Science.gov

Sample records for 2-d model investigation

  1. Impact of high speed civil transports on stratospheric ozone: A 2-D model investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, D.E.; Connell, P.S.

    1996-12-01

    This study investigates the effect on stratospheric ozone from a fleet of proposed High Speed Civil Transports (HSCTs). The new LLNL 2-D operator-split chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere is used for this HSCT investigation. This model is integrated in a diurnal manner, using an implicit numerical solver. Therefore, rate coefficients are not modified by any sort of diurnal average factor. This model also does not make any assumptions on lumping of chemical species into families. Comparisons to previous model-derived HSCT assessment of ozone change are made, both to the previous LLNL 2-D model and to other models from the international assessment modeling community. The sensitivity to the NO{sub x} emission index and sulfate surface area density is also explored.

  2. An investigation of DTNS2D for use as an incompressible turbulence modelling test-bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper documents an investigation of a two dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes solver for use as a test-bed for turbulence modelling. DTNS2D is the code under consideration for use at the Center for Modelling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT). This code was created by Gorski at the David Taylor Research Center and incorporates the pseudo compressibility method. Two laminar benchmark flows are used to measure the performance and implementation of the method. The classical solution of the Blasius boundary layer is used for validating the flat plate flow, while experimental data is incorporated in the validation of backward facing step flow. Velocity profiles, convergence histories, and reattachment lengths are used to quantify these calculations. The organization and adaptability of the code are also examined in light of the role as a numerical test-bed.

  3. The development and testing of a 2D laboratory seismic modelling system for heterogeneous structure investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Yike; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Karaman, Hakki

    2015-05-01

    Lateral velocity variations and low velocity near-surface layers can produce strong scattered and guided waves which interfere with reflections and lead to severe imaging problems in seismic exploration. In order to investigate these specific problems by laboratory seismic modelling, a simple 2D ultrasonic model facility has been recently assembled within the Wave Propagation Lab at ETH Zurich. The simulated geological structures are constructed from 2 mm thick metal and plastic sheets, cut and bonded together. The experiments entail the use of a piezoelectric source driven by a pulse amplifier at ultrasonic frequencies to generate Lamb waves in the plate, which are detected by piezoelectric receivers and recorded digitally on a National Instruments recording system, under LabVIEW software control. The 2D models employed were constructed in-house in full recognition of the similitude relations. The first heterogeneous model features a flat uniform low velocity near-surface layer and deeper dipping and flat interfaces separating different materials. The second model is comparable but also incorporates two rectangular shaped inserts, one of low velocity, the other of high velocity. The third model is identical to the second other than it has an irregular low velocity surface layer of variable thickness. Reflection as well as transmission experiments (crosshole & vertical seismic profiling) were performed on each model. The two dominant Lamb waves recorded are the fundamental symmetric mode (non-dispersive) and the fundamental antisymmetric (flexural) dispersive mode, the latter normally being absent when the source transducer is located on a model edge but dominant when it is on the flat planar surface of the plate. Experimental group and phase velocity dispersion curves were determined and plotted for both modes in a uniform aluminium plate. For the reflection seismic data, various processing techniques were applied, as far as pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The

  4. 2D modeling and preliminary in vitro investigation of a prototype high gradient magnetic separator for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haitao; Kaminski, Michael D; Rosengart, Axel J

    2008-01-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) of magnetic materials from fluids or waste products has many established industrial applications. However, there is currently no technology employing HGMS for ex-vivo biomedical applications, such as for the removal of magnetic drug- or toxin-loaded spheres from the human blood stream. Importantly, human HGMS applications require special design modifications as, in contrast to conventional use where magnetic elements are permanently imbedded within the separation chambers, medical separators need to avoid direct contact between the magnetic materials and blood to reduce the risk of blood clotting and to facilitate convenient and safe treatment access for many individuals. We describe and investigate the performance of a magnetic separator prototype designed for biomedical applications. First, the capture efficiency of a prototype HGMS separator unit consisting of a short tubing segment and two opposing magnetizable fine wires along the outside of the tubing was investigated using 2D mathematical modeling. Second, the first-pass effectiveness to remove commercially available, magnetic polystyrene spheres from human blood using a single separator unit was experimentally verified. The theoretical and experimental data correlated well at low flow velocities (<5.0 cm/s) and high external magnetic fields (>0.05 T). This prototype separator unit removed >90% in a single pass of the magnetic spheres from water at mean flow velocity < or =8.0 cm/s and from blood mimic fluids (ethylene glycol-water solutions) at mean flow velocity < or =2.0 cm/s. In summary, we describe and prove the feasibility of a HGMS separator for biomedical applications.

  5. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  6. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  7. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  8. Investigation of capillary nanosecond discharges in air at moderate pressure: comparison of experiments and 2D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, Andrei V.; Starikovskaia, Svetlana M.; Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-01

    Nanosecond electrical discharges in the form of ionization waves are of interest for rapidly ionizing and exciting complex gas mixtures to initiate chemical reactions. Operating with a small discharge tube diameter can significantly increase the specific energy deposition and so enable optimization of the initiation process. Analysis of the uniformity of energy release in small diameter capillary tubes will aid in this optimization. In this paper, results for the experimentally derived characteristics of nanosecond capillary discharges in air at moderate pressure are presented and compared with results from a two-dimensional model. The quartz capillary tube, having inner and outer diameters of 1.5 and 3.4 mm, is about 80 mm long and filled with synthetic dry air at 27 mbar. The capillary tube with two electrodes at the ends is inserted into a break of the central wire of a long coaxial cable. A metal screen around the tube is connected to the cable ground shield. The discharge is driven by a 19 kV 35 ns voltage pulse applied to the powered electrode. The experimental measurements are conducted primarily by using a calibrated capacitive probe and back current shunts. The numerical modelling focuses on the fast ionization wave (FIW) and the plasma properties in the immediate afterglow after the conductive plasma channel has been established between the two electrodes. The FIW produces a highly focused region of electric field on the tube axis that sustains the ionization wave that eventually bridges the electrode gap. Results from the model predict FIW propagation speed and current rise time that agree with the experiment.

  9. HAM2D: 2D Shearing Box Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammie, Charles F.; Guan, Xiaoyue

    2012-10-01

    HAM solves non-relativistic hyperbolic partial differential equations in conservative form using high-resolution shock-capturing techniques. This version of HAM has been configured to solve the magnetohydrodynamic equations of motion in axisymmetry to evolve a shearing box model.

  10. An Investigation of 2D Electrostatic Dust Levitation about Bennu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartzell, Christine; Zimmerman, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Electrostatic dust levitation has been hypothesized to occur near the surface of asteroids, due to the interaction of the solar wind plasma and UV radiation with the asteroids’ surfaces and their near-zero surficial gravity. Dust levitation could provide a mechanism to move regolith across the surface of an asteroid. Our preliminary investigations have identified grains sizes and the altitudes at which grains may levitate considering a semi-analytical 1D plasma model. However, our initial semi-analytical plasma model was not well-suited to the complex terminator region, where the surface transitions between positive (dominated by photoemission) and negative (in the plasma wake) potentials. In this analysis, we use a new 2D treecode-based plasma simulation to more accurately model the plasma environment about a simplified circular cross-section of the asteroid Bennu. We investigate the altitudes and grain sizes where electrostatic levitation could occur at Bennu. The improved plasma model will allow more accurate predictions of dust levitation and deposition, particularly in the terminator and wake regions that could not be characterized be earlier plasma models.

  11. Using a 2D Model of the Io Plasma Torus to Investigate the Effects of Density Variations on the Morphology and Intensity of the Io Footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payan, A. P.; Rajendar, A.; Paty, C. S.; Bonfond, B.; Crary, F.

    2012-12-01

    Io is the primary source of plasma in the Jovian magnetosphere, continuously releasing approximately 1 ton/s of SO2 from volcanic eruptions. The interaction of Io with Jupiter's magnetosphere is strongly influenced by the density structure of the resulting plasma torus and the position of Io relative to the center of the torus [Bonfond et al. 2008]. This unusual interaction produces a complex auroral feature on Jupiter's ionosphere known as the Io footprint. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of Jupiter's far-UV aurora during spring 2007 showed an increased number of isolated auroral blobs along with a continuous expansion of Jupiter's main auroral oval over a few months. These blobs were associated with several large injections of hot plasma between 9 and 27 Jovian radii. These events coincided with a large volcanic eruption of the Tvashtar Paterae on Io, as observed by the New Horizons spacecraft [Spencer et al., 2007]. This, in turn, may have resulted in a significant increase in the plasma torus density. Besides, on June 7th, 2007, the Io footprint momentarily became so faint that it disappeared under a diffuse patch of emission remaining from an injection blob [Bonfond et al., 2012]. The goal of the present study is to examine the relationship between the increased density of the plasma torus and the dimming of the Io footprint. We implement a 2D model of the Io plasma torus that treats the variable-density torus as being composed of discrete layers of uniform density. As the co-rotating plasma in the plasma torus impinges on Io, Alfvén waves are launched at a pushback angle obtained from Gurnett and Goertz [1981]. The waves propagate inside the plasma torus through reflection and refraction at density discontinuities where they lose some of their initial energy. Using the above model, we can track the Alfvén wave fronts in the plasma torus and determine the longitude at which they exit the torus along with the corresponding remaining energy. Since

  12. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  13. Investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA hybridization by means of 2-D fluorescence spectroscopy and soft/hard modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Sara; Kompany-Zareh, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    Reversible hybridization reaction plays a key role in fundamental biological processes, in many laboratory techniques, and also in DNA based sensing devices. Comprehensive investigation of this process is, therefore, essential for the development of more sophisticated applications. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the hybridization reaction, as a second order process, are systematically investigated with the aid of the soft and hard chemometric methods. Labeling two complementary 21 mer DNA single strands with FAM and Texas red fluorophores, enabled recording of the florescence excitation-emission matrices during the experiments which led to three-way data sets. The presence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in excitation and emission modes and the closure in concentration mode, made the three-way data arrays rank deficient. To acquire primary chemical information, restricted Tucker3 as a soft method was employed. Herein a model-based method, hard restricted trilinear decomposition, is introduced for in depth analysis of rank deficient three-way data sets. By employing proposed hard method, the nonlinear model parameters as well as the correct profiles could be estimated. In addition, a simple constraint is presented to extract chemically reasonable output profiles regarding the core elements of restricted Tucker3 model.

  14. Network models for 2D disordered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagalovsky, Victor; Horovitz, Baruch; Avishai, Yshai

    2004-04-01

    We study new random matrix symmetry classes which arise in models of non-interacting quasi-particles in disordered superconductors. Within the Altland-Zirnbauer classification scheme these are class C (with time-reversal symmetry broken and spin-rotaion invariance intact), and class D where both symmetries are broken. Preliminary studies of the two remaining symmetry classes CI and DIII are briefly mentioned. New results are presented pertaining to the 3d realization of class C, which, physically, corresponds to a layered superconductor.

  15. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  16. Investigating the definition of flood maps using a 2D hydraulic routing model forced by a DEM-based fully continuous rainfall-runoff algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardi, Fernando; Petroselli, Andrea; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Ongoing efforts of remote sensing technologies to provide more accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) at the global scale are supporting the use of terrain analysis and hydrologic and hydraulic modelling algorithms for flood mapping in ungauged basins. In this work we implement a fully continuous hydrologic-hydraulic model feeded by a rainfall synthetic time series for providing river hydrographs that are routed along the channel using a bidimensional hydraulic model for the detailed physically-based characterization of the inundation process. In this way the whole physical process is represented, from the net rainfall to the flow time series, avoiding any conceptual sub-method (design hyetograph and hydrograph) commonly needed to apply standard flood modelling and mapping procedures. Nevertheless, the floodplain information is no longer deterministic as the result of the evaluation of the impact on the river valley of a single design hydrologic scenario (event-based approach,EBA), but the final result is composed of a combination of data derived by the application of a fully-continuous approach (FCA). Indeed FCA provides a flow depth time series for each single cell of the inundated domain. The final flood map should be, thus, the result of a proper analysis of this dataset in statistical, qualitative and quantitative terms. Otherwise this would lead to an undefined flooding scenario that could be useless for flood risk management and decision making in urban plans.

  17. An Intercomparison of 2-D Models Within a Common Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.; Considine, David B.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A model intercomparison among the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) 2-D model, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D model, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D model allows us to separate differences due to model transport from those due to the model's chemical formulation. This is accomplished by constructing two hybrid models incorporating the transport parameters of the GSFC and LLNL models within the AER model framework. By comparing the results from the native models (AER and e.g. GSFC) with those from the hybrid model (e.g. AER chemistry with GSFC transport), differences due to chemistry and transport can be identified. For the analysis, we examined an inert tracer whose emission pattern is based on emission from a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) fleet; distributions of trace species in the 2015 atmosphere; and the response of stratospheric ozone to an HSCT fleet. Differences in NO(y) in the upper stratosphere are found between models with identical transport, implying different model representations of atmospheric chemical processes. The response of O3 concentration to HSCT aircraft emissions differs in the models from both transport-dominated differences in the HSCT-induced perturbations of H2O and NO(y) as well as from differences in the model represent at ions of O3 chemical processes. The model formulations of cold polar processes are found to be the most significant factor in creating large differences in the calculated ozone perturbations

  18. Investigations on the sensitivity of the computer code TURBO-2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amon, B.

    1994-12-01

    The two-dimensional computer model TURBO-2D for the calculation of two-phase flow was used to calculate the cold injection of fuel into a model chamber. Investigations of the influence of the input parameter on its sensitivity relative to the obtained results were made. In addition to that calculations were performed and compared using experimental injection pressure data and corresponding averaged injection parameter.

  19. 2D quantum gravity at three loops: A counterterm investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Lætitia; Bilal, Adel

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the divergences of the three-loop partition function at fixed area in 2D quantum gravity. Considering the Liouville action in the Kähler formalism, we extract the coefficient of the leading divergence ∼ AΛ2(ln ⁡ AΛ2) 2. This coefficient is non-vanishing. We discuss the counterterms one can and must add and compute their precise contribution to the partition function. This allows us to conclude that every local and non-local divergence in the partition function can be balanced by local counterterms, with the only exception of the maximally non-local divergence (ln ⁡ AΛ2) 3. Yet, this latter is computed and does cancel between the different three-loop diagrams. Thus, requiring locality of the counterterms is enough to renormalize the partition function. Finally, the structure of the new counterterms strongly suggests that they can be understood as a renormalization of the measure action.

  20. Duality Between Spin Networks and the 2D Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzom, Valentin; Costantino, Francesco; Livine, Etera R.

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to exhibit a deep relation between the partition function of the Ising model on a planar trivalent graph and the generating series of the spin network evaluations on the same graph. We provide respectively a fermionic and a bosonic Gaussian integral formulation for each of these functions and we show that they are the inverse of each other (up to some explicit constants) by exhibiting a supersymmetry relating the two formulations. We investigate three aspects and applications of this duality. First, we propose higher order supersymmetric theories that couple the geometry of the spin networks to the Ising model and for which supersymmetric localization still holds. Secondly, after interpreting the generating function of spin network evaluations as the projection of a coherent state of loop quantum gravity onto the flat connection state, we find the probability distribution induced by that coherent state on the edge spins and study its stationary phase approximation. It is found that the stationary points correspond to the critical values of the couplings of the 2D Ising model, at least for isoradial graphs. Third, we analyze the mapping of the correlations of the Ising model to spin network observables, and describe the phase transition on those observables on the hexagonal lattice. This opens the door to many new possibilities, especially for the study of the coarse-graining and continuum limit of spin networks in the context of quantum gravity.

  1. Experimental investigation of 2D flexible plunging hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ruijun; Mitchell, Robert; Shu, Fangjun

    2012-11-01

    It is believed that both birds and insects benefit from their wing flexibility during the flapping flight. One of the possible benefits is higher lift force generation capability than that of rigid wing models. Both experimental and computational work has discovered that the leading edge vortex (LEV) plays an important role in this advantage of high lift force generating efficiency. In the present work, flow physics related to high lift-generating flexible wings are investigated experimentally. Both flexible and rigid hydrofoils (NACA0012) were actively plunged in glycerol-water solution with various amplitude, frequency and Reynolds number combinations. Phase-locked Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to investigate the generation and evolution of the LEVs. Lift and drag forces during plunging were also measured to uncover the relationship between the force response and the surrounding flow field development. The overall results were also compared between flexible and rigid hydrofoils to provide qualitative data for validation of computational work. Supported by Army High Performance Computing Center.

  2. Effects of Agent's Repulsion in 2d Flocking Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Najem; Tarras, Iliass; Mazroui, M'hammed; Boughaleb, Yahya

    In nature many animal groups, such as fish schools or bird flocks, clearly display structural order and appear to move as a single coherent entity. In order to understand the complex behavior of these systems, many models have been proposed and tested so far. This paper deals with an extension of the Vicsek model, by including a second zone of repulsion, where each agent attempts to maintain a minimum distance from the others. The consideration of this zone in our study seems to play an important role during the travel of agents in the two-dimensional (2D) flocking models. Our numerical investigations show that depending on the basic ingredients such as repulsion radius (R1), effect of density of agents (ρ) and noise (η), our nonequilibrium system can undergo a kinetic phase transition from no transport to finite net transport. For different values of ρ, kinetic phase diagrams in the plane (η ,R1) are found. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. Finite temperature corrections in 2d integrable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselle, M.; Hasenbusch, M.

    2002-09-01

    We study the finite size corrections for the magnetization and the internal energy of the 2d Ising model in a magnetic field by using transfer matrix techniques. We compare these corrections with the functional form recently proposed by Delfino and LeClair-Mussardo for the finite temperature behaviour of one-point functions in integrable 2d quantum field theories. We find a perfect agreement between theoretical expectations and numerical results. Assuming the proposed functional form as an input in our analysis we obtain a relevant improvement in the precision of the continuum limit estimates of both quantities.

  4. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  5. Flow transitions in a 2D directional solidification model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larroude, Philippe; Ouazzani, Jalil; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1992-01-01

    Flow transitions in a Two Dimensional (2D) model of crystal growth were examined using the Bridgman-Stockbarger me thod. Using a pseudo-spectral Chebyshev collocation method, the governing equations yield solutions which exhibit a symmetry breaking flow tansition and oscillatory behavior indicative of a Hopf bifurcation at higher values of Ra. The results are discussed from fluid dynamic viewpoint, and broader implications for process models are also addressed.

  6. Influence of Elevation Data Source on 2D Hydraulic Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, Krzysztof; Stępnik, Mateusz; Kurczyński, Zdzisław

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the influence of the source of various elevation data on hydraulic modelling in open channels. In the research, digital terrain models from different datasets were evaluated and used in two-dimensional hydraulic models. The following aerial and satellite elevation data were used to create the representation of terrain - digital terrain model: airborne laser scanning, image matching, elevation data collected in the LPIS, EuroDEM, and ASTER GDEM. From the results of five 2D hydrodynamic models with different input elevation data, the maximum depth and flow velocity of water were derived and compared with the results of the most accurate ALS data. For such an analysis a statistical evaluation and differences between hydraulic modelling results were prepared. The presented research proved the importance of the quality of elevation data in hydraulic modelling and showed that only ALS and photogrammetric data can be the most reliable elevation data source in accurate 2D hydraulic modelling.

  7. 2D DEM model of sand transport with wind interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oger, L.; Valance, A.

    2013-06-01

    The advance of the dunes in the desert is a threat to the life of the local people. The dunes invade houses, agricultural land and perturb the circulation on the roads. It is therefore very important to understand the mechanism of sand transport in order to fight against desertification. Saltation in which sand grains are propelled by the wind along the surface in short hops, is the primary mode of blown sand movement [1]. The saltating grains are very energetic and when impact a sand surface, they rebound and consequently eject other particles from the sand bed. The ejected grains, called reptating grains, contribute to the augmentation of the sand flux. Some of them can be promoted to the saltation motion. We use a mechanical model based on the Discrete Element Method to study successive collisions of incident energetic beads with granular packing in the context of Aeolian saltation transport. We investigate the collision process for the case where the incident bead and those from the packing have identical mechanical properties. We analyze the features of the consecutive collision processes made by the transport of the saltating disks by a wind in which its profile is obtained from the counter-interaction between air flow and grain flows. We used a molecular dynamics method known as DEM (soft Discrete Element Method) with a initial static packing of 20000 2D particles. The dilation of the upper surface due to the consecutive collisions is responsible for maintaining the flow at a given energy input due to the wind.

  8. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT`S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field (``port approximation``). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  9. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT'S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field ( port approximation''). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  10. Unitary matrix models and 2D quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dalley, S. . Joseph Henry Labs.); Johnson, C.V.; Morris, T.R. . Dept. of Physics); Watterstam, A. )

    1992-09-21

    In this paper the KdV and modified KdV integrable hierarchies are shown to be different descriptions of the same 2D gravitational system - open-closed string theory. Non-perturbative solutions of the multicritical unitary matrix models map to non-singular solutions of the renormalization group equation for the string susceptibility, [P, Q] = Q. The authors also demonstrate that the large-N solutions of unitary matrix integrals in external fields, studied by Gross and Newman, equal the non-singular pure closed-string solutions of [[bar P], Q] = Q.

  11. Brane brick models and 2 d (0 , 2) triality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Sebastián; Lee, Sangmin; Seong, Rak-Kyeong

    2016-05-01

    We provide a brane realization of 2 d (0 , 2) Gadde-Gukov-Putrov triality in terms of brane brick models. These are Type IIA brane configurations that are T-dual to D1-branes over singular toric Calabi-Yau 4-folds. Triality translates into a local transformation of brane brick models, whose simplest representative is a cube move. We present explicit examples and construct their triality networks. We also argue that the classical mesonic moduli space of brane brick model theories, which corresponds to the probed Calabi-Yau 4-fold, is invariant under triality. Finally, we discuss triality in terms of phase boundaries, which play a central role in connecting Calabi-Yau 4-folds to brane brick models.

  12. 2D numerical modelling of meandering channel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    XIAO, Y.; ZHOU, G.; YANG, F. S.

    2016-03-01

    A 2D depth-averaged model for hydrodynamic sediment transport and river morphological adjustment was established. The sediment transport submodel takes into account the influence of non-uniform sediment with bed surface armoring and considers the impact of secondary flow in the direction of bed-load transport and transverse slope of the river bed. The bank erosion submodel incorporates a simple simulation method for updating bank geometry during either degradational or aggradational bed evolution. Comparison of the results obtained by the extended model with experimental and field data, and numerical predictions validate that the proposed model can simulate grain sorting in river bends and duplicate the characteristics of meandering river and its development. The results illustrate that by using its control factors, the improved numerical model can be applied to simulate channel evolution under different scenarios and improve understanding of patterning processes.

  13. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, B.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on an equal footing. Electron bandstructure is treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. We present the results of our simulations of MIT 25 and 90 nm "well-tempered" MOSFETs and compare them to those of classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are consistent with 1D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and subthreshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller leakage current than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current.

  14. Investigations of spectral resolution and angle dependency in a 2-D tracking Doppler method.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, Tonje D; Avdal, Jorgen; Ekroll, Ingvild K; Dahl, Torbjorn; Lovstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans

    2014-07-01

    An important source of error in velocity measurements from conventional pulsed wave (PW) Doppler is the angle used for velocity calibration. Because there are great uncertainties and interobserver variability in the methods used for Doppler angle correction in the clinic today, it is desirable to develop new and more robust methods. In this work, we have investigated how a previously presented method, 2-D tracking Doppler, depends on the tracking angle. A signal model was further developed to include tracking along any angle, providing velocity spectra which showed good agreement with both experimental data and simulations. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) bandwidth and the peak value of predicted power spectra were calculated for varying tracking angles. It was shown that the spectra have lowest bandwidth and maximum power when the tracking angle is equal to the beam-to-flow angle. This may facilitate new techniques for velocity calibration, e.g., by manually adjusting the tracking angle, while observing the effect on the spectral display. An in vitro study was performed in which the Doppler angles were predicted by the minimum FWHM and the maximum power of the 2-D tracking Doppler spectra for 3 different flow angles. The estimated Doppler angles had an overall error of 0.24° ± 0.75° when using the minimum FWHM. With an in vivo example, it was demonstrated that the 2-D tracking Doppler method is suited for measurements in a patient with carotid stenosis.

  15. Mass loss in 2D rotating stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Lovekin, Caterine; Deupree, Bob

    2010-10-05

    Radiatively driven mass loss is an important factor in the evolution of massive stars . The mass loss rates depend on a number of stellar parameters, including the effective temperature and luminosity. Massive stars are also often rapidly rotating, which affects their structure and evolution. In sufficiently rapidly rotating stars, both the effective temperature and radius vary significantly as a function of latitude, and hence mass loss rates can vary appreciably between the poles and the equator. In this work, we discuss the addition of mass loss to a 2D stellar evolution code (ROTORC) and compare evolution sequences with and without mass loss. Preliminary results indicate that a full 2D calculation of mass loss using the local effective temperature and luminosity can significantly affect the distribution of mass loss in rotating main sequence stars. More mass is lost from the pole than predicted by 1D models, while less mass is lost at the equator. This change in the distribution of mass loss will affect the angular momentum loss, the surface temperature and luminosity, and even the interior structure of the star. After a single mass loss event, these effects are small, but can be expected to accumulate over the course of the main sequence evolution.

  16. Predicting abnormal pressure from 2-D seismic velocity modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Grauls, D.; Dunand, J.P.; Beaufort, D.

    1995-12-01

    Seismic velocities are the only data available, before drilling, on which to base a quantitative, present-day estimate of abnormal pressure. Recent advances in seismic velocity processing have enabled them to obtain, using an in-house approach, an optimized 2-D interval velocity field and consequently to better define the lateral extension of pressure regimes. The methodology, interpretation and quantification of overpressure-related anomalies are supported by case studies, selected in sand-shale dominated Tertiary basins, offshore West Africa. Another advantage of this approach is that it can also account for the presence of reservoir-potential intervals at great depth and thus provide significant insight, from a prospective standpoint, into very poorly explored areas. Although at the outset the 2-D seismic tool legitimately merits being favored, optimization of the final predictive pressure model, prior to drilling, will depend upon the success of its combined use with other concepts and approaches, pertaining to structural geology, sedimentology, rock mechanics and fluid dynamics.

  17. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density- gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Quantum simulations are focused on MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well- tempered" MOSFETs and compared to classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are quantitatively consistent with I D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and sub-threshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  18. Accurate coronary modeling procedure using 2D calibrated projections based on 2D centerline points on a single projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassaghi, Babak; Rasche, Volker; Viergever, Max A.; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2004-05-01

    For the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, accurate quantitative analysis of the coronary arteries is important. In coronary angiography, a number of projections is acquired from which 3D models of the coronaries can be reconstructed. A signifcant limitation of the current 3D modeling procedures is the required user interaction for defining the centerlines of the vessel structures in the 2D projections. Currently, the 3D centerlines of the coronary tree structure are calculated based on the interactively determined centerlines in two projections. For every interactively selected centerline point in a first projection the corresponding point in a second projection has to be determined interactively by the user. The correspondence is obtained based on the epipolar-geometry. In this paper a method is proposed to retrieve all the information required for the modeling procedure, by the interactive determination of the 2D centerline-points in only one projection. For every determined 2D centerline-point the corresponding 3D centerline-point is calculated by the analysis of the 1D gray value functions of the corresponding epipolarlines in space for all available 2D projections. This information is then used to build a 3D representation of the coronary arteries using coronary modeling techniques. The approach is illustrated on the analysis of calibrated phantom and calibrated coronary projection data.

  19. Cascading rainfall uncertainties into 2D inundation impact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvignet, Maxime; de Almeida, Gustavo; Champion, Adrian; Garcia Pintado, Javier; Neal, Jeff; Freer, Jim; Cloke, Hannah; Odoni, Nick; Coxon, Gemma; Bates, Paul; Mason, David

    2013-04-01

    Existing precipitation products show differences in their spatial and temporal distribution and several studies have presented how these differences influence the ability to predict hydrological responses. However, an atmospheric-hydrologic-hydraulic uncertainty cascade is seldom explored and how, importantly, input uncertainties propagate through this cascade is still poorly understood. Such a project requires a combination of modelling capabilities, runoff generation predictions based on those rainfall forecasts, and hydraulic flood wave propagation based on the runoff predictions. Accounting for uncertainty in each component is important in decision making for issuing flood warnings, monitoring or planning. We suggest a better understanding of uncertainties in inundation impact modelling must consider these differences in rainfall products. This will improve our understanding of the input uncertainties on our predictive capability. In this paper, we propose to address this issue by i) exploring the effects of errors in rainfall on inundation predictive capacity within an uncertainty framework, i.e. testing inundation uncertainty against different comparable meteorological conditions (i.e. using different rainfall products). Our method cascades rainfall uncertainties into a lumped hydrologic model (FUSE) within the GLUE uncertainty framework. The resultant prediction uncertainties in discharge provide uncertain boundary conditions, which are cascaded into a simplified shallow water 2D hydraulic model (LISFLOOD-FP). Rainfall data captured by three different measurement techniques - rain gauges, gridded data and numerical weather predictions (NWP) models are used to assess the combined input data and model parameter uncertainty. The study is performed in the Severn catchment over the period between June and July 2007, where a series of rainfall events causing record floods in the study area). Changes in flood area extent are compared and the uncertainty envelope is

  20. A 2-D DNS investigation of extinction and reignition dynamics in nonpremixed flame-vortex interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopal, Rishikesh; Abraham, John

    2008-05-15

    Two-dimensional (2-D) DNS investigations of extinction and reignition dynamics during interactions of laminar nonpremixed flames with counterrotating vortex pairs are performed. The length and velocity scales chosen for the vortices are representative of those in the near fields of high-Reynolds-number jets such as those occurring in Diesel engines. The governing equations are solved with sixth-order spatial discretization and fourth-order time integration. Chemistry is modeled as an irreversible single-step reaction. Local extinction along the symmetry axis, followed by reignition, is observed. The extinction is characterized by strong unsteady effects, which are captured well by 1-D transient diffusion flamelet libraries, provided the time-history of the instantaneous scalar dissipation rate is taken into account. On the other hand, reignition is essentially a 2-D phenomenon involving flame-flame interactions, which are favored for smaller vortices and increasing flame curvature. The effects of unsteadiness and curvature on extinction and reignition are carefully assessed through parametric studies involving a range of vortex and flame characteristics. The interaction outcomes are summarized on Reynolds-Damkoehler number (Re-Da) diagrams, which show the combined effects of unsteadiness and curvature on extinction and reignition. The implications of the observed interaction outcomes for turbulent combustion modeling in the near fields of jet diffusion flames are discussed. (author)

  1. 2-D Chemical-Dynamical Modeling of Venus's Sulfur Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierson, Carver J.; Zhang, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Over the last decade a combination of ground based and Venus Express observations have been made of the concentration of sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere, both above [1, 2] and below the clouds [3, 4]. These observations put constraints on both the vertical and meridional variations of the major sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere.. It has also been observed that SO2 concentrations varies on both timescales of hours and years [1,4]. The spatial and temporal distribution of tracer species is owing to two possibilities: mutual chemical interaction and dynamical tracer transport.Previous Chemical modeling of Venus's middle atmosphere has only been explored in 1-D. We will present the first 2-D (altitude and latitude) chemical-dynamical model for Venus's middle atmosphere. The sulfur chemistry is based on of the 1D model of Zhang et al. 2012 [5]. We do model runs over multiple Venus decades testing two scenarios: first one with varying sulfur fluxes from below, and second with secular dynamical perturbations in the atmosphere [6]. By comparing to Venus Express and ground based observations, we put constraints on the dynamics of Venus's middle atmosphere.References: [1] Belyaev et al. Icarus 2012 [2] Marcq et al. Nature geoscience, 2013 [3] Marcq et al. JGR:Planets, 2008 [4] Arney et al. JGR:Planets, 2014 [5] Zhang et al. Icarus 2012 [6] Parish et al. Icarus 2012

  2. 2-D Model for Normal and Sickle Cell Blood Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekleab, Yonatan; Harris, Wesley

    2011-11-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that alters the red blood cell (RBC) structure and function such that hemoglobin (Hb) cannot effectively bind and release oxygen. Previous computational models have been designed to study the microcirculation for insight into blood disorders such as SCD. Our novel 2-D computational model represents a fast, time efficient method developed to analyze flow dynamics, O2 diffusion, and cell deformation in the microcirculation. The model uses a finite difference, Crank-Nicholson scheme to compute the flow and O2 concentration, and the level set computational method to advect the RBC membrane on a staggered grid. Several sets of initial and boundary conditions were tested. Simulation data indicate a few parameters to be significant in the perturbation of the blood flow and O2 concentration profiles. Specifically, the Hill coefficient, arterial O2 partial pressure, O2 partial pressure at 50% Hb saturation, and cell membrane stiffness are significant factors. Results were found to be consistent with those of Le Floch [2010] and Secomb [2006].

  3. 2-D Inhomogeneous Modeling of the Solar CO Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, T. R.

    1996-05-01

    The recent discovery of off-limb emissions in the mid-IR ( ~ 5 mu m) vibration-rotation bands of solar carbon monoxide (CO) has sparked new interest in the formation of the molecular lines, and their ability to diagnose thermal conditions at high altitudes. The off-limb extensions of the strong CO lines indicate the penetration of cool material (T ~ 3500 K) several hundred kilometers into the otherwise hot (T ~ 6000 K) chromosphere. The origin of the cool gas, and its role in the thermal energy balance, remain controversial. The interpretation of the CO observations must rely heavily upon numerical modeling, in particular highly-inhomogeneous thermal structures arrayed in a 2-D scheme that can properly treat the geometry of the grazing rays at the solar limb. The radiation transport, itself, is especially simple for the CO off-limb emissions, because the fundamental bands form quite close to LTE (high collision rates; low spontaneous decay rates) and the background continuum is purely thermal as well (f--f transitions in H(-) and H). Thus, the geometrical aspects of the problem can be treated in considerably more detail than would be practical for typical NLTE scattering lines. I describe the recent modeling efforts, and the diagnostic potential of the CO bands for future observational studies of inhomogeneous surface structure on the Sun, and on other stars of late spectral type. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-9218063 to the University of Colorado.

  4. Ab initio modeling of 2D layered organohalide lead perovskites.

    PubMed

    Fraccarollo, Alberto; Cantatore, Valentina; Boschetto, Gabriele; Marchese, Leonardo; Cossi, Maurizio

    2016-04-28

    A number of 2D layered perovskites A2PbI4 and BPbI4, with A and B mono- and divalent ammonium and imidazolium cations, have been modeled with different theoretical methods. The periodic structures have been optimized (both in monoclinic and in triclinic systems, corresponding to eclipsed and staggered arrangements of the inorganic layers) at the DFT level, with hybrid functionals, Gaussian-type orbitals and dispersion energy corrections. With the same methods, the various contributions to the solid stabilization energy have been discussed, separating electrostatic and dispersion energies, organic-organic intralayer interactions and H-bonding effects, when applicable. Then the electronic band gaps have been computed with plane waves, at the DFT level with scalar and full relativistic potentials, and including the correlation energy through the GW approximation. Spin orbit coupling and GW effects have been combined in an additive scheme, validated by comparing the computed gap with well known experimental and theoretical results for a model system. Finally, various contributions to the computed band gaps have been discussed on some of the studied systems, by varying some geometrical parameters and by substituting one cation in another's place. PMID:27131557

  5. 2D modeling of electromagnetic waves in cold plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Crombé, K.; Van Eester, D.; Koch, R.; Kyrytsya, V.

    2014-02-12

    The consequences of sheath (rectified) electric fields, resulting from the different mobility of electrons and ions as a response to radio frequency (RF) fields, are a concern for RF antenna design as it can cause damage to antenna parts, limiters and other in-vessel components. As a first step to a more complete description, the usual cold plasma dielectric description has been adopted, and the density profile was assumed to be known as input. Ultimately, the relevant equations describing the wave-particle interaction both on the fast and slow timescale will need to be tackled but prior to doing so was felt as a necessity to get a feeling of the wave dynamics involved. Maxwell's equations are solved for a cold plasma in a 2D antenna box with strongly varying density profiles crossing also lower hybrid and ion-ion hybrid resonance layers. Numerical modelling quickly becomes demanding on computer power, since a fine grid spacing is required to capture the small wavelengths effects of strongly evanescent modes.

  6. Comparison of 1D and 2D CSR Models with Application to the FERMI@ELETTRA Bunch Compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, G.; Ellison, J.A.; Heinemann, K.

    2011-03-28

    We compare our 2D mean field (Vlasov-Maxwell) treatment of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects with 1D approximations of the CSR force which are commonly implemented in CSR codes. In our model we track particles in 4D phase space and calculate 2D forces [1]. The major cost in our calculation is the computation of the 2D force. To speed up the computation and improve 1D models we also investigate approximations to our exact 2D force. As an application, we present numerical results for the Fermi{at}Elettra first bunch compressor with the configuration described in [1].

  7. 2D IR spectra of cyanide in water investigated by molecular dynamics simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung Won; Carr, Joshua K.; Göllner, Michael; Hamm, Peter; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the 2D infrared (IR) spectroscopy of CN− solvated in D2O is investigated. Depending on the force field parametrizations, most of which are based on multipolar interactions for the CN− molecule, the frequency-frequency correlation function and observables computed from it differ. Most notably, models based on multipoles for CN− and TIP3P for water yield quantitatively correct results when compared with experiments. Furthermore, the recent finding that T 1 times are sensitive to the van der Waals ranges on the CN− is confirmed in the present study. For the linear IR spectrum, the best model reproduces the full widths at half maximum almost quantitatively (13.0 cm−1 vs. 14.9 cm−1) if the rotational contribution to the linewidth is included. Without the rotational contribution, the lines are too narrow by about a factor of two, which agrees with Raman and IR experiments. The computed and experimental tilt angles (or nodal slopes) α as a function of the 2D IR waiting time compare favorably with the measured ones and the frequency fluctuation correlation function is invariably found to contain three time scales: a sub-ps, 1 ps, and one on the 10-ps time scale. These time scales are discussed in terms of the structural dynamics of the surrounding solvent and it is found that the longest time scale (≈10 ps) most likely corresponds to solvent exchange between the first and second solvation shell, in agreement with interpretations from nuclear magnetic resonance measurements.

  8. A 2D simulation model for urban flood management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Roland; van der Wielen, Jonathan; Velickov, Slavco; Galvao, Diogo

    2014-05-01

    The European Floods Directive, which came into force on 26 November 2007, requires member states to assess all their water courses and coast lines for risk of flooding, to map flood extents and assets and humans at risk, and to take adequate and coordinated measures to reduce the flood risk in consultation with the public. Flood Risk Management Plans are to be in place by 2015. There are a number of reasons for the promotion of this Directive, not least because there has been much urban and other infrastructural development in flood plains, which puts many at risk of flooding along with vital societal assets. In addition there is growing awareness that the changing climate appears to be inducing more frequent extremes of rainfall with a consequent increases in the frequency of flooding. Thirdly, the growing urban populations in Europe, and especially in the developing countries, means that more people are being put at risk from a greater frequency of urban flooding in particular. There are urgent needs therefore to assess flood risk accurately and consistently, to reduce this risk where it is important to do so or where the benefit is greater than the damage cost, to improve flood forecasting and warning, to provide where necessary (and possible) flood insurance cover, and to involve all stakeholders in decision making affecting flood protection and flood risk management plans. Key data for assessing risk are water levels achieved or forecasted during a flood. Such levels should of course be monitored, but they also need to be predicted, whether for design or simulation. A 2D simulation model (PriceXD) solving the shallow water wave equations is presented specifically for determining flood risk, assessing flood defense schemes and generating flood forecasts and warnings. The simulation model is required to have a number of important properties: -Solve the full shallow water wave equations using a range of possible solutions; -Automatically adjust the time step and

  9. Molecular Dynamics implementation of BN2D or 'Mercedes Benz' water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scukins, Arturs; Bardik, Vitaliy; Pavlov, Evgen; Nerukh, Dmitry

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional 'Mercedes Benz' (MB) or BN2D water model (Naim, 1971) is implemented in Molecular Dynamics. It is known that the MB model can capture abnormal properties of real water (high heat capacity, minima of pressure and isothermal compressibility, negative thermal expansion coefficient) (Silverstein et al., 1998). In this work formulas for calculating the thermodynamic, structural and dynamic properties in microcanonical (NVE) and isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensembles for the model from Molecular Dynamics simulation are derived and verified against known Monte Carlo results. The convergence of the thermodynamic properties and the system's numerical stability are investigated. The results qualitatively reproduce the peculiarities of real water making the model a visually convenient tool that also requires less computational resources, thus allowing simulations of large (hydrodynamic scale) molecular systems. We provide the open source code written in C/C++ for the BN2D water model implementation using Molecular Dynamics.

  10. Justification for a 2D versus 3D fingertip finite element model during static contact simulations.

    PubMed

    Harih, Gregor; Tada, Mitsunori; Dolšak, Bojan

    2016-10-01

    The biomechanical response of a human hand during contact with various products has not been investigated in details yet. It has been shown that excessive contact pressure on the soft tissue can result in discomfort, pain and also cumulative traumatic disorders. This manuscript explores the benefits and limitations of a simplified two-dimensional vs. an anatomically correct three-dimensional finite element model of a human fingertip. Most authors still use 2D FE fingertip models due to their simplicity and reduced computational costs. However we show that an anatomically correct 3D FE fingertip model can provide additional insight into the biomechanical behaviour. The use of 2D fingertip FE models is justified when observing peak contact pressure values as well as displacement during the contact for the given studied cross-section. On the other hand, an anatomically correct 3D FE fingertip model provides a contact pressure distribution, which reflects the fingertip's anatomy.

  11. A 2D simulation model for urban flood management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Roland; van der Wielen, Jonathan; Velickov, Slavco; Galvao, Diogo

    2014-05-01

    The European Floods Directive, which came into force on 26 November 2007, requires member states to assess all their water courses and coast lines for risk of flooding, to map flood extents and assets and humans at risk, and to take adequate and coordinated measures to reduce the flood risk in consultation with the public. Flood Risk Management Plans are to be in place by 2015. There are a number of reasons for the promotion of this Directive, not least because there has been much urban and other infrastructural development in flood plains, which puts many at risk of flooding along with vital societal assets. In addition there is growing awareness that the changing climate appears to be inducing more frequent extremes of rainfall with a consequent increases in the frequency of flooding. Thirdly, the growing urban populations in Europe, and especially in the developing countries, means that more people are being put at risk from a greater frequency of urban flooding in particular. There are urgent needs therefore to assess flood risk accurately and consistently, to reduce this risk where it is important to do so or where the benefit is greater than the damage cost, to improve flood forecasting and warning, to provide where necessary (and possible) flood insurance cover, and to involve all stakeholders in decision making affecting flood protection and flood risk management plans. Key data for assessing risk are water levels achieved or forecasted during a flood. Such levels should of course be monitored, but they also need to be predicted, whether for design or simulation. A 2D simulation model (PriceXD) solving the shallow water wave equations is presented specifically for determining flood risk, assessing flood defense schemes and generating flood forecasts and warnings. The simulation model is required to have a number of important properties: -Solve the full shallow water wave equations using a range of possible solutions; -Automatically adjust the time step and

  12. Implementation of 2D computational models for NDE on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardel, Charles; Lei, Naiguang; Udpa, Lalita

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents an attempt to implement a simulation model for electromagnetic NDE on a GPU. A sample electromagnetic NDE problem is examined and the solution is computed on both CPU and GPU. Diffierent matrix storage formats and matrix-vector computational strategies will be investigated. Analysis of the storage requirements for the matrix on the GPU is tabulated and a full-timing breakdown of the process is presented and discussed.

  13. Simplified 2D Bidomain Model of Whole Heart Electrical Activity and ECG Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovilj, Siniša; Magjarević, Ratko; Abed, Amr Al; Lovell, Nigel H.; Dokos, Socrates

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a geometrically simple and highly computationally-efficient two dimensional (2D) biophysical model of whole heart electrical activity, incorporating spontaneous activation of the sinoatrial node (SAN), the specialized conduction system, and realistic surface ECG morphology computed on the torso. The FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) equations were incorporated into a bidomain finite element model of cardiac electrical activity, which was comprised of a simplified geometry of the whole heart with the blood cavities, the lungs and the torso as an extracellular volume conductor. To model the ECG, we placed four electrodes on the surface of the torso to simulate three Einthoven leads VI, VII and VIII from the standard 12-lead system. The 2D model was able to reconstruct ECG morphology on the torso from action potentials generated at various regions of the heart, including the sinoatrial node, atria, atrioventricular node, His bundle, bundle branches, Purkinje fibers, and ventricles. Our 2D cardiac model offers a good compromise between computational load and model complexity, and can be used as a first step towards three dimensional (3D) ECG models with more complex, precise and accurate geometry of anatomical structures, to investigate the effect of various cardiac electrophysiological parameters on ECG morphology.

  14. A novel adenoviral vector-mediated mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D (CMT2D).

    PubMed

    Seo, Ah Jung; Shin, Youn Ho; Lee, Seo Jin; Kim, Doyeun; Park, Byung Sun; Kim, Sunghoon; Choi, Kyu Ha; Jeong, Na Young; Park, Chan; Jang, Ji-Yeon; Huh, Youngbuhm; Jung, Junyang

    2014-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D is a hereditary axonal and glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)-associated neuropathy that is caused by a mutation in GARS. Here, we report a novel GARS-associated mouse neuropathy model using an adenoviral vector system that contains a neuronal-specific promoter. In this model, we found that wild-type GARS is distributed to peripheral axons, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cell bodies, central axon terminals, and motor neuron cell bodies. In contrast, GARS containing a G240R mutation was localized in DRG and motor neuron cell bodies, but not axonal regions, in vivo. Thus, our data suggest that the disease-causing G240R mutation may result in a distribution defect of GARS in peripheral nerves in vivo. Furthermore, a distributional defect may be associated with axonal degradation in GARS-associated neuropathies.

  15. Preliminary Study of 2D Fracture Upscaling of Geothermal Rock Using IFS Fractal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobing, Prana F. L.; Feranie, Selly; Latief, Fourier D. E.

    2016-08-01

    Fractured rock plays important role in reservoir production. In larger scale, fractures are more likely to be heterogeneous and considered to be fractal in its nature. One of the characteristics of fractal structure is the scale independence. An investigation of fractal properties on natural fractured rock is therefore needed for modelling larger fracture. We have investigated the possibilities of fractal upscaling method to produce a larger geothermal fracture model based on smaller fracture data. We generate Iterated Function System (IFS) fractal model using parameters e.g. scale factor, angle between branch, initial line direction, and branch thickness. All the model parameters are obtained from smaller fracture data. We generate higher iteration model to be compared with larger geothermal fracture. The similarity between the IFS fractal model and natural fracture is measured by 2D box counting fractal dimension (D). The fractal dimension of first to fourth generation fractal model is (1.86 ± 0.02). The fractal dimension of the reference geothermal site is (1.86 ± 0.04). Besides of D, we found significant similarity of fracture parameters there are intensity and density between fracture model and natural fracture. Based on these result, we conclude that fractal upscaling using IFS fractal model is potential to model larger scale of 2D fracture.

  16. Monte Carlo - Metropolis Investigations of Shape and Matrix Effects in 2D and 3D Spin-Crossover Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerroudj, Salim; Caballero, Rafael; De Zela, Francisco; Jureschi, Catalin; Linares, Jorge; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2016-08-01

    The Ising like model, taking into account short-, long-range interaction as well as surface effects is used to investigate size and shape effects on the thermal behaviour of 2D and 3D spin crossover (SCO) nanoparticles embedded in a matrix. We analyze the role of the parametert, representing the ratio between the number of surface and volume molecules, on the unusual thermal hysteresis behaviour (appearance of the hysteresis and a re-entrance phase transition) at small scales.

  17. Inhibitory effects of phytochemicals on metabolic capabilities of CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 using cell-based models in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Qiang; Qu, Jian; Han, Lu; Zhan, Min; Wu, Lan-xiang; Zhang, Yi-wen; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Hong-hao

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Herbal products have been widely used, and the safety of herb-drug interactions has aroused intensive concerns. This study aimed to investigate the effects of phytochemicals on the catalytic activities of human CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 in vitro. Methods: HepG2 cells were stably transfected with CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 expression vectors. The metabolic kinetics of the enzymes was studied using HPLC and fluorimetry. Results: HepG2-CYP2D6*1 and HepG2-CYP2D6*10 cell lines were successfully constructed. Among the 63 phytochemicals screened, 6 compounds, including coptisine sulfate, bilobalide, schizandrin B, luteolin, schizandrin A and puerarin, at 100 μmol/L inhibited CYP2D6*1- and CYP2D6*10-mediated O-demethylation of a coumarin compound AMMC by more than 50%. Furthermore, the inhibition by these compounds was dose-dependent. Eadie-Hofstee plots demonstrated that these compounds competitively inhibited CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10. However, their Ki values for CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10 were very close, suggesting that genotype-dependent herb-drug inhibition was similar between the two variants. Conclusion: Six phytochemicals inhibit CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*10-mediated catalytic activities in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Thus herbal products containing these phytochemicals may inhibit the in vivo metabolism of co-administered drugs whose primary route of elimination is CYP2D6. PMID:24786236

  18. The Implementation of C-ID, R2D2 Model on Learning Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayanto, Yudi Hari; Rusmawan, Putu Ngurah

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this research are to find out, (1) whether C-ID, R2D2 model is effective to be implemented on learning Reading comprehension, (2) college students' activity during the implementation of C-ID, R2D2 model on learning Reading comprehension, and 3) college students' learning achievement during the implementation of C-ID, R2D2 model on…

  19. An Incompressible 2D Didactic Model with Singularity and Explicit Solutions of the 2D Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Dongho; Constantin, Peter; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-09-01

    We give an example of a well posed, finite energy, 2D incompressible active scalar equation with the same scaling as the surface quasi-geostrophic equation and prove that it can produce finite time singularities. In spite of its simplicity, this seems to be the first such example. Further, we construct explicit solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations whose gradients grow exponentially in time for all time. In addition, we introduce a variant of the 2D Boussinesq equations which is perhaps a more faithful companion of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations than the usual 2D Boussinesq equations.

  20. 2D density model of the Chinese continental lithosphere along a NW-SE transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimonová, Barbora; Bielik, Miroslav; Dérerová, Jana

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a 2D density model along a transect from NW to SE China. The model was first constructed by the transformation of seismic velocity to density, revealed by previous deep seismic soundings (DSS) investigations in China. Then, the 2D density model was updated using the GM-SYS software by fitting the computed to the observed gravity data. Based on the density distribution of anomalous layers we divided the Chinese continental crust along the transect into three regions: north-western, central and south-eastern. The first one includes the Junggar Basin, Tianshan and Tarim Basin. The second part consists of the Qilian Orogen, the Qaidam Basin and the Songpan Ganzi Basin. The third region is represented by the Yangtze and the Cathaysia blocks. The low velocity body (vp =5.2 - 6.2 km/s) at the junction of the North-western and Central parts at a depth between 21 - 31 km, which was discovered out by DSS, was also confirmed by our 2D density modelling.

  1. Metal-dielectric photonic crystal superlattice: 1D and 2D models and empty lattice approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kichin, G.; Weiss, T.; Gao, H.; Henzie, J.; Odom, T. W.; Tikhodeev, S. G.; Giessen, H.

    2012-10-01

    Periodic nanostructures are one of the main building blocks in modern nanooptics. They are used for constructing photonic crystals and metamaterials and provide optical properties that can be changed by adjusting the geometrical parameters of the structures. In this paper the optical properties of a photonic crystal slab with a 2D superlattice are discussed. The structure consists of a gold layer with a finite periodic pattern of air holes that is itself repeated periodically with a larger superperiod. We propose simplified 1D and 2D models to understand the physical nature of Wood's anomalies in the optical spectra of the investigated structure. The latter are attributed to the Rayleigh anomalies, surface plasmon Bragg resonances and the hole-localized plasmons.

  2. Investigation of CYP2D6 Gene Polymorphisms in Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Taskin, Bayram; Percin, Ferda E.; Ergun, Mehmet Ali

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is interested in the variable response to drugs depending on the genetic constitution of an individual. Depending on the genetic variation in individuals known as polymorphism; leads to differences in the types of proteins, enzymes or receptors that play a role in the elimination of drugs. Investigation of the correlation between the genotype with phenotype changes in drug metabolism is among the most important topics of today. CYP2D6 gene polymorphisms show clinical efficiency in the use of especially antidepressants, neuroleptics, antiarrhythmic, antihypertensive, beta blocker, and morphine derivatives. Poor metabolizers have been shown to demonstrate adverse drug reactions to these drugs. The plasma concentrations tend to increase inducing side effects after using a standard dose in poor metabolizers. The ratio of poor metabolizers in Caucasians is 5–10%, whereas 3.4–3.8% of the Turkish population. The allele frequencies of CYP2D6 *2, *3, *4 and *10 were found in 35%, 6%, 10% and 26% respectively in 200 healthy controls. The ratio of poor metabolizers in our population revealed as 1%. Genotyping of CYP2D6 is very important for determining a better genotype-phenotype relation.

  3. Theoretical investigation on a general class of 2D quasicrystals with the rectangular projection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yang-Yang; Lu, Rong-er; Yang, Bo; Huang, Huang; Hong, Xu-Hao; Zhang, Chao; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-10-01

    We take a theoretical investigation on the reciprocal property of a class of 2D nonlinear photonic quasicrystal proposed by Lifshitz et al. in PRL 95, 133901 (2005). Using the rectangular projection method, the analytical expression for the Fourier spectrum of the quasicrystal structure is obtained explicitly. It is interesting to find that the result has a similar form to the corresponding expression of the well-known 1D Fibonacci lattice. In addition, we predict a further extension of the result to higher dimensions. This work is of practical importance for the photonic device design in nonlinear optical conversion progresses.

  4. a 2d Integrable Axion Model and Target Space Duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter

    2001-04-01

    A review is given on the recently proposed two dimensional axion model (O(3) σ-model with a dynamical θ-term) and the T-duality relating it to the SU(2)×U(1) symmetric anisotropic σ-model. The T-duality transformation leads to a new Lax-pair. Strong evidence is presented for the correctness of the proposed S-matrix for both models comparing perturbative and Thermodynamical Bethe Ansatz calculations for different types of free energies. The quantum non-integrability of the O(3) σ-model with a constant θ-term, in contradistinction to the axion model, is illustrated by calculating the 2 → 3 particle production amplitude to lowest order in θ

  5. 2D modeling of the regeneration surface growth on crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, V. G.; Gavryushkin, P. N.; Fursenko, D. A.

    2012-11-01

    A physical model is proposed to describe the growth of regeneration surfaces (flat crystal surfaces that are not parallel to any possible faces). According to this model, the change in the growth rate of a regeneration surface during its evolution and the decrease in the number of subindividuals forming the growth front can be explained by the implementation of two types of geometric selection: within each subindividual (the absorption of rapidly growing faces by slowly growing ones) and between subindividuals (when subindividuals absorb each other). A numerical modeling of the growth of the regeneration surface (30.30.19) of potassium alum crystals showed quantitative agreement between the model proposed and the experimental data.

  6. Improvement of a 2D numerical model of lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimine, Y.

    2013-12-01

    I propose an improved procedure that reduces an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in two-dimensional simulations based on Ishihara et al. (in Lava Flows and Domes, Fink, JH eds., 1990). The numerical model for lava flow simulations proposed by Ishihara et al. (1990) is based on two-dimensional shallow water model combined with a constitutive equation for a Bingham fluid. It is simple but useful because it properly reproduces distributions of actual lava flows. Thus, it has been regarded as one of pioneer work of numerical simulations of lava flows and it is still now widely used in practical hazard prediction map for civil defense officials in Japan. However, the model include an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of DEM because the model separately assigns the condition for the lava flow to stop due to yield stress for each of two orthogonal axes of rectangular calculating grid based on DEM. This procedure brings a diamond-shaped distribution as shown in Fig. 1 when calculating a lava flow supplied from a point source on a virtual flat plane although the distribution should be circle-shaped. To improve the drawback, I proposed a modified procedure that uses the absolute value of yield stress derived from both components of two orthogonal directions of the slope steepness to assign the condition for lava flows to stop. This brings a better result as shown in Fig. 2. Fig. 1. (a) Contour plots calculated with the original model of Ishihara et al. (1990). (b) Contour plots calculated with a proposed model.

  7. Simulations of Quantum Spin Models on 2D Frustrated Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melko, Roger

    2006-03-01

    Algorithmic advances in quantum Monte Carlo techniques have opened up the possibility of studying models in the general class of the S=1/2 XXZ model (equivalent to hard-core bosons) on frustrated lattices. With an antiferromagnetic diagonal interaction (Jz), these models can be solved exactly with QMC, albeit with some effort required to retain ergodicity in the near-degenerate manifold of states that exists for large Jz. The application of the quantum (ferromagnetic off-diagonal) interaction to this classically degenerate manifold produces a variety of intriguing physics, including an order-by-disorder supersolid phase, novel insulating states, and possible exotic quantum critical phenomena. We discuss numerical results for the triangular and kagome lattices with nearest and next-nearest neighbor exchange interactions, and focus on the relevance of the simulations to related areas of physics, such as experiments of cold trapped atomic gasses and the recent theory of deconfined quantum criticality.

  8. Development of CCHE2D embankment break model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Earthen embankment breach often results in detrimental impact on downstream residents and infrastructure, especially those located in the flooding zone. Embankment failures are most commonly caused by overtopping or internal erosion. This study is to develop a practical numerical model for simulat...

  9. 2D modeling of regeneration surface growth on a single-crystal sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, V. G.; Gavryushkin, P. N.; Fursenko, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of a sphere produced from a single crystal potassium alum in course of its regeneration, using numerical 2D-simulation in the kinematic model, which describes the growth of the regenerating surfaces.The modeling results demonstrate a qualitative agreement between the predictions of the kinematic model and real processes of sphere regeneration. It is shown that the face arising on the regenerating surface of a sphere may grow either more slowly or more rapidly than the surrounding surface. In the latter case, the face interacts with the regeneration surface and disappears from the sphere surface before intersecting in edges with neighboring faces. The influence of the input model parameters on the numerical modeling results is analyzed. It is established that the roughness parameters of the initial surface of a single-crystal sphere significantly affect the surface evolution during regeneration.

  10. The Maximum Disk Hypothesis and 2-D Spiral Galaxy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palunas, P.; Williams, T. B.

    1995-12-01

    We present an analysis of two-dimensional \\ha\\ velocity fields and I-band surface photometry for spiral galaxies taken from the southern sky Fabry-Perot Tully-Fisher survey (Schommer et al., 1993, AJ 105, 97). We construct axi-symmetric maximum disk mass models for 75 galaxies and examine in detail the deviations from axi-symmetry in the surface brightness and kinematics for a subsample of these galaxies. The luminosity profiles and rotation curves are derived using consistent centers, position angles, and inclinations. The disk and bulge are deconvolved by fitting an exponential disk and a series expansion of Gaussians for the bulge directly to the I-band images. This helps constrain the deconvolution by exploiting geometric information as well as the distinct disk and bulge radial profiles. The final disk model is the surface brightness profile of the bulge-subtracted image. The photometric model is fitted to the rotation curve assuming a maximum disk and constant M/L's for the disk and bulge components. The overall structure of the photometric models reproduces the structure in the rotation curves in the majority of galaxies spanning a large range of morphologies and rotation widths from 120 \\kms\\ to 680 \\kms. The median I-band M/L in solar units is 2.8, consistent with normal stellar populations. These results make the disk-halo conspiracy even more puzzling. The degree to which spiral galaxy mass models can reproduce small-scale structure in rotation curves is often used as evidence to support or refute the maximum disk hypothesis. However, single-slit rotation curves sample the velocity distribution only along the major axis, and photometric profiles for inclined galaxies are also sampled most heavily near the major axis. The small-scale structure can be due to local perturbations, such as spiral arms and spiral-arm streaming motions, rather than variations in the global mass distribution. We test this hypothesis by analysing azimuthal correlations in

  11. Simulation of subgrid orographic precipitation with an embedded 2-D cloud-resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Joon-Hee; Arakawa, Akio

    2016-03-01

    By explicitly resolving cloud-scale processes with embedded two-dimensional (2-D) cloud-resolving models (CRMs), superparameterized global atmospheric models have successfully simulated various atmospheric events over a wide range of time scales. Up to now, however, such models have not included the effects of topography on the CRM grid scale. We have used both 3-D and 2-D CRMs to simulate the effects of topography with prescribed "large-scale" winds. The 3-D CRM is used as a benchmark. The results show that the mean precipitation can be simulated reasonably well by using a 2-D representation of topography as long as the statistics of the topography such as the mean and standard deviation are closely represented. It is also shown that the use of a set of two perpendicular 2-D grids can significantly reduce the error due to a 2-D representation of topography.

  12. Conservation laws and LETKF with 2D Shallow Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yuefei; Janjic, Tijana

    2016-04-01

    Numerous approaches have been proposed to maintain physical conservation laws in the numerical weather prediction models. However, to achieve a reliable prediction, adequate initial conditions are also necessary, which are produced by a data assimilation algorithm. If an ensemble Kalman filters (EnKF) is used for this purpose, it has been shown that it could yield unphysical analysis ensemble that for example violates principles of mass conservation and positivity preservation (e.g. Janjic et al 2014) . In this presentation, we discuss the selection of conservation criteria for the analysis step, and start with testing the conservation of mass, energy and enstrophy. The simple experiments deal with nonlinear shallow water equations and simulated observations that are assimilated with LETKF (Localized Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter, Hunt et al. 2007). The model is discretized in a specific way to conserve mass, angular momentum, energy and enstrophy. The effects of the data assimilation on the conserved quantities (of mass, energy and enstrophy) depend on observation covarage, localization radius, observed variable and observation operator. Having in mind that Arakawa (1966) and Arakawa and Lamb (1977) showed that the conservation of both kinetic energy and enstrophy by momentum advection schemes in the case of nondivergent flow prevents systematic and unrealistic energy cascade towards high wave numbers, a cause of excessive numerical noise and possible eventual nonlinear instability, we test the effects on prediction depending on the type of errors in the initial condition. The performance with respect to nonlinear energy cascade is assessed as well.

  13. A 2D model to design MHD induction pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, R.; Zeininger, J.

    2006-09-01

    Technical liquid metal systems accompanied by a thermal transfer of energy such as reactor systems, metallurgical processes, metal refinement, casting, etc., require a forced convection of the fluid. The increased temperatures and more often the environmental conditions as, e.g., in a nuclear environment, pumping principles are required, in which rotating parts are absent. Additionally, in many applications a controlled atmosphere is indispensable, in order to ensure the structural integrity of the duct walls. An interesting option to overcome the sealing problem of a mechanical pump towards the surrounding is offered by induction systems. Although their efficiency compared to that of turbo machines is quite low, they have several advantages, which are attractive to the specific requirements in liquid metal applications such as: - low maintenance costs due to the absence of sealings, bearings and moving parts; - low degradation rate of the structural material; - simple replacement of the inductor without cut of the piping system; - fine regulation of flow rate by different inductor connections; - change of pump characteristics without change of the mechanical set-up. Within the article, general design requirements of electromagnetic pumps (EMP) are elaborated. The design of two annular linear induction pumps operating with sodium and lead-bismuth are presented and the calculated pump characteristics and experimentally obtained data are compared. In this context, physical effects leading to deviations between the model and the real data are addressed. Finally, the main results are summarized. Tables 4, Figs 4, Refs 12.

  14. Bond Order Correlations in the 2D Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Conrad; Abu Asal, Sameer; Yang, Shuxiang; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    We use the dynamical cluster approximation to study the bond correlations in the Hubbard model with next nearest neighbor (nnn) hopping to explore the region of the phase diagram where the Fermi liquid phase is separated from the pseudogap phase by the Lifshitz line at zero temperature. We implement the Hirsch-Fye cluster solver that has the advantage of providing direct access to the computation of the bond operators via the decoupling field. In the pseudogap phase, the parallel bond order susceptibility is shown to persist at zero temperature while it vanishes for the Fermi liquid phase which allows the shape of the Lifshitz line to be mapped as a function of filling and nnn hopping. Our cluster solver implements NVIDIA's CUDA language to accelerate the linear algebra of the Quantum Monte Carlo to help alleviate the sign problem by allowing for more Monte Carlo updates to be performed in a reasonable amount of computation time. Work supported by the NSF EPSCoR Cooperative Agreement No. EPS-1003897 with additional support from the Louisiana Board of Regents.

  15. Investigation on the overlapping bands of syndiotactic polystyrene by using 2D-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qianhong; Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Chunbo; Yang, Jian; Wang, Dujin

    2016-11-01

    In this work, WAXD and FTIR spectroscopy were utilized to investigate the phase transition of syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS) from amorphous phase to mesophase during the isothermal annealing process at 130 °C. Two dimensional (2D) correlation infrared spectroscopy was applied to reveal the sub-bands from the highly overlapping bands. The ∼900 cm-1 band is shown to be composed of two sub-bands. One band located around 906 cm-1 corresponds to the amorphous phase, another peak that occurs around 900 cm-1 is associated with mesophase. The trans-planar conformation band at 1223 cm-1 turns out to consist of two bands which might be related to trans-planar conformation with different sequence lengths.

  16. Momentum Transport: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to investigate the momentum budgets associated with several convective systems that developed during the TOGA COARE IOP (west Pacific warm pool region) and GATE (east Atlantic region). The tool for this study is the improved Goddard Cumulas Ensemble (GCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysical scheme, explicit cloud radiative interactive processes and air-sea interactive surface processes. The model domain contains 256 x 256 grid points (with 2 km resolution) in the horizontal and 38 grid points (to a depth of 22 km) in the vertical. The 2D domain has 1024 grid points. The simulations were performed over a 7-day time period (December 19-26, 1992, for TOGA COARE and September 1-7, 1994 for GATE). Cyclic literal boundary conditions are required for this type of long-term integration. Two well organized squall systems (TOGA, COARE February 22, 1993, and GATE September 12, 1994) were also simulated using the 3D GCE model. Only 9 h simulations were required to cover the life time of the squall systems. the lateral boundary conditions were open for these two squall systems simulations. the following will be examined: (1) the momentum budgets in the convective and stratiform regions, (2) the relationship between momentum transport and cloud organization (i.e., well organized squall lines versus less organized convective), (3) the differences and similarities in momentum transport between 2D and 3D simulated convective systems, and (4) the differences and similarities in momentum budgets between cloud systems simulated with open and cyclic lateral boundary conditions. Preliminary results indicate that there are only small differences between 2D and 3D simulated momentum budgets. Major differences occur, however, between momentum budgets associated with squall systems simulated using different lateral boundary conditions.

  17. Self-Organization in 2D Traffic Flow Model with Jam-Avoiding Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    1995-04-01

    A stochastic cellular automaton (CA) model is presented to investigate the traffic jam by self-organization in the two-dimensional (2D) traffic flow. The CA model is the extended version of the 2D asymmetric exclusion model to take into account jam-avoiding drive. Each site contains either a car moving to the up, a car moving to the right, or is empty. A up car can shift right with probability p ja if it is blocked ahead by other cars. It is shown that the three phases (the low-density phase, the intermediate-density phase and the high-density phase) appear in the traffic flow. The intermediate-density phase is characterized by the right moving of up cars. The jamming transition to the high-density jamming phase occurs with higher density of cars than that without jam-avoiding drive. The jamming transition point p 2c increases with the shifting probability p ja. In the deterministic limit of p ja=1, it is found that a new jamming transition occurs from the low-density synchronized-shifting phase to the high-density moving phase with increasing density of cars. In the synchronized-shifting phase, all up cars do not move to the up but shift to the right by synchronizing with the move of right cars. We show that the jam-avoiding drive has an important effect on the dynamical jamming transition.

  18. GEO2D - Two-Dimensional Computer Model of a Ground Source Heat Pump System

    DOE Data Explorer

    James Menart

    2013-06-07

    This file contains a zipped file that contains many files required to run GEO2D. GEO2D is a computer code for simulating ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems in two-dimensions. GEO2D performs a detailed finite difference simulation of the heat transfer occurring within the working fluid, the tube wall, the grout, and the ground. Both horizontal and vertical wells can be simulated with this program, but it should be noted that the vertical wall is modeled as a single tube. This program also models the heat pump in conjunction with the heat transfer occurring. GEO2D simulates the heat pump and ground loop as a system. Many results are produced by GEO2D as a function of time and position, such as heat transfer rates, temperatures and heat pump performance. On top of this information from an economic comparison between the geothermal system simulated and a comparable air heat pump systems or a comparable gas, oil or propane heating systems with a vapor compression air conditioner. The version of GEO2D in the attached file has been coupled to the DOE heating and cooling load software called ENERGYPLUS. This is a great convenience for the user because heating and cooling loads are an input to GEO2D. GEO2D is a user friendly program that uses a graphical user interface for inputs and outputs. These make entering data simple and they produce many plotted results that are easy to understand. In order to run GEO2D access to MATLAB is required. If this program is not available on your computer you can download the program MCRInstaller.exe, the 64 bit version, from the MATLAB website or from this geothermal depository. This is a free download which will enable you to run GEO2D..

  19. CAST2D: A finite element computer code for casting process modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1991-10-01

    CAST2D is a coupled thermal-stress finite element computer code for casting process modeling. This code can be used to predict the final shape and stress state of cast parts. CAST2D couples the heat transfer code TOPAZ2D and solid mechanics code NIKE2D. CAST2D has the following features in addition to all the features contained in the TOPAZ2D and NIKE2D codes: (1) a general purpose thermal-mechanical interface algorithm (i.e., slide line) that calculates the thermal contact resistance across the part-mold interface as a function of interface pressure and gap opening; (2) a new phase change algorithm, the delta function method, that is a robust method for materials undergoing isothermal phase change; (3) a constitutive model that transitions between fluid behavior and solid behavior, and accounts for material volume change on phase change; and (4) a modified plot file data base that allows plotting of thermal variables (e.g., temperature, heat flux) on the deformed geometry. Although the code is specialized for casting modeling, it can be used for other thermal stress problems (e.g., metal forming).

  20. Comparison of 1D and 2D modelling with soil erosion model SMODERP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavka, Petr; Weyskrabova, Lenka; Zajicek, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The contribution presents a comparison of a runoff simulated by profile method (1D) and spatially distributed method (2D). Simulation model SMODERP is used for calculation and prediction of soil erosion and surface runoff from agricultural land. SMODERP is physically based model that includes the processes of infiltration (Phillips equation), surface runoff (kinematic wave based equation), surface retention, surface roughness and vegetation impact on runoff. 1D model was developed in past, new 2D model was developed in last two years. The model is being developed at the Department of Irrigation, Drainage and Landscape Engineering, Civil Engineering Faculty, CTU in Prague. 2D model was developed as a tool for widespread GIS software ArcGIS. The physical relations were implemented through Python script. This script uses ArcGIS system tools for raster and vectors treatment of the inputs. Flow direction is calculated by Steepest Descent algorithm in the preliminary version of 2D model. More advanced multiple flow algorithm is planned in the next version. Spatially distributed models enable to estimate not only surface runoff but also flow in the rills. Surface runoff is described in the model by kinematic wave equation. Equation uses Manning roughness coefficient for surface runoff. Parameters for five different soil textures were calibrated on the set of forty measurements performed on the laboratory rainfall simulator. For modelling of the rills a specific sub model was created. This sub model uses Manning formula for flow estimation. Numerical stability of the model is solved by Courant criterion. Spatial scale is fixed. Time step is dynamically changed depending on how flow is generated and developed. SMODERP is meant to be used not only for the research purposes, but mainly for the engineering practice. We also present how the input data can be obtained based on available resources (soil maps and data, land use, terrain models, field research, etc.) and how can

  1. Assessing soil fluxes using meteoric 10Be: development and application of the Be2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be is a promising and increasingly popular tool to better understand soil fluxes at different timescales. Unlike other, more classical, methods such as the study of sedimentary archives it enables a direct coupling between eroding and deposition sites. However, meteoric 10Be can be mobilized within the soil. Therefore, spatial variations in meteoric 10Be inventories cannot directly be translated into spatial variations in erosion and sedimentation rates: a correct interpretation of measured 10Be inventories requires that both lateral and vertical movement of meteoric 10Be are accounted for. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system over timescales of up to 1 million year and use the model to investigate the impact of accelerated erosion on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility within the soil profile, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes. Different types of erosion such as creep, water and tillage erosion are supported. Model runs show that natural soil fluxes can be well reconstructed based on meteoric 10Be inventories, and this for a wide range of geomorphological and pedological conditions. However, extracting signals of human impact and distinguishing them from natural soil fluxes is only feasible when the soil has a rather high retention capacity so that meteoric 10Be is retained in the top soil layer. Application of the Be2D model to an existing data set in the Appalachian Mountains [West et al.,2013] using realistic parameter values for the soil retention capacity as well as for vertical advection resulted in a good agreement between simulated and observed 10Be inventories. This confirms the robustness of the model. We

  2. Tropical Oceanic Precipitation Processes over Warm Pool: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.- K.; Johnson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Rainfall is a key link in the hydrologic cycle as well as the primary heat source for the atmosphere, The vertical distribution of convective latent-heat release modulates the large-scale circulations of the tropics, Furthermore, changes in the moisture distribution at middle and upper levels of the troposphere can affect cloud distributions and cloud liquid water and ice contents. How the incoming solar and outgoing longwave radiation respond to these changes in clouds is a major factor in assessing climate change. Present large-scale weather and climate models simulate cloud processes only crudely, reducing confidence in their predictions on both global and regional scales. One of the most promising methods to test physical parameterizations used in General Circulation Models (GCMS) and climate models is to use field observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and physically realistic parameterizations of cloud microphysical processes, and allow for their complex interactions with solar and infrared radiative transfer processes. The CRMs can reasonably well resolve the evolution, structure, and life cycles of individual clouds and cloud systems, The major objective of this paper is to investigate the latent heating, moisture and momenti,im budgets associated with several convective systems developed during the TOGA COARE IFA - westerly wind burst event (late December, 1992). The tool for this study is the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (CCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysical scheme, The model domain contains 256 x 256 grid points (using 2 km resolution) in the horizontal and 38 grid points (to a depth of 22 km depth) in the vertical, The 2D domain has 1024 grid points. The simulations are performed over a 7 day time period. We will examine (1) the precipitation processes (i.e., condensation/evaporation) and their interaction with warm pool; (2) the heating and moisture budgets in the convective and

  3. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Poisson-sigma model for 2D gravity with non-metricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, M.; Grumiller, D.

    2007-10-01

    We present a Poisson-sigma model describing general 2D dilaton gravity with non-metricity, torsion and curvature. It involves three arbitrary functions of the dilaton field, two of which are well known from metric compatible theories, while the third one characterizes the local strength of non-metricity. As an example we show that α' corrections in 2D string theory can generate (target space) non-metricity.

  4. Experimental investigation on the high chip rate of 2D incoherent optical CDMA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guorui; Wang, Rong; Pu, Tao; Fang, Tao; Zheng, Jilin; Zhu, Huatao; Wu, Weijiang

    2015-08-01

    An innovative approach to realise high chip rate in OCDMA transmission system is proposed and experimentally investigation, the high chip rate is achieved through a 2-D wavelength-hopping time-spreading en/decoder based on the supercontinuum light source. The source used in the experiment is generated by high nonlinear optical fiber (HNLF), Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) which output power is 26 dBm, and distributed feed-back laser diode which works in the gain switch state. The span and the flatness of the light source are 20 nm and 3 dB, respectively, after equalization of wavelength selective switch (WSS). The wavelength-hopping time-spreading coder can be changed 20 nm in the wavelength and 400 ps in the time, is consist of WSS and delay lines. Therefore, the experimental results show that the chip rate can achieve 500 Gchip/s, in the case of 2.5 Gbit/s, while keeping a bit error rate below forward error correction limit after 40 km transmission.

  5. Transforming 2d Cadastral Data Into a Dynamic Smart 3d Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiliakou, E.; Labropoulos, T.; Dimopoulou, E.

    2013-08-01

    3D property registration has become an imperative need in order to optimally reflect all complex cases of the multilayer reality of property rights and restrictions, revealing their vertical component. This paper refers to the potentials and multiple applications of 3D cadastral systems and explores the current state-of-the art, especially the available software with which 3D visualization can be achieved. Within this context, the Hellenic Cadastre's current state is investigated, in particular its data modeling frame. Presenting the methodologies and specifications addressing the registration of 3D properties, the operating cadastral system's shortcomings and merits are pointed out. Nonetheless, current technological advances as well as the availability of sophisticated software packages (proprietary or open source) call for 3D modeling. In order to register and visualize the complex reality in 3D, Esri's CityEngine modeling software has been used, which is specialized in the generation of 3D urban environments, transforming 2D GIS Data into Smart 3D City Models. The application of the 3D model concerns the Campus of the National Technical University of Athens, in which a complex ownership status is established along with approved special zoning regulations. The 3D model was built using different parameters based on input data, derived from cadastral and urban planning datasets, as well as legal documents and architectural plans. The process resulted in a final 3D model, optimally describing the cadastral situation and built environment and proved to be a good practice example of 3D visualization.

  6. Simulation of Cardiac Arrhythmias Using a 2D Heterogeneous Whole Heart Model.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Minimol; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa; Guhathakurta, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac arrhythmias at the whole heart level with electrocardiogram (ECG) gives an understanding of how the underlying cell and tissue level changes manifest as rhythm disturbances in the ECG. We present a 2D whole heart model (WHM2D) which can accommodate variations at the cellular level and can generate the ECG waveform. It is shown that, by varying cellular-level parameters like the gap junction conductance (GJC), excitability, action potential duration (APD) and frequency of oscillations of the auto-rhythmic cell in WHM2D a large variety of cardiac arrhythmias can be generated including sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinus pause, junctional rhythm, Wolf Parkinson White syndrome and all types of AV conduction blocks. WHM2D includes key components of the electrical conduction system of the heart like the SA (Sino atrial) node cells, fast conducting intranodal pathways, slow conducting atriovenctricular (AV) node, bundle of His cells, Purkinje network, atrial, and ventricular myocardial cells. SA nodal cells, AV nodal cells, bundle of His cells, and Purkinje cells are represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) model which is a reduced model of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The atrial and ventricular myocardial cells are modeled by the Aliev-Panfilov (AP) two-variable model proposed for cardiac excitation. WHM2D can prove to be a valuable clinical tool for understanding cardiac arrhythmias.

  7. Simulation of Cardiac Arrhythmias Using a 2D Heterogeneous Whole Heart Model

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Minimol; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa; Guhathakurta, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac arrhythmias at the whole heart level with electrocardiogram (ECG) gives an understanding of how the underlying cell and tissue level changes manifest as rhythm disturbances in the ECG. We present a 2D whole heart model (WHM2D) which can accommodate variations at the cellular level and can generate the ECG waveform. It is shown that, by varying cellular-level parameters like the gap junction conductance (GJC), excitability, action potential duration (APD) and frequency of oscillations of the auto-rhythmic cell in WHM2D a large variety of cardiac arrhythmias can be generated including sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinus pause, junctional rhythm, Wolf Parkinson White syndrome and all types of AV conduction blocks. WHM2D includes key components of the electrical conduction system of the heart like the SA (Sino atrial) node cells, fast conducting intranodal pathways, slow conducting atriovenctricular (AV) node, bundle of His cells, Purkinje network, atrial, and ventricular myocardial cells. SA nodal cells, AV nodal cells, bundle of His cells, and Purkinje cells are represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) model which is a reduced model of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The atrial and ventricular myocardial cells are modeled by the Aliev-Panfilov (AP) two-variable model proposed for cardiac excitation. WHM2D can prove to be a valuable clinical tool for understanding cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26733873

  8. Creeping motion and deformation of liquid drops in flow through 2D model porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, I. )

    1988-01-01

    The motion, deformation and breakup of immiscible drops suspended in low Reynolds number flow through cylinder arrays has been studied experimentally to assess the applicability of the 2D model as a prototype for 2-phase flow through porous media. Both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid systems are considered. The relationship between key flow and geometric parameters and the critical condition for breakup, the resulting drop site distribution and the drop mobility is investigated. It is observed that the headon impact of a drop with a cylinder is an effective precursor to severe drop deformation and even breakup. The sequence of flow leading to impact is also important in determining the effectiveness of impact to result in breakup. When many drops fragments are present, the interaction between nearby drops strongly influences the final disposition of the fragments. Fluid elasticity appears to enhance the elongation of drops to form strands, but also to stabilize the strand against breakup.

  9. Analysis of vegetation effect on waves using a vertical 2-D RANS model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vertical two-dimensional (2-D) model has been applied in the simulation of wave propagation through vegetated water bodies. The model is based on an existing model SOLA-VOF which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the finite difference method on a staggered rectangula...

  10. The combined effect of attraction and orientation zones in 2D flocking models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliass, Tarras; Cambui, Dorilson

    2016-01-01

    In nature, many animal groups, such as fish schools or bird flocks, clearly display structural order and appear to move as a single coherent entity. In order to understand the complex motion of these systems, we study the Vicsek model of self-propelled particles (SPP) which is an important tool to investigate the behavior of collective motion of live organisms. This model reproduces the biological behavior patterns in the two-dimensional (2D) space. Within the framework of this model, the particles move with the same absolute velocity and interact locally in the zone of orientation by trying to align their direction with that of the neighbors. In this paper, we model the collective movement of SPP using an agent-based model which follows biologically motivated behavioral rules, by adding a second region called the attraction zone, where each particles move towards each other avoiding being isolated. Our main goal is to present a detailed numerical study on the effect of the zone of attraction on the kinetic phase transition of our system. In our study, the consideration of this zone seems to play an important role in the cohesion. Consequently, in the directional orientation, the zone that we added forms the compact particle group. In our simulation, we show clearly that the model proposed here can produce two collective behavior patterns: torus and dynamic parallel group. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. MODELING THE TRANSVERSE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF 2D-SICF/SIC COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Senor, David J.; Jones, Russell H.

    2002-09-01

    A hierarchical model was developed to describe the effective transverse thermal conductivity, K effective, of a 2D-SiC/SiC composite made from stacked and infiltrated woven fabric layers in terms of constituent properties and microstructural and architectural variables. The model includes the expected effects of fiber-matrix interfacial conductance as well as the effects of high fiber packing fractions within individual tows and the non-uniform nature of 2D-fabric layers that include a significant amount of interlayer porosity. Model predictions were obtained for two versions of DuPont 2D-Hi Nicalon(Trademark)/PyC/ICVI-SiC composite, one with a thin (0.110 micron) and the other with a thick (1.040 micron) PyC fiber coating. The model predicts that the matrix porosity content and porosity shape factor have a major influence on K effective(T) for such a composite.

  12. 2D numerical simulation of the MEP energy-transport model with a finite difference scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, V. . E-mail: romano@dmi.unict.it

    2007-02-10

    A finite difference scheme of Scharfetter-Gummel type is used to simulate a consistent energy-transport model for electron transport in semiconductors devices, free of any fitting parameters, formulated on the basis of the maximum entropy principle. Simulations of silicon n{sup +}-n-n{sup +} diodes, 2D-MESFET and 2D-MOSFET and comparisons with the results obtained by a direct simulation of the Boltzmann transport equation and with other energy-transport models, known in the literature, show the validity of the model and the robustness of the numerical scheme.

  13. Spectroscopic investigation of the 3d 2D → nf 2F transitions in lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzada, S.; Shah, M.; Haq, S. U.; Nawaz, M.; Ahmed, M.; Nadeem, Ali

    2016-05-01

    We report term energies and effective quantum numbers of the odd parity 3d 2D → nf 2F series of lithium using multi-step and multi-photon laser excitation schemes. The experiments were performed using three dye lasers simultaneously pumped by the second harmonic (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in conjunction with an atomic beam apparatus and thermionic diode ion detector. The first ionization potential of lithium has been determined as 43,487.13 ± 0.02 cm- 1 from the much extended 3d 2D → nf 2F (17 ≤ n ≤ 70) series. In addition, the oscillator strengths of the 3d 2D → nf 2F (15 ≤ n ≤ 48) transitions have been determined, showing a decreasing trend with the increase in principal quantum number n.

  14. Evaluation of 2D shallow-water model for spillway flow with a complex geometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the two-dimensional (2D) shallow water model is formulated based on several assumptions such as hydrostatic pressure distribution and vertical velocity is negligible, as a simple alternative to the complex 3D model, it has been used to compute water flows in which these assumptions may be ...

  15. Introducing the R2D2 Model: Online Learning for the Diverse Learners of This World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonk, Curtis J.; Zhang, Ke

    2006-01-01

    The R2D2 method--read, reflect, display, and do--is a new model for designing and delivering distance education, and in particular, online learning. Such a model is especially important to address the diverse preferences of online learners of varied generations and varied Internet familiarity. Four quadrants can be utilized separately or as part…

  16. a Field-Theoretical Investigation of 2-D Coulomb Systems with Short-Range Yukawa Repulsion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jargocki, Krzysztof Piotr

    correspond to the two-dimensional Coulomb dipole gas in the functional integral formulation. A different type of a field theory is found for the dipole gas using the collective field formalism. A comparison is made with the critical behavior in the nonlinear sigma model, the 2-D Heisenberg model, and the nonabelian gauge theories.

  17. 2-D magnetotelluric experiment to investigate the Nassugtoqidian orogeny in South-East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heincke, Björn; Chen, Jin; Riisager, Peter; Kolb, Jochen; Jørgensen, Asta F.

    2015-04-01

    The northwest-trending Palaeoproterozoic Nagssugtoqidian orogen extends over 250 km along the east coast of Greenland in the area around the village Tasiilaq. The geological evolution of this area closely compares with the ones of the Lewisian complex of Scotland and the Nagssugtoqidian orogen in western Greenland and, hence, leads to the suggestion that they belong to the same continental-scale orogenic belt. However, an accurate correlation across the inland ice is challenging and still ambiguous and therefore more detailed knowledge about the individual orogens might help to understand their relationship. Details about the large-scale tectonic evolution during the Nagssugtoqidian orogeny in this remote Arctic region are not known due to complex geology, relatively coarse geological mapping and the lack of extensive geophysical investigations. E.g. the vergence of the orogen, subduction-related magmatism and accretion history are matters of ongoing discussion (Kalsbeek et al., 1993; Nutman et al., 2008 and Kolb, 2013). We performed a 2-D magnetotelluric (MT) experiment across the southern part of the orogen along the Sermilik Fjord in order to improve our understanding of the orogenic process in general and to better constrain the location and vergence of the suture zone. However, because of the rough climate and the lack of infrastructure, this study is considered as a first test to investigate how MT surveys can be most efficiently performed in this remote part of the world. The NE-SW trending profile consists of eight MT stations and has a total length of ~70 km using long period LEMI-420 systems. The quality of the data is severely affected by polar electrojets that do not satisfy the plane wave assumptions, which is typical for regions close to the magnetic poles. In order to reduce the distortion from these signals onto the impedance estimates, we tested different advanced processing schemes. In addition to the more conventional robust response function

  18. Continental rifting to seafloor spreading: 2D and 3D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie; Gerya, Taras

    2014-05-01

    Two topics related with continental extension is studied by using numerical modeling methods: (1) Lithospheric mantle stratification changes dynamics of craton extension (2D modeling) and (2) Initial lithospheric rheological structure influences the incipient geometry of the seafloor spreading (3D modeling). (Topic 1) Lithospheric mantle stratification is a common feature in cratonic areas which has been demonstrated by geophysical and geochemical studies. The influence of lithospheric mantle stratification during craton evolution remains poorly understood. We use a 2D thermo-mechanical coupled numerical model to study the influence of stratified lithospheric mantle on craton extension. A rheologically weak layer representing hydrated and/or metasomatized composition is implemented in the lithospheric mantle. Our results show that the weak mantle layer changes the dynamics of lithospheric extension by enhancing the deformation of the overlying mantle and crust and inhibiting deformation of the underlying mantle. Modeling results are compared with North China and North Atlantic cratons. Our work indicates that although the presence of a weak layer may not be sufficient to initiate craton deformation, it enhances deformation by lowering the required extensional plate boundary force. (Topic 2) The process from continental rifting to seafloor spreading is an important step in the Wilson Cycle. Since the rifting to spreading is a continuous process, understanding the inheritance of continental rifting in seafloor spreading is crucial to study the incipient geometry (on a map view) of the oceanic ridge and remains a big challenge. Large extension strain is required to simulate the rifting and spreading processes. Oceanic ridge has a 3D geometry on a map view in nature, which requires 3D studies. Therefore, we employ the three-dimensional numerical modeling method to study this problem. The initial lithospheric rheological structure and the perturbation geometry are two

  19. 2D-photochemical model for forbidden oxygen line emission for comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, G.; De Keyser, J.; Maggiolo, R.; Rubin, M.; Gronoff, G.; Gibbons, A.; Jehin, E.; Dhooghe, F.; Gunell, H.; Vaeck, N.; Loreau, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present here a 2D-model of photochemistry for computing the production and loss mechanisms of the O(1S) and O(1D) states, which are responsible for the emission lines at 577.7 nm, 630 nm, and 636.4 nm, in case of the comet 1P/Halley. The presence of O2 within cometary atmospheres, measured by the in-situ ROSETTA and GIOTTO missions, necessitates a revision of the usual photochemical models. Indeed, the photodissociation of molecular oxygen also leads to a significant production of oxygen in excited electronic states. In order to correctly model the solar UV flux absorption, we consider here a 2D configuration. While the green to red-doublet ratio is not affected by the solar UV flux absorption, estimates of the red-doublet and green lines emissions are, however, overestimated by a factor of two in the 1D model compared to the 2D model. Considering a spherical symmetry, emission maps can be deduced from the 2D model in order to be directly compared to ground and/or in-situ observations.

  20. Validation of DYSTOOL for unsteady aerodynamic modeling of 2D airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, A.; Gomez-Iradi, S.; Munduate, X.

    2014-06-01

    From the point of view of wind turbine modeling, an important group of tools is based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory using 2D aerodynamic calculations on the blade elements. Due to the importance of this sectional computation of the blades, the National Renewable Wind Energy Center of Spain (CENER) developed DYSTOOL, an aerodynamic code for 2D airfoil modeling based on the Beddoes-Leishman model. The main focus here is related to the model parameters, whose values depend on the airfoil or the operating conditions. In this work, the values of the parameters are adjusted using available experimental or CFD data. The present document is mainly related to the validation of the results of DYSTOOL for 2D airfoils. The results of the computations have been compared with unsteady experimental data of the S809 and NACA0015 profiles. Some of the cases have also been modeled using the CFD code WMB (Wind Multi Block), within the framework of a collaboration with ACCIONA Windpower. The validation has been performed using pitch oscillations with different reduced frequencies, Reynolds numbers, amplitudes and mean angles of attack. The results have shown a good agreement using the methodology of adjustment for the value of the parameters. DYSTOOL have demonstrated to be a promising tool for 2D airfoil unsteady aerodynamic modeling.

  1. Casting process modeling using CAST2D: The part mold interface

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1991-10-01

    Correctly modeling the physics across the part-mold interface is crucial in predicting the quality of a cast part. Most metals undergo a volume change on solidification (e.g., aluminum -6.6%) and shrinkage on cooling. As the cast metal shrinks, it pulls away from the mol wall creating a gap. This gap effects the thermal contact resistance between the part and mold. The thermal contact resistance increase as the gap widens. This directly effects the cooling rate and ultimately the final cast shape, stress state, and quality of the cast part. CAST2D is a coupled thermal-stress finite element computer code for casting process modeling. This code can be used to predict the final shape and stress state of cast parts. CAST2D couples the heat transfer code TOPAZ2D and solid mechanics code NIKE2D. CAST2D is a code in development. This report presents the status of a general purpose thermal-mechanical interface algorithm. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  2. The simulation of 3D mass models in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaheen, Eman De Keyzer, Frederik; Bosmans, Hilde; Ongeval, Chantal Van; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D breast mass models with different morphological shapes and describes the validation of the realism of their appearance after simulation into 2D digital mammograms and breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: Twenty-five contrast enhanced MRI breast lesions were collected and each mass was manually segmented in the three orthogonal views: sagittal, coronal, and transversal. The segmented models were combined, resampled to have isotropic voxel sizes, triangularly meshed, and scaled to different sizes. These masses were referred to as nonspiculated masses and were then used as nuclei onto which spicules were grown with an iterative branching algorithm forming a total of 30 spiculated masses. These 55 mass models were projected into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. The realism of the appearance of these mass models was assessed by five radiologists via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis when compared to 54 real masses. All lesions were also given a breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) score. The data sets of 2D mammography and tomosynthesis were read separately. The Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used for the interrater observer agreement assessment for the BIRADS scores per modality. Further paired analysis, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, of the BIRADS assessment between 2D and tomosynthesis was separately performed for the real masses and for the simulated masses. Results: The area under the ROC curves, averaged over all observers, was 0.54 (95% confidence interval [0.50, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.67 (95% confidence interval [0.55, 0.79]) for the tomosynthesis study. According to the BIRADS scores, the nonspiculated and the spiculated masses varied in their degrees of malignancy from normal (BIRADS 1) to highly

  3. Extension and application of the Preissmann slot model to 2D transient mixed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranzoni, Andrea; Dazzi, Susanna; Aureli, Francesca; Mignosa, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an extension of the Preissmann slot concept for the modeling of highly transient two-dimensional (2D) mixed flows. The classic conservative formulation of the 2D shallow water equations for free surface flows is adapted by assuming that two fictitious vertical slots, aligned along the two Cartesian plane directions and normally intersecting, are added on the ceiling of each integration element. Accordingly, transitions between free surface and pressurized flow can be handled in a natural and straightforward way by using the same set of governing equations. The opportunity of coupling free surface and pressurized flows is actually useful not only in one-dimensional (1D) problems concerning sewer systems but also for modeling 2D flooding phenomena in which the pressurization of bridges, culverts, or other crossing hydraulic structures can be expected. Numerical simulations are performed by using a shock-capturing MUSCL-Hancock finite volume scheme combined with the FORCE (First-Order Centred) solver for the evaluation of the numerical fluxes. The validation of the mathematical model is accomplished on the basis of both exact solutions of 1D discontinuous initial value problems and reference radial solutions of idealized test cases with cylindrical symmetry. Furthermore, the capability of the model to deal with practical field-scale applications is assessed by simulating the transit of a bore under an arch bridge. Numerical results show that the proposed model is suitable for the prediction of highly transient 2D mixed flows.

  4. KPLS-RWBFNN model for MFL 2D defect profile reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Changlong; Ji, Fengzhu

    2013-03-01

    Kernel partial least squares (KPLS) is normally very efficient for tackling nonlinear systems by mapping an original input space into a high-dimensional feature space and creating a linear PLS model in the feature space. Unlike other nonlinear PLS techniques, KPLS does not entail any nonlinear optimisation procedures. However, due to the linear inner model of PLS, KPLS is still inappropriate for describing the significant nonlinear characteristic data structure while dealing with complex physical systems in practical situations. Under this circumstance, radial wavelet basic function neural network (RWBFNN) can replace the linear inner model of PLS in the nonlinear kernel-based algorithm. Thus, KPLS-RWBFNN model is proposed in this paper and applied to multi-resolution approximation reconstruction of 2D defect profiles in magnetic flux leakage testing. The reconstructions of 2D defect profiles by this method are implemented, and the comparisons among reconstructions by KPLS, RWBFNN and the proposed approach are also undertaken. Meanwhile, the reconstructions of 2D defects by RWBFNN and the proposed approach at different SNR are also executed. The results indicate that KPLS-RWBFNN model could simplify the structure of the network while holding well-behaved generalisation and multi-resolution approximation and predict the 2D defect profiles accurately and rapidly with good robustness.

  5. Investigation on the spectral properties of 2D asynchronous fluorescence spectra generated by using variable excitation wavelengths as a perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingdan; He, Anqi; Guo, Ran; Wei, Yongju; Feng, Juan; Xu, Yizhuang; Noda, Isao; Wu, Jinguang

    2016-11-01

    Properties of 2D asynchronous spectra generated from a series of fluorescence emission spectra are investigated. Variable excitation wavelengths are utilized as an external perturbation. Based on the results of mathematical analysis and computer simulation, we find that no cross peak will be produced on the 2D asynchronous spectrum if the fluorescent solute under investigation occurs in a single micro-environment. The observation of cross peaks implies that the fluorescent molecule may occur in different micro-environments in a solution. Based on these results, we use 2D asynchronous spectra to investigate the emission spectra of anthracene dissolved in cyclohexane. When the concentration of anthracene is low, no cross peak is produced in the resultant 2D asynchronous spectrum, confirming that anthracene is dissolved as single molecule in the solution. As the concentration elevated, cross peaks appear in the corresponding 2D asynchronous spectra. A plausible explanation of this phenomenon is that anthracene may undergo aggregation via π-π interaction or π-C-H interaction.

  6. New technologies of 2-D and 3-D modeling for analysis and management of natural resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisina, E. N.; Lyubimova, A. V.; Kirpicheva, E. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    For ensuring technological support of research and administrative activity in the sphere of environmental management a specialized modular program complex was developed. The special attention in developing a program complex is focused to creation of convenient and effective tools for creation and visualization 2d and 3D models providing the solution of tasks of the analysis and management of natural resources.

  7. Analysis of Korean Students' International Mobility by 2-D Model: Driving Force Factor and Directional Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Elisa L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the dynamics of Korean students' international mobility to study abroad by using the 2-D Model. The first D, "the driving force factor," explains how and what components of the dissatisfaction with domestic higher education perceived by Korean students drives students' outward mobility to seek foreign…

  8. 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy: a sensitive test of polarizable water models.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Peter

    2014-11-14

    In a recent paper, the experimental 2D-Raman-THz response of liquid water at ambient conditions has been presented [J. Savolainen, S. Ahmed, and P. Hamm, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 110, 20402 (2013)]. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are performed with the goal to reproduce the experimental results. To that end, the molecular response functions are calculated in a first step, and are then convoluted with the laser pulses in order to enable a direct comparison with the experimental results. The molecular dynamics simulation are performed with several different water models: TIP4P/2005, SWM4-NDP, and TL4P. As polarizability is essential to describe the 2D-Raman-THz response, the TIP4P/2005 water molecules are amended with either an isotropic or a anisotropic polarizability a posteriori after the molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast, SWM4-NDP and TL4P are intrinsically polarizable, and hence the 2D-Raman-THz response can be calculated in a self-consistent way, using the same force field as during the molecular dynamics simulation. It is found that the 2D-Raman-THz response depends extremely sensitively on details of the water model, and in particular on details of the description of polarizability. Despite the limited time resolution of the experiment, it could easily distinguish between various water models. Albeit not perfect, the overall best agreement with the experimental data is obtained for the TL4P water model.

  9. 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy: A sensitive test of polarizable water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Peter

    2014-11-01

    In a recent paper, the experimental 2D-Raman-THz response of liquid water at ambient conditions has been presented [J. Savolainen, S. Ahmed, and P. Hamm, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 110, 20402 (2013)]. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are performed with the goal to reproduce the experimental results. To that end, the molecular response functions are calculated in a first step, and are then convoluted with the laser pulses in order to enable a direct comparison with the experimental results. The molecular dynamics simulation are performed with several different water models: TIP4P/2005, SWM4-NDP, and TL4P. As polarizability is essential to describe the 2D-Raman-THz response, the TIP4P/2005 water molecules are amended with either an isotropic or a anisotropic polarizability a posteriori after the molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast, SWM4-NDP and TL4P are intrinsically polarizable, and hence the 2D-Raman-THz response can be calculated in a self-consistent way, using the same force field as during the molecular dynamics simulation. It is found that the 2D-Raman-THz response depends extremely sensitively on details of the water model, and in particular on details of the description of polarizability. Despite the limited time resolution of the experiment, it could easily distinguish between various water models. Albeit not perfect, the overall best agreement with the experimental data is obtained for the TL4P water model.

  10. 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy: A sensitive test of polarizable water models

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Peter

    2014-11-14

    In a recent paper, the experimental 2D-Raman-THz response of liquid water at ambient conditions has been presented [J. Savolainen, S. Ahmed, and P. Hamm, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 110, 20402 (2013)]. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are performed with the goal to reproduce the experimental results. To that end, the molecular response functions are calculated in a first step, and are then convoluted with the laser pulses in order to enable a direct comparison with the experimental results. The molecular dynamics simulation are performed with several different water models: TIP4P/2005, SWM4-NDP, and TL4P. As polarizability is essential to describe the 2D-Raman-THz response, the TIP4P/2005 water molecules are amended with either an isotropic or a anisotropic polarizability a posteriori after the molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast, SWM4-NDP and TL4P are intrinsically polarizable, and hence the 2D-Raman-THz response can be calculated in a self-consistent way, using the same force field as during the molecular dynamics simulation. It is found that the 2D-Raman-THz response depends extremely sensitively on details of the water model, and in particular on details of the description of polarizability. Despite the limited time resolution of the experiment, it could easily distinguish between various water models. Albeit not perfect, the overall best agreement with the experimental data is obtained for the TL4P water model.

  11. Parallelized CCHE2D flow model with CUDA Fortran on Graphics Process Units

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents the CCHE2D implicit flow model parallelized using CUDA Fortran programming technique on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). A parallelized implicit Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) solver using Parallel Cyclic Reduction (PCR) algorithm on GPU is developed and tested. This solve...

  12. Comprehensive Cardiovascular Risk Factor Control Improves Survival: The Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Vera; Bertolet, Marnie; Felix, Rafael Barraza; Farkouh, Michael E.; Goldberg, Suzanne; Ramanathan, Kodangudi B.; Redmon, J. Bruce; Sperling, Laurence; Rutter, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear if achieving multiple risk factor (RF) goals through protocol-guided intensive medical therapy is feasible or improves outcomes in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Objectives We sought to quantify the relationship between achieved RF goals in the BARI 2D (Bypass Angioplasty Investigation Revascularization 2 Diabetes) trial and cardiovascular events/survival. Methods We performed a nonrandomized analysis of survival/cardiovascular events and control of 6 RFs (nonsmoker, non-HDL-C <130 mg/dl, triglycerides <150 mg/dl, blood pressure [systolic <130 mm Hg; diastolic <80 mm Hg], hemoglobin A1c <7%) in BARI 2D. Cox models with time-varying number of RFs in control were adjusted for baseline number of RFs in control, clinical characteristics, and trial randomization assignments. Results In 2,265 patients (mean age 62 years, 29% women) followed for 5 years, the mean ± SD number of RFs in control improved from 3.5 ± 1.4 out of 6 at baseline to 4.2 ± 1.3 at 5 years, p < 0.0001. The number of RFs in control during the trial was strongly related to death (global p = 0.0010) and the composite of death, myocardial infarction and stroke (global p = 0.0035) in fully adjusted models. Participants with 0 to 2 RFs in control during follow-up had a 2-fold higher risk of death (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.0; 95% CI: 1.3 to 3.3, p = 0.0031) and a 1.7-fold higher risk of the composite endpoint (HR: 1.7; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.5, p = 0.0043), compared with those with 6 RFs in-control. Conclusions Simultaneous control of multiple RFs through protocol-guided intensive medical therapy is feasible and relates to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary disease and T2DM. PMID:26271057

  13. A deformed shape monitoring model for building structures based on a 2D laser scanner.

    PubMed

    Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Bub Ryur; Lee, Hong Min; Kim, Yousok; Park, Hyo Seon

    2013-01-01

    High-rise buildings subjected to lateral loads such as wind and earthquake loads must be checked not to exceed the limits on the maximum lateral displacement or the maximum inter-story drift ratios. In this paper, a sensing model for deformed shapes of a building structure in motion is presented. The deformed shape sensing model based on a 2D scanner consists of five modules: (1) module for acquiring coordinate information of a point in a building; (2) module for coordinate transformation and data arrangement for generation of time history of the point; (3) module for smoothing by adjacent averaging technique; (4) module for generation of the displacement history for each story and deformed shape of a building, and (5) module for evaluation of the serviceability of a building. The feasibility of the sensing model based on a 2D laser scanner is tested through free vibration tests of a three-story steel frame structure with a relatively high slenderness ratio of 5.0. Free vibration responses measured from both laser displacement sensors and a 2D laser scanner are compared. In the experimentation, the deformed shapes were obtained from three different methods: the model based on the 2D laser scanner, the direct measurement based on laser displacement sensors, and the numerical method using acceleration data and the displacements from GPS. As a result, it is confirmed that the deformed shape measurement model based on a 2D laser scanner can be a promising alternative for high-rise buildings where installation of laser displacement sensors is impossible.

  14. MODELING THE TRANSVERSE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF 2-D SICF/SIC COMPOSITES MADE WITH WOVEN FABRIC

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E; Senor, David J; Jones, Russell H

    2004-06-01

    The hierarchical two-layer (H2L) model describes the effective transverse thermal conductivity (Keff) of a 2D-SiCf/SiC composite plate made from stacked and infiltrated woven fabric layers in terms of constituent properties and microstructural and architectural variables. The H2L model includes the effects of fiber-matrix interfacial conductance, high fiber packing fractions within individual tows and the non-uniform nature of 2D fabric/matrix layers that usually include a significant amount of interlayer porosity. Previously, H2L model Keff-predictions were compared to measured values for two versions of 2D Hi-Nicalon/PyC/ICVI-SiC composite, one with a “thin” (0.11m) and the other with a “thick” (1.04m) pyrocarbon (PyC) fiber coating, and for a 2D Tyranno SA/”thin” PyC/FCVI-SIC composite. In this study, H2L model Keff-predictions were compared to measured values for a 2D-SiCf/SiC composite made using the ICVI-process with Hi-Nicalon type S fabric and a “thin” PyC fiber coating. The values of Keff determined for the latter composite were significantly greater than the Keff-values determined for the composites made with either the Hi-Nicalon or the Tyranno SA fabrics. Differences in Keff-values were expected for the different fiber types, but major differences also were due to observed microstructural and architectural variations between the composite systems, and as predicted by the H2L model.

  15. Uncertainty in 2D hydrodynamic models from errors in roughness parameterization based on aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatsma, Menno; Huthoff, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    In The Netherlands, 2D-hydrodynamic simulations are used to evaluate the effect of potential safety measures against river floods. In the investigated scenarios, the floodplains are completely inundated, thus requiring realistic representations of hydraulic roughness of floodplain vegetation. The current study aims at providing better insight into the uncertainty of flood water levels due to uncertain floodplain roughness parameterization. The study focuses on three key elements in the uncertainty of floodplain roughness: (1) classification error of the landcover map, (2), within class variation of vegetation structural characteristics, and (3) mapping scale. To assess the effect of the first error source, new realizations of ecotope maps were made based on the current floodplain ecotope map and an error matrix of the classification. For the second error source, field measurements of vegetation structure were used to obtain uncertainty ranges for each vegetation structural type. The scale error was investigated by reassigning roughness codes on a smaller spatial scale. It is shown that classification accuracy of 69% leads to an uncertainty range of predicted water levels in the order of decimeters. The other error sources are less relevant. The quantification of the uncertainty in water levels can help to make better decisions on suitable flood protection measures. Moreover, the relation between uncertain floodplain roughness and the error bands in water levels may serve as a guideline for the desired accuracy of floodplain characteristics in hydrodynamic models.

  16. Numerical analysis using 2D modeling of optical fiber poled by induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; De Lucia, F.; Corbari, C.; Healy, N.; Sazio, P. J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal poling, a technique to introduce effective second-order nonlinearities in silica optical fibers, has found widespread applications in frequency conversion, electro-optic modulation, switching and polarization-entangled photon pair generation. Since its first demonstration around 25 years ago, studies into thermal poling were primarily based on anode-cathode electrode configurations. However, more recently, superior electrode configurations have been investigated that allow for robust and reliable thermally poled fibers with excellent second order nonlinear properties [1, 2]. Very recently, we experimentally demonstrated an electrostatic induction poling technique that creates a stable second-order nonlinearity in a twin-hole fiber without any direct physical contact to internal fiber electrodes whatsoever [3]. This innovative technique lifts a number of restrictions on the use of complex microstructured optical fibers (MOF) for poling, as it is no longer necessary to individually contact internal electrodes and presents a general methodology for selective liquid electrode filling of complex MOF geometries. In order to systematically implement these more advanced device embodiments, it is first necessary to develop comprehensive numerical models of the induction poling mechanism itself. To this end, we have developed two-dimensional (2D) simulations of space-charge region formation using COMSOL finite element analysis, by building on current numerical models [4].

  17. A depth-averaged 2-D model of flow and sediment transport in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Alejandro; Wu, Weiming; Beck, Tanya M.

    2016-11-01

    A depth-averaged 2-D model has been developed to simulate unsteady flow and nonuniform sediment transport in coastal waters. The current motion is computed by solving the phase-averaged 2-D shallow water flow equations reformulated in terms of total-flux velocity, accounting for the effects of wave radiation stresses and general diffusion or mixing induced by current, waves, and wave breaking. The cross-shore boundary conditions are specified by assuming fully developed longshore current and wave setup that are determined using the reduced 1-D momentum equations. A 2-D wave spectral transformation model is used to calculate the wave height, period, direction, and radiation stresses, and a surface wave roller model is adopted to consider the effects of surface roller on the nearshore currents. The nonequilibrium transport of nonuniform total-load sediment is simulated, considering sediment entrainment by current and waves, the lag of sediment transport relative to the flow, and the hiding and exposure effect of nonuniform bed material. The flow and sediment transport equations are solved using an implicit finite volume method on a variety of meshes including nonuniform rectangular, telescoping (quadtree) rectangular, and hybrid triangular/quadrilateral meshes. The flow and wave models are integrated through a carefully designed steering process. The model has been tested in three field cases, showing generally good performance.

  18. TRENT2D WG: a smart web infrastructure for debris-flow modelling and hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorzi, Nadia; Rosatti, Giorgio; Zugliani, Daniel; Rizzi, Alessandro; Piffer, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Mountain regions are naturally exposed to geomorphic flows, which involve large amounts of sediments and induce significant morphological modifications. The physical complexity of this class of phenomena represents a challenging issue for modelling, leading to elaborate theoretical frameworks and sophisticated numerical techniques. In general, geomorphic-flows models proved to be valid tools in hazard assessment and management. However, model complexity seems to represent one of the main obstacles to the diffusion of advanced modelling tools between practitioners and stakeholders, although the UE Flood Directive (2007/60/EC) requires risk management and assessment to be based on "best practices and best available technologies". Furthermore, several cutting-edge models are not particularly user-friendly and multiple stand-alone software are needed to pre- and post-process modelling data. For all these reasons, users often resort to quicker and rougher approaches, leading possibly to unreliable results. Therefore, some effort seems to be necessary to overcome these drawbacks, with the purpose of supporting and encouraging a widespread diffusion of the most reliable, although sophisticated, modelling tools. With this aim, this work presents TRENT2D WG, a new smart modelling solution for the state-of-the-art model TRENT2D (Armanini et al., 2009, Rosatti and Begnudelli, 2013), which simulates debris flows and hyperconcentrated flows adopting a two-phase description over a mobile bed. TRENT2D WG is a web infrastructure joining advantages offered by the software-delivering model SaaS (Software as a Service) and by WebGIS technology and hosting a complete and user-friendly working environment for modelling. In order to develop TRENT2D WG, the model TRENT2D was converted into a service and exposed on a cloud server, transferring computational burdens from the user hardware to a high-performing server and reducing computational time. Then, the system was equipped with an

  19. A Convective Vorticity Vector Associated With Tropical Convection: A 2D Cloud-Resolving Modeling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Shou-Ting; Ping, Fan; Li, Xiao-Fan; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    Although dry/moist potential vorticity is a useful physical quantity for meteorological analysis, it cannot be applied to the analysis of 2D simulations. A convective vorticity vector (CVV) is introduced in this study to analyze 2D cloud-resolving simulation data associated with 2D tropical convection. The cloud model is forced by the vertical velocity, zonal wind, horizontal advection, and sea surface temperature obtained from the TOGA COARE, and is integrated for a selected 10-day period. The CVV has zonal and vertical components in the 2D x-z frame. Analysis of zonally-averaged and mass-integrated quantities shows that the correlation coefficient between the vertical component of the CVV and the sum of the cloud hydrometeor mixing ratios is 0.81, whereas the correlation coefficient between the zonal component and the sum of the mixing ratios is only 0.18. This indicates that the vertical component of the CVV is closely associated with tropical convection. The tendency equation for the vertical component of the CVV is derived and the zonally-averaged and mass-integrated tendency budgets are analyzed. The tendency of the vertical component of the CVV is determined by the interaction between the vorticity and the zonal gradient of cloud heating. The results demonstrate that the vertical component of the CVV is a cloud-linked parameter and can be used to study tropical convection.

  20. On craton thinning/destruction: Insight from 2D thermal-mechanical numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Although most cratons maintain stable, some exceptions are present, such as the North China craton, North Atlantic craton, and Wyoming craton, which have experienced dramatic lithospheric deformation/thinning. Mechanisms triggering cratonic thinning remains enigmatic [Lee et al., 2011]. Using a 2D thermo-mechanical coupled numerical model [Gerya and Yuen, 2007], we investigate two possible mechanisms: (1) stratification of cratonic lithospheric mantle, and (2) rheological weakening due to hydration.Lithospheric mantle stratification is a common feature in cratonic areas which has been demonstrated by geophysical and geochemical studies [Thybo and Perchuc, 1997; Griffin et al., 2004; Romanowicz, 2009; Rychert and Shearer, 2009; Yuan and Romanowicz, 2010]. The influence of lithospheric mantle stratification during craton evolution remains poorly understood. A rheologically weak layer representing hydrated and/or metasomatized composition is implemented in the lithospheric mantle. Our results show that the weak mantle layer changes the dynamics of lithospheric extension by enhancing the deformation of the overlying mantle and crust and inhibiting deformation of the underlying mantle [Liao et al., 2013; Liao and Gerya, 2014]. Modeling results are compared with North China and North Atlantic cratons. Our work indicates that although the presence of a weak layer may not be sufficient to initiate craton deformation, it enhances deformation by lowering the required extensional plate boundary force. Rheological weakening due to hydration is a possible mechanism triggering/enhancing craton deformation, especially for cratons jaxtaposing with a subduction, since water can release from a subducting slab. We investigate the influence of wet mantle flow laws [Hirth and Kohlstedt, 2003], in which a water parameter (i.e. constant water content) is involved. Our results show that wet dislocation alone does not accelerate cratonic deformation significantly. However, if wet diffusion

  1. Driven microswimmers on a 2D substrate: A stochastic towed sled model

    SciTech Connect

    Marchegiani, Giampiero; Marchesoni, Fabio

    2015-11-14

    We investigate, both numerically and analytically, the diffusion properties of a stochastic sled sliding on a substrate, subject to a constant towing force. The problem is motivated by the growing interest in controlling transport of artificial microswimmers in 2D geometries at low Reynolds numbers. We simulated both symmetric and asymmetric towed sleds. Remarkable properties of their mobilities and diffusion constants include sidewise drifts and excess diffusion peaks. We interpret our numerical findings by making use of stochastic approximation techniques.

  2. Electrical resistivity tomography applied to a complex lava dome: 2D and 3D models comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The study of volcanic domes growth (e.g. St. Helens, Unzen, Montserrat) shows that it is often characterized by a succession of extrusion phases, dome explosions and collapse events. Lava dome eruptive activity may last from days to decades. Therefore, their internal structure, at the end of the eruption, is complex and includes massive extrusions and lava lobes, talus and pyroclastic deposits as well as hydrothermal alteration. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for volcano structure imaging. Because a large range of resistivity values is often observed in volcanic environments, the method is well suited to study the internal structure of volcanic edifices. We performed an ERT survey on an 11ka years old trachytic lava dome, the Puy de Dôme volcano (French Massif Central). The analysis of a recent high resolution DEM (LiDAR 0.5 m), as well as other geophysical data, strongly suggest that the Puy de Dôme is a composite dome. 11 ERT profiles have been carried out, both at the scale of the entire dome (base diameter of ~2 km and height of 400 m) on the one hand, and at a smaller scale on the summit part on the other hand. Each profile is composed of 64 electrodes. Three different electrode spacing have been used depending on the study area (35 m for the entire dome, 10 m and 5 m for its summit part). Some profiles were performed with half-length roll-along acquisitions, in order to keep a good trade-off between depth of investigation and resolution. Both Wenner-alpha and Wenner-Schlumberger protocols were used. 2-D models of the electrical resistivity distribution were computed using RES2DINV software. In order to constrain inversion models interpretation, the depth of investigation (DOI) method was applied to those results. It aims to compute a sensitivity index on inversion results, illustrating how the data influence the model and constraining models

  3. Investigating the role of a poorly soluble surfactant in a thermally driven 2D microfoam.

    PubMed

    Miralles, Vincent; Rio, Emmanuelle; Cantat, Isabelle; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2016-08-17

    Foam drainage dynamics is known to be strongly affected by the nature of the surfactants stabilising the liquid/gas interface. In the present work, we consider a 2D microfoam stabilized by both soluble (sodium dodecylsulfate) and poorly soluble (dodecanol) surfactants. The drainage dynamics is driven by a thermocapillary Marangoni stress at the liquid/gas interface [V. Miralles et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 112, 238302] and the presence of dodecanol at the interface induces interface stress acting against the applied thermocapillary stress, which slows down the drainage dynamics. We define a damping parameter that we measure as a function of the geometrical characteristics of the foam. We compare it with predictions based on the interface rheological properties of the solution. PMID:27493005

  4. Parameterising root system growth models using 2D neutron radiography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Leitner, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Root architecture is a key factor for plant acquisition of water and nutrients from soil. In particular in view of a second green revolution where the below ground parts of agricultural crops are important, it is essential to characterise and quantify root architecture and its effect on plant resource acquisition. Mathematical models can help to understand the processes occurring in the soil-plant system, they can be used to quantify the effect of root and rhizosphere traits on resource acquisition and the response to environmental conditions. In order to do so, root architectural models are coupled with a model of water and solute transport in soil. However, dynamic root architectural models are difficult to parameterise. Novel imaging techniques such as x-ray computed tomography, neutron radiography and magnetic resonance imaging enable the in situ visualisation of plant root systems. Therefore, these images facilitate the parameterisation of dynamic root architecture models. These imaging techniques are capable of producing 3D or 2D images. Moreover, 2D images are also available in the form of hand drawings or from images of standard cameras. While full 3D imaging tools are still limited in resolutions, 2D techniques are a more accurate and less expensive option for observing roots in their environment. However, analysis of 2D images has additional difficulties compared to the 3D case, because of overlapping roots. We present a novel algorithm for the parameterisation of root system growth models based on 2D images of root system. The algorithm analyses dynamic image data. These are a series of 2D images of the root system at different points in time. Image data has already been adjusted for missing links and artefacts and segmentation was performed by applying a matched filter response. From this time series of binary 2D images, we parameterise the dynamic root architecture model in the following way: First, a morphological skeleton is derived from the binary

  5. D Recording for 2d Delivering - the Employment of 3d Models for Studies and Analyses -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, A.; Baratti, G.; Jiménez, B.; Girardi, S.; Remondino, F.

    2011-09-01

    In the last years, thanks to the advances of surveying sensors and techniques, many heritage sites could be accurately replicated in digital form with very detailed and impressive results. The actual limits are mainly related to hardware capabilities, computation time and low performance of personal computer. Often, the produced models are not visible on a normal computer and the only solution to easily visualized them is offline using rendered videos. This kind of 3D representations is useful for digital conservation, divulgation purposes or virtual tourism where people can visit places otherwise closed for preservation or security reasons. But many more potentialities and possible applications are available using a 3D model. The problem is the ability to handle 3D data as without adequate knowledge this information is reduced to standard 2D data. This article presents some surveying and 3D modeling experiences within the APSAT project ("Ambiente e Paesaggi dei Siti d'Altura Trentini", i.e. Environment and Landscapes of Upland Sites in Trentino). APSAT is a multidisciplinary project funded by the Autonomous Province of Trento (Italy) with the aim documenting, surveying, studying, analysing and preserving mountainous and hill-top heritage sites located in the region. The project focuses on theoretical, methodological and technological aspects of the archaeological investigation of mountain landscape, considered as the product of sequences of settlements, parcelling-outs, communication networks, resources, and symbolic places. The mountain environment preserves better than others the traces of hunting and gathering, breeding, agricultural, metallurgical, symbolic activities characterised by different lengths and environmental impacts, from Prehistory to the Modern Period. Therefore the correct surveying and documentation of this heritage sites and material is very important. Within the project, the 3DOM unit of FBK is delivering all the surveying and 3D material to

  6. Approaches to Modeling Coupled Flow and Reaction in a 2-D Cementation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl; Cochepin, B.; Trotignon, L.; Bildstein, O.; Steefel, C.; Lagneau, V.; van der Lee, J.

    2008-04-01

    Porosity evolution at reactive interfaces is a key process that governs the evolution and performances of many engineered systems that have important applications in earth and environmental sciences. This is the case, for example, at the interface between cement structures and clays in deep geological nuclear waste disposals. Although in a different transport regime, similar questions arise for permeable reactive barriers used for biogeochemical remediation in surface environments. The COMEDIE project aims at investigating the coupling between transport, hydrodynamics and chemistry when significant variations of porosity occur. The present work focuses on a numerical benchmark used as a design exercise for the future COMEDIE-2D experiment. The use of reactive transport simulation tools like Hytec and Crunch provides predictions of the physico-chemical evolutions that are expected during the future experiments in laboratory. Focus is given in this paper on the evolution during the simulated experiment of precipitate, permeability and porosity fields. A first case is considered in which the porosity is constant. Results obtained with Crunch and Hytec are in relatively good agreement. Differences are attributable to the models of reactive surface area taken into account for dissolution/precipitation processes. Crunch and Hytec simulations taking into account porosity variations are then presented and compared. Results given by the two codes are in qualitative agreement, with differences attributable in part to the models of reactive surface area for dissolution/precipitation processes. As a consequence, the localization of secondary precipitates predicted by Crunch leads to lower local porosities than for predictions obtained by Hytec and thus to a stronger coupling between flow and chemistry. This benchmark highlights the importance of the surface area model employed to describe systems in which strong porosity variations occur as a result of dissolution

  7. Progress in Complex 2D and 3D Cohesive Fracture Modelling Considering Random Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenjun; Su, Xiangting; Chen, Jianfei; Liu, Guohua

    2010-05-01

    This paper summarises our recent efforts on finite element modelling of complex 2D and 3D fracture in quasi-brittle materials considering random heterogeneous fracture properties, using a simple yet effective method developed in associated with Abaqus. In this method, potential cracks are represented by pre-inserted cohesive elements with traction-separation softening constitutive laws modelled by spatially-varying Weibull random fields. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations of small-sized concrete specimens under uni-axial tension were carried out. It is found that the developed method is able to predict realistic 2D and 3D crack propagation processes and excellent load-displacement curves with little mesh-dependence. It provides a potentially powerful tool to assess reliability of existing structures against external loadings.

  8. A Neural-FEM tool for the 2-D magnetic hysteresis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, E.; Faba, A.; Laudani, A.; Lozito, G. M.; Riganti Fulginei, F.; Salvini, A.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to present a new tool for the analysis of magnetic field problems considering 2-D magnetic hysteresis. In particular, this tool makes use of the Finite Element Method to solve the magnetic field problem in real device, and fruitfully exploits a neural network (NN) for the modeling of 2-D magnetic hysteresis of materials. The NS has as input the magnetic inductions components B at the k-th simulation step and returns as output the corresponding values of the magnetic field H corresponding to the input pattern. It is trained by vector measurements performed on the magnetic material to be modeled. This input/output scheme is directly implemented in a FEM code employing the magnetic potential vector A formulation. Validations through measurements on a real device have been performed.

  9. Contact transfer length investigation of a 2D nanoparticle network by scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Vargas, Carlos S; Reissner, Patrick A; Wagner, Tino; Wyss, Roman M; Park, Hyung Gyu; Stemmer, Andreas

    2015-09-11

    Nanoparticle network devices find growing application in sensing and electronics. One recurring challenge in the design and fabrication of this class of devices is ensuring a stable interface via robust yet unobstructive electrodes. A figure of merit which dictates the minimum electrode overlap required for optimal charge injection into the network is the contact transfer length. However, we find that traditional contact characterization using the transmission line model, an indirect method which requires extrapolation, is insufficient for network devices. Instead, we apply Kelvin probe force microscopy to characterize the contact resistance by imaging the surface potential with nanometer resolution. We then use scanning probe lithography to directly investigate the contact transfer length. We have determined the transfer length in graphene contacted devices to be 200-400 nm, thus apt for further device reduction which is often necessary for on-site sensing applications. Simulations from a two-dimensional resistor model support our observations and are expected to be an important tool for further optimizing the design of nanoparticle-based devices. PMID:26291069

  10. Experimental Investigation of Shock-Shock Interactions Over a 2-D Wedge at M=6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of fin-leading-edge radius and sweep angle on peak heating rates due to shock-shock interactions were investigated in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The fin model leading edges, which represent cylindrical leading edges or struts on hypersonic vehicles, were varied from 0.25 inches to 0.75 inches in radius. A 9deg wedge generated a planar oblique shock at 16.7deg to the flow that intersected the fin bow shock, producing a shock-shock interaction that impinged on the fin leading edge. The fin angle of attack was varied from 0deg (normal to the free-stream) to 15deg and 25deg swept forward. Global temperature data was obtained from the surface of the fused silica fins through phosphor thermography. Metal oil flow models with the same geometries as the fused silica models were used to visualize the streamline patterns for each angle of attack. High-speed zoom-schlieren videos were recorded to show the features and temporal unsteadiness of the shock-shock interactions. The temperature data were analyzed using one-dimensional semi-infinite as well as one- and two-dimensional finite-volume methods to determine the proper heat transfer analysis approach to minimize errors from lateral heat conduction due to the presence of strong surface temperature gradients induced by the shock interactions. The general trends in the leading-edge heat transfer behavior were similar for the three shock-shock interactions, respectively, between the test articles with varying leading-edge radius. The dimensional peak heat transfer coefficient augmentation increased with decreasing leading-edge radius. The dimensional peak heat transfer output from the two-dimensional code was about 20% higher than the value from a standard, semi-infinite one-dimensional method.

  11. TMRPres2D: high quality visual representation of transmembrane protein models.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Ioannis C; Liakopoulos, Theodore D; Bagos, Pantelis G; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2004-11-22

    The 'TransMembrane protein Re-Presentation in 2-Dimensions' (TMRPres2D) tool, automates the creation of uniform, two-dimensional, high analysis graphical images/models of alpha-helical or beta-barrel transmembrane proteins. Protein sequence data and structural information may be acquired from public protein knowledge bases, emanate from prediction algorithms, or even be defined by the user. Several important biological and physical sequence attributes can be embedded in the graphical representation. PMID:15201184

  12. Development of a Geocryologic Model of Permafrost From 2D Inversion of IP Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortier, R.; Leblanc, A.

    2004-05-01

    Non-invasive investigation of permafrost along a planned route of pipeline, road or airstrip in cold regions involves the use of effective methods for detecting, characterizing, mapping and monitoring permafrost conditions on various spatial and temporal scales. Among the available near-surface geophysical methods, the electrical resistivity imaging is probably the most suitable method since the resistivity contrast between unfrozen and frozen ground can be one or two orders of magnitude. Induced polarization (IP) profiling was carried out to study the spatial distribution of ground ice in two permafrost mounds near Umiujaq in Nunavik, Canada. A dipole-dipole array was used to perform the IP profiling. Pseudo-sections of electrical resistivity and chargeability giving a misrepresented cross-section of the sub-surface were first draw. The inversion of IP profiling was also performed using DCIP2D developed by UBC-GIF for estimating the spatial distribution of electrical properties in the ground to create realistic models of sub-surface resistivity and chargeability cross-section. The inverse models show clearly the presence of ice-rich core in the permafrost mounds. The ice-rich cores are underlined by high resistivity values while the unfrozen zones show low resistivity values. The localisation of the permafrost table is highlighted by a strong contrast of resistivity while the permafrost base is marked by a transitional change in resistivity. In the hollow between the permafrost mounds, the models show low resistivity values characteristic of unfrozen zone. A synthetic resistivity sounding built from the most acceptable inverse model correlates well with electrical resistivity logging carried out in the permafrost mound during cone penetration tests. The inversion of IP profiling is fundamental for defining realistic models of sub-surface resistivity and chargeability. Electrical resistivity imaging is a appropriate near-surface geophysical method for permafrost

  13. A 2-D Model to Predict Time Development of Scour below Pipelines with Spoiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. S.; Cheng, Liang

    2010-05-01

    A lattice Boltzmann 2-D scour model is developed in order to predict time development of scour around offshore pipelines with spoiler. The fluid flow is captured employing Lattice Boltzmann method and the scour model is designed with the combination of multi-particle Cellular Automata technique and threshold of sediment entrainment technique available in literature. It is revealed that the proposed hybrid model is robust enough to predict evolution of bed profiles for flow and scour underneath offshore pipelines considering various orientation and length of spoiler attached.

  14. Investigation on wide-band scattering of a 2-D target above 1-D randomly rough surface by FDTD method.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Guo, Li-Xin; Jiao, Yong-Chang; Li, Ke

    2011-01-17

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm with a pulse wave excitation is used to investigate the wide-band composite scattering from a two-dimensional(2-D) infinitely long target with arbitrary cross section located above a one-dimensional(1-D) randomly rough surface. The FDTD calculation is performed with a pulse wave incidence, and the 2-D representative time-domain scattered field in the far zone is obtained directly by extrapolating the currently calculated data on the output boundary. Then the 2-D wide-band scattering result is acquired by transforming the representative time-domain field to the frequency domain with a Fourier transform. Taking the composite scattering of an infinitely long cylinder above rough surface as an example, the wide-band response in the far zone by FDTD with the pulsed excitation is computed and it shows a good agreement with the numerical result by FDTD with the sinusoidal illumination. Finally, the normalized radar cross section (NRCS) from a 2-D target above 1-D rough surface versus the incident frequency, and the representative scattered fields in the far zone versus the time are analyzed in detail.

  15. A Parametric Investigation of Breaking Bow Waves using a 2D+T Wave Maker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxeiner, E. A.; Shakeri, M.; Duncan, J. H.

    2008-11-01

    An experimental study of bow waves generated by a 2D+T (Two Dimensions plus Time) wave maker in a tank that is 14.8 m long, 1.2 m wide and 2.2 m deep is presented. Rather than simulating a specific ship hull, here we use a parametric set of wave maker motions with each parameter simulating a common feature of a ship hull form. Three categories of wave maker motions are used: ``slap'' (rotation of the wave board (held flat) about the keel), ``fixed'' (translation the wave board while it is upper part remains flat and at a fixed angle relative to horizontal), and ``full'' (simultaneous rotation and translation). The wave maker motions are run over a range of speeds and, in the ``fixed'' cases, over a range of angles. The temporal histories of the wave profiles were measured using a cinematic LIF technique. The relationship between various geometrical features of the waves and the wave maker motion parameters is explored. Each category of wave maker motions produces waves that develop and break in markedly different ways, thus highlighting the complex nature of bow waves. The wave crest speeds vary between 2 and 2.5 times the maximum speed of the wave maker and, for a given class of wave maker motion, vary with wave maker speed.

  16. 2D Forward Modeling of Gravity Data Using Geostatistically Generated Subsurface Density Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) forward models of synthetic gravity anomalies are calculated and compared to observed gravity anomalies using geostatistical models of density variations in the subsurface, constrained by geologic data. These models have an advantage over forward gravity models generated using polygonal bodies of homogeneous density because the homogeneous density restriction is relaxed, allowing density variations internal to geologic bodies to be considered. By discretizing the subsurface and calculating the cumulative gravitational effect of each cell, multiple forward models can be generated for a given geologic body, which expands the exploration of the solution space. Furthermore, the stochastic models can be designed to match the observed statistical properties of the internal densities of the geologic units being modeled. The results of such stochastically generated forward gravity models can then be compared with the observed data. To test this modeling approach, we compared stochastic forward gravity models of 2D geologic cross-sections to gravity data collected along a profile across the Vaca Fault near Fairfield, California. Three conceptual geologic models were created, each representing a distinct fault block scenario (normal, strike-slip, reverse) with four rock units in each model. Using fixed rock unit boundaries, the units were populated with geostatistically generated density values, characterized by their respective histogram and vertical variogram. The horizontal variogram could not be estimated because of lack of data, and was therefore left as a free parameter. Each fault block model had multiple geostatistical realizations of density associated with it. Forward models of gravity were then generated from the fault block model realizations, and rejection sampling was used to determine viable fault block density models. Given the constraints on subsurface density, the normal and strike-slip fault model were the most likely.

  17. A simple 2-D inundation model for incorporating flood damage in urban drainage planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathirana, A.; Tsegaye, S.; Gersonius, B.; Vairavamoorthy, K.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper a new inundation model code is developed and coupled with Storm Water Management Model, SWMM, to relate spatial information associated with urban drainage systems as criteria for planning of storm water drainage networks. The prime objective is to achive a model code that is simple and fast enough to be consistently be used in planning stages of urban drainage projects. The formulation for the two-dimensional (2-D) surface flow model algorithms is based on the Navier Stokes equation in two dimensions. An Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) finite difference numerical scheme is applied to solve the governing equations. This numerical scheme is used to express the partial differential equations with time steps split into two halves. The model algorithm is written using C++ computer programming language. This 2-D surface flow model is then coupled with SWMM for simulation of both pipe flow component and surcharge induced inundation in urban areas. In addition, a damage calculation block is integrated within the inundation model code. The coupled model is shown to be capable of dealing with various flow conditions, as well as being able to simulate wetting and drying processes that will occur as the flood flows over an urban area. It has been applied under idealized and semi-hypothetical cases to determine detailed inundation zones, depths and velocities due to surcharged water on overland surface.

  18. Rotation is visualisation, 3D is 2D: using a novel measure to investigate the genetics of spatial ability.

    PubMed

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G; Rimfeld, Kaili; Schofield, Kerry L; Selzam, Saskia; Malanchini, Margherita; Rodic, Maja; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Spatial abilities-defined broadly as the capacity to manipulate mental representations of objects and the relations between them-have been studied widely, but with little agreement reached concerning their nature or structure. Two major putative spatial abilities are "mental rotation" (rotating mental models) and "visualisation" (complex manipulations, such as identifying objects from incomplete information), but inconsistent findings have been presented regarding their relationship to one another. Similarly inconsistent findings have been reported for the relationship between two- and three-dimensional stimuli. Behavioural genetic methods offer a largely untapped means to investigate such relationships. 1,265 twin pairs from the Twins Early Development Study completed the novel "Bricks" test battery, designed to tap these abilities in isolation. The results suggest substantial genetic influence unique to spatial ability as a whole, but indicate that dissociations between the more specific constructs (rotation and visualisation, in 2D and 3D) disappear when tested under identical conditions: they are highly correlated phenotypically, perfectly correlated genetically (indicating that the same genetic influences underpin performance), and are related similarly to other abilities. This has important implications for the structure of spatial ability, suggesting that the proliferation of apparent sub-domains may sometimes reflect idiosyncratic tasks rather than meaningful dissociations. PMID:27476554

  19. Rotation is visualisation, 3D is 2D: using a novel measure to investigate the genetics of spatial ability

    PubMed Central

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G.; Rimfeld, Kaili; Schofield, Kerry L.; Selzam, Saskia; Malanchini, Margherita; Rodic, Maja; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Spatial abilities–defined broadly as the capacity to manipulate mental representations of objects and the relations between them–have been studied widely, but with little agreement reached concerning their nature or structure. Two major putative spatial abilities are “mental rotation” (rotating mental models) and “visualisation” (complex manipulations, such as identifying objects from incomplete information), but inconsistent findings have been presented regarding their relationship to one another. Similarly inconsistent findings have been reported for the relationship between two- and three-dimensional stimuli. Behavioural genetic methods offer a largely untapped means to investigate such relationships. 1,265 twin pairs from the Twins Early Development Study completed the novel “Bricks” test battery, designed to tap these abilities in isolation. The results suggest substantial genetic influence unique to spatial ability as a whole, but indicate that dissociations between the more specific constructs (rotation and visualisation, in 2D and 3D) disappear when tested under identical conditions: they are highly correlated phenotypically, perfectly correlated genetically (indicating that the same genetic influences underpin performance), and are related similarly to other abilities. This has important implications for the structure of spatial ability, suggesting that the proliferation of apparent sub-domains may sometimes reflect idiosyncratic tasks rather than meaningful dissociations. PMID:27476554

  20. Comparison between 2D and 3D Numerical Modelling of a hot forging simulative test

    SciTech Connect

    Croin, M.; Ghiotti, A.; Bruschi, S.

    2007-04-07

    The paper presents the comparative analysis between 2D and 3D modelling of a simulative experiment, performed in laboratory environment, in which operating conditions approximate hot forging of a turbine aerofoil section. The plane strain deformation was chosen as an ideal case to analyze the process because of the thickness variations in the final section and the consequent distributions of contact pressure and sliding velocity at the interface that are closed to the conditions of the real industrial process. In order to compare the performances of 2D and 3D approaches, two different analyses were performed and compared with the experiments in terms of loads and temperatures peaks at the interface between the dies and the workpiece.

  1. H∞ control for 2-D T-S fuzzy FMII model with stochastic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaofeng; Wang, Weiqun; Li, Lizhen

    2015-03-01

    This paper deals with the problem of H∞ control for 2-D non-linear system with stochastic perturbation. Based on spatial fuzzy set and inference mechanism, 2-D T-S fuzzy FMII model with stochastic perturbation is established first. Then the results for stability analysis and bounded real lemma are obtained. Moreover, an H∞ fuzzy controller is designed. In order to reduce the computational demand of the conditions for the existence of H∞ fuzzy controller, the control inputs are regarded as the variables independent of the states, and some free matrices are introduced to reduce the conservatism of this method. Then, a new H∞ fuzzy controller is derived. Two simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  2. 2D MHD test-particle simulations in modeling geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Elkington, S. R.; Hudson, M. K.; Murphy, J. J.; Schmitt, P.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of magnetic storms on the evolution of the electron radiation belts are studied using MHD test-particle simulations. The 2D guiding center code developed by Elkington et al. (2002) has been used to simulate particle motion in the Solar Magnetic equatorial plane in the MHD fields calculated from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD code. However, our study shows that the B-minimum plane is well off the SM equatorial plane during solstice events. Since 3D test-particle simulation is computationally expensive, we improve the 2D model by pushing particles in the B-minimum surface instead of the SM equatorial plane. Paraview software is used to visualize the LFM data file and to find the B-minimum surface. Magnetic and electric fields on B-minimum surface are projected to the equatorial plane for particle pushing.

  3. 2D Radiation MHD K-shell Modeling of Single Wire Array Stainless Steel Experiments on the Z Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Apruzese, J. P.; Chong, Y. K.; Davis, J.; Dasgupta, A.; Whitney, K. G.; Clark, R. W.; Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    Many physical effects can produce unstable plasma behavior that affect K-shell emission from arrays. Such effects include: asymmetry in the initial density profile, asymmetry in power flow, thermal conduction at the boundaries, and non-uniform wire ablation. Here we consider how asymmetry in the radiation field also contributes to the generation of multidimensional plasma behavior that affects K-shell power and yield. To model this radiation asymmetry, we have incorporated into the MACH2 r-z MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE population kinetics based on radiation transport using multi-dimensional ray tracing. Such methodology is necessary for modeling the enhanced radiative cooling that occurs at the anode and cathode ends of the pinch during the run-in phase of the implosion. This enhanced radiative cooling is due to reduced optical depth at these locations producing an asymmetric flow of radiative energy that leads to substantial disruption of large initial diameter (>5 cm) pinches and drives 1D into 2D fluid (i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor like) flows. The impact of this 2D behavior on K-shell power and yield is investigated by comparing 1D and 2D model results with data obtained from a series of single wire array stainless steel experiments performed on the Z generator.

  4. Nested 1D-2D approach for urban surface flood modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murla, Damian; Willems, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Floods in urban areas as a consequence of sewer capacity exceedance receive increased attention because of trends in urbanization (increased population density and impermeability of the surface) and climate change. Despite the strong recent developments in numerical modeling of water systems, urban surface flood modeling is still a major challenge. Whereas very advanced and accurate flood modeling systems are in place and operation by many river authorities in support of flood management along rivers, this is not yet the case in urban water management. Reasons include the small scale of the urban inundation processes, the need to have very high resolution topographical information available, and the huge computational demands. Urban drainage related inundation modeling requires a 1D full hydrodynamic model of the sewer network to be coupled with a 2D surface flood model. To reduce the computational times, 0D (flood cones), 1D/quasi-2D surface flood modeling approaches have been developed and applied in some case studies. In this research, a nested 1D/2D hydraulic model has been developed for an urban catchment at the city of Gent (Belgium), linking the underground sewer (minor system) with the overland surface (major system). For the overland surface flood modelling, comparison was made of 0D, 1D/quasi-2D and full 2D approaches. The approaches are advanced by considering nested 1D-2D approaches, including infiltration in the green city areas, and allowing the effects of surface storm water storage to be simulated. An optimal nested combination of three different mesh resolutions was identified; based on a compromise between precision and simulation time for further real-time flood forecasting, warning and control applications. Main streets as mesh zones together with buildings as void regions constitute one of these mesh resolution (3.75m2 - 15m2); they have been included since they channel most of the flood water from the manholes and they improve the accuracy of

  5. Multi-layered coarse grid modelling in 2D urban flood simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Albert S.; Evans, Barry; Djordjević, Slobodan; Savić, Dragan A.

    2012-11-01

    SummaryRegular grids are commonly used in 2D flood modelling due to wide availability of terrain models and low pre-processing required for input preparation. Despite advances in both computing software and hardware, high resolution flood modelling remains computationally demanding when applied to a large study area when the available time and resources are limited. Traditional grid coarsening approach may reduce not only the computing demands, but also the accuracy of results due to the loss of detailed information. To keep key features that affect flow propagation within coarse grid, the approach proposed and tested in this paper adopts multiple layers in flood modelling to reflect individual flow paths separated by buildings within a coarse grid cell. The cell in each layer has its own parameters (elevation, roughness, building coverage ratio, and conveyance reduction factors) to describe itself and the conditions at boundaries with neighbourhood cells. Results of tests on the synthetic case study and the real world urban area show that the proposed multi-layered approach greatly improves the accuracy of coarse grid modelling with an insignificant additional computing cost. The proposed approach has been tested in conjunction with the UIM model by taking the high resolution results as the benchmark. The implementation of the proposed multi-layered methodology to any regular grid based 2D model would be straightforward.

  6. 2D-IR investigation of the pH-dependent conformational change in cytochrome c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, David A.

    1998-06-01

    The reduced-minus-oxidized FTIR difference spectrum of cytochrome c was measured at a series of pH values between 6 and 11. The results obtained clearly document the increasing divergence in the conformations of reduced and oxidized cytochrome c with increasing pH. A parametric analysis of the data based on least squares fitting to a sum of Henderson-Hasselbalch functions showed that at least two pK values, 9.5 and 10.5, are required to describe the pH titration data. Simultaneously recorded spectral data in the visible region, by contrast, could be described with a single pK value of 9.5, in good agreement with the literature. The FTIR spectrum of the component titrating with a pK of 10.5 was strongly suggestive of a tyrosine deprotonation, while the spectrum of the pK 9.5 component was consistent with a carboxyl deprotonation. The pH dependency of the spectral data was also analyzed using the 2D correlation method. Two-dimensional correlation analysis of the FTIR data confirmed the presence of two components titrating at different pK values, and yielded spectra for these two components that were essential identical to those obtained by parametric least-squares fitting. Correlation analysis of the FTIR against the visible data was particularly useful in providing immediate access to the FTIR spectral component titrating at the same pK as the 695 nm band, without requiring any assumptions as to the total number of pH-dependent components present.

  7. Export of earthquake-triggered landslides in active mountain ranges: insights from 2D morphodynamic modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croissant, Thomas; Lague, Dimitri; Davy, Philippe; Steer, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    In active mountain ranges, large earthquakes (Mw > 5-6) trigger numerous landslides that impact river dynamics. These landslides bring local and sudden sediment piles that will be eroded and transported along the river network causing downstream changes in river geometry, transport capacity and erosion efficiency. The progressive removal of landslide materials has implications for downstream hazards management and also for understanding landscape dynamics at the timescale of the seismic cycle. The export time of landslide-derived sediments after large-magnitude earthquakes has been studied from suspended load measurements but a full understanding of the total process, including the coupling between sediment transfer and channel geometry change, still remains an issue. Note that the transport of small sediment pulses has been studied in the context of river restoration, but the magnitude of sediment pulses generated by landslides may make the problem different. Here, we study the export of large volumes (>106 m3) of sediments with the 2D hydro-morphodynamic model, Eros. This model uses a new hydrodynamic module that resolves a reduced form of the Saint-Venant equations with a particle method. It is coupled with a sediment transport and lateral and vertical erosion model. Eros accounts for the complex retroactions between sediment transport and fluvial geometry, with a stochastic description of the floods experienced by the river. Moreover, it is able to reproduce several features deemed necessary to study the evacuation of large sediment pulses, such as river regime modification (single-thread to multi-thread), river avulsion and aggradation, floods and bank erosion. Using a synthetic and simple topography we first present how granulometry, landslide volume and geometry, channel slope and flood frequency influence 1) the dominance of pulse advection vs. diffusion during its evacuation, 2) the pulse export time and 3) the remaining volume of sediment in the catchment

  8. Canonical vs. micro-canonical sampling methods in a 2D Ising model

    SciTech Connect

    Kepner, J.

    1990-12-01

    Canonical and micro-canonical Monte Carlo algorithms were implemented on a 2D Ising model. Expressions for the internal energy, U, inverse temperature, Z, and specific heat, C, are given. These quantities were calculated over a range of temperature, lattice sizes, and time steps. Both algorithms accurately simulate the Ising model. To obtain greater than three decimal accuracy from the micro-canonical method requires that the more complicated expression for Z be used. The overall difference between the algorithms is small. The physics of the problem under study should be the deciding factor in determining which algorithm to use. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Brane brick models, toric Calabi-Yau 4-folds and 2d (0,2) quivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Sebastián; Lee, Sangmin; Seong, Rak-Kyeong

    2016-02-01

    We introduce brane brick models, a novel type of Type IIA brane configurations consisting of D4-branes ending on an NS5-brane. Brane brick models are T-dual to D1-branes over singular toric Calabi-Yau 4-folds. They fully encode the infinite class of 2 d (generically) {N}=(0,2) gauge theories on the worldvolume of the D1-branes and streamline their connection to the probed geometries. For this purpose, we also introduce new combinatorial procedures for deriving the Calabi-Yau associated to a given gauge theory and vice versa.

  10. Uncertainties in modelling Mt. Pinatubo eruption with 2-D AER model and CCM SOCOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenzelmann, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Peter, T.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Fueglistaler, S.; Thomason, L. W.

    2009-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions may introduce a strong forcing on climate. They challenge the skills of climate models. In addition to the short time attenuation of solar light by ashes the formation of stratospheric sulphate aerosols, due to volcanic sulphur dioxide injection into the lower stratosphere, may lead to a significant enhancement of the global albedo. The sulphate aerosols have a residence time of about 2 years. As a consequence of the enhanced sulphate aerosol concentration both the stratospheric chemistry and dynamics are strongly affected. Due to absorption of longwave and near infrared radiation the temperature in the lower stratosphere increases. So far chemistry climate models overestimate this warming [Eyring et al. 2006]. We present an extensive validation of extinction measurements and model runs of the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in 1991. Even if Mt. Pinatubo eruption has been the best quantified volcanic eruption of this magnitude, the measurements show considerable uncertainties. For instance the total amount of sulphur emitted to the stratosphere ranges from 5-12 Mt sulphur [e.g. Guo et al. 2004, McCormick, 1992]. The largest uncertainties are in the specification of the main aerosol cloud. SAGE II, for instance, could not measure the peak of the aerosol extinction for about 1.5 years, because optical termination was reached. The gap-filling of the SAGE II [Thomason and Peter, 2006] using lidar measurements underestimates the total extinctions in the tropics for the first half year after the eruption by 30% compared to AVHRR [Rusell et. al 1992]. The same applies to the optical dataset described by Stenchikov et al. [1998]. We compare these extinction data derived from measurements with extinctions derived from AER 2D aerosol model calculations [Weisenstein et al., 2007]. Full microphysical calculations with injections of 14, 17, 20 and 26 Mt SO2 in the lower stratosphere were performed. The optical aerosol properties derived from SAGE II

  11. 2D-3D Registration of CT Vertebra Volume to Fluoroscopy Projection: A Calibration Model Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifulco, P.; Cesarelli, M.; Allen, R.; Romano, M.; Fratini, A.; Pasquariello, G.

    2009-12-01

    This study extends a previous research concerning intervertebral motion registration by means of 2D dynamic fluoroscopy to obtain a more comprehensive 3D description of vertebral kinematics. The problem of estimating the 3D rigid pose of a CT volume of a vertebra from its 2D X-ray fluoroscopy projection is addressed. 2D-3D registration is obtained maximising a measure of similarity between Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (obtained from the CT volume) and real fluoroscopic projection. X-ray energy correction was performed. To assess the method a calibration model was realised a sheep dry vertebra was rigidly fixed to a frame of reference including metallic markers. Accurate measurement of 3D orientation was obtained via single-camera calibration of the markers and held as true 3D vertebra position; then, vertebra 3D pose was estimated and results compared. Error analysis revealed accuracy of the order of 0.1 degree for the rotation angles of about 1 mm for displacements parallel to the fluoroscopic plane, and of order of 10 mm for the orthogonal displacement.

  12. Analytical formulation of 2-D aeroelastic model in weak ground effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessi, Daniele; Mastroddi, Franco; Mancini, Simone

    2013-10-01

    This paper deals with the aeroelastic modeling and analysis of a 2-D oscillating airfoil in ground effect, elastically constrained by linear and torsional springs and immersed in an incompressible potential flow (typical section) at a finite distance from the ground. This work aims to extend Theodorsen theory, valid in an unbounded flow domain, to the case of weak ground effect, i.e., for clearances above half the airfoil chord. The key point is the determination of the aerodynamic loads, first in the frequency domain and then in the time domain, accounting for their dependence on the ground distance. The method of images is exploited in order to comply with the impermeability condition on the ground. The new integral equation in the unknown vortex distribution along the chord and the wake is solved using asymptotic expansions in the perturbation parameter defined as the inverse of the non-dimensional ground clearance of the airfoil. The mathematical model describing the aeroelastic system is transformed from the frequency domain into the time domain and then in a pure differential form using a finite-state aerodynamic approximation (augmented states). The typical section, which the developed theory is applied to, is obtained as a reduced model of a wing box finite element representation, thus allowing comparison with the corresponding aeroelastic analysis carried out by a commercial solver based on a 3-D lifting surface aerodynamic model. Stability (flutter margins) and response of the airfoil both in frequency and time domains are then investigated. In particular, within the developed theory, the solution of the Wagner problem can be directly achieved confirming an asymptotic trend of the aerodynamic coefficients toward the steady-state conditions different from that relative to the unbounded domain case. The dependence of flutter speed and the frequency response functions on ground clearance is highlighted, showing the usefulness of this approach in efficiently

  13. Gender and ethnicity specific generic elastic models from a single 2D image for novel 2D pose face synthesis and recognition.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jingu; Savvides, Marios

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method for generating a realistic 3D human face from a single 2D face image for the purpose of synthesizing new 2D face images at arbitrary poses using gender and ethnicity specific models. We employ the Generic Elastic Model (GEM) approach, which elastically deforms a generic 3D depth-map based on the sparse observations of an input face image in order to estimate the depth of the face image. Particularly, we show that Gender and Ethnicity specific GEMs (GE-GEMs) can approximate the 3D shape of the input face image more accurately, achieving a better generalization of 3D face modeling and reconstruction compared to the original GEM approach. We qualitatively validate our method using publicly available databases by showing each reconstructed 3D shape generated from a single image and new synthesized poses of the same person at arbitrary angles. For quantitative comparisons, we compare our synthesized results against 3D scanned data and also perform face recognition using synthesized images generated from a single enrollment frontal image. We obtain promising results for handling pose and expression changes based on the proposed method. PMID:22201062

  14. A 2-D semi-analytical model of double-gate tunnel field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huifang, Xu; Yuehua, Dai; Ning, Li; Jianbin, Xu

    2015-05-01

    A 2-D semi-analytical model of double gate (DG) tunneling field-effect transistor (TFET) is proposed. By aid of introducing two rectangular sources located in the gate dielectric layer and the channel, the 2-D Poisson equation is solved by using a semi-analytical method combined with an eigenfunction expansion method. The expression of the surface potential is obtained, which is a special function for the infinite series expressions. The influence of the mobile charges on the potential profile is taken into account in the proposed model. On the basis of the potential profile, the shortest tunneling length and the average electrical field can be derived, and the drain current is then constructed by using Kane's model. In particular, the changes of the tunneling parameters Ak and Bk influenced by the drain—source voltage are also incorporated in the predicted model. The proposed model shows a good agreement with TCAD simulation results under different drain—source voltages, silicon film thicknesses, gate dielectric layer thicknesses, and gate dielectric layer constants. Therefore, it is useful to optimize the DG TFET and this provides a physical insight for circuit level design. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61376106) and the Graduate Innovation Fund of Anhui University.

  15. Modeling the Elastic Modulus of 2D Woven CVI SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2006-01-01

    The use of fiber, interphase, CVI SiC minicomposites as structural elements for 2D-woven SiC fiber reinforced chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC matrix composites is demonstrated to be a viable approach to model the elastic modulus of these composite systems when tensile loaded in an orthogonal direction. The 0deg (loading direction) and 90deg (perpendicular to loading direction) oriented minicomposites as well as the open porosity and excess SiC associated with CVI SiC composites were all modeled as parallel elements using simple Rule of Mixtures techniques. Excellent agreement for a variety of 2D woven Hi-Nicalon(TradeMark) fiber-reinforced and Sylramic-iBN reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites that differed in numbers of plies, constituent content, thickness, density, and number of woven tows in either direction (i.e, balanced weaves versus unbalanced weaves) was achieved. It was found that elastic modulus was not only dependent on constituent content, but also the degree to which 90deg minicomposites carried load. This depended on the degree of interaction between 90deg and 0deg minicomposites which was quantified to some extent by composite density. The relationships developed here for elastic modulus only necessitated the knowledge of the fractional contents of fiber, interphase and CVI SiC as well as the tow size and shape. It was concluded that such relationships are fairly robust for orthogonally loaded 2D woven CVI SiC composite system and can be implemented by ceramic matrix composite component modelers and designers for modeling the local stiffness in simple or complex parts fabricated with variable constituent contents.

  16. Attaining 2D Black Phosphorus and Investigations into Floating-Electrode Dielectric Barrier Discharge Treatment of Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joshua Benjamin

    Since the discovery and isolation of the 2D carbon allotrope, graphene, research into additional 2D materials has significantly expanded. Electrical components continue to decrease in size so there is an ever-growing need for smaller circuitry to keep up with the demand. Research with graphene and additional 2D layered materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides, brought about a realization of many unique properties that have never been previously explored for applications in electronics, photonics, and optoelectronics. Phosphorene, a novel 2D material isolated from bulk black phosphorus, is an intrinsic p-type material with a variable band gap for a variety of applications. However, these applications are limited by the inability to isolate films of phosphorene. This work investigates some of the previously found techniques for use with graphene isolation and their adaptations to phosphorene. Isolation of phosphorene from black phosphorus was investigated by exfoliation from bulk, chemical vapor deposition, and thin film conversion. Mechanical exfoliation with a tape method, drawing method, and tape/drawing method were used to isolate few-layer black phosphorus samples from bulk material. These methods were also briefly compared to liquid exfoliation of black phosphorus. A chemical vapor deposition approach led to the discovery of a novel method for growth of amorphous red phosphorus thin films from bulk red phosphorus/black phosphorus. An in situ chemical vapor deposition type approach was developed using these thin films for growth of a variety of 2D phosphorus allotropes. Successful conversion has provided fibrous phosphorus wires and hexagons, along with violet phosphorus and eventually black phosphorus. This approach demonstrates progress towards direct growth of 2D black phosphorus onto substrates with average areas >3 microm2 and thicknesses representing samples around 4 layers. Thicker samples were also observed with average areas >100 microm2. X

  17. An Integrative Model of Excitation Driven Fluid Flow in a 2D Uterine Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggio, Charles; Fauci, Lisa; Chrispell, John

    2009-11-01

    We present a model of intra-uterine fluid flow in a sagittal cross-section of the uterus by inducing peristalsis in a 2D channel. This is an integrative multiscale computational model that takes as input fluid viscosity, passive tissue properties of the uterine channel and a prescribed wave of membrane depolarization. This voltage pulse is coupled to a model of calcium dynamics inside a uterine smooth muscle cell, which in turn drives a kinetic model of myosin phosphorylation governing contractile muscle forces. Using the immersed boundary method, these muscle forces are communicated to a fluid domain to simulate the contractions which occur in a human uterus. An analysis of the effects of model parameters on the flow properties and emergent geometry of the peristaltic channel will be presented.

  18. A velocity-dependent anomalous radial transport model for (2-D, 2-V) kinetic transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Kowsik; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Cohen, Ron; Rognlien, Tom

    2008-11-01

    Plasma turbulence constitutes a significant part of radial plasma transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This turbulent transport is modeled in the form of anomalous convection and diffusion coefficients in fluid transport codes. There is a need to model the same in continuum kinetic edge codes [such as the (2-D, 2-V) transport version of TEMPEST, NEO, and the code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory] with non-Maxwellian distributions. We present an anomalous transport model with velocity-dependent convection and diffusion coefficients leading to a diagonal transport matrix similar to that used in contemporary fluid transport models (e.g., UEDGE). Also presented are results of simulations corresponding to radial transport due to long-wavelength ExB turbulence using a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. A BGK collision model is used to enable comparison with fluid transport codes.

  19. Global regularity for the 2D Oldroyd-B model in the corotational case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhuan; Xu, Xiaojing

    2016-09-01

    This paper is dedicated to the Oldroyd-B model with fractional dissipation $(-\\Delta)^{\\alpha}\\tau$ for any $\\alpha>0$. We establish the global smooth solutions to the Oldroyd-B model in the corotational case with arbitrarily small fractional powers of the Laplacian in two spatial dimensions. The methods described here are quite different from the tedious iterative approach used in recent paper \\cite{XY}. Moreover, in the Appendix we provide some a priori estimates to the Oldroyd-B model in the critical case which may be useful and of interest for future improvement. Finally, the global regularity to to the Oldroyd-B model in the corotational case with $-\\Delta u$ replaced by $(-\\Delta)^{\\gamma}u$ for $\\gamma>1$ are also collected in the Appendix. Therefore our result is more closer to the resolution of the well-known global regularity issue on the critical 2D Oldroyd-B model.

  20. A solidification constitutive model for NIKE2D and NIKE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P.J.

    1994-03-17

    This memo updates the current status of a solidification material model development which has been underway for more than a year. Significant modeling goals such as predicting cut-off stresses, thermo-elasto-plasticity, strain rate dependent plasticity and dynamic recovery have been completed. The model is called SOLMAT for solidification material model, and while developed for NIKE2D, it has already been implemented in NIKE3D and NIT03D by B. Maker. This memo details the future development strategy of SOLMAT including liquid and solid constitutive improvements, coupling of deviatoric and dilatational deformation and a plan to switch between constitutive theories. It explains some of the difficulties associated solidification modeling and proposes two experiments to measure properties for using SOLMAT. Due to the sensitive nature of these plans in relation to programmatic and CRADA concerns, this memo should be treated as confidential document.

  1. Evaluation of Hydrus-2D model for solute distribution in subsurface drip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Claudinei; Bizari, Douglas; Grecco, Katarina

    2015-04-01

    The competition for water use between agriculture, industry and population has become intense over the years, requiring a rational use of this resource for food production. The subsurface drip irrigation can help producers with the optimization of operating parameters such as frequency and duration of irrigation, flow, spacing and depth of the dripper installation. This information can be obtained by numerical simulations using mathematical models, thus the aim of this study was to evaluate the HYDRUS-2D model from experimental data to predict the size of the wet bulbs generated by emitters of different application rates (1.0 and 1.6 L h-1). The results showed that horizontal displacement (bulb diameter) remained the largest in all the bulbs, observed both in experimental trials and estimated by the model and the correlation between them was high, above 0.90 to below 16% error. We conclude that the HYDRUS-2D model can be used to estimate the dimensions of the wet bulb getting new information on the sizing of the irrigation system.

  2. Exact solution of an anisotropic 2D random walk model with strong memory correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressoni, J. C.; Viswanathan, G. M.; da Silva, M. A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, there has been progress in understanding one-dimensional non-Markovian processes via analytic, sometimes exact, solutions. The extension of these ideas and methods to two and higher dimensions is challenging. We report the first exactly solvable two-dimensional (2D) non-Markovian random walk model belonging to the family of the elephant random walk model. In contrast to Lévy walks or fractional Brownian motion, such models incorporate memory effects by keeping an explicit history of the random walk trajectory. We study a memory driven 2D random walk with correlated memory and stops, i.e. pauses in motion. The model has an inherent anisotropy with consequences for its diffusive properties, thereby mixing the dominant regime along one dimension with a subdiffusive walk along a perpendicular dimension. The anomalous diffusion regimes are fully characterized by an exact determination of the Hurst exponent. We discuss the remarkably rich phase diagram, as well as several possible combinations of the independent walks in both directions. The relationship between the exponents of the first and second moments is also unveiled.

  3. Bernstein copula approach to model direction-length dependency for 2D discrete fracture network simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Torres, F.; Diaz-Viera, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In many natural fractured porous media, such as aquifers, soils, oil and geothermal reservoirs, fractures play a crucial role in their flow and transport properties. An approach that has recently gained popularity for modeling fracture systems is the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) model. This approach consists in applying a stochastic boolean simulation method, also known as object simulation method, where fractures are represented as simplified geometric objects (line segments in 2D and polygons in 3D). One of the shortcomings of this approach is that it usually does not consider the dependency relationships that may exist between the geometric properties of fractures (direction, length, aperture, etc), that is, each property is simulated independently. In this work a method for modeling such dependencies by copula theory is introduced. In particular, a nonparametric model using Bernstein copulas for direction-length fracture dependency in 2D is presented. The application of this method is illustrated in a case study for a fractured rock sample from a carbonate reservoir outcrop.

  4. SU-D-12A-04: Investigation of a 2D Antiscatter Grid for Flat Panel Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Altunbas, C; Kavanagh, B; Miften, M; Zhong, Y; Shaw, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To improve CT number accuracy and contrast sensitivity, a novel 2D antiscatter grid (ASG) for flat panel detector (FPD) based CBCT imaging was evaluated. Experiments were performed to characterize the scatter rejection and contrast sensitivity performance of ASG. The reduction in primary transmission for various ASG geometries was also evaluated by a computational model. Methods: The 2D ASG design was based on multi-hole collimators used in Nuclear Medicine. It consisted of abutted hexagon shaped apertures with 2.5 mm pitch and 32 mm height, and separated by 0.25 mm thick lead septa. Scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and mean primary transmission were measured using a benchtop FPD/x-ray source system. Acrylic slabs of varying thicknesses were imaged with a contrast-detail phantom to measure CNR and SPR under different scatter conditions. Primary transmission was also measured by averaging pixel values in flood field images without the phantom. We additionally explored variation of primary transmission with pitch and septum thickness using a computational model of our ASG. Results: Our 2D ASG reduced the SPR from 3.3 to 0.12, and improved CNR by 50% in 20 cm thick slab phantom projections acquired at 120 kVp. While the measured primary transmission was 72.8%, our simulations show that primary transmission can be increased to 86% by reducing the septum thickness to 0.1 mm. Primary transmission further increases to 93% if septum thickness of 0.1 mm is used in conjunction with an increased pitch of 4 mm. Conclusion: The 2D ASG appears to be a promising scatter rejection device, offering both superior scatter rejection and improved contrast sensitivity. Though its lead footprint reduced primary transmission, our work shows that optimization of aperture pitch and septum thickness can significantly improve the primary transmission.

  5. Investigation of 2D laterally dispersive photonic crystal structures : LDRD 33602 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Wendt, Joel Robert; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Guo, Junpeng; Peters, David William; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2003-12-01

    Artificially structured photonic lattice materials are commonly investigated for their unique ability to block and guide light. However, an exciting aspect of photonic lattices which has received relatively little attention is the extremely high refractive index dispersion within the range of frequencies capable of propagating within the photonic lattice material. In fact, it has been proposed that a negative refractive index may be realized with the correct photonic lattice configuration. This report summarizes our investigation, both numerically and experimentally, into the design and performance of such photonic lattice materials intended to optimize the dispersion of refractive index in order to realize new classes of photonic devices.

  6. Casting process modeling using ProCAST and CAST2D

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.; Stein, W.; Raboin, P.

    1990-12-01

    Correctly modeling the fluid flow and heat transfer during the filling of a mold with a molten metal, and the thermal-mechanical physics of solidification and cooldown is important in predicting the quality of a cast part. Determining the dynamics of the flow and the free surface shape during filling are essential in establishing the temperature gradients in the melt and in the mold. Correctly modeling the physics of volume change on solidification, shrinkage on cooling, and contact resistance across the part-mold interface directly affects the cooling rate and ultimately the final cast shape and stress state of the cast part. In this paper we describe our current research efforts on modeling fluid fill using the commercial code ProCAST by UES, and thermal-mechanical solidification modeling using the code CAST2D by LLNL.

  7. Image restoration using 2D autoregressive texture model and structure curve construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, V. V.; Marchuk, V. I.; Petrosov, S. P.; Svirin, I.; Agaian, S.; Egiazarian, K.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper an image inpainting approach based on the construction of a composite curve for the restoration of the edges of objects in an image using the concepts of parametric and geometric continuity is presented. It is shown that this approach allows to restore the curved edges and provide more flexibility for curve design in damaged image by interpolating the boundaries of objects by cubic splines. After edge restoration stage, a texture restoration using 2D autoregressive texture model is carried out. The image intensity is locally modeled by a first spatial autoregressive model with support in a strongly causal prediction region on the plane. Model parameters are estimated by Yule-Walker method. Several examples considered in this paper show the effectiveness of the proposed approach for large objects removal as well as recovery of small regions on several test images.

  8. Improving object detection in 2D images using a 3D world model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viggh, Herbert E. M.; Cho, Peter L.; Armstrong-Crews, Nicholas; Nam, Myra; Shah, Danelle C.; Brown, Geoffrey E.

    2014-05-01

    A mobile robot operating in a netcentric environment can utilize offboard resources on the network to improve its local perception. One such offboard resource is a world model built and maintained by other sensor systems. In this paper we present results from research into improving the performance of Deformable Parts Model object detection algorithms by using an offboard 3D world model. Experiments were run for detecting both people and cars in 2D photographs taken in an urban environment. After generating candidate object detections, a 3D world model built from airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) and aerial photographs was used to filter out false alarm using several types of geometric reasoning. Comparison of the baseline detection performance to the performance after false alarm filtering showed a significant decrease in false alarms for a given probability of detection.

  9. Investigation of the effect of wall friction on the flow rate in 2D and 3D Granular Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballo-Ramirez, Brenda; Pleau, Mollie; Easwar, Nalini; Birwa, Sumit; Shah, Neil; Tewari, Shubha

    We have measured the mass flow rate of spherical steel spheres under gravity in vertical, straight-walled 2 and 3-dimensional hoppers, where the flow velocity is controlled by the opening size. Our measurements focus on the role of friction and its placement along the walls of the hopper. In the 2D case, an increase in the coefficient of static friction from μ = 0.2 to 0.6 is seen to decrease the flow rate significantly. We have changed the placement of frictional boundaries/regions from the front and back walls of the 2D hopper to the side walls and floor to investigate the relative importance of the different regions in determining the flow rate. Fits to the Beverloo equation show significant departure from the expected exponent of 1.5 in the case of 2D flow. In contrast, 3D flow rates do not show much dependence on wall friction and its placement. We compare the experimental data to numerical simulations of gravity driven hopper granular flow with varying frictional walls constructed using LAMMPS*. *http://lammps.sandia.gov Supported by NSF MRSEC DMR 0820506.

  10. Adaptive finite element modeling of direct current resistivity in 2-D generally anisotropic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Yuguo; Liu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite element (FE) algorithm for direct current (DC) resistivity modeling in 2-D generally anisotropic conductivity structures. Our algorithm is implemented on an unstructured triangular mesh that readily accommodates complex structures such as topography and dipping layers and so on. We implement a self-adaptive, goal-oriented grid refinement algorithm in which the finite element analysis is performed on a sequence of refined grids. The grid refinement process is guided by an a posteriori error estimator. The problem is formulated in terms of total potentials where mixed boundary conditions are incorporated. This type of boundary condition is superior to the Dirichlet type of conditions and improves numerical accuracy considerably according to model calculations. We have verified the adaptive finite element algorithm using a two-layered earth with azimuthal anisotropy. The FE algorithm with incorporation of mixed boundary conditions achieves high accuracy. The relative error between the numerical and analytical solutions is less than 1% except in the vicinity of the current source location, where the relative error is up to 2.4%. A 2-D anisotropic model is used to demonstrate the effects of anisotropy upon the apparent resistivity in DC soundings.

  11. Accelerating numerical modeling of wave propagation through 2-D anisotropic materials using OpenCL.

    PubMed

    Molero, Miguel; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula

    2013-03-01

    We present an implementation of the numerical modeling of elastic waves propagation, in 2D anisotropic materials, using the new parallel computing devices (PCDs). Our study is aimed both to model laboratory experiments and explore the capabilities of the emerging PCDs by discussing performance issues. In the experiments a sample plate of an anisotropic material placed inside a water tank is rotated and, for every angle of rotation it is subjected to an ultrasonic wave (produced by a large source transducer) that propagates in the water and through the material producing some reflection and transmission signals that are recording by a "point-like" receiver. This experiment is numerically modeled by running a finite difference code covering a set of angles θ∈[-50°, 50°], and recorded the signals for the transmission and reflection results. Transversely anisotropic and weakly orthorhombic materials are considered. We accelerated the computation using an open-source toolkit called PyOpenCL, which lets one to easily access the OpenCL parallel computation API's from the high-level programming environment of Python. A speedup factor over 19 using the GPU is obtained when compared with the execution of the same program in parallel using a CPU multi-core (in this case we use the 4-cores that has the CPU). The performance for different graphic cards and operating systems is included together with the full 2-D finite difference code with PyOpenCL. PMID:23290584

  12. Experimental Investigation of a 2D Supercritical Circulation-Control Airfoil Using Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Allan, Brian G.

    2006-01-01

    Recent efforts in extreme short takeoff and landing aircraft configurations have renewed the interest in circulation control wing design and optimization. The key to accurately designing and optimizing these configurations rests in the modeling of the complex physics of these flows. This paper will highlight the physics of the stagnation and separation regions on two typical circulation control airfoil sections.

  13. Performance of Replica-Exchange Wang-Landau Sampling for the 2D Ising Model: A Brief Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yiwei; Cheung, Siu Wun; Li, Ying Wai; Eisenbach, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We report a brief performance study of the replica-exchange Wang-Landau algorithm, a recently proposed parallel realization of Wang-Landau sampling, using the 2D Ising model as a test case. The simulation time is found to scale inversely with the square root of the number of subwindows (and thus number of processors) used to span the global parameter space. We also investigate the time profiles for random walkers in dierent subwindows to complete iterations, which will aid the development of and adaptive load-balancing scheme.

  14. Kinetic parameter estimation in N. europaea biofilms using a 2-D reactive transport model.

    PubMed

    Lauchnor, Ellen G; Semprini, Lewis; Wood, Brian D

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms of the ammonia oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea were cultivated to study microbial processes associated with ammonia oxidation in pure culture. We explored the hypothesis that the kinetic parameters of ammonia oxidation in N. europaea biofilms were in the range of those determined with batch suspended cells. Oxygen and pH microelectrodes were used to measure dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH above and inside biofilms and reactive transport modeling was performed to simulate the measured DO and pH profiles. A two dimensional (2-D) model was used to simulate advection parallel to the biofilm surface and diffusion through the overlying fluid while reaction and diffusion were simulated in the biofilm. Three experimental studies of microsensor measurements were performed with biofilms: i) NH3 concentrations near the Ksn value of 40 μM determined in suspended cell tests ii) Limited buffering capacity which resulted in a pH gradient within the biofilms and iii) NH3 concentrations well below the Ksn value. Very good fits to the DO concentration profiles both in the fluid above and in the biofilms were achieved using the 2-D model. The modeling study revealed that the half-saturation coefficient for NH3 in N. europaea biofilms was close to the value measured in suspended cells. However, the third study of biofilms with low availability of NH3 deviated from the model prediction. The model also predicted shifts in the DO profiles and the gradient in pH that resulted for the case of limited buffering capacity. The results illustrate the importance of incorporating both key transport and chemical processes in a biofilm reactive transport model.

  15. An investigation of design optimization using a 2-D viscous flow code with multigrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doria, Michael L.

    1990-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes have advanced to the point where they are effective analytical tools for solving flow fields around complex geometries. There is also a need for their use as a design tool to find optimum aerodynamic shapes. In the area of design, however, a difficulty arises due to the large amount of computer resources required by these codes. It is desired to streamline the design process so that a large number of design options and constraints can be investigated without overloading the system. There are several techniques which have been proposed to help streamline the design process. The feasibility of one of these techniques is investigated. The technique under consideration is the interaction of the geometry change with the flow calculation. The problem of finding the value of camber which maximizes the ratio of lift over drag for a particular airfoil is considered. In order to test out this technique, a particular optimization problem was tried. A NACA 0012 airfoil was considered at free stream Mach number of 0.5 with a zero angle of attack. Camber was added to the mean line of the airfoil. The goal was to find the value of camber for which the ratio of lift over drag is a maximum. The flow code used was FLOMGE which is a two dimensional viscous flow solver which uses multigrid to speed up convergence. A hyperbolic grid generation program was used to construct the grid for each value of camber.

  16. Observation of spatial charge and spin correlations in the 2D Fermi-Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Lawrence W; Nichols, Matthew A; Lawrence, Katherine R; Okan, Melih; Zhang, Hao; Khatami, Ehsan; Trivedi, Nandini; Paiva, Thereza; Rigol, Marcos; Zwierlein, Martin W

    2016-09-16

    Strong electron correlations lie at the origin of high-temperature superconductivity. Its essence is believed to be captured by the Fermi-Hubbard model of repulsively interacting fermions on a lattice. Here we report on the site-resolved observation of charge and spin correlations in the two-dimensional (2D) Fermi-Hubbard model realized with ultracold atoms. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations are maximal at half-filling and weaken monotonically upon doping. At large doping, nearest-neighbor correlations between singly charged sites are negative, revealing the formation of a correlation hole, the suppressed probability of finding two fermions near each other. As the doping is reduced, the correlations become positive, signaling strong bunching of doublons and holes, in agreement with numerical calculations. The dynamics of the doublon-hole correlations should play an important role for transport in the Fermi-Hubbard model. PMID:27634529

  17. Longtime Well-posedness for the 2D Groma-Balogh Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Renhui; Chen, Jiecheng

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider the cauchy problem for the 2D Groma-Balogh model (Acta Mater 47:3647-3654, 1999). From the works Cannone et al. (Arch Ration Mech Anal 196:71-96, 2010) and El Hajj (Ann Inst Henri Poincaré Anal Nonlinéaire 27:21-35, 2010), one can see global well-posedness for this model is an open question. However, we can prove longtime well-posedness. In particular, we show that this model admits a unique solution with the lifespan T^star satisfying T^star log ^2(1+T^star )≳ ɛ ^{-2} if the initial data is of size ɛ . To achieve this, we first establish some new decay estimates concerning the operator e^{-{R}_{12}^2t} . Then, we prove the longtime well-posedness by utilizing the weak dissipation to deal with the nonlinear terms.

  18. Modeling floods in a dense urban area using 2D shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignot, E.; Paquier, A.; Haider, S.

    2006-07-01

    SummaryA code solving the 2D shallow water equations by an explicit second-order scheme is used to simulate the severe October 1988 flood in the Richelieu urban locality of the French city of Nîmes. A reference calculation using a detailed description of the street network and of the cross-sections of the streets, considering impervious residence blocks and neglecting the flow interaction with the sewer network provides a mean peak water elevation 0.13 m lower than the measured flood marks with a standard deviation between the measured and computed water depths of 0.53 m. Sensitivity analysis of various topographical and numerical parameters shows that globally, the results keep the same level of accuracy, which reflects both the stability of the calculation method and the smoothening of results. However, the local flow modifications due to change of parameter values can drastically modify the local water depths, especially when the local flow regime is modified. Furthermore, the flow distribution to the downstream parts of the city can be altered depending on the set of parameters used. Finally, a second event, the 2002 flood, was simulated with the calibrated model providing results similar to 1988 flood calculation. Thus, the article shows that, after calibration, a 2D model can be used to help planning mitigation measures in a dense urban area.

  19. A 2D Electromechanical Model of Human Atrial Tissue Using the Discrete Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Brocklehurst, Paul; Adeniran, Ismail; Yang, Dongmin; Sheng, Yong; Zhang, Henggui; Ye, Jianqiao

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue is a syncytium of coupled cells with pronounced intrinsic discrete nature. Previous models of cardiac electromechanics often ignore such discrete properties and treat cardiac tissue as a continuous medium, which has fundamental limitations. In the present study, we introduce a 2D electromechanical model for human atrial tissue based on the discrete element method (DEM). In the model, single-cell dynamics are governed by strongly coupling the electrophysiological model of Courtemanche et al. to the myofilament model of Rice et al. with two-way feedbacks. Each cell is treated as a viscoelastic body, which is physically represented by a clump of nine particles. Cell aggregations are arranged so that the anisotropic nature of cardiac tissue due to fibre orientations can be modelled. Each cell is electrically coupled to neighbouring cells, allowing excitation waves to propagate through the tissue. Cell-to-cell mechanical interactions are modelled using a linear contact bond model in DEM. By coupling cardiac electrophysiology with mechanics via the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, the DEM model successfully simulates the conduction of cardiac electrical waves and the tissue's corresponding mechanical contractions. The developed DEM model is numerically stable and provides a powerful method for studying the electromechanical coupling problem in the heart. PMID:26583141

  20. Assessing HYDRUS-2D model to estimate soil water contents and olive tree transpiration fluxes under different water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autovino, Dario; Negm, Amro; Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    comparison between measured and simulated soil water content and actual transpiration fluxes, under the hypothesis to neglect the contribute of the tree capacitance. Moreover, two different crop water stress functions and in particular the linear model proposed by Feddes et al. (1978) and the S-shape model suggested by van Genuchten et al. (1987), were considered. The result of the study evidenced that for the investigated crop and under the examined conditions, HYDRUS-2D model reproduces fairly well the dynamic of soil water contents at different distances from the emitters (RMSE<0.09 cm3 cm-3) and actual crop transpiration fluxes (RMSE<0.11 mm d-1), whose estimations can be slightly improved by assuming a S-shape crop water stress function. Key-words: Olive tree, HYDRUS-2D, Soil water content, Actual transpiration fluxes

  1. A Beam-Fourier Technique for the Numerical Investigation of 2D Nonlinear Convective Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, N. C.

    2011-11-01

    In the current work, we develop a numerical method suitable for treating the problem of nonlinear two-dimensional flows in rectangular domains. For the spatial approximation we employ the Fourier-Galerkin approach. More specifically, our basis functions are products of trigonometric and Beam functions. This choice means that the solutions automatically satisfy the boundary and periodic conditions in the x and y directions respectively. The accuracy of the method is assessed by applying it to model problems which admit exact analytical solutions. The numerical and analytic solutions are found to be in good agreement. The convergence rate of the spectral coefficients is found to be fifth-order algebraic in the x-direction and y-direction, confirming the efficiency and speed of our technique.

  2. Locally adaptive 2D-3D registration using vascular structure model for liver catheterization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Lee, Jeongjin; Chung, Jin Wook; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional-three-dimensional (2D-3D) registration between intra-operative 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and pre-operative 3D computed tomography angiography (CTA) can be used for roadmapping purposes. However, through the projection of 3D vessels, incorrect intersections and overlaps between vessels are produced because of the complex vascular structure, which makes it difficult to obtain the correct solution of 2D-3D registration. To overcome these problems, we propose a registration method that selects a suitable part of a 3D vascular structure for a given DSA image and finds the optimized solution to the partial 3D structure. The proposed algorithm can reduce the registration errors because it restricts the range of the 3D vascular structure for the registration by using only the relevant 3D vessels with the given DSA. To search for the appropriate 3D partial structure, we first construct a tree model of the 3D vascular structure and divide it into several subtrees in accordance with the connectivity. Then, the best matched subtree with the given DSA image is selected using the results from the coarse registration between each subtree and the vessels in the DSA image. Finally, a fine registration is conducted to minimize the difference between the selected subtree and the vessels of the DSA image. In experimental results obtained using 10 clinical datasets, the average distance errors in the case of the proposed method were 2.34±1.94mm. The proposed algorithm converges faster and produces more correct results than the conventional method in evaluations on patient datasets.

  3. 2-D Modeling of Nanoscale MOSFETs: Non-Equilibrium Green's Function Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions and oxide tunneling are treated on an equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Electron-electron interaction is treated within Hartree approximation by solving NEGF and Poisson equations self-consistently. For the calculations presented here, parallelization is performed by distributing the solution of NEGF equations to various processors, energy wise. We present simulation of the "benchmark" MIT 25nm and 90nm MOSFETs and compare our results to those from the drift-diffusion simulator and the quantum-corrected results available. In the 25nm MOSFET, the channel length is less than ten times the electron wavelength, and the electron scattering time is comparable to its transit time. Our main results are: (1) Simulated drain subthreshold current characteristics are shown, where the potential profiles are calculated self-consistently by the corresponding simulation methods. The current predicted by our quantum simulation has smaller subthreshold slope of the Vg dependence which results in higher threshold voltage. (2) When gate oxide thickness is less than 2 nm, gate oxide leakage is a primary factor which determines off-current of a MOSFET (3) Using our 2-D NEGF simulator, we found several ways to drastically decrease oxide leakage current without compromising drive current. (4) Quantum mechanically calculated electron density is much smaller than the background doping density in the poly silicon gate region near oxide interface. This creates an additional effective gate voltage. Different ways to. include this effect approximately will be discussed.

  4. Locally adaptive 2D-3D registration using vascular structure model for liver catheterization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Lee, Jeongjin; Chung, Jin Wook; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional-three-dimensional (2D-3D) registration between intra-operative 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and pre-operative 3D computed tomography angiography (CTA) can be used for roadmapping purposes. However, through the projection of 3D vessels, incorrect intersections and overlaps between vessels are produced because of the complex vascular structure, which makes it difficult to obtain the correct solution of 2D-3D registration. To overcome these problems, we propose a registration method that selects a suitable part of a 3D vascular structure for a given DSA image and finds the optimized solution to the partial 3D structure. The proposed algorithm can reduce the registration errors because it restricts the range of the 3D vascular structure for the registration by using only the relevant 3D vessels with the given DSA. To search for the appropriate 3D partial structure, we first construct a tree model of the 3D vascular structure and divide it into several subtrees in accordance with the connectivity. Then, the best matched subtree with the given DSA image is selected using the results from the coarse registration between each subtree and the vessels in the DSA image. Finally, a fine registration is conducted to minimize the difference between the selected subtree and the vessels of the DSA image. In experimental results obtained using 10 clinical datasets, the average distance errors in the case of the proposed method were 2.34±1.94mm. The proposed algorithm converges faster and produces more correct results than the conventional method in evaluations on patient datasets. PMID:26824922

  5. Structural investigations on betacyanin pigments by LC NMR and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian C; Conrad, Jürgen; Klaiber, Iris; Beifuss, Uwe; Carle, Reinhold

    2004-02-01

    Four betacyanin pigments were analysed by LC NMR and subjected to extensive NMR characterisation after isolation. Previously, low pH values were applied for NMR investigations of betalains resulting in rapid degradation of the purified substances thus preventing extensive NMR studies. Consequently, up to now only one single (13)C NMR spectrum of a betalain pigment, namely that of neobetanin (=14,15-dehydrobetanin), was available. Because of its sufficient stability under highly acidic conditions otherwise detrimental for betacyanins, this pigment remained an exemption. Since betalains are most stable in the pH range of 5-7, a new solvent system has been developed allowing improved data acquisition through improved pigment stability at near neutral pH. Thus, not only (1)H, but for the first time also partial (13)C data of betanin, isobetanin, phyllocactin and hylocerenin isolated from red-purple pitaya [Hylocereus polyrhizus (Weber) Britton & Rose, Cactaceae] could be indirectly obtained by gHSQC- and gHMQC-NMR experiments.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of DNAPL infiltration and spreading in a 2-D sandbox by means of light transmission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, F.; Shi, X.; Wu, J.; Gao, Y. W.

    2013-12-01

    Chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE) are widespread groundwater contaminants often referred to as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Accuracy description of the spreading behavior and configuration for subsurface DNAPL migration is important, especially favourable for design effective remediation strategies. In this study, a 2-D experiment was conducted to investigate the infiltration behavior and spatial distribution of PCE in saturated porous media. Accusand 20/30 mesh sand (Unimin, Le Sueur, MN) was used as the background medium with two 70/80 and 60/70 mesh lenses embedded to simulate heterogeneous conditions. Dyed PCE of 100 ml was released into the flow cell at a constant rate of 2ml/min using a Harvard Apparatus syringe pump with a 50 ml glass syringe for two times, and 5 ml/min water was continuously injected through the inlet at the left side of the sandbox, while kept the same effluent rate at right side to create hydrodynamic condition. A light transmission (LT) system was used to record the migration of PCE and determine the saturation distribution of PCE in the sandbox experiment with a thermoelectrically air-cooled charged-coupled device (CCD) camera. All images were processed using MATLAB to calculate thickness-averaged PCE saturation for each pixel. Mass balance was checked through comparing injected known mounts of PCE with that calculated from LT analysis. Results showed that LT method is effective to delineate PCE migration pathways and quantify the saturation distribution. The relative errors of total PCE volumes calculated by LT analysis at different times were within 15% of the injected PCE volumes. The simulation are conducted using the multiphase modeling software T2VOC, which calibrated by the LT analysis results of three recorded time steps to fit with the complete spatial-temporal distribution of the PCE saturation. Model verification was then performed using the other eight recorded time

  7. Investigation of ellipsometric parameters of 2D microrough surfaces by FDTD.

    PubMed

    Qiu, J; Ran, D F; Liu, Y B; Liu, L H

    2016-07-10

    Ellipsometry is a powerful method for measuring the optical constants of materials and is very sensitive to surface roughness. In previous ellipsometric measurement of optical constants of solid materials with rough surfaces, researchers frequently used effective medium approximation (EMA) with roughness already known to fit the complex refractive index of the material. However, the ignored correlation length, the other important parameter of rough surfaces, will definitely result in fitting errors. Hence it is necessary to consider the influence of surface roughness and correlation length on the ellipsometric parameters Δ (phase difference) and Ψ (azimuth) characterizing practical systems. In this paper, the influence of roughness of two-dimensional randomly microrough surfaces (relative roughness σ/λ ranges from 0.001 to 0.025) of silicon on ellipsometric parameters was simulated by the finite-difference time-domain method which was validated with experimental results. The effects of incident angle, relative roughness, and correlation length were numerically investigated for two-dimensional Gaussian distributed randomly microrough surfaces, respectively. The simulated results showed that compared with the smooth surface, only tiny changes of the ellipsometric parameter Δ could be observed for microrough silicon surface in the vicinity of the Brewster angle, but obviously changes of Ψ occur especially in the vicinity of the Brewster angle. More differences between the ellipsometric parameters of the rough surface and smooth surface can been seen especially in the vicinity of the Brewster angle as the relative roughness σ/λ increases or correlation length τ decreases. The results reveal that when we measure the optical constants of solid materials by ellipsometry, the smaller roughness, larger correlation length and larger incident wavelength will lead to the higher precision of measurements.

  8. A Bayesian approach to modeling 2D gravity data using polygon states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, W. J.; Titus, S.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for the 2D gravity inversion of a localized subsurface object with constant density contrast. Our models have four parameters: the density contrast, the number of vertices in a polygonal approximation of the object, an upper bound on the ratio of the perimeter squared to the area, and the vertices of a polygon container that bounds the object. Reasonable parameter values can be estimated prior to inversion using a forward model and geologic information. In addition, we assume that the field data have a common random uncertainty that lies between two bounds but that it has no systematic uncertainty. Finally, we assume that there is no uncertainty in the spatial locations of the measurement stations. For any set of model parameters, we use MCMC methods to generate an approximate probability distribution of polygons for the object. We then compute various probability distributions for the object, including the variance between the observed and predicted fields (an important quantity in the MCMC method), the area, the center of area, and the occupancy probability (the probability that a spatial point lies within the object). In addition, we compare probabilities of different models using parallel tempering, a technique which also mitigates trapping in local optima that can occur in certain model geometries. We apply our method to several synthetic data sets generated from objects of varying shape and location. We also analyze a natural data set collected across the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge in New Mexico, where the object (i.e. the air below the bridge) is known and the canyon is approximately 2D. Although there are many ways to view results, the occupancy probability proves quite powerful. We also find that the choice of the container is important. In particular, large containers should be avoided, because the more closely a container confines the object, the better the predictions match properties of object.

  9. Be2D: A model to understand the distribution of meteoric 10Be in soilscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides have revolutionised our understanding of earth surface process rates. They have become one of the standard tools to quantify soil production by weathering, soil redistribution and erosion. Especially Beryllium-10 has gained much attention due to its long half-live and propensity to be relatively conservative in the landscape. The latter makes 10Be an excellent tool to assess denudation rates over the last 1000 to 100 × 103 years, bridging the anthropogenic and geological time scale. Nevertheless, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in soil systems makes translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates difficult. Here we present a coupled soil hillslope model, Be2D, that is applied to synthetic and real topography to address the following three research questions. (i) What is the influence of vertical meteoric Be10 mobility, caused by chemical mobility, clay translocation and bioturbation, on its lateral redistribution over the soilscape, (ii) How does vertical mobility influence erosion rates and soil residence times inferred from meteoric 10Be inventories and (iii) To what extent can a tracer with a half-life of 1.36 Myr be used to distinguish between natural and human-disturbed soil redistribution rates? The model architecture of Be2D is designed to answer these research questions. Be2D is a dynamic model including physical processes such as soil formation, physical weathering, clay migration, bioturbation, creep, overland flow and tillage erosion. Pathways of meteoric 10Be mobility are simulated using a two step approach which is updated each timestep. First, advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be is simulated within the soil profile and second, lateral redistribution because of lateral soil fluxes is calculated. The performance and functionality of the model is demonstrated through a number of synthetic and real model runs using existing datasets of meteoric 10Be from case-studies in southeastern US. Brute

  10. Estimating nitrogen losses in furrow irrigated soil amended by compost using HYDRUS-2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Guber, Andrey; Zaman Khan, Haroon; ullah, Ehsan

    2014-05-01

    Furrow irrigation commonly results in high nitrogen (N) losses from soil profile via deep infiltration. Estimation of such losses and their reduction is not a trivial task because furrow irrigation creates highly nonuniform distribution of soil water that leads to preferential water and N fluxes in soil profile. Direct measurements of such fluxes are impractical. The objective of this study was to assess applicability of HYDRUS-2D model for estimating nitrogen balance in manure amended soil under furrow irrigation. Field experiments were conducted in a sandy loam soil amended by poultry manure compost (PMC) and pressmud compost (PrMC) fertilizers. The PMC and PrMC contained 2.5% and 0.9% N and were applied at 5 rates: 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 ton/ha. Plots were irrigated starting from 26th day from planting using furrows with 1x1 ridge to furrow aspect ratio. Irrigation depths were 7.5 cm and time interval between irrigations varied from 8 to 15 days. Results of the field experiments showed that approximately the same corn yield was obtained with considerably higher N application rates using PMC than using PrMC as a fertilizer. HYDRUS-2D model was implemented to evaluate N fluxes in soil amended by PMC and PrMC fertilizers. Nitrogen exchange between two pools of organic N (compost and soil) and two pools of mineral N (soil NH4-N and soil NO3-N) was modeled using mineralization and nitrification reactions. Sources of mineral N losses from soil profile included denitrification, root N uptake and leaching with deep infiltration of water. HYDRUS-2D simulations showed that the observed increases in N root water uptake and corn yields associated with compost application could not be explained by the amount of N added to soil profile with the compost. Predicted N uptake by roots significantly underestimated the field data. Good agreement between simulated and field-estimated values of N root uptake was achieved when the rate of organic N mineralization was increased

  11. Modeling of 2D photonic bandgap structures using a triangular mesh finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, G. Ronald

    2001-10-01

    A numerical model is presented for computing the out-of- plane losses of a general class of row-defect waveguides formed by the superposition of a 2D photonic crystal onto a slab confinement structure. The usefulness of this model is demonstrated here by calculating the propagation loss of a single-row-defect waveguide composed of hexagonal air holes etched into two different slab structures. The results are interpreted in terms of a simple coupled-mode-theory picture in which loss is due to coupling by the waveguide corrugation between the fundamental and certain radiative slab modes. These calculations show that low-loss photonic crystal waveguides should be possible by carefully engineering the radiation modes of the slab waveguide.

  12. Comparative modeling of vertical and planar organic phototransistors with 2D drift-diffusion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzeccheri, E.; Colasanti, S.; Falco, A.; Liguori, R.; Rubino, A.; Lugli, P.

    2016-05-01

    Vertical Organic Transistors and Phototransistors have been proven to be promising technologies due to the advantages of reduced channel length and larger sensitive area with respect to planar devices. Nevertheless, a real improvement of their performance is subordinate to the quantitative description of their operation mechanisms. In this work, we present a comparative study on the modeling of vertical and planar Organic Phototransistor (OPT) structures. Computer-based simulations of the devices have been carried out with Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD in a 2D Drift-Diffusion framework. The photoactive semiconductor material has been modeled using the virtual semiconductor approach as the archetypal P3HT:PC61BM bulk heterojunction. It has been found that both simulated devices have comparable electrical and optical characteristics, accordingly to recent experimental reports on the subject.

  13. Bootstrap resampling as a tool for uncertainty analysis in 2-D magnetotelluric inversion modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnaidt, Sebastian; Heinson, Graham

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainty estimation is a vital part of geophysical numerical modelling. There exist a variety of methods aimed at uncertainty estimation, which are often complicated and difficult to implement. We present an inversion technique that produces multiple solutions, based on bootstrap resampling, to create a qualitative uncertainty measure for 2-D magnetotelluric inversion models. The approach is easy to implement, can be used with almost any inversion code, and does not require access to the inversion software's source code. It is capable of detecting the effect of data uncertainties on the model result rather than just analysing the effect of model variations on the model response. To obtain uncertainty estimates for an inversion model, the original data set is resampled repeatedly and alternate data set realizations are created and inverted. This ensemble of solutions is then statistically analysed to determine the variability between the different solutions. The process yields interpretable uncertainty maps for the inversion model and we demonstrate its effectiveness to qualitatively quantify uncertainty in synthetic model tests and a case study.

  14. Implications of lack-of-ergodicity in 2D Potts model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Smita

    2015-03-01

    Microcanonical Monte Carlo simulation is used to study two dimensional (2D) q state Potts model. We consider a 2D square lattice having NxN spins with periodic boundary condition and simulated the system with N =15 and q =10. The demon energy distribution is found to be exponential for high system energy and large system size. For smaller system size and above the first order transition the demon energy distribution is found to deviate from exp(- βED) and has the form exp(- βED + γ ED2). Here β = 1/kBT and kB is the Boltzmann constant. It is found that γ is finite at higher temperatures. As the system energy is reduced γ becomes zero near the first order transition. It is found that during cooling γ changes sign from negative to positive and then to negative again near the 1st order transition. Therefore the demon energy distribution becomes exp(- βED) (or ergodic) at two values of system energy near the 1st order transition. Further cooling or at still lower temperatures the system shows lack of ergodicity. However, difference in heating cooling curves are apparent in E vs γ. The system energies for which γ is zero during cooling can represent the 'ergodic' states. This can be related to the two-level systems observed in glasses at low temperatures.

  15. GRAV2D: an interactive 2-1/2 dimensional gravity modeling program (user's guide and documentation for Rev. 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, C.

    1980-11-01

    GRAV2D is an interactive computer program used for modeling 2-1/2 dimensional gravity data. A forward algorithm is used to give the theoretical attraction of gravity intensity at a station due to a perturbing body given by the initial model. The resultant model can then be adjusted for a better fit by a combination of manual adjustment, one-dimensional automatic search, and Marquardt inversion. GRAV2D has an interactive data management system for data manipulation and display built around subroutines to do a forward problem, a one-dimensional direct search and an inversion. This is a user's guide and documentation for GRAV2D.

  16. 2D time-domain finite-difference modeling for viscoelastic seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Na; Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Ge, Zengxi; Yao, Zhen-Xing

    2016-07-01

    Real Earth media are not perfectly elastic. Instead, they attenuate propagating mechanical waves. This anelastic phenomenon in wave propagation can be modeled by a viscoelastic mechanical model consisting of several standard linear solids. Using this viscoelastic model, we approximate a constant Q over a frequency band of interest. We use a four-element viscoelastic model with a tradeoff between accuracy and computational costs to incorporate Q into 2D time-domain first-order velocity-stress wave equations. To improve the computational efficiency, we limit the Q in the model to a list of discrete values between 2 and 1000. The related stress and strain relaxation times that characterize the viscoelastic model are pre-calculated and stored in a database for use by the finite-difference calculation. A viscoelastic finite-difference scheme that is second-order in time and fourth-order in space is developed based on the MacCormack algorithm. The new method is validated by comparing the numerical result with analytical solutions that are calculated using the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method. The synthetic seismograms exhibit greater than 95 per cent consistency in a two-layer viscoelastic model. The dispersion generated from the simulation is consistent with the Kolsky-Futterman dispersion relationship.

  17. 2D-photochemical modeling of Saturn’s stratosphere: hydrocarbon and water distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, Vincent; Cavalié, Thibault; Hersant, Franck; Dobrijevic, Michel; Greathouse, Thomas; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Hartogh, Paul; Cassidy, Timothy; Spiga, Aymeric; Guerlet, Sandrine; Sylvestre, Melody

    2014-11-01

    Saturn’s axial tilt of 27° produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. The seasonal forcing over Saturn’s 30 years period influences the production/loss of the major atmospheric absorbers and coolants through photochemistry, and influences therefore Saturn’s stratospheric temperatures. We have developed a 2D time-dependent photochemical model of Saturn’s atmosphere [Hue et al., in prep.], coupled to a radiative-climate model [Greathouse et al., 2008] to study seasonal effects on its atmospheric composition. Cassini spacecraft has revealed that the distribution of hydrocarbons in Saturn’s stratosphere [Guerlet et al., 2009] differs from pure photochemical predictions, i.e. without meridional transport [Moses et al., 2005]. Differences between the observed distribution of hydrocarbons and 2D-photochemical predictions are likely to be an indicator of dynamical forcing.Disentangling the origin of water in the stratosphere of this planet has been a long-term issue. Due to Saturn’s cold tropopause trap, which acts as a transport barrier, the water vapor observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) [Feuchtgruber et al., 1997] has an external origin. Three external sources have been identified: (i) permanent flux from interplanetary dust particles, (ii) local sources form planetary environments (rings, satellites), (iii) large cometary impacts, similar to Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter. Previous observations of Saturn with Herschel’s Hsso program [Hartogh et al., 2009] led to the detection of a water torus around Saturn [Hartogh et al., 2011], fed by Enceladus’ geysers. A substantial fraction of this torus is predicted to be a local source of water for Saturn’s and its satellites, as it will spread in this system [Cassidy et al., 2010]. Using the new 2D-photochemical model, we test here the validity of Enceladus’ torus as the source of Saturn’s stratospheric water.References : Hue et al., in prep. Greathouse et al., 2008. AGU Fall Meeting

  18. 1-D and 2-D resonances in an Alpine valley identified from ambient noise measurements and 3-D modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Olivier; Cornou, Cécile; Jongmans, Denis; Schwartz, Stéphane

    2012-09-01

    H/V spectral ratios are regularly used for estimating the bedrock depth in 1-D like basins exhibiting smooth lateral variations. In the case of 2-D or 3-D pronounced geometries, observational and numerical studies have shown that H/V curves exhibit peculiar shapes and that the H/V frequency generally overestimates 1-D theoretical resonance frequency. To investigate the capabilities of the H/V method in complex structures, a detailed comparison between measured and 3-D-simulated ambient vibrations was performed in the small-size lower Romanche valley (French Alps), which shows significant variations in geometry, downstream and upstream the Séchilienne basin. Analysing the H/V curve characteristics, two different wave propagation modes were identified along the valley. Relying on previous geophysical investigation, a power-law relationship was derived between the bedrock depth and the H/V peak frequency, which was used for building a 3-D model of the valley geometry. Simulated and experimental H/V curves were found to exhibit quite similar features in terms of curve shape and peak frequency values, validating the 3-D structure. This good agreement also evidenced two different propagation modes in the valley: 2-D resonance in the Séchilienne basin and 1-D resonance in the external parts. This study underlines the interest of H/V curves for investigating complex basin structures.

  19. Coronary arteries motion modeling on 2D x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Sundar, Hari

    2012-02-01

    During interventional procedures, 3D imaging modalities like CT and MRI are not commonly used due to interference with the surgery and radiation exposure concerns. Therefore, real-time information is usually limited and building models of cardiac motion are difficult. In such case, vessel motion modeling based on 2-D angiography images become indispensable. Due to issues with existing vessel segmentation algorithms and the lack of contrast in occluded vessels, manual segmentation of certain branches is usually necessary. In addition, such occluded branches are the most important vessels during coronary interventions and obtaining motion models for these can greatly help in reducing the procedure time and radiation exposure. Segmenting different cardiac phases independently does not guarantee temporal consistency and is not efficient for occluded branches required manual segmentation. In this paper, we propose a coronary motion modeling system which extracts the coronary tree for every cardiac phase, maintaining the segmentation by tracking the coronary tree during the cardiac cycle. It is able to map every frame to the specific cardiac phase, thereby inferring the shape information of the coronary arteries using the model corresponding to its phase. Our experiments show that our motion modeling system can achieve promising results with real-time performance.

  20. Comparison of a 2D Photochemical Model to Data Using Statistical Trend Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor); Stolarski, Richard; Jackman, Charles; Fleming, Eric; Frith, Stacey Hollandsworth

    2002-01-01

    We have analyzed our 23-year merged ozone data set for variability and trends with a statistical time-series model. To assist in that analysis, we have analyzed the Goddard 2D photochemical model for the same time period with the same time-series model. Multiple runs of the photochemical model allow us to separate the effects of various terms on ozone, such as solar cycle and volcanic eruptions. We use this to help us separate those signals from each other in the data. We also used a smoothed version of the photochemical model's prediction of global ozone change in place of a simple linear trend. We find a number of interesting results. This particular photochemical model is more sensitive to chlorine perturbations than the atmosphere appears to be. It is less sensitive to solar cycle. It predicts an effect from the Pinatubo eruption that is nearly symmetric in the two hemispheres, but the data appears to have not responded to Pinatubo in the southern mid-latitudes. These results and their uncertainties will be discussed.

  1. Simulation of Ultra-Small MOSFETs Using a 2-D Quantum-Corrected Drift-Diffusion Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegal, Bryan A.; Rafferty, Connor S.; Yu, Zhiping; Ancona, Mario G.; Dutton, Robert W.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The continued down-scaling of electronic devices, in particular the commercially dominant MOSFET, will force a fundamental change in the process of new electronics technology development in the next five to ten years. The cost of developing new technology generations is soaring along with the price of new fabrication facilities, even as competitive pressure intensifies to bring this new technology to market faster than ever before. To reduce cost and time to market, device simulation must become a more fundamental, indeed dominant, part of the technology development cycle. In order to produce these benefits, simulation accuracy must improve markedly. At the same time, device physics will become more complex, with the rapid increase in various small-geometry and quantum effects. This work describes both an approach to device simulator development and a physical model which advance the effort to meet the tremendous electronic device simulation challenge described above. The device simulation approach is to specify the physical model at a high level to a general-purpose (but highly efficient) partial differential equation solver (in this case PROPHET, developed by Lucent Technologies), which then simulates the model in 1-D, 2-D, or 3-D for a specified device and test regime. This approach allows for the rapid investigation of a wide range of device models and effects, which is certainly essential for device simulation to catch up with, and then stay ahead of, electronic device technology of the present and future. The physical device model used in this work is the density-gradient (DG) quantum correction to the drift-diffusion model [Ancona, Phys. Rev. B 35(5), 7959 (1987)]. This model adds tunneling and quantum smoothing of carrier density profiles to the drift-diffusion model. We used the DG model in 1-D and 2-D (for the first time) to simulate both bipolar and unipolar devices. Simulations of heavily-doped, short-base diodes indicated that the DG quantum

  2. Surface delta interaction in the g7/2 - d5/2 model space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaofei; Zamick, Larry

    2016-05-01

    Using an attractive surface delta interaction we obtain wave functions for 2 neutrons (or neutron holes) in the g7/2 -d5/2 model space. If we take the single particle energies to be degenerate we find that the g factors for I = 2 , 4 and 6 are all the same G (J) =gl, the orbital g factor of the nucleon. For a free neutron gl = 0, so in this case all 2 particles or 2 holes' g factors are equal to zero. Only the orbital part of the g-factors contributes - the spin part cancels out. We then consider the effects of introducing a single energy splitting between the 2 orbits. We make a linear approximation for all other n values.

  3. Optical fiber poling by induction: analysis by 2D numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, F; Huang, D; Corbari, C; Healy, N; Sazio, P J A

    2016-04-15

    Since their first demonstration some 25 years ago, thermally poled silica fibers have been used to realize device functions such as electro-optic modulation, switching, polarization-entangled photons, and optical frequency conversion with a number of advantages over bulk free-space components. We have recently developed an innovative induction poling technique that could allow for the development of complex microstructured fiber geometries for highly efficient χ(2)-based device applications. To systematically implement these more advanced poled fiber designs, we report here the development of comprehensive numerical models of the induction poling mechanism itself via two-dimensional (2D) simulations of ion migration and space-charge region formation using finite element analysis. PMID:27082323

  4. Robust autonomous model learning from 2D and 3D data sets.

    PubMed

    Langs, Georg; Donner, René; Peloschek, Philipp; Bischof, Horst

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we propose a weakly supervised learning algorithm for appearance models based on the minimum description length (MDL) principle. From a set of training images or volumes depicting examples of an anatomical structure, correspondences for a set of landmarks are established by group-wise registration. The approach does not require any annotation. In contrast to existing methods no assumptions about the topology of the data are made, and the topology can change throughout the data set. Instead of a continuous representation of the volumes or images, only sparse finite sets of interest points are used to represent the examples during optimization. This enables the algorithm to efficiently use distinctive points, and to handle texture variations robustly. In contrast to standard elasticity based deformation constraints the MDL criterion accounts for systematic deformations typical for training sets stemming from medical image data. Experimental results are reported for five different 2D and 3D data sets. PMID:18051152

  5. Calibration Of 2D Hydraulic Inundation Models In The Floodplain Region Of The Lower Tagus River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestanana, R.; Matias, M.; Canelas, R.; Araujo, A.; Roque, D.; Van Zeller, E.; Trigo-Teixeira, A.; Ferreira, R.; Oliveira, R.; Heleno, S.

    2013-12-01

    In terms of inundated area, the largest floods in Portugal occur in the Lower Tagus River. On average, the river overflows every 2.5 years, at times blocking roads and causing important agricultural damages. This paper focus on the calibration of 2D-horizontal flood simulation models for the floods of 2001 and 2006 on a 70-km stretch of the Lower Tagus River. Flood extent maps, derived from ERS SAR and ENVISAT ASAR imagery were compared with the flood extent maps obtained for each simulation, to calibrate roughness coefficients. The combination of the calibration results from the 2001 and 2006 floods provided a preliminary Manning coefficient map of the study area.

  6. Numerical Simulations of 2-D Phase-Field Model with Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; McDonough, J. M.; Tagavi, K. A.

    2003-11-01

    We present a 2-D isotropic phase-field model with convection induced by a flow field applied to freezing into a supercooled melt of pure substance, nickle. Numerical procedures and details of numerical parameters employed are provided, and the convergence of the numerical method is demonstrated by conducting grid-function convergence tests. Dendrite structures, temperature fields, pressure fields, streamlines and velocity vector fields are presented at several different times during the dendrite growth process. Comparisons of dendrites and temperature fields with and without convection indicate that the flow field has a significant effect on the growth rate of the dendrites; in particular, it inhibits the growth. In addition, the flow field influences the dendritic structural morphologies and thickness of the interface. Moreover, the dendrites behave as a solid body in the flow leading to stagnation points and other interesting flow features.

  7. Models Ion Trajectories in 2D and 3D Electrostatic and Magnetic Fields

    2000-02-21

    SIMION3D7.0REV is a C based ion optics simulation program that can model complex problems using Laplace equation solutions for potential fields. The program uses an ion optics workbench that can hold up to 200 2D and/or 3D electrostatic/magnetic potential arrays. Arrays can have up to 50,000,000 points. SIMION3D7.0''s 32 bit virtual Graphics User Interface provides a highly interactive advanced user environment. All potential arrays are visualized as 3D objects that the user can cut awaymore » to inspect ion trajectories and potential energy surfaces. User programs allow the user to customize the program for specific simulations. A geometry file option supports the definition of highly complex array geometry. Algorithm modifications have improved this version''s computational speed and accuracy.« less

  8. An application of the distributed hydrologic model CASC2D to a tropical montane watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsik, Matt; Waylen, Peter

    2006-11-01

    SummaryIncreased stormflow in the Quebrada Estero watershed (2.5 km 2), in the northwestern Central Valley tectonic depression of Costa Rica, reportedly has caused flooding of the city of San Ramón in recent decades. Although scientifically untested, urban expansion was deemed the cause and remedial measures were recommended by the Programa de Investigación en Desarrollo Humano Sostenible (ProDUS). CASC2D, a physically-based, spatially explicit hydrologic model, was constructed and calibrated to a June 10th 2002 storm that delivered 110.5 mm of precipitation in 4.5 h visibly exceeded the bankfull stage (0.9 m) of the Quebrada flooding portions of San Ramón. The calibrated hydrograph showed a peak discharge 16.68% (2.5 m 3 s -1) higher, an above flood stage duration 20% shorter, and time to peak discharge 11 min later than the same observed discharge hydrograph characteristics. Simulations of changing land cover conditions from 1979 to 1999 showed an increase also in the peak discharge, above flood stage duration, and time to peak discharge. Analysis using a modified location quotient identified increased urbanization in lower portions of the watershed over the time period studied. These results suggest that increased urbanization in the Quebrada Estero watershed have increased flooding peaks, and durations above threshold, confirming the ProDUS report. These results and the CASC2D model offer an easy-to-use, pragmatic planning tool for policymakers in San Ramón to assess future development scenarios and their potential flooding impacts to San Ramón.

  9. Graded Poisson-sigma models and dilaton-deformed 2D supergravity algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamin, Luzi; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2003-05-01

    Supergravity extensions of generic 2d gravity theories obtained from the graded Poisson-Sigma model (gPSM) approach show a large degree of ambiguity. On the other hand, obstructions may reduce the allowed range of fields as given by the bosonic theory, or even prohibit any extension in certain cases. In our present work we relate the finite W-algebras inherent in the gPSM algebra of constraints to supergravity algebras (Neuveu-Schwarz or Ramond algebras resp.), deformed by the presence of the dilaton field. With very straightforward and natural assumptions on them - like the one linking the anti-commutator of certain fermionic charges to the Hamiltonian constraint without deformation - we are able not only to remove the ambiguities but, at the same time, the singularities referred to above. Thus all especially interesting bosonic models (spherically reduced gravity, the Jackiw-Teitelboim model etc.) under these conditions possess a unique fermionic extension and are free from new singularities. The superspace supergravity model of Howe is found as a special case of this supergravity action. For this class of models the relation between bosonic potential and prepotential does not introduce obstructions as well.

  10. Spin Circuit Model for 2D Channels with Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokmin; Sayed, Shehrin; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a general theory for an arbitrary 2D channel with “spin momentum locking” due to spin-orbit coupling. It is based on a semiclassical model that classifies all the channel electronic states into four groups based on the sign of the z-component of the spin (up (U), down (D)) and the sign of the x-component of the velocity (+, -). This could be viewed as an extension of the standard spin diffusion model which uses two separate electrochemical potentials for U and D states. Our model uses four: U+, D+, U-, and D-. We use this formulation to develop an equivalent spin circuit that is also benchmarked against a full non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) model. The circuit representation can be used to interpret experiments and estimate important quantities of interest like the charge to spin conversion ratio or the maximum spin current that can be extracted. The model should be applicable to topological insulator surface states with parallel channels as well as to other layered structures with interfacial spin-orbit coupling.

  11. Spin Circuit Model for 2D Channels with Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seokmin; Sayed, Shehrin; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a general theory for an arbitrary 2D channel with "spin momentum locking" due to spin-orbit coupling. It is based on a semiclassical model that classifies all the channel electronic states into four groups based on the sign of the z-component of the spin (up (U), down (D)) and the sign of the x-component of the velocity (+, -). This could be viewed as an extension of the standard spin diffusion model which uses two separate electrochemical potentials for U and D states. Our model uses four: U+, D+, U-, and D-. We use this formulation to develop an equivalent spin circuit that is also benchmarked against a full non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) model. The circuit representation can be used to interpret experiments and estimate important quantities of interest like the charge to spin conversion ratio or the maximum spin current that can be extracted. The model should be applicable to topological insulator surface states with parallel channels as well as to other layered structures with interfacial spin-orbit coupling.

  12. Spin Circuit Model for 2D Channels with Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seokmin; Sayed, Shehrin; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a general theory for an arbitrary 2D channel with "spin momentum locking" due to spin-orbit coupling. It is based on a semiclassical model that classifies all the channel electronic states into four groups based on the sign of the z-component of the spin (up (U), down (D)) and the sign of the x-component of the velocity (+, -). This could be viewed as an extension of the standard spin diffusion model which uses two separate electrochemical potentials for U and D states. Our model uses four: U+, D+, U-, and D-. We use this formulation to develop an equivalent spin circuit that is also benchmarked against a full non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) model. The circuit representation can be used to interpret experiments and estimate important quantities of interest like the charge to spin conversion ratio or the maximum spin current that can be extracted. The model should be applicable to topological insulator surface states with parallel channels as well as to other layered structures with interfacial spin-orbit coupling. PMID:26932563

  13. Field Evaluation of a Novel 2D Preferential Flow Snowpack Hydrology Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, N.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Kinar, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate estimation of snowmelt flux is of primary importance for runoff hydrograph prediction, which is used for water management and flood forecasting. Lateral flows and preferential flow pathways in porous media flow have proven critical for improving soil and groundwater flow models, but though many physically-based layered snowmelt models have been developed, only 1D matrix flow is accounted for in these models. Therefore, there is a need for snowmelt models that include these processes so as to examine the potential to improve snowmelt hydrological modelling. A 2D model is proposed that enables an improved understanding of energy and water flows within deep heterogeneous snowpacks, including those on slopes. A dual pathway theory is presented that simulates the formation of preferential flow paths, vertical and lateral water flows through the snow matrix and flow fingers, internal energy fluxes, melt, wet snow metamorphism, and internal refreezing. The dual pathway model utilizes an explicit finite volume method to solve for the energy and water flux equations over a non-orthogonal grid. It was run and evaluated using in-situ data collected from snowpit - accessed gravimetric, thermometric, photographic, and dielectric observations and novel non-invasive acoustic observations of layering, temperature, flowpath geometry, density and wetness at the Fortress Mountain Snow Laboratory, Alberta, Canada. The melt of a natural snowpack was artificially generated after detailed observation of snowpack initial conditions such as snow layer properties, temperature, and liquid water content. Snowpack ablation and liquid water content distribution over time were then measured and used for model parameterization and validation. Energy available at the snow surface and soil slope angle were set as mondel inputs. Model verification was based on snowpack property evolution. The heterogeneous flow model can be an important tool to help understand snowmelt flow processes, how

  14. Extreme Floods and Probability Estimates for Dams: A 2D Distributed Model and Paleoflood Data Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    Estimates of extreme floods and probabilities are needed in dam safety risk analysis. A multidisciplinary approach was developed to estimate extreme floods that integrated four main elements: radar hydrometeorology, stochastic storm transposition, paleoflood data, and 2d distributed rainfall-runoff modeling. The research focused on developing and applying a two-dimensional, distributed model to simulate extreme floods on the 12,000 km2 Arkansas River above Pueblo, Colorado with return periods up to 10,000 years. The four objectives were to: (1) develop a two-dimensional model suitable for large watersheds (area greater than 2,500 km2); (2) calibrate and validate the model to the June 1921 and May 1894 floods on the Arkansas River; (3) develop a flood frequency curve with the model using the stochastic storm transposition technique; and (4) conduct a sensitivity analysis for initial soil saturation, storm duration and area, and compare the flood frequency curve with gage and paleoflood data. The Two-dimensional Runoff, Erosion and EXport (TREX) model was developed as part of this research. Basin-average rainfall depths and probabilities were estimated using DAD data and stochastic storm transposition with elliptical storms for input to TREX. From these extreme rainstorms, the TREX model was used to estimate a flood frequency curve for this large watershed. Model-generated peak flows were as large as 90,000 to 282,000 ft3/s at Pueblo for 100- to 10,000-year return periods, respectively. Model-generated frequency curves were generally comparable to peak flow and paleoflood data-based frequency curves after radar-based storm location and area limits were applied. The model provides a unique physically-based method for determining flood frequency curves under varied scenarios of antecedent moisture conditions, space and time variability of rainfall and watershed characteristics, and storm center locations.

  15. Vortical and nonlinear effects in the roll motion of a 2-D body in the free surface investigated by SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmez, O.; Ozbulut, M.; Yildiz, M.; Goren, O.

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigates the vortical and nonlinear effects in the roll motion of a 2-D body with square cross-sections by using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). A 2-D rigid body with square cross-section is taken into account for the benchmark study and subjected to the oscillatory roll motion with a given angular frequency. The governing equations are continuity equation and Euler's equation with artificial viscosity term. Weakly Compressible SPH (WCSPH) scheme is employed for the discretization of the governing equations. Velocities of the fluid particles are updated by means of XSPH+Artificial Particle Displacement (VXSPH+APD) algorithm. In this method only the free surface fluid particles are subjected to VXSPH algorithm while the APD algorithm is employed for the fully populated flow regions. The hybrid usage of numerical treatment keeps free surface particles together by creating an artificial surface tension on the free surface. VXSPH+APD is a proven numerical treatment to provide the most accurate results for this type of free surface flows (Ozbulut et al. 2014). The results of the present study are compared with those of the experimental studies as well as with those of the numerical methods obtained from the current literature.

  16. A new model for two-dimensional numerical simulation of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Zhang, Yongmin

    2013-10-11

    Pseudo-two dimensional (pseudo-2D) fluidized beds, for which the thickness of the system is much smaller than the other two dimensions, is widely used to perform fundamental studies on bubble behavior, solids mixing, or clustering phenomenon in different gas-solids fluidization systems. The abundant data from such experimental systems are very useful for numerical model development and validation. However, it has been reported that two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds usually predict poor quantitative agreement with the experimental data, especially for the solids velocity field. In this paper, a new model is proposed to improve the 2D numerical simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds by properly accounting for the frictional effect of the front and back walls. Two previously reported pseudo-2D experimental systems were simulated with this model. Compared to the traditional 2D simulations, significant improvements in the numerical predictions have been observed and the predicted results are in better agreement with the available experimental data.

  17. 2-D Finite Difference Modeling of the D'' Structure Beneath the Eastern Cocos Plate: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, D. V.; Song, T. A.; Sun, D.

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of phase transition from Perovskite (Pv) to Post-Perovskite (PPv) at depth nears the lowermost mantle has revealed a new view of the earth's D'' layer (Oganov et al. 2004; Murakami et al. 2004). Hernlund et al. (2004) recently pusposed that, depending on the geotherm at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), a double-crossing of the phase boundary by the geotherm at two different depths may also occur. To explore these new findings, we adopt 2-D finite difference scheme (Helmberger and Vidale, 1988) to model wave propagation in rapidly varying structure. We collect broadband waveform data recorded by several Passcal experiments, such as La Ristra transect and CDROM transect in the southwest US to constrain the lateral variations in D'' structure. These data provide fairly dense sampling (~ 20 km) in the lowermost mantle beneath the eastern Cocos plate. Since the source-receiver paths are mostly in the same azimuth, we make 2-D cross-sections from global tomography model (Grand, 2002) and compute finite difference synthetics. We modify the lowermost mantle below 2500 km with constraints from transverse-component waveform data at epicentral distances of 70-82 degrees in the time window between S and ScS, essentially foward modeling waveforms. Assuming a velocity jump of 3 % at D'', our preferred model shows that the D'' topography deepens from the north to the south by about 120 km over a lateral distance of 300 km. Such large topography jumps have been proposed by Thomas et al. (2004) using data recorded by TriNet. In addition, there is a negative velocity jump (-3 %) 100 km above the CMB in the south. This simple model compare favorably with results from a study by Sun, Song and Helmberger (2005), who follow Sidorin et al. (1999) approach and produce a thermodynamically consistent velocity model with Pv-PPv phase boundary. It appears that much of this complexity exists in Grand's tomographic maps with rapid variation in velocities just above the D''. We also

  18. Assessment of Flood Mitigation Solutions Using a Hydrological Model and Refined 2D Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuat Duy, B.; Archambeau, P.; Dewals, B. J.; Erpicum, S.; Pirotton, M.

    2009-04-01

    Following recurrent inundation problems on the Berwinne catchment, in Belgium, a combined hydrologic and hydrodynamic study has been carried out in order to find adequate solutions for the floods mitigation. Thanks to detailed 2D simulations, the effectiveness of the solutions can be assessed not only in terms of discharge and height reductions in the river, but also with other aspects such as the inundated surfaces reduction and the decrease of inundated buildings and roads. The study is carried out in successive phases. First, the hydrological runoffs are generated using a physically based and spatially distributed multi-layer model solving depth-integrated equations for overland flow, subsurface flow and baseflow. Real floods events are simulated using rainfall series collected at 8 stations (over 20 years of available data). The hydrological inputs are routed through the river network (and through the sewage network if relevant) with the 1D component of the modelling system, which solves the Saint-Venant equations for both free-surface and pressurized flows in a unified way. On the main part of the river, the measured river cross-sections are included in the modelling, and existing structures along the river (such as bridges, sluices or pipes) are modelled explicitely with specific cross sections. Two gauging stations with over 15 years of continuous measurements allow the calibration of both the hydrologic and hydrodynamic models. Second, the flood mitigation solutions are tested in the simulations in the case of an extreme flooding event, and their effects are assessed using detailed 2D simulations on a few selected sensitive areas. The digital elevation model comes from an airborne laser survey with a spatial resolution of 1 point per square metre and is completed in the river bed with a bathymetry interpolated from cross-section data. The upstream discharge is extracted from the 1D simulation for the selected rainfall event. The study carried out with this

  19. A model for smooth viewing and navigation of large 2D information spaces.

    PubMed

    van Wijk, Jarke J; Nuij, Wim A A

    2004-01-01

    Large 2D information spaces, such as maps, images, or abstract visualizations, require views at various level of detail: close ups to inspect details, overviews to maintain (literally) an overview. Users often change their view during a session. Smooth animations enable the user to maintain an overview during interactive viewing and to understand the context of separate views. We present a generic model to handle smooth image viewing. The core of the model is a metric on the effect of simultaneous zooming and panning, based on an estimate of the perceived velocity. Using this metric, solutions for various problems are derived, such as the optimal animation between two views, automatic zooming, and the parametrization of arbitrary camera paths. Optimal is defined here as smooth and efficient. Solutions are based on the shortest paths of a virtual camera, given the metric. The model has two free parameters: animation speed and zoom/pan trade off. A user experiment to find good values for these is described. Finally, it is shown how the model can be extended to deal also with rotation and nonuniform scaling. PMID:18579972

  20. Distributed and coupled 2D electro-thermal model of power semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, Ghania; Lefebvre, Stéphane; Joubert, Pierre-Yves; Bouarroudj-Berkani, Mounira; Labrousse, Denis; Rostaing, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    The development of power electronics in the field of transportations (automotive, aeronautics) requires the use of power semiconductor devices providing protection and diagnostic functions. In the case of series protections power semiconductor devices which provide protection may operate in shortcircuit and act as a current limiting device. This mode of operations is very constraining due to the large dissipation of power. In these particular conditions of operation, electro-thermal models of power semiconductor devices are of key importance in order to optimize their thermal design and increase their reliability. The development of such an electro-thermal model for power MOSFET transistors based on the coupling between two computation softwares (Matlab and Cast3M) is described in this paper. The 2D electro-thermal model is able to predict (i) the temperature distribution on chip surface well as in the volume under short-circuit operations, (ii) the effect of the temperature on the distribution of the current flowing within the die and (iii) the effects of the ageing of the metallization layer on the current density and the temperature. In this paper, the electrical and thermal models are described as well as the implemented coupling scheme.

  1. LBQ2D, Extending the Line Broadened Quasilinear Model to TAE-EP Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Berk, Herbert

    2012-10-01

    The line broadened quasilinear model was proposed and tested on the one dimensional electrostatic case of the bump on tailfootnotetextH.L Berk, B. Breizman and J. Fitzpatrick, Nucl. Fusion, 35:1661, 1995 to study the wave particle interaction. In conventional quasilinear theory, the sea of overlapping modes evolve with time as the particle distribution function self consistently undergo diffusion in phase space. The line broadened quasilinear model is an extension to the conventional theory in a way that allows treatment of isolated modes as well as overlapping modes by broadening the resonant line in phase space. This makes it possible to treat the evolution of modes self consistently from onset to saturation in either case. We describe here the model denoted by LBQ2D which is an extension of the proposed one dimensional line broadened quasilinear model to the case of TAEs interacting with energetic particles in two dimensional phase space, energy as well as canonical angular momentum. We study the saturation of isolated modes in various regimes and present the analytical derivation and numerical results. Finally, we present, using ITER parameters, the case where multiple modes overlap and describe the techniques used for the numerical treatment.

  2. Study on the human perception of incipient and overall slippages using a 2D FE fingertip model.

    PubMed

    Zhongkui Wang; Chathuranga, Damith Suresh; Hirai, Shinichi

    2015-08-01

    Slippage on the fingertips is an important phenomenon that occurs constantly in our daily life. However, the mechanism behind the slippage, especially incipient slippage, which appears prior to overall slippage, has not been fully understood. In this paper, a 2D finite element (FE) model of the human fingertip was presented to study how the human fingertip perceives slippages. The 2D geometries of the fingertip were generated based on magnetic resonance (MR) images. The fingertip model consisted of four layers: epidermis, dermis, subcutaneous tissue, and distal phalanx. The microstructures of the intermediate and limiting ridges in between the epidermis and dermis layers were manually constructed to locate four types of mechanoreceptors. Simulations of pushing and sliding motions were implemented, and mechanical measures of the acceleration and strain energy density (SED) were investigated at the locations of the mechanoreceptors. We found that both incipient and overall slippages could be clearly detected using the acceleration signal captured by the FA-I and SA-I receptors. The SED measurement does not provide useful information for the slippage detection. PMID:26737602

  3. AC Loss Calculation of REBCO Cables by the Combination of Electric Circuit Model and 2D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noji, H.

    This study investigates the losses in a two conducting-layer REBCO cable fabricated by researchers at Furukawa Electric Co. Ltd. The losses were calculated using a combination of my electric circuit (EC) model with a two-dimensional finite element method (2D FEM). The helical pitches of the tapes in each layer, P1 and P2, were adjusted to equalize the current in both cable layers, although the loss calculation assumed infinite helical pitches and the same current in each layer at first. The results showed that the losses depended on the relative tape-position angle between the layers (θ/θ'), because the vertical field between adjacent tapes in the same layer varied with θ/θ'. When simulating the real cable, the helical pitches were adjusted and the layer currents were calculated by the EC model. These currents were input to the 2D FEM to compute the losses. The losses changed along the cable length because the difference between P1 and P2 altered the θ/θ' along this direction. The average angle-dependent and position-dependent losses were equal and closely approximated the measured losses. As an example to reduce the loss in this cable, the angle and the helical pitches were fixed at θ/θ' = 0.5 and P1 = P2 = 100 mm (S-direction). The calculation with these conditions indicated that the loss is about one order of magnitude lower than the measurement.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Oxidized 2D C/SiC Composites in Air Environments Below 900 °C: Microstructure and Elastic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhigang; Chen, Xihui; Shao, Hongyan; Song, Yingdong

    2016-08-01

    A numerical model is presented for simulation of the oxidation-affected behaviors of two dimensional carbon fiber-reinforced silcon carbide matrix composite (2D C/SiC) exposed to air oxidizing environments below 900 °C, which incorporates the modeling of oxidized microstructure and computing of degraded elastic properties. This model is based upon the analysis of the representative volume cell (RVC) of the composite. The multi-scale model of 2D C/SiC composites is concerned in the present study. Analysis results of such a composite can provide a guideline for the real 2D C/SiC composite. The micro-structure during oxidation process is firstly modeled in the RVC. The elastic moduli of oxidized composite under non-stress oxidation environment is computed by finite element analysis. The elastic properties of 2D-C/SiC composites in air oxidizing environment are evaluated and validated in comparison to experimental data. The oxidation time, temperature and fiber volume fractions of C/SiC composite are investigated to show their influences upon the elastic properties of 2D C/SiC composites.

  5. Insights into the growth of bismuth nanoparticles on 2D structured BiOCl photocatalysts: an in situ TEM investigation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Shuangbao; Qi, Qi; Gondal, Mohammed A; Rashid, Siddique G; Gao, Si; Yang, Deyuan; Shen, Kai; Xu, Qingyu; Wang, Peng

    2015-09-28

    The synthetic techniques for novel photocatalytic crystals had evolved by a trial-and-error process that spanned more than two decades, and an insight into the photocatalytic crystal growth process is a challenging area and prerequisite for achieving an excellent photoactivity. Bismuth nanoparticle based hybrids, such as Bi/BiOCl composites, have recently been investigated as highly efficient photocatalytic systems because of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of nanostructured bismuth. In this work, the observation towards the formation and growth of bismuth nanoparticles onto 2D structured BiOCl photocatalysts has been performed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) directly in real time. The growth of bismuth nanoparticles on BiOCl nanosheets can be emulated and speeded up driven by the electron beam (e(-) beam) in TEM. The crystallinity, growth and the elemental evolution during the formation of bismuth nanoparticles have also been probed in this work.

  6. 2D- and 3D SIMS investigations on hot-pressed steel powder HS 6-5-3-8.

    PubMed

    Rosner, M; Pöckl, G; Danninger, H; Hutter, H

    2002-10-01

    Processing of steel with powder metallurgical methods such as sintering or hot-pressing have proven to be a powerful tool for the production of industrial parts and for components in the automotive industry. Series of steel-powders (HS 6-5-3-8) produced by gas atomization has been hot-pressed in a graphite tube at temperatures from 820 degrees C to 1050 degrees C. The samples have been characterized with a Secondary Electron Microscope (SEM) due to their porosity and then investigated with 2D- and 3D- SIMS. The spatial distribution of the non-metallic impurities and the covering oxide layer of the single particles has been traced dependent to the pressing temperature. Powders pressed at temperatures higher than 880 degrees C exhibited different precipitation behavior of the impurities and an excessive loss of the covering oxide layer of the single powder particles.

  7. Doubled CO2 Effects on NO(y) in a Coupled 2D Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, J. E.; Douglass, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in temperature and ozone have been the main focus of studies of the stratospheric impact of doubled CO2. Increased CO2 is expected to cool the stratosphere, which will result in increases in stratospheric ozone through temperature dependent loss rates. Less attention has been paid to changes in minor constituents which affect the O3 balance and which may provide additional feedbacks. Stratospheric NO(y) fields calculated using the GSFC 2D interactive chemistry-radiation-dynamics model show significant sensitivity to the model CO2. Modeled upper stratospheric NO(y) decreases by about 15% in response to CO2 doubling, mainly due to the temperature decrease calculated to result from increased cooling. The abundance of atomic nitrogen, N, increases because the rate of the strongly temperature dependent reaction N + O2 yields NO + O decreases at lower temperatures. Increased N leads to an increase in the loss of NO(y) which is controlled by the reaction N + NO yields N2 + O. The NO(y) reduction is shown to be sensitive to the NO photolysis rate. The decrease in the O3 loss rate due to the NO(y) changes is significant when compared to the decrease in the O3 loss rate due to the temperature changes.

  8. Field-induced magnetization jumps and quantum criticality in the 2D J-Q model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaizzi, Adam; Sandvik, Anders

    The J-Q model is a `designer hamiltonian' formed by adding a four spin `Q' term to the standard antiferromagnetic S = 1 / 2 Heisenberg model. The Q term drives a quantum phase transition to a valence-bond solid (VBS) state: a non-magnetic state with a pattern of local singlets which breaks lattice symmetries. The elementary excitations of the VBS are triplons, i.e. gapped S=1 quasiparticles. There is considerable interest in the quantum phase transition between the Néel and VBS states as an example of deconfined quantum criticality. Near the phase boundary, triplons deconfine into pairs of bosonic spin-1/2 excitations known as spinons. Using exact diagonalization and the stochastic series expansion quantum monte carlo method, we study the 2D J-Q model in the presence of an external magnetic field. We use the field to force a nonzero density of magnetic excitations at T=0 and look for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation of spinons. At higher magnetic fields, there is a jump in the induced magnetization caused by the onset of an effective attractive interaction between magnons on a ferromagnetic background. We characterize the first order quantum phase transition and determine the minimum value of the coupling ratio q ≡ Q / J required to produce this jump. Funded by NSF DMR-1410126.

  9. 1-D and 2-D modeling of U-Ti alloy response in impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, B.; Favorsky, V.; Landau, A.; Shvarts, D.; Zaretsky, E. B.

    2003-09-01

    Dynamie response of a U-0.75wt%Ti alloy bas been studied in planar (disk-on-disk), reverse (disk-on-rod) and symmetric (rod-on-rod) ballistic impact experiments performed with a 25 mm light-gas gun. The impact velocities ranged between 100 and 500 m/see and the samples were softly recovered for further examination, revealing different degrees of spall fracture (planar impact) and of adiabatic shear bands (ballistic experiments). The back (planar experiments) and the lateral (ballistic experiments) surface velocities were continuously monitored by VISAR. The velocity profiles and the damage maps were simulated using a 2-D AUTODYN^TM Lagrangian finite differences code. Simulations of the planar experiments were performed with special attention to the compressive path of the loading cycle in order to calibrate a modified Steinberg-Cochran-Guinan (SCG) constitutive model. The Bauschinger effect and a single-parameter spall model were added to describe the unloading and tensile paths. The calibrated SCG model was then employed to simulate the ballistic experiments. An erosion AUTODYN built-in subroutine with a threshold value of plastic strain was chosen to describe the failure in the ballistic impact experiments. The results of the suggested experimental-numerical technique can be taken into account in estimating the different contributions to the shock-induced plastic deformation and failure.

  10. 2d Affine XY-Spin Model/4d Gauge Theory Duality and Deconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Anber, Mohamed M.; Poppitz, Erich; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /San Francisco State U.

    2012-08-16

    We introduce a duality between two-dimensional XY-spin models with symmetry-breaking perturbations and certain four-dimensional SU(2) and SU(2) = Z{sub 2} gauge theories, compactified on a small spatial circle R{sup 1,2} x S{sup 1}, and considered at temperatures near the deconfinement transition. In a Euclidean set up, the theory is defined on R{sup 2} x T{sup 2}. Similarly, thermal gauge theories of higher rank are dual to new families of 'affine' XY-spin models with perturbations. For rank two, these are related to models used to describe the melting of a 2d crystal with a triangular lattice. The connection is made through a multi-component electric-magnetic Coulomb gas representation for both systems. Perturbations in the spin system map to topological defects in the gauge theory, such as monopole-instantons or magnetic bions, and the vortices in the spin system map to the electrically charged W-bosons in field theory (or vice versa, depending on the duality frame). The duality permits one to use the two-dimensional technology of spin systems to study the thermal deconfinement and discrete chiral transitions in four-dimensional SU(N{sub c}) gauge theories with n{sub f} {ge} 1 adjoint Weyl fermions.

  11. Simulation of abrasive flow machining process for 2D and 3D mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Rupalika; Maity, Kalipada

    2015-12-01

    Improvement of surface finish and material removal has been quite a challenge in a finishing operation such as abrasive flow machining (AFM). Factors that affect the surface finish and material removal are media viscosity, extrusion pressure, piston velocity, and particle size in abrasive flow machining process. Performing experiments for all the parameters and accurately obtaining an optimized parameter in a short time are difficult to accomplish because the operation requires a precise finish. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was employed to accurately determine optimum parameters. In the current work, a 2D model was designed, and the flow analysis, force calculation, and material removal prediction were performed and compared with the available experimental data. Another 3D model for a swaging die finishing using AFM was simulated at different viscosities of the media to study the effects on the controlling parameters. A CFD simulation was performed by using commercially available ANSYS FLUENT. Two phases were considered for the flow analysis, and multiphase mixture model was taken into account. The fluid was considered to be a

  12. Automatic 3D high-fidelity traffic interchange modeling using 2D road GIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-03-01

    3D road models are widely used in many computer applications such as racing games and driving simulations. However, almost all high-fidelity 3D road models were generated manually by professional artists at the expense of intensive labor. There are very few existing methods for automatically generating 3D high-fidelity road networks, especially for those existing in the real world. Real road network contains various elements such as road segments, road intersections and traffic interchanges. Among them, traffic interchanges present the most challenges to model due to their complexity and the lack of height information (vertical position) of traffic interchanges in existing road GIS data. This paper proposes a novel approach that can automatically produce 3D high-fidelity road network models, including traffic interchange models, from real 2D road GIS data that mainly contain road centerline information. The proposed method consists of several steps. The raw road GIS data are first preprocessed to extract road network topology, merge redundant links, and classify road types. Then overlapped points in the interchanges are detected and their elevations are determined based on a set of level estimation rules. Parametric representations of the road centerlines are then generated through link segmentation and fitting, and they have the advantages of arbitrary levels of detail with reduced memory usage. Finally a set of civil engineering rules for road design (e.g., cross slope, superelevation) are selected and used to generate realistic road surfaces. In addition to traffic interchange modeling, the proposed method also applies to other more general road elements. Preliminary results show that the proposed method is highly effective and useful in many applications.

  13. Generalized Mechanistic Model for the Chemical Vapor Deposition of 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Govind Rajan, Ananth; Warner, Jamie H; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S

    2016-04-26

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) like molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) are layered materials capable of growth to one monolayer thickness via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Such CVD methods, while powerful, are notoriously difficult to extend across different reactor types and conditions, with subtle variations often confounding reproducibility, particularly for 2D TMD growth. In this work, we formulate the first generalized TMD synthetic theory by constructing a thermodynamic and kinetic growth mechanism linked to CVD reactor parameters that is predictive of specific geometric shape, size, and aspect ratio from triangular to hexagonal growth, depending on specific CVD reactor conditions. We validate our model using experimental data from Wang et al. (Chem. Mater. 2014, 26, 6371-6379) that demonstrate the systemic evolution of MoS2 morphology down the length of a flow CVD reactor where variations in gas phase concentrations can be accurately estimated using a transport model (CSulfur = 9-965 μmol/m(3); CMoO3 = 15-16 mmol/m(3)) under otherwise isothermal conditions (700 °C). A stochastic model which utilizes a site-dependent activation energy barrier based on the intrinsic TMD bond energies and a series of Evans-Polanyi relations leads to remarkable, quantitative agreement with both shape and size evolution along the reactor. The model is shown to extend to the growth of WS2 at 800 °C and MoS2 under varied process conditions. Finally, a simplified theory is developed to translate the model into a "kinetic phase diagram" of the growth process. The predictive capability of this model and its extension to other TMD systems promise to significantly increase the controlled synthesis of such materials. PMID:26937889

  14. On the assimilation of SWOT type data into 2D shallow-water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frédéric, Couderc; Denis, Dartus; Pierre-André, Garambois; Ronan, Madec; Jérôme, Monnier; Jean-Paul, Villa

    2013-04-01

    In river hydraulics, assimilation of water level measurements at gauging stations is well controlled, while assimilation of images is still delicate. In the present talk, we address the richness of satellite mapped information to constrain a 2D shallow-water model, but also related difficulties. 2D shallow models may be necessary for small scale modelling in particular for low-water and flood plain flows. Since in both cases, the dynamics of the wet-dry front is essential, one has to elaborate robust and accurate solvers. In this contribution we introduce robust second order, stable finite volume scheme [CoMaMoViDaLa]. Comparisons of real like tests cases with more classical solvers highlight the importance of an accurate flood plain modelling. A preliminary inverse study is presented in a flood plain flow case, [LaMo] [HoLaMoPu]. As a first step, a 0th order data processing model improves observation operator and produces more reliable water level derived from rough measurements [PuRa]. Then, both model and flow behaviours can be better understood thanks to variational sensitivities based on a gradient computation and adjoint equations. It can reveal several difficulties that a model designer has to tackle. Next, a 4D-Var data assimilation algorithm used with spatialized data leads to improved model calibration and potentially leads to identify river discharges. All the algorithms are implemented into DassFlow software (Fortran, MPI, adjoint) [Da]. All these results and experiments (accurate wet-dry front dynamics, sensitivities analysis, identification of discharges and calibration of model) are currently performed in view to use data from the future SWOT mission. [CoMaMoViDaLa] F. Couderc, R. Madec, J. Monnier, J.-P. Vila, D. Dartus, K. Larnier. "Sensitivity analysis and variational data assimilation for geophysical shallow water flows". Submitted. [Da] DassFlow - Data Assimilation for Free Surface Flows. Computational software http

  15. 2D spectral element modeling of GPR wave propagation in inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei, Sajad; Oskooi, Behrooz; Amini, Navid; Dalkhani, Amin Rahimi

    2016-10-01

    We present a spectral element method, for simulation of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) in two dimensions. The technique is based upon a weak formulation of the equations of Maxwell and combines the flexibility of the elemental-based methods with the accuracy of the spectral based methods. The wave field on the elements is discretized using high-degree Lagrange interpolation and integration over an element is accomplished based upon the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre integration rule. As a result, the mass matrix and the damping matrix are always diagonal, which drastically reduces the computational cost. We first develop the formulation of 2D spectral element method (SEM) in the time-domain based on Maxwell's equations. The presented formulation is with matrix notation that simplifies the implementation of the relations in computer programs, especially in MATLAB application. We discuss the differences between spectral element method and finite-element method in the time-domain. Also, we show that the SEM numerical dispersion is much lower than FEM. To absorb waves at the edges of the modeling domain, we implement first order Clayton and Engquist absorbing boundary conditions (CE-ABC) introduced in numerical finite-difference modeling of seismic wave propagation. We used the SEM to simulate a complex model to show its abilities and limitations. As well as, one distinct advantage of SEM is that we can easily define our model features in nodal points, because the integration points and the interpolation points are similar that makes it very flexible in simulation of complex models.

  16. A friction to flow constitutive law and its application to a 2-D modeling of earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Noda, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-01

    Establishment of a constitutive law from friction to high-temperature plastic flow has long been a challenging task for solving problems such as modeling earthquakes and plate interactions. Here we propose an empirical constitutive law that describes this transitional behavior using only friction and flow parameters, with good agreements with experimental data on halite shear zones. The law predicts steady state and transient behaviors, including the dependence of the shear resistance of fault on slip rate, effective normal stress, and temperature. It also predicts a change in velocity weakening to velocity strengthening with increasing temperature, similar to the changes recognized for quartz and granite gouge under hydrothermal conditions. A slight deviation from the steady state friction law due to the involvement of plastic deformation can cause a large change in the velocity dependence. We solved seismic cycles of a fault across the lithosphere with the law using a 2-D spectral boundary integral equation method, revealing dynamic rupture extending into the aseismic zone and rich evolution of interseismic creep including slow slip prior to earthquakes. Seismic slip followed by creep is consistent with natural pseudotachylytes overprinted with mylonitic deformation. Overall fault behaviors during earthquake cycles are insensitive to transient flow parameters. The friction-to-flow law merges "Christmas tree" strength profiles of the lithosphere and rate dependency fault models used for earthquake modeling on a unified basis. Strength profiles were drawn assuming a strain rate for the flow regime, but we emphasize that stress distribution evolves reflecting the fault behavior. A fault zone model was updated based on the earthquake modeling.

  17. Optimal implicit 2-D finite differences to model wave propagation in poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzá, Reymundo; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2016-08-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous reservoir rocks is an important tool for the interpretation of seismic surveys in reservoir engineering. We apply globally optimal implicit staggered-grid finite differences (FD) to model 2-D wave propagation in heterogeneous poroelastic media at a low-frequency range (<10 kHz). We validate the numerical solution by comparing it to an analytical-transient solution obtaining clear seismic wavefields including fast P and slow P and S waves (for a porous media saturated with fluid). The numerical dispersion and stability conditions are derived using von Neumann analysis, showing that over a wide range of porous materials the Courant condition governs the stability and this optimal implicit scheme improves the stability of explicit schemes. High-order explicit FD can be replaced by some lower order optimal implicit FD so computational cost will not be as expensive while maintaining the accuracy. Here, we compute weights for the optimal implicit FD scheme to attain an accuracy of γ = 10-8. The implicit spatial differentiation involves solving tridiagonal linear systems of equations through Thomas' algorithm.

  18. Beyond Flood Hazard Maps: Detailed Flood Characterization with Remote Sensing, GIS and 2d Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, J. R.; Marqueso, J. T.; Makinano-Santillan, M.; Serviano, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    Flooding is considered to be one of the most destructive among many natural disasters such that understanding floods and assessing the risks associated to it are becoming more important nowadays. In the Philippines, Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) are two main technologies used in the nationwide modelling and mapping of flood hazards. Although the currently available high resolution flood hazard maps have become very valuable, their use for flood preparedness and mitigation can be maximized by enhancing the layers of information these maps portrays. In this paper, we present an approach based on RS, GIS and two-dimensional (2D) flood modelling to generate new flood layers (in addition to the usual flood depths and hazard layers) that are also very useful in flood disaster management such as flood arrival times, flood velocities, flood duration, flood recession times, and the percentage within a given flood event period a particular location is inundated. The availability of these new layers of flood information are crucial for better decision making before, during, and after occurrence of a flood disaster. The generation of these new flood characteristic layers is illustrated using the Cabadbaran River Basin in Mindanao, Philippines as case study area. It is envisioned that these detailed maps can be considered as additional inputs in flood disaster risk reduction and management in the Philippines.

  19. Basic Brackets of a 2D Model for the Hodge Theory Without its Canonical Conjugate Momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Gupta, S.; Malik, R. P.

    2016-06-01

    We deduce the canonical brackets for a two (1+1)-dimensional (2D) free Abelian 1-form gauge theory by exploiting the beauty and strength of the continuous symmetries of a Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) invariant Lagrangian density that respects, in totality, six continuous symmetries. These symmetries entail upon this model to become a field theoretic example of Hodge theory. Taken together, these symmetries enforce the existence of exactly the same canonical brackets amongst the creation and annihilation operators that are found to exist within the standard canonical quantization scheme. These creation and annihilation operators appear in the normal mode expansion of the basic fields of this theory. In other words, we provide an alternative to the canonical method of quantization for our present model of Hodge theory where the continuous internal symmetries play a decisive role. We conjecture that our method of quantization is valid for a class of field theories that are tractable physical examples for the Hodge theory. This statement is true in any arbitrary dimension of spacetime.

  20. Directional adaptive deformable models for segmentation with application to 2D and 3D medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougon, Nicolas F.; Preteux, Francoise J.

    1993-09-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of adapting the functions controlling the material properties of 2D snakes, and show how introducing oriented smoothness constraints results in a novel class of active contour models for segmentation which extends standard isotropic inhomogeneous membrane/thin-plate stabilizers. These constraints, expressed as adaptive L2 matrix norms, are defined by two 2nd-order symmetric and positive definite tensors which are invariant with respect to rigid motions in the image plane. These tensors, equivalent to directional adaptive stretching and bending densities, are quadratic with respect to 1st- and 2nd-order derivatives of the image intensity, respectively. A representation theorem specifying their canonical form is established and a geometrical interpretation of their effects if developed. Within this framework, it is shown that, by achieving a directional control of regularization, such non-isotropic constraints consistently relate the differential properties (metric and curvature) of the deformable model with those of the underlying intensity surface, yielding a satisfying preservation of image contour characteristics.

  1. Optimal implicit 2-D finite differences to model wave propagation in poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzá, Reymundo; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous reservoir rocks is an important tool for the interpretation of seismic surveys in reservoir engineering. We apply globally optimal implicit staggered-grid finite-differences to model 2-D wave propagation in heterogeneous poroelastic media at a low-frequency range (<10kHz). We validate the numerical solution by comparing it to an analytical-transient solution obtaining clear seismic wavefields including fast P, slow P and S waves (for a porous media saturated with fluid). The numerical dispersion and stability conditions are derived using von Neumann analysis, showing that over a wide range of porous materials the Courant condition governs the stability and this optimal implicit scheme improves the stability of explicit schemes. High order explicit finite-differences (FD) can be replaced by some lower order optimal implicit FD so computational cost will not be as expensive while maintaining the accuracy. Here we compute weights for the optimal implicit FD scheme to attain an accuracy of γ = 10-8. The implicit spatial differentiation involves solving tridiagonal linear systems of equations through Thomas' algorithm.

  2. Hydraulic Modeling of Alluvial Fans along the Truckee Canal using the 2-Dimensional Model SRH2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J.; Kallio, R.; Sankovich, V.

    2013-12-01

    Alluvial fans are gently sloping, fan-shaped landforms created by sediment deposition at the ends of mountain valleys. Their gentle slopes and scenic vistas are attractive to developers. Unfortunately, alluvial fans are highly flood-prone, and the flow paths of flood events are highly variable, thereby placing human developments at risk. Many studies have been performed on alluvial fans in the arid west because of the uncertainty of their flow paths and flood extents. Most of these studies have been focused on flood elevations and mitigation. This study is not focused on the flood elevations. Rather, it is focused on the attenuation effects of alluvial fans on floods entering and potentially failing a Reclamation canal. The Truckee Canal diverts water from the Truckee River to Lahontan Reservoir. The drainage areas along the canal are alluvial fans with complex distributary channel networks . Ideally, in nature, the sediment grain-size distribution along the alluvial fan flow paths would provide enough infiltration and subsurface storage to attenuate floods entering the canal and reduce risk to low levels. Human development, however, can prevent the natural losses from occurring due to concentrated flows within the alluvial fan. While the concentrated flows might mitigate flood risk inside the fan, they do not lower the flood risk of the canal. A 2-dimensional hydraulic model, SRH-2D, was coupled to a 1-dimensional rainfall-runoff model to estimate the flood attenuation effects of the alluvial fan network surrounding an 11 mile stretch of the Truckee Canal near Fernley, Nevada. Floods having annual exceedance probabilities ranging from 1/10 to 1/100 were computed and analyzed. SRH-2D uses a zonal approach for modeling river systems, allowing areas to be divided into separate zones based on physical parameters such as surface roughness and infiltration. One of the major features of SRH-2D is the adoption of an unstructured hybrid mixed element mesh, which is based

  3. Toward IMRT 2D dose modeling using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantzis, Georgios; Vasquez-Quino, Luis A.; Zalman, Travis; Pratx, Guillem; Lei, Yu

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of artificial neural networks (ANN) to reconstruct dose maps for intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields compared with those of the treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: An artificial feed forward neural network and the back-propagation learning algorithm have been used to replicate dose calculations of IMRT fields obtained from PINNACLE{sup 3} v9.0. The ANN was trained with fluence and dose maps of IMRT fields for 6 MV x-rays, which were obtained from the amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device of Novalis TX. Those fluence distributions were imported to the TPS and the dose maps were calculated on the horizontal midpoint plane of a water equivalent homogeneous cylindrical virtual phantom. Each exported 2D dose distribution from the TPS was classified into two clusters of high and low dose regions, respectively, based on the K-means algorithm and the Euclidian metric in the fluence-dose domain. The data of each cluster were divided into two sets for the training and validation phase of the ANN, respectively. After the completion of the ANN training phase, 2D dose maps were reconstructed by the ANN and isodose distributions were created. The dose maps reconstructed by ANN were evaluated and compared with the TPS, where the mean absolute deviation of the dose and the {gamma}-index were used. Results: A good agreement between the doses calculated from the TPS and the trained ANN was achieved. In particular, an average relative dosimetric difference of 4.6% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 93% were obtained for low dose regions, and a dosimetric difference of 2.3% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 97% for high dose region. Conclusions: An artificial neural network has been developed to convert fluence maps to corresponding dose maps. The feasibility and potential of an artificial neural network to replicate complex convolution kernels in the TPS for IMRT dose calculations

  4. Influence of Transport on Two-Dimensional Model Simulation. Tracer Sensitivity to 2-D Model Transport. 1; Long Lived Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Considine, David B.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we examine the sensitivity of long lived tracers to changes in the base transport components in our 2-D model. Changes to the strength of the residual circulation in the upper troposphere and stratosphere and changes to the lower stratospheric K(sub zz) had similar effects in that increasing the transport rates decreased the overall stratospheric mean age, and increased the rate of removal of material from the stratosphere. Increasing the stratospheric K(sub yy) increased the mean age due to the greater recycling of air parcels through the middle atmosphere, via the residual circulation, before returning to the troposphere. However, increasing K(sub yy) along with self-consistent increases in the corresponding planetary wave drive, which leads to a stronger residual circulation, more than compensates for the K(sub yy)-effect, and produces significantly younger ages throughout the stratosphere. Simulations with very small tropical stratospheric K(sub yy) decreased the globally averaged age of air by as much as 25% in the middle and upper stratosphere, and resulted in substantially weaker vertical age gradients above 20 km in the extratropics. We found only very small stratospheric tracer sensitivity to the magnitude of the horizontal mixing across the tropopause, and to the strength of the mesospheric gravity wave drag and diffusion used in the model. We also investigated the transport influence on chemically active tracers and found a strong age-tracer correlation, both in concentration and calculated lifetimes. The base model transport gives the most favorable overall comparison with a variety of inert tracer observations, and provides a significant improvement over our previous 1995 model transport. Moderate changes to the base transport were found to provide modest agreement with some of the measurements. Transport scenarios with residence times ranging from moderately shorter to slightly longer relative to the base case simulated N2O lifetimes

  5. Water cycling beneath subduction zones in 2D and 3D numerical models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupke, L.; Iyer, K. H.; Hasenclever, J.; Morgan, J.

    2013-12-01

    Tracing the cycling of fluids and volatiles through subduction zones continues to be a challenging task with budgets still having large error bars attached to them. In this contribution we show how numerical models can help to integrate various geological, geophysical, and geochemical datasets and how they can be used to put better bounds on the likely amounts of water being subducted, released into the arc and back-arc melting regions, and recycled to the deeper mantle. To achieve this task we use a suite of numerical models. Bending related faulting and hydration of the incoming lithosphere is resolved using a reactive flow model that solves for crustal scale fluid flow and mantle serpentinization using reaction kinetics. Seismic tomography studies from offshore Chile and Central America are used to evaluate and constrain the effective reaction rate. These rates are then used to assess the contribution of serpentinization to the water budget at subduction zones. The pattern of hydration is controlled by the reaction kinetics and serpentinization is most intense around the 270°C isotherm. The depth of this isotherm correlates well with the dominant spacing of double seismic zones observed globally. Comparison of the results with heat flow data suggests that observed seafloor temperature gradients in the bend-fault region are too low to be caused by ';one-pass' downward water flow into the serpentinizing lithosphere, but rather suggest that bend-faults are areas of active hydrothermal circulation. This implies that serpentine-sourced vents and chemosynthetic vent communities should be found in this deep-sea environment as well. Dehydration reactions are resolved with a 2D kinematic subduction zone model that computes the temperature field and the likely locations and volumes of slab fluid release due to metamorphic dehydration reactions. Here we find that up to 1/3 of the subducted water may be transported into the deeper mantle for the coldest subduction zones

  6. GPU computing with OpenCL to model 2D elastic wave propagation: exploring memory usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Molero-Armenta, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) have become increasingly powerful in recent years. Programs exploring the advantages of this architecture could achieve large performance gains and this is the aim of new initiatives in high performance computing. The objective of this work is to develop an efficient tool to model 2D elastic wave propagation on parallel computing devices. To this end, we implement the elastodynamic finite integration technique, using the industry open standard open computing language (OpenCL) for cross-platform, parallel programming of modern processors, and an open-source toolkit called [Py]OpenCL. The code written with [Py]OpenCL can run on a wide variety of platforms; it can be used on AMD or NVIDIA GPUs as well as classical multicore CPUs, adapting to the underlying architecture. Our main contribution is its implementation with local and global memory and the performance analysis using five different computing devices (including Kepler, one of the fastest and most efficient high performance computing technologies) with various operating systems.

  7. Modeling of two-storey precast school building using Ruaumoko 2D program

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, N. H.; Tarmizi, L. H.; Ghani, K. D.

    2015-05-15

    The long-distant earthquake loading from Sumatra and Java Island had caused some slight damages to precast and reinforced concrete buildings in West Malaysia such as cracks on wall panels, columns and beams. Subsequently, the safety of existing precast concrete building is needed to be analyzed because these buildings were designed using BS 8110 which did not include the seismic loading in the design. Thus, this paper emphasizes on the seismic performance and dynamic behavior of precast school building constructed in Malaysia under three selected past earthquakes excitations ; El Centro 1940 North-South, El Centro East-West components and San Fernando 1971 using RUAUMOKO 2D program. This program is fully utilized by using prototype precast school model and dynamic non-linear time history analysis. From the results, it can be concluded that two-storey precast school building has experienced severe damage and partial collapse especially at beam-column joint under San Fernando and El Centro North-South Earthquake as its exceeds the allowable inter-storey drift and displacement as specified in Eurocode 8. The San Fernando earthquake has produced a massive destruction to the precast building under viscous damping, ξ = 5% and this building has generated maximum building displacement of 435mm, maximum building drift of 0.68% and maximum bending moment at 8458kNm.

  8. 2D and 3D multipactor modeling in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Multipactor (MP) is known as the avalanche growth of the number of secondary electrons emitted from a solid surface exposed to an RF electric field under vacuum conditions. MP is a severe problem in modern rf systems and, therefore, theoretical and experimental studies of MP are of great interest to the researchers working in various areas of physics and engineering. In this work we present results of MP studies in dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) structures. First, we show simulation results obtained with the use of the 2D self-consistent MP model (O. V. Sinitsyn, et. al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 16, 073102 (2009)) and compare those to experimental ones obtained during recent extensive studies of DLA structures performed by Argonne National Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Euclid TechLabs (C. Jing, et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., vol. 38, pp. 1354-1360 (2010)). Then we present some new results of 3D analysis of MP which include studies of particle trajectories and studies of MP development at the early stage.

  9. Spectral functions in the 1D and 2D Bose Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, Robert; Duchon, Eric; Trivedi, Nandini

    2014-03-01

    We use state of the art numerical techniques including quantum Monte Carlo and maximum entropy methods to obtain the low energy excitation spectra in the superfluid and Mott-insulator phases of the Bose Hubbard model. These results are checked in 1D against Bethe Ansatz and tDMRG results and extended to 2D where such approaches are impossible. In the superfluid, we find linearly dispersing Bogoliubov sound modes as well as additional gapped modes broadened by interaction effects. In the Mott insulator, we find evidence for a finite gap and well defined quasiparticle excitations. We examine properties such as the excitation lifetime, density of states, and speed of sound as the system is tuned across the quantum phase transition that separates the superfluid and Mott states. These results provide an important theoretical framework for upcoming ultracold atom experiments in one and two dimensions. We acknowledge support from the NSF DMR-0907275 (R.I., E.D. and N.T.).

  10. Modeling of two-storey precast school building using Ruaumoko 2D program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, N. H.; Tarmizi, L. H.; Ghani, K. D.

    2015-05-01

    The long-distant earthquake loading from Sumatra and Java Island had caused some slight damages to precast and reinforced concrete buildings in West Malaysia such as cracks on wall panels, columns and beams. Subsequently, the safety of existing precast concrete building is needed to be analyzed because these buildings were designed using BS 8110 which did not include the seismic loading in the design. Thus, this paper emphasizes on the seismic performance and dynamic behavior of precast school building constructed in Malaysia under three selected past earthquakes excitations ; El Centro 1940 North-South, El Centro East-West components and San Fernando 1971 using RUAUMOKO 2D program. This program is fully utilized by using prototype precast school model and dynamic non-linear time history analysis. From the results, it can be concluded that two-storey precast school building has experienced severe damage and partial collapse especially at beam-column joint under San Fernando and El Centro North-South Earthquake as its exceeds the allowable inter-storey drift and displacement as specified in Eurocode 8. The San Fernando earthquake has produced a massive destruction to the precast building under viscous damping, ξ = 5% and this building has generated maximum building displacement of 435mm, maximum building drift of 0.68% and maximum bending moment at 8458kNm.

  11. Spot size variation FCS in simulations of the 2D Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Margaret C.; Nouri, Mariam; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2016-06-01

    Spot variation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (svFCS) was developed to study the movement and organization of single molecules in plasma membranes. This experimental technique varies the size of an illumination area while measuring correlations in time using standard fluorescence correlation methods. Frequently, this data is interpreted using the assumption that correlation measurements reflect the dynamics of single molecule motions, and not motions of the average composition. Here, we explore how svFCS measurements report on the dynamics of components diffusing within simulations of a 2D Ising model with a conserved order parameter. Simulated correlation functions report on both the fast dynamics of single component mobility and the slower dynamics of the average composition. Over a range of simulation conditions, a conventional svFCS analysis suggests the presence of anomalous diffusion even though single molecule motions are nearly Brownian in these simulations. This misinterpretation is most significant when the surface density of the fluorescent label is elevated, therefore we suggest future measurements be made over a range of tracer densities. Some simulation conditions reproduce qualitative features of published svFCS experimental data. Overall, this work emphasizes the need to probe membranes using multiple complimentary experimental methodologies in order to draw conclusions regarding the nature of spatial and dynamical heterogeneity in these systems.

  12. Modelling 2001 lahars at Popocatépetl volcano using FLO2D numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2013-12-01

    Popocatépetl volcano is located on the central part of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt. It is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico and endanger more than 25 million people that lives in its surroundings. In the last months, the renewal of its volcanic activity put into alert scientific community. One of the possible scenarios is the 2001 explosive activity, which was characterized by a 8 km eruptive column and the subsequent formation of pumice flows up to 4 km from the crater. Lahars were generated few hours after, remobilizing the new deposits towards NE flank of the volcano, along Huiloac Gorge, almost reaching Santiago Xalitzintla town (Capra et al., 2004). The occurrence of a similar scenario makes very important to reproduce this event to delimitate accurately lahar hazard zones. In this work, 2001 lahar deposit is modeled using FLO2D numerical code. Geophone data is used to reconstruct initial hydrograph and sediment concentration. Sensitivity study of most important parameters used by this code like Manning, and α and β coefficients was conducted in order to achieve a good simulation. Results obtained were compared with field data and demonstrated a good agreement in thickness and flow distribution. A comparison with previously published data with laharZ program (Muñoz-Salinas, 2009) is also made. Additionally, lahars with fluctuating sediment concentrations but with similar volume are simulated to observe the influence of the rheological behavior on lahar distribution.

  13. 1D and 2D urban dam-break flood modelling in Istanbul, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Hasan; Neal, Jeffrey; Bates, Paul; Döker, Fatih

    2014-05-01

    Urban flood events are increasing in frequency and severity as a consequence of several factors such as reduced infiltration capacities due to continued watershed development, increased construction in flood prone areas due to population growth, the possible amplification of rainfall intensity due to climate change, sea level rise which threatens coastal development, and poorly engineered flood control infrastructure (Gallegos et al., 2009). These factors will contribute to increased urban flood risk in the future, and as a result improved modelling of urban flooding according to different causative factor has been identified as a research priority (Gallegos et al., 2009; Ozdemir et al. 2013). The flooding disaster caused by dam failures is always a threat against lives and properties especially in urban environments. Therefore, the prediction of dynamics of dam-break flows plays a vital role in the forecast and evaluation of flooding disasters, and is of long-standing interest for researchers. Flooding occurred on the Ayamama River (Istanbul-Turkey) due to high intensity rainfall and dam-breaching of Ata Pond in 9th September 2009. The settlements, industrial areas and transportation system on the floodplain of the Ayamama River were inundated. Therefore, 32 people were dead and millions of Euros economic loses were occurred. The aim of this study is 1 and 2-Dimensional flood modelling of the Ata Pond breaching using HEC-RAS and LISFLOOD-Roe models and comparison of the model results using the real flood extent. The HEC-RAS model solves the full 1-D Saint Venant equations for unsteady open channel flow whereas LISFLOOD-Roe is the 2-D shallow water model which calculates the flow according to the complete Saint Venant formulation (Villanueva and Wright, 2006; Neal et al., 2011). The model consists a shock capturing Godunov-type scheme based on the Roe Riemann solver (Roe, 1981). 3 m high resolution Digital Surface Model (DSM), natural characteristics of the pond

  14. Activating Receptor NKG2D Targets RAE-1-Expressing Allogeneic Neural Precursor Cells in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, Jason G.; Plaisted, Warren C.; Maciejewski, Sonia M.; Lanier, Lewis L.; Walsh, Craig M.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched mouse neural precursor cells (NPCs) into mice persistently infected with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) results in rapid rejection that is mediated, in part, by T cells. However, the contribution of the innate immune response to allograft rejection in a model of viral-induced neurological disease has not been well defined. Herein, we demonstrate that the natural killer (NK) cell-expressing activating receptor NKG2D participates in transplanted allogeneic NPC rejection in mice persistently infected with JHMV. Cultured NPCs derived from C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice express the NKG2D ligand retinoic acid early precursor transcript (RAE)-1 but expression was dramatically reduced upon differentiation into either glia or neurons. RAE-1+ NPCs were susceptible to NK cell-mediated killing whereas RAE-1- cells were resistant to lysis. Transplantation of C57BL/6-derived NPCs into JHMV-infected BALB/c (H-2d) mice resulted in infiltration of NKG2D+CD49b+ NK cells and treatment with blocking antibody specific for NKG2D increased survival of allogeneic NPCs. Further, transplantation of differentiated RAE-1- allogeneic NPCs into JHMV-infected BALB/c mice resulted in enhanced survival, highlighting a role for the NKG2D:RAE-1 signaling axis in allograft rejection. We also demonstrate that transplantation of allogeneic NPCs into JHMV-infected mice resulted in infection of the transplanted cells suggesting that these cells may be targets for infection. Viral infection of cultured cells increased RAE-1 expression, resulting in enhanced NK cell-mediated killing through NKG2D recognition. Collectively, these results show that in a viral-induced demyelination model, NK cells contribute to rejection of allogeneic NPCs through an NKG2D signaling pathway. PMID:24898518

  15. 2-D finite difference time domain model of ultrasound reflection from normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage surface.

    PubMed

    Kaleva, Erna; Liukkonen, Jukka; Toyras, Juha; Saarakkala, Simo; Kiviranta, Panu; Jurvelin, Jukka

    2010-04-01

    Quantitative high-frequency ultrasonic evaluation of articular cartilage has shown a potential for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis, where the roughness of the surface, collagen and proteoglycan contents, and the density and mechanical properties of cartilage change concurrently. Experimentally, these factors are difficult to investigate individually and thus a numerical model is needed. The present study is the first one to use finite difference time domain modeling of pulse-echo measurements of articular cartilage. Ultrasound reflection from the surface was investigated with varying surface roughness, material parameters (Young's modulus, density, longitudinal, and transversal velocities) and inclination of the samples. The 2-D simulation results were compared with the results from experimental measurements of the same samples in an identical geometry. Both the roughness and the material parameters contributed significantly to the ultrasound reflection. The angular dependence of the ultrasound reflection was strong for a smooth cartilage surface but disappeared for the samples with a rougher surface. These results support the findings of previous experimental studies and indicate that ultrasound detects changes in the cartilage that are characteristic of osteoarthritis. In the present study there are differences between the results of the simulations and the experimental measurements. However, the systematic patterns in the experimental behavior are correctly reproduced by the model. In the future, our goal is to develop more realistic acoustic models incorporating inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the cartilage. PMID:20378451

  16. Dynamical Models of SAURON and CALIFA Galaxies: 1D and 2D Rotational Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinova, Veselina; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; van den Bosch, R.

    2013-01-01

    The mass of a galaxy is the most important parameter to understand its structure and evolution. The total mass we can infer by constructing dynamical models that fit the motion of the stars and gas in the galaxy. The dark matter content then follows after subtracting the luminous matter inferred from colors and/or spectra. Here, we present the mass distribution of a sample of 18 late-type spiral (Sb-Sd) galaxies, using two-dimensional stellar kinematics obtained with the integral-field spectrograph SAURON. The observed second order velocity moments of these galaxies are fitted with solutions of the Axisymmetric Jeans equations and give us an accurate estimation of the mass-to-light ratio profiles and rotational curves. The rotation curves of the galaxies are obtained by the Asymmetric Drift Correction (ADC) and Multi-Gaussian Expansion (MGE) methods, corresponding to one- and two-dimensional mass distribution. Their comparison shows that the mass distribution based on the 2D stellar kinematics is much more reliable than 1D one. SAURON integral field of view looks at the inner parts of the galaxies in contrast with CALIFA survey. CALIFA survey provides PMAS/PPAK integral-field spectroscopic data of ~ 600 nearby galaxies as part of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area. We show the first CALIFA dynamical models of different morphological type of galaxies, giving the clue about the mass distribution of galaxies through the whole Hubble sequence and their evolution from the blue cloud to the red sequence.

  17. 2D Global Rayleigh Wave Attenuation Model Using Finite Frequency Focusing and Defocusing Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z.; Masters, G.; Dalton, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed an efficient technique to process and measure surface-wave amplitude and phase from a large collection of seismic waveforms. These amplitude and phase data sets are used to jointly invert for 2D phase velocity and attenuation maps. As demonstrated by Dalton and Ekstrom (2006), correcting for the effects of focusing and defocusing by elastic structure is crucial in order to obtain reliable attenuation structures. A robust theory that can reliably predict focusing-defocusing effects and is insensitive to the details of making the phase velocity maps is preferred. Great circle ray theory can give useful predictions for the focusing-defocusing effects if careful attention is paid to how the phase velocity model is smoothed. However, the predictions of the finite frequency kernels are more robust at the low-intermediate frequency range (below 25mHz) and suggest that they are better suited as a basis for inversion.We invert for the phase velocity, attenuation, source, and receiver terms simultaneously. Our models provide 60-70% variance reduction to the raw data though the source terms are the biggest contribution to the fit of the data. The attenuation maps show structures that correlate well with surface tectonics and the age-dependent trend of attenuation is clearly seen in the ocean basins. We have also identified problematic stations and earthquake sources as a by-product of our data selection process. Although our approach was developed for a global study, it can be extended to regional studies. Our first regional-scale application of this approach is to the Atlantic upper mantle.

  18. Facial Sketch Synthesis Using 2D Direct Combined Model-Based Face-Specific Markov Network.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ching-Ting; Chan, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Chung

    2016-08-01

    A facial sketch synthesis system is proposed, featuring a 2D direct combined model (2DDCM)-based face-specific Markov network. In contrast to the existing facial sketch synthesis systems, the proposed scheme aims to synthesize sketches, which reproduce the unique drawing style of a particular artist, where this drawing style is learned from a data set consisting of a large number of image/sketch pairwise training samples. The synthesis system comprises three modules, namely, a global module, a local module, and an enhancement module. The global module applies a 2DDCM approach to synthesize the global facial geometry and texture of the input image. The detailed texture is then added to the synthesized sketch in a local patch-based manner using a parametric 2DDCM model and a non-parametric Markov random field (MRF) network. Notably, the MRF approach gives the synthesized results an appearance more consistent with the drawing style of the training samples, while the 2DDCM approach enables the synthesis of outcomes with a more derivative style. As a result, the similarity between the synthesized sketches and the input images is greatly improved. Finally, a post-processing operation is performed to enhance the shadowed regions of the synthesized image by adding strong lines or curves to emphasize the lighting conditions. The experimental results confirm that the synthesized facial images are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the input images as well as the ground-truth sketches provided by the same artist. The representing power of the proposed framework is demonstrated by synthesizing facial sketches from input images with a wide variety of facial poses, lighting conditions, and races even when such images are not included in the training data set. Moreover, the practical applicability of the proposed framework is demonstrated by means of automatic facial recognition tests. PMID:27244737

  19. Dynamic Linkages Between the Transition Zone & Surface Plate Motions in 2D Models of Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2012-12-01

    Descending subducted slabs affect both plate tectonics at the surface and overall mantle flow (e.g. Conrad and Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2002). For time-dependent numerical models, the potential evolution of these slabs, ranging from immediate penetration into the lower mantle to prior buckling and stagnation, are affected by parameters such as the plate age, the viscosity jump into the lower mantle, the presence of phase transitions, trench motion and the chosen governing equation approximation (e.g. Billen and Hirth, 2007). Similarly, the overall deviatoric stress within the slab, especially where modified by the phase transitions, may explain the uneven distribution of deep earthquakes with depth (e.g. Bina, 1997). Better understanding of these processes may arise from a more realistic 2-D model that is fully-dynamic, with an overriding plate, freely-moving trench, compositionally-layered slab and seven major phase transitions, in addition to using the compressible (TALA) form of the governing equations. Though the thermodynamic parameters of certain phase transitions may be uncertain, this study aims to test the latest data and encourage further mineralogical research. We will present fully-dynamic models, which explore the importance of the phase transitions, especially those that have been previously excluded such as the wadsleyite to ringwoodite and the pyroxene and garnet phase transitions. These phase transitions, coupled with the modeled compositionally distinct crust, harzburgite, and pyrolite lithosphere layers, may produce new large-scale dynamic behavior not seen in past numerical models, as well as stress variations within the slab related to deep slab seismicity. Feedback from the compositionally complex slab to the dynamic trench may provide further insight on the mechanics of slab stagnation and behavior in the upper and lower mantle. Billen, M. I., and G. Hirth, Rheologic controls on slab dynamics, Geochemistry, Geophysics and Geosystems, 8 (Q08012

  20. Building a 2.5D Digital Elevation Model from 2D Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, Curtis W.; Ansar, Adnan I.; Brennan, Shane; Cheng, Yang; Clouse, Daniel S.; Almeida, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    When projecting imagery into a georeferenced coordinate frame, one needs to have some model of the geographical region that is being projected to. This model can sometimes be a simple geometrical curve, such as an ellipse or even a plane. However, to obtain accurate projections, one needs to have a more sophisticated model that encodes the undulations in the terrain including things like mountains, valleys, and even manmade structures. The product that is often used for this purpose is a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The technology presented here generates a high-quality DEM from a collection of 2D images taken from multiple viewpoints, plus pose data for each of the images and a camera model for the sensor. The technology assumes that the images are all of the same region of the environment. The pose data for each image is used as an initial estimate of the geometric relationship between the images, but the pose data is often noisy and not of sufficient quality to build a high-quality DEM. Therefore, the source imagery is passed through a feature-tracking algorithm and multi-plane-homography algorithm, which refine the geometric transforms between images. The images and their refined poses are then passed to a stereo algorithm, which generates dense 3D data for each image in the sequence. The 3D data from each image is then placed into a consistent coordinate frame and passed to a routine that divides the coordinate frame into a number of cells. The 3D points that fall into each cell are collected, and basic statistics are applied to determine the elevation of that cell. The result of this step is a DEM that is in an arbitrary coordinate frame. This DEM is then filtered and smoothed in order to remove small artifacts. The final step in the algorithm is to take the initial DEM and rotate and translate it to be in the world coordinate frame [such as UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator), MGRS (Military Grid Reference System), or geodetic] such that it can be saved in

  1. Structural modifications of Tilia cordata wood during heat treatment investigated by FT-IR and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Maria-Cristina; Froidevaux, Julien; Navi, Parviz; Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela

    2013-02-01

    It is known that heat treatment of wood combined with a low percent of relative humidity causes transformations in the chemical composition of it. The modifications and/or degradation of wood components occur by hydrolysis, oxidation, and decarboxylation reactions. The aim of this study was to give better insights on wood chemical modifications during wood heat treatment under low temperature at about 140 °C and 10% percentage of relative humidity, by infrared, principal component analysis and two dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy. For this purpose, hardwood samples of lime (Tilia cordata) were investigated and analysed. The infrared spectra of treated samples were compared with the reference ones, the most important differences being observed in the "fingerprint" region. Due to the complexity of this region, which have contributions from all the wood constituents the chemical changes during hydro-thermal treatment were examined in detail using principal component analysis and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy. By hydro-thermal treatment of wood results the formation of acetic acid, which catalyse the hydrolysis reactions of hemicelluloses and amorphous cellulose. The cleavage of the β-O-4 linkages and splitting of the aliphatic methoxyl chains from the aromatic lignin ring was also observed. For the first treatment interval, a higher extent of carbohydrates degradation was observed, then an increase of the extent of the lignin degradation also took place.

  2. 2D condensation model for the inner Solar Nebula: an enstatite-rich environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatale, F. C.; Liffman, Kurt; Maddison, Sarah T.; Brooks, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    Infrared observations provide the dust composition in the protoplanetary discs surface layers, but cannot probe the dust chemistry in the mid-plane, where planet formation occurs. Meteorites show that dynamics was important in determining the dust distribution in the Solar Nebula and needs to be considered if we are to understand the global chemistry in discs. 1D radial condensation sequences can only simulate one disc layer at a time and cannot describe the global chemistry or the complexity of meteorites. To address these limitations, we compute for the first time the 2D distribution of condensates in the inner Solar Nebula using a thermodynamic equilibrium model, and derive time-scales for vertical settling and radial migration of dust. We find two enstatite-rich zones within 1 AU from the young Sun: a band ˜0.1 AU thick in the upper optically-thin layer of the disc interior to 0.8 AU, and in the optically-thick disc mid-plane out to ˜0.4 AU. The two enstatite-rich zones support recent evidence that Mercury and enstatite chondrites (ECs) shared a bulk material with similar composition. Our results are also consistent with infrared observation of protoplanetary disc which show emission of enstatite-rich dust in the inner surface of discs. The resulting chemistry and dynamics suggests that the formation of the bulk material of ECs occurred in the inner surface layer of the disc, within 0.4 AU. We also propose a simple alternative scenario in which gas fractionation and vertical settling of the condensates lead to an enstatite-chondritic bulk material.

  3. Fracture mode analysis and related surface deformation during dyke intrusion: Results from 2D experimental modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalak, M.; Mourgues, R.; Bureau, D.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of surface deformation in response to approaching intrusion is important for assessing volcanic hazards. In this paper, we present results from 2D scaled models of magma intrusion, in which we discuss the propagation mode and related surface deformation during dyke growth. Our experiments consist in the injection of analogue magma (Golden syrup) into cohesive fine-grained silica powder, simulating the brittle upper crust. Using an optical image correlation technique (Particle Imaging Velocimetry), we were able to follow the surface deformation, the displacements within the country rock and to calculate strains induced by the magma emplacement. We identified two kinds of intrusion morphologies resulting from different interactions between the dyke and plastic deformations occurring in the country rock near the surface. In both morphologies, the dyke is vertical at depth. Our analysis demonstrates that both hydraulic tensile opening and shear-related propagation operate during this first stage of vertical growth. At the same time, the surface lifted up and formed a smooth symmetrical dome. Both types of morphologies differ in the upper part. During a second stage of evolution, the first type of intrusion inclined at a dip between 45 to 65°. This inclination is not caused by shear deformations and is attributed to stress rotation near the tip. Closer to the surface, the growth of the inclined sheet creates shear bands which conduct the fluid toward the surface. The surface uplift becomes asymmetric. The second type of intrusion does not rotate at depth and continues its vertical propagation by catching vertical tensile cracks. The intrusion of magma in these cracks creates horizontal stresses which are responsible for the closure of fractures and the formation of reverse faults. At the surface the dome remains symmetrical. For both intrusions, the surface uplift accelerates during the second stage and it is strongly influenced by the presence or the

  4. The Two-Commponent Model and 2d Metal-Insulator Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castner, Theodore G.

    2004-03-01

    Fermi liquid theory for the 2d MIT is extended to include the soft correlation gap (CG) in the density-of-states N(E) from carrier interactions [N(E)α(E-E_F)^t] producing a minimum in N(E) at E_F. The results are consistent with the scaling form g=g_cexp(xT_o/T) in a limited T-regime, but not as Tarrow0 ruling out the perfect conductor scenario. The two-component model of itinerant plus localized electrons n_i+n_loc=n=n_c(1+x) for n>nc is an essential feature and allows a full explanation of the T-dependence of the metallic resistivity ratio ρ_i(T)/ρ_i(0) [ρ_i= 1/(σ-σ_c)] including the maximum at T_max. The results explain the Hanein et al. data^1 for p-type GaAs and show p_i(T)/p_i(0)=1+T/T_phi in a restricted T-range where T_phi=xTc [T_c=E_c/k, E_c=mobility edge] as x=p/p_c-1 goes to 0. The correction to EF from the soft CG [of width |Delta_c] yields a constant ratio E_F/Δc as x goes to 0. The origin of the nonuniversal gc [ρc at x=0] and implications for the beta function β(g)=ln(g/g_c) and single particle scaling will be discussed. 1. Y. Hanein et al., PRL80, 1288 (1998);Phys.Rev.B58, R13338 (1998).

  5. A MODIFIED LIGHT TRANSMISSION VISUALIZATION METHOD FOR DNAPL SATURATION MEASUREMENTS IN 2-D MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this research, a light transmission visualization (LTV) method was used to quantify dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) saturation in two-dimensional (2-D), two fluid phase systems. The method is an expansion of earlier LTV methods and takes into account both absorption an...

  6. Multi-scale Model of Residual Strength of 2D Plain Weave C/SiC Composites in Oxidation Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xihui; Sun, Zhigang; Sun, Jianfen; Song, Yingdong

    2016-06-01

    Multi-scale models play an important role in capturing the nonlinear response of woven carbon fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites. In plain weave carbon fiber/silicon carbon (C/SiC) composites, the carbon fibers and interphases will be oxidized at elevated temperature and the strength of the composite will be degraded when oxygen enters micro-cracks formed in the as-produced parts due to the mismatch in thermal properties between constituents. As a result of the oxidation on fiber surface, fiber shows a notch-like morphology. In this paper, the change rule of fiber notch depth is fitted by circular function. And a multi-scale model based upon the change rule of fiber notch depth is developed to simulate the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of the composite. The multi-scale model is able to accurately predict the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of the composite. Besides, the simulated residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of 2D plain weave C/SiC composites in oxidation atmosphere show good agreements with experimental results. Furthermore, the oxidation time and temperature of the composite are investigated to show their influences upon the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of plain weave C/SiC composites.

  7. Modeling the Effect of Multiple Matrix Cracking Modes on Cyclic Hysteresis Loops of 2D Woven Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of multiple matrix cracking modes on cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated. The interface slip between fibers and the matrix existed in matrix cracking mode 3 and mode 5, in which matrix cracking and interface debonding occurred in longitudinal yarns, are considered as the major reason for hysteresis loops of 2D woven CMCs. The effects of fiber volume content, peak stress, matrix crack spacing, interface properties, matrix cracking mode proportion and interface wear on interface slip and hysteresis loops have been analyzed. The cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven SiC/SiC composite corresponding to different peak stresses have been predicted using the present analysis. It was found that the damage parameter, i.e., the proportion of matrix cracking mode 3 in the entire cracking modes of the composite, increases with increasing peak stress.

  8. Time-lapse 2D electrical resistivity tomographies for investigating the Picerno landslide (Basilicata Region, southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luongo, Raffaele; de Bari, Claudia; Calamita, Giuseppe; Loperte, Antonio; Perrone, Angela; Satriani, Antonio; Votta, Mario; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    The rainwater infiltration into the soil and the increase of pore water pressure in the vadose zone can be considered the main causes of shallow landslides triggering. The standard techniques used to measure the water content of the soil and the piezometric levels in areas of potential instability are the TDR method and the piezometric measurements, respectively. These techniques, while allowing to obtain direct information of the considered parameter, provide a punctual information about the specific hydrological characteristics of the investigated soil. Recently, the literature reports many examples of applications of indirect methods for the study and the estimate of water content in the first layers of the subsoil. In particular, the 2D electrical resistivity tomography has been applied for obtaining information about the temporal and spatial patterns of water infiltration processes. This paper reports the results obtained in the area affected by the Picerno landslide (Basilicata Region, Southern Italy), which represents one of the test sites of Morfeo project (Monitoraggio e Rischio da Frana mediante dati EO) funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The studied slope has been frequently involved in reactivation phenomena the most recent of which occurred on March 2006. In the area, we have installed a prototype system for time-dependent analysis of electrical resistivity images and TDR measurements. The geophysical results are opportunely integrated with the piezometric data. The system is composed of a 48-channel cable connected to the georesistivimeter Syscal Pro Switch 48, the electrodes are placed at a distance of 1 m. Two holes used to measure the piezometric level and another four equipped with TDR probes are located along the acquisition profile. The electrical resistivity tomographies and the water content measurements are performed with time intervals selected by considering the rainfall intensity and frequency. The first preliminary result of this

  9. Comparison of the 1D flux theory with a 2D hydrodynamic secondary settling tank model.

    PubMed

    Ekama, G A; Marais, P

    2004-01-01

    The applicability of the 1D idealized flux theory (1DFT) for design of secondary settling tanks (SSTs) is evaluated by comparing its predicted maximum surface overflow (SOR) and solids loading (SLR) rates with that calculated from the 2D hydrodynamic model SettlerCAD using as a basis 35 full scale SST stress tests conducted on different SSTs with diameters from 30 to 45m and 2.25 to 4.1 m side water depth, with and without Stamford baffles. From the simulations, a relatively consistent pattern appeared, i.e. that the 1DFT can be used for design but its predicted maximum SLR needs to be reduced by an appropriate flux rating, the magnitude of which depends mainly on SST depth and hydraulic loading rate (HLR). Simulations of the sloping bottom shallow (1.5-2.5 m SWD) Dutch SSTs tested by STOWa and the Watts et al. SST, all with doubled SWDs, and the Darvill new (4.1 m) and old (2.5 m) SSTs with interchanged depths, were run to confirm the sensitivity of the flux rating to depth and HLR. Simulations with and without a Stamford baffle were also done. While the design of the internal features of the SST, such as baffling, have a marked influence on the effluent SS concentration for underloaded SSTs, these features appeared to have only a small influence on the flux rating, i.e. capacity, of the SST, In the meantime until more information is obtained, it would appear that from the simulations so far that the flux rating of 0.80 of the 1DFT maximum SLR recommended by Ekama and Marais remains a reasonable value to apply in the design of full scale SSTs--for deep SSTs (4 m SWD) the flux rating could be increased to 0.85 and for shallow SSTs (2.5 m SWD) decreased to 0.75. It is recommended that (i) while the apparent interrelationship between SST flux rating and depth suggests some optimization of the volume of the SST, that this be avoided and that (ii) the depth of the SST be designed independently of the surface area as is usually the practice and once selected, the

  10. Development of models for the two-dimensional, two-fluid code for sodium boiling NATOF-2D. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.G.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1981-09-01

    Several features were incorporated into NATOF-2D, a two-dimensional, two fluid code developed at MIT for the purpose of analysis of sodium boiling transients under LMFBR conditions. They include improved interfacial mass, momentum and energy exchange rate models, and a cell-to-cell radial heat conduction mechanism which was calibrated by simulation of Westinghouse Blanket Heat Transfer Test Program Runs 544 and 545. Finally, a direct method of pressure field solution was implemented into a direct method of pressure field solution was implemented into NATOF-2D, replacing the iterative technique previously available, and resulted in substantially reduced computational costs.

  11. An influence of solar activity on latitudinal distribution of atmospheric ozone and temperature in 2-D radiative-photochemical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyominov, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of the 2-D radiative-photochemical model of the ozone layer at heights 0 to 60 km in the Northern Hemisphere there are revealed and analyzed in detail the characteristic features of the season-altitude-latitude variations of ozone and temperature due to changes of the solar flux during the 11 year cycle, electron and proton precipitations.

  12. 2D Hydrodynamic Based Logic Modeling Tool for River Restoration Decision Analysis: A Quantitative Approach to Project Prioritization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrowski, D.; Lai, Y.; Bradley, N.; Gaeuman, D. A.; Murauskas, J.; Som, N. A.; Martin, A.; Goodman, D.; Alvarez, J.

    2014-12-01

    In the field of river restoration sciences there is a growing need for analytical modeling tools and quantitative processes to help identify and prioritize project sites. 2D hydraulic models have become more common in recent years and with the availability of robust data sets and computing technology, it is now possible to evaluate large river systems at the reach scale. The Trinity River Restoration Program is now analyzing a 40 mile segment of the Trinity River to determine priority and implementation sequencing for its Phase II rehabilitation projects. A comprehensive approach and quantitative tool has recently been developed to analyze this complex river system referred to as: 2D-Hydrodynamic Based Logic Modeling (2D-HBLM). This tool utilizes various hydraulic output parameters combined with biological, ecological, and physical metrics at user-defined spatial scales. These metrics and their associated algorithms are the underpinnings of the 2D-HBLM habitat module used to evaluate geomorphic characteristics, riverine processes, and habitat complexity. The habitat metrics are further integrated into a comprehensive Logic Model framework to perform statistical analyses to assess project prioritization. The Logic Model will analyze various potential project sites by evaluating connectivity using principal component methods. The 2D-HBLM tool will help inform management and decision makers by using a quantitative process to optimize desired response variables with balancing important limiting factors in determining the highest priority locations within the river corridor to implement restoration projects. Effective river restoration prioritization starts with well-crafted goals that identify the biological objectives, address underlying causes of habitat change, and recognizes that social, economic, and land use limiting factors may constrain restoration options (Bechie et. al. 2008). Applying natural resources management actions, like restoration prioritization, is

  13. 2-D Reflectometer Modeling for Optimizing the ITER Low-field Side Reflectometer System

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.J.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.J.; Budny, R.V.; Kessel, C.; Johnson, D.

    2005-09-02

    The response of a low-field side reflectometer system for ITER is simulated with a 2?D reflectometer code using a realistic plasma equilibrium. It is found that the reflected beam will often miss its launch point by as much as 40 cm and that a vertical array of receiving antennas is essential in order to observe a reflection on the low-field side of ITER.

  14. Comparison between a 1D and a 2D numerical model of an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Thomas Frank; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Bahl, Christian R. H.; Elmegaard, Brian; Pryds, Nini; Smith, Anders

    2008-05-01

    The active magnetic regenerator (AMR) refrigeration system represents an environmentally attractive alternative to vapour-compression refrigeration. This paper compares the results of two numerical AMR models: (1) a 1D finite difference model and (2) a 2D finite element model. Both models simulate a reciprocating AMR and can determine the cyclical steady-state temperature profile of the system as well as performance parameters such as the refrigeration capacity, the work input and the coefficient of performance (COP). The models are used to analyse an AMR with a regenerator made of flat parallel plates of gadolinium operating in the presence of a 1 T magnetic field. The results are used to discuss under which circumstances a 1D model is insufficient and a 2D model is necessary. The results indicate that when the temperature gradients in the AMR perpendicular to the flow are small a 1D model obtains accurate results of overall results such as the refrigeration capacity but that a 2D model is required for a detailed analysis of the phenomena occurring inside the AMR.

  15. Synaptic Deficits at Neuromuscular Junctions in Two Mouse Models of Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 2d

    PubMed Central

    Spaulding, Emily L.; Sleigh, James N.; Morelli, Kathryn H.; Pinter, Martin J.; Burgess, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 2D (CMT2D), caused by dominant mutations in Glycl tRNA synthetase (GARS), present with progressive weakness, consistently in the hands, but often in the feet also. Electromyography shows denervation, and patients often report that early symptoms include cramps brought on by cold or exertion. Based on reported clinical observations, and studies of mouse models of CMT2D, we sought to determine whether weakened synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is an aspect of CMT2D. Quantal analysis of NMJs in two different mouse models of CMT2D (GarsP278KY, GarsC201R), found synaptic deficits that correlated with disease severity and progressed with age. Results of voltage-clamp studies revealed presynaptic defects characterized by: (1) decreased frequency of spontaneous release without any change in quantal amplitude (miniature endplate current), (2) reduced amplitude of evoked release (endplate current) and quantal content, (3) age-dependent changes in the extent of depression in response to repetitive stimulation, and (4) release failures at some NMJs with high-frequency, long-duration stimulation. Drugs that modify synaptic efficacy were tested to see whether neuromuscular performance improved. The presynaptic action of 3,4 diaminopyridine was not beneficial, whereas postsynaptic-acting physostigmine did improve performance. Smaller mutant NMJs with correspondingly fewer vesicles and partial denervation that eliminates some release sites also contribute to the reduction of release at a proportion of mutant NMJs. Together, these voltage-clamp data suggest that a number of release processes, while essentially intact, likely operate suboptimally at most NMJs of CMT2D mice. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We have uncovered a previously unrecognized aspect of axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease in mouse models of CMT2D. Synaptic dysfunction contributes to impaired neuromuscular performance and disease progression. This

  16. Modeling the Transverse Thermal Conductivity of 2-D SiCf/SiC Composites Made with Woven Fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Senor, David J.; Jones, Russell H.

    2004-06-30

    The hierarchical two-layer (H2L) model was developed to describe the effective transverse thermal conductivity, Keff, of a 2D-SiCf/SiC composite made from stacked and infiltrated woven fabric layers in terms of constituent properties and microstructural and architectural variables. The H2L model includes the expected effects of fiber-matrix interfacial conductance as well as the effects of high fiber packing fractions within individual tows and the non-uniform nature of 2D-fabric layers that usually include a significant amount of interlayer porosity. Previously, H2L model predictions were compared to measured values of Keff for two versions of DuPont 2D-Hi NicalonÔ/PyC/ICVI-SiC composite, one with a “thin” (0.110 μm) and the other with a “thick” (1.040 μm) pyrocarbon (PyC) fiber coating, and for a 2D-TyrannoÔ SA/”thin” PyC/FCVI-SIC composite made by ORNL. In this study, H2L model predictions are compared to measured Keff-values for a 2D-SiCf/SiC composite made by GE Power Systems (formerly DuPont Lanxide) using the ICVI-process with Hi-NicalonÔ type S fabric. The values of Keff determined for the composite made with the Hi-NicalonÔ type S fabric were significantly greater than Keff-values determined for the composites made with either the Hi-NicalonÔor the TyrannoÔ SA fabrics. Differences in Keff-values were expected for using different fiber types, but major differences also were due to observed microstructural variations between the systems, and as predicted by the H2L model.

  17. Baryon acoustic oscillations in 2D: Modeling redshift-space power spectrum from perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taruya, Atsushi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Saito, Shun

    2010-09-01

    We present an improved prescription for the matter power spectrum in redshift space taking proper account of both nonlinear gravitational clustering and redshift distortion, which are of particular importance for accurately modeling baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). Contrary to the models of redshift distortion phenomenologically introduced but frequently used in the literature, the new model includes the corrections arising from the nonlinear coupling between the density and velocity fields associated with two competitive effects of redshift distortion, i.e., Kaiser and Finger-of-God effects. Based on the improved treatment of perturbation theory for gravitational clustering, we compare our model predictions with the monopole and quadrupole power spectra of N-body simulations, and an excellent agreement is achieved over the scales of BAOs. Potential impacts on constraining dark energy and modified gravity from the redshift-space power spectrum are also investigated based on the Fisher-matrix formalism, particularly focusing on the measurements of the Hubble parameter, angular diameter distance, and growth rate for structure formation. We find that the existing phenomenological models of redshift distortion produce a systematic error on measurements of the angular diameter distance and Hubble parameter by 1%-2% , and the growth-rate parameter by ˜5%, which would become non-negligible for future galaxy surveys. Correctly modeling redshift distortion is thus essential, and the new prescription for the redshift-space power spectrum including the nonlinear corrections can be used as an accurate theoretical template for anisotropic BAOs.

  18. Baryon acoustic oscillations in 2D: Modeling redshift-space power spectrum from perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Taruya, Atsushi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Saito, Shun

    2010-09-15

    We present an improved prescription for the matter power spectrum in redshift space taking proper account of both nonlinear gravitational clustering and redshift distortion, which are of particular importance for accurately modeling baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). Contrary to the models of redshift distortion phenomenologically introduced but frequently used in the literature, the new model includes the corrections arising from the nonlinear coupling between the density and velocity fields associated with two competitive effects of redshift distortion, i.e., Kaiser and Finger-of-God effects. Based on the improved treatment of perturbation theory for gravitational clustering, we compare our model predictions with the monopole and quadrupole power spectra of N-body simulations, and an excellent agreement is achieved over the scales of BAOs. Potential impacts on constraining dark energy and modified gravity from the redshift-space power spectrum are also investigated based on the Fisher-matrix formalism, particularly focusing on the measurements of the Hubble parameter, angular diameter distance, and growth rate for structure formation. We find that the existing phenomenological models of redshift distortion produce a systematic error on measurements of the angular diameter distance and Hubble parameter by 1%-2%, and the growth-rate parameter by {approx}5%, which would become non-negligible for future galaxy surveys. Correctly modeling redshift distortion is thus essential, and the new prescription for the redshift-space power spectrum including the nonlinear corrections can be used as an accurate theoretical template for anisotropic BAOs.

  19. Floodplain mapping via 1D and quasi-2D numerical models in the valley of Thessaly, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, Athanasios; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Koukouvinos, Antonis; Tegos, Aristoteles; Pagana, Vasiliki; Panagopoulos, Panayiotis-Dionisios; Mamassis, Nikolaos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2013-04-01

    The European Union Floods Directive defines a flood as 'a covering by water of land not normally covered by water'. Human activities, such as agriculture, urban development, industry and tourism, contribute to an increase in the likelihood and adverse impacts of flood events. The study of the hydraulic behaviour of a river is important in flood risk management. Here, we investigate the behaviour of three hydraulic models, with different theoretical frameworks, in a real case scenario. The area is located in the Penios river basin, in the plain of Thessaly (Greece). The three models used are the one-dimensional HEC-RAS and the quasi two-dimensional LISFLOOD-FP and FLO-2D which are compared to each other, in terms of simulated maximum water depth as well as maximum flow velocity, and to a real flood event. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is performed to determine how each simulation is affected by the river and floodplain roughness coefficient, in terms of flood inundation.

  20. 2D MHD and 1D HD Models of a Solar Flare—a Comprehensive Comparison of the Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P.; Murawski, K.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    Without any doubt, solar flaring loops possess a multithread internal structure that is poorly resolved, and there are no means to observe heating episodes and thermodynamic evolution of the individual threads. These limitations cause fundamental problems in numerical modeling of flaring loops, such as selection of a structure and a number of threads, and an implementation of a proper model of the energy deposition process. A set of one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic models of a flaring loop are developed to compare energy redistribution and plasma dynamics in the course of a prototypical solar flare. Basic parameters of the modeled loop are set according to the progenitor M1.8 flare recorded in AR 10126 on 2002 September 20 between 09:21 UT and 09:50 UT. The nonideal 1D models include thermal conduction and radiative losses of the optically thin plasma as energy-loss mechanisms, while the nonideal 2D models take into account viscosity and thermal conduction as energy-loss mechanisms only. The 2D models have a continuous distribution of the parameters of the plasma across the loop and are powered by varying in time and space along and across the loop heating flux. We show that such 2D models are an extreme borderline case of a multithread internal structure of the flaring loop, with a filling factor equal to 1. Nevertheless, these simple models ensure the general correctness of the obtained results and can be adopted as a correct approximation of the real flaring structures.

  1. 2D MHD AND 1D HD MODELS OF A SOLAR FLARE—A COMPREHENSIVE COMPARISON OF THE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P.; Murawski, K.; Srivastava, A. K. E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl E-mail: asrivastava.app@iitbhu.ac.in

    2015-11-01

    Without any doubt, solar flaring loops possess a multithread internal structure that is poorly resolved, and there are no means to observe heating episodes and thermodynamic evolution of the individual threads. These limitations cause fundamental problems in numerical modeling of flaring loops, such as selection of a structure and a number of threads, and an implementation of a proper model of the energy deposition process. A set of one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic models of a flaring loop are developed to compare energy redistribution and plasma dynamics in the course of a prototypical solar flare. Basic parameters of the modeled loop are set according to the progenitor M1.8 flare recorded in AR 10126 on 2002 September 20 between 09:21 UT and 09:50 UT. The nonideal 1D models include thermal conduction and radiative losses of the optically thin plasma as energy-loss mechanisms, while the nonideal 2D models take into account viscosity and thermal conduction as energy-loss mechanisms only. The 2D models have a continuous distribution of the parameters of the plasma across the loop and are powered by varying in time and space along and across the loop heating flux. We show that such 2D models are an extreme borderline case of a multithread internal structure of the flaring loop, with a filling factor equal to 1. Nevertheless, these simple models ensure the general correctness of the obtained results and can be adopted as a correct approximation of the real flaring structures.

  2. Theory of bi-molecular association dynamics in 2D for accurate model and experimental parameterization of binding rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogurtcu, Osman N.; Johnson, Margaret E.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamics of association between diffusing and reacting molecular species are routinely quantified using simple rate-equation kinetics that assume both well-mixed concentrations of species and a single rate constant for parameterizing the binding rate. In two-dimensions (2D), however, even when systems are well-mixed, the assumption of a single characteristic rate constant for describing association is not generally accurate, due to the properties of diffusional searching in dimensions d ≤ 2. Establishing rigorous bounds for discriminating between 2D reactive systems that will be accurately described by rate equations with a single rate constant, and those that will not, is critical for both modeling and experimentally parameterizing binding reactions restricted to surfaces such as cellular membranes. We show here that in regimes of intrinsic reaction rate (ka) and diffusion (D) parameters ka/D > 0.05, a single rate constant cannot be fit to the dynamics of concentrations of associating species independently of the initial conditions. Instead, a more sophisticated multi-parametric description than rate-equations is necessary to robustly characterize bimolecular reactions from experiment. Our quantitative bounds derive from our new analysis of 2D rate-behavior predicted from Smoluchowski theory. Using a recently developed single particle reaction-diffusion algorithm we extend here to 2D, we are able to test and validate the predictions of Smoluchowski theory and several other theories of reversible reaction dynamics in 2D for the first time. Finally, our results also mean that simulations of reactive systems in 2D using rate equations must be undertaken with caution when reactions have ka/D > 0.05, regardless of the simulation volume. We introduce here a simple formula for an adaptive concentration dependent rate constant for these chemical kinetics simulations which improves on existing formulas to better capture non-equilibrium reaction dynamics from dilute

  3. OpenHVSR: imaging the subsurface 2D/3D elastic properties through multiple HVSR modeling and inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignardi, S.; Mantovani, A.; Abu Zeid, N.

    2016-08-01

    OpenHVSR is a computer program developed in the Matlab environment, designed for the simultaneous modeling and inversion of large Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR or H/V) datasets in order to construct 2D/3D subsurface models (topography included). The program is designed to provide a high level of interactive experience to the user and still to be of intuitive use. It implements several effective and established tools already present in the code ModelHVSR by Herak (2008), and many novel features such as: -confidence evaluation on lateral heterogeneity -evaluation of frequency dependent single parameter impact on the misfit function -relaxation of Vp/Vs bounds to allow for water table inclusion -a new cost function formulation which include a slope dependent term for fast matching of peaks, which greatly enhances convergence in case of low quality HVSR curves inversion -capability for the user of editing the subsurface model at any time during the inversion and capability to test the changes before acceptance. In what follows, we shall present many features of the program and we shall show its capabilities on both simulated and real data. We aim to supply a powerful tool to the scientific and professional community capable of handling large sets of HSVR curves, to retrieve the most from their microtremor data within a reduced amount of time and allowing the experienced scientist the necessary flexibility to integrate into the model their own geological knowledge of the sites under investigation. This is especially desirable now that microtremor testing has become routinely used. After testing the code over different datasets, both simulated and real, we finally decided to make it available in an open source format. The program is available by contacting the authors.

  4. Simulated KWAJEX Convective Systems Using a 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model and Their Comparisons with Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, Chung-Lin; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    The 1999 Kwajalein Atoll field experiment (KWAJEX), one of several major TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) field experiments, has successfully obtained a wealth of information and observation data on tropical convective systems over the western Central Pacific region. In this paper, clouds and convective systems that developed during three active periods (Aug 7-12, Aug 17-21, and Aug 29-Sep 13) around Kwajalein Atoll site are simulated using both 2D and 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) models. Based on numerical results, the clouds and cloud systems are generally unorganized and short lived. These features are validated by radar observations that support the model results. Both the 2D and 3D simulated rainfall amounts and their stratiform contribution as well as the heat, water vapor, and moist static energy budgets are examined for the three convective episodes. Rainfall amounts are quantitatively similar between the two simulations, but the stratiform contribution is considerably larger in the 2D simulation. Regardless of dimension, fo all three cases, the large-scale forcing and net condensation are the two major physical processes that account for the evolution of the budgets with surface latent heat flux and net radiation solar and long-wave radiation)being secondary processes. Quantitative budget differences between 2D and 3D as well as between various episodes will be detailed.Morover, simulated radar signatures and Q1/Q2 fields from the three simulations are compared to each other and with radar and sounding observations.

  5. Observer-based H∞ controller for 2-D T-S fuzzy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lizhen

    2016-10-01

    This paper develops a method of fuzzy observer-based H∞ controller design for two-dimensional (2-D) discrete Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy systems. By reformulating the system, a linear matrix inequality (LMI)-based sufficient condition is derived. Then the fuzzy controller and the fuzzy observer can be independently designed, which guarantee an H∞ noise attenuation γ of the whole system. Owing to the introduction of free matrices, the presented design method has a wider range of application and can guarantee a better H∞ performance of the closed-loop fuzzy control system. Simulation results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Atmospheric Nitrogen Trifluoride: Optimized emission estimates using 2-D and 3-D Chemical Transport Models from 1973-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy, D. J.; Rigby, M. L.; Prinn, R. G.; Muhle, J.; Weiss, R. F.

    2009-12-01

    We present optimized annual global emissions from 1973-2008 of nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), a powerful greenhouse gas which is not currently regulated by the Kyoto Protocol. In the past few decades, NF3 production has dramatically increased due to its usage in the semiconductor industry. Emissions were estimated through the 'pulse-method' discrete Kalman filter using both a simple, flexible 2-D 12-box model used in the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) network and the Model for Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART v4.5), a full 3-D atmospheric chemistry model. No official audited reports of industrial NF3 emissions are available, and with limited information on production, a priori emissions were estimated using both a bottom-up and top-down approach with two different spatial patterns based on semiconductor perfluorocarbon (PFC) emissions from the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR v3.2) and Semiconductor Industry Association sales information. Both spatial patterns used in the models gave consistent results, showing the robustness of the estimated global emissions. Differences between estimates using the 2-D and 3-D models can be attributed to transport rates and resolution differences. Additionally, new NF3 industry production and market information is presented. Emission estimates from both the 2-D and 3-D models suggest that either the assumed industry release rate of NF3 or industry production information is still underestimated.

  7. Capturing tumor complexity in vitro: Comparative analysis of 2D and 3D tumor models for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Kristin; Estrada, Marta F.; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; Rudisch, Albin; Santo, Vítor E.; Barbier, Michaël; Blom, Sami; Arundkar, Sharath C.; Selvam, Irwin; Osswald, Annika; Stein, Yan; Gruenewald, Sylvia; Brito, Catarina; van Weerden, Wytske; Rotter, Varda; Boghaert, Erwin; Oren, Moshe; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Chong, Yolanda; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures growing on plastic do not recapitulate the three dimensional (3D) architecture and complexity of human tumors. More representative models are required for drug discovery and validation. Here, 2D culture and 3D mono- and stromal co-culture models of increasing complexity have been established and cross-comparisons made using three standard cell carcinoma lines: MCF7, LNCaP, NCI-H1437. Fluorescence-based growth curves, 3D image analysis, immunohistochemistry and treatment responses showed that end points differed according to cell type, stromal co-culture and culture format. The adaptable methodologies described here should guide the choice of appropriate simple and complex in vitro models. PMID:27364600

  8. Capturing tumor complexity in vitro: Comparative analysis of 2D and 3D tumor models for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Stock, Kristin; Estrada, Marta F; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; Rudisch, Albin; Santo, Vítor E; Barbier, Michaël; Blom, Sami; Arundkar, Sharath C; Selvam, Irwin; Osswald, Annika; Stein, Yan; Gruenewald, Sylvia; Brito, Catarina; van Weerden, Wytske; Rotter, Varda; Boghaert, Erwin; Oren, Moshe; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Chong, Yolanda; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures growing on plastic do not recapitulate the three dimensional (3D) architecture and complexity of human tumors. More representative models are required for drug discovery and validation. Here, 2D culture and 3D mono- and stromal co-culture models of increasing complexity have been established and cross-comparisons made using three standard cell carcinoma lines: MCF7, LNCaP, NCI-H1437. Fluorescence-based growth curves, 3D image analysis, immunohistochemistry and treatment responses showed that end points differed according to cell type, stromal co-culture and culture format. The adaptable methodologies described here should guide the choice of appropriate simple and complex in vitro models. PMID:27364600

  9. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Odd-Parity 3 d 2 D → nf 2 F Transitions of Neutral Sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, A.; Shah, M.; Shahzada, S.; Ahmed, M.; Haq, S. U.

    2015-11-01

    We report new experimental data on term energies and effective quantum numbers of the odd parity Rydberg states of sodium in the 40687-41408 cm-1 energy range. The experiment was performed using a two-color scheme of three-photon laser excitation in conjunction with a thermionic diode ion detector. The new observation includes much extended nf 2 F (12 ≤ n ≤ 51) series excited from the 3 d 2 D intermediate state. In addition, oscillator strengths of the 3 d 2 D → nf 2 F (16 ≤ n ≤ 45) Rydberg transitions have been determined and a complete picture is presented from n = 4-45 incorporating the present work and earlier computed results.

  10. Relationships of Obesity and Fat Distribution With atherothrombotic Risk Factors: Baseline Results From the Bypass angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BaRI 2D) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Albu, Jeanine B.; Lu, Jiang; Mooradian, Arshag D.; Krone, Ronald J.; Nesto, Richard W.; Porter, Marty H.; Rana, Jamal S.; Rogers, William J.; Sobel, Burton E.; Gottlieb, Sheldon H.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of obesity on cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and established coronary artery disease (CAD) is controversial; whether BMI and/or waist circumference correlate with atherothrombotic risk factors in such patients is uncertain. We sought to evaluate whether higher BMI or waist circumference are associated with specific risk factors among 2,273 Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) study participants with T2DM and documented CAD (baseline data, mean age 62 years, 66% non-Hispanic white, 71% men). Multiple linear regression models were constructed after adjusting for sex, age, race/ ethnicity, US vs. non-US site, diabetes duration, exercise, smoking, alcohol, and relevant medication use. First-order partial correlations of BMI with risk factors after controlling for waist circumference and of waist circumference with risk factors after controlling for BMI were also evaluated. Ninety percent of the patients were overweight (BMI ≥25 kg/m2); 68% of men and 89% of women had high-risk waist circumference measures (≥102 and ≥88 cm, respectively). BMI and waist circumference, in separate models, explained significant variation in metabolic (insulin, lipids, blood pressure (BP)) and inflammatory/procoagulation (C-reactive protein, PAI-1 activity and antigen, and fibrinogen) risk factors. In partial correlation analyses BMI was independently associated with BP and inflammatory/procoagulation factors, waist circumference with lipids, and both BMI and waist circumference with insulin. We conclude that, in cross-sectional analyses, both BMI and waist circumference, independently, are associated with increased atherothrombotic risk in centrally obese cohorts such as the BARI 2D patients with T2DM and CAD. PMID:19875998

  11. Insights into drug metabolism by cytochromes P450 from modelling studies of CYP2D6-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, J-D; Kemp, C A; Roberts, G C K; Paine, M J I; Wolf, C R; Sutcliffe, M J

    2008-03-01

    The cytochromes P450 (CYPs) comprise a vast superfamily of enzymes found in virtually all life forms. In mammals, xenobiotic metabolizing CYPs provide crucial protection from the effects of exposure to a wide variety of chemicals, including environmental toxins and therapeutic drugs. Ideally, the information on the possible metabolism by CYPs required during drug development would be obtained from crystal structures of all the CYPs of interest. For some years only crystal structures of distantly related bacterial CYPs were available and homology modelling techniques were used to bridge the gap and produce structural models of human CYPs, and thereby obtain useful functional information. A significant step forward in the reliability of these models came seven years ago with the first crystal structure of a mammalian CYP, rabbit CYP2C5, followed by the structures of six human enzymes, CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4, and a second rabbit enzyme, CYP2B4. In this review we describe as a case study the evolution of a CYP2D6 model, leading to the validation of the model as an in silico tool for predicting binding and metabolism. This work has led directly to the successful design of CYP2D6 mutants with novel activity-including creating a testosterone hydroxylase, converting quinidine from inhibitor to substrate, creating a diclofenac hydroxylase and creating a dextromethorphan O-demethylase. Our modelling-derived hypothesis-driven integrated interdisciplinary studies have given key insight into the molecular determinants of CYP2D6 and other important drug metabolizing enzymes. PMID:18026129

  12. Dynamic Linkages Between the Transition Zone & Surface Plate Motions in 2D Models of Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, K.; Billen, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    While slab pull is considered the dominant force controlling plate motion and speed, its magnitude is controlled by slab behavior in the mantle, where tomographic studies show a wide range of possibilities from direct penetration to folding, or stagnation directly above the lower mantle (e.g. Fukao et al., 2009). Geodynamic studies have investigated various parameters, such as plate age and two phase transitions, to recreate observed behavior (e.g. Běhounková and Cízková, 2008). However, past geodynamic models have left out known slab characteristics that may have a large impact on slab behavior and our understanding of subduction processes. Mineral experiments and seismic observations have indicated the existence of additional phase transitions in the mantle transition zone that may produce buoyancy forces large enough to affect the descent of a subducting slab (e.g. Ricard et al., 2005). The current study systematically tests different common assumptions used in geodynamic models: kinematic versus free-slip boundary conditions, the effects of adiabatic heating, viscous dissipation and latent heat, compositional layering and a more complete suite of phase transitions. Final models have a complete energy equation, with eclogite, harzburgite and pyrolite lithosphere compositional layers, and seven composition-dependent phase transitions within the olivine, pyroxene and garnet polymorph minerals. Results show important feedback loops between different assumptions and new behavior from the most complete models. Kinematic models show slab weakening or breaking above the 660 km boundary and between compositional layers. The behavior in dynamic models with a free-moving trench and overriding plate is compared to the more commonly found kinematic models. The new behavior may have important implications for the depth distribution of deep earthquakes within the slab. Though the thermodynamic parameters of certain phase transitions may be uncertain, their presence and

  13. Numerical Study of Turbulence Model Predictions for the MD 30P/30N and NHLP-2D Three-Element Highlift Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Joseph H.

    1998-01-01

    This report details calculations for the McDonnell-Douglas 30P/30N and the NHLP-2D three-element highlift configurations. Calculations were performed with the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes code ISAAC to study the effects of various numerical issues on high lift predictions. These issues include the effect of numerical accuracy on the advection terms of the turbulence equations, Navier-Stokes versus the thin-layer Navier-Stokes approximation, an alternative formulation of the production term, and the performance of several turbulence models. The effect of the transition location on the NHLP-2D flow solution was investigated. Two empirical transition models were used to estimate the transition location.

  14. SU-E-T-05: A 2D EPID Transit Dosimetry Model Based On An Empirical Quadratic Formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Y; Metwaly, M; Glegg, M; Baggarley, S; Elliott, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To describe a 2D electronic portal imaging device (EPID) transit dosimetry model, based on an empirical quadratic formalism, that can predict either EPID or in-phantom dose distribution for comparisons with EPID captured image or treatment planning system (TPS) dose respectively. Methods: A quadratic equation can be used to relate the reduction in intensity of an exit beam to the equivalent path length of the attenuator. The calibration involved deriving coefficients from a set of dose planes measured for homogeneous phantoms with known thicknesses under reference conditions. In this study, calibration dose planes were measured with EPID and ionisation chamber (IC) in water for the same reference beam (6MV, 100mu, 20×20cm{sup 2}) and set of thicknesses (0–30cm). Since the same calibration conditions were used, the EPID and IC measurements can be related through the quadratic equation. Consequently, EPID transit dose can be predicted from TPS exported dose planes and in-phantom dose can be predicted using EPID distribution captured during treatment as an input. The model was tested with 4 open fields, 6 wedge fields, and 7 IMRT fields on homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Comparisons were done using 2D absolute gamma (3%/3mm) and results were validated against measurements with a commercial 2D array device. Results: The gamma pass rates for comparisons between EPID measured and predicted ranged from 93.6% to 100.0% for all fields and phantoms tested. Results from this study agreed with 2D array measurements to within 3.1%. Meanwhile, comparisons in-phantom between TPS computed and predicted ranged from 91.6% to 100.0%. Validation with 2D array device was not possible for inphantom comparisons. Conclusion: A 2D EPID transit dosimetry model for treatment verification was described and proven to be accurate. The model has the advantage of being generic and allows comparisons at the EPID plane as well as multiple planes in-phantom.

  15. 2-D Modeling of the Variability of the Solar Interior for Climate Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, S.; Li, L. H.; Spada, F.; Ventura, P.

    2012-07-01

    To establish the possible influence of solar variability on climate, it is necessary to understand the luminosity changes induced by a variable dynamo magnetic field. To accomplish this, we have developed a 2D code of the structure and evolution of the solar interior (based on the 1D YREC code), that includes rotation, magnetic fields of arbitrary configuration, and turbulence, that can be run on very short time scales (down to 1 year), and that represents all global parameters (R, L, Teff) with a relative accuracy of 1 part per million, or better. This paper discusses the motivation for this work, the structure and the physical components of the code, and its application to interpret the results of the SODISM experiment on the PICARD satellite, and of the balloon-borne Solar Disk Sextant (SDS) experiment.

  16. 2D full wave modeling for a synthetic Doppler backscattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Kubota, S.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; Holland, C.

    2012-10-15

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is a plasma diagnostic used in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices to measure the fluctuation level of intermediate wavenumber (k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s}{approx} 1) density fluctuations and the lab frame propagation velocity of turbulence. Here, a synthetic DBS diagnostic is described, which has been used for comparisons between measurements in the DIII-D tokamak and predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. To estimate the wavenumber range to which a Gaussian beam would be sensitive, a ray tracing code and a 2D finite difference, time domain full wave code are used. Experimental density profiles and magnetic geometry are used along with the experimental antenna and beam characteristics. An example of the effect of the synthetic diagnostic on the output of a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation is presented.

  17. 2D full wave modeling for a synthetic Doppler backscattering diagnostica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Holland, C.; Schmitz, L.; Kubota, S.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.

    2012-10-01

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is a plasma diagnostic used in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices to measure the fluctuation level of intermediate wavenumber (kθρs ˜ 1) density fluctuations and the lab frame propagation velocity of turbulence. Here, a synthetic DBS diagnostic is described, which has been used for comparisons between measurements in the DIII-D tokamak and predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. To estimate the wavenumber range to which a Gaussian beam would be sensitive, a ray tracing code and a 2D finite difference, time domain full wave code are used. Experimental density profiles and magnetic geometry are used along with the experimental antenna and beam characteristics. An example of the effect of the synthetic diagnostic on the output of a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation is presented.

  18. A 2-D Self-Consistent DSMC Model for Chemically Reacting Low Pressure Plasma Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, Timothy J.; Economou, Demetre; Johannes, Justine E.

    1999-06-17

    This paper will focus on the methodology of using a 2D plasma Direct Simulation Monte Carlo technique to simulate the species transport in an inductively coupled, low pressure, chemically reacting plasma system. The pressure in these systems is typically less than 20 mtorr with plasma densities of approximately 10{sup 17} {number_sign}/m{sup 3} and an ionization level of only 0.1%. This low ionization level tightly couples the neutral, ion, and electron chemistries and interactions in a system where the flow is subsonic. We present our strategy and compare simulation results to experimental data for Cl{sub 2} in a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell modified with an inductive coil.

  19. Almost Gibbsianness and Parsimonious Description of the Decimated 2d-Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Ny, Arnaud

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we complete and provide details for the existing characterizations of the decimation of the Ising model on {Z}2 in the generalized Gibbs context. We first recall a few features of the Dobrushin program of restoration of Gibbsianness and present the construction of global specifications consistent with the extremal decimated measures. We use them to prove that these renormalized measures are almost Gibbsian at any temperature and to analyse in detail its convex set of DLR measures. We also recall the weakly Gibbsian description and complete it using a potential that admits a quenched correlation decay, i.e. a well-defined configuration-dependent length beyond which this potential decays exponentially. We use these results to incorporate these decimated measures in the new framework of parsimonious random fields that has been recently developed to investigate probability aspects related to neurosciences.

  20. A mathematical model for a didactic device able to simulate a 2D Newtonian gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a mathematical model to describe a theoretical device able to simulate an inverse-square force on a test mass moving on a horizontal plane. We use two pulleys, a counterweight, a wire and a smooth rail, in addition to the test mass. The tension of the wire (i.e. the attractive force on the test mass) is determined by the position of a counterweight free to move on a rail placed under the plane. The profile of the rail is calculated in order to obtain the required Newtonian force. Details of this calculation are reported in the paper, and numerical simulations are provided in order to investigate the stability of the orbits under the effect of the main friction forces and other perturbative effects. This work points out that there are some criticalities intrinsic to the apparatus and gives some suggestions about how to minimize their impact.

  1. Interannual variability of carbon cycle implied by a 2-d atmospheric transport model.

    PubMed

    Can, Li; Xu, Li; Shao, Min; Zhang, Ren-Jian

    2004-01-01

    A 2-dimensional atmospheric transport model is deployed in a simplified CO2 inverse study. Calculated carbon flux distribution for the interval from 1981 to 1997 confirms the existence of a terrestrial carbon sink in mid-high latitude area of North Hemisphere. Strong interannual variability exists in carbon flux patterns, implying a possible link with ENSO and other natural episodes such as Pinatubo volcano eruption in 1991. Mechanism of this possible link was investigated with statistic method. Correlation analysis indicated that in North Hemisphere, climatic factors such as temperature and precipitation, to some extend, could influence the carbon cycle process of land and ocean, thus cause considerable change in carbon flux distribution. In addition, correlation study also demonstrated the possible, important role of Asian terrestrial ecosystems in carbon cycle. PMID:15559811

  2. A Model of the Effect of Uncertainty on the C elegans L2/L2d Decision

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Leon

    2014-01-01

    At the end of the first larval stage, the C elegans larva chooses between two developmental pathways, an L2 committed to reproductive development and an L2d, which has the option of undergoing reproductive development or entering the dauer diapause. I develop a quantitative model of this choice using mathematical tools developed for pricing financial options. The model predicts that the optimal decision must take into account not only the expected potential for reproductive growth, but also the uncertainty in that expected potential. Because the L2d has more flexibility than the L2, it is favored in unpredictable environments. I estimate that the ability to take uncertainty into account may increase reproductive value by as much as 5%, and discuss possible experimental tests for this ability. PMID:25029446

  3. Phase Diagram of a 2-D Plane Rotator Model with Integer and Half-Integer Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Adauto J. F.; Landau, D. P.

    1996-03-01

    A two-dimensional plane rotator spin model is simulated by employing the single cluster embeding Monte Carlo technique and the re-weighting histogram analysis. The system is described by the Hamiltonian^1 \\cal H = -J1 sum_< i,j > Si \\cdot Sj - J2 sum_< i,j > ( Si \\cdot Sj )^2. In adition to the familiar integer vortices, this model possesses half-integer vortex excitations as well. The system exhibits three low-temperature phases which may be identified by the behavior of suitably defined two-point correlation functions. The half- and integer-vortex densities as a function of temperature are calculated for several values of the parameter α = J_2/J_1. The phase boundaries are determined and the nature of the phase transitions is investigated. Research supported in part by the CNPq and the NSF. Permanent address: Departmento de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, 52171-900, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil ^1 D.H. Lee and G. Grinstein Phys. Rev. Lett. \\underline55, 541, (1985)

  4. Investigation of the Triggering Mechanism of Magnetospheric Substorm via 2-1/2 D Full-Particle Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, H.; Machida, S.

    2012-12-01

    A physical process of the substorm triggering in the Earth's Magnetotail is thought to be closely related to the magnetic reconnection and the tearing instability. Recently we proposed a new scheme of the substorm onset called "Catapult Current Sheet Relaxation (CCSR) Model " to physically understand the results from GEOTAIL and THEMIS data. The CCSR Model has characters that are the decrease of the total pressure and thinning of the current sheet at the distance about -12Re in the magnetotail a few minutes before the substorm onset, and the simultaneous occurrence of the dipolarization at X~-10Re and the magnetic reconnection at X~-20Re at the time of the onset. In this study, we investigate a stability of the current sheet and the particle acceleration via particle simulation in order to assess the validity of the CCSR model and to clarify the mechanism of substorm onset. We give an initial magnetic field structure which is akin to the Earth's dipole magnetic field together with a stretched magnetic field by thin current sheet, and further add a weak northward magnetic field at the place where Near-Earth Neutral Line is expected to be formed. The results of simulation contain similar features that characterize the CCSR Model. A physically interpretation of the simulation result with the linear instability theory as well as comparison with observations will be given.

  5. Comparison of 2-D model simulations of ozone and nitrous oxide at high latitudes with stratospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proffitt, M. H.; Solomon, S.; Loewenstein, M.

    1992-01-01

    A linear reference relationship between O3 and N2O has been used to estimate polar winter O3 loss from aircraft data taken in the lower stratosphere. Here, this relationship is evaluated at high latitudes by comparing it with a 2D model simulation and with NIMBUS 7 satellite measurements. Although comparisons with satellite measurements are limited to January through May, the model simulations are compared during other seasons. The model simulations and the satellite data are found to be consistent with the winter O3 loss analysis. It is shown that such analyses are likely to be inappropriate during other seasons.

  6. Response of the mesosphere to human-induced perturbations and solar variability calculated by a 2-D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Rashid; Brasseur, Guy; Smith, Anne; Rusch, David; Walters, Stacy; Chabrillat, Simon; Kockarts, Gaston

    2002-09-01

    We have used the improved NCAR interactive 2-D model (SOCRATES) to investigate the chemical and thermal response of the mesosphere to composition changes from the preindustrial era (˜1850) to the present, to doubling the CO2 concentration, and to the 11-year solar flux variability. The calculations show that all regions in the model mesosphere have cooled relative to the preindustrial times. The mesopause region has cooled by ˜5 K and the winter pole by up to 9 K near 60 km. Ozone mixing ratio has decreased by about 5% in the lower mesosphere and by about 30% near the summer mesopause region (caused by a dramatic increase in [OH]). Doubling the CO2 abundance cools the whole mesosphere by about 4-16 K and has a complicated effect on O3, which exhibits an alternating increase/decrease behavior from the lower mesosphere up to the mesopause region. Similar results are obtained, in both magnitude and structure, for the O3 response to a decrease in solar UV flux. Similarities are also found in the response of T, OH, and H to these two perturbations. These results lead to the conclusion that the long-term increase in the well-mixed greenhouse gases, in particular CO2, alters the thermal structure and chemical composition of the mesosphere significantly and that these anthropogenic effects are of the same magnitude as the effects associated with the 11-year solar cycle. Thus, the difference in the timescales involved suggests that the anthropogenic signal over periods of typically 10 years is smaller than the signal generated by the 11-year solar variability. Finally, analysis of the results from a simulation of the combined perturbations (2 × CO2 + 11-year solar variability) shows that, for the most part, the solar variability does not interact with increasing CO2 and vice versa; that is, the two effects are additive.

  7. Combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction and geotechnical investigations for Bukit Bunuh complex crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azwin, I. N.; Saad, Rosli; Saidin, Mokhtar; Nordiana, M. M.; Anderson Bery, Andy; Hidayah, I. N. E.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in studying impact crater on earth has increased tremendously due to its importance in geologic events, earth inhabitant history as well as economic value. The existences of few shock metamorphism and crater morphology evidences are discovered in Bukit Bunuh, Malaysia thus detailed studies are performed using geophysical and geotechnical methods to verify the type of the crater and characteristics accordingly. This paper presents the combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction, geotechnical SPT N value, moisture content and RQD within the study area. Three stages of data acquisition are made starting with regional study followed by detailed study on West side and East side. Bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity were digitized from 2-D resistivity and seismic sections at specific distance and depth for corresponding boreholes and samples taken. Generally, Bukit Bunuh shows the complex crater characteristics. Standard table of bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity against SPT N value, moisture content and RQD are produce according to geological classifications of impact crater; inside crater, rim/slumped terrace and outside crater.

  8. 2D models of gas flow and ice grain acceleration in Enceladus' vents using DSMC methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Orenthal J.; Combi, Michael R.; Tenishev, Valeriy M.

    2015-09-01

    The gas distribution of the Enceladus water vapor plume and the terminal speeds of ejected ice grains are physically linked to its subsurface fissures and vents. It is estimated that the gas exits the fissures with speeds of ∼300-1000 m/s, while the micron-sized grains are ejected with speeds comparable to the escape speed (Schmidt, J. et al. [2008]. Nature 451, 685-688). We investigated the effects of isolated axisymmetric vent geometries on subsurface gas distributions, and in turn, the effects of gas drag on grain acceleration. Subsurface gas flows were modeled using a collision-limiter Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique in order to consider a broad range of flow regimes (Bird, G. [1994]. Molecular Gas Dynamics and the Direct Simulation of Gas Flows. Oxford University Press, Oxford; Titov, E.V. et al. [2008]. J. Propul. Power 24(2), 311-321). The resulting DSMC gas distributions were used to determine the drag force for the integration of ice grain trajectories in a test particle model. Simulations were performed for diffuse flows in wide channels (Reynolds number ∼10-250) and dense flows in narrow tubular channels (Reynolds number ∼106). We compared gas properties like bulk speed and temperature, and the terminal grain speeds obtained at the vent exit with inferred values for the plume from Cassini data. In the simulations of wide fissures with dimensions similar to that of the Tiger Stripes the resulting subsurface gas densities of ∼1014-1020 m-3 were not sufficient to accelerate even micron-sized ice grains to the Enceladus escape speed. In the simulations of narrow tubular vents with radii of ∼10 m, the much denser flows with number densities of 1021-1023 m-3 accelerated micron-sized grains to bulk gas speed of ∼600 m/s. Further investigations are required to understand the complex relationship between the vent geometry, gas source rate and the sizes and speeds of ejected grains.

  9. The structure of salt bridges between Arg(+) and Glu(-) in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu(-)) and arginine (Arg(+)) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu(-) and Arg(+), which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu(-)⋯Arg(+) salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  10. The structure of salt bridges between Arg+ and Glu- in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R.; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu-) and arginine (Arg+) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu- and Arg+, which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu-⋯Arg+ salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  11. A review on 2D models for the description of pantographic fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Luca; Barchiesi, Emilio; Turco, Emilio; Rizzi, Nicola Luigi

    2016-10-01

    A review on models for pantographic fabrics, a new promising kind of metamaterials, is presented. We treat those models that are able to capture the peculiar effects conferred by their specific microstructure and that can be generalized for the description of more complex metamaterials. For each approach, model formulation and modeling assumptions are discussed along with the presentation of numerical solutions in exemplary cases and no attempt is made to model damage and failure phenomena.

  12. Experimental investigation of photoionization cross section for the 3d 2D excited states of lithium and sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Ali; Shah, Mehmood; Shahzada, Shaista; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Haq, Sami-ul-

    2013-09-01

    We report experimentally measured photoionization cross sections for the 3 d 2D excited states of lithium and sodium at first ionization threshold. The experiments were performed using two dye lasers simultaneously pumped by the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. The vapor contentment and the detection system was a thermionic diode ion detector operating in a space charge limited mode. Photoionization cross sections of the excited states were deduced from the dependence of ion signal intensity on the ionizing laser energies as 19 ± 3 Mb and 21.5 ± 3.5 Mb for lithium and sodium respectively, which are in good agreement with the previously computed theoretical results.

  13. Local Mass Transfer Coefficient for Idealized 2D Urban Street Canyon Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Ka Kit; Liu, Chun-Ho

    2011-09-01

    Human activities in urban areas is one of the major sources of anthropogenic releases in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The mechanism of urban morphology for the heat and mass transfer in built environment is thus an attractive topic in the research community. In this paper, a series of laboratory measurements is conducted to elucidate the mass transfer from hypothetical urban roughness constructed by idealized 2D street canyons. The experiments are carried out in the wind tunnel in the University of Hong Kong. The urban ABL structure inside the wind tunnel is controlled by placing small cubic Styrofoam blocks upstream of the test section. The street canyons are fabricated by movable rectangular acrylic blocks so that different building height to street width (aspect) ratios are examined. The height of building blocks is kept minimum to make sure that the urban ABL over the street canyons is high enough for fully developed turbulent flows. The prevailing wind is normal to the street axis, demonstrating the scenario of least pollutant removal from the street canyons to the urban ABL. The sample street canyon is covered by soaked filter papers to represent uniform mass concentrations on the building facades and ground surface. The wet bulb temperature of the filter papers is continuously monitored to ensure saturated conditions. Their weight before and after an experiment is used to measure the amount of water evaporated. Preliminary results illustrate the local mass transfer coefficient distribution for aspect ratios 1/4, 1/2, 1, and 2, which are comparable with those available in literuatre.

  14. Towards Simulating the Transverse Ising Model in a 2D Array of Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Brian

    2013-05-01

    Two-dimensional Coulomb crystals provide a useful platform for large-scale quantum simulation. Penning traps enable confinement of large numbers of ions (>100) and allow for the tunable-range spin-spin interactions demonstrated in linear ion strings, facilitating simulation of quantum magnetism at a scale that is currently intractable on classical computers. We readily confine hundreds of Doppler laser-cooled 9Be+ within a Penning trap, producing a planar array of ions with self-assembled triangular order. The transverse ``drumhead'' modes of our 2D crystal along with the valence electron spin of Be+ serve as a resource for generating spin-motion and spin-spin entanglement. Applying a spin-dependent optical dipole force (ODF) to the ion array, we perform spectroscopy and thermometry of individual drumhead modes. This ODF also allows us to engineer long-range Ising spin couplings of either ferromagnetic or anti-ferromagnetic character whose approximate power-law scaling with inter-ion distance, d, may be varied continuously from 1 /d0 to 1 /d3. An effective transverse magnetic field is applied via microwave radiation at the ~124-GHz spin-flip frequency, and ground states of the effective Ising Hamiltonian may in principle be prepared adiabatically by slowly decreasing this transverse field in the presence of the induced Ising coupling. Long-range anti-ferromagnetic interactions are of particular interest due to their inherent spin frustration and resulting large, near-degenerate manifold of ground states. We acknowledge support from NIST and the DARPA-OLE program.

  15. Transport Equations Resolution By N-BEE Anti-Dissipative Scheme In 2D Model Of Low Pressure Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kraloua, B.; Hennad, A.

    2008-09-23

    The aim of this paper is to determine electric and physical properties by 2D modelling of glow discharge low pressure in continuous regime maintained by term constant source. This electric discharge is confined in reactor plan-parallel geometry. This reactor is filled by Argon monatomic gas. Our continuum model the order two is composed the first three moments the Boltzmann's equations coupled with Poisson's equation by self consistent method. These transport equations are discretized by the finite volumes method. The equations system is resolved by a new technique, it is about the N-BEE explicit scheme using the time splitting method.

  16. 2D Model for Diffusion of Oxygen with Biochemical Reaction During Biofilm Formation Process in Static Aqueous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puyate, Y. T.; Rim-Rukeh, A.

    A 2D model that describes diffusion of oxygen with biochemical reaction during biofilm formation process in static aqueous medium is presented. The analysis is based on X60 steel placed at the bottom of a container containing produced water inoculated with Leptothrix discophora (iron-oxidizing bacteria). These bacteria form biofilms on the exposed surfaces of the metal. The biofilm-microorganisms absorb oxygen from the produced water through biochemical reaction, resulting in transfer of oxygen from the bulk liquid phase to the biofilm. Predictions of the model are compared with experimental data and good agreement is obtained.

  17. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Variational approach to the scaling function of the 2D Ising model in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangazeev, Vladimir V.; Batchelor, Murray T.; Bazhanov, Vladimir V.; Dudalev, Michael Yu

    2009-01-01

    The universal scaling function of the square lattice Ising model in a magnetic field is obtained numerically via Baxter's variational corner transfer matrix approach. The high precision numerical data are in perfect agreement with the remarkable field theory results obtained by Fonseca and Zamolodchikov, as well as with many previously known exact and numerical results for the 2D Ising model. This includes excellent agreement with analytic results for the magnetic susceptibility obtained by Orrick, Nickel, Guttmann and Perk. In general, the high precision of the numerical results underlines the potential and full power of the variational corner transfer matrix approach.

  18. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  19. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part I. Low-order thermal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating the temperature distribution within Li-ion batteries during operation is critical for safety and control purposes. Although existing control-oriented thermal models - such as thermal equivalent circuits (TEC) - are computationally efficient, they only predict average temperatures, and are unable to predict the spatially resolved temperature distribution throughout the cell. We present a low-order 2D thermal model of a cylindrical battery based on a Chebyshev spectral-Galerkin (SG) method, capable of predicting the full temperature distribution with a similar efficiency to a TEC. The model accounts for transient heat generation, anisotropic heat conduction, and non-homogeneous convection boundary conditions. The accuracy of the model is validated through comparison with finite element simulations, which show that the 2-D temperature field (r, z) of a large format (64 mm diameter) cell can be accurately modelled with as few as 4 states. Furthermore, the performance of the model for a range of Biot numbers is investigated via frequency analysis. For larger cells or highly transient thermal dynamics, the model order can be increased for improved accuracy. The incorporation of this model in a state estimation scheme with experimental validation against thermocouple measurements is presented in the companion contribution (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378775316308163)

  20. Development of 2D dynamic model for hydrogen-fed and methane-fed solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X. J.; Fong, K. F.

    2016-10-01

    A new two-dimensional (2D) dynamic model is developed in Fortran to study the mass and energy transport, the velocity field and the electrochemical phenomena of high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The key feature of this model is that gas properties, reaction heat, open circuit voltage, ohmic voltage and exchange current density are temperature-dependent. Based on this, the change of gas temperature and related characteristics can be evaluated in this study. The transient performances of SOFC, like heat-up and start-up processes, are therefore assessed accordingly. In this 2D dynamic SOFC model, chemical and electrochemical reaction, flow field, mass and energy transfer models are coupled in order to determine the current density, the mass fraction and the temperature of gas species. Mass, momentum and energy balance equations are discretized by finite difference method. Performance evaluation in current density, electrical efficiency and overall efficiency is conducted for the effects of different operating parameters in SOFC. The present model can serve as a valuable tool for in-depth performance evaluation of other design and operating parameters of SOFC unit, as well as further dynamic simulation and optimization of SOFC as a prime mover in cogeneration or trigeneration system.

  1. Ultrasonic field profile evaluation in acoustically inhomogeneous anisotropic materials using 2D ray tracing model: Numerical and experimental comparison.

    PubMed

    Kolkoori, S R; Rahman, M-U; Chinta, P K; Ktreutzbruck, M; Rethmeier, M; Prager, J

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic materials is difficult to examine because of the directional dependency of elastic properties. Simulation tools play an important role in developing advanced reliable ultrasonic non destructive testing techniques for the inspection of anisotropic materials particularly austenitic cladded materials, austenitic welds and dissimilar welds. In this contribution we present an adapted 2D ray tracing model for evaluating ultrasonic wave fields quantitatively in inhomogeneous anisotropic materials. Inhomogeneity in the anisotropic material is represented by discretizing into several homogeneous layers. According to ray tracing model, ultrasonic ray paths are traced during its energy propagation through various discretized layers of the material and at each interface the problem of reflection and transmission is solved. The presented algorithm evaluates the transducer excited ultrasonic fields accurately by taking into account the directivity of the transducer, divergence of the ray bundle, density of rays and phase relations as well as transmission coefficients. The ray tracing model is able to calculate the ultrasonic wave fields generated by a point source as well as a finite dimension transducer. The ray tracing model results are validated quantitatively with the results obtained from 2D Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique (EFIT) on several configurations generally occurring in the ultrasonic non destructive testing of anisotropic materials. Finally, the quantitative comparison of ray tracing model results with experiments on 32mm thick austenitic weld material and 62mm thick austenitic cladded material is discussed.

  2. Evaluating sludge minimization caused by predation and viral infection based on the extended activated sludge model No. 2d.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Qilin; Cao, Yali; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-10-15

    The Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) was extended to incorporate the processes of both predation and viral infection. The extended model was used to evaluate the contributions of predation and viral infection to sludge minimization in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system enriching polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs). Three individual decay processes formulated according to the general model rules were used in the extended model. The model was firstly calibrated and validated by different experimental results. It was used to evaluate the potential extent of predation and viral infection on sludge minimization. Simulations indicate that predation contributes roughly two times more to sludge minimization than viral infection in the SBR system enriching PAOs. The sensitivity analyses of the selected key parameters reveal that there are thresholds on both predation and viral infection rates, if they are too large a minimal sludge retention time is obtained and the effluent quality is deteriorating. Due to the thresholds, the contributions of predation and viral infection to sludge minimization are limited to a maximal extent of about 21% and 9%, respectively. However, it should be noted that the parameters concerning predation and viral infection were not calibrated separately by independent experiment in our study due to the lack of an effective method, especially for the parameters regarding viral infection. Therefore, it is essential to better evaluate these parameters in the future.

  3. Field lines and magnetic surfaces in a two-component slab/2D model of interplanetary magnetic fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Pontius, D. H., Jr.; Gray, P. C.; Bieber, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    A two-component model for the spectrum of interplanetary magnetic fluctuations was proposed on the basis of ISEE observations, and has found an intriguing level of application in other solar wind studies. The model fluctuations consist of a fraction of 'slab' fluctuations, varying only in the direction parallel to the locally uniform mean magnetic field B(0) and a complement of 2D (two-dimensional) fluctuations that vary in the directions transverse to B(0). We have developed an spectral method computational algorithm for computing the magnetic flux surfaces (flux tubes) associated with the composite model, based upon a precise analogy with equations for ideal transport of a passive scalar in planar two dimensional geometry. Visualization of various composite models will be presented, including the 80 percent 2D/ 20 percent slab model with delta B/B(0) approximately equals 1 and a minus 5/3 spectral law, that is thought to approximately represent a snapshot of solar wind turbulence. Characteristically, the visualizations show that flux tubes, even when defined as regular on some plane, shred and disperse rapidly as they are viewed along the parallel direction. This diffusive process, which generalizes the standard picture of field line random walk, will be discussed in detail. Evidently, the traditional picture that flux tubes randomize like strands of spaghetti with a uniform tangle along the axial direction is in need of modification.

  4. Method to Rapidly Collect Thousands of Velocity Observations to Validate Million-Element 2D Hydrodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, J. R.; Pasternack, G. B.; Bratovich, P.; Massa, D.; Reedy, G.; Johnson, T.

    2010-12-01

    Two-dimensional (depth-averaged) hydrodynamic models have existed for decades and are used to study a variety of hydrogeomorphic processes as well as to design river rehabilitation projects. Rapid computer and coding advances are revolutionizing the size and detail of 2D models. Meanwhile, advances in topo mapping and environmental informatics are providing the data inputs to drive large, detailed simulations. Million-element computational meshes are in hand. With simulations of this size and detail, the primary challenge has shifted to finding rapid and inexpensive means for testing model predictions against observations. Standard methods for collecting velocity data include boat-mounted ADCP and point-based sensors on boats or wading rods. These methods are labor intensive and often limited to a narrow flow range. Also, they generate small datasets at a few cross-sections, which is inadequate to characterize the statistical structure of the relation between predictions and observations. Drawing on the long-standing oceanographic method of using drogues to track water currents, previous studies have demonstrated the potential of small dGPS units to obtain surface velocity in rivers. However, dGPS is too inaccurate to test 2D models. Also, there is financial risk in losing drogues in rough currents. In this study, an RTK GPS unit was mounted onto a manned whitewater kayak. The boater positioned himself into the current and used floating debris to maintain a speed and heading consistent with the ambient surface flow field. RTK GPS measurements were taken ever 5 sec. From these positions, a 2D velocity vector was obtained. The method was tested over ~20 km of the lower Yuba River in California in flows ranging from 500-5000 cfs, yielding 5816 observations. To compare velocity magnitude against the 2D model-predicted depth-averaged value, kayak-based surface values were scaled down by an optimized constant (0.72), which had no negative effect on regression analysis

  5. 3D/2D model-to-image registration applied to TIPS surgery.

    PubMed

    Jomier, Julien; Bullitt, Elizabeth; Van Horn, Mark; Pathak, Chetna; Aylward, Stephen R

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a novel model-to-image registration technique which aligns a 3-dimensional model of vasculature with two semiorthogonal fluoroscopic projections. Our vascular registration method is used to intra-operatively initialize the alignment of a catheter and a preoperative vascular model in the context of image-guided TIPS (Transjugular, Intrahepatic, Portosystemic Shunt formation) surgery. Registration optimization is driven by the intensity information from the projection pairs at sample points along the centerlines of the model. Our algorithm shows speed, accuracy and consistency given clinical data.

  6. Modeling water flow and nitrate dynamics in a plastic mulch vegetable cultivation system using HYDRUS-2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipović, Vilim; Romić, Davor; Romić, Marija; Matijević, Lana; Mallmann, Fábio J. K.; Robinson, David A.

    2016-04-01

    Growing vegetables commercially requires intensive management and involves high irrigation demands and input of agrochemicals. Plastic mulch application in combination with drip irrigation is a common agricultural management technique practiced due to variety of benefits to the crop, mostly vegetable biomass production. However, the use of these techniques can result in various impacts on water and nutrient distribution in underlying soil and consequently affect nutrient leaching towards groundwater resources. The aim of this work is to estimate the effect of plastic mulch cover in combination with drip irrigation on water and nitrate dynamics in soil using HYDRUS-2D model. The field site was located in Croatian costal karst area on a Gleysol (WRB). The experiment was designed according to the split-plot design in three repetitions and was divided into plots with plastic mulch cover (MULCH) and control plots with bare soil (CONT). Each of these plots received applications of three levels of nitrogen fertilizer: 70, 140, and 210 kg per ha. All plots were equipped with drip irrigation and cropped with bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Bianca F1). Lysimeters were installed at 90 cm depth in all plots and were used for monitoring the water and nitrate outflow. HYDRUS-2D was used for modeling the water and nitrogen outflow in the MULCH and CONT plots, implementing the proper boundary conditions. HYDRUS-2D simulated results showed good fitting to the field site observed data in both cumulative water and nitrate outflow, with high level of agreement. Water flow simulations produced model efficiency of 0.84 for CONT and 0.56 for MULCH plots, while nitrate simulations showed model efficiency ranging from 0.67 to 0.83 and from 0.70 to 0.93, respectively. Additional simulations were performed with the absence of the lysimeter, revealing faster transport of nitrates below drip line in the CONT plots, mostly because of the increased surface area subjected to precipitation

  7. A computationally efficient hybrid 2D/3D thin film dislocation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrafan, Siavash

    Substantial research has been devoted to attempting to understand how dislocation structures evolve and how they affect device properties. However, current dislocation simulation methods are only able to model highly idealized systems accurately. The three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics models, in particular, are too computationally intensive for modelling high dislocation densities and their resultant deformations that are observed in some real applications. In this thesis, we propose a novel method to exploit the quasi-two-dimensional nature of three-dimensional dislocation loops in a thin film to model their behaviors. For most film configurations, simulation performance can be greatly enhanced by implementing a hybrid two-dimensional/three-dimensional model without losing significant fidelity. In this technique, misfits stress fields are modeled by superposing multiple two-dimensional models. Threads are modeled with a more traditional three-dimensional implementation as they move through the misfit stress field. Using this innovative technique, much higher strains and/or dislocation densities could be studied.

  8. Collective Flocking Dynamics: Long Rang Order in a Non-Equilibrium 2D XY Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yuhai

    1996-03-01

    We propose and study a non-equilibrium continuum dynamical model for the collective motion of large groups of biological organisms (e.g., flocks of birds, slime molds, schools of fishs, etc.) (J. Toner and Y. Tu, Phys. Rev. Lett.), 75(23), 4326(1995) Our model becomes highly non-trivial, and different from the equilibrium model, for dmodel exhibits a broken continuous symmetry even in d=2. Our model describes a large universality class of microscopic rules, including those recently simulated by Vicsek et. al.( T. Vicsek et. al. , Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75, 1226(95).

  9. Neurochemical abnormalities in anterior cingulate cortex on betel quid dependence: a 2D 1H MRS investigation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Li, Jianjun; Huang, Shixiong; Zhao, Zhongyan; Yang, Guoshuai; Pan, Mengjie; Li, Changqing; Chen, Feng; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    The effects of betel quid dependence (BQD) on biochemical changes remain largely unknown. Individuals with impaired cognitive control of behavior often reveal altered neurochemicals in Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) and those changes are usually earlier than structural alteration. Here, we examined BQD individuals (n = 33) and age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy control participants (n = 32) in an 2D 1H-MRS study to observe brain biochemical alterations in the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC) associated with the severity of BQD and duration of BQD. In the bilateral ACC, our study found NAA/Cr were lower in BQD individuals compared to the healthy controls, Cho/Cr and Glx/Cr were higher in individuals with BQD compared to the healthy group, but increase was noted for mI/Cr in BQD individuals only in the left ACC. NAA/Cr ratios of the right ACC negatively correlated with BQDS and duration, NAA/Cr ratios of the left ACC negatively correlated with duration, Glx/Cr ratios of the right ACC positively correlated with BQDS. The findings of the study support previous analyses of a role for ACC area in the mediation of BQ addiction and mechanistically explain past observations of reduced ACC grey matter in BQD patients. These data jointly point to state related abnormalities of BQ effect and provide a novel strategy of therapeutic intervention designed to normalize Glu transmission and function during treating BQ addiction. PMID:26885276

  10. A computational model that recovers the 3D shape of an object from a single 2D retinal representation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Steinman, Robert M

    2009-05-01

    Human beings perceive 3D shapes veridically, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The problem of producing veridical shape percepts is computationally difficult because the 3D shapes have to be recovered from 2D retinal images. This paper describes a new model, based on a regularization approach, that does this very well. It uses a new simplicity principle composed of four shape constraints: viz., symmetry, planarity, maximum compactness and minimum surface. Maximum compactness and minimum surface have never been used before. The model was tested with random symmetrical polyhedra. It recovered their 3D shapes from a single randomly-chosen 2D image. Neither learning, nor depth perception, was required. The effectiveness of the maximum compactness and the minimum surface constraints were measured by how well the aspect ratio of the 3D shapes was recovered. These constraints were effective; they recovered the aspect ratio of the 3D shapes very well. Aspect ratios recovered by the model were compared to aspect ratios adjusted by four human observers. They also adjusted aspect ratios very well. In those rare cases, in which the human observers showed large errors in adjusted aspect ratios, their errors were very similar to the errors made by the model. PMID:18621410

  11. FireStem2D--a two-dimensional heat transfer model for simulating tree stem injury in fires.

    PubMed

    Chatziefstratiou, Efthalia K; Bohrer, Gil; Bova, Anthony S; Subramanian, Ravishankar; Frasson, Renato P M; Scherzer, Amy; Butler, Bret W; Dickinson, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    FireStem2D, a software tool for predicting tree stem heating and injury in forest fires, is a physically-based, two-dimensional model of stem thermodynamics that results from heating at the bark surface. It builds on an earlier one-dimensional model (FireStem) and provides improved capabilities for predicting fire-induced mortality and injury before a fire occurs by resolving stem moisture loss, temperatures through the stem, degree of bark charring, and necrotic depth around the stem. We present the results of numerical parameterization and model evaluation experiments for FireStem2D that simulate laboratory stem-heating experiments of 52 tree sections from 25 trees. We also conducted a set of virtual sensitivity analysis experiments to test the effects of unevenness of heating around the stem and with aboveground height using data from two studies: a low-intensity surface fire and a more intense crown fire. The model allows for improved understanding and prediction of the effects of wildland fire on injury and mortality of trees of different species and sizes.

  12. FireStem2D – A Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer Model for Simulating Tree Stem Injury in Fires

    PubMed Central

    Chatziefstratiou, Efthalia K.; Bohrer, Gil; Bova, Anthony S.; Subramanian, Ravishankar; Frasson, Renato P. M.; Scherzer, Amy; Butler, Bret W.; Dickinson, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    FireStem2D, a software tool for predicting tree stem heating and injury in forest fires, is a physically-based, two-dimensional model of stem thermodynamics that results from heating at the bark surface. It builds on an earlier one-dimensional model (FireStem) and provides improved capabilities for predicting fire-induced mortality and injury before a fire occurs by resolving stem moisture loss, temperatures through the stem, degree of bark charring, and necrotic depth around the stem. We present the results of numerical parameterization and model evaluation experiments for FireStem2D that simulate laboratory stem-heating experiments of 52 tree sections from 25 trees. We also conducted a set of virtual sensitivity analysis experiments to test the effects of unevenness of heating around the stem and with aboveground height using data from two studies: a low-intensity surface fire and a more intense crown fire. The model allows for improved understanding and prediction of the effects of wildland fire on injury and mortality of trees of different species and sizes. PMID:23894599

  13. A hydrodynamically-consistent MRT lattice Boltzmann model on a 2D rectangular grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng; Min, Haoda; Guo, Zhaoli; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2016-12-01

    A multiple-relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann (LB) model on a D2Q9 rectangular grid is designed theoretically and validated numerically in the present work. By introducing stress components into the equilibrium moments, this MRT-LB model restores the isotropy of diffusive momentum transport at the macroscopic level (or in the continuum limit), leading to moment equations that are fully consistent with the Navier-Stokes equations. The model is derived by an inverse design process which is described in detail. Except one moment associated with the energy square, all other eight equilibrium moments can be theoretically and uniquely determined. The model is then carefully validated using both the two-dimensional decaying Taylor-Green vortex flow and lid-driven cavity flow, with different grid aspect ratios. The corresponding results from an earlier model (Bouzidi et al. (2001) [28]) are also presented for comparison. The results of Bouzidi et al.'s model show problems associated with anisotropy of viscosity coefficients, while the present model exhibits full isotropy and is accurate and stable.

  14. Numerical modeling of ground-penetrating radar in 2-D using MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, James; Knight, Rosemary

    2006-11-01

    We present MATLAB codes for finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) in two dimensions. Surface-based reflection GPR is modeled using a transverse magnetic (TM-) mode formulation. Crosshole and vertical radar profiling (VRP) geometries are modeled using a transverse electric (TE-) mode formulation. Matrix notation is used in the codes wherever possible to optimize them for speed in the MATLAB environment. To absorb waves at the edges of the modeling grid, we implement perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundaries. Although our codes are two-dimensional and do not incorporate features such as dispersion in electrical properties, they capture many of the important elements of GPR surveying and run at a fraction of the computational cost of more elaborate algorithms. In addition, the codes are well commented, relatively easy to understand, and can be easily modified for the user's specific purpose.

  15. The effective half-filled band model is inappropriate for the dimerized 2D organic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Niladri; Clay, R. Torsten; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2013-03-01

    The antiferromagnetism in κ-(ET)2X can be understood within the effective 1/2-filled band anisotropic triangular lattice Hubbard Hamiltonian for strong anisotropy. DMFT theories have claimed antiferromagnetic-to-superconductor transition within the same model, as the anistropy is reduced. In previous work we have shown the absence of superconductivity within the triangular lattice 1/2-filled band Hubbard model for any Hubbard U and any anisotropy. Other DMFT approaches theories have claimed superconductivity within the so-called Hubbard-Heisenberg model, which incorporates an additional antiferromagnetic spin-exchange over and above that due to the Hubbard U. Very recent work has also claimed a valence-bond solid (VBS) phase within the Hubbard-Heisenberg model, which would seemingly explain the observed VBS phase in EtMe3P[Pd(dmit)2]2. We report exact calculations that show that neither the VBS nor the superconducting phase occur within the Hubbard-Heisenberg model, showing clearly that the effective 1/2-filled band model is unsuitable for describing the complete phase space of the κ-(ET)2X. Our work raises serious doubts about the DMFT theories of superconductivity of metal intercalated C60 and picene. Supported by DOE Grant Number: DE-FG02-06ER46315

  16. Multi-level model for 2D human motion analysis and description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foures, Thomas; Joly, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the proposition of a model for human motion analysis in a video. Its main caracteristic is to adapt itself automatically to the current resolution, the actual quality of the picture, or the level of precision required by a given application, due to its possible decomposition into several hierarchical levels. The model is region-based to address some analysis processing needs. The top level of the model is only defined with 5 ribbons, which can be cut into sub-ribbons regarding to a given (or an expected) level of details. Matching process between model and current picture consists in the comparison of extracted subject shape with a graphical rendering of the model built on the base of some computed parameters. The comparison is processed by using a chamfer matching algorithm. In our developments, we intend to realize a platform of interaction between a dancer and tools synthetizing abstract motion pictures and music in the conditions of a real-time dialogue between a human and a computer. In consequence, we use this model in a perspective of motion description instead of motion recognition: no a priori gestures are supposed to be recognized as far as no a priori application is specially targeted. The resulting description will be made following a Description Scheme compliant with the movement notation called "Labanotation".

  17. Enhanced Kalman Filtering for a 2D CFD NS Wind Farm Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doekemeijer, B. M.; van Wingerden, J. W.; Boersma, S.; Pao, L. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbines are often grouped together for financial reasons, but due to wake development this usually results in decreased turbine lifetimes and power capture, and thereby an increased levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Wind farm control aims to minimize this cost by operating turbines at their optimal control settings. Most state-of-the-art control algorithms are open-loop and rely on low fidelity, static flow models. Closed-loop control relying on a dynamic model and state observer has real potential to further decrease wind's LCOE, but is often too computationally expensive for practical use. In this paper two time-efficient Kalman filter (KF) variants are outlined incorporating the medium fidelity, dynamic flow model “WindFarmSimulator” (WFSim). This model relies on a discretized set of Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions to predict the flow in wind farms at low computational cost. The filters implemented are an Ensemble KF and an Approximate KF. Simulations in which a high fidelity simulation model represents the true wind farm show that these filters are 101 —102 times faster than a regular KF with comparable or better performance, correcting for wake dynamics that are not modeled in WFSim (noticeably, wake meandering and turbine hub effects). This is a first big step towards real-time closed-loop control for wind farms.

  18. Estimating 3D movements from 2D observations using a continuous model of helical swimming.

    PubMed

    Gurarie, Eliezer; Grünbaum, Daniel; Nishizaki, Michael T

    2011-06-01

    Helical swimming is among the most common movement behaviors in a wide range of microorganisms, and these movements have direct impacts on distributions, aggregations, encounter rates with prey, and many other fundamental ecological processes. Microscopy and video technology enable the automated acquisition of large amounts of tracking data; however, these data are typically two-dimensional. The difficulty of quantifying the third movement component complicates understanding of the biomechanical causes and ecological consequences of helical swimming. We present a versatile continuous stochastic model-the correlated velocity helical movement (CVHM) model-that characterizes helical swimming with intrinsic randomness and autocorrelation. The model separates an organism's instantaneous velocity into a slowly varying advective component and a perpendicularly oriented rotation, with velocities, magnitude of stochasticity, and autocorrelation scales defined for both components. All but one of the parameters of the 3D model can be estimated directly from a two-dimensional projection of helical movement with no numerical fitting, making it computationally very efficient. As a case study, we estimate swimming parameters from videotaped trajectories of a toxic unicellular alga, Heterosigma akashiwo (Raphidophyceae). The algae were reared from five strains originally collected from locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, where they have caused Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). We use the CVHM model to quantify cell-level and strain-level differences in all movement parameters, demonstrating the utility of the model for identifying strains that are difficult to distinguish by other means. PMID:20725795

  19. 2D Global Attenuation Model of the Upper Mantle from Combined Analysis of Surface Wave Phase and Amplitude Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z.; Masters, G.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a technique that uses a cluster analysis method to measure Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude anomalies. The measurements are made on the vertical components of all permanent stations recording LHZ data from IRIS. We currently consider earthquakes with Ms>5.5 between 1990 and 2007. Joint inversions for 2D phase velocity and attenuation maps are performed, allowing the coupling through physical dispersion (e.g. Zhou 2009). As demonstrated in Dalton and Ekstrom (2006), correcting the effect of focusing-defocusing is crucial in order to obtain reliable attenuation structures. Ray theory, which has been used to date, may not give reliable predictions of such effects, because it depends strongly on short wavelength velocity structures and so is very sensitive to how the phase velocity maps are smoothed. Instead, we use the 2D finite frequency amplitude kernel (Zhou et al, 2004) to model the focusing-defocusing effect. Attenuation models and evaluations of model error and resolution will be presented.

  20. Investigation of CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 Interactions of Withania somnifera and Centella asiatica in Human Liver Microsomes.

    PubMed

    Savai, Jay; Varghese, Alice; Pandita, Nancy; Chintamaneni, Meena

    2015-05-01

    Withania somnifera is commonly used as a rejuvenator, whereas Centella asiatica is well known for its anxiolytic and nootropic effects. The present study aims at investigating the effect of crude extracts and principal phytoconstituents of both the medicinal plants with CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 enzyme activity in human liver microsomes (HLM). Phytoconstituents were quantified in the crude extracts of both the medicinal plants using reverse phase HPLC. Crude extracts and phytoconstituents of W. somnifera showed no significant interaction with both CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 enzymes in HLM. Of the crude extracts of C. asiatica screened in vitro, methanolic extract showed potent noncompetitive inhibition of only CYP3A4 enzyme (Ki-64.36 ± 1.82 µg/mL), whereas ethanol solution extract showed potent noncompetitive inhibition of only CYP2D6 enzyme (Ki-36.3 ± 0.44 µg/mL). The flavonoids, quercetin, and kaempferol showed potent (IC50 values less than 100 μM) inhibition of CYP3A4 activity, whereas quercetin alone showed potent inhibition of CYP2D6 activity in HLM. Because methanolic extract of C. asiatica showed a relatively high percentage content of quercetin and kaempferol than ethanol solution extract, the inhibitory effect of methanolic extract on CYP3A4 enzyme activity could be attributed to the flavonoids. Thus, co-administration of the alcoholic extracts of C. asiatica with drugs that are substrates of CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 enzymes may lead to undesirable herb-drug interactions in humans.

  1. Experimental investigation of compound-specific dilution of solute plumes in saturated porous media: 2-D vs. 3-D flow-through systems.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf; Grathwohl, Peter; Rolle, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Dilution of solute plumes in groundwater strongly depends on transverse mixing. Thus, the correct parameterization of transverse dispersion is of critical importance for the quantitative description of solute transport. In this study we perform flow-through laboratory experiments to investigate the influence of transport dimensionality on transverse mixing. We present a high-resolution experimental setup to study solute dilution and transverse dispersion in three-dimensional porous media. We conduct multi-tracer experiments in the new 3-D setup and compare the results with the outcomes of analogous tracer experiments performed in a quasi 2-D system. We work under steady-state flow and transport conditions and consider a range of velocities relevant for groundwater flow (0.5-8 m/day). Transverse dispersion coefficients are determined from high-resolution concentration profiles at the outlet of the flow-through chambers (7×7 ports in the 3-D setup and 7 ports in the quasi 2-D system), considering conservative tracers with significantly different aqueous diffusion coefficients, namely fluorescein and dissolved oxygen. To quantify dilution in the 2-D and 3-D systems, we experimentally determine the flux-related dilution index using the flow rates and the concentrations measured at the inlet and outlet ports, and we propose semi-analytical expressions to predict its evolution with travel distance in uniform groundwater flow. The experimental results in the quasi 2-D and 3-D flow-through systems are consistent and show a compound-specific behavior of the transverse dispersion coefficient and its non-linear dependence on the seepage velocity in both setups. The degree of dilution and the compound-specific effects of transverse dispersion are considerably more pronounced in 3-D than in quasi 2-D transport systems.

  2. Unsteady separation experiments on 2-D airfoils, 3-D wings, and model helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorber, Peter F.; Carta, Franklin O.

    1992-01-01

    Information on unsteady separation and dynamic stall is being obtained from two experimental programs that have been underway at United Technologies Research Center since 1984. The first program is designed to obtain detailed surface pressure and boundary layer condition information during high amplitude pitching oscillations of a large (17.3 in. chord) model wing in a wind tunnel. The second program involves the construction and testing of a pressure-instrumented model helicopter rotor. This presentation describes some of the results of these experiments, and in particular compares the detailed dynamic stall inception information obtained from the oscillating wing with the unsteady separation and reverse flow results measured on the retreating blade side of the model rotor during wind tunnel testing.

  3. The continuum phase diagram of the 2d non-commutative λϕ 4 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía-Díaz, Héctor; Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Panero, Marco

    2014-10-01

    We present a non-perturbative study of the λ ϕ 4 model on a non-commutative plane. The lattice regularised form can be mapped onto a Hermitian matrix model, which enables Monte Carlo simulations. Numerical data reveal the phase diagram; at large λ it contains a "striped phase", which is absent in the commutative case. We explore the question whether or not this phenomenon persists in a Double Scaling Limit (DSL), which extrapolates simultaneously to the continuum and to infinite volume, at a fixed non-commutativity parameter. To this end, we introduce a dimensional lattice spacing based on the decay of the correlation function. Our results provide evidence for the existence of a striped phase even in the DSL, which implies the spontaneous breaking of translation symmetry. Due to the non-locality of this model, this does not contradict the Mermin-Wagner theorem.

  4. Pangolin v1.0, a conservative 2-D transport model for large scale parallel calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praga, A.; Cariolle, D.; Giraud, L.

    2014-07-01

    To exploit the possibilities of parallel computers, we designed a large-scale bidimensional atmospheric transport model named Pangolin. As the basis for a future chemistry-transport model, a finite-volume approach was chosen both for mass preservation and to ease parallelization. To overcome the pole restriction on time-steps for a regular latitude-longitude grid, Pangolin uses a quasi-area-preserving reduced latitude-longitude grid. The features of the regular grid are exploited to improve parallel performances and a custom domain decomposition algorithm is presented. To assess the validity of the transport scheme, its results are compared with state-of-the-art models on analytical test cases. Finally, parallel performances are shown in terms of strong scaling and confirm the efficient scalability up to a few hundred of cores.

  5. 2D numerical modeling of gravity-driven giant-scale deformation processes in the offshore Barreirinhas Basin (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Francesco; Manconi, Andrea; Rinaldo Barchi, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    this particular place and also elsewhere. We set up a 2D fluid dynamic model by considering a Finite Element Method (FEM) environment, which allows us to well represent the geometries, densities and viscosities of the geological materials, as derived from geophysical investigations. Our study aims at understanding whether the long-term mechanical behavior of the Barreirinhas Basin DW-FTB can be reproduced by considering a simplified Newtonian fluid dynamics environment or it is controlled by a more complex rheology, which might include the effect of additional parameters such as internal friction, cohesive strength and pore-fluid pressure at the basal detachment.

  6. 2-D Fused Image Reconstruction approach for Microwave Tomography: a theoretical assessment using FDTD Model.

    PubMed

    Bindu, G; Semenov, S

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient two-dimensional fused image reconstruction approach for Microwave Tomography (MWT). Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) models were created for a viable MWT experimental system having the transceivers modelled using thin wire approximation with resistive voltage sources. Born Iterative and Distorted Born Iterative methods have been employed for image reconstruction with the extremity imaging being done using a differential imaging technique. The forward solver in the imaging algorithm employs the FDTD method of solving the time domain Maxwell's equations with the regularisation parameter computed using a stochastic approach. The algorithm is tested with 10% noise inclusion and successful image reconstruction has been shown implying its robustness.

  7. Hard Copy to Digital Transfer: 3D Models that Match 2D Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellie, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    This research describes technical drawing techniques applied in a project involving digitizing of existing hard copy subsurface mapping for the preparation of three dimensional graphic and mathematical models. The intent of this research was to identify work flows that would support the project, ensure the accuracy of the digital data obtained,…

  8. An Inexpensive 2-D and 3-D Model of the Sarcomere as a Teaching Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Vitor Passos; Bonfim, Vanessa Maria Gomes

    2013-01-01

    To address a common problem of teaching the sliding filament theory (that is, students have difficulty in visualizing how the component proteins of the sarcomere differ, how they organize themselves into a single working unit, and how they function in relation to each other), we have devised a simple model, with inexpensive materials, to be built…

  9. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  10. 2D stochastic-integral models for characterizing random grain noise in titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Cherry, Matthew; Pilchak, Adam; Knopp, Jeremy S.; Blodgett, Mark P.

    2014-02-18

    We extend our previous work, in which we applied high-dimensional model representation (HDMR) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) concepts to the characterization of a metallic surface that has undergone a shot-peening treatment to reduce residual stresses, and has, therefore, become a random conductivity field. That example was treated as a onedimensional problem, because those were the only data available. In this study, we develop a more rigorous two-dimensional model for characterizing random, anisotropic grain noise in titanium alloys. Such a model is necessary if we are to accurately capture the 'clumping' of crystallites into long chains that appear during the processing of the metal into a finished product. The mathematical model starts with an application of the Karhunen-Loève (K-L) expansion for the random Euler angles, θ and φ, that characterize the orientation of each crystallite in the sample. The random orientation of each crystallite then defines the stochastic nature of the electrical conductivity tensor of the metal. We study two possible covariances, Gaussian and double-exponential, which are the kernel of the K-L integral equation, and find that the double-exponential appears to satisfy measurements more closely of the two. Results based on data from a Ti-7Al sample will be given, and further applications of HDMR and ANOVA will be discussed.

  11. 2-D modeling of gas and overpressure generation in the Venture field (Canada)

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, P.L.; Ungerer, P. ); Mudford, S. )

    1990-05-01

    Venture field is located in an overpressured zone of gas accumulations in a region that had low sedimentation rates over the last 80 m.y. This could support the hydrocarbon generation, rather than compaction disequilibrium, as the main cause for overpressuring. Study of these accumulations can be done using the IFP (Institut Francais du Petrole) THEMIS model, which integrates compactions, hydraulic fracturation, fluid flows, heat transfer, and formation and migration of hydrocarbons. A single phase basin scale model is constructed first to assess the input parameters related to the fluid-flow reconstruction. The permeability of faults is calibrated to fit the actual pressure distribution through the field. Permeability is found to be very low and allows a fit to the regional distribution of overpressuring. In a second step, a two-phase model, restricted to the field itself, is used to test parameters related to hydrocarbon and source rocks. Gas accumulations are effectively obtained in the reservoir units. Finally, the two-phase model is extended to the regional scale to check the parameters previously assessed. At this scale, the gas and overpressure distributions are found to fit those actually observed. Gas accumulations contribute slightly to overpressuring, which is better accounted for by compaction disequilibrium despite the low sedimentation rates. Generation in or close to the reservoir unit does not contribute significantly to the gas accumulations. However, gas sources are found in the underlying formations.

  12. Edge gradients evaluation for 2D hybrid finite volume method model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, a two-dimensional depth-integrated hydrodynamic model was developed using FVM on a hybrid unstructured collocated mesh system. To alleviate the negative effects of mesh irregularity and non-uniformity, a conservative evaluation method for edge gradients based on the second-order Tayl...

  13. Application of 2D-Nonlinear Shallow Water Model of Tsunami by using Adomian Decomposition Method

    SciTech Connect

    Waewcharoen, Sribudh; Boonyapibanwong, Supachai; Koonprasert, Sanoe

    2008-09-01

    One of the most important questions in tsunami modeling is the estimation of tsunami run-up heights at different points along a coastline. Methods for numerical simulation of tsunami wave propagation in deep and shallow seas are well developed and have been widely used by many scientists (2001-2008). In this paper, we consider a two-dimensional nonlinear shallow water model of tsunami given by Tivon Jacobson is work [1]. u{sub t}+uu{sub x}+{nu}u{sub y} -c{sup 2}(h{sub x}+(h{sub b}){sub x}) {nu}{sub t}+u{nu}{sub x}+{nu}{nu}{sub y} = -c{sup 2}(h{sub y}+(h{sub b}){sub y}) h{sub t}+(hu){sub x}+(h{nu}){sub y} = 0 g-shore, h is surface elevation and s, t is time, u is velocity of cross-shore, {nu} is velocity of along-shore, h is surface elevation and h{sub b} is function of shore. This is a nondimensionalized model with the gravity g and constant reference depth H factored into c = {radical}(gH). We apply the Adomian Decompostion Method (ADM) to solve the tsunami model. This powerful method has been used to obtain explicit and numerical solutions of three types of diffusion-convection-reaction (DECR) equations. The ADM results for the tsunami model yield analytical solutions in terms of a rapidly convergent infinite power series. Symbolic computation, numerical results and graphs of solutions are obtained by Maple program.

  14. Magmatism vs mushmatism: 2D thermo-mechanical modelling of crustal mush processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roele, K.; Morgan, J. V.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of 'mushmatism'- that a magma chamber resides in a crystalline state for the majority of its life, has been suggested as a plausible mechanism for observed crustal melt evolution. It is proposed that as melt is generated, its composition evolves as it rises buoyantly, reacting chemically with the surrounding crystal mush at progressively lower temperatures. It is therefore possible to explain formation of granitic melts and observed mafic-felsic layering in the crust using mush processes. It has previously been assumed that a high influx rate of molten material is required for large volumes of crustal melt to be produced. This has been modelled in the past with repetitive sill intrusion at unrealistically high rates (>3x107 m3a-1) to cause a large enough thermal perturbation of the geotherm to sustain eruptible melt in the shallow crust. However, these models are purely thermal and neglect the effects of melt segregation and mush processes on longevity of melt volumes in the crust. We have developed an axisymmetric thermo-mechanical model that includes mass transport described by coupled matrix compaction and buoyant melt segregation during repeated sill intrusion. Results are consistent with thermal models in that they demonstrate dominance of crystalline mush processes in the transient magma chamber at low-to-moderate intrusion rates. However, addition of buoyant segregation leads to formation of discrete high melt fraction layers as melt ascends through the emplacement zone. This causes a decoupling in location of maximum temperature and melt fraction not observed by purely thermal models. Our results therefore have significant implications for current methods of interpretation of geophysical data, in particular, calculating melt volumes and determining the depth of the magma chamber. In addition, transient reservoirs are produced at lower emplacement rates by the thermo-mechanical model because accumulated magma is evolved and able to remain liquid

  15. The Meandering-Braided River Pattern Transition Explained Empirically and with a 2D Morphodynamics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, J. H.; Schuurman, F.; Kleinhans, M. G.; Lentink, H.

    2010-12-01

    Our objective is to understand general causes of different river channel patterns in unconfined alluvial plains. We discuss the principles and compare the performance of an empirical stream power-based classification and a physics-based bar pattern predictor. We present a careful selection of data from literature that contains rivers with discharge and median bed particle size ranging several orders of magnitude with various channel patterns and bar types, but no obvious eroding or aggrading tendency. Empirically a continuum of patterns is found for increasing specific stream power from single-thread, laterally immobile channels, meandering styles with scroll bars and with chute bars and moderately and highly braided channel patterns. Stream power is calculated with pattern-independent variables: mean annual flood, valley gradient and channel width predicted with a hydraulic geometry relation. `Thresholds', above which these patterns emerge, increase with bed sediment size. Linear bar theory predicts nature and presence of bars and bar mode, here converted to active braiding index. The most important variables are actual width-to-depth ratio and nonlinearity of bed sediment transport. Numerical modelling with the same equations as underlying the bar theory allow for nonlinear effects. We modelled hypothetical rivers over a large range of stream power and particle sizes with various choices for hydraulic roughness, sediment transport and transverse slope relations. Results agree well with the empirical diagram as well as empirical relations for bar and channel dimensions. Increasing potential specific stream power implies more energy to erode banks and indeed correlates to channels with high width-to-depth ratio. Bar theory and numerical modelling predict that such rivers develop more bars across the width (higher braiding index). At the transition from meandering to braiding weakly braided rivers and meandering rivers with chutes are found in nature and in the

  16. Delocalization of two interacting particles in the 2D Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, Klaus M.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-01-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in a two-dimensional quasiperiodic potential of the Harper model. We consider an amplitude of the quasiperiodic potential such that in absence of interactions all eigenstates are exponentially localized while the two interacting particles are delocalized showing anomalous subdiffusive spreading over the lattice with the spreading exponent b ≈ 0.5 instead of a usual diffusion with b = 1. This spreading is stronger than in the case of a correlated disorder potential with a one particle localization length as for the quasiperiodic potential. At the same time we do not find signatures of ballistic pairs existing for two interacting particles in the localized phase of the one-dimensional Harper model.

  17. Mixed-RKDG Finite Element Methods for the 2-D Hydrodynamic Model for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Zhangxin; Cockburn, Bernardo; Jerome, Joseph W.; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new method for numerically solving the equations of the hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices in two space dimensions. The method combines a standard mixed finite element method, used to obtain directly an approximation to the electric field, with the so-called Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) method, originally devised for numerically solving multi-dimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, which is applied here to the convective part of the equations. Numerical simulations showing the performance of the new method are displayed, and the results compared with those obtained by using Essentially Nonoscillatory (ENO) finite difference schemes. Frommore » the perspective of device modeling, these methods are robust, since they are capable of encompassing broad parameter ranges, including those for which shock formation is possible. The simulations presented here are for Gallium Arsenide at room temperature, but we have tested them much more generally with considerable success.« less

  18. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2014-02-01

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than λD. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed.

  19. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, P. Serianni, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2014-02-15

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than λ{sub D}. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed.

  20. Multi-particle FEM modeling on microscopic behavior of 2D particle compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; An, X. Z.; Zhang, Y. L.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the discrete random packing and various ordered packings such as tetragonal and hexagonal close packed structures generated by discrete element method and honeycomb, which is manually generated were input as the initial packing structures into the multi-particle finite element model (FEM) to study their densification during compaction, where each particle is discretized as a FEM mesh. The macro-property such as relative density and micro-properties such as local morphology, stress, coordination number and densification mechanism obtained from various initial packings are characterized and analyzed. The results show that the coupling of discrete feature in particle scale with the continuous FEM in macro-scale can effectively conquer the difficulties in traditional FEM modeling, which provides a reasonable way to reproduce the compaction process and identify the densification mechanism more accurately and realistically.

  1. A Survey on Model Based Approaches for 2D and 3D Visual Human Pose Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Sala, Xavier; Escalera, Sergio; Angulo, Cecilio; Gonzàlez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Human Pose Recovery has been studied in the field of Computer Vision for the last 40 years. Several approaches have been reported, and significant improvements have been obtained in both data representation and model design. However, the problem of Human Pose Recovery in uncontrolled environments is far from being solved. In this paper, we define a general taxonomy to group model based approaches for Human Pose Recovery, which is composed of five main modules: appearance, viewpoint, spatial relations, temporal consistence, and behavior. Subsequently, a methodological comparison is performed following the proposed taxonomy, evaluating current SoA approaches in the aforementioned five group categories. As a result of this comparison, we discuss the main advantages and drawbacks of the reviewed literature. PMID:24594613

  2. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2014-02-01

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than λD. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed.

  3. Stability of Solitary Waves and Vortices in a 2D Nonlinear Dirac Model.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G; Saxena, Avadh; Comech, Andrew; Lan, Ruomeng

    2016-05-27

    We explore a prototypical two-dimensional massive model of the nonlinear Dirac type and examine its solitary wave and vortex solutions. In addition to identifying the stationary states, we provide a systematic spectral stability analysis, illustrating the potential of spinor solutions to be neutrally stable in a wide parametric interval of frequencies. Solutions of higher vorticity are generically unstable and split into lower charge vortices in a way that preserves the total vorticity. These conclusions are found not to be restricted to the case of cubic two-dimensional nonlinearities but are found to be extended to the case of quintic nonlinearity, as well as to that of three spatial dimensions. Our results also reveal nontrivial differences with respect to the better understood nonrelativistic analogue of the model, namely the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. PMID:27284659

  4. A hierarchical lattice spring model to simulate the mechanics of 2-D materials-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brely, Lucas; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola

    2015-07-01

    In the field of engineering materials, strength and toughness are typically two mutually exclusive properties. Structural biological materials such as bone, tendon or dentin have resolved this conflict and show unprecedented damage tolerance, toughness and strength levels. The common feature of these materials is their hierarchical heterogeneous structure, which contributes to increased energy dissipation before failure occurring at different scale levels. These structural properties are the key to exceptional bioinspired material mechanical properties, in particular for nanocomposites. Here, we develop a numerical model in order to simulate the mechanisms involved in damage progression and energy dissipation at different size scales in nano- and macro-composites, which depend both on the heterogeneity of the material and on the type of hierarchical structure. Both these aspects have been incorporated into a 2-dimensional model based on a Lattice Spring Model, accounting for geometrical nonlinearities and including statistically-based fracture phenomena. The model has been validated by comparing numerical results to continuum and fracture mechanics results as well as finite elements simulations, and then employed to study how structural aspects impact on hierarchical composite material properties. Results obtained with the numerical code highlight the dependence of stress distributions on matrix properties and reinforcement dispersion, geometry and properties, and how failure of sacrificial elements is directly involved in the damage tolerance of the material. Thanks to the rapidly developing field of nanocomposite manufacture, it is already possible to artificially create materials with multi-scale hierarchical reinforcements. The developed code could be a valuable support in the design and optimization of these advanced materials, drawing inspiration and going beyond biological materials with exceptional mechanical properties.

  5. Impacts of Large-Scale Circulation on Convection: A 2-D Cloud Resolving Model Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of impacts of large-scale circulation on convection, and the roles of convection in heat and water balances over tropical region are fundamentally important for understanding global climate changes. Heat and water budgets over warm pool (SST=29.5 C) and cold pool (SST=26 C) were analyzed based on simulations of the two-dimensional cloud resolving model. Here the sensitivity of heat and water budgets to different sizes of warm and cold pools is examined.

  6. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part II: Feedback between composition and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, V.; Greathouse, T. K.; Cavalié, T.; Dobrijevic, M.; Hersant, F.

    2016-03-01

    Saturn's axial tilt of 26.7° produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along Saturn's orbital path. The atmospheric thermal structure is controlled and regulated by the amount of hydrocarbons in the stratosphere, which act as absorbers and coolants from the UV to the far-IR spectral range, and this structure has an influence on the amount of hydrocarbons. We study here the feedback between the chemical composition and the thermal structure by coupling a latitudinal and seasonal photochemical model with a radiative seasonal model. Our results show that the seasonal temperature peak in the higher stratosphere, associated with the seasonal increase of insolation, is shifted earlier than the maximum insolation peak. This shift is increased with increasing latitudes and is caused by the low amount of stratospheric coolants in the spring season. At 80° in both hemispheres, the temperature peak at 10-2 mbar is seen to occur half a season (3-4 Earth years) earlier than was previously predicted by radiative seasonal models that assumed spatially and temporally uniform distribution of coolants. This shift progressively decreases with increasing pressure, up to around the 0.5 mbar pressure level where it vanishes. On the opposite, the thermal field has a small feedback on the abundance distributions. Accounting for that feedback modifies the predicted equator-to-pole temperature gradient. The meridional gradients of temperature at the mbar pressure levels are better reproduced when this feedback is accounted for. At lower pressure levels, Saturn's stratospheric thermal structure seems to depart from pure radiative seasonal equilibrium as previously suggested by Guerlet et al. (2014). Although the agreement with the absolute value of the stratospheric temperature observed by Cassini is moderate, it is a mandatory step toward a fully coupled GCM-photochemical model.

  7. Radar Reflectivity Simulated by a 2-D Spectra Bin Model: Sensitivity of Cloud-aerosol Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Kiaowen; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Khain, Alexander; Simpson, Joanne; Johnson, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model with bin spectra microphysics is used to simulate mesoscale convective systems.The model uses explicit bins to represent size spectra of cloud nuclei, water drops, ice crystals, snow and graupel. Each hydrometeorite category is described by 33 mass bins. The simulations provide a unique data set of simulated raindrop size distribution in a realistic dynamic frame. Calculations of radar parameters using simulated drop size distribution serve as an evaluation of numerical model performance. In addition, the GCE bin spectra modes is a very useful tool to study uncertainties related to radar observations; all the environmental parameters are precisely known. In this presentation, we concentrate on the discussion of Z-R (ZDR-R) relation in the simulated systems. Due to computational limitations, the spectra bin model has been run in two dimensions with 31 stretched vertical layers and 1026 horizontal grid points (1 km resolution). Two different cases, one in midlatitude continent, the other in tropical ocean, have been simulated. The continental case is a strong convection which lasted for two hours. The oceanic case is a persistent system with more than 10 hours' life span. It is shown that the simulated Z-R (ZDR-R) relations generally agree with observations using radar and rain gauge data. The spatial and temporal variations of Z-R relation in different locations are also analyzed. Impact of aerosols on cloud formation and raindrop size distribution was studied. Both clean (low CCN) and dirty (high CCN) cases are simulated. The Z-R relation is shown to vary considerable in the initial CCN concentrations.

  8. Pulling at the fabric of the exotic phase diagram for a simple 2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almudallal, Ahmad; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Buldyrev, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    We use computer simulation to study a simple, two-dimensional off-lattice model that was originally devised to understand the anomalous properties of water. The model comprises core-softened disks interacting through a repulsive square shoulder located inside a longer attractive square well. In calculating the phase diagram for the model we discover that the system exhibits the truly remarkable phenomenon of inverse melting, for which the system crystallizes upon isobaric heating, over a small range in pressure. Despite occurring in two dimensions, the melting transition is first order and to a liquid, rather than to a hexatic or quasicrystal phase. We find that by increasing the extent of the shoulder, we increase the pressure range over which inverse melting occurs. But as this range increases, the stability fields of other crystal phases must bend to accommodate the changing inverse melting line. This continues until the phase diagram breaks, with a triple point disappearing, new phases appearing, and a channel of liquid stability to low temperatures forming. We acknowledge support from NSERC, ACEnet, CFI and the Dr. Bernard W. Gamson Computational Science Center at Yeshiva College.

  9. Non-singular string cosmology in a 2d hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florakis, I.; Kounnas, C.; Partouche, H.; Toumbas, N.

    2011-03-01

    The existence of non-singular string cosmologies is established in a class of two-dimensional supersymmetric Hybrid models at finite temperature. The left-moving sector of the Hybrid models gives rise to 16 real (N=4) spacetime supercharges as in the usual superstring models. The right-moving sector is non-supersymmetric at the massless level, but is characterized by MSDS symmetry, which ensures boson/fermion degeneracy of the right-moving massive levels. Finite temperature configurations, which are free of Hagedorn instabilities, are constructed in the presence of non-trivial “gravito-magnetic” fluxes. These fluxes inject non-trivial winding charge into the thermal vacuum and restore the thermal T-duality symmetry associated with the Euclidean time circle. Thanks to the unbroken right-moving MSDS symmetry, the one-loop string partition function is exactly calculable beyond any α‧-approximation. At the self-dual point new massless thermal states appear, sourcing localized spacelike branes, which can be used to connect a contracting thermal Universe to an expanding one. The resulting bouncing cosmology is free of any curvature singularities and the string coupling remains perturbative throughout the cosmological evolution.

  10. Superdiffusive cell motility on 2D substrates modeled as a persistent Lévy walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passucci, Giuseppe; Brasch, Megan E.; Deakin, Nicholas O.; Turner, Christopher E.; Henderson, James H.; Manning, M. Lisa

    Cell motility is an essential part of many biological processes such as morphogenesis, wound healing and tumorigenesis. We quantified cell motility by tracking mouse fibroblast and human breast carcinoma nuclei to construct cell trajectories. The mean-squared displacement of these trajectories reveals that cell motion is super diffusive, where displacements scale faster than t 1 / 2 in all directions. Existing self-propelled particle (SPP) models that do not explicitly incorporate ensemble heterogeneity are unable to predict this super-diffusive behavior. Therefore we developed a run-and-tumble SPP model with Levy distributed run times that captures observed super-diffusive behavior in the mean-squared displacement as well as scaling collapse exponents of displacement probability distributions which match those of mouse fibroblast and human breast carcinoma cell trajectories. We additionally introduced small fluctuations in particle orientation during runs, which generates a crossover from super-diffusive to diffusive dynamics at a very long times. This timescale can be extracted in experiments from the velocity auto-correlation function, allowing us to explicitly test this model prediction.

  11. Development and validation of a modelling framework for simulating 2D-mammography and breast tomosynthesis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Diaz, Oliver; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Bosmans, Hilde; Strudley, Celia J.; Wells, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Planar 2D x-ray mammography is generally accepted as the preferred screening technique used for breast cancer detection. Recently, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been introduced to overcome some of the inherent limitations of conventional planar imaging, and future technological enhancements are expected to result in the introduction of further innovative modalities. However, it is crucial to understand the impact of any new imaging technology or methodology on cancer detection rates and patient recall. Any such assessment conventionally requires large scale clinical trials demanding significant investment in time and resources. The concept of virtual clinical trials and virtual performance assessment may offer a viable alternative to this approach. However, virtual approaches require a collection of specialized modelling tools which can be used to emulate the image acquisition process and simulate images of a quality indistinguishable from their real clinical counterparts. In this paper, we present two image simulation chains constructed using modelling tools that can be used for the evaluation of 2D-mammography and DBT systems. We validate both approaches by comparing simulated images with real images acquired using the system being simulated. A comparison of the contrast-to-noise ratios and image blurring for real and simulated images of test objects shows good agreement ( < 9% error). This suggests that our simulation approach is a promising alternative to conventional physical performance assessment followed by large scale clinical trials.

  12. Leaf Area Index Estimation in Vineyards from Uav Hyperspectral Data, 2d Image Mosaics and 3d Canopy Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisperakis, I.; Stentoumis, Ch.; Grammatikopoulos, L.; Karantzalos, K.

    2015-08-01

    The indirect estimation of leaf area index (LAI) in large spatial scales is crucial for several environmental and agricultural applications. To this end, in this paper, we compare and evaluate LAI estimation in vineyards from different UAV imaging datasets. In particular, canopy levels were estimated from i.e., (i) hyperspectral data, (ii) 2D RGB orthophotomosaics and (iii) 3D crop surface models. The computed canopy levels have been used to establish relationships with the measured LAI (ground truth) from several vines in Nemea, Greece. The overall evaluation indicated that the estimated canopy levels were correlated (r2 > 73%) with the in-situ, ground truth LAI measurements. As expected the lowest correlations were derived from the calculated greenness levels from the 2D RGB orthomosaics. The highest correlation rates were established with the hyperspectral canopy greenness and the 3D canopy surface models. For the later the accurate detection of canopy, soil and other materials in between the vine rows is required. All approaches tend to overestimate LAI in cases with sparse, weak, unhealthy plants and canopy.

  13. Development and validation of a modelling framework for simulating 2D-mammography and breast tomosynthesis images.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Warren, Lucy M; Mackenzie, Alistair; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Diaz, Oliver; Dance, David R; Young, Kenneth C; Bosmans, Hilde; Strudley, Celia J; Wells, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Planar 2D x-ray mammography is generally accepted as the preferred screening technique used for breast cancer detection. Recently, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been introduced to overcome some of the inherent limitations of conventional planar imaging, and future technological enhancements are expected to result in the introduction of further innovative modalities. However, it is crucial to understand the impact of any new imaging technology or methodology on cancer detection rates and patient recall. Any such assessment conventionally requires large scale clinical trials demanding significant investment in time and resources. The concept of virtual clinical trials and virtual performance assessment may offer a viable alternative to this approach. However, virtual approaches require a collection of specialized modelling tools which can be used to emulate the image acquisition process and simulate images of a quality indistinguishable from their real clinical counterparts. In this paper, we present two image simulation chains constructed using modelling tools that can be used for the evaluation of 2D-mammography and DBT systems. We validate both approaches by comparing simulated images with real images acquired using the system being simulated. A comparison of the contrast-to-noise ratios and image blurring for real and simulated images of test objects shows good agreement ( < 9% error). This suggests that our simulation approach is a promising alternative to conventional physical performance assessment followed by large scale clinical trials.

  14. Superconducting correlations and thermodynamic properties in 2D square and triangular t-J model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Masao

    2006-03-01

    Equal-time superconducting correlation functions of the two-dimensional t-J model on the square lattice are studied using high-temperature expansion method.[1] The sum of the pairing correlation, its spatial dependence and correlation length are obtained down to T ˜0.2t. By comparison of single-particle contributions in the correlation functions, we find effective attractive interactions between quasi-particles in dx^2-y^2-wave channel. It is shown that d-wave correlation grows rapidly at low temperatures for the doping 0.1 < δ< 0.5. The temperature for this growth is roughly scaled by J/2. This is in sharp contrast to the Hubbard model in a weak or intermediate coupling region, where there are few numerical evidences of superconductivity. We also study the possible d- and f-wave pairing in the triangular t-J model.[2] When t>0 with hole doping, a rapid growth of effective d-wave paring interaction is found that indicates the resonating-valence-bond superconductivity. In contrast, when t<0, where the ferromagnetic- and antiferromagnetic correlation compete, correlation lengths of the f-wave triplet paring tends to diverge around δ=0.6, although its effective interaction is small. This result is compared and discussed with the recently discovered superconductor, NaxCoO2.yH2O, where Co atoms form a triangular lattice. Specific heat in low temperatures are also obtained in the high-temperature expansion method. We will discuss that the doping dependence of the specific heat coefficient, γ, agrees with experimental data. [1] T. Koretsune and M. Ogata, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 74, 1390 (2005). [2] T. Koretsune and M. Ogata, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 116401 (2002), and Phys. Rev. B72, 134513 (2005).

  15. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-15

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model. PMID:21386517

  16. Using 1D2D Hydrodynamic Modeling to Inform Restoration Planning in the Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden-Lesmeister, A.; Remo, J. W.; Piazza, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Atchafalaya River (AR) in Louisiana is the principal distributary of the Mississippi River (MR), and its basin contains the largest contiguous area of baldcypress-water tupelo swamp forests in North America. After designation of the Atchafalaya River Basin (ARB) as a federal floodway following the destructive 1927 MR flood, it was extensively modified to accommodate a substantial portion of the MR flow (~25%) to mitigate flooding in southern Louisiana. These modifications and increased flows resulted in substantial incision along large portions of the AR, altering connectivity between the river and its associated waterbodies. As a result of incision, the hydroperiod has been substantially altered, which has contributed to a decline in ecological health of the ARB's baldcypress-water tupelo forests. While it is recognized that the altered hydroperiod has negatively affected natural baldcypress regeneration, it is unclear whether proposed projects designed to enhance flow connectivity will increase long-term survival of these forests. In this study, we have constructed a 1D2D hydrodynamic model using SOBEK 2.12 to realistically model key physical parameters such as residence times, inundation extent, water-surface elevations (WSELs), and flow velocities to increase our understanding of the ARB's altered hydroperiod and the consequences for baldcypress-water tupelo forests. While the model encompasses a majority of the ARB, our modeling effort is focused on the Flat Lake Water Management Unit located in the southern portion of the ARB, where it will also be used to evaluate flow connectivity enhancement projects within the management unit. We believe our 1D2D hybrid hydraulic modeling approach will provide the flexibility and accuracy needed to guide connectivity enhancement efforts in the ARB and may provide a model framework for guiding similar efforts along other highly-altered river systems.

  17. Potential energy landscapes for the 2D XY model: Minima, transition states, and pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Dhagash; Hughes, Ciaran; Schröck, Mario; Wales, David J.

    2013-11-01

    We describe a numerical study of the potential energy landscape for the two-dimensional XY model (with no disorder), considering up to 100 spins and central processing unit and graphics processing unit implementations of local optimization, focusing on minima and saddles of index one (transition states). We examine both periodic and anti-periodic boundary conditions, and show that the number of stationary points located increases exponentially with increasing lattice size. The corresponding disconnectivity graphs exhibit funneled landscapes; the global minima are readily located because they exhibit relatively large basins of attraction compared to the higher energy minima as the lattice size increases.

  18. Evolution of 2D Potts Model Grain Microstructures from an Initial Hillert Size Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Battaile, C.C.; Holm E.A.

    1998-10-19

    Grain growth experiments and simulations exhibit self-similar grain size distributions quite different from that derived via a mean field approach by Hillert [ 1]. To test whether this discrepancy is due to insufficient anneal times, two different two-dimensional grain structures with realistic topologies and Hillert grain size distributions are generated and subjected to grain growth via the Monte Carlo Potts Model (MCPM). In both cases, the observed self-similar grain size distributions deviate from the initial Hillert form and conform instead to that observed in MCPM grain growth simulations that start from a random microstructure. This suggests that the Hillert grain size distribution is not an attractor.

  19. An Asymptotic Analysis of a 2-D Model of Dynamically Active Compartments Coupled by Bulk Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, J.; Ward, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    A class of coupled cell-bulk ODE-PDE models is formulated and analyzed in a two-dimensional domain, which is relevant to studying quorum-sensing behavior on thin substrates. In this model, spatially segregated dynamically active signaling cells of a common small radius ɛ ≪ 1 are coupled through a passive bulk diffusion field. For this coupled system, the method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to construct steady-state solutions and to formulate a spectral problem that characterizes the linear stability properties of the steady-state solutions, with the aim of predicting whether temporal oscillations can be triggered by the cell-bulk coupling. Phase diagrams in parameter space where such collective oscillations can occur, as obtained from our linear stability analysis, are illustrated for two specific choices of the intracellular kinetics. In the limit of very large bulk diffusion, it is shown that solutions to the ODE-PDE cell-bulk system can be approximated by a finite-dimensional dynamical system. This limiting system is studied both analytically, using a linear stability analysis and, globally, using numerical bifurcation software. For one illustrative example of the theory, it is shown that when the number of cells exceeds some critical number, i.e., when a quorum is attained, the passive bulk diffusion field can trigger oscillations through a Hopf bifurcation that would otherwise not occur without the coupling. Moreover, for two specific models for the intracellular dynamics, we show that there are rather wide regions in parameter space where these triggered oscillations are synchronous in nature. Unless the bulk diffusivity is asymptotically large, it is shown that a diffusion-sensing behavior is possible whereby more clustered spatial configurations of cells inside the domain lead to larger regions in parameter space where synchronous collective oscillations between the small cells can occur. Finally, the linear stability analysis for these cell

  20. Competition Among Reputations in the 2D Sznajd Model: Spontaneous Emergence of Democratic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crokidakis, Nuno; Forgerini, Fabricio L.

    2012-04-01

    We propose a modification in the Sznajd sociophysics model defined on the square lattice. For this purpose, we consider reputation—a mechanism limiting the agents' persuasive power. The reputation is introduced as a time-dependent score, which can be positive or negative. This mechanism avoids dictatorship (full consensus, all spins parallel) for a wide range of model parameters. We consider two different situations: case 1, in which the agents' reputation increases for each persuaded neighbor, and case 2, in which the agents' reputation increases for each persuasion and decreases when a neighbor keeps his opinion. Our results show that the introduction of reputation avoids full consensus even for initial densities of up spins greater than 1/2. The relaxation times follow a log-normal-like distribution in both cases, but they are larger in case 2 due to the competition among reputations. In addition, we show that the usual phase transition occurs and depends on the initial concentration d of individuals with the same opinion, but the critical points d c in the two cases are different.

  1. Acid/base front propagation in saturated porous media: 2D laboratory experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyaux-Lawniczak, Stéphanie; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    We perform laboratory scale reactive transport experiments involving acid-basic reactions between nitric acid and sodium hydroxide. A two-dimensional experimental setup is designed to provide continuous on-line measurements of physico-chemical parameters such as pH, redox potential (Eh) and electrical conductivity (EC) inside the system under saturated flow through conditions. The electrodes provide reliable values of pH and EC, while sharp fronts associated with redox potential dynamics could not be captured. Care should be taken to properly incorporate within a numerical model the mixing processes occurring inside the electrodes. The available observations are modeled through a numerical code based on the advection-dispersion equation. In this framework, EC is considered as a variable behaving as a conservative tracer and pH and Eh require solving the advection dispersion equation only once. The agreement between the computed and measured pH and EC is good even without recurring to parameters calibration on the basis of the experiments. Our findings suggest that the classical advection-dispersion equation can be used to interpret these kinds of experiments if mixing inside the electrodes is adequately considered.

  2. Acid/base front propagation in saturated porous media: 2D laboratory experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Loyaux-Lawniczak, Stéphanie; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    We perform laboratory scale reactive transport experiments involving acid-basic reactions between nitric acid and sodium hydroxide. A two-dimensional experimental setup is designed to provide continuous on-line measurements of physico-chemical parameters such as pH, redox potential (Eh) and electrical conductivity (EC) inside the system under saturated flow through conditions. The electrodes provide reliable values of pH and EC, while sharp fronts associated with redox potential dynamics could not be captured. Care should be taken to properly incorporate within a numerical model the mixing processes occurring inside the electrodes. The available observations are modeled through a numerical code based on the advection-dispersion equation. In this framework, EC is considered as a variable behaving as a conservative tracer and pH and Eh require solving the advection dispersion equation only once. The agreement between the computed and measured pH and EC is good even without recurring to parameters calibration on the basis of the experiments. Our findings suggest that the classical advection-dispersion equation can be used to interpret these kinds of experiments if mixing inside the electrodes is adequately considered.

  3. Manifest: A computer program for 2-D flow modeling in Stirling machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedeon, David

    1989-01-01

    A computer program named Manifest is discussed. Manifest is a program one might want to use to model the fluid dynamics in the manifolds commonly found between the heat exchangers and regenerators of Stirling machines; but not just in the manifolds - in the regenerators as well. And in all sorts of other places too, such as: in heaters or coolers, or perhaps even in cylinder spaces. There are probably nonStirling uses for Manifest also. In broad strokes, Manifest will: (1) model oscillating internal compressible laminar fluid flow in a wide range of two-dimensional regions, either filled with porous materials or empty; (2) present a graphics-based user-friendly interface, allowing easy selection and modification of region shape and boundary condition specification; (3) run on a personal computer, or optionally (in the case of its number-crunching module) on a supercomputer; and (4) allow interactive examination of the solution output so the user can view vector plots of flow velocity, contour plots of pressure and temperature at various locations and tabulate energy-related integrals of interest.

  4. Subsurface Gas Flow and Ice Grain Acceleration within Enceladus and Europa Fissures: 2D DSMC Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, O. J.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.

    2014-12-01

    The ejection of material from geysers is a ubiquitous occurrence on outer solar system bodies. Water vapor plumes have been observed emanating from the southern hemispheres of Enceladus and Europa (Hansen et al. 2011, Roth et al. 2014), and N2plumes carrying ice and ark particles on Triton (Soderblom et al. 2009). The gas and ice grain distributions in the Enceladus plume depend on the subsurface gas properties and the geometry of the fissures e.g., (Schmidt et al. 2008, Ingersoll et al. 2010). Of course the fissures can have complex geometries due to tidal stresses, melting, freezing etc., but directly sampled and inferred gas and grain properties for the plume (source rate, bulk velocity, terminal grain velocity) can be used to provide a basis to constrain characteristic dimensions of vent width and depth. We used a 2-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique to model venting from both axi-symmetric canyons with widths ~2 km and narrow jets with widths ~15-40 m. For all of our vent geometries, considered the water vapor source rates (1027­ - 1028 s-1) and bulk gas velocities (~330 - 670 m/s) obtained at the surface were consistent with inferred values obtained by fits of the data for the plume densities (1026 - 1028 s-1, 250 - 1000 m/s) respectively. However, when using the resulting DSMC gas distribution for the canyon geometries to integrate the trajectories of ice grains we found it insufficient to accelerate submicron ice grains to Enceladus' escape speed. On the other hand, the gas distributions in the jet like vents accelerated grains > 10 μm significantly above Enceladus' escape speed. It has been suggested that micron-sized grains are ejected from the vents with speeds comparable to the Enceladus escape speed. Here we report on these results including comparisons to results obtained from 1D models as well as discuss the implications of our plume model results. We also show preliminary results for similar considerations applied to Europa

  5. Directional 2D functions as models for fast layout pattern transfer verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. Andres; Hofmann, Mark; Otto, Oberdan

    2009-03-01

    results are analyzed from the point of view of runtime and matching with respect to a complete verification process that uses full mask data preparation followed by production-quality contour simulations under a variety of process variations, including perturbations to focus, mask bias and exposure. One of the main concerns with using an empirical model is its ability to predict topologies that were not part of the original calibration. While there is indeed a dependency on the model in regard to the data used for calibration, the results indicate that this dependency is weak and that such models are able to provide sufficient accuracy with much more tolerable computation times.

  6. Comparative 2D BRT and seismic modeling of CO2 plumes in deep saline reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagrey, Said Attia Al; Strahser, Matthias; Rabbel, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    The multi-disciplinary research project 'CO2 MoPa' (modeling and parameterization of CO2 storage in deep saline formations for dimensions and risk analysis) deals, among others, with the parameterization of virtual subsurface storage sites to characterize rock properties with modeling of processes related to CCS in deep saline reservoirs. The geophysical task is to estimate the sensitivity and the resolution of reflection seismic and geoelectrical time-lapses in order to determine the propagation of CO2 within the sediments and the development of the CO2 reservoir. Compared with seismic, borehole electric resistivity tomography (BRT) has lower resolution, but its permanent installation and continuous monitoring can make it an economical alternative or complement. Seismic and geoelectric applications to quantify changes of intrinsic aquifer properties with time are justified by the lower density and velocity and the higher electric resistivity of CO2 in comparison to pore brine. We present here modeling results on scenarios with realistic parameters of deep saline formations of the German Basin (candidate for CCS). The study focuses on effects of parameters related to depth (temperature, pressure), petrophysics (salinity, porosity), plume dimensions/saturations and data acquisition, processing and inversions. Both methods show stronger effects with increasing brine salinity, CO2 reservoir thickness, porosity and CO2 saturation in the pores. Both methods have a pronounced depth dependence due to the pressure and temperature dependence of the velocities, densities and resistivities of the host rock, brine and CO2. Increasing depth means also decreasing frequencies of the seismic signal and hence weaker resolution. Because of the expected limited thickness of the CO2 reservoir, the reflections from its top and bottom will most likely interfere with each other, making it difficult to determine the exact dimensions of the reservoir. In BRT, the resulting resistivity

  7. Reverse modeling of 2D and 3D diapiric salt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, N.; Kaus, B.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical forward modeling of salt diapirs formed by two different processes (differential loading and buoyancy driven) has been widely performed with numerical codes in many studies, whereas works focusing on the dynamic retro-deformation of such structures remain scarce. Buoyancy driven diapirs, in which the density difference between salt and overburden induces upward motion of salt, have been successfully retro-deformed in two and three dimensions using simple rheologies for the salt and overburden (e.g., Kaus & Podladchikov 2001). However, retro-deformation of down-building diapirs (syndepositional process in which salt structures grow while sediments are being deposited) using mechanical codes has only been done in two dimensions (e.g., Ismael-Zadeh et al. 2001), even though the importance of three-dimensionality in salt diapirism is accepted. We have used the two-dimensional visco-elasto-plastic finite element code MILAMIN_VEP to perform both forward and backward simulations and to check the validity of a reversed time step method (Kaus & Podladchikov 2001 and Ismael-Zadeh et al. 2001) for a wide range of parameters, variable sedimentation rates, and for non-linear rheologies. Forward simulations are run until the salt layer is exhausted and then a reverse time step is applied in order to retro-deform the model. Down-building process was mimicked using a fast-erosion condition at the surface, which keeps it flat and redistributes material at every time step. Initially, we have tested our method by retro-deforming salt structures that develop from an interface that is sinusoidally perturbed. More realistic simulations were performed by starting with randomly perturbed salt interface and using different rheological parameters for the salt and the overburden as well as variable sedimentation rates. Once the method has been proved successful for different parameters in two dimensions, the finite differences parallel code LaMEM has also been used to dynamically

  8. Numerical Real Space Renormalization of a 2D Random Boson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Shankar; Refael, Gil

    2011-03-01

    Interest in the random boson problem originated in experiments on Helium adsorbed in Vycor, but the problem arises in many contexts, including Josephson junction arrays and disordered cold atom systems. Recently, Altman, Kafri, Polkovnikov, and Refael have studied a rotor model description of interacting bosons subjected to quenched disorder in one dimension. Using a real space renormalization approach, they have identified a random fixed point that marks the transition between superfluid and Mott-glass phases. Here, we describe work that numerically extends their approach to the random boson problem in two dimensions. We first test the validity of the real space renormalization by comparison to exact diagonalization of small systems. Then, we move to larger systems and explore what the renormalization scheme can tell us about the nature of the insulating and superfluid phases.

  9. Improving 2D and 3D Skin In Vitro Models Using Macromolecular Crowding.

    PubMed

    Benny, Paula; Badowski, Cedric; Lane, E Birgitte; Raghunath, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The glycoprotein family of collagens represents the main structural proteins in the human body, and are key components of biomaterials used in modern tissue engineering. A technical bottleneck is the deposition of collagen in vitro, as it is notoriously slow, resulting in sub-optimal formation of connective tissue and subsequent tissue cohesion, particularly in skin models. Here, we describe a method which involves the addition of differentially-sized sucrose co-polymers to skin cultures to generate macromolecular crowding (MMC), which results in a dramatic enhancement of collagen deposition. Particularly, dermal fibroblasts deposited a significant amount of collagen I/IV/VII and fibronectin under MMC in comparison to controls. The protocol also describes a method to decellularize crowded cell layers, exposing significant amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) which were retained on the culture surface as evidenced by immunocytochemistry. Total matrix mass and distribution pattern was studied using interference reflection microscopy. Interestingly, fibroblasts, keratinocytes and co-cultures produced cell-derived matrices (CDM) of varying composition and morphology. CDM could be used as "bio-scaffolds" for secondary cell seeding, where the current use of coatings or scaffolds, typically from xenogenic animal sources, can be avoided, thus moving towards more clinically relevant applications. In addition, this protocol describes the application of MMC during the submerged phase of a 3D-organotypic skin co-culture model which was sufficient to enhance ECM deposition in the dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ), in particular, collagen VII, the major component of anchoring fibrils. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of anchoring fibrils in cultures developed with MMC, as compared to controls. This is significant as anchoring fibrils tether the dermis to the epidermis, hence, having a pre-formed mature DEJ may benefit skin graft recipients in terms of graft stability and

  10. Finite-size effects for anisotropic 2D Ising model with various boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailian, N. Sh

    2012-12-01

    We analyze the exact partition function of the anisotropic Ising model on finite M × N rectangular lattices under four different boundary conditions (periodic-periodic (pp), periodic-antiperiodic (pa), antiperiodic-periodic (ap) and antiperiodic-antiperiodic (aa)) obtained by Kaufman (1949 Phys. Rev. 76 1232), Wu and Hu (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 5189) and Kastening (2002 Phys. Rev. E 66 057103)). We express the partition functions in terms of the partition functions Zα, β(J, k) with (α, β) = (0, 0), (1/2, 0), (0, 1/2) and (1/2, 1/2), J is an interaction coupling and k is an anisotropy parameter. Based on such expressions, we then extend the algorithm of Ivashkevich et al (2002 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 5543) to derive the exact asymptotic expansion of the logarithm of the partition function for all boundary conditions mentioned above. Our result is f = fbulk + ∑∞p = 0fp(ρ, k)S-p - 1, where f is the free energy of the system, fbulk is the free energy of the bulk, S = MN is the area of the lattice and ρ = M/N is the aspect ratio. All coefficients in this expansion are expressed through analytical functions. We have introduced the effective aspect ratio ρeff = ρ/sinh 2Jc and show that for pp and aa boundary conditions all finite size correction terms are invariant under the transformation ρeff → 1/ρeff. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  11. A novel 2-D transition metal cyanide membrane: Modeling, structural, magnetic, and functional characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Marcus

    A novel 2-dimensional crystalline material composed of cyanide-bridged metal nanosheets with a square planar framework has been prepared. This material, similar to Hofmann clathrates, has a variety of interesting properties. The material is crystalline and possesses characteristics that include magnetic properties, electronic properties and useful structural features. They have recently been exfoliated into individual crystalline sheets. These sheets show a strong potential for use as ion selective membranes. Performance improvements in water purification and desalination by reverse osmosis methods owing to their single atom thickness is possible. A series of dynamic molecular simulations has provided an understanding of the mechanism for water permeability and salt rejection. Energy profiles for the passage of water and ionic species through the porous areas of these nanosheets have been built and reported. Performance estimates of the efficacy of this novel material for use as an ion selective membrane such as an improved desalination RO membrane are presented. Experiments in synthesis and exfoliation of this class of cyanide-bridged transition metal complex were conducted and the results are presented. A preliminary investigation into the magnetic properties of these materials is included.

  12. Tangential 2-D Edge Imaging for GPI and Edge/Impurity Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ricardo Maqueda; Dr. Fred M. Levinton

    2011-12-23

    Nova Photonics, Inc. has a collaborative effort at the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This collaboration, based on fast imaging of visible phenomena, has provided key insights on edge turbulence, intermittency, and edge phenomena such as edge localized modes (ELMs) and multi-faceted axisymmetric radiation from the edge (MARFE). Studies have been performed in all these areas. The edge turbulence/intermittency studies make use of the Gas Puff Imaging diagnostic developed by the Principal Investigator (Ricardo Maqueda) together with colleagues from PPPL. This effort is part of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) edge, scrape-off layer and divertor group joint activity (DSOL-15: Inter-machine comparison of blob characteristics). The edge turbulence/blob study has been extended from the current location near the midplane of the device to the lower divertor region of NSTX. The goal of this effort was to study turbulence born blobs in the vicinity of the X-point region and their circuit closure on divertor sheaths or high density regions in the divertor. In the area of ELMs and MARFEs we have studied and characterized the mode structure and evolution of the ELM types observed in NSTX, as well as the study of the observed interaction between MARFEs and ELMs. This interaction could have substantial implications for future devices where radiative divertor regions are required to maintain detachment from the divertor plasma facing components.

  13. 2D and 3D separate and joint inversion of airborne ZTEM and ground AMT data: Synthetic model studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Choi, Jihyang

    2014-05-01

    The ZTEM (Z-axis Tipper Electromagnetic) method measures naturally occurring audio-frequency magnetic fields and obtains the tipper function that defines the relationship among the three components of the magnetic field. Since the anomalous tipper responses are caused by the presence of lateral resistivity variations, the ZTEM survey is most suited for detecting and delineating conductive bodies extending to considerable depths, such as graphitic dykes encountered in the exploration of unconformity type uranium deposit. Our simulations shows that inversion of ZTEM data can detect reasonably well multiple conductive dykes placed 1 km apart. One important issue regarding ZTEM inversion is the effect of the initial model, because homogeneous half-space and (1D) layered structures produce no responses. For the 2D model with multiple conductive dykes, the inversion results were useful for locating the dykes even when the initial model was not close to the true background resistivity. For general 3D structures, however, the resolution of the conductive bodies can be reduced considerably depending on the initial model. This is because the tipper magnitudes from 3D conductors are smaller due to boundary charges than the 2D responses. To alleviate this disadvantage of ZTEM surveys, we combined ZTEM and audio-frequency magnetotelluric (AMT) data. Inversion of sparse AMT data was shown to be effective in providing a good initial model for ZTEM inversion. Moreover, simultaneously inverting both data sets led to better results than the sequential approach by enabling to identify structural features that were difficult to resolve from the individual data sets.

  14. Evaluation of FLO-2D runoff and sediment loading models in tropical humid to semi-arid catchments of Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, B.; El-Kadi, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    The FLO-2D flood routing model with topography derived from 10 m DEMs was used to estimate runoff and suspended sediment fluxes of the Hanalei and Kawela catchments located on the Hawaiian islands of Kauai and Molokai, respectively. These catchments differ in average annual rainfall (~17.0 mm/day in the Hanalei vs. ~3.81 mm/day in the Kawela), discharge (~540 x 106 L/day in the Hanalei vs. 7.80 x 106 L/day in the Kawela), suspended sediment content (~13.3 mg/L in the Hanalei vs. ~39.8 mg/L in the Kawela) and vegetation cover (evergreen forests in the Hanalei vs. grassland in the Kawela). However, they are similar in catchment area (~80 km2), bedrock lithology (basalt and marine carbonates) and relief (3-70% slopes normal to river channel). Models were calibrated and validated using 4 years (2005-2008) of daily observed discharge and suspended sediment content data. Alternative scenarios of spatial distribution of rainfall, evaporation, infiltration and surface roughness were evaluated. Once surface flow begins, slope becomes the principal parameter controlling flow direction in both catchments and velocity and a convex topography promote a rapid spreading of the flow towards the estuaries, especially considering the smoothing effect on surface roughness of the gently dipping lowlands. Monthly runoff fluxes predicted by FLO-2D compared well with the measured data in the Hanalei; however, a significant difference between the actual and simulated runoff was observed in the Kawela River in the dry season. Predicted and observed monthly sediment yield correlated reasonably well in both catchments; however for the events of small rainfall magnitude, the model generally overestimated sediment yield, while the opposite was true for larger rainfall events. Our modeling results showed that sediment loading is strongly influenced by infiltration which, in turn, is controlled by the soil, land use and vegetation properties of the catchments. Lower proportions of riparian

  15. Calibration of 2D Hydraulic Inundation Models with SAR Imagery in the Floodplain Region of the Lower Tagus River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestana, Rita; Matias, Magda; Canelas, Ricardo; Roque, Dora; Araujo, Amelia; Van Zeller, Emilia; Trigo-Teixeira, Antonio; Ferreira, Rui; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Heleno, Sandra; Falcão, Ana Paula; Gonçalves, Alexandre B.

    2014-05-01

    Floods account for 40% of all natural hazards worldwide and were responsible for the loss of about 100 thousand human lives and affected more than 1,4 million people in the last decade of the 20th century alone. Floods have been the deadliest natural hazard in Portugal in the last 100 years. In terms of inundated area, the largest floods in Portugal occur in the Lower Tagus (LT) River. On average, the river overflows every 2.5 years, at times blocking roads and causing important agricultural damages. The economical relevance of the area and the high frequency of the relevant flood events make the LT floodplain a good pilot region to conduct a data-driven, systematic calibration work of flood hydraulic models. This paper focus on the calibration of 2D-horizontal flood simulation models for the floods of 1997, 2001 and 2006 on a 70-km stretch of the LT River, between Tramagal and Omnias, using the software Tuflow. This computational engine provides 2D solutions based on the Stelling finite-difference, alternating direction implicit (ADI) scheme that solves the full 2D free surface shallow-water flow equations and allowed the introduction of structures that constrain water flow. The models were based on a digital terrain model (DTM) acquired in 2008 by radar techniques (5m of spatial resolution) and on in situ measurements of water elevation in Omnias (downstream boundary condition) and discharge in Tramagal and Zezere (upstream boundary conditions). Due to the relevancy of several dykes on this stretch of the LT River, non-existent on the available DTM, five of them were introduced in the models. All models have the same boundaries and were simulated using steady-state flow initial conditions. The resolution of the 2D grid mesh was 30m. Land cover data for the study area was retrieved from Corine Land Cover 2006 (CO-ordination of INformation on the Environment) with spatial resolution of 100m, and combined with estimated manning coefficients obtained in literature

  16. Revisiting 2D numerical models for the 19th century outbursts of η Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, R. F.; Villa, A. M.; Gómez, G. C.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Raga, A. C.; Cantó, J.; Velázquez, P. F.; de La Fuente, E.

    2010-02-01

    We present here new results of two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the eruptive events of the 1840s (the great) and the 1890s (the minor) eruptions suffered by the massive star η Carinae (Car). The two bipolar nebulae commonly known as the Homunculus and the little Homunculus (LH) were formed from the interaction of these eruptive events with the underlying stellar wind. We assume here an interacting, non-spherical multiple-phase wind scenario to explain the shape and the kinematics of both Homunculi, but adopt a more realistic parametrization of the phases of the wind. During the 1890s eruptive event, the outflow speed decreased for a short period of time. This fact suggests that the LH is formed when the eruption ends, from the impact of the post-outburst η Car wind (that follows the 1890s event) with the eruptive flow (rather than by the collision of the eruptive flow with the pre-outburst wind, as claimed in previous models; González et al.). Our simulations reproduce quite well the shape and the observed expansion speed of the large Homunculus. The LH (which is embedded within the large Homunculus) becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable and develop filamentary structures that resemble the spatial features observed in the polar caps. In addition, we find that the interior cavity between the two Homunculi is partially filled by material that is expelled during the decades following the great eruption. This result may be connected with the observed double-shell structure in the polar lobes of the η Car nebula. Finally, as in previous work, we find the formation of tenuous, equatorial, high-speed features that seem to be related to the observed equatorial skirt of η Car.

  17. Renormalizability of the gradient flow in the 2D O(N) non-linear sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Hiroki; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    It is known that the gauge field and its composite operators evolved by the Yang-Mills gradient flow are ultraviolet (UV) finite without any multiplicative wave function renormalization. In this paper, we prove that the gradient flow in the 2D O(N) non-linear sigma model possesses a similar property: The flowed N-vector field and its composite operators are UV finite without multiplicative wave function renormalization. Our proof in all orders of perturbation theory uses a (2+1)-dimensional field theoretical representation of the gradient flow, which possesses local gauge invariance without gauge field. As an application of the UV finiteness of the gradient flow, we construct the energy-momentum tensor in the lattice formulation of the O(N) non-linear sigma model that automatically restores the correct normalization and the conservation law in the continuum limit.

  18. Developing a 2D vertical flow and sediment transport model for open channels using the Youngs-VOF method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongmiao; Tang, Jun; Wu, Xiuguang; Lin, Changning; Liu, Lijun; Chen, Jian

    2016-05-01

    A 2D vertical (2DV) numerical model, without σ-coordinate transformation in the vertical direction, is developed for the simulation of fl ow and sediment transport in open channels. In the model, time-averaged Reynolds equations are closed by the k-ɛ nonlinear turbulence model. The modifi ed Youngs-VOF method is introduced to capture free surface dynamics, and the free surface slope is simulated using the ELVIRA method. Based on the power-law scheme, the k-ɛ model and the suspended-load transport model are solved numerically with an implicit scheme applied in the vertical plane and an explicit scheme applied in the horizontal plane. Bedload transport is modeled using the Euler-WENO scheme, and the grid-closing skill is adopted to deal with the moving channel bed boundary. Verifi cation of the model using laboratory data shows that the model is able to adequately simulate fl ow and sediment transport in open channels, and is a good starting point for the study of sediment transport dynamics in strong nonlinear fl ow scenarios.

  19. Developing an effective 2-D urban flood inundation model for city emergency management based on cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Liu, Y.; Wang, X.; Yu, D.; Liu, K.; Huang, H.; Hu, G.

    2015-03-01

    Flash floods have occurred frequently in the urban areas of southern China. An effective process-oriented urban flood inundation model is urgently needed for urban storm-water and emergency management. This study develops an efficient and flexible cellular automaton (CA) model to simulate storm-water runoff and the flood inundation process during extreme storm events. The process of infiltration, inlets discharge and flow dynamics can be simulated with little preprocessing on commonly available basic urban geographic data. In this model, a set of gravitational diverging rules are implemented to govern the water flow in a rectangular template of three cells by three cells of a raster layer. The model is calibrated by one storm event and validated by another in a small urban catchment in Guangzhou of southern China. The depth of accumulated water at the catchment outlet is interpreted from street-monitoring closed-circuit television (CCTV) videos and verified by on-site survey. A good level of agreement between the simulated process and the reality is reached for both storm events. The model reproduces the changing extent and depth of flooded areas at the catchment outlet with an accuracy of 4 cm in water depth. Comparisons with a physically based 2-D model (FloodMap) show that the model is capable of effectively simulating flow dynamics. The high computational efficiency of the CA model can meet the needs of city emergency management.

  20. Monte Carlo entropic sampling applied to Ising-like model for 2D and 3D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jureschi, C. M.; Linares, J.; Dahoo, P. R.; Alayli, Y.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present the Monte Carlo entropic sampling (MCES) applied to an Ising-like model for 2D and 3D system in order to show the interaction influence of the edge molecules of the system with their local environment. We show that, as for the 1D and the 2D spin crossover (SCO) systems, the origin of multi steps transition in 3D SCO is the effect of the edge interaction molecules with its local environment together with short and long range interactions. Another important result worth noting is the co-existence of step transitions with hysteresis and without hysteresis. By increasing the value of the edge interaction, L, the transition is shifted to the lower temperatures: it means that the role of edge interaction is equivalent to an applied negative pressure because the edge interaction favours the HS state while the applied pressure favours the LS state. We also analyse, in this contribution, the role of the short- and long-range interaction, J respectively G, with respect to the environment interaction, L.

  1. Resolution of anisotropic and shielded highly conductive layers using 2-D electromagnetic modelling in the Rhine Graben and Black Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezkan, Bülent; Červ, Václav; Pek, Josef

    1992-12-01

    Anisotropy in magnetotelluric (MT) data has been found very often and has been explained as the result of local structures of different conductivities. In this paper, an observed anisotropy in MT data is not interpreted qualitatively in terms of local structures but is modelled quantitatively by a quasi-anisotropic layer. Besides the MT transfer functions, measurements of the vertical magnetic component are required. The second goal of this paper is to describe a method which permits the resolution of mid-crustal conductive layers in the presence of an additional high-conductivity layer at the surface. This method is possible in a two-dimensional (2-D) situation that limits the spatial extension of the surface structure. Again, vertical magnetic field recordings are necessary, but the phase of the E-polarization with respect to the 2-D structure is the most sensitive parameter. Using two field sites in Southern Germany, it has been possible to give a quantitative explanation of anisotropy and an improved depth resolution, and to derive an integrated conductivity of the highly conductive mid-crustal layers using MT and geomagnetic depth sounding data. The anisotropic highly conductive layer is located 12 km beneath the poorly conductive Black Forest crystalline rocks, whereas it is at a depth of 6 km beneath the highly conductive Rhine Graben sediments.

  2. Lithospheric architecture of the Levant Basin (Eastern Mediterranean region): A 2D modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inati, Lama; Zeyen, Hermann; Nader, Fadi-Henri; Adelinet, Mathilde; Sursock, Alexandre; Rahhal, Muhsin Elie; Roure, Francois

    2016-04-01

    One of the major uncertainties regarding the Levant Basin, known to be the site of rifting in the Late Paleozoic and Early Mesozoic, concerns its deep crustal configuration despite numerous old and recent geophysical studies in this region. The aim of this study is to deduce the deep structure of the lithosphere underlying the easternmost Mediterranean region, in particular the Levant Basin and its margins, where the nature of the crust, continental versus oceanic, remains debated and has major implications on understanding the regional tectonic and thermal evolution, and on constraining potential petroleum systems. The algorithm used is a trial and error method that delivers the crustal thickness and the depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) as well as the crustal density distribution by integrating surface heat flow data, free-air gravity anomaly, Geoid and topography data. Moho depth and crustal thickness were locally constrained by refraction data where available. The models representing two EW sections show a progressively attenuated crystalline crust in an EW direction (35 to 8 km). The SN section represents a 12 km thick crust to the south, thins to 9-7 km towards the Lebanese coast and reaches 20 km in the north. The crystalline crust is best interpreted as a strongly thinned continental crust under the Levant Basin, represented by two distinct components, an upper and a lower crust. Nevertheless, the Herodotus Basin shows a thin crust, likely oceanic, with a thickness between 6 and 10 kms. West of the Eratosthenes Seamount, a local crustal anomaly is interpreted to be the result of an underlying continental crust with a thickness of 13 kms. The Moho under the Arabian plate is 35-40 km deep and becomes shallower towards the Mediterranean coast. Within the Levant Basin, the Moho appears to be situated between 20 and 23 km, reaching 26 km in the Herodotus Basin. While depth to LAB is around 110 km under the Arabian and the Eurasian plates, it

  3. Simulating the mobility of meteoric 10Be in the landscape through a coupled soil-hillslope model (Be2D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be allows for the quantification of vertical and lateral soil fluxes over long time scales (103-105 yr). However, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in the soil system makes a translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates complex. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model simulating the behaviour of meteoric 10Be on a hillslope. The model consists of two parts. The first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be within the soil profile, and the second component describes lateral soil and meteoric 10Be fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering as well as downslope fluxes of soil due to creep, water and tillage erosion. Synthetic model simulations show that meteoric 10Be inventories can be related to erosion and deposition across a wide range of geomorphological and pedological settings. Our results also show that meteoric 10Be can be used as a tracer to detect human impact on soil fluxes for soils with a high affinity for meteoric 10Be. However, the quantification of vertical mobility is essential for a correct interpretation of the observed variations in meteoric 10Be profiles and inventories. Application of the Be2D model to natural conditions using data sets from the Southern Piedmont (Bacon et al., 2012) and Appalachian Mountains (Jungers et al., 2009; West et al., 2013) allows to reliably constrain parameter values. Good agreement between simulated and observed meteoric 10Be concentrations and inventories is obtained with realistic parameter values. Furthermore, our results provide detailed insights into the processes redistributing meteoric 10Be at the soil-hillslope scale.

  4. Application of 2D numerical model to unsteady performance evaluation of vertical-axis tidal current turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Qu, Hengliang; Shi, Hongda; Hu, Gexing; Hyun, Beom-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Tidal current energy is renewable and sustainable, which is a promising alternative energy resource for the future electricity supply. The straight-bladed vertical-axis turbine is regarded as a useful tool to capture the tidal current energy especially under low-speed conditions. A 2D unsteady numerical model based on Ansys-Fluent 12.0 is established to conduct the numerical simulation, which is validated by the corresponding experimental data. For the unsteady calculations, the SST model, 2×105 and 0.01 s are selected as the proper turbulence model, mesh number, and time step, respectively. Detailed contours of the velocity distributions around the rotor blade foils have been provided for a flow field analysis. The tip speed ratio (TSR) determines the azimuth angle of the appearance of the torque peak, which occurs once for a blade in a single revolution. It is also found that simply increasing the incident flow velocity could not improve the turbine performance accordingly. The peaks of the averaged power and torque coefficients appear at TSRs of 2.1 and 1.8, respectively. Furthermore, several shapes of the duct augmentation are proposed to improve the turbine performance by contracting the flow path gradually from the open mouth of the duct to the rotor. The duct augmentation can significantly enhance the power and torque output. Furthermore, the elliptic shape enables the best performance of the turbine. The numerical results prove the capability of the present 2D model for the unsteady hydrodynamics and an operating performance analysis of the vertical tidal stream turbine.

  5. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  6. SWAT and River-2D Modelling of Pinder River for Analysing Snow Trout Habitat under Different Flow Abstraction Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nale, J. P.; Gosain, A. K.; Khosa, R.

    2015-12-01

    Pinder River, one of major headstreams of River Ganga, originates in Pindari Glaciers of Kumaon Himalayas and after passing through rugged gorges meets Alaknanda at Karanprayag forming one of the five celestial confluences of Upper Ganga region. While other sub-basins of Upper Ganga are facing severe ecological losses, Pinder basin is still in its virginal state and is well known for its beautiful valleys besides being host to unique and rare biodiversity. A proposed 252 MW run-of-river hydroelectric project at Devsari on this river has been a major concern on account of its perceived potential for egregious environmental and social impacts. In this context, the study presented tries to analyse the expected changes in aquatic habitat conditions after this project is operational (with different operation policies). SWAT hydrological modelling platform has been used to derive stream flow simulations under various scenarios ranging from the present to the likely future conditions. To analyse the habitat conditions, a two dimensional hydraulic-habitat model 'River-2D', a module of iRIC software, is used. Snow trout has been identified as the target keystone species and its habitat preferences, in the form of flow depths, flow velocity and substrate condition, are obtained from diverse sources of related literature and are provided as Habitat Suitability Indices to River-2D. Bed morphology constitutes an important River-2D input and has been obtained, for the designated 1 km long study reach of Pinder upto Karanprayag, from a combination of actual field observations and supplemented by SRTM 1 Arc-Second Global digital elevation data. Monthly Weighted Usable Area for three different life stages (Spawning, Juvenile and Adult) of Snow Trout are obtained corresponding to seven different flow discharges ranging from 10 cumec to 1000 cumec. Comparing the present and proposed future river flow conditions obtained from SWAT modelling, losses in Weighted Usable Area, for the

  7. Modeling of Devonian shale gas reservoirs. Task 16. Mathematical modeling of shale gas production (2D model). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has been supporting the development of flow models for Devonian shale gas reservoirs. The broad objectives of this modeling program are to: (1) develop and validate a mathematical model which describes gas flow through Devonian shales; (2) determine the sensitive parameters that affect deliverability and recovery of gas from Devonian shales; (3) recommend laboratory and field measurements for determination of those parameters critical to the productivity and timely recovery of gas from the Devonian shales; (4) analyze pressure and rate transient data from observation and production gas wells to determine reservoir parameters and well performance; and (5) study and determine the overall performance of Devonian shale reservoirs in terms of well stimulation, well spacing, and resource recovery as a function of gross reservoir properties such as anisotropy, porosity and thickness variations, and boundary effects. During the previous annual period, a mathematical model describing gas flow through Devonian shales and the software for a radial one-dimensional numerical model for single well performance were completed and placed into operation. Although the radial flow model is a powerful tool for studying single well behavior, it is inadequate for determining the effects of well spacing, stimulation treatments, and variation in reservoir properties. Hence, it has been necessary to extend the model to two-dimensions, maintaining full capability regarding Klinkerberg effects, desorption, and shale matrix parameters. During the current annual period, the radial flow model has been successfully extended to provide the two-dimensional capability necessary for the attainment of overall program objectives, as described above.

  8. Constraints on values of biological parameters by observed turbulence in a quasi-2D phytoplankton model of the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn-Woernle, Lisa; Dijkstra, Henk A.; van der Woerd, Hans J.

    2013-04-01

    Constraints on values of biological parameters by observed turbulence in a quasi-2D phytoplankton model of the North Atlantic Session and Session Number: Scaling and complex Physical and Biogeophysical Processes in the Atmosphere, Ocean and climate (NP3.1) Preferred Mode of Presentation: Oral Lisa Hahn-Woernle¹, Henk A. Dijkstra¹ & Hans J. van der Woerd² 1. Institute for Marine and Atmospheric research Utrecht, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands. 2. Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands. During the STRATIPHYT cruises in Summer 2009 and Spring 2011 in-situ plankton and nutrient concentrations as well as upper-ocean turbulence characteristics were measured from Las Palmas to Reykjavik [1,2]. The measurements agree with previous findings that the incoming light intensity and the stratification of the upper ocean set important conditions for the initiation of the phytoplankton bloom close to the surface and also for a possible shift to a deep chlorophyll maximum below the mixed layer. These strong characteristic spatial patterns and temporal cycles of phytoplankton surface concentration are also observed in satellite images of chlorophyll-a concentration in the Northern Atlantic. To understand the meridional depth (upper 200 m) variation of the phytoplankton distributions, a quasi-2D phytoplankton model was used. The results indicate that with the given profiles of the turbulent vertical mixing coefficient, only a very limited interval for the biological model parameters leads to the observed depth of the phytoplankton maximum. [1] E. Jurado, H. van der Woerd and H. A. Dijkstra, Microstructure measurements along a quasi-meridional transect in the North Atlantic, J. Geophysical Res. Oceans, 117, C04016, doi:10.1029/2011JC007137, (2012). [2] E. Jurado, H. A. Dijkstra and H. van der Woerd, Microstructure observations during the spring 2011 STRATIPHYT-II cruise in the

  9. Improved treatment of asthenosphere flow and melting in 2D numerical solutions for continental rifting: embedded vs nested modeling approaches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Monserrat, Albert; Morgan, Jason P.; Taramón, Jorge M.; Hall, Robert

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on improving current 2D numerical approaches to modeling the boundary conditions associated with computing accurate deformation and melting associated with continental rifting. Recent models primarily use far-field boundary conditions that have been used for decades with little assessment of their effects on asthenospheric flow beneath the rifting region. All are extremely oversimplified. All are likely to significantly shape the pattern of asthenospheric flow beneath the stretching lithosphere which is associated with pressure-release melting and rift volcanism. The choice of boundary conditions may lead to different predictions of asthenospheric flow and melting associated with lithospheric stretching and breakup. We also find that they may affect the mode of crustal stretching. Here we discuss a suite of numerical experiments using a Lagrangian formulation, that compare these choices to likely more realistic boundary condition choices like the analytical solution for flow associated with two diverging plates stretching over a finite-width region. We also compare embedded and nested meshes with a high-resolution 2-D region within a cartesian 'whole mantle cross-section' box. Our initial results imply that the choice of far-field boundary conditions does indeed significantly influence predicted melting distributions and melt volumes associated with continental breakup. For calculations including asthenospheric melting, the 'finite width plate spreading' and embedded rifting boundary condition treatments lead to significantly smaller BC-influenced signals when using high-resolution calculation regions of order ~1000 km wide and 600 km deep within a lower resolution box of the order of >5000 km wide and 2800 km. We recommend their use when models are attempting to resolve the effects of asthenosphere flow and melting. We also discuss several examples of typical numerical 'artifacts' related to 'edge convection' at the sides of the stretching region

  10. Numerical investigation of the flat band Bloch modes in a 2D photonic crystal with Dirac cones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Fietz, Chris; Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2015-04-20

    A numerical method combining complex-k band calculations and absorbing boundary conditions for Bloch waves is presented. We use this method to study photonic crystals with Dirac cones. We demonstrate that the photonic crystal behaves as a zero-index medium when excited at normal incidence, but that the zero-index behavior is lost at oblique incidence due to excitation of modes on the flat band. We also investigate the formation of monomodal and multimodal cavity resonances inside the photonic crystals, and the physical origins of their different line-shape features.

  11. Using overlapping sonobuoy data from the Ross Sea to construct a 2D deep crustal velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvans, M. M.; Clayton, R. W.; Stock, J. M.; Granot, R.

    2012-03-01

    Sonobuoys provide an alternative to using long streamers while conducting multi-channel seismic (MCS) studies, in order to provide deeper velocity control. We present analysis and modeling techniques for interpreting the sonobuoy data and illustrate the method with ten overlapping sonobuoys collected in the Ross Sea, offshore from Antarctica. We demonstrate the importance of using the MCS data to correct for ocean currents and changes in ship navigation, which is required before using standard methods for obtaining a 1D velocity profile from each sonobuoy. We verify our 1D velocity models using acoustic finite-difference (FD) modeling and by performing depth migration on the data, and demonstrate the usefulness of FD modeling for tying interval velocities to the shallow crust imaged using MCS data. Finally, we show how overlapping sonobuoys along an MCS line can be used to construct a 2D velocity model of the crust. The velocity model reveals a thin crust (5.5 ± 0.4 km) at the boundary between the Adare and Northern Basins, and implies that the crustal structure of the Northern Basin may be more similar to that of the oceanic crust in the Adare Basin than to the stretched continental crust further south in the Ross Sea.

  12. Building 2D wide-area site models from single- and multipass single-polarization SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttikkad, Shyam; Chellappa, Rama; Novak, Leslie M.

    1996-06-01

    Wide area site models are useful for delineating regions of interest and assisting in tasks like monitoring and change detection. They are also useful in registering a newly acquired image to an existing one of the same site, or to a map. This paper presents an algorithm for building a 2D wide area site model from high resolution, single polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. A three stage algorithm, involving detection of bright pixels, statistical segmentation of the data into homogeneous regions, and labeling/validation of segmentation results, is used for this task. Constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detectors are used for detecting bright pixels. Under assumptions of a suitable model for the statistical distribution of single polarization intensity or complex data, maximum likelihood labeling is used for initial segmentation. Knowledge of the acquisition parameters and other geometric cues are used to refine the initial segmentation and to extract man-made objects like buildings, and their shadows, as well as roads, from these images. When data from multiple passes of the same site is available, site models yield feature points which can be used to register the different images. In case complete information regarding the radar location, heading, and depression angle are available, the multiple views can be registered prior to site model construction, leading to improved performance. Site models are also useful for SAR data compression, where possible targets, man-made objects, and their neighborhoods are compressed losslessly and the background regions are compressed using lossy schemes.

  13. Experimental Investigation of the 2D Ion Beam Profile Generated by an ESI Octopole-QMS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Sarfaraz U. A. H.; Eijkel, Gert B.; Kistemaker, Piet; Ellis, Shane; Maher, Simon; Smith, Donald F.; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we have employed an ion imaging approach to investigate the behavior of ions exiting from a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system that employs a radio frequency octopole ion guide before the QMS. An in-vacuum active pixel detector (Timepix) is employed at the exit of the QMS to image the ion patterns. The detector assembly simultaneously records the ion impact position and number of ions per pixel in every measurement frame. The transmission characteristics of the ion beam exiting the QMS are studied using this imaging detector under different operating conditions. Experimental results confirm that the ion spatial distribution exiting the QMS is heavily influenced by ion injection conditions. Furthermore, ion images from Timepix measurements of protein standards demonstrate the capability to enhance the quality of the mass spectral information and provide a detailed insight in the spatial distribution of different charge states (and hence different m/z) ions exiting the QMS.

  14. A 2D transient numerical model combining heat/mass transport effects in a tubular solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollayi Barzi, Y.; Ghassemi, M.; Hamedi, M. H.

    The purpose of this study is to present a 2D transient numerical model to predict the dynamic behavior of a tubular SOFC. In this model, the transient conservation equations (momentum, species and energy equations) are solved numerically and electrical and electrochemical outputs are calculated with an equivalent electrical circuit for the cell. The developed model determines the cell electrical and thermal responses to the variation of load current. Also it predicts the local EMF, state variables (pressure, temperature and species concentration) and cell performance for different cell load currents. Using this comprehensive model the dynamic behavior of Tubular SOFC is studied. First an initial steady state operating condition is set for the SOFC model and then the time response of the fuel cell to changes of some interested input parameters (like electrical load) is analyzed. The simulation starts when the cell is at the steady state in a specific output load. When the load step change takes place, the solution continues to reach to the new steady state condition. Then the cell transient behavior is analyzed. The results show that when the load current is stepped up, the output voltage decreases to a new steady state voltage in about 67 min.

  15. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  16. SU-E-T-430: Modeling MLC Leaf End in 2D for Sliding Window IMRT and Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, X; Zhu, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a 2D geometric model for MLC accounting for leaf end dose leakage for dynamic IMRT and Rapidarc therapy. Methods: Leaf-end dose leakage is one of the problems for MLC dose calculation and modeling. Dosimetric leaf gap used to model the MLC and to count for leakage in dose calculation, but may not be accurate for smaller leaf gaps. We propose another geometric modeling method to compensate for the MLC round-shape leaf ends dose leakage, and improve the accuracy of dose calculation and dose verification. A triangular function is used to geometrically model the MLC leaf end leakage in the leaf motion direction, and a step function is used in the perpendicular direction. Dose measurements with different leaf gap, different window width, and different window height were conducted, and the results were used to fit the analytical model to get the model parameters. Results: Analytical models have been obtained for stop-and-shoot and dynamic modes for MLC motion. Parameters a=0.4, lw'=5.0 mm for 6X and a=0.54, lw'=4.1 mm for 15x were obtained from the fitting process. The proposed MLC leaf end model improves the dose profile at the two ends of the sliding window opening. This improvement is especially significant for smaller sliding window openings, which are commonly used for highly modulated IMRT plans and arc therapy plans. Conclusion: This work models the MLC round leaf end shape and movement pattern for IMRT dose calculation. The theory, as well as the results in this work provides a useful tool for photon beam IMRT dose calculation and verification.

  17. Simulating Dynamic Stall in a 2D VAWT: Modeling strategy, verification and validation with Particle Image Velocimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão Ferreira, C. J.; Bijl, H.; van Bussel, G.; van Kuik, G.

    2007-07-01

    The implementation of wind energy conversion systems in the built environment renewed the interest and the research on Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT), which in this application present several advantages over Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT). The VAWT has an inherent unsteady aerodynamic behavior due to the variation of angle of attack with the angle of rotation, perceived velocity and consequentially Reynolds number. The phenomenon of dynamic stall is then an intrinsic effect of the operation of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine at low tip speed ratios, having a significant impact in both loads and power. The complexity of the unsteady aerodynamics of the VAWT makes it extremely attractive to be analyzed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models, where an approximation of the continuity and momentum equations of the Navier-Stokes equations set is solved. The complexity of the problem and the need for new design approaches for VAWT for the built environment has driven the authors of this work to focus the research of CFD modeling of VAWT on: •comparing the results between commonly used turbulence models: URANS (Spalart-Allmaras and k-epsilon) and large eddy models (Large Eddy Simulation and Detached Eddy Simulation) •verifying the sensitivity of the model to its grid refinement (space and time), •evaluating the suitability of using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experimental data for model validation. The 2D model created represents the middle section of a single bladed VAWT with infinite aspect ratio. The model simulates the experimental work of flow field measurement using Particle Image Velocimetry by Simão Ferreira et al for a single bladed VAWT. The results show the suitability of the PIV data for the validation of the model, the need for accurate simulation of the large eddies and the sensitivity of the model to grid refinement.

  18. A static investigation of a simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring 2-D C-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, John G.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance and flow-turning capability of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. Thrust vectoring in the pitch plane was provided by rotation of the divergent flaps. The exhaust stream was turned in the yaw direction by deflection of yaw flaps hinged at the end of the nozzle sidewalls. The yaw flap hinge location was varied along the divergent region of the nozzle at four locations including the exit plane and the throat plane. The three hinge locations upstream of the nozzle exit plane required the downstream corners of both upper and lower divergent flaps to be cut off to eliminate interference when the yaw flaps were deflected. Three different lengths of yaw flaps were tested at several angles of deflection. The nozzle simulated a dry power setting with an expansion ratio typical of subsonic cruise and was tested at nozzle pressure ratios from 2.0 to 7.0.

  19. Effects of Precipitation on Ocean Mixed-Layer Temperature and Salinity as Simulated in a 2-D Coupled Ocean-Cloud Resolving Atmosphere Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K-M.; Adamec, D.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere model is used to investigate possible roles of convective scale ocean disturbances induced by atmospheric precipitation on ocean mixed-layer heat and salt budgets. The model couples a cloud resolving model with an embedded mixed layer-ocean circulation model. Five experiment are performed under imposed large-scale atmospheric forcing in terms of vertical velocity derived from the TOGA COARE observations during a selected seven-day period. The dominant variability of mixed-layer temperature and salinity are simulated by the coupled model with imposed large-scale forcing. The mixed-layer temperatures in the coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models show similar variations when salinity effects are not included. When salinity effects are included, however, differences in the domain-mean mixed-layer salinity and temperature between coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models could be as large as 0.3 PSU and 0.4 C respectively. Without fresh water effects, the nocturnal heat loss over ocean surface causes deep mixed layers and weak cooling rates so that the nocturnal mixed-layer temperatures tend to be horizontally-uniform. The fresh water flux, however, causes shallow mixed layers over convective areas while the nocturnal heat loss causes deep mixed layer over convection-free areas so that the mixed-layer temperatures have large horizontal fluctuations. Furthermore, fresh water flux exhibits larger spatial fluctuations than surface heat flux because heavy rainfall occurs over convective areas embedded in broad non-convective or clear areas, whereas diurnal signals over whole model areas yield high spatial correlation of surface heat flux. As a result, mixed-layer salinities contribute more to the density differences than do mixed-layer temperatures.

  20. Observation and simulation of heterogeneous 2D water and solute flow processes in ditch beds for subsequent catchment modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dages, Cecile; Samouelian, Anatja; Lanoix, Marthe; Dollinger, Jeanne; Chakkour, Sara; Chovelon, Gabrielle; Trabelsi, Khouloud; Voltz, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Ditches are involved in the transfer of pesticide to surface and groundwaters (e.g. Louchart et al., 2001). Soil horizons underlying ditch beds may present specific soil characteristics compared to neighbouring field soils due to erosion/deposition processes, to the specific biological activities (rooting dynamic and animal habitat) in the ditches (e.g. Vaughan et al., 2008) and to management practices (burning, dredging, mowing,...). Moreover, in contrast to percolation processes in field soils that can be assumed to be mainly 1D vertical, those occurring in the ditch beds are by essence 2D or even 3D. Nevertheless, due to a lake of knowledge, these specific aspects of transfer within ditch beds are generally omitted for hydrological simulation at the catchment scale (Mottes et al., 2014). Accordingly, the aims of this study were i) to characterize subsurface solute transfer through ditch beds and ii) to determine equivalent hydraulic parameters of the ditch beds for use in catchment scale hydrological simulations. A complementary aim was to evaluate the error in predictions performed when percolation in ditches is assumed to be similar to that in the neighbouring field soil. First, bromide transfer experiments were performed on undisturbed soil column (15 cm long with a 15 cm inner-diameter), horizontally and vertically sampled within each soil horizon underlying a ditch bed and within the neighboring field. Columns were sampled at the Roujan catchment (Hérault, France), which belongs to the long term Mediterranean hydrological observatory OMERE (Voltz and Albergel, 2002). Second, for each column, a set of parameters was determined by inverse optimization with mobile-immobile or dual permeability models, with CXTFIT (Toride et al., 1999) or with HYDRUS (Simunek et al., 1998). Third, infiltration and percolation in the ditch was simulated by a 2D flow domain approach considering the 2D variation in hydraulic properties of the cross section of a ditch bed. Last

  1. Human Lung Cancer Cells Grown in an Ex Vivo 3D Lung Model Produce Matrix Metalloproteinases Not Produced in 2D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Dhruva K.; Sakamoto, Jason H.; Thrall, Michael J.; Baird, Brandi N.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Ferrari, Mauro; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Kim, Min P.

    2012-01-01

    We compared the growth of human lung cancer cells in an ex vivo three-dimensional (3D) lung model and 2D culture to determine which better mimics lung cancer growth in patients. A549 cells were grown in an ex vivo 3D lung model and in 2D culture for 15 days. We measured the size and formation of tumor nodules and counted the cells after 15 days. We also stained the tissue/cells for Ki-67, and Caspase-3. We measured matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels in the conditioned media and in blood plasma from patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung. Organized tumor nodules with intact vascular space formed in the ex vivo 3D lung model but not in 2D culture. Proliferation and apoptosis were greater in the ex vivo 3D lung model compared to the 2D culture. After 15 days, there were significantly more cells in the 2D culture than the 3D model. MMP-1, MMP-9, and MMP-10 production were significantly greater in the ex vivo 3D lung model. There was no production of MMP-9 in the 2D culture. The patient samples contained MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-10. The human lung cancer cells grown on ex vivo 3D model form perfusable nodules that grow over time. It also produced MMPs that were not produced in 2D culture but seen in human lung cancer patients. The ex vivo 3D lung model may more closely mimic the biology of human lung cancer development than the 2D culture. PMID:23028922

  2. Regional spherical modeling of 2-D functions: The case of the critical frequency of the F2 ionospheric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santis, A.; De Franceschi, G.; Kerridge, D. J.

    1994-06-01

    In this paper it is shown that Adjusted Spherical Harmonic Analysis (ASHA), previously used for modeling the three-dimensional (3-D) geomagnetic field in a restricted area can be adapted to model general bidimensional (2-D) spherical functions, f(γ, θ). As an example of application the case of the critical frequency of the F2 ionospheric layer, f0F2 is described. By assuming that, at a fixed epoch, the monthly median value of f0F2 is a function only of the geographic longitude γ and colatitude θ, that is f0F2 = f( γ, θ), ASHA has been applied to modeling and mapping this ionospheric parameter over Europe. Here, the FORTRAN-77 computer programs and subprograms are presented enabling the practical and easy use of the ASHA technique to obtain, as a final output, either a grid (2 × 2 degrees) of the computed monthly medians of f0F2 in the European area and the calculated value of the parameter at one point, in the region of interest, as a function of time. The same codes can be adapted easily to be used for modeling any bidimensional function defined over a spherical portion of the Earth.

  3. Experimental validation of a 2D overland flow model using high resolution water depth and velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, L.; Legout, C.; Darboux, F.; Esteves, M.; Nord, G.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a validation of a two-dimensional overland flow model using empirical laboratory data. Unlike previous publications in which model performance is evaluated as the ability to predict an outlet hydrograph, we use high resolution 2D water depth and velocity data to analyze to what degree the model is able to reproduce the spatial distribution of these variables. Several overland flow conditions over two impervious surfaces of the order of one square meter with different micro and macro-roughness characteristics are studied. The first surface is a simplified representation of a sinusoidal terrain with three crests and furrows, while the second one is a mould of a real agricultural seedbed terrain. We analyze four different bed friction parameterizations and we show that the performance of formulations which consider the transition between laminar, smooth turbulent and rough turbulent flow do not improve the results obtained with Manning or Keulegan formulas for rough turbulent flow. The simulations performed show that using Keulegan formula with a physically-based definition of the bed roughness coefficient, a two-dimensional shallow water model is able to reproduce satisfactorily the flow hydrodynamics. It is shown that, even if the resolution of the topography data and numerical mesh are high enough to include all the small scale features of the bed surface, the roughness coefficient must account for the macro-roughness characteristics of the terrain in order to correctly reproduce the flow hydrodynamics.

  4. Tropical Convective Responses to Microphysical and Radiative Processes: A Sensitivity Study With a 2D Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Tao, W.-K.

    2004-01-01

    Prognostic cloud schemes are increasingly used in weather and climate models in order to better treat cloud-radiation processes. Simplifications are often made in such schemes for computational efficiency, like the scheme being used in the National Centers for Environment Prediction models that excludes some microphysical processes and precipitation-radiation interaction. In this study, sensitivity tests with a 2D cloud resolving model are carried out to examine effects of the excluded microphysical processes and precipitation-radiation interaction on tropical thermodynamics and cloud properties. The model is integrated for 10 days with the imposed vertical velocity derived from the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment. The experiment excluding the depositional growth of snow from cloud ice shows anomalous growth of cloud ice and more than 20% increase of fractional cloud cover, indicating that the lack of the depositional snow growth causes unrealistically large mixing ratio of cloud ice. The experiment excluding the precipitation-radiation interaction displays a significant cooling and drying bias. The analysis of heat and moisture budgets shows that the simulation without the interaction produces more stable upper troposphere and more unstable mid and lower troposphere than does the simulation with the interaction. Thus, the suppressed growth of ice clouds in upper troposphere and stronger radiative cooling in mid and lower troposphere are responsible for the cooling bias, and less evaporation of rain associated with the large-scale subsidence induces the drying in mid and lower troposphere.

  5. Modeling Coastal Salinity in Quasi 2D and 3D Using a DUALEM-421 and Inversion Software.

    PubMed

    Davies, Gareth; Huang, Jingyi; Monteiro Santos, Fernando Acacio; Triantafilis, John

    2015-01-01

    Rising sea levels, owing to climate change, are a threat to fresh water coastal aquifers. This is because saline intrusions are caused by increases and intensification of medium-large scale influences including sea level rise, wave climate, tidal cycles, and shifts in beach morphology. Methods are therefore required to understand the dynamics of these interactions. While traditional borehole and galvanic contact resistivity (GCR) techniques have been successful they are time-consuming. Alternatively, frequency-domain electromagnetic (FEM) induction is potentially useful as physical contact with the ground is not required. A DUALEM-421 and EM4Soil inversion software package are used to develop a quasi two- (2D) and quasi three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic conductivity images (EMCI) across Long Reef Beach located north of Sydney Harbour, New South Wales, Australia. The quasi 2D models discern: the dry sand (<10 mS/m) associated with the incipient dune; sand with fresh water (10 to 20 mS/m); mixing of fresh and saline water (20 to 500 mS/m), and; saline sand of varying moisture (more than 500 mS/m). The quasi 3D EMCIs generated for low and high tides suggest that daily tidal cycles do not have a significant effect on local groundwater salinity. Instead, the saline intrusion is most likely influenced by medium-large scale drivers including local wave climate and morphology along this wave-dominated beach. Further research is required to elucidate the influence of spring-neap tidal cycles, contrasting beach morphological states and sea level rise.

  6. Modeling Coastal Salinity in Quasi 2D and 3D Using a DUALEM-421 and Inversion Software.

    PubMed

    Davies, Gareth; Huang, Jingyi; Monteiro Santos, Fernando Acacio; Triantafilis, John

    2015-01-01

    Rising sea levels, owing to climate change, are a threat to fresh water coastal aquifers. This is because saline intrusions are caused by increases and intensification of medium-large scale influences including sea level rise, wave climate, tidal cycles, and shifts in beach morphology. Methods are therefore required to understand the dynamics of these interactions. While traditional borehole and galvanic contact resistivity (GCR) techniques have been successful they are time-consuming. Alternatively, frequency-domain electromagnetic (FEM) induction is potentially useful as physical contact with the ground is not required. A DUALEM-421 and EM4Soil inversion software package are used to develop a quasi two- (2D) and quasi three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic conductivity images (EMCI) across Long Reef Beach located north of Sydney Harbour, New South Wales, Australia. The quasi 2D models discern: the dry sand (<10 mS/m) associated with the incipient dune; sand with fresh water (10 to 20 mS/m); mixing of fresh and saline water (20 to 500 mS/m), and; saline sand of varying moisture (more than 500 mS/m). The quasi 3D EMCIs generated for low and high tides suggest that daily tidal cycles do not have a significant effect on local groundwater salinity. Instead, the saline intrusion is most likely influenced by medium-large scale drivers including local wave climate and morphology along this wave-dominated beach. Further research is required to elucidate the influence of spring-neap tidal cycles, contrasting beach morphological states and sea level rise. PMID:25053423

  7. Numerical model of water flow and solute accumulation in vertisols using HYDRUS 2D/3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Tomáš; Dahan, Ofer; Turkeltub, Tuvia

    2015-04-01

    Keywords: dessication-crack-induced-salinization, preferential flow, conceptual model, numerical model, vadose zone, vertisols, soil water retention function, HYDRUS 2D/3D Vertisols cover a hydrologically very significant area of semi-arid regions often through which water infiltrates to groundwater aquifers. Understanding of water flow and solute accumulation is thus very relevant to agricultural activity and water resources management. Previous works suggest a conceptual model of dessication-crack-induced-salinization where salinization of sediment in the deep section of the vadose zone (up to 4 m) is induced by subsurface evaporation due to convective air flow in the dessication cracks. It suggests that the salinization is induced by the hydraulic gradient between the dry sediment in the vicinity of cracks (low potential) and the relatively wet sediment further from the main cracks (high potential). This paper presents a modified previously suggested conceptual model and a numerical model. The model uses a simple uniform flow approach but unconventionally prescribes the boundary conditions and the hydraulic parameters of soil. The numerical model is bound to one location close to a dairy farm waste lagoon, but the application of the suggested conceptual model could be possibly extended to all semi-arid regions with vertisols. Simulations were conducted using several modeling approaches with an ultimate goal of fitting the simulation results to the controlling variables measured in the field: temporal variation in water content across thick layer of unsaturated clay sediment (>10 m), sediment salinity and salinity the water draining down the vadose zone to the water table. The development of the model was engineered in several steps; all computed as forward solutions by try-and-error approach. The model suggests very deep instant infiltration of fresh water up to 12 m, which is also supported by the field data. The paper suggests prescribing a special atmospheric

  8. 2D fluid model analysis for the effect of 3D gas flow on a capacitively coupled plasma deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The wide applicability of capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) deposition has increased the interest in developing comprehensive numerical models, but CCP imposes a tremendous computational cost when conducting a transient analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) model which reflects the real geometry of reactors. In particular, the detailed flow features of reactive gases induced by 3D geometric effects need to be considered for the precise calculation of radical distribution of reactive species. Thus, an alternative inclusive method for the numerical simulation of CCP deposition is proposed to simulate a two-dimensional (2D) CCP model based on the 3D gas flow results by simulating flow, temperature, and species fields in a 3D space at first without calculating the plasma chemistry. A numerical study of a cylindrical showerhead-electrode CCP reactor was conducted for particular cases of SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film. The proposed methodology produces numerical results for a 300 mm wafer deposition reactor which agree very well with the deposition rate profile measured experimentally along the wafer radius.

  9. Fluid-assisted deformation of the subduction interface: Coupled and decoupled regimes from 2-D hydromechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liang; May, Dave; Gerya, Taras; Bostock, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Shear deformation, accompanied with fluid activity inside the subduction interface, is related to many tectonic energy-releasing events, including regular and slow earthquakes. We have numerically examined the fluid-rock interactions inside a deforming subduction interface using state-of-the-art 2-D hydromechanical numerical models, which incorporate the rock fracturing behavior as a plastic rheology which is dependent on the pore fluid pressure. Our modeling results suggest that two typical dynamical regimes of the deforming subduction interface exist, namely, a "coupled" and a "decoupled" regime. In the coupled regime the subduction interface is subdivided into multiple rigid blocks, each separated by a narrow shear zone inclined at an angle of 15-20° with respect to the slab surface. In contrast, in the decoupled regime the subduction interface is divided into two distinct layers moving relative to each other along a pervasive slab surface-parallel shear zone. Through a systematic parameter study, we observe that the tensile strength (cohesion) of the material within the subduction interface dictates the resulting style of deformation within the interface: high cohesion (~60 MPa) results in the coupled regime, while low cohesion (~10 MPa) leads to the decoupled regime. We also demonstrate that the lithostatic pressure and inflow/outflow fluid fluxes (i.e., fluid-fluxed boundary condition) influence the location and orientation of faults. Predictions from our numerical models are supported by experimental laboratory studies, geological data, and geophysical observations from modern subduction settings.

  10. Simple point vortex model for the relaxation of 2D superfluid turbulence in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joon Hyun; Kwon, Woo Jin; Shin, Yong-Il

    2016-05-01

    In a recent experiment, it was found that the dissipative evolution of a corotating vortex pair in a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate is well described by a point vortex model with longitudinal friction on the vortex motion and the thermal friction coefficient was determined as a function of sample temperature. In this poster, we present a numerical study on the relaxation of 2D superfluid turbulence based on the dissipative point vortex model. We consider a homogeneous system in a cylindrical trap having randomly distributed vortices and implement the vortex-antivortex pair annihilation by removing a pair when its separation becomes smaller than a certain threshold value. We characterize the relaxation of the turbulent vortex states with the decay time required for the vortex number to be reduced to a quarter of initial number. We find the vortex decay time is inversely proportional to the thermal friction coefficient. In particular, we observe the decay times obtained from this work show good quantitative agreement with the experimental results in, indicating that in spite of its simplicity, the point vortex model reasonably captures the physics in the relaxation dynamics of the real system.

  11. Active vitamin D3, 1,25-(OH)2D3, protects against macrovasculopathy in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ma, R; Deng, X L; Du, G L; Li, C; Xiao, S; Aibibai, Y; Zhu, J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the protective effect of the active form of vitamin D3, 1,25-(OH)2D3, on macrovasculopathy in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), 8-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control group, T2DM group, and treatment group. The T2DM model was established after 6 weeks by administering an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (30 mg/kg). 1,25-(OH)2D3 was administered by gavage to rats in the treatment group, and an equal volume of peanut oil was administered to rats in the T2DM group. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) cholesterols were measured in all rats. The morphology of the thoracic aorta was examined, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), endothelin (ET), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), CD54, and CD106 in the thoracic aorta was determined by immunohistochemistry. The expression of FPG, TG, TC, and LDL-C in rats from the T2DM and treatment groups was significantly elevated compared with rats from the control group (P < 0.05). Compared with that in control group, the expression of TNF-α, ET, eNOS, and CD106 was significantly upregulated in the T2DM group and the treatment group, while the expression of CD54 was increased only in the T2DM group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the levels of TNF-α, CD54, and CD106 in rats from the treatment group were lower than those in the T2DM group (P < 0.05). These data suggest that 1,25-(OH)2D3 may protect the macrovessels from injury in T2DM rats by inhibiting the expression of TNF-α, CD54, and CD106. PMID:27323139

  12. Part A: Investigations of the Synthesis of Pyrazinochlorins and Other Porphyrin Derivatives. Part B: investigations of Student Translation Between 2-D/3-D Representations of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Michelle L.

    This dissertation will be composed of two parts. The first part was completed under the direction of Dr. Christian Bruckner and outlines the synthesis of porphyrins and related derivatives. It explores specifically the synthesis of pyrazinoporphyrin, a pyrrole-modified porphyrin, the use of microwaves for porphyrin synthesis, and the synthesis of a novel building block for use in an expanded porphyrin structure. Lastly, this part will describe a laboratory experiment, suitable for an organic chemistry course, which investigates the photophysical properties of porphyrins using brown eggs as a source of protoporphyrin IX. The second part, under the advisement of Dr. Tyson Miller, will detail research conducted on students' ability to translate between two-dimensional and three-dimensional representations of molecules. Using the Grounded Theory and a formal interview it was investigated what errors students make as they translate from a two-dimensional drawing to a three-dimensional model, and visa versa. This part also seeks to gain an understanding, through the use of phenomenography what was factors contribute to cognitive overload when drawing chiral centers.

  13. Calibration of the 2D Hydrodynamic Model Floodos and Implications of Distributed Friction on Sediment Transport Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croissant, T.; Lague, D.; Davy, P.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical models of floodplain dynamics often use a simplified 1D description of flow hydraulics and sediment transport that cannot fully account for differential friction between vegetated banks and low friction in the main channel. Key parameters of such models are the friction coefficient and the description of the channel bathymetry which strongly influence predicted water depth and velocity, and therefore sediment transport capacity. In this study, we use a newly developed 2D hydrodynamic model, Floodos, whose efficiency is a major advantage for exploring channel morphodynamics from a flood event to millennial time scales. We evaluate the quality of Floodos predictions in the Whataroa river, New Zealand and assess the effect of a spatially distributed friction coefficient (SDFC) on long term sediment transport. Predictions from the model are compared to water depth data from a gauging station located on the Whataroa River in Southern Alps, New Zealand. The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the 2.5 km long studied reach is derived from a 2010 LiDAR acquisition with 2 m resolution and an interpolated bathymetry. The several large floods experienced by this river during 2010 allow us to access water depth for a wide range of possible river discharges and to retrieve the scaling between these two parameters. The high resolution DEM used has a non-negligible part of submerged bathymetry that airborne LiDAR was not able to capture. Bathymetry can be reconstructed by interpolation methods that introduce several uncertainties concerning water depth predictions. We address these uncertainties inherent to the interpolation using a simplified channel with a geometry (slope and width) similar to the Whataroa river. We then explore the effect of a SDFC on velocity pattern, water depth and sediment transport capacity and discuss its relevance on long term predictions of sediment transport and channel morphodynamics.

  14. Crustal metamorphic fluid flux beneath the Dead Sea Basin: Constraints from 2D and 3D magnetotelluric modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meqbel, Naser; Weckmann, Ute; Muñoz, Gerard; Ritter, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    We report on a study to explore the deep electrical conductivity structure of the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) using magnetotelluric (MT) data collected along a transect across the DSB where the left lateral strike slip Dead Sea transform fault (DST) splits into two fault strands forming one of the largest pull-apart basins of the world. A very pronounced feature of our 2D inversion model is a deep, sub-vertical conductive zone beneath the DSB. The conductor extends through the entire crust and is sandwiched between highly resistive structures associated with Precambrian rocks of the basin flanks. The high electrical conductivity could be attributed to fluids released by dehydration of the uppermost mantle beneath the DSB, possibly in combination with fluids released by mid to low grade metamorphism in the lower crust and generation of hydrous minerals in the middle crust through retrograde metamorphism. Similar high conductivity zones associated with fluids have been reported from other large fault systems. The presence of fluids and hydrous minerals in the middle and lower crust could explain the required low friction coefficient of the DST along the eastern boundary of the Dead Sea basin and the high subsidence rate of basin sediments. 3D inversion models confirm the existence of a sub-vertical high conductivity structure underneath the DSB but its expression is far less pronounced. Instead, the 3D inversion model suggests a deepening of the conductive DSB sediments off-profile towards the south, reaching a maximum depth of approximately 12 km, which is consistent with other geophysical observations. At shallower levels, the 3D inversion model reveals salt diapirism as an upwelling of highly resistive structures, localized underneath the Al-Lisan Peninsula. The 3D model furthermore contains an E-W elongated conductive structure to the north-east of the Dead Sea basin. More MT data with better spatial coverage are required, however, to fully constrain the robustness of

  15. Effective finite-difference modelling methods with 2-D acoustic wave equation using a combination of cross and rhombus stencils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enjiang; Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2016-09-01

    The 2-D acoustic wave equation is commonly solved numerically by finite-difference (FD) methods in which the accuracy of solution is significantly affected by the FD stencils. The commonly used cross stencil can reach either only second-order accuracy for space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method or (2M)th-order accuracy along eight specific propagation directions for time-space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method, if the conventional (2M)th-order spatial FD and second-order temporal FD are used to discretize the equation. One other newly developed rhombus stencil can reach arbitrary even-order accuracy. However, this stencil adds significantly to computational cost when the operator length is large. To achieve a balance between the solution accuracy and efficiency, we develop a new FD stencil to solve the 2-D acoustic wave equation. This stencil is a combination of the cross stencil and rhombus stencil. A cross stencil with an operator length parameter M is used to approximate the spatial partial derivatives while a rhombus stencil with an operator length parameter N together with the conventional second-order temporal FD is employed in approximating the temporal partial derivatives. Using this stencil, a new FD scheme is developed; we demonstrate that this scheme can reach (2M)th-order accuracy in space and (2N)th-order accuracy in time when spatial FD coefficients and temporal FD coefficients are derived from respective dispersion relation using Taylor-series expansion (TE) method. To further increase the accuracy, we derive the FD coefficients by employing the time-space domain dispersion relation of this FD scheme using TE. We also use least-squares (LS) optimization method to reduce dispersion at high wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis, stability analysis and modelling examples demonstrate that our new scheme has greater accuracy and better stability than conventional FD schemes, and thus can adopt large time steps. To reduce the extra

  16. Effective finite-difference modelling methods with 2D acoustic wave equation using a combination of cross and rhombus stencils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enjiang; Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2016-07-01

    The 2D acoustic wave equation is commonly solved numerically by finite-difference (FD) methods in which the accuracy of solution is significantly affected by the FD stencils. The commonly used cross stencil can reach either only second-order accuracy for space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method or (2 M)th-order accuracy along eight specific propagation directions for time-space domain dispersion-relation-based FD method, if the conventional (2 M)th-order spatial FD and second-order temporal FD are used to discretize the equation. One other newly developed rhombus stencil can reach arbitrary even-order accuracy. However, this stencil adds significantly computational cost when the operator length is large. To achieve a balance between the solution accuracy and efficiency, we develop a new FD stencil to solve the 2D acoustic wave equation. This stencil is a combination of the cross stencil and rhombus stencil. A cross stencil with an operator length parameter M is used to approximate the spatial partial derivatives while a rhombus stencil with an operator length parameter N together with the conventional 2nd-order temporal FD is employed in approximating the temporal partial derivatives. Using this stencil, a new FD scheme is developed; we demonstrate that this scheme can reach (2 M)th-order accuracy in space and (2 N)th-order accuracy in time when spatial FD coefficients and temporal FD coefficients are derived from respective dispersion relation using Taylor-series expansion (TE) method. To further increase the accuracy, we derive the FD coefficients by employing the time-space domain dispersion relation of this FD scheme using TE. We also use least-squares (LS) optimization method to reduce dispersion at high wavenumbers. Dispersion analysis, stability analysis and modelling examples demonstrate that our new scheme has greater accuracy and better stability than conventional FD schemes, and thus can adopt large time steps. To reduce the extra computational

  17. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part I: Seasonal variation of atmospheric composition without meridional transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, V.; Cavalié, T.; Dobrijevic, M.; Hersant, F.; Greathouse, T. K.

    2015-09-01

    Saturn's axial tilt of 26.7° produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along Saturn's orbital path. A new time-dependent 2D photochemical model is presented to study the seasonal evolution of Saturn's stratospheric composition. This study focuses on the impact of the seasonally variable thermal field on the main stratospheric C2-hydrocarbon chemistry (C2H2 and C2H6) using a realistic radiative climate model. Meridional mixing and advective processes are implemented in the model but turned off in the present study for the sake of simplicity. The results are compared to a simple study case where a latitudinally and temporally steady thermal field is assumed. Our simulations suggest that, when the seasonally variable thermal field is accounted for, the downward diffusion of the seasonally produced hydrocarbons is faster due to the seasonal compression of the atmospheric column during winter. This effect increases with increasing latitudes which experience the most important thermal changes in the course of the seasons. The seasonal variability of C2H2 and C2H6 therefore persists at higher-pressure levels with a seasonally-variable thermal field. Cassini limb-observations of C2H2 and C2H6 (Guerlet, S. et al. [2009]. Icarus 203, 214-232) are reasonably well-reproduced from the equator to 40° in both hemispheres in the 0.1-1 mbar pressure range. At lower pressure levels, the models only fit the Cassini observations in the northern hemisphere, from the equator to 40°N. Beyond 40° in both hemispheres, deviations from the pure photochemical predictions, mostly in the southern hemisphere, suggest the presence of large-scale stratospheric dynamics.

  18. Metabolite profile of a mouse model of Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 2D neuropathy: implications for disease mechanisms and interventions

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Preeti; Beebe, Kirk; Morelli, Kathryn H.; Currie, Meagan E.; Norberg, Sara N.; Evsikov, Alexei V.; Miers, Kathy E.; Seburn, Kevin L.; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Kremensky, Ivo; Jordanova, Albena; Bult, Carol J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease encompasses a genetically heterogeneous class of heritable polyneuropathies that result in axonal degeneration in the peripheral nervous system. Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 2D neuropathy (CMT2D) is caused by dominant mutations in glycyl tRNA synthetase (GARS). Mutations in the mouse Gars gene result in a genetically and phenotypically valid animal model of CMT2D. How mutations in GARS lead to peripheral neuropathy remains controversial. To identify putative disease mechanisms, we compared metabolites isolated from the spinal cord of Gars mutant mice and their littermate controls. A profile of altered metabolites that distinguish the affected and unaffected tissue was determined. Ascorbic acid was decreased fourfold in the spinal cord of CMT2D mice, but was not altered in serum. Carnitine and its derivatives were also significantly reduced in spinal cord tissue of mutant mice, whereas glycine was elevated. Dietary supplementation with acetyl-L-carnitine improved gross motor performance of CMT2D mice, but neither acetyl-L-carnitine nor glycine supplementation altered the parameters directly assessing neuropathy. Other metabolite changes suggestive of liver and kidney dysfunction in the CMT2D mice were validated using clinical blood chemistry. These effects were not secondary to the neuromuscular phenotype, as determined by comparison with another, genetically unrelated mouse strain with similar neuromuscular dysfunction. However, these changes do not seem to be causative or consistent metabolites of CMT2D, because they were not observed in a second mouse Gars allele or in serum samples from CMT2D patients. Therefore, the metabolite ‘fingerprint’ we have identified for CMT2D improves our understanding of cellular biochemical changes associated with GARS mutations, but identification of efficacious treatment strategies and elucidation of the disease mechanism will require additional studies. PMID:27288508

  19. Metabolite profile of a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D neuropathy: implications for disease mechanisms and interventions.

    PubMed

    Bais, Preeti; Beebe, Kirk; Morelli, Kathryn H; Currie, Meagan E; Norberg, Sara N; Evsikov, Alexei V; Miers, Kathy E; Seburn, Kevin L; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Kremensky, Ivo; Jordanova, Albena; Bult, Carol J; Burgess, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease encompasses a genetically heterogeneous class of heritable polyneuropathies that result in axonal degeneration in the peripheral nervous system. Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D neuropathy (CMT2D) is caused by dominant mutations in glycyl tRNA synthetase (GARS). Mutations in the mouse Gars gene result in a genetically and phenotypically valid animal model of CMT2D. How mutations in GARS lead to peripheral neuropathy remains controversial. To identify putative disease mechanisms, we compared metabolites isolated from the spinal cord of Gars mutant mice and their littermate controls. A profile of altered metabolites that distinguish the affected and unaffected tissue was determined. Ascorbic acid was decreased fourfold in the spinal cord of CMT2D mice, but was not altered in serum. Carnitine and its derivatives were also significantly reduced in spinal cord tissue of mutant mice, whereas glycine was elevated. Dietary supplementation with acetyl-L-carnitine improved gross motor performance of CMT2D mice, but neither acetyl-L-carnitine nor glycine supplementation altered the parameters directly assessing neuropathy. Other metabolite changes suggestive of liver and kidney dysfunction in the CMT2D mice were validated using clinical blood chemistry. These effects were not secondary to the neuromuscular phenotype, as determined by comparison with another, genetically unrelated mouse strain with similar neuromuscular dysfunction. However, these changes do not seem to be causative or consistent metabolites of CMT2D, because they were not observed in a second mouse Gars allele or in serum samples from CMT2D patients. Therefore, the metabolite 'fingerprint' we have identified for CMT2D improves our understanding of cellular biochemical changes associated with GARS mutations, but identification of efficacious treatment strategies and elucidation of the disease mechanism will require additional studies.

  20. Origin of long-lived oscillations in 2D-spectra of a quantum vibronic model: Electronic versus vibrational coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Plenio, M. B.; Almeida, J.; Huelga, S. F.

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate that the coupling of excitonic and vibrational motion in biological complexes can provide mechanisms to explain the long-lived oscillations that have been obtained in nonlinear spectroscopic signals of different photosynthetic pigment protein complexes and we discuss the contributions of excitonic versus purely vibrational components to these oscillatory features. Considering a dimer model coupled to a structured spectral density we exemplify the fundamental aspects of the electron-phonon dynamics, and by analyzing separately the different contributions to the nonlinear signal, we show that for realistic parameter regimes purely electronic coherence is of the same order as purely vibrational coherence in the electronic ground state. Moreover, we demonstrate how the latter relies upon the excitonic interaction to manifest. These results link recently proposed microscopic, non-equilibrium mechanisms to support long lived coherence at ambient temperatures with actual experimental observations of oscillatory behaviour using 2D photon echo techniques to corroborate the fundamental importance of the interplay of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in the dynamics of light harvesting aggregates.

  1. Reconstruction of 3D lung models from 2D planning data sets for Hodgkin's lymphoma patients using combined deformable image registration and navigator channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Angela; Nguyen, Thao-Nguyen; Moseley, Joanne L.; Hodgson, David C.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Late complications (cardiac toxicities, secondary lung, and breast cancer) remain a significant concern in the radiation treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). To address this issue, predictive dose-risk models could potentially be used to estimate radiotherapy-related late toxicities. This study investigates the use of deformable image registration (DIR) and navigator channels (NCs) to reconstruct 3D lung models from 2D radiographic planning images, in order to retrospectively calculate the treatment dose exposure to HL patients treated with 2D planning, which are now experiencing late effects. Methods: Three-dimensional planning CT images of 52 current HL patients were acquired. 12 image sets were used to construct a male and a female population lung model. 23 ''Reference'' images were used to generate lung deformation adaptation templates, constructed by deforming the population model into each patient-specific lung geometry using a biomechanical-based DIR algorithm, MORFEUS. 17 ''Test'' patients were used to test the accuracy of the reconstruction technique by adapting existing templates using 2D digitally reconstructed radiographs. The adaptation process included three steps. First, a Reference patient was matched to a Test patient by thorax measurements. Second, four NCs (small regions of interest) were placed on the lung boundary to calculate 1D differences in lung edges. Third, the Reference lung model was adapted to the Test patient's lung using the 1D edge differences. The Reference-adapted Test model was then compared to the 3D lung contours of the actual Test patient by computing their percentage volume overlap (POL) and Dice coefficient. Results: The average percentage overlapping volumes and Dice coefficient expressed as a percentage between the adapted and actual Test models were found to be 89.2{+-}3.9% (Right lung=88.8%; Left lung=89.6%) and 89.3{+-}2.7% (Right=88.5%; Left=90.2%), respectively. Paired T-tests demonstrated that the

  2. 2D Numeric Modeling of Cenozoic Lithospheric deformation in the Himalaya-Tibet-Pamir-Tien Shan Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tympel, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2011-12-01

    The Pamir-Hindu Kush region located in the western syntaxis of the Himalaya is the locus of a large number of intermediate-depth earthquakes and an almost vertical high velocity zone, seen in seismic tomography. The seismicity is not clearly related to oceanic subduction and forms an S-shaped zone between north-western Afghanistan and the eastern Pamir. In depth, the earthquake hypocenters are forming what some authors interpret as a V-shaped pattern which supports the model of two converging subduction zones to explain the observations. However, other models propose a single but highly contorted Indian slab or even a Rayleigh-Taylor instability due to a higher density in the lithosphere compared to the asthenosphere. As part of the TIPAGE project (TIen Shan - PAmir GEodynamic program) our aim is to find lithospheric scale models consistent with all major observations as well as to find controlling factors for the extreme Cenozoic shortening in the Pamir-Tien Shan orogen. For our current modeling approach we use the finite-element code SLIM3D which allows coupled thermo-mechanical treatment of deformation processes. The code is capable of highly nonlinear elasto-visco-plastic rheology including diffusion, dislocation and Peierls creep mechanism and allowing self-consistent generation of faults. It incorporates free surface boundary conditions and is equiped with petrological routines for gabbro-eclogite, coesite-stishovite phase transitions. We run several 2D cross-section models in order to explain the high velocity zone below the Pamir-Hindu Kush and the seismicity which distingushes the region from the rest of the Himalaya. In a typical model setup India has two parts: the 'inner part' which comprises 35-45 km thick continental crust and relatively thick cratonic mantle lithosphere; the 'outer part' has 25-30 km thick crust and a less depleted, more ocean-like lithosphere. Inside of Asia we place an "inclusion" of thicker cratonic lithosphere, like that of the

  3. Modeling and Analysis of Granite Matrix Pore Structure and Hydraulic Characteristics in 2D and 3D Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdik, L.; Polak, M.; Zaruba, J.; Vanecek, M.

    2010-12-01

    A geological environment labeled as a Granite massif represents in terms of groundwater flow and transport a distinct hydrogeological environment from that of sedimentary basins, the characterisation of which is generally more complex and uncertain. Massifs are composed of hard crystalline rocks with the very low effective porosity. Due to their rheological properties such rocks are predisposed to brittle deformation resulting from changes in stress conditions. Our specific research project (Research on the influence of intergrangular porosity on deep geological disposal: geological formations, methodology and the development of measurement apparatus) is focussed on the problem of permeable zones within apparently undisturbed granitic rock matrix. The project including the both laboratory and in-situ tracer tests study migration along and through mineral grains in fresh and altered granite. The objective of the project is to assess whether intergranular porosity is a general characteristic of the granitic rock matrix or subject to significant evolution resulting from geochemical and/or hydrogeochemical processes, geotechnical and/or mechanical processes. Moreover, the research is focussed on evaluating methods quantifying intergranular porosity by both physical testing and mathematical modelling using verified standard hydrological software tools. Groundwater flow in microfractures and intergranular pores in granite rock matrix were simulated in three standard hydrogeological modeling programs with completely different conceptual approaches: MODFLOW (Equivalent Continuum concept), FEFLOW (Discrete Fracture and Equivalent Continuum concepts) and NAPSAC (Discrete Fracture Network concept). Specialized random fracture generators were used for creation of several 2D and 3D models in each of the chosen program. Percolation characteristics of these models were tested and analyzed. Several scenarios of laboratory tests of the rock samples permeability made in triaxial

  4. Anaerobic degradation of solid material: importance of initiation centers for methanogenesis, mixing intensity, and 2D distributed model.

    PubMed

    Vavilin, V A; Angelidaki, I

    2005-01-01

    Batch anaerobic codigestion of municipal household solid waste (MHSW) and digested manure in mesophilic conditions was carried out. The different waste-to-biomass ratios and intensity of mixing were studied theoretically and experimentally. The experiments showed that when organic loading was high, intensive mixing resulted in acidification and failure of the process, while low mixing intensity was crucial for successful digestion. However, when loading was low, mixing intensity had no significant effect on the process. We hypothesized that mixing was preventing establishment of methanogenic zones in the reactor space. The methanogenic zones are important to withstand inhibition due to development of acids formed during acidogenesis. The 2D distributed models of symmetrical cylinder reactor are presented based on the hypothesis of the necessity of a minimum size of methanogenic zones that can propagate and establish a good methanogenic environment. The model showed that at high organic loading rate spatial separation of the initial methanogenic centers from active acidogenic areas is the key factor for efficient conversion of solids to methane. The initial level of methanogenic biomass in the initiation centers is a critical factor for the survival of these centers. At low mixing, most of the initiation methanogenic centers survive and expand over the reactor volume. However, at vigorous mixing the initial methanogenic centers are reduced in size, averaged over the reactor volume, and finally dissipate. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, large irregular cocci of microorganisms were observed in the case with minimal mixing, while in the case with high stirring mainly dead cells were found. PMID:15540194

  5. Numerical study on spatially varying bottom friction coefficient of a 2D tidal model with adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xianqing; Zhang, Jicai

    2006-10-01

    Based on the simulation of M2 tide in the Bohai Sea, the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea, TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data are assimilated into a 2D tidal model to study the spatially varying bottom friction coefficient (BFC) by using the adjoint method. In this study, the BFC at some grid points are selected as the independent BFC, while the BFC at other grid points can be obtained through linear interpolation with the independent BFC. Two strategies for selecting the independent BFC are discussed. In the first strategy, one independent BFC is uniformly selected from each 1°×1° area. In the second one, the independent BFC are selected based on the spatial distribution of water depth. Twin and practical experiments are carried out to compare the two strategies. In the twin experiments, the adjoint method has a strong ability of inverting the prescribed BFC distributions combined with the spatially varying BFC. In the practical experiments, reasonable simulation results can be obtained by optimizing the spatially varying independent BFC. In both twin and practical experiments, the simulation results with the second strategy are better than those with the first one. The BFC distribution obtained from the practical experiment indicates that the BFC in shallow water are larger than those in deep water in the Bohai Sea, the North Yellow Sea, the South Yellow Sea and the East China Sea individually. However, the BFC in the East China Sea are larger than those in the other areas perhaps because of the large difference of water depth or bottom roughness. The sensitivity analysis indicates that the model results are more sensitive to the independent BFC near the land.

  6. 2-D modeling of generation, migration, oil mixture and biodegradation in Ceuta, south-east of the Maracaibo Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Marcano, F.; Leonard, C.; Dominguez, C.; Cassani, F.

    1996-08-01

    Oil in the Ceuta area have been found in Cretaceous and Tertiary reservoirs. A recent 300 sq km 3-D survey has confirmed the existence of strong faulting that determined important thickness variations of deltaic Eocene prograding sediments between the eastern and western areas. A major sequence boundary is associated to uplifting and erosion from the upper Eocene to the lower Miocene, inversion playing an important role in hydrocarbon entrapment, at the same time that a progressive tilting towards the southeast developed, controlling most of the migration directions. Added to the differences in burial histories, a variable heat flow field is estimated through the area, considering that changes in thicknesses and lithologies convey a significant part in the bulk thermal conductivities of the rock column. Oil-source rock correlation based on biomarker fingerprints relates the existing crude to the Cretaceous La Luna source rock. Rock maturity measurements constrain the thermal evolution model and we conclude that expulsion of oil in the east occurred during the Eocene, while in the east is during the upper Miocene. The identification by biological markers of crudes of different maturities validate the hypothesis of drainage areas of different geological and thermal evolution together with complex migration paths. As a result of exposure of crudes to biodegradation during Eocene times, a loss of an extensive volume of hydrocarbons is believed to have occurred. The former existence of this oil is recorded by the presence of demetilated hopanes, indicative of a high level of biodegradation, mixed with unaltered oils. All these processes have been examined by computerized 2-D modeling.

  7. Modelling river bank erosion using a 2D depth-averaged numerical model of flow and non-cohesive, non-uniform sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kadi Abderrezzak, Kamal; Die Moran, Andrés; Tassi, Pablo; Ata, Riadh; Hervouet, Jean-Michel

    2016-07-01

    Bank erosion can be an important form of morphological adjustment in rivers. With the advances made in computational techniques, two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical models have become valuable tools for resolving many engineering problems dealing with sediment transport. The objective of this research work is to present a simple, new, bank-erosion operator that is integrated into a 2D Saint-Venant-Exner morphodynamic model. The numerical code is based on an unstructured grid of triangular elements and finite-element algorithms. The slope of each element in the grid is compared to the angle of repose of the bank material. Elements for which the slope is too steep are tilted to bring them to the angle of repose along a horizontal axis defined such that the volume loss above the axis is equal to the volume gain below, thus ensuring mass balance. The model performance is assessed using data from laboratory flume experiments and a scale model of the Old Rhine. For the flume experiment case with uniform bank material, relevant results are obtained for bank geometry changes. For the more challenging case (i.e. scale model of the Old Rhine with non-uniform bank material), the numerical model is capable of reproducing the main features of the bank failure, induced by the newly designed groynes, as well as the transport of the mobilized sediment material downstream. Some deviations between the computed results and measured data are, however, observed. They are ascribed to the effects of three-dimensional (3D) flow structures, pore pressure and cohesion, which are not considered in the present 2D model.

  8. Bifurcation structure of the special class of nonstationary regimes emerging in the 2D inertially coupled, unit-cell model: Analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorotnikov, K.; Starosvetsky, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Present work is devoted to the analytical investigation of the bifurcation structure of special class of nonstationary low-energy regimes emerging in the locally resonant unit-cell model. System under consideration comprises an outer mass with internal rotator and subject to the 2D, nonlinear local potential. These regimes are characterized by the slow, purely rotational motion of the rotator synchronized with the periodic energy beats between the axial and the lateral vibrations of the outer element. Thus the angular speed of the rotator and the beating frequency of the outer element satisfy the 1:2 resonance condition. In the present study these regimes are referred to as regimes of synchronous nonlinear beats (RSNB). Using the regular muti-scale analysis in the limit of low energy excitation we derive the slow-flow model. To showcase the evolution of RSNBs we used the special Poincaré map technique applied on the slow-flow model. Results of the Poincaré sections unveiled some interesting local bifurcations undergone by these regimes. Further analysis of the slow-flow model enabled us to describe the RSNBs analytically as well as exposed their entire bifurcation structure. The bifurcation analysis has shown the coexistence of several branches of RSNBs corresponding to the regimes of weak and strong, two-dimensional, recurrent energy channeling. We substantiate the results of the analytical study with numerical simulations of the full model and find them to be in the very good agreement.

  9. A BENCHMARKING ANALYSIS FOR FIVE RADIONUCLIDE VADOSE ZONE MODELS (CHAIN, MULTIMED_DP, FECTUZ, HYDRUS, AND CHAIN 2D) IN SOIL SCREENING LEVEL CALCULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five radionuclide vadose zone models with different degrees of complexity (CHAIN, MULTIMED_DP, FECTUZ, HYDRUS, and CHAIN 2D) were selected for use in soil screening level (SSL) calculations. A benchmarking analysis between the models was conducted for a radionuclide (99Tc) rele...

  10. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  11. A 2-D process-based model for suspended sediment dynamics: A first step towards ecological modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Achete, F. M.; van der Wegen, M.; Roelvink, D.; Jaffe, B.

    2015-01-01

    In estuaries suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is one of the most important contributors to turbidity, which influences habitat conditions and ecological functions of the system. Sediment dynamics differs depending on sediment supply and hydrodynamic forcing conditions that vary over space and over time. A robust sediment transport model is a first step in developing a chain of models enabling simulations of contaminants, phytoplankton and habitat conditions. This works aims to determine turbidity levels in the complex-geometry delta of the San Francisco estuary using a process-based approach (Delft3D Flexible Mesh software). Our approach includes a detailed calibration against measured SSC levels, a sensitivity analysis on model parameters and the determination of a yearly sediment budget as well as an assessment of model results in terms of turbidity levels for a single year, water year (WY) 2011. Model results show that our process-based approach is a valuable tool in assessing sediment dynamics and their related ecological parameters over a range of spatial and temporal scales. The model may act as the base model for a chain of ecological models assessing the impact of climate change and management scenarios. Here we present a modeling approach that, with limited data, produces reliable predictions and can be useful for estuaries without a large amount of processes data.

  12. A 2-D process-based model for suspended sediment dynamics: a first step towards ecological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achete, F. M.; van der Wegen, M.; Roelvink, D.; Jaffe, B.

    2015-06-01

    In estuaries suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is one of the most important contributors to turbidity, which influences habitat conditions and ecological functions of the system. Sediment dynamics differs depending on sediment supply and hydrodynamic forcing conditions that vary over space and over time. A robust sediment transport model is a first step in developing a chain of models enabling simulations of contaminants, phytoplankton and habitat conditions. This works aims to determine turbidity levels in the complex-geometry delta of the San Francisco estuary using a process-based approach (Delft3D Flexible Mesh software). Our approach includes a detailed calibration against measured SSC levels, a sensitivity analysis on model parameters and the determination of a yearly sediment budget as well as an assessment of model results in terms of turbidity levels for a single year, water year (WY) 2011. Model results show that our process-based approach is a valuable tool in assessing sediment dynamics and their related ecological parameters over a range of spatial and temporal scales. The model may act as the base model for a chain of ecological models assessing the impact of climate change and management scenarios. Here we present a modeling approach that, with limited data, produces reliable predictions and can be useful for estuaries without a large amount of processes data.

  13. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results. PMID:24188921

  14. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-12-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results.

  15. Numerical simulations - Some results for the 2- and 3-D Hubbard models and a 2-D electron phonon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalapino, D. J.; Sugar, R. L.; White, S. R.; Bickers, N. E.; Scalettar, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations on the half-filled three-dimensional Hubbard model clearly show the onset of Neel order. Simulations of the two-dimensional electron-phonon Holstein model show the competition between the formation of a Peierls-CDW state and a superconducting state. However, the behavior of the partly filled two-dimensional Hubbard model is more difficult to determine. At half-filling, the antiferromagnetic correlations grow as T is reduced. Doping away from half-filling suppresses these correlations, and it is found that there is a weak attractive pairing interaction in the d-wave channel. However, the strength of the pair field susceptibility is weak at the temperatures and lattice sizes that have been simulated, and the nature of the low-temperature state of the nearly half-filled Hubbard model remains open.

  16. Comparative evaluation of 1D and quasi-2D hydraulic models based on benchmark and real-world applications for uncertainty assessment in flood mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Tegos, Aristoteles; Oikonomou, Athanasios; Pagana, Vassiliki; Koukouvinos, Antonios; Mamassis, Nikos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris; Efstratiadis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    One-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional hydraulic freeware models (HEC-RAS, LISFLOOD-FP and FLO-2d) are widely used for flood inundation mapping. These models are tested on a benchmark test with a mixed rectangular-triangular channel cross section. Using a Monte-Carlo approach, we employ extended sensitivity analysis by simultaneously varying the input discharge, longitudinal and lateral gradients and roughness coefficients, as well as the grid cell size. Based on statistical analysis of three output variables of interest, i.e. water depths at the inflow and outflow locations and total flood volume, we investigate the uncertainty enclosed in different model configurations and flow conditions, without the influence of errors and other assumptions on topography, channel geometry and boundary conditions. Moreover, we estimate the uncertainty associated to each input variable and we compare it to the overall one. The outcomes of the benchmark analysis are further highlighted by applying the three models to real-world flood propagation problems, in the context of two challenging case studies in Greece.

  17. Investigation of 2D photonic crystal structure based channel drop filter using quad shaped photonic crystal ring resonator for CWDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhipa, Mayur Kumar; Dusad, Lalit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the design & performance of two dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal structure based channel drop filter is investigated using quad shaped photonic crystal ring resonator. In this paper, Photonic Crystal (PhC) based on square lattice periodic arrays of Gallium Indium Phosphide (GaInP) rods in air structure have been investigated using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and photonic band gap is being calculated using Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) method. The PhC designs have been optimized for telecommunication wavelength λ= 1571 nm by varying the rods lattice constant. The number of rods in Z and X directions is 21 and 20, with lattice constant 0.540 nm it illustrates that the arrangement of Gallium Indium Phosphide (GaInP) rods in the structure which gives the overall size of the device around 11.4 µm × 10.8 µm. The designed filter gives good dropping efficiency using 3.298, refractive index. The designed structure is useful for CWDM systems. This device may serve as a key component in photonic integrated circuits. The device is ultra compact with the overall size around 123 µm2.

  18. A 2-D FEM thermal model to simulate water flow in a porous media: Campi Flegrei caldera case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, V.; Tammaro, U.; Capuano, P.

    2012-05-01

    Volcanic and geothermal aspects both exist in many geologically young areas. In these areas the heat transfer process is of fundamental importance, so that the thermal and fluid-dynamic processes characterizing a viscous fluid in a porous medium are very important to understand the complex dynamics of the these areas. The Campi Flegrei caldera, located west of the city of Naples, within the central-southern sector of the large graben of Campanian plain, is a region where both volcanic and geothermal phenomena are present. The upper part of the geothermal system can be considered roughly as a succession of volcanic porous material (tuff) saturated by a mixture formed mainly by water and carbon dioxide. We have implemented a finite elements approach in transient conditions to simulate water flow in a 2-D porous medium to model the changes of temperature in the geothermal system due to magmatic fluid inflow, accounting for a transient phase, not considered in the analytical solutions and fluid compressibility. The thermal model is described by means of conductive/convective equations, in which we propose a thermal source represented by a parabolic shape function to better simulate an increase of temperature in the central part (magma chamber) of a box, simulating the Campi Flegrei caldera and using more recent evaluations, from literature, for the medium's parameters (specific heat capacity, density, thermal conductivity, permeability). A best-fit velocity for the permeant is evaluated by comparing the simulated temperatures with those measured in wells drilled by Agip (Italian Oil Agency) in the 1980s in the framework of geothermal exploration. A few tens of days are enough to reach the thermal steady state, showing the quick response of the system to heat injection. The increase in the pressure due to the heat transport is then used to compute ground deformation, in particular the vertical displacements characteristics of the Campi Flegrei caldera behaviour. The

  19. Effects of substrate on 2D materials, graphene, MoS2, WS2, and black phosphorus, investigated by high temperature and spatially resolved Raman scattering and photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Liqin

    The exploration of a group of new 2D materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides, has become the hottest research of interest in recent years. With the dependable techniques of producing 2D materials, particularly mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition, we are able to study all kinds of their unique properties in mechanical, electrical and optical fields. In this dissertation, we examine the vibrational and thermal properties of four 2D materials---graphene, MoS2, WS2 and black phosphorus---as well as their interaction with the supporting substrates, by using temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy. Regarding the increasing interests of studying on the fabrication and applications of 2D materials, the role of 2D-material/substrate interaction has seldom been taken into consideration which would significantly affects the quality of the grown films and the performance of the devices. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to systematically investigate on this issue. At first, we performed temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy on two graphene samples prepared by CVD and ME up to 400°C, as well as graphite as a reference. The temperature dependence of both graphene samples shows very non-linear behavior for G and 2D bands, but with the CVD-grown graphene more nonlinear. Comparing to the Raman spectra collected before the measurements, the spectra after the measurements exhibit not only a shift of peak position but also a huge broadening of linewidth, especially for CVD-grown graphene. This study implies that the polymeric residues from either scotch tape or PMMA during transfer process are converted to amorphous carbon after annealed at high temperature, which may significantly change the optical and electrical properties of graphene. With the same temperature-dependent Raman technique as graphene, we examine on monolayer MoS2 and WS2, and thin-film black phosphorus and demonstrate that the film morphology and the

  20. Global SH-wave propagation in a 2D whole Moon model using the parallel hybrid PSM/FDM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xianghua; Wang, Yanbin; Qin, Yanfang; Takenaka, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    We present numerical modeling of SH-wave propagation for the recently proposed whole Moon model and try to improve our understanding of lunar seismic wave propagation. We use a hybrid PSM/FDM method on staggered grids to solve the wave equations and implement the calculation on a parallel PC cluster to improve the computing efficiency. Features of global SH-wave propagation are firstly discussed for a 100-km shallow and 900-km deep moonquakes, respectively. Effects of frequency range and lateral variation of crust thickness are then investigated with various models. Our synthetic waveforms are finally compared with observed Apollo data to show the features of wave propagation that were produced by our model and those not reproduced by our models. Our numerical modeling show that the low-velocity upper crust plays significant role in the development of reverberating wave trains. Increasing frequency enhances the strength and duration of the reverberations. Surface multiples dominate wavefields for shallow event. Core-mantle reflections can be clearly identified for deep event at low frequency. The layered whole Moon model and the low-velocity upper crust produce the reverberating wave trains following each phases consistent with observation. However, more realistic Moon model should be considered in order to explain the strong and slow decay scattering between various phases shown on observation data.

  1. Investigation of the thermal response of a gasdynamic heater with helical impellers. Calspan Report No. 6961-A-1. [MAZE and TACO2D codes

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, W. J.

    1981-12-01

    A gasdynamic heater, capable of producing contamination-free gas streams at temperatures up to 9000/sup 0/K, is being developed by the Vulcan project. The design of a cooling system for the case parts and the associated thermal analysis are a critical part of a successful design. The purpose of the present work was to perform a preliminary cooling passage design and complete thermal analysis for the center body liner, end plate liners and exit nozzle. The approach envisioned for this work was the use of a set of LLNL finite-element codes, called MAZE and TACO2D. These were to be used at LLNL in a series of visits by the Calspan principal investigator. The project was cancelled shortly after the first of these visits; this report contains a summary of the work accomplished during the abbreviated contract period, and a review of the items that will need to be considered when the work is resumed at some future date.

  2. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Aygun, N.; Lo, S.-F.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE  <  6.4 mm (±4.4 mm interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1-2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of  >14% however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved

  3. 3D–2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Aygun, N; Lo, S-F; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D–2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D–2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE > 30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE < 6.4 mm (±4.4 mm interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1–2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of >14%; however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE = 5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved the

  4. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch.

    PubMed

    De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Aygun, N; Lo, S-F; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-21

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE < 6.4 mm (±4.4 mm interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1-2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of >14%; however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved

  5. Computational Studies of Condensed Matter Systems: Manganese Vanadium Oxide and 2D attractive Hubbard model with spin-dependent disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanguneri, Ravindra

    -dependent disorder. Further, the finite temperature phase diagram for the 2D attractive fermion Hubbard model with spin-dependent disorder is also considered within BdG mean field theory. Three types of disorder are studied. In the first, only one species is coupled to a random site energy; in the second, the two species both move in random site energy landscapes which are of the same amplitude, but different realizations; and finally, in the third, the disorder is in the hopping rather than the site energy. For all three cases we find that, unlike the case of spin-symmetric randomness, where the energy gap and average order parameter do not vanish as the disorder strength increases, a critical disorder strength exists separating distinct phases. In fact, the energy gap and the average order parameter vanish at distinct transitions, Vcgap and Vc op, allowing for a gapless superconducting (gSC) phase. The gSC phase becomes smaller with increasing temperature, until it vanishes at a temperature T*.

  6. 2D modeling of DC potential structures induced by RF sheaths with transverse currents in front of ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2005-09-26

    Understanding DC potential generation in front of ICRF antennas is crucial for long pulse high RF power systems. DC potentials are produced by sheath rectification of these RF potentials. To reach this goal, near RF parallel electric fields have to be computed in 3D and integrated along open magnetic field lines to yield a 2D RF potential map in a transverse plane. DC potentials are produced by sheath rectification of these RF potentials. As RF potentials are spatially inhomogeneous, transverse polarization currents are created, modifying RF and DC maps. Such modifications are quantified on a 'test map' having initially a Gaussian shape and assuming that the map remains Gaussian near its summit,the time behavior of the peak can be estimated analytically in presence of polarization current as a function of its width r0 and amplitude {phi}0 (normalized to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature). A 'peaking factor' is built from the DC peak potential normalized to {phi}0, and validated with a 2D fluid code and a 2D PIC code (XOOPIC). In an unexpected way transverse currents can increase this factor. Realistic situations of a Tore Supra antenna are also studied, with self-consistent near fields provided by ICANT code. Basic processes will be detailed and an evaluation of the 'peaking factor' for ITER will be presented for a given configuration.

  7. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  8. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  9. Modeling the Transverse Thermal Conductivity of 2-D SiC{sub f} /SiC Composites Made with Woven Fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Senor, David J.; Jones, Russell H.

    2004-06-15

    The hierarchical two-layer (H2L) model describes the effective transverse