang or Godunov) to separate the dynamics parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field (assumed strong). Along the magnetic field, Viriato allows for either a second-order accurate MacCormack method or, for higher accuracy, a spectral-like scheme composed of the combination of a total variation diminishing (TVD) third order Runge-Kutta method for the time derivative with a 7th order upwind scheme for the fluxes. Perpendicular to the field Viriato is pseudo-spectral, and the time integration is performed by means of an iterative predictor-corrector scheme. In addition, a distinctive feature of Viriato is its spectral representation of the parallel velocity-space dependence, achieved by means of a Hermite representation of the perturbed distribution function. A series of linear and nonlinear benchmarks and tests are presented, including a detailed analysis of 2D and 3D Orszag-Tang-type decaying turbulence, both in fluid and kinetic regimes.

  10. MHD Oscillations in the Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, A. S.; Mazur, V. A.; Kozlov, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    In studies of hydromagnetic oscillations of the Earth's magnetosphere, it is often considered as a giant resonator for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. A shear flow instability on the magnetopause has long been regarded as a possible source of MHD oscillations in the Earth's magnetosphere. A most interesting phenomenon investigated for the past two decades are ultra-low-frequency oscillations with a discrete spectrum. Such oscillations are recorded usually in the midnight-morning sector of the magnetosphere at 60° to 80° latitudes. Another type of MHD oscillations typical of the magnetotail is the coupled Alfvén and slow magnetosonic waves on stretched magnetic field lines passing through the current sheet. Each of these modes can propagate along paths that almost coincide with the magnetic field lines. The recently discovered kink-like oscillations are oscillations of the current sheet itself, similar to a piece of fabric fluttering in the wind. In this regard they are called flapping modes.

  11. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  12. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  13. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  14. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  15. Liquid metal MHD research and development in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branover, H.

    1991-05-01

    The study and development of liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in Israel, from 1973 to the present, are reviewed. Following extensive research and evaluation, it was established that the most promising concept for a relatively short development time was the gravitational system, using lead or lead alloys as the magnetohydrodynamic fluid and steam or gases as the working fluid. The Etgar Program, set up to investigate such systems, is comprised of seven segments, of which the first six have been completed; work on the last segment has been started. The segments are as follows: studies of the physical phenomena; development of a universal numerical code for parametric studies and optimization and design of the system; materials studies; development of engineering components; construction and testing of small-scale Etgar-type systems; economic evaluation and comparison with conventional technologies; and development of an industrial demonstration plant.

  16. A New Godunov Algorithm for Radiation MHD in Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.-F.; Stone, J. M.; Davis, S. W.

    2012-07-01

    Here we describe the implementation and tests of a new multi-dimension Godunov algorithm for radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations based on Athena. There are several new features of this algorithm. First, this is a Godunov method with stiff source terms from radiation field. Second, we use a variable Eddington tensor to close the radiation momentum equations. Thus we do not need to assume any diffusion like approximation. This also makes the code be suitable for both optical thin and optical thick regimes. Third, we only need to solve a set of linear equations for the radiation subsystem, instead of a non-linear equation people usually encounter with flux-limited diffusion approximation. We have also developed a suite of tests, which cover a wide range of parameter space in terms of optical depth and the ratio between radiation pressure and gas pressure, to show that the algorithm is working accurately.

  17. Stormtime Ionospheric Outflow Effects in Global Multi-Fluid MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sage, K.; Moore, T. E.; Eccles, V.; Merkin, V. G.; Welling, D. T.; Schunk, R. W.; Barakat, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present work detailing the effects of ionospheric outflow in the magnetosphere during the Sept 27- Oct 4, 2002 and Oct 22- Oct 29, 2002 GEM storms. The Multi-Fluid LFM global MHD code is driven by OMNI solar wind and IMF data and by outflow from the Generalized Polar Wind (GPW) model. The GPW input results in a realistic and dynamic, although not self-consistent, outflow of O+, H+, and He+ from the ionosphere. The validity of this outflow and its entry into the magnetosphere is tested through comparisons to Cluster and geosynchronous spacecraft observations. We show the access of these various populations to the magnetosphere, and we examine their effects on plasma sheet structure and storm time dynamics.

  18. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  19. 2dF mechanical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Greg; Lankshear, Allan

    1998-07-01

    2dF is a multi-object instrument mounted at prime focus at the AAT capable of spectroscopic analysis of 400 objects in a single 2 degree field. It also prepares a second 2 degree 400 object field while the first field is being observed. At its heart is a high precision robotic positioner that places individual fiber end magnetic buttons on one of two field plates. The button gripper is carried on orthogonal gantries powered by linear synchronous motors and contains a TV camera which precisely locates backlit buttons to allow placement in user defined locations to 10 (mu) accuracy. Fiducial points on both plates can also be observed by the camera to allow repeated checks on positioning accuracy. Field plates rotate to follow apparent sky rotation. The spectrographs both analyze light from the 200 observing fibers each and back- illuminate the 400 fibers being re-positioned during the observing run. The 2dF fiber position and spectrograph system is a large and complex instrument located at the prime focus of the Anglo Australian Telescope. The mechanical design has departed somewhat from the earlier concepts of Gray et al, but still reflects the audacity of those first ideas. The positioner is capable of positioning 400 fibers on a field plate while another 400 fibers on another plate are observing at the focus of the telescope and feeding the twin spectrographs. When first proposed it must have seemed like ingenuity unfettered by caution. Yet now it works, and works wonderfully well. 2dF is a system which functions as the result of the combined and coordinated efforts of the astronomers, the mechanical designers and tradespeople, the electronic designers, the programmers, the support staff at the telescope, and the manufacturing subcontractors. The mechanical design of the 2dF positioner and spectrographs was carried out by the mechanical engineering staff of the AAO and the majority of the manufacture was carried out in the AAO workshops.

  20. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  1. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  2. Tomosynthesis imaging with 2D scanning trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Kedar; Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Eberhard, Jeffrey W.

    2011-03-01

    Tomosynthesis imaging in chest radiography provides volumetric information with the potential for improved diagnostic value when compared to the standard AP or LAT projections. In this paper we explore the image quality benefits of 2D scanning trajectories when coupled with advanced image reconstruction approaches. It is intuitively clear that 2D trajectories provide projection data that is more complete in terms of Radon space filling, when compared with conventional tomosynthesis using a linearly scanned source. Incorporating this additional information for obtaining improved image quality is, however, not a straightforward problem. The typical tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms are based on direct inversion methods e.g. Filtered Backprojection (FBP) or iterative algorithms that are variants of the Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART). The FBP approach is fast and provides high frequency details in the image but at the same time introduces streaking artifacts degrading the image quality. The iterative methods can reduce the image artifacts by using image priors but suffer from a slow convergence rate, thereby producing images lacking high frequency details. In this paper we propose using a fast converging optimal gradient iterative scheme that has advantages of both the FBP and iterative methods in that it produces images with high frequency details while reducing the image artifacts. We show that using favorable 2D scanning trajectories along with the proposed reconstruction method has the advantage of providing improved depth information for structures such as the spine and potentially producing images with more isotropic resolution.

  3. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells. PMID:25602462

  4. VAM2D: Variably saturated analysis model in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Huyakorn, P.S.; Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. )

    1991-10-01

    This report documents a two-dimensional finite element model, VAM2D, developed to simulate water flow and solute transport in variably saturated porous media. Both flow and transport simulation can be handled concurrently or sequentially. The formulation of the governing equations and the numerical procedures used in the code are presented. The flow equation is approximated using the Galerkin finite element method. Nonlinear soil moisture characteristics and atmospheric boundary conditions (e.g., infiltration, evaporation and seepage face), are treated using Picard and Newton-Raphson iterations. Hysteresis effects and anisotropy in the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity can be taken into account if needed. The contaminant transport simulation can account for advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, linear equilibrium sorption, and first-order degradation. Transport of a single component or a multi-component decay chain can be handled. The transport equation is approximated using an upstream weighted residual method. Several test problems are presented to verify the code and demonstrate its utility. These problems range from simple one-dimensional to complex two-dimensional and axisymmetric problems. This document has been produced as a user's manual. It contains detailed information on the code structure along with instructions for input data preparation and sample input and printed output for selected test problems. Also included are instructions for job set up and restarting procedures. 44 refs., 54 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Explosively-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator studies

    SciTech Connect

    Agee, F.J.; Lehr, F.M.; Vigil, M.; Kaye, R.; Gaudet, J.; Shiffler, D.

    1995-08-01

    Plasma jet generators have been designed and tested which used an explosive driver and shocktube with a rectangular cross section that optimize the flow velocity and electrical conductivity. The latest in a series of designs has been tested using a reactive load to diagnose the electrical properties of the MHD generator/electromagnet combination. The results of these tests indicate that the plasma jet/MHD generator design does generate a flow velocity greater than 25 km/s and produces several gigawatts of pulsed power in a very small package size. A larger, new generator design is also presented.

  6. Realistic Modeling of SDO/AIA-discovered Coronal Fast MHD Wave Trains in Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, Leon; Liu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution EUV observations by space telescopes have provided plenty of evidence for coronal MHD waves in active regions. In particular, SDO/AIA discovered quasi-periodic, fast-mode propagating MHD wave trains (QFPs), which can propagate at speeds of ~1000 km/s perpendicular to the magnetic field. Such waves can provide information on the energy release of their associated flares and the magnetized plasma structure of the active regions. Before we can use these waves as tools for coronal seismology, 3D MHD modeling is required for disentangling observational ambiguities and improving the diagnostic accuracy. We present new results of observationally contained models of QFPs using our recently upgraded radiative, thermally conductive, visco-resistive 3D MHD code. The waves are excited by time-depended boundary conditions constrained by the spatial (localized) and quasi-periodic temporal evolution of a C-class flare typically associated with QFPs. We investigate the excitation, propagation, and damping of the waves for a range of key model parameters, such as the background temperature, density, magnetic field structure, and the location of the flaring site within the active region. We synthesize EUV intensities in multiple AIA channels and then obtain the model parameters that best reproduce the properties of observed QFPs. We discuss the implications of our model results for the seismological application of QFPs and for understanding the dynamics of their associated flares.

  7. High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program. Quarterly report, January 1, 1981-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1981-04-01

    Progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields is reported. The areas of research include nonuniformity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the study of the effects of nonuniformities, experiments have been performed to test a multi-channel, fiber optics diagnostic system that yields time-resolved temperature profiles in an MHD channel. For the study of magneto-acoustic fluctuation phenomena, a one-dimensional model has been developed to describe the performance of a non-ideal MHD generator with a generalized electrical configuration. The installation of the hardware for the data acquisition and reduction of the laser Doppler velocimeter data, to be used in the study of turbulence suppression in a magnetic field, has been nearly completed. A two-dimensional MHD computer code has been developed which predicts the dependence on electrode and insulator dimensions of the onset of interelectrode Hall field breakdown. Calculations have been performed of the effects of nonuniformities on the flow and electrical behavior of baseload-sized disk generators.

  8. Effects of stochastic field lines on the pressure driven MHD instabilities in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohdachi, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kiyomasa; Sakakibara, Satoru; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Hayato; Ming, Tingfeng; Du, Xiaodi; LHD Expriment Group Team

    2014-10-01

    In the Large Helical Device (LHD), the plasma is surrounded by the so-called magnetic stochastic region, where the Kolmogorov length of the magnetic field lines is very short, from several tens of meters and to thousands meters. Finite pressure gradient are formed in this region and MHD instabilities localized in this region is observed since the edge region of the LHD is always unstable against the pressure driven mode. Therefore, the saturation level of the instabilities is the key issue in order to evaluate the risk of this kind of MHD instabilities. The saturation level depends on the pressure gradient and on the magnetic Reynolds number; there results are similar to the MHD mode in the closed magnetic surface region. The saturation level in the stochastic region is affected also by the stocasticity itself. Parameter dependence of the saturation level of the MHD activities in the region is discussed in detail. It is supported by NIFS budget code ULPP021, 028 and is also partially supported by the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research 26249144, by the JSPS-NRF-NSFC A3 Foresight Program NSFC: No. 11261140328.

  9. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  10. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W = 4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure.

  11. TOPAZ2D validation status report, August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.

    1990-08-01

    Analytic solutions to two heat transfer problems were used to partially evaluate the performance TOPAZ, and LLNL finite element heat transfer code. The two benchmark analytic solutions were for: 2D steady state slab, with constant properties, constant uniform temperature boundary conditions on three sides, and constant temperature distribution according to a sine function on the fourth side; 1D transient non-linear, with temperature dependent conductivity and specific heat (varying such that the thermal diffusivity remained constant), constant heat flux on the front face and adiabatic conditions on the other face. The TOPAZ solution converged to the analytic solution in both the transient and the steady state problem. Consistent mass matrix type of analysis yielded best performance for the transient problem, in the late-time response; but notable unnatural anomalies were observed in the early-time temperature response at nodal locations near the front face. 5 refs., 22 figs.

  12. areaDetector: Software for 2-D Detectors in EPICS

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, M.

    2011-09-23

    areaDetector is a new EPICS module designed to support 2-D detectors. It is modular C++ code that greatly simplifies the task of writing support for a new detector. It also supports plugins, which receive detector data from the driver and process it in some way. Existing plugins perform Region-Of-Interest extraction and analysis, file saving (in netCDF, HDF, TIFF and JPEG formats), color conversion, and export to EPICS records for image display in clients like ImageJ and IDL. Drivers have now been written for many of the detectors commonly used at synchrotron beamlines, including CCDs, pixel array and amorphous silicon detectors, and online image plates.

  13. areaDetector: Software for 2-D Detectors in EPICS

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Mark L.

    2010-06-23

    areaDetector is a new EPICS module designed to support 2-D detectors. It is modular C++ code that greatly simplifies the task of writing support for a new detector. It also supports plugins, which receive detector data from the driver and process it in some way. Existing plugins perform Region-Of-Interest extraction and analysis, file saving (in netCDF, HDF, TIFF and JPEG formats), color conversion, and export to EPICS records for image display in clients like ImageJ and IDL. Drivers have now been written for many of the detectors commonly used at synchrotron beamlines, including CCDs, pixel array and amorphous silicon detectors, and online image plates.

  14. The Anatomy of High-Performance 2D Similarity Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Imran S.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2011-01-01

    Similarity measures based on the comparison of dense bit-vectors of two-dimensional chemical features are a dominant method in chemical informatics. For large-scale problems, including compound selection and machine learning, computing the intersection between two dense bit-vectors is the overwhelming bottleneck. We describe efficient implementations of this primitive, as well as example applications, using features of modern CPUs that allow 20-40x performance increases relative to typical code. Specifically, we describe fast methods for population count on modern x86 processors and cache-efficient matrix traversal and leader clustering algorithms that alleviate memory bandwidth bottlenecks in similarity matrix construction and clustering. The speed of our 2D comparison primitives is within a small factor of that obtained on GPUs, and does not require specialized hardware. PMID:21854053

  15. Mass loss in 2D rotating stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Lovekin, Caterine; Deupree, Bob

    2010-10-05

    Radiatively driven mass loss is an important factor in the evolution of massive stars . The mass loss rates depend on a number of stellar parameters, including the effective temperature and luminosity. Massive stars are also often rapidly rotating, which affects their structure and evolution. In sufficiently rapidly rotating stars, both the effective temperature and radius vary significantly as a function of latitude, and hence mass loss rates can vary appreciably between the poles and the equator. In this work, we discuss the addition of mass loss to a 2D stellar evolution code (ROTORC) and compare evolution sequences with and without mass loss. Preliminary results indicate that a full 2D calculation of mass loss using the local effective temperature and luminosity can significantly affect the distribution of mass loss in rotating main sequence stars. More mass is lost from the pole than predicted by 1D models, while less mass is lost at the equator. This change in the distribution of mass loss will affect the angular momentum loss, the surface temperature and luminosity, and even the interior structure of the star. After a single mass loss event, these effects are small, but can be expected to accumulate over the course of the main sequence evolution.

  16. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  17. Creating Synthetic Coronal Observational Data From MHD Models: The Forward Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rachmeler, Laurel A.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Dove, James; Kucera, Therese Ann

    2010-01-01

    We present a generalized forward code for creating simulated corona) observables off the limb from numerical and analytical MHD models. This generalized forward model is capable of creating emission maps in various wavelengths for instruments such as SXT, EIT, EIS, and coronagraphs, as well as spectropolari metric images and line profiles. The inputs to our code can be analytic models (of which four come with the code) or 2.5D and 3D numerical datacubes. We present some examples of the observable data created with our code as well as its functional capabilities. This code is currently available for beta-testing (contact authors), with the ultimate goal of release as a SolarSoft package

  18. MHD Ballooning Instability in the Plasma Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng; S. Zaharia

    2003-10-20

    Based on the ideal-MHD model the stability of ballooning modes is investigated by employing realistic 3D magnetospheric equilibria, in particular for the substorm growth phase. Previous MHD ballooning stability calculations making use of approximations on the plasma compressibility can give rise to erroneous conclusions. Our results show that without making approximations on the plasma compressibility the MHD ballooning modes are unstable for the entire plasma sheet where beta (sub)eq is greater than or equal to 1, and the most unstable modes are located in the strong cross-tail current sheet region in the near-Earth plasma sheet, which maps to the initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the ionosphere. However, the MHD beq threshold is too low in comparison with observations by AMPTE/CCE at X = -(8 - 9)R(sub)E, which show that a low-frequency instability is excited only when beq increases over 50. The difficulty is mitigated by considering the kinetic effects of ion gyrorad ii and trapped electron dynamics, which can greatly increase the stabilizing effects of field line tension and thus enhance the beta(sub)eq threshold [Cheng and Lui, 1998]. The consequence is to reduce the equatorial region of the unstable ballooning modes to the strong cross-tail current sheet region where the free energy associated with the plasma pressure gradient and magnetic field curvature is maximum.

  19. Axisymmetric ideal MHD stellar wind flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, M.; Olbert, S.

    1978-01-01

    The ideal MHD equations are reduced to a single equation under the assumption of axisymmetric flow. A variational principle from which the equation is derivable is given. The characteristics of the equation are briefly discussed. The equation is used to rederive the theorem of Gussenhoven and Carovillano.

  20. GEO2D - Two-Dimensional Computer Model of a Ground Source Heat Pump System

    DOE Data Explorer

    James Menart

    2013-06-07

    This file contains a zipped file that contains many files required to run GEO2D. GEO2D is a computer code for simulating ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems in two-dimensions. GEO2D performs a detailed finite difference simulation of the heat transfer occurring within the working fluid, the tube wall, the grout, and the ground. Both horizontal and vertical wells can be simulated with this program, but it should be noted that the vertical wall is modeled as a single tube. This program also models the heat pump in conjunction with the heat transfer occurring. GEO2D simulates the heat pump and ground loop as a system. Many results are produced by GEO2D as a function of time and position, such as heat transfer rates, temperatures and heat pump performance. On top of this information from an economic comparison between the geothermal system simulated and a comparable air heat pump systems or a comparable gas, oil or propane heating systems with a vapor compression air conditioner. The version of GEO2D in the attached file has been coupled to the DOE heating and cooling load software called ENERGYPLUS. This is a great convenience for the user because heating and cooling loads are an input to GEO2D. GEO2D is a user friendly program that uses a graphical user interface for inputs and outputs. These make entering data simple and they produce many plotted results that are easy to understand. In order to run GEO2D access to MATLAB is required. If this program is not available on your computer you can download the program MCRInstaller.exe, the 64 bit version, from the MATLAB website or from this geothermal depository. This is a free download which will enable you to run GEO2D..

  1. Interparticle Attraction in 2D Complex Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompaneets, Roman; Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2016-03-01

    Complex (dusty) plasmas allow experimental studies of various physical processes occurring in classical liquids and solids by directly observing individual microparticles. A major problem is that the interaction between microparticles is generally not molecularlike. In this Letter, we propose how to achieve a molecularlike interaction potential in laboratory 2D complex plasmas. We argue that this principal aim can be achieved by using relatively small microparticles and properly adjusting discharge parameters. If experimentally confirmed, this will make it possible to employ complex plasmas as a model system with an interaction potential resembling that of conventional liquids.

  2. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  3. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  4. A scalable 2-D parallel sparse solver

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, S.C.; Mitra, S.

    1995-12-01

    Scalability beyond a small number of processors, typically 32 or less, is known to be a problem for existing parallel general sparse (PGS) direct solvers. This paper presents a parallel general sparse PGS direct solver for general sparse linear systems on distributed memory machines. The algorithm is based on the well-known sequential sparse algorithm Y12M. To achieve efficient parallelization, a 2-D scattered decomposition of the sparse matrix is used. The proposed algorithm is more scalable than existing parallel sparse direct solvers. Its scalability is evaluated on a 256 processor nCUBE2s machine using Boeing/Harwell benchmark matrices.

  5. 2D stepping drive for hyperspectral systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrödy, Csaba; Mehner, Hannes; Grewe, Adrian; Sinzinger, Stefan; Hoffmann, Martin

    2015-07-01

    We present the design, fabrication and characterization of a compact 2D stepping microdrive for pinhole array positioning. The miniaturized solution enables a highly integrated compact hyperspectral imaging system. Based on the geometry of the pinhole array, an inch-worm drive with electrostatic actuators was designed resulting in a compact (1 cm2) positioning system featuring a step size of about 15 µm in a 170 µm displacement range. The high payload (20 mg) as required for the pinhole array and the compact system design exceed the known electrostatic inch-worm-based microdrives.

  6. Design of FBG En/decoders in Coherent 2-D Time-polarization OCDMA Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Fen-fei; Yang, Ming

    2012-12-01

    A novel fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based en/decoder for the two-dimensional (2-D) time-spreading and polarization multiplexer optical coding is proposed. Compared with other 2-D en/decoders, the proposed en/decoding for an optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) system uses a single phase-encoded FBG and coherent en/decoding. Furthermore, combined with reconstruction-equivalent-chirp technology, such en/decoders can be realized with a conventional simple fabrication setup. Experimental results of such en/decoders and the corresponding system test at a data rate of 5 Gbit/s demonstrate that this kind of 2-D FBG-based en/decoders could improve the performances of OCDMA systems.

  7. Theoretical modelling of the feedback stabilization of external MHD modes in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Chu, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical framework for understanding the feedback mechanism for stabilization of external MHD modes has been formulated. Efficient computational tools - the GATO stability code coupled with a substantially modified VACUUM code - have been developed to effectively design viable feedback systems against these modes. The analysis assumed a thin resistive shell and a feedback coil structure accurately modelled in θ and phi, albeit with only a single harmonic variation in phi. Time constants and induced currents in the enclosing resistive shell are calculated. An optimized configuration based on an idealized model has been computed for the DIII-D device. Up to 90% of the effectiveness of an ideal wall can be achieved.

  8. MHD-induced Energetic Ion Loss during H-mode Discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. Medley; N.N. Gorelenkov; R. Andre; R.E. Bell; D.S. Darrow; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; A.L. Roquemore; and the NSTX Team

    2004-03-15

    MHD-induced energetic ion loss in neutral-beam-heated H-mode [high-confinement mode] discharges in NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] is discussed. A rich variety of energetic ion behavior resulting from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity is observed in the NSTX using a horizontally scanning Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) whose sightline views across the three co-injected neutral beams. For example, onset of an n = 2 mode leads to relatively slow decay of the energetic ion population (E {approx} 10-100 keV) and consequently the neutron yield. The effect of reconnection events, sawteeth, and bounce fishbones differs from that observed for low-n, low-frequency, tearing-type MHD modes. In this case, prompt loss of the energetic ion population occurs on a time scale of less than or equal to 1 ms and a precipitous drop in the neutron yield occurs. This paper focuses on MHD-induced ion loss during H-mode operation in NSTX. After H-mode onset, the NPA charge-exchange spectrum usually exhibits a significant loss of energetic ions only for E > E(sub)b/2 where E(sub)b is the beam injection energy. The magnitude of the energetic ion loss was observed to decrease with increasing tangency radius, R(sub)tan, of the NPA sightline, increasing toroidal field, B(sub)T, and increasing neutral-beam injection energy, E(sub)b. TRANSP modeling suggests that MHD-induced ion loss is enhanced during H-mode operation due to an evolution of the q and beam deposition profiles that feeds both passing and trapped ions into the region of low-n MHD activity. ORBIT code analysis of particle interaction with a model magnetic perturbation supported the energy selectivity of the MHD-induced loss observed in the NPA measurements. Transport analysis with the TRANSP code using a fast-ion diffusion tool to emulate the observed MHD-induced energetic ion loss showed significant modifications of the neutral- beam heating as well as the power balance, thermal diffusivities, energy confinement times

  9. Characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer in pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. J.

    2016-01-01

    As gradually wide applications of MHD fluid, transportation as well as control with pumps and valves is unavoidable, which induces MHD fluid hammer. The paper attempts to combine MHD effect and fluid hammer effect and to investigate the characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer. A non-dimensional fluid hammer model, based on Navier-Stocks equations, coupling with Lorentz force is numerically solved in a reservoir-pipe-valve system with uniform external magnetic field. The MHD effect is represented by the interaction number which associates with the conductivity of the MHD fluid as well as the external magnetic field and can be interpreted as the ratio of Lorentz force to Joukowsky force. The transient numerical results of pressure head, average velocity, wall shear stress, velocity profiles and shear stress profiles are provided. The additional MHD effect hinders fluid motion, weakens wave front and homogenizes velocity profiles, contributing to obvious attenuation of oscillation, strengthened line packing and weakened Richardson annular effect. Studying the characteristics of MHD laminar fluid hammer theoretically supplements the gap of knowledge of rapid-transient MHD flow and technically provides beneficial information for MHD pipeline system designers to better devise MHD systems.

  10. Performance of Scramjet Engine with MHD Energy Bypass System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminaga, Susumu; Tomioka, Sadatake; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki

    Flow behavior and thrust performance of MHD energy bypass scramjet engine was examined numerically. MHD generator was placed at the isolator to enhance the flow compression. Kinetic energy was converted to electrical energy in the MHD generator. Extracted electrical energy was consumed at the MHD accelerator placed at the downstream of the combustor. When MHD energy bypass system was used, the flow was decelerated and compressed in the MHD generator. Effect of velocity and Mach number on wall friction was analyzed and decrease of friction force was pointed out. Also, high pressure in the combustor resulted in increase of pressure contribution to net thrust. Despite of positive effects, decelerating Lorentz force in the MHD generator was comparably large and no significant difference in net thrust performance is observed.

  11. ELRIS2D: A MATLAB Package for the 2D Inversion of DC Resistivity/IP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, Irfan

    2016-04-01

    ELRIS2D is an open source code written in MATLAB for the two-dimensional inversion of direct current resistivity (DCR) and time domain induced polarization (IP) data. The user interface of the program is designed for functionality and ease of use. All available settings of the program can be reached from the main window. The subsurface is discretized using a hybrid mesh generated by the combination of structured and unstructured meshes, which reduces the computational cost of the whole inversion procedure. The inversion routine is based on the smoothness constrained least squares method. In order to verify the program, responses of two test models and field data sets were inverted. The models inverted from the synthetic data sets are consistent with the original test models in both DC resistivity and IP cases. A field data set acquired in an archaeological site is also used for the verification of outcomes of the program in comparison with the excavation results.

  12. FARGO3D: Hydrodynamics/magnetohydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez Llambay, Pablo; Masset, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    A successor of FARGO (ascl:1102.017), FARGO3D is a versatile HD/MHD code that runs on clusters of CPUs or GPUs, with special emphasis on protoplanetary disks. FARGO3D offers Cartesian, cylindrical or spherical geometry; 1-, 2- or 3-dimensional calculations; and orbital advection (aka FARGO) for HD and MHD calculations. As in FARGO, a simple Runge-Kutta N-body solver may be used to describe the orbital evolution of embedded point-like objects. There is no need to know CUDA; users can develop new functions in C and have them translated to CUDA automatically to run on GPUs.

  13. Symmetry, Statistics and Structure in MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Here, we examine homogeneous MHD turbulence in terms of truncated Fourier series. The ideal MHD equations and the associated statistical theory of absolute equilibrium ensembles are symmetric under P, C and T. However, the presence of invariant helicities, which are pseudoscalars under P and C, dynamically breaks this symmetry. This occurs because the surface of constant energy in phase space has disjoint parts, called components: while ensemble averages are taken over all components, a dynamical phase trajectory is confined to only one component. As the Birkhoff-Khinchin theorem tells us, ideal MHD turbulence is thus non-ergodic. This non-ergodicity manifests itself in low-wave number Fourier modes that have large mean values (while absolute ensemble theory predicts mean values of zero). Therefore, we have coherent structure in ideal MHD turbulence. The level of non-ergodicity and amount of energy contained in the associated coherent structure depends on the values of the helicities, as well as on the presence, or not, of a mean magnetic field and/or overall rotation. In addition to the well known cross and magnetic helicities, we also present a new invariant, which we call the parallel helicity, since it occurs when mean field and rotation axis are aligned. The question of applicability of these results to real (i.e., dissipative) MHD turbulence is also examined. Several long-time numerical simulations on a 64(exp 3) grid are given as examples. It is seen that coherent structure begins to form before decay dominates over nonlinearity. The connection of these results with inverse spectral cascades, selective decay, and magnetic dynamos is also discussed.

  14. A PC-based package for interactive assessment of MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, W.; Steiner, D.

    1989-03-01

    A personal computer system was developed for use in the assessment of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and Poloidal Field Coil (PFC) arrangement in toroidal axisymmetric geometry. This system involves two steps: first MHD equilibrium is calculated with the program PCEQ, then the PFC arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium, is determined in an interactive design environment using the program PFDESIGN. The PCEQ/PFDESIGN system was used to examine equilibrium for the STARFIRE reactor concept, including the design of two different PFC arrangements. The MHD/PFC calculations agree to within a few percent of mainframe code results, demonstrating the utility and accuracy of PCEQ/PFDESIGN, proving it to be an ideal tool for scoping studies.

  15. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  16. Photocurrent spectroscopy of 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobden, David

    Confocal photocurrent measurements provide a powerful means of studying many aspects of the optoelectronic and electrical properties of a 2D device or material. At a diffraction-limited point they can provide a detailed absorption spectrum, and they can probe local symmetry, ultrafast relaxation rates and processes, electron-electron interaction strengths, and transport coefficients. We illustrate this with several examples, once being the photo-Nernst effect. In gapless 2D materials, such as graphene, in a perpendicular magnetic field a photocurrent antisymmetric in the field is generated near to the free edges, with opposite sign at opposite edges. Its origin is the transverse thermoelectric current associated with the laser-induced electron temperature gradient. This effect provides an unambiguous demonstration of the Shockley-Ramo nature of long-range photocurrent generation in gapless materials. It also provides a means of investigating quasiparticle properties. For example, in the case of graphene on hBN, it can be used to probe the Lifshitz transition that occurs due to the minibands formed by the Moire superlattice. We also observe and discuss photocurrent generated in other semimetallic (WTe2) and semiconducting (WSe2) monolayers. Work supported by DoE BES and NSF EFRI grants.

  17. Multienzyme Inkjet Printed 2D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Efrat; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mandler, Daniel

    2015-08-19

    The use of printing to produce 2D arrays is well established, and should be relatively facile to adapt for the purpose of printing biomaterials; however, very few studies have been published using enzyme solutions as inks. Among the printing technologies, inkjet printing is highly suitable for printing biomaterials and specifically enzymes, as it offers many advantages. Formulation of the inkjet inks is relatively simple and can be adjusted to a variety of biomaterials, while providing nonharmful environment to the enzymes. Here we demonstrate the applicability of inkjet printing for patterning multiple enzymes in a predefined array in a very straightforward, noncontact method. Specifically, various arrays of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx), invertase (INV) and horseradish peroxidase (HP) were printed on aminated glass surfaces, followed by immobilization using glutardialdehyde after printing. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for imaging the printed patterns and to ascertain the enzyme activity. The successful formation of 2D arrays consisting of enzymes was explored as a means of developing the first surface confined enzyme based logic gates. Principally, XOR and AND gates, each consisting of two enzymes as the Boolean operators, were assembled, and their operation was studied by SECM. PMID:26214072

  18. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaw, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W=4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure. We also simulate jets with the more realistic initial conditions for injecting jets for helical mangetic field, perturbed density, velocity, and internal energy, which are supposed to be caused in the process of jet generation. Three possible explanations for the observed variability are (i) tidal disruption of a star falling into the black hole, (ii) instabilities in the relativistic accretion disk, and (iii) jet-related PRocesses. New results will be reported at the meeting.

  19. Review of Recent Results in Global MHD Modeling: ISTP Project Scientist for Theory and Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Global MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations have shown a remarkable ability to describe the global dynamics of geospace. The limitations of the physical approximations underlying MHD would seem to limit the effectiveness of these codes, since kinetic and hybrid effects should manifest themselves by cross-scale coupling from microscales to mesoscales to global scales. However three effects appear to allow the codes to operate much more successfully than one would at first believe. They are:(l) the globally self-consistent nature of the codes with very well defined exterior boundary conditions (the solar wind) which allows the proper intercommunication between magnetospheric regions on MHD scales, (2) the control by global dynamics of the boundary layer locations where micro and meso scale processes operate, and (3) the critical role of numerical diffusion and with a sufficiently high resolution grid, the use of an empirical resistivity term, which if set at a level where the major magnetosphere boundaries properly calibrate against their observed locations, appear to well represent the effects of kinetic and hybrid processes on the global dynamics. The effectiveness of the global MHD codes, which have been developed under the ISTP mission, in describing Wind, Polar and Geotail observations, as well as ground-based observations are described. Particular emphasis is placed upon the Polar imaging data which when combined with ground-based data and global MHD-based synthetic aurora and convection patterns provide a powerful tool in understanding the final link in the solar-terrestrial chain: coupling into the atmosphere and ionosphere.

  20. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  1. Modeling of Feedback Stabilization of External MHD Modes in Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Chance, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.

    2000-10-01

    The intelligent shell feedback scheme(C.M. Bishop, Plasma Phys. Contr. Nucl. Fusion 31), 1179 (1989). seeks to utilize external coils to suppress the unstable MHD modes slowed down by the resistive shell. We present a new formulation and numerical results of the interaction between the plasma and its outside vacuum region, with complete plasma response and the inclusion of a resistive vessel in general toroidal geometry. This is achieved by using the Green's function technique, which is a generalization of that previously used for the VACUUM(M.S. Chance, Phys. Plasmas 4), 2161 (1997). code and coupled with the ideal MHD code GATO. The effectiveness of different realizations of the intelligent shell concept is gauged by their ability to minimize the available free energy to drive the MHD mode. Computations indicate poloidal coverage of 30% of the total resistive wall surface area and 6 or 7 segments of ``intelligent coil'' arrays superimposed on the resistive wall will allow recovery of up to 90% the effectiveness of the ideal shell in stabilizing the ideal external kink.

  2. Physical Model Development and Benchmarking for MHD Flows in Blanket Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakanth Munipalli; P.-Y.Huang; C.Chandler; C.Rowell; M.-J.Ni; N.Morley; S.Smolentsev; M.Abdou

    2008-06-05

    An advanced simulation environment to model incompressible MHD flows relevant to blanket conditions in fusion reactors has been developed at HyPerComp in research collaboration with TEXCEL. The goals of this phase-II project are two-fold: The first is the incorporation of crucial physical phenomena such as induced magnetic field modeling, and extending the capabilities beyond fluid flow prediction to model heat transfer with natural convection and mass transfer including tritium transport and permeation. The second is the design of a sequence of benchmark tests to establish code competence for several classes of physical phenomena in isolation as well as in select (termed here as “canonical”,) combinations. No previous attempts to develop such a comprehensive MHD modeling capability exist in the literature, and this study represents essentially uncharted territory. During the course of this Phase-II project, a significant breakthrough was achieved in modeling liquid metal flows at high Hartmann numbers. We developed a unique mathematical technique to accurately compute the fluid flow in complex geometries at extremely high Hartmann numbers (10,000 and greater), thus extending the state of the art of liquid metal MHD modeling relevant to fusion reactors at the present time. These developments have been published in noted international journals. A sequence of theoretical and experimental results was used to verify and validate the results obtained. The code was applied to a complete DCLL module simulation study with promising results.

  3. On the Transition from Hydrodynamic to MHD Cascade and the Breakdown of Vorticity Homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katt, L. T.; Tobias, S. M.

    2005-10-01

    We adress the simple question of ``At what value of a weak uniform B0 does a 2D hydrodynamic dual cascade (associated with enstrophy homogenization) convert to a 2D MHD forward energy cascade?" We approach this by calculating the gradient in vorticity within a cell or eddy (with closed streamlines) linked to an external magnetic field. Both a local and an averaged criterion are derived. The global criterion is in terms of an Hartmann nuber and is consistent with preliminary results of simulation. More interestingly, the degree of vorticity homogenization emerges as related to the topology of filed line to streamline linkage at the boundary of the cell, as well as the profile of current density on the boundary of the cell. A variety of stable configurations are shown to be possible and will be discussed.

  4. 2-D stationary gas dynamics in a barred galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.

    2015-06-01

    A code for solving the 2-D isothermal Euler equations of gas dynamics in a rotating disc is presented. The gravitational potential represents a weak bar and controls the flow. A damped Newton method solves the second-order upwind discretisation of the equations for a steady-state solution, using a consistent linearisation and a direct solver. Successive grid refinement, starting from a finite-volume grid with 8 by 8 cells, is applied to find solutions on subsequently finer meshes. On coarser meshes, a first-order spatial discretisation is used. The method obtains quadratic convergence once the solution approaches the steady state. The initial search is quick with the first-order scheme and slower with the second-order discretisation, up to 256 by 256 cells. Beyond, with 512 by 512 cells, the number of iterations becomes too large to be of practical use. Potential causes are discussed. The code can be applied as a tool for generating flow models if used on not too fine meshes.

  5. Evolution of generalized two-dimensional magnetotail equilibria in ideal and resistive MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Sitnov, M. I.; Lyon, J. G.

    2015-03-01

    We present results of two-dimensional (2-D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the terrestrial magnetotail. A regional adaptation of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model is used. As initial conditions, we employ a class of asymptotic magnetotail equilibria with and without an accumulation of magnetic flux at the tailward end (a Bz hump). The former have been recently shown by full particle simulations to be unstable to a kinetic mode with formal properties of ion tearing. Thus, our goal here is to investigate the evolution of the same equilibria in the MHD approximation and assist in the physical interpretation of the kinetic simulations. This is additionally motivated by the energy principle considerations which suggest that if the system is unstable kinetically, it may also be unstable ideally. To seek dynamical MHD regimes similar to those observed in kinetic simulations, we implement two sets of boundary conditions (velocity balanced, VB, and momentum balanced, MB), one allowing plasma flows through the boundaries and the other inhibiting such flows. The use of more reflecting MB boundary conditions results in suppression of any significant dynamics, and we see no substantial changes beyond initial equilibrium relaxation. On the other hand, VB boundary conditions allow a more efficient relaxation of initial equilibrium and absorb subsequently generated plasma flows. With these boundary conditions we find the equilibrium without a flux accumulation (i.e., with constant magnetic field component normal to the current sheet) to develop an apparently resistive mode accompanied by tailward plasma flows. At the same time, the equilibria with a Bz hump of sufficiently large amplitude develop a different, ideal, mode characterized by spontaneous generation of earthward plasma flows and an exponential growth of the corresponding electric field. This growth is qualitatively similar to the corresponding fully kinetic simulations although no explosive growth of

  6. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations of Extragalactic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1997-12-01

    We present the numerical simulations of relativistic jets propagating initially oblique to the field lines of a magnetized ambient medium. Our simulations incorporate relativistic MHD in a four-dimensional spacetime and clearly show that (a) relatively weak, oblique fields (at 1/16 of the equipartition value) have only a negligible influence on the propagating jet and they are passively pushed away by the relativistically moving head; (b) oblique fields in equipartition with the ambient plasma provide more resistance and cause bending at the jet head, but the magnitude of this deflection and the associated backflow are small compared to those identified by previous studies with a 2-D slab model. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently during the simulations. The effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure. Applied to relativistic extragalactic jets from blazars, the new results are encouraging since superluminal outflows exhibit bending near their sources and their environments are profoundly magnetized---but observations do not provide support for irregular kinematics such as large-scale vortical motions and pronounced reverse flows near the points of origin.

  7. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  8. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  9. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  10. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  11. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  12. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  13. Mach number validation of a new zonal CFD method (ZAP2D) for airfoil simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strash, Daniel J.; Summa, Michael; Yoo, Sungyul

    1991-01-01

    A closed-loop overlapped velocity coupling procedure has been utilized to combine a two-dimensional potential-flow panel code and a Navier-Stokes code. The fully coupled two-zone code (ZAP2D) has been used to compute the flow past a NACA 0012 airfoil at Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 0.84 near the two-dimensional airfoil C(lmax) point for a Reynolds number of 3 million. For these cases, the grid domain size can be reduced to 3 chord lengths with less than 3-percent loss in accuracy for freestream Mach numbers through 0.8. Earlier validation work with ZAP2D has demonstrated a reduction in the required Navier-Stokes computation time by a factor of 4 for subsonic Mach numbers. For this more challenging condition of high lift and Mach number, the saving in CPU time is reduced to a factor of 2.

  14. MHD Modeling of Coronal Loops: the Transition Region Throat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarrasi, M.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Mignone, A.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The expansion of coronal loops in the transition region may considerably influence the diagnostics of the plasma emission measure. The cross-sectional area of the loops is expected to depend on the temperature and pressure, and might be sensitive to the heating rate. Aims. The approach here is to study the area response to slow changes in the coronal heating rate, and check the current interpretation in terms of steady heating models. Methods. We study the area response with a time-dependent 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) loop model, including the description of the expanding magnetic field, coronal heating and losses by thermal conduction, and radiation from optically thin plasma. We run a simulation for a loop 50 Mm long and quasi-statically heated to about 4 millikelvin. Results. We find that the area can change substantially with the quasi-steady heating rate, e.g., by approx. 40% at 0.5 millikelvin as the loop temperature varies between 1 millikelvin and 4 millikelvin, and, therefore, affects the interpretation of the differential emission measure vs. temperature (DEM(T)) curves.

  15. Performance capabilities of a space-power liquid metal MHD converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborde, R.; Alemany, A.; Werkoff, F.

    In a Liquid Metal MHD (or Faraday) converter, thermal energy is converted into electrical energy by the expansion of a condensable fluid, the acceleration of a liquid metal and its circulation through a MHD generator. The performance capabilities of such a converter appear to be very attractive for a utilization in space with lithium and caesium as liquid metal and condensable fluid respectively. A code based on balance equations has been developed to estimate the masses, sizes and efficiencies of all parts of the converters. Iterative methods are used for each part, while the caesium mass flow rate acts as a control parameter in an external loop. Lastly we present results typical of a 200 kW electrical power station.

  16. Numerical analysis of real gas MHD flow on two-dimensional self-field MPD thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xisto, Carlos M.; Páscoa, José C.; Oliveira, Paulo J.

    2015-07-01

    A self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster is a low-thrust electric propulsion space-system that enables the usage of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles for accelerating a plasma flow towards high speed exhaust velocities. It can produce an high specific impulse, making it suitable for long duration interplanetary space missions. In this paper numerical results obtained with a new code, which is being developed at C-MAST (Centre for Mechanical and Aerospace Technologies), for a two-dimensional self-field MPD thruster are presented. The numerical model is based on the macroscopic MHD equations for compressible and electrically resistive flow and is able to predict the two most important thrust mechanisms that are associated with this kind of propulsion system, namely the thermal thrust and the electromagnetic thrust. Moreover, due to the range of very high temperatures that could occur during the operation of the MPD, it also includes a real gas model for argon.

  17. Neoclassical viscous stress tensor for non-linear MHD simulations with XTOR-2F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellet, N.; Maget, P.; Lütjens, H.; Meshcheriakov, D.; the Tore Supra Team

    2013-04-01

    The neoclassical viscous stress tensor is implemented in the non-linear MHD code XTOR-2F (Lütjens and Luciani 2010 J. Comput. Phys. 229 8130-43), allowing consistent bi-fluid simulations of MHD modes, including the metastable branch of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) (Carrera et al 1986 Phys. Fluids 29 899-902). Equilibrium flows and bootstrap current from the neoclassical theory are formally recovered in this Chew-Goldberger-Low formulation. The non-linear behaviour of the new model is verified on a test case coming from a Tore Supra non-inductive discharge. A NTM threshold that is larger than with the previous model is obtained. This is due to the fact that the velocity is now part of the bootstrap current and that it differs from the theoretical neoclassical value.

  18. Gas Core Reactor Numerical Simulation Using a Coupled MHD-MCNP Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghaie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis is provided in this report of using two head-on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks to achieve supercritical nuclear fission in an axially elongated cylinder filled with UF4 gas as an energy source for deep space missions. The motivation for each aspect of the design is explained and supported by theory and numerical simulations. A subsequent report will provide detail on relevant experimental work to validate the concept. Here the focus is on the theory of and simulations for the proposed gas core reactor conceptual design from the onset of shock generations to the supercritical state achieved when the shocks collide. The MHD model is coupled to a standard nuclear code (MCNP) to observe the neutron flux and fission power attributed to the supercritical state brought about by the shock collisions. Throughout the modeling, realistic parameters are used for the initial ambient gaseous state and currents to ensure a resulting supercritical state upon shock collisions.

  19. The mouse ruby-eye 2(d) (ru2(d) /Hps5(ru2-d) ) allele inhibits eumelanin but not pheomelanin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hirobe, Tomohisa; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-09-01

    The novel mutation named ru2(d) /Hps5(ru2-d) , characterized by light-colored coats and ruby-eyes, prohibits differentiation of melanocytes by inhibiting tyrosinase (Tyr) activity, expression of Tyr, Tyr-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), Tyrp2, and Kit. However, it is not known whether the ru2(d) allele affects pheomelanin synthesis in recessive yellow (e/Mc1r(e) ) or in pheomelanic stage in agouti (A) mice. In this study, effects of the ru2(d) allele on pheomelanin synthesis were investigated by chemical analysis of melanin present in dorsal hairs of 5-week-old mice from F2 generation between C57BL/10JHir (B10)-co-isogenic ruby-eye 2(d) and B10-congenic recessive yellow or agouti. Eumelanin content was decreased in ruby-eye 2(d) and ruby-eye 2(d) agouti mice, whereas pheomelanin content in ruby-eye 2(d) recessive yellow and ruby-eye 2(d) agouti mice did not differ from the corresponding Ru2(d) /- mice, suggesting that the ru2(d) allele inhibits eumelanin but not pheomelanin synthesis. PMID:23672590

  20. Hall MHD reconnection with an initial guide field By0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. A.; Jin, S. P.; Li, Y.

    An uniform out-of-plane magnetic field component B y0 is added to the equilibrium Harris sheet with plasma beta 0 5 and L c 0 5 d i where L c is the half-width of the equilibrium current layer and d i is the ion inertial length Driven by a constant boundary inflow the magnetic reconnections with various guide field B y0 are investigated using a 2 5 dimensional Hall MHD code developed from a multi-step implicit scheme For the cases of B y0 B x0 0 0 0 5 1 0 and 1 5 the reconnection rates partial A partial t vert st at quasi-steady states are approximate to 0 15 0 14 0 12 and 0 1 respectively Such results prove that the dynamic growth of Hall MHD reconnection is considerably suppressed by the field of cross-current sheet In the case with a finite B y0 the spatial profile of B y component along x at z 0 04 d i is a up-down distorted signature with respect to B y B y0 which is different from the bipolar signature associated with the B y quadrupolar pattern in the case of a zero guide field B y0 0 For the case with a finite B y0 the decoupling of electrons and ions also occurs near the X line but the effect of initial B y0 on the electron flow is greater than that on the ion flow While the ion flow remains primarily horizontal out of the reconnection region the electrons have a stronger flow into the reconnection region in the first and third quadrants than that in the second and fourth quadrants

  1. Flow development and analysis of MHD generators and seawater thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D. ); Roy, G.D. )

    1992-03-01

    In this paper, the flow characteristics inside magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma generators and seawater thrusters are analyzed and are compared using a three-dimensional computer model that solves the governing partial differential equations for fluid flow and electrical fields. Calculations have been performed for a Faraday plasma generator and for a continuous electrode seawater thruster. The results of the calculations show that the effects caused by the interaction of the MHD forces with the fluid flow are strongly manifested in the case of the MHD generator as compared to the flow development in the MHD thruster. The existence of velocity overshoots over the sidewalls confirm previously published results for MHD generators with strong MHD interaction. For MHD thrusters, the velocity profile is found to be slightly flatter over the sidewall as compared to that over the electrode wall. As a result, distinct enhancement of the skin friction exists over the sidewalls of MHD generators in comparison to that of MHD thrusters. Plots of velocity profiles and skin friction distributions are presented to illustrate and compare the flow development in MHD generators and thrusters.

  2. Power facility with a built-in multipolar MHD generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalev, K.L.; Markina, T.A.

    1995-05-01

    The scheme of a power facility with a built-in multipolar MHD generator is discussed. In most papers devoted to airborne high-power MHD generators (self-contained or built into the nozzle of the propulsion unit), MHD channels are discussed that are based on a two-pole scheme. The processes of energy conversion in these MHD generators are usually accompanied by disturbances of flow in the entire channel volume, which, in many cases, is undesirable for the operation of power facilities. Depending on the number of pairs of poles, the proposed facility makes it possible to accomplish MHD conversion both in the nozzle peripheral zone and in the central part of the flow. An analysis of the methods and results of calculations of volume MHD effects for finite Hall parameters {beta} and MHD-interaction s, as well as of the output characteristics of multipolar MHD generators equipped with electrode modules of different types are given. A comparison of the theoretical and experimental data is made. A scheme involving an advanced propulsion unit fired with cryogenic fuel H{sub 2}+O{sub 2} and a built-in multipolar MHD generator is considered. The problems of using built-in multipolar MHD generators in propulsion units utilizing other fuel pairs are discussed.

  3. Study of Magnetorotational Instability and MHD Surface Waves in Liquid Gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Chen, F.; Kageyama, A.; Goodman, J.; Shoshan, E.; Rappaport, H.; Borg, M.; Halcrow, J.

    2002-11-01

    Two liquid gallium experiments have been constructed in PPPL to study basic MHD physics related to astrophysics and fusion sciences. The first experiment focuses on laboratory studies of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a rotating gallium disk or a short Couette flow geometry. The MRI has been proposed as a dominant mechanism for fast angular momentum transport in electrically-conducting accretion disks ranging from quasars and X-ray binaries to cataclysmic variables and perhaps even protoplanetary disks. Experiments using a prototype water disk has revealed importance of Ekman circulation, consistent with 2D hydrodynamic simulations. A revised design using multiple rings at each end of the flow are being implemented. The second experiment focuses on MHD surface waves in a large liquid gallium pool. It has been found that the damping rates of driven 1D surface waves propogating along a magnetic field are consistent with linear theory. The parametric excitation of 2D surface waves is being studied to elucidate effects of a horizonally imposed magnetic field on the dynamics of pattern formation. Detailed results will be presented for both experiments and implications to astrophysics and to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors will be discussed. This work is supported by DoE.

  4. Regular shock refraction in planar ideal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmont, P.; Keppens, R.

    2010-03-01

    We study the classical problem of planar shock refraction at an oblique density discontinuity, separating two gases at rest, in planar ideal (magneto)hydrodynamics. In the hydrodynamical case, 3 signals arise and the interface becomes Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable due to vorticity deposition on the shocked contact. In the magnetohydrodynamical case, on the other hand, when the normal component of the magnetic field does not vanish, 5 signals will arise. The interface then typically remains stable, since the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions in ideal MHD do not allow for vorticity deposition on a contact discontinuity. We present an exact Riemann solver based solution strategy to describe the initial self similar refraction phase. Using grid-adaptive MHD simulations, we show that after reflection from the top wall, the interface remains stable.

  5. MHD shocks in coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is the study of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced as a result of the interaction of ejected lower coronal plasma with the ambient corona. The types of shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced for representative coronal conditions and disturbance velocities were determined. The wave system and the interactions between the ejecta and ambient corona were studied using both analytic theory and numerical solutions of the time-dependent, nonlinear MHD equations. Observations from the SMM coronagraph/polarimeter provided both guidance and motivation and are used extensively in evaluating the results. As a natural consequence of the comparisons with the data, the simulations assisted in better understanding the physical interactions in coronal mass ejections (CME's).

  6. Amplitudes of MHD Waves in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Aimee Ann; Cally, Paul; Baldner, Charles; Kleint, Lucia; Tarbell, Theodore D.; De Pontieu, Bart; Scherrer, Philip H.; Rajaguru, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The conversion of p-modes into MHD waves by strong magnetic fields occurs mainly in the sub-photospheric layers. The photospheric signatures of MHD waves are weak due to low amplitudes at the beta=1 equipartion level where mode-conversion occurs. We report on small amplitude oscillations observed in the photosphere with Hinode SOT/SP in which we analyze time series for sunspots ARs 12186 (11.10.2014) and 12434 (17.10.2015). No significant magnetic field oscillations are recovered in the umbra or penumbra in the ME inversion. However, periodicities in the inclination angle are found at the umbral/penumbral boundary with 5 minute periods. Upward propagating waves are indicated in the intensity signals correlated between HMI and AIA at different heights. We compare SP results with the oscillations observed in HMI data. Simultaneous IRIS data shows transition region brightening above the umbral core.

  7. MHD Waves in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter focuses on reviewing several observational aspects of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the solar wind, in particular on Alfvén waves, Alfvénic turbulent spectrum, and their role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. It also reviews computational models that incorporate Alfvén waves as the driving source of the wind in the lower corona (coronal holes) and in the inner heliosphere, with emphasis on multi-dimensional models. Evidence for MHD waves in the solar wind is obtained from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations using Earth-based radio telescope observations of distant (galactic) radio sources. The solar wind electron density variability in the line of sight affects the received radio signal. The propagating fluctuations and their correlations are used to estimate the solar wind velocity and the wave amplitude in the parallel and the perpendicular directions in line of sight.

  8. Verification of the Resistive DCON Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, A. H.; Wang, Z. R.; Park, J.-K.

    2014-10-01

    The ideal MHD axisymmetric toroidal stability code DCON has been extended to treat resistive instabilities, with resonant surfaces at rational safety factor values of q = m / n . DCON solves the ideal MHD equations using a singular Galerkin method to obtain matching data for the ideal outer region. Robust convergence is achieved by a careful choice of basis functions: C1 Hermite cubics to resolve nonresonant solutions; a high-order power series in the neighborhood of each singular surface to resolve large and small resonant solutions; distributed with a grid-packing algorith with high resolution near the singular surfaces and adequate grid to resolve the nonresonant region. The degenerate case for β = 0 has been derived and coded up for verification, in addition to the nondegenerate case β > 0 . The DELTAR code computes corresponding inner region matching data for the resistive MHD equations of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson. The MATCH code matches the inner and outer region data to obtain global eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. The VACUUM provides data for a vacuum region outside the plasma region. The MARS-F code, which solves the same equations by a straigh-through method, is used to verify the accuracy of the DCON solution. Results will be presented.

  9. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  10. Kinetic-MHD hybrid equilibrium model using a Monte-Carlo calculation of runaway electron distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Akinobu; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Yagi, Masatoshi

    2015-11-01

    An axisymmetric MHD equilibrium model is studied to allow the inclusion of both beam inertia and energy spectrum for runaway electron beam. Following kinetic-MHD hybrid approach, we evaluate the RE beam current from the integrals of the RE distribution function. The distribution function is here evaluated by a relativistic guiding-center trace code ETC-Rel, where we have implemented the effects of collisions, radiations, and exponential growth into the code. Because to directly treat the Dreicer mechanism in particle simulations is time consuming, the primary RE source is modeled by a Monte-Carlo weighing scheme taking into account the instantaneous generation rate. This paper applies ETC-Rel to the parametric study of the MHD equilibrium with different RE beam parameters. Kinetic effects on the MHD equilibrium appears, e.g., as enhanced Shafranov shifts due to the inertia of highly relativistic electrons. A kinetic modification to the equilibrium becomes significant if the contribution of the beam inertia - being increased with the total electron mass of multi-MeV RE populations - becomes large enough to affect the radial force balance. This work was supported in part by MEXT KAKENHI Grant No. 23561009 and 26820404.

  11. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  12. Magnetic reconnection in a compressible MHD plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji; Birn, Joachim

    2011-04-15

    Using steady-state resistive MHD, magnetic reconnection is reinvestigated for conditions of high resistivity/low magnetic Reynolds number, when the thickness of the diffusion region is no longer small compared to its length. Implicit expressions for the reconnection rate and other reconnection parameters are derived based on the requirements of mass, momentum, and energy conservation. These expressions are solved via simple iterative procedures. Implications specifically for low Reynolds number/high resistivity are being discussed.

  13. Statistical Theory of the Ideal MHD Geodynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, J. V.

    2012-01-01

    A statistical theory of geodynamo action is developed, using a mathematical model of the geodynamo as a rotating outer core containing an ideal (i.e., no dissipation), incompressible, turbulent, convecting magnetofluid. On the concentric inner and outer spherical bounding surfaces the normal components of the velocity, magnetic field, vorticity and electric current are zero, as is the temperature fluctuation. This allows the use of a set of Galerkin expansion functions that are common to both velocity and magnetic field, as well as vorticity, current and the temperature fluctuation. The resulting dynamical system, based on the Boussinesq form of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, represents MHD turbulence in a spherical domain. These basic equations (minus the temperature equation) and boundary conditions have been used previously in numerical simulations of forced, decaying MHD turbulence inside a sphere [1,2]. Here, the ideal case is studied through statistical analysis and leads to a prediction that an ideal coherent structure will be found in the form of a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field that results from broken ergodicity, an effect that has been previously studied both analytically and numerically for homogeneous MHD turbulence [3,4]. The axial dipole component becomes prominent when there is a relatively large magnetic helicity (proportional to the global correlation of magnetic vector potential and magnetic field) and a stationary, nonzero cross helicity (proportional to the global correlation of velocity and magnetic field). The expected angle of the dipole moment vector with respect to the rotation axis is found to decrease to a minimum as the average cross helicity increases for a fixed value of magnetic helicity and then to increase again when average cross helicity approaches its maximum possible value. Only a relatively small value of cross helicity is needed to produce a dipole moment vector that is aligned at approx.10deg with the

  14. Dispersive waves in a seeded MHD generator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.

    1972-01-01

    The equations giving the response of a slightly ionized plasma with monatomic components to sinusoidal perturbations have been formulated. Included in the model equations were the electron Hall effect, electron thermal diffusion, radiation, and electron-atom rate processes. Plasma conditions were limited to those where viscous effects, the induced magnetic field, ion slip, and atom-atom inelastic processes can be neglected. Presented are results of numerical calculations for MHD generators with a working fluid of potassium seeded argon.

  15. Design Study: Rocket Based MHD Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report addresses the technical feasibility and design of a rocket based MHD generator using a sub-scale LOx/RP rocket motor. The design study was constrained by assuming the generator must function within the performance and structural limits of an existing magnet and by assuming realistic limits on (1) the axial electric field, (2) the Hall parameter, (3) current density, and (4) heat flux (given the criteria of heat sink operation). The major results of the work are summarized as follows: (1) A Faraday type of generator with rectangular cross section is designed to operate with a combustor pressure of 300 psi. Based on a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla, the electrical power output from this generator is estimated to be 54.2 KW with potassium seed (weight fraction 3.74%) and 92 KW with cesium seed (weight fraction 9.66%). The former corresponds to a enthalpy extraction ratio of 2.36% while that for the latter is 4.16%; (2) A conceptual design of the Faraday MHD channel is proposed, based on a maximum operating time of 10 to 15 seconds. This concept utilizes a phenolic back wall for inserting the electrodes and inter-electrode insulators. Copper electrode and aluminum oxide insulator are suggested for this channel; and (3) A testing configuration for the sub-scale rocket based MHD system is proposed. An estimate of performance of an ideal rocket based MHD accelerator is performed. With a current density constraint of 5 Amps/cm(exp 2) and a conductivity of 30 Siemens/m, the push power density can be 250, 431, and 750 MW/m(sup 3) when the induced voltage uB have values of 5, 10, and 15 KV/m, respectively.

  16. Fully implicit adaptive mesh refinement MHD algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby

    2005-10-01

    In the macroscopic simulation of plasmas, the numerical modeler is faced with the challenge of dealing with multiple time and length scales. The former results in stiffness due to the presence of very fast waves. The latter requires one to resolve the localized features that the system develops. Traditional approaches based on explicit time integration techniques and fixed meshes are not suitable for this challenge, as such approaches prevent the modeler from using realistic plasma parameters to keep the computation feasible. We propose here a novel approach, based on implicit methods and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Our emphasis is on both accuracy and scalability with the number of degrees of freedom. To our knowledge, a scalable, fully implicit AMR algorithm has not been accomplished before for MHD. As a proof-of-principle, we focus on the reduced resistive MHD model as a basic MHD model paradigm, which is truly multiscale. The approach taken here is to adapt mature physics-based technologyootnotetextL. Chac'on et al., J. Comput. Phys. 178 (1), 15- 36 (2002) to AMR grids, and employ AMR-aware multilevel techniques (such as fast adaptive composite --FAC-- algorithms) for scalability. We will demonstrate that the concept is indeed feasible, featuring optimal scalability under grid refinement. Results of fully-implicit, dynamically-adaptive AMR simulations will be presented on a variety of problems.

  17. Robust preconditioners for incompressible MHD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yicong; Hu, Kaibo; Hu, Xiaozhe; Xu, Jinchao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we develop two classes of robust preconditioners for the structure-preserving discretization of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) system. By studying the well-posedness of the discrete system, we design block preconditioners for them and carry out rigorous analysis on their performance. We prove that such preconditioners are robust with respect to most physical and discretization parameters. In our proof, we improve the existing estimates of the block triangular preconditioners for saddle point problems by removing the scaling parameters, which are usually difficult to choose in practice. This new technique is applicable not only to the MHD system, but also to other problems. Moreover, we prove that Krylov iterative methods with our preconditioners preserve the divergence-free condition exactly, which complements the structure-preserving discretization. Another feature is that we can directly generalize this technique to other discretizations of the MHD system. We also present preliminary numerical results to support the theoretical results and demonstrate the robustness of the proposed preconditioners.

  18. NASA Lewis Research Center combustion MHD experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The MHD power generation experiments were conducted in a high field strength cryomagnet which was adapted from an existing facility. In its original construction, it consisted of 12 high purity aluminum coils pool cooled in a bath of liquid neon. In this configuration, a peak field of 15 tesla was produced. For the present experiments, the center four coils were removed and a 23 cm diameter transverse warm bore tube was inserted to allow the placement of the MHD experiment between the remaining eight coils. In this configuration, a peak field of 6 tesla should be obtainable. The time duration of the experiment is limited by the neon supply which allows on the order of 1 minute of total operating time followed by an 18-hour reliquefaction period. As a result, the experiments are run in a pulsed mode. The run duration for the data presented here was 5 sec. The magnetic field profile along the MHD duct is shown. Since the working fluid is in essence superheated steam, it is easily water quenched at the exit of the diffuser and the components are designed vacuum tight so that the exhaust pipe and demister an be pumped down to simulate the vacuum of outer space.

  19. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is a universal, nonlinear phenomenon found in all energetic fluid and plasma motion. In particular. understanding magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and incorporating its effects in the computation and prediction of the flow of ionized gases in space, for example, are great challenges that must be met if such computations and predictions are to be meaningful. Although a general solution to the "problem of turbulence" does not exist in closed form, numerical integrations allow us to explore the phase space of solutions for both ideal and dissipative flows. For homogeneous, incompressible turbulence, Fourier methods are appropriate, and phase space is defined by the Fourier coefficients of the physical fields. In the case of ideal MHD flows, a fairly robust statistical mechanics has been developed, in which the symmetry and ergodic properties of phase space is understood. A discussion of these properties will illuminate our principal discovery: Coherent structure and randomness co-exist in ideal MHD turbulence. For dissipative flows, as opposed to ideal flows, progress beyond the dimensional analysis of Kolmogorov has been difficult. Here, some possible future directions that draw on the ideal results will also be discussed. Our conclusion will be that while ideal turbulence is now well understood, real turbulence still presents great challenges.

  20. MHD Turbulence in the Taurus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, M.; Gong, H.; Brunt, C.; Ostriker, E.

    2005-12-01

    The presence of MHD turbulence in the Taurus Molecular Cloud is examined from 12CO and 13CO J=1-0 imaging observations using the FCRAO 14 meter telescope. The degree of velocity anisotropy is measured from velocity structure functions derived separately along the x and y axes using Principal Component Analysis of spectroscopic imaging data (Brunt & Heyer 2002). Such anisotropy is predicted from model descriptions and computational simulations of MHD turbulence in the case of strong magnetic fields (Goldreich & Sridhar 1995; Cho, Lazarian, & Vishniac 2002; Vestuto, Ostriker, & Stone 2003). Within a subfield of the Taurus image where the column densities are low, this velocity anisotropy is largest along an angle that is coincident with the local magnetic field direction determined independently from optical polarization of background stars.The structure function derived from data perpendicular to the local field shows a shallower scaling exponent and a larger scaling coefficient than the values that describe the structure function constructed along the magnetic field as predicted by the MHD models. This alignment provides strong evidence that the magnetic field is a significant dynamical force within this column density regime of the Taurus cloud.

  1. 2-D simulation of a waveguide free electron laser having a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Lee, B.C.; Jeong, Y.U.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a 2-D simulation code for the calculation of output power from an FEL oscillator having a helical undulator and a cylindrical waveguide. In the simulation, the current and the energy of the electron beam is 2 A and 400 keV, respectively. The parameters of the permanent-magnet helical undulator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, magnetic field = 1.3 kG. The gain per pass is 10 and the output power is calculated to be higher than 10 kW The results of the 2-D simulation are compared with those of 1-D simulation.

  2. 2D Quantum Mechanical Study of Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, B.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density-gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions and oxide tunneling are treated on an equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. We present the results of our simulations of MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well-tempered" MOSFETs and compare them to those of classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. Surprisingly, the self-consistent potential profile shows lower injection barrier in the channel in quantum case. These results are qualitatively consistent with ID Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and subthreshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  3. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density- gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Quantum simulations are focused on MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well- tempered" MOSFETs and compared to classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are quantitatively consistent with I D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and sub-threshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  4. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  5. Moving finite elements in 2-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K.; Vajk, J. P.; Djomehri, J.; Miller, K.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical background regarding the moving finite element (MFE) method of Miller and Miller (1981) is discussed, taking into account a general system of partial differential equations (PDE) and the amenability of the MFE method in two dimensions to code modularization and to semiautomatic user-construction of numerous PDE systems for both Dirichlet and zero-Neumann boundary conditions. A description of test problem results is presented, giving attention to aspects of single square wave propagation, and a solution of the heat equation.

  6. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  7. 2D Radiative Processes Near Cloud Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, T.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the importance and complexity of dynamical, microphysical, and radiative processes taking place near cloud edges, the transition zone between clouds and cloud free air has been the subject of intense research both in the ASR program and in the wider community. One challenge in this research is that the one-dimensional (1D) radiative models widely used in both remote sensing and dynamical simulations become less accurate near cloud edges: The large horizontal gradients in particle concentrations imply that accurate radiative calculations need to consider multi-dimensional radiative interactions among areas that have widely different optical properties. This study examines the way the importance of multidimensional shortwave radiative interactions changes as we approach cloud edges. For this, the study relies on radiative simulations performed for a multiyear dataset of clouds observed over the NSA, SGP, and TWP sites. This dataset is based on Microbase cloud profiles as well as wind measurements and ARM cloud classification products. The study analyzes the way the difference between 1D and 2D simulation results increases near cloud edges. It considers both monochromatic radiances and broadband radiative heating, and it also examines the influence of factors such as cloud type and height, and solar elevation. The results provide insights into the workings of radiative processes and may help better interpret radiance measurements and better estimate the radiative impacts of this critical region.

  8. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse. PMID:26988702

  9. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  10. Ion Transport in 2-D Graphene Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Quan; Foo, Elbert; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Graphene membranes have recently attracted wide attention due to its great potential in water desalination and selective molecular sieving. Further developments of these membranes, including enhancing their mass transport rate and/or molecular selectivity, rely on the understanding of fundamental transport mechanisms through graphene membranes, which has not been studied experimentally before due to fabrication and measurement difficulties. Herein we report the fabrication of the basic constituent of graphene membranes, i.e. 2-D single graphene nanochannels (GNCs) and the study of ion transport in these channels. A modified bonding technique was developed to form GNCs with well-defined geometry and uniform channel height. Ion transport in such GNCs was studied using DC conductance measurement. Our preliminary results showed that the ion transport in GNCs is still governed by surface charge at low concentrations (10-6M to 10-4M). However, GNCs exhibits much higher ionic conductances than silica nanochannels with the same geometries in the surface-charge-governed regime. This conductance enhancement can be attributed to the pre-accumulation of charges on graphene surfaces. The work is supported by the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  11. Parallel map analysis on 2-D grids

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M.; Comiskey, J.; Minser, K.

    1993-12-31

    In landscape ecology, computer modeling is used to assess habitat fragmentation and its ecological iMPLications. Specifically, maps (2-D grids) of habitat clusters must be analyzed to determine number, sizes and geometry of clusters. Models prior to this study relied upon sequential Fortran-77 programs which limited the sizes of maps and densities of clusters which could be analyzed. In this paper, we present more efficient computer models which can exploit recursion or parallelism. Significant improvements over the original Fortran-77 programs have been achieved using both recursive and nonrecursive C implementations on a variety of workstations such as the Sun Sparc 2, IBM RS/6000-350, and HP 9000-750. Parallel implementations on a 4096-processor MasPar MP-1 and a 32-processor CM-5 are also studied. Preliminary experiments suggest that speed improvements for the parallel model on the MasPar MP-1 (written in MPL) and on the CM-5 (written in C using CMMD) can be as much as 39 and 34 times faster, respectively, than the most efficient sequential C program on a Sun Sparc 2 for a 512 map. An important goal in this research effort is to produce a scalable map analysis algorithm for the identification and characterization of clusters for relatively large maps on massively-parallel computers.

  12. 2D Turbulence with Complicated Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullet, G.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the consequences of lateral viscous boundary layers on the 2D turbulence that arises in domains with complicated boundaries (headlands, bays etc). The study is carried out numerically with LES. The numerics are carefully designed to ensure all global conservation laws, proper boundary conditions and a minimal range of dissipation scales. The turbulence dramatically differs from the classical bi-periodic case. Boundary layer separations lead to creation of many small vortices and act as a continuing energy source exciting the inverse cascade of energy throughout the domain. The detachments are very intermittent in time. In free decay, the final state depends on the effective numerical resolution: laminar with a single dominant vortex for low Re and turbulent with many vortices for large enough Re. After very long time, the turbulent end-state exhibits a striking tendency for the emergence of shielded vortices which then interact almost elastically. In the forced case, the boundary layers allow the turbulence to reach a statistical steady state without any artificial hypo-viscosity or other large-scale dissipation. Implications are discussed for the oceanic mesoscale and submesoscale turbulence.

  13. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  14. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  15. 2-D wavelet with position controlled resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Andrzej; Puzio, Leszek

    2005-09-01

    Wavelet transformation localizes all irregularities in the scene. It is most effective in the case when intensities in the scene have no sharp details. It is the case often present in a medical imaging. To identify the shape one has to extract it from the scene as typical irregularity. When the scene does not contain sharp changes then common differential filters are not efficient tool for a shape extraction. The new 2-D wavelet for such task has been proposed. Described wavelet transform is axially symmetric and has varied scale in dependence on the distance from the centre of the wavelet symmetry. The analytical form of the wavelet has been presented as well as its application for details extraction in the scene. Most important feature of the wavelet transform is that it gives a multi-scale transformation, and if zoom is on the wavelet selectivity varies proportionally to the zoom step. As a result, the extracted shape does not change during zoom operation. What is more the wavelet selectivity can be fit to the local intensity gradient properly to obtain best extraction of the irregularities.

  16. Cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 gene polymorphism and lung cancer susceptibility in Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Legrand-Andréoletti, M; Stücker, I; Marez, D; Galais, P; Cosme, J; Sabbagh, N; Spire, C; Cenée, S; Lafitte, J J; Beaune, P; Broly, F

    1998-02-01

    Many studies have been performed in an attempt to establish a link between the polymorphism of the cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 gene and the incidence of lung cancer. Nevertheless, whether or not this genetic polymorphism has a role in the development of the disease remains unclear. Recently, new advances in our knowledge of the CYP2D6 gene and its locus (CYP2D) have been achieved. In particular, CYP2D6 was found to be highly polymorphic and multiple novel mutations and allelic variants of the gene have been identified. In addition, a number of CYP2D rearrangements, including those with amplification of the gene, have been demonstrated. Taking this new information into account, we have reconsidered the potential influence of CYP2D6 polymorphism in lung cancer susceptibility by performing a comparative analysis of the overall mutational spectrum of CYP2D6 and of the rearrangements of CYP2D in 249 patients with lung cancer and in 265 control individuals matched on age, sex, hospital and residence area. For this purpose, a strategy based on SSCP analysis of the entire coding sequence of CYP2D6 and on RFLP analysis of the gene locus was carried out in DNA samples from each individual. Forty mutations occurring in various combinations on 42 alleles of the gene and 82 different genotypes were identified. No significant difference in the distribution of the mutations, alleles or genotypes was observed between the two groups, except a particular genotype (CYP2D6*1A/*2), which was more common in the sub-group of moderate smokers (< 30 pack-years) suffering from small cell carcinoma (Odds Ratio (OR) 3.6, 95% CI 1.1-11.9). When the phenotype was predicted according to genotype, only a trend toward a higher frequency of ultrarapid metabolizers in patients was obtained. In spite of a complete analysis of the CYP2D6 gene and its locus, this case-control study provides elements against an influence of the CYP2D6 polymorphism on lung cancer susceptibility. PMID:9511176

  17. An analytical demonstration of coupling schemes between magnetohydrodynamic codes and eddy current codes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueqiang

    2008-07-15

    In order to model a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability that strongly couples to external conducting structures (walls and/or coils) in a fusion device, it is often necessary to combine a MHD code solving for the plasma response, with an eddy current code computing the fields and currents of conductors. We present a rigorous proof of the coupling schemes between these two types of codes. One of the coupling schemes has been introduced and implemented in the CARMA code [R. Albanese, Y. Q. Liu, A. Portone, G. Rubinacci, and F. Villone, IEEE Trans. Magn. 44, 1654 (2008); A. Portone, F. Villone, Y. Q. Liu, R. Albanese, and G. Rubinacci, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 085004 (2008)] that couples the MHD code MARS-F[Y. Q. Liu, A. Bondeson, C. M. Fransson, B. Lennartson, and C. Breitholtz, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3681 (2000)] and the eddy current code CARIDDI[R. Albanese and G. Rubinacci, Adv. Imaging Electron Phys. 102, 1 (1998)]. While the coupling schemes are described for a general toroidal geometry, we give the analytical proof for a cylindrical plasma.

  18. 2-D Animation's Not Just for Mickey Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of two-dimensional (2-D) animation; highlights include character animation, painting issues, and motion graphics. Sidebars present Silicon Graphics animations tools and 2-D animation programs for the desktop computer. (DGM)

  19. NASA Lewis H2-O2 MHD program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M.; Nichols, L. D.; Seikel, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    Performance and power costs of H2-O2 combustion powered steam-MHD central power systems are estimated. Hydrogen gas is assumed to be transmitted by pipe from a remote coal gasifier into the city and converted to electricity in a steam MHD plant having an integral gaseous oxygen plant. These steam MHD systems appear to offer an attractive alternative to both in-city clean fueled conventional steam power plants and to remote coal fired power plants with underground electric transmission into the city. Status and plans are outlined for an experimental evaluation of H2-O2 combustion-driven MHD power generators at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  20. Evidence for polymorphism in the cytochrome P450 2D50 gene in horses.

    PubMed

    Corado, C R; McKemie, D S; Young, A; Knych, H K

    2016-06-01

    Metabolism is an essential factor in the clearance of many drugs and as such plays a major role in the establishment of dosage regimens and withdrawal times. CYP2D6, the human orthologue to equine CYP2D50, is a drug-metabolizing enzyme that is highly polymorphic in humans leading to widely differing levels of metabolic activity. As CYP2D6 is highly polymorphic, in this study it was hypothesized that the gene coding for the equine orthologue, CYP2D50, may also be prone to polymorphism. Blood samples were collected from 150 horses, the CYP2D50 gene was cloned and sequenced; and full-length sequences were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), deletions, or insertions. Pharmacokinetic data were collected from a subset of horses following the administration of a single oral dose of tramadol and probit analysis used to calculate metabolic ratios. Prior to drug administration, the ability of recombinant CYP2D50 to metabolize tramadol to O-desmethyltramadol was confirmed. Sequencing of CYP2D50 identified 126 exonic SNPs, with 31 of those appearing in multiple horses. Oral administration of tramadol to a subset of these horses revealed variable metabolic ratios (tramadol: O-desmethyltramadol) in individual horses and separation into three metabolic groups. While a limited number of horses of primarily a single breed were studied, the variability in tramadol metabolism to O-desmethyltramadol between horses and preliminary evidence of what appears to be poor, extensive, and ultra-rapid metabolizers supports further study of the potential for genetic polymorphisms in the CYP2D50 gene in horses. PMID:26441153