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Sample records for 2-d neutron transport

  1. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; Young, Mitchell T. H.; Kochunas, Brendan; Graham, Aaron; Larsen, Edward W.; Downar, Thomas; Godfrey, Andrew

    2016-08-25

    We derived a consistent “2D/1D” neutron transport method from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. Our paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. We also performed several applications on both leadership-class and industry-classmore » computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.« less

  2. A 2D/1D coupling neutron transport method based on the matrix MOC and NEM methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Zheng, Y.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.

    2013-07-01

    A new 2D/1D coupling method based on the matrix MOC method (MMOC) and nodal expansion method (NEM) is proposed for solving the three-dimensional heterogeneous neutron transport problem. The MMOC method, used for radial two-dimensional calculation, constructs a response matrix between source and flux with only one sweep and then solves the linear system by using the restarted GMRES algorithm instead of the traditional trajectory sweeping process during within-group iteration for angular flux update. Long characteristics are generated by using the customization of commercial software AutoCAD. A one-dimensional diffusion calculation is carried out in the axial direction by employing the NEM method. The 2D and ID solutions are coupled through the transverse leakage items. The 3D CMFD method is used to ensure the global neutron balance and adjust the different convergence properties of the radial and axial solvers. A computational code is developed based on these theories. Two benchmarks are calculated to verify the coupling method and the code. It is observed that the corresponding numerical results agree well with references, which indicates that the new method is capable of solving the 3D heterogeneous neutron transport problem directly. (authors)

  3. BOXER: Fine-flux Cross Section Condensation, 2D Few Group Diffusion and Transport Burnup Calculations

    2010-02-01

    Neutron transport, calculation of multiplication factor and neutron fluxes in 2-D configurations: cell calculations, 2-D diffusion and transport, and burnup. Preparation of a cross section library for the code BOXER from a basic library in ENDF/B format (ETOBOX).

  4. A large 2D PSD for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, R. B.; Smith, G. C.; Watt, G.; Boldeman, J. W.

    1997-02-01

    A 2D PSD based on a MWPC has been constructed for a small angle neutron scattering instrument. The active area of the detector was 640 × 640 mm 2. To meet the specifications for neutron detection efficiency and spatial resolution, and to minimise parallax, the gas mixture was 190 kPa 3He plus 100 kPa CF 4, and the active volume had a thickness of 30 mm. The design maximum neutron count rate of the detector was 10 5 events per secod. The (calculated) neutron detection efficiency was 60% for 2 Å neutrons and the (measured) neutron energy resolution on the anode grid was typically 20% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active area was determined using the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 × 5 mm 2) was thereby defined by the wire geometry. A 16-channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator module has been developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1 V/fC, noise line width of 0.4 fC (fwhm) and channel-to-channel cross-talk of less than 5%. The Proportional Counter Operating System (PCOS III) (LeCroy Corp, USA) was used for event encoding. The ECL signals produced by the 16 channel modules were latched in PCOS III by a trigger pulse from the anode and the fast encoders produce a position and width for each event. The information was transferred to a UNIX workstation for accumulation and online display.

  5. A large 2D PSD for thermal neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, R.B.; Watt, G.; Boldeman, J.W.; Smith, G.C.

    1996-12-31

    A 2D PSD based on a MWPC has been constructed for a small angle neutron scattering instrument. The active area of the detector was 640 x 640 mm{sup 2}. To meet the specifications for neutron detection efficiency and spatial resolution, and to minimize parallax, the gas mixture was 190 kPa {sup 3}He plus 100 kPa CF{sub 4} and the active volume had a thickness of 30 mm. The design maximum neutron count-rate of the detector was 10{sup 5} events per second. The (calculated) neutron detection efficiency was 60% for 2{angstrom} neutrons and the (measured) neutron energy resolution on the anode grid was typically 20% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active area was determined using the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 x 5 mm{sup 2}) was thereby defined by the wire geometry. A 16 channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator module has been developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1 V/fC, noise linewidth of 0.4 fC (fwhm) and channel-to-channel cross-talk of less than 5%. The Proportional Counter Operating System (PCOS III) (LeCroy Corp USA) was used for event encoding. The ECL signals produced by the 16 channel modules were latched in PCOS III by a trigger pulse from the anode and the fast encoders produce a position and width for each event. The information was transferred to a UNIX workstation for accumulation and online display.

  6. Parallel algorithms for 2-D cylindrical transport equations of Eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Yang, S.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, aimed at the neutron transport equations of eigenvalue problem under 2-D cylindrical geometry on unstructured grid, the discrete scheme of Sn discrete ordinate and discontinuous finite is built, and the parallel computation for the scheme is realized on MPI systems. Numerical experiments indicate that the designed parallel algorithm can reach perfect speedup, it has good practicality and scalability. (authors)

  7. A New 2D-Transport, 1D-Diffusion Approximation of the Boltzmann Transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17

    The work performed in this project consisted of the derivation, implementation, and testing of a new, computationally advantageous approximation to the 3D Boltz- mann transport equation. The solution of the Boltzmann equation is the neutron flux in nuclear reactor cores and shields, but solving this equation is difficult and costly. The new “2D/1D” approximation takes advantage of a special geometric feature of typical 3D reactors to approximate the neutron transport physics in a specific (ax- ial) direction, but not in the other two (radial) directions. The resulting equation is much less expensive to solve computationally, and its solutions are expected to be sufficiently accurate for many practical problems. In this project we formulated the new equation, discretized it using standard methods, developed a stable itera- tion scheme for solving the equation, implemented the new numerical scheme in the MPACT code, and tested the method on several realistic problems. All the hoped- for features of this new approximation were seen. For large, difficult problems, the resulting 2D/1D solution is highly accurate, and is calculated about 100 times faster than a 3D discrete ordinates simulation.

  8. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  9. A feasibility study using radiochromic films for fast neutron 2D passive dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Samuel L.; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Howell, Calvin R.; Crowell, Alexander S.; Fallin, Brent; Tonchev, Anton P.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this paper is threefold: (1) to establish sensitivity of XRQA and EBT radiochromic films to fast neutron exposure; (2) to develop a film response to radiation dose calibration curve and (3) to investigate a two-dimensional (2D) film dosimetry technique for use in establishing an experimental setup for a radiobiological irradiation of mice and to assess the dose to the mice in this setup. The films were exposed to a 10 MeV neutron beam via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction. The XRQA film response was a factor of 1.39 greater than EBT film response to the 10 MeV neutron beam when exposed to a neutron dose of 165 cGy. A film response-to-soft tissue dose calibration function was established over a range of 0-10 Gy and had a goodness of fit of 0.9926 with the calibration data. The 2D film dosimetry technique estimated the neutron dose to the mice by measuring the dose using a mouse phantom and by placing a piece of film on the exterior of the experimental mouse setup. The film results were benchmarked using Monte Carlo and aluminum (Al) foil activation measurements. The radiochromic film, Monte Carlo and Al foil dose measurements were strongly correlated, and the film within the mouse phantom agreed to better than 7% of the externally mounted films. These results demonstrated the potential application of radiochromic films for passive 2D neutron dosimetry.

  10. Parameterising root system growth models using 2D neutron radiography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Leitner, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Root architecture is a key factor for plant acquisition of water and nutrients from soil. In particular in view of a second green revolution where the below ground parts of agricultural crops are important, it is essential to characterise and quantify root architecture and its effect on plant resource acquisition. Mathematical models can help to understand the processes occurring in the soil-plant system, they can be used to quantify the effect of root and rhizosphere traits on resource acquisition and the response to environmental conditions. In order to do so, root architectural models are coupled with a model of water and solute transport in soil. However, dynamic root architectural models are difficult to parameterise. Novel imaging techniques such as x-ray computed tomography, neutron radiography and magnetic resonance imaging enable the in situ visualisation of plant root systems. Therefore, these images facilitate the parameterisation of dynamic root architecture models. These imaging techniques are capable of producing 3D or 2D images. Moreover, 2D images are also available in the form of hand drawings or from images of standard cameras. While full 3D imaging tools are still limited in resolutions, 2D techniques are a more accurate and less expensive option for observing roots in their environment. However, analysis of 2D images has additional difficulties compared to the 3D case, because of overlapping roots. We present a novel algorithm for the parameterisation of root system growth models based on 2D images of root system. The algorithm analyses dynamic image data. These are a series of 2D images of the root system at different points in time. Image data has already been adjusted for missing links and artefacts and segmentation was performed by applying a matched filter response. From this time series of binary 2D images, we parameterise the dynamic root architecture model in the following way: First, a morphological skeleton is derived from the binary

  11. 2D DEM model of sand transport with wind interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oger, L.; Valance, A.

    2013-06-01

    The advance of the dunes in the desert is a threat to the life of the local people. The dunes invade houses, agricultural land and perturb the circulation on the roads. It is therefore very important to understand the mechanism of sand transport in order to fight against desertification. Saltation in which sand grains are propelled by the wind along the surface in short hops, is the primary mode of blown sand movement [1]. The saltating grains are very energetic and when impact a sand surface, they rebound and consequently eject other particles from the sand bed. The ejected grains, called reptating grains, contribute to the augmentation of the sand flux. Some of them can be promoted to the saltation motion. We use a mechanical model based on the Discrete Element Method to study successive collisions of incident energetic beads with granular packing in the context of Aeolian saltation transport. We investigate the collision process for the case where the incident bead and those from the packing have identical mechanical properties. We analyze the features of the consecutive collision processes made by the transport of the saltating disks by a wind in which its profile is obtained from the counter-interaction between air flow and grain flows. We used a molecular dynamics method known as DEM (soft Discrete Element Method) with a initial static packing of 20000 2D particles. The dilation of the upper surface due to the consecutive collisions is responsible for maintaining the flow at a given energy input due to the wind.

  12. A velocity-dependent anomalous radial transport model for (2-D, 2-V) kinetic transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Kowsik; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Cohen, Ron; Rognlien, Tom

    2008-11-01

    Plasma turbulence constitutes a significant part of radial plasma transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This turbulent transport is modeled in the form of anomalous convection and diffusion coefficients in fluid transport codes. There is a need to model the same in continuum kinetic edge codes [such as the (2-D, 2-V) transport version of TEMPEST, NEO, and the code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory] with non-Maxwellian distributions. We present an anomalous transport model with velocity-dependent convection and diffusion coefficients leading to a diagonal transport matrix similar to that used in contemporary fluid transport models (e.g., UEDGE). Also presented are results of simulations corresponding to radial transport due to long-wavelength ExB turbulence using a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. A BGK collision model is used to enable comparison with fluid transport codes.

  13. Coupling 2-D cylindrical and 3-D x-y-z transport computations

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Shumays, I.K.; Yehnert, C.E.; Pitcairn, T.N.

    1998-06-30

    This paper describes a new two-dimensional (2-D) cylindrical geometry to three-dimensional (3-D) rectangular x-y-z splice option for multi-dimensional discrete ordinates solutions to the neutron (photon) transport equation. Of particular interest are the simple transformations developed and applied in order to carry out the required spatial and angular interpolations. The spatial interpolations are linear and equivalent to those applied elsewhere. The angular interpolations are based on a high order spherical harmonics representation of the angular flux. Advantages of the current angular interpolations over previous work are discussed. An application to an intricate streaming problem is provided to demonstrate the advantages of the new method for efficient and accurate prediction of particle behavior in complex geometries.

  14. The Kubo-Greenwood expression and 2d MIT transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castner, Theodore

    2010-03-01

    The 2d MIT in GaAs heterostructures (p- and n-type)features a mobility that drops continuously as the reduced density x= n/nc-1 is decreased. The Kubo-Greenwood result [1] predicts μ = (eɛh/hnc)α^2(x) where α is a normalized DOS. α(x)is obtained from the data [p-type, Gao et al. [2]; n-type Lilly et al. [3

  15. Initial global 2-D shielding analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source core and reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    This document describes the initial global 2-D shielding analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor, the D{sub 2}O reflector, the reflector vessel, and the first 200 mm of light water beyond the reflector vessel. Flux files generated here will later serve as source terms in subsequent shielding analyses. In addition to reporting fluxes and other data at key points of interest, a major objective of this report was to document how these analyses were performed, the phenomena that were included, and checks that were made to verify that these phenomena were properly modeled. In these shielding analyses, the fixed neutron source distribution in the core was based on the `lifetime-averaged` spatial power distribution. Secondary gamma production cross sections in the fuel were modified so as to account intrinsically for delayed fission gammas in the fuel as well as prompt fission gammas. In and near the fuel, this increased the low-energy gamma fluxes by 50 to 250%, but out near the reflector vessel, these same fluxes changed by only a few percent. Sensitivity studies with respect to mesh size were performed, and a new 2-D mesh distribution developed after some problems were discovered with respect to the use of numerous elongated mesh cells in the reflector. All of the shielding analyses were performed sing the ANSL-V 39n/44g coupled library with 25 thermal neutron groups in order to obtain a rigorous representation of the thermal neutron spectrum throughout the reflector. Because of upscatter in the heavy water, convergence was very slow. Ultimately, the fission cross section in the various materials had to be artificially modified in order to solve this fixed source problem as an eigenvalue problem and invoke the Vondy error-mode extrapolation technique which greatly accelerated convergence in the large 2-D RZ DORT analyses. While this was quite effective, 150 outer iterations (over energy) were still required.

  16. The HB-2D Polarized Neutron Development Beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Lowell; Hamilton, WA; Zhao, JK; Robertson, JL

    2016-09-01

    The Polarized Neutron Development beamline, recently commissioned at the HB-2D position on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides a tool for development and testing of polarizers, polarized neutron devices, and prototyping of polarized neutron techniques. With available monochromators including pyrolytic graphite and polarizing enriched Fe-57 (Si), the instrument has operated at 4.25 and 2.6 Å wavelengths, using crystal, supermirror, or He-3 polarizers and analyzers in various configurations. The Neutron Optics and Development Team has used the beamline for testing of He-3 polarizers for use at other HFIR and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) instruments, as well as a variety of flipper devices. Recently, we have acquired new supermirror polarizers which have improved the instrument performance. The team and collaborators also have continuing demonstration experiments of spin-echo focusing techniques, and plans to conduct polarized diffraction measurements. The beamline is also used to support a growing use of polarization techniques at present and future instruments at SNS and HFIR.

  17. Coupled Neutron Transport for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircrafts exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETC-HEDS, FLUKA, and MCNPX, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light particle transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  18. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, B.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on an equal footing. Electron bandstructure is treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. We present the results of our simulations of MIT 25 and 90 nm "well-tempered" MOSFETs and compare them to those of classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are consistent with 1D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and subthreshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller leakage current than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current.

  19. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density- gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Quantum simulations are focused on MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well- tempered" MOSFETs and compared to classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are quantitatively consistent with I D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and sub-threshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  20. Active transport and cluster formation on 2D networks.

    PubMed

    Greulich, P; Santen, L

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a model for active transport on inhomogeneous networks embedded in a diffusive environment which is motivated by vesicular transport on actin filaments. In the presence of a hard-core interaction, particle clusters are observed that exhibit an algebraically decaying distribution in a large parameter regime, indicating the existence of clusters on all scales. The scale-free behavior can be understood by a mechanism promoting preferential attachment of particles to large clusters. The results are compared with a diffusion-limited aggregation model and active transport on a regular network. For both models we observe aggregation of particles to clusters which are characterized by a finite size scale if the relevant time scales and particle densities are considered. PMID:20556462

  1. Screening and transport in 2D semiconductor systems at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Das Sarma, S.; Hwang, E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature carrier transport properties in 2D semiconductor systems can be theoretically well-understood within RPA-Boltzmann theory as being limited by scattering from screened Coulomb disorder arising from random quenched charged impurities in the environment. In this work, we derive a number of analytical formula, supported by realistic numerical calculations, for the relevant density, mobility, and temperature range where 2D transport should manifest strong intrinsic (i.e., arising purely from electronic effects) metallic temperature dependence in different semiconductor materials arising entirely from the 2D screening properties, thus providing an explanation for why the strong temperature dependence of the 2D resistivity can only be observed in high-quality and low-disorder 2D samples and also why some high-quality 2D materials manifest much weaker metallicity than other materials. We also discuss effects of interaction and disorder on the 2D screening properties in this context as well as compare 2D and 3D screening functions to comment why such a strong intrinsic temperature dependence arising from screening cannot occur in 3D metallic carrier transport. Experimentally verifiable predictions are made about the quantitative magnitude of the maximum possible low-temperature metallicity in 2D systems and the scaling behavior of the temperature scale controlling the quantum to classical crossover. PMID:26572738

  2. 2D numerical simulation of the MEP energy-transport model with a finite difference scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, V. . E-mail: romano@dmi.unict.it

    2007-02-10

    A finite difference scheme of Scharfetter-Gummel type is used to simulate a consistent energy-transport model for electron transport in semiconductors devices, free of any fitting parameters, formulated on the basis of the maximum entropy principle. Simulations of silicon n{sup +}-n-n{sup +} diodes, 2D-MESFET and 2D-MOSFET and comparisons with the results obtained by a direct simulation of the Boltzmann transport equation and with other energy-transport models, known in the literature, show the validity of the model and the robustness of the numerical scheme.

  3. A depth-averaged 2-D model of flow and sediment transport in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Alejandro; Wu, Weiming; Beck, Tanya M.

    2016-11-01

    A depth-averaged 2-D model has been developed to simulate unsteady flow and nonuniform sediment transport in coastal waters. The current motion is computed by solving the phase-averaged 2-D shallow water flow equations reformulated in terms of total-flux velocity, accounting for the effects of wave radiation stresses and general diffusion or mixing induced by current, waves, and wave breaking. The cross-shore boundary conditions are specified by assuming fully developed longshore current and wave setup that are determined using the reduced 1-D momentum equations. A 2-D wave spectral transformation model is used to calculate the wave height, period, direction, and radiation stresses, and a surface wave roller model is adopted to consider the effects of surface roller on the nearshore currents. The nonequilibrium transport of nonuniform total-load sediment is simulated, considering sediment entrainment by current and waves, the lag of sediment transport relative to the flow, and the hiding and exposure effect of nonuniform bed material. The flow and sediment transport equations are solved using an implicit finite volume method on a variety of meshes including nonuniform rectangular, telescoping (quadtree) rectangular, and hybrid triangular/quadrilateral meshes. The flow and wave models are integrated through a carefully designed steering process. The model has been tested in three field cases, showing generally good performance.

  4. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  5. Impact of high speed civil transports on stratospheric ozone: A 2-D model investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, D.E.; Connell, P.S.

    1996-12-01

    This study investigates the effect on stratospheric ozone from a fleet of proposed High Speed Civil Transports (HSCTs). The new LLNL 2-D operator-split chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere is used for this HSCT investigation. This model is integrated in a diurnal manner, using an implicit numerical solver. Therefore, rate coefficients are not modified by any sort of diurnal average factor. This model also does not make any assumptions on lumping of chemical species into families. Comparisons to previous model-derived HSCT assessment of ozone change are made, both to the previous LLNL 2-D model and to other models from the international assessment modeling community. The sensitivity to the NO{sub x} emission index and sulfate surface area density is also explored.

  6. Neutron imaging of root water uptake, transport and hydraulic redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of plant water fluxes is critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolving root water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task. Our objectives were to demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within 1-3-week old Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings using neutron imaging. Seedlings were propagated in a growth chamber adjacent to the HFIR CG1 Beam Line at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in cylindrical or plate-like aluminum chambers containing sand. Seedlings were maintained under fairly dry conditions, with water added only to replace daily evapotranspiration. Plants were placed into the high flux cold neutron beam line and injections of H2O or deuterium oxide (D2O) were tracked through the soil and root systems by collecting consecutive CCD radiographs through time. Water fluxes within the root systems were manipulated by cycling on a growth lamp that altered foliar demand for water and thus internal water potential driving forces. 2D and 3D neutron radiography readily illuminated root structure, root growth, and relative plant and soil water content. 2D pulse-chase irrigation experiments with H2O and D2O, which have different neutron cross sections and thus differences in resulting image contrast, successfully allowed observation of uptake and mass flow of water within the root system. After irrigation there was rapid root water uptake from the newly wetted soil, followed by progressive hydraulic redistribution of water through the root systems to roots terminating in dry soil. Water flux within individual roots responded differentially to foliar illumination based on internal water potential gradients. Using 2D radiography, absolute fluxes of H2O or D2O through the system could not be easily determined since neutron attenuation through the sample was dependent on unknown and dynamic magnitudes of both D and H

  7. Transport studies in 2D transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuchen; Neal, Adam T; Zhou, Hong; Ye, Peide D

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials are a new family of materials with interesting physical properties, ranging from insulating hexagonal boron nitride, semiconducting or semi-metallic transition metal dichalcogenides, to gapless metallic graphene. In this review, we provide a brief discussion of transport studies in transition metal dichalcogenides, including both semiconducting and semi-metallic phases, as well as a discussion of the newly emerged narrow bandgap layered material, black phosphorus, in terms of its electrical and quantum transport properties at room and cryogenic temperatures. Ultra-thin layered channel materials with atomic layer thickness in the cross-plane direction, together with relatively high carrier mobility with appropriate passivation techniques, provide the promise for new scientific discoveries and broad device applications. PMID:27187790

  8. Transport studies in 2D transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yuchen; Neal, Adam T.; Zhou, Hong; Ye, Peide D.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials are a new family of materials with interesting physical properties, ranging from insulating hexagonal boron nitride, semiconducting or semi-metallic transition metal dichalcogenides, to gapless metallic graphene. In this review, we provide a brief discussion of transport studies in transition metal dichalcogenides, including both semiconducting and semi-metallic phases, as well as a discussion of the newly emerged narrow bandgap layered material, black phosphorus, in terms of its electrical and quantum transport properties at room and cryogenic temperatures. Ultra-thin layered channel materials with atomic layer thickness in the cross-plane direction, together with relatively high carrier mobility with appropriate passivation techniques, provide the promise for new scientific discoveries and broad device applications.

  9. Momentum Transport: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to investigate the momentum budgets associated with several convective systems that developed during the TOGA COARE IOP (west Pacific warm pool region) and GATE (east Atlantic region). The tool for this study is the improved Goddard Cumulas Ensemble (GCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysical scheme, explicit cloud radiative interactive processes and air-sea interactive surface processes. The model domain contains 256 x 256 grid points (with 2 km resolution) in the horizontal and 38 grid points (to a depth of 22 km) in the vertical. The 2D domain has 1024 grid points. The simulations were performed over a 7-day time period (December 19-26, 1992, for TOGA COARE and September 1-7, 1994 for GATE). Cyclic literal boundary conditions are required for this type of long-term integration. Two well organized squall systems (TOGA, COARE February 22, 1993, and GATE September 12, 1994) were also simulated using the 3D GCE model. Only 9 h simulations were required to cover the life time of the squall systems. the lateral boundary conditions were open for these two squall systems simulations. the following will be examined: (1) the momentum budgets in the convective and stratiform regions, (2) the relationship between momentum transport and cloud organization (i.e., well organized squall lines versus less organized convective), (3) the differences and similarities in momentum transport between 2D and 3D simulated convective systems, and (4) the differences and similarities in momentum budgets between cloud systems simulated with open and cyclic lateral boundary conditions. Preliminary results indicate that there are only small differences between 2D and 3D simulated momentum budgets. Major differences occur, however, between momentum budgets associated with squall systems simulated using different lateral boundary conditions.

  10. A deterministic method for transient, three-dimensional neutron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goluoglu, Sedat

    A deterministic method for solving the time-dependent, three-dimensional Boltzmann transport equation with explicit representation of delayed neutrons has been developed and evaluated. The methodology used in this study for the time variable is the improved quasi-static (IQS) method. The position, energy, and angle variables of the neutron flux are computed using the three-dimensional (3-D) discrete ordinates code TORT. The resulting time-dependent, 3-D code is called TDTORT. The flux shape calculated by TORT is used to compute the point kinetics parameters (e.g., reactivity, generation time, etc.). The amplitude function is calculated by solving the point kinetics equations using LSODE (Livermore Solver of Ordinary differential Equations). Several transient 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D benchmark problems are used to verify TDTORT. The results show that methodology and code developed in this work have sufficient accuracy and speed to serve as a benchmarking tool for other less accurate models and codes. More importantly, a new computational tool based on transport theory now exists for analyzing the dynamic behavior of complex neutronic systems.

  11. TART. Coupled Neutron & Photon MC Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Plechaty, E.F.

    1988-10-06

    TART is a three-dimensional, data-dependent Monte Carlo transport program. The program calculates the transport of neutrons, photons, and neutron-induced photons through zones described by algebraic functions. The zones and elements to be included are user-specified. Any one of 21 different output tallys (methods of calculating particle transport) may be selected for each zone. A spectral reflection tally, which calculates reflections from planes and quadratic surfaces, saves considerable time and effort for some classes of problems. The neutron and photon energy deposition output tally is included in all TART calculations. The neutron and gamma-ray production cross sections are specified from 10E-9 MeV to 20 MeV. The gamma-ray interaction cross sections are specified from 10E-4 MeV to 30 MeV. The three cross section libraries are provided in binary form. Variance reduction methods included are splitting and Russian roulette at zone boundaries. Each zone in the problem can be assigned a weight.

  12. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  13. Kinetic parameter estimation in N. europaea biofilms using a 2-D reactive transport model.

    PubMed

    Lauchnor, Ellen G; Semprini, Lewis; Wood, Brian D

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms of the ammonia oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea were cultivated to study microbial processes associated with ammonia oxidation in pure culture. We explored the hypothesis that the kinetic parameters of ammonia oxidation in N. europaea biofilms were in the range of those determined with batch suspended cells. Oxygen and pH microelectrodes were used to measure dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH above and inside biofilms and reactive transport modeling was performed to simulate the measured DO and pH profiles. A two dimensional (2-D) model was used to simulate advection parallel to the biofilm surface and diffusion through the overlying fluid while reaction and diffusion were simulated in the biofilm. Three experimental studies of microsensor measurements were performed with biofilms: i) NH3 concentrations near the Ksn value of 40 μM determined in suspended cell tests ii) Limited buffering capacity which resulted in a pH gradient within the biofilms and iii) NH3 concentrations well below the Ksn value. Very good fits to the DO concentration profiles both in the fluid above and in the biofilms were achieved using the 2-D model. The modeling study revealed that the half-saturation coefficient for NH3 in N. europaea biofilms was close to the value measured in suspended cells. However, the third study of biofilms with low availability of NH3 deviated from the model prediction. The model also predicted shifts in the DO profiles and the gradient in pH that resulted for the case of limited buffering capacity. The results illustrate the importance of incorporating both key transport and chemical processes in a biofilm reactive transport model.

  14. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Walker, Steven A.; Badavi, Francis F.

    2010-01-01

    Long term human presence in space requires the inclusion of radiation constraints in mission planning and the design of shielding materials, structures, and vehicles. In this paper, the numerical error associated with energy discretization in HZETRN is addressed. An inadequate numerical integration scheme in the transport algorithm is shown to produce large errors in the low energy portion of the neutron and light ion fluence spectra. It is further shown that the errors result from the narrow energy domain of the neutron elastic cross section spectral distributions, and that an extremely fine energy grid is required to resolve the problem under the current formulation. Two numerical methods are developed to provide adequate resolution in the energy domain and more accurately resolve the neutron elastic interactions. Convergence testing is completed by running the code for various environments and shielding materials with various energy grids to ensure stability of the newly implemented method.

  15. Simulation and analysis of solute transport in 2D fracture/pipe networks: the SOLFRAC program.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Jacques; Porel, Gilles; Delay, Fred; Ubertosi, Fabrice; Bernard, Stéphane; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2007-01-01

    The Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) method has been recently developed by Delay and Bodin [Delay, F. and Bodin, J., 2001. Time domain random walk method to simulate transport by advection-dispersion and matrix diffusion in fracture networks. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(21): 4051-4054.] and Bodin et al. [Bodin, J., Porel, G. and Delay, F., 2003c. Simulation of solute transport in discrete fracture networks using the time domain random walk method. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 6566: 1-8.] for simulating solute transport in discrete fracture networks. It is assumed that the fracture network can reasonably be represented by a network of interconnected one-dimensional pipes (i.e. flow channels). Processes accounted for are: (1) advection and hydrodynamic dispersion in the channels, (2) matrix diffusion, (3) diffusion into stagnant zones within the fracture planes, (4) sorption reactions onto the fracture walls and in the matrix, (5) linear decay, and (6) mass sharing at fracture intersections. The TDRW method is handy and very efficient in terms of computation costs since it allows for the one-step calculation of the particle residence time in each bond of the network. This method has been programmed in C++, and efforts have been made to develop an efficient and user-friendly software, called SOLFRAC. This program is freely downloadable at the URL (labo.univ-poitiers.fr/hydrasa/intranet/telechargement.htm). It calculates solute transport into 2D pipe networks, while considering different types of injections and different concepts of local dispersion within each flow channel. Post-simulation analyses are also available, such as the mean velocity or the macroscopic dispersion at the scale of the entire network. The program may be used to evaluate how a given transport mechanism influences the macroscopic transport behaviour of fracture networks. It may also be used, as is the case, e.g., with analytical solutions, to interpret laboratory or field tracer test experiments performed

  16. A Computer Code for 2-D Transport Calculations in x-y Geometry Using the Interface Current Method.

    1990-12-01

    Version 00 RICANT performs 2-dimensional neutron transport calculations in x-y geometry using the interface current method. In the interface current method, the angular neutron currents crossing region surfaces are expanded in terms of the Legendre polynomials in the two half-spaces made by the region surfaces.

  17. A plastic scintillator-based 2D thermal neutron mapping system for use in BNCT studies.

    PubMed

    Ghal-Eh, N; Green, S

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a scintillator-based measurement instrument is proposed which is capable of measuring a two-dimensional map of thermal neutrons within a phantom based on the detection of 2.22MeV gamma rays generated via nth+H→D+γ reaction. The proposed instrument locates around a small rectangular water phantom (14cm×15cm×20cm) used in Birmingham BNCT facility. The whole system has been simulated using MCNPX 2.6. The results confirm that the thermal flux peaks somewhere between 2cm and 4cm distance from the system entrance which is in agreement with previous studies. PMID:26986813

  18. 2D simulation of transport and degradation in the River Rhine.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, L; Reuschenbach, P; Müller, B; Horn, H

    2002-01-01

    A simple 2D model has been developed for the simulation of mass transport and degradation of substances in the river Rhine. The model describes mass transport in the flow direction with a convective and a dispersive term. Transversal transport is described by segmenting the river and formulating a transversal exchange coefficient between the segments. Degradation can be formulated with any kinetics from first order to complex enzyme kinetics. The model was verified with monitoring data from the river Rhine. The hydrodynamic parameters such as dispersion coefficients and exchange coefficients were fitted to the conductivity, which was assumed to be non-degradable. The degradation term was fitted to ammonia values. The model was used to simulate measured concentrations of a readily (Aniline) and a poorly biodegradable substance (1,4-Dioxan) 10 m from the left river bank. It was the objective of this research program to develop a model which allows a realistic estimation of the locally and regionally predicted environmental concentration of chemical substances in the EU risk assessment scheme.

  19. A sequential partly iterative approach for multicomponent reactive transport with CORE2D

    SciTech Connect

    Samper, J.; Xu, T.; Yang, C.

    2008-11-01

    CORE{sup 2D} V4 is a finite element code for modeling partly or fully saturated water flow, heat transport and multicomponent reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. It can handle coupled microbial processes and geochemical reactions such as acid-base, aqueous complexation, redox, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/exsolution, ion exchange, sorption via linear and nonlinear isotherms, sorption via surface complexation. Hydraulic parameters may change due to mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. Coupled transport and chemical equations are solved by using sequential iterative approaches. A sequential partly-iterative approach (SPIA) is presented which improves the accuracy of the traditional sequential noniterative approach (SNIA) and is more efficient than the general sequential iterative approach (SIA). While SNIA leads to a substantial saving of computing time, it introduces numerical errors which are especially large for cation exchange reactions. SPIA improves the efficiency of SIA because the iteration between transport and chemical equations is only performed in nodes with a large mass transfer between solid and liquid phases. The efficiency and accuracy of SPIA are compared to those of SIA and SNIA using synthetic examples and a case study of reactive transport through the Llobregat Delta aquitard in Spain. SPIA is found to be as accurate as SIA while requiring significantly less CPU time. In addition, SPIA is much more accurate than SNIA with only a minor increase in computing time. A further enhancement of the efficiency of SPIA is achieved by improving the efficiency of the Newton-Raphson method used for solving chemical equations. Such an improvement is obtained by working with increments of log-concentrations and ignoring the terms of the Jacobian matrix containing derivatives of activity coefficients. A proof is given for the symmetry and non-singularity of the Jacobian matrix

  20. Spin-Orbit Interaction and Related Transport Phenomena in 2d Electron and Hole Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaetskii, A.

    Spin-orbit interaction is responsible for many physical phenomena which are under intensive study currently. Here we discuss several of them. The first phenomenon is the edge spin accumulation, which appears due to spin-orbit interaction in 2D mesoscopic structures in the presence of a charge current. We consider the case of a strong spin-orbit-related splitting of the electron spectrum, i.e. a spin precession length is small compared to the mean free path l. The structure can be either in a ballistic regime (when the mean free path is the largest scale in the problem) or quasi-ballistic regime (when l is much smaller than the sample size). We show how physics of edge spin accumulation in different situations should be understood from the point of view of unitarity of boundary scattering. Using transparent method of scattering states, we are able to explain some previous puzzling theoretical results. We clarify the important role of the form of the spin-orbit Hamiltonian, the role of the boundary conditions, etc., and reveal the wrong results obtained in the field by other researchers. The relation between the edge spin density and the bulk spin current in different regimes is discussed. The detailed comparison with the existing theoretical works is presented. Besides, we consider several new transport phenomena which appear in the presence of spin-orbit interaction, for example, magnetotransport phenomena in an external classical magnetic field. In particular, new mechanism of negative magneto-resistance appears which is due to destruction of spin fluxes by the magnetic field, and which can be really pronounced in 2D systems with strong scatterers.

  1. Influence of Transport on Two-Dimensional Model Simulation. Tracer Sensitivity to 2-D Model Transport. 1; Long Lived Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Considine, David B.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we examine the sensitivity of long lived tracers to changes in the base transport components in our 2-D model. Changes to the strength of the residual circulation in the upper troposphere and stratosphere and changes to the lower stratospheric K(sub zz) had similar effects in that increasing the transport rates decreased the overall stratospheric mean age, and increased the rate of removal of material from the stratosphere. Increasing the stratospheric K(sub yy) increased the mean age due to the greater recycling of air parcels through the middle atmosphere, via the residual circulation, before returning to the troposphere. However, increasing K(sub yy) along with self-consistent increases in the corresponding planetary wave drive, which leads to a stronger residual circulation, more than compensates for the K(sub yy)-effect, and produces significantly younger ages throughout the stratosphere. Simulations with very small tropical stratospheric K(sub yy) decreased the globally averaged age of air by as much as 25% in the middle and upper stratosphere, and resulted in substantially weaker vertical age gradients above 20 km in the extratropics. We found only very small stratospheric tracer sensitivity to the magnitude of the horizontal mixing across the tropopause, and to the strength of the mesospheric gravity wave drag and diffusion used in the model. We also investigated the transport influence on chemically active tracers and found a strong age-tracer correlation, both in concentration and calculated lifetimes. The base model transport gives the most favorable overall comparison with a variety of inert tracer observations, and provides a significant improvement over our previous 1995 model transport. Moderate changes to the base transport were found to provide modest agreement with some of the measurements. Transport scenarios with residence times ranging from moderately shorter to slightly longer relative to the base case simulated N2O lifetimes

  2. Hardware accelerated high performance neutron transport computation based on AGENT methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shanjie

    The spatial heterogeneity of the next generation Gen-IV nuclear reactor core designs brings challenges to the neutron transport analysis. The Arbitrary Geometry Neutron Transport (AGENT) AGENT code is a three-dimensional neutron transport analysis code being developed at the Laboratory for Neutronics and Geometry Computation (NEGE) at Purdue University. It can accurately describe the spatial heterogeneity in a hierarchical structure through the R-function solid modeler. The previous version of AGENT coupled the 2D transport MOC solver and the 1D diffusion NEM solver to solve the three dimensional Boltzmann transport equation. In this research, the 2D/1D coupling methodology was expanded to couple two transport solvers, the radial 2D MOC solver and the axial 1D MOC solver, for better accuracy. The expansion was benchmarked with the widely applied C5G7 benchmark models and two fast breeder reactor models, and showed good agreement with the reference Monte Carlo results. In practice, the accurate neutron transport analysis for a full reactor core is still time-consuming and thus limits its application. Therefore, another content of my research is focused on designing a specific hardware based on the reconfigurable computing technique in order to accelerate AGENT computations. It is the first time that the application of this type is used to the reactor physics and neutron transport for reactor design. The most time consuming part of the AGENT algorithm was identified. Moreover, the architecture of the AGENT acceleration system was designed based on the analysis. Through the parallel computation on the specially designed, highly efficient architecture, the acceleration design on FPGA acquires high performance at the much lower working frequency than CPUs. The whole design simulations show that the acceleration design would be able to speedup large scale AGENT computations about 20 times. The high performance AGENT acceleration system will drastically shortening the

  3. New approach to creation of geometrical module for nuclear reactor neutron transport computer simulation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Poveschenko, T.; Poveschenko, O.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the new approach to creation of geometrical module for nuclear reactor neutron transport computer simulation analysis so called the differential cross method. It is elaborated for detecting boards between physical zones. It is proposed to use GMSH open source mesh editor extended by some features: a special option and a special kind of mesh (cubic background mesh).This method is aimed into Monte Carlo Method as well as for deterministic neutron transport methods. Special attention is attended for reactor core composed of a set of material zones with complicate geometrical boundaries. The idea of this approach is described. In general case method works for 3-D space. Algorithm of creation of the geometrical module is given. 2-D neutron transport benchmark-test for RBMK reactor cluster cell is described. It demonstrates the ability of this approach to provide flexible definition of geometrical meshing with preservation of curved surface or any level of heterogeneity. (authors)

  4. Impact of Interface Roughness on the Metallic Transport of Strongly Correlated 2D Holes in GaAs Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goble, Nicholas; Watson, John; Manfra, Michael; Gao, Xuan

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the non-monotonic behavior in the temperature dependent resistance, R(T) , of strongly correlated two-dimensional (2D) carriers in clean semiconductors has been a central issue in the studies of 2D metallic states and metal-insulator transitions. We have studied the transport of high mobility 2D holes in 20nm wide GaAs quantum wells with varying interface roughness by changing the Al fraction x in the AlxGa1-xAs barrier. Prior to this work, no comprehensive study of the non-monotonic resistance peak against controlled barrier characteristics has been conducted. We show that the shape of the electronic contribution to R(T) is qualitatively unchanged throughout all of our measurements, regardless of the percentage of Al in the barrier. It is observed that increasing x or short range interface roughness suppresses both the strength and characteristic temperature scale of the 2D metallicity, pointing to the distinct role of short range versus long range disorder in the 2D metallic transport in this 2D hole system with interaction parameter rs ~ 20. N.G. acknowledges the US DOE GAANN fellowship (P200A090276 & P200A070434). M.J.M. is supported by the Miller Family Foundation and the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DMS (DE-SC0006671). X.P.A.G thanks the NSF for funding support (DMR-0906415).

  5. In situ 2D-extraction of DNA wheels by 3D through-solution transport.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Cervantes-Salguero, Keitel; Nakanishi, Waka; Kawamata, Ibuki; Minami, Kosuke; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Murata, Satoshi; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-28

    Controlled transfer of DNA nanowheels from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic surface was achieved by complexation of the nanowheels with a cationic lipid (2C12N(+)). 2D surface-assisted extraction, '2D-extraction', enabled structure-persistent transfer of DNA wheels, which could not be achieved by simple drop-casting.

  6. In situ 2D-extraction of DNA wheels by 3D through-solution transport.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Cervantes-Salguero, Keitel; Nakanishi, Waka; Kawamata, Ibuki; Minami, Kosuke; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Murata, Satoshi; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-28

    Controlled transfer of DNA nanowheels from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic surface was achieved by complexation of the nanowheels with a cationic lipid (2C12N(+)). 2D surface-assisted extraction, '2D-extraction', enabled structure-persistent transfer of DNA wheels, which could not be achieved by simple drop-casting. PMID:26583486

  7. Neutron Transport Characteristics of a Nuclear Reactor Based Dynamic Neutron Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Khaial, Anas M.; Harvel, Glenn D.; Chang, Jen-Shih

    2006-07-01

    An advanced dynamic neutron imaging system has been constructed in the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR) for nondestructive testing and multi-phase flow studies in energy and environmental applications. A high quality neutron beam is required with a thermal neutron flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}-s and a collimation ratio of 120 at image plane to promote high-speed neutron imaging up to 2000 frames per second. Neutron source strength and neutron transport have been experimentally and numerically investigated. Neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance was evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes, and simple analytical neutron transport calculations were performed based upon these measured neutron fluxes to predict facility components in accordance with high-speed dynamic neutron imaging and operation safety requirements. Monte-Carlo simulations (using MCNP-4B code) with multiple neutron energy groups have also been used to validate neutron beam parameters and to ensure shielding capabilities of facility shutter and cave walls. Neutron flux distributions at the image plane and the neutron beam characteristics were experimentally measured by irradiating a two-dimensional array of Copper foils and using a real-time neutron radiography system. The neutron image characteristics -- such as neutron flux, image size, beam quality -- measured experimentally and predicted numerically for beam tube, beam shutter and radiography cave are compared and discussed in detail in this paper. The experimental results show that thermal neutron flux at image plane is nearly uniform over an imaging area of 20.0-cm diameter and its magnitude ranges from 8.0 x 10{sup 6} - 1.0 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}-sec while the neutron-to-gamma ratio is 6.0 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}-{mu}Sv. (authors)

  8. Advanced Nodal P3/SP3 Axial Transport Solvers for the MPACT 2D/1D Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Stimpson, Shane G; Collins, Benjamin S

    2015-01-01

    As part of its initiative to provide multiphysics simulations of nuclear reactor cores, the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is developing the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator (VERA-CS). The MPACT code, which is the primary neutron transport solver of VERA-CS, employs the two-dimensional/one-dimensional (2D/1D) method to solve 3-dimensional neutron transport problems and provide sub-pin-level resolution of the power distribution. While 2D method of characteristics is used to solve for the transport effects within each plane, 1D-nodal methods are used axially. There have been extensive studies of the 2D/1D method with a variety nodal methods, and the P3/SP3 solver has proved to be an effective method of providing higher-fidelity solutions while maintaining a low computational burden.The current implementation in MPACT wraps a one-node nodal expansion method (NEM) kernel for each moment, iterating between them and performing multiple sweeps to resolve flux distributions. However, it has been observed that this approach is more sensitive to convergence problems. This paper documents the theory and application two new nodal P3/SP3 approaches to be used within the 2D/1D method in MPACT. These two approaches aim to provide enhanced stability compared with the pre-existing one-node approach. Results from the HY-NEM-SP3 solver show that the accuracy is consistent with the one-node formulations and provides improved convergence for some problems; but the solver has issues with cases in thin planes. Although the 2N-SENM-SP3 solver is still under development, it is intended to resolve the issues with HY-NEM-SP3 but it will incur some additional computational burden by necessitating an additional 1D-CMFD-P3 solver to generate the second moment cell-averaged scalar flux.

  9. 2-D Path Corrections for Local and Regional Coda Waves: A Test of Transportability

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K M; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D S; Morasca, P

    2005-07-13

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. [2003] has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. We will compare performance of 1-D versus 2-D path corrections in a variety of regions. First, the complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Next, we will compare results for the Italian Alps using high frequency data from the University of Genoa. For Northern California, we used the same station and event distribution and compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7 {le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter

  10. Theoretical Study of Large-Angle Bending Transport of Microparticles by 2D Acoustic Half-Bessel Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yixiang; Qiu, Chunyin; Xu, Shengjun; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-08-01

    Conventional microparticle transports by light or sound are realized along a straight line. Recently, this limit has been overcome in optics as the growing up of the self-accelerating Airy beams, which are featured by many peculiar properties, e.g., bending propagation, diffraction-free and self-healing. However, the bending angles of Airy beams are rather small since they are only paraxial solutions of the two-dimensional (2D) Helmholtz equation. Here we propose a novel micromanipulation by using acoustic Half-Bessel beams, which are strict solutions of the 2D Helmholtz equation. Compared with that achieved by Airy beams, the bending angle of the particle trajectory attained here is much steeper (exceeding 90o). The large-angle bending transport of microparticles, which is robust to complex scattering environment, enables a wide range of applications from the colloidal to biological sciences.

  11. Topologically robust transport of entangled photons in a 2D photonic system.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sunil; Orre, Venkata Vikram; Hafezi, Mohammad

    2016-07-11

    We theoretically study the transport of time-bin entangled photon pairs in a two-dimensional topological photonic system of coupled ring resonators. This system implements the integer quantum Hall model using a synthetic gauge field and exhibits topologically robust edge states. We show that the transport through edge states preserves temporal correlations of entangled photons whereas bulk transport does not preserve these correlations and can lead to significant unwanted temporal bunching or anti-bunching of photons. We study the effect of disorder on the quantum transport properties; while the edge transport remains robust, bulk transport is very susceptible, and in the limit of strong disorder, bulk states become localized. We show that this localization is manifested as an enhanced bunching/anti-bunching of photons. This topologically robust transport of correlations through edge states could enable robust on-chip quantum communication channels and delay lines for information encoded in temporal correlations of photons.

  12. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Dazeley, S.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Sweany, M. D.; Vetter, K.

    2016-08-01

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV and a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. The multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.

  13. Crossover from 3D to 2D quantum transport in Bi2Se3/In2Se3 superlattices.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanfei; Liu, Haiwen; Guo, Xin; Jiang, Ying; Sun, Yi; Wang, Huichao; Wang, Yong; Li, Han-Dong; Xie, Mao-Hai; Xie, Xin-Cheng; Wang, Jian

    2014-09-10

    The topological insulator/normal insulator (TI/NI) superlattices (SLs) with multiple Dirac channels are predicted to offer great opportunity to design novel materials and investigate new quantum phenomena. Here, we report first transport studies on the SLs composed of TI Bi2Se3 layers sandwiched by NI In2Se3 layers artificially grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The transport properties of two kinds of SL samples show convincing evidence that the transport dimensionality changes from three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D) when decreasing the thickness of building block Bi2Se3 layers, corresponding to the crossover from coherent TI transport to separated TI channels. Our findings provide the possibility to realizing "3D surface states" in TI/NI SLs.

  14. Spin Hall effect and spin transport in graphene and 2D heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oezyilmaz, Barbaros

    Semiconducting 2D materials offer new opportunities in both alternative technologies and fundamental discoveries by using the spin degree freedom of electrons. One of the main challenges in this field is to identify new materials which allow the control of spin currents by means of the electric field effect. This requires either a sizeable spin-orbit coupling strength or a sizeable bandgap or both. Unfortunately, pristine graphene has a negligibly small spin-orbit coupling strength. Recently we have addressed this problem in three distinct ways. First we have used chemical functionalization to introduce locally sp3 type bonding. Next we used metal ad-atoms to increase spin-orbit coupling via local enhancement of the spin-orbit coupling strength due to resonant scattering. Finally, I will show that the proximity of graphene on transition metal dichalcogenides can also lead to a significant enhancement of the spin-orbit coupling strength. I will complete my talk with a brief discussion on the possibility of all electrical spin injection into complementary 2D crystals such as WS2, MoS2 or black phosphorus. Membership Pending in the abstract Special Instructions field.

  15. Insights on the physics and application of off-plane quantum transport through graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannaccone, G.; Zhang, Q.; Bruzzone, S.; Fiori, G.

    2016-01-01

    Different proposals of graphene transistors based on off-plane (i.e., vertical) transport, have recently appeared in the literature, exhibiting experimental current modulation of a factor 104-105 at room temperature. These devices overcome the lack of bandgap that undermines the operation of graphene transistors, and positively exploit graphene's ultimate thinness, high conductivity, and low density of states. However, very little is known about vertical transport through graphene and two-dimensional materials, either in terms of experiments or theory. In this paper we will discuss the physics and the electronics of off-plane transport through hetero-structures of graphene and 2D materials. We investigate transport across vertical heterostructures of 2D materials with multi-scale simulations, including first-principle density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions based on NanoTCAD ViDES. We show that unexpected behaviors emerge, which are not observed in the more familiar semiconductor heterostructures based on III-V and II-VI materials systems, and that are not predicted by simplistic physical models. Such properties have a significant impact on the design and performance of transistors for digital or high frequency operations.

  16. Scattered Neutron Tomography Based on A Neutron Transport Inverse Problem

    SciTech Connect

    William Charlton

    2007-07-01

    Neutron radiography and computed tomography are commonly used techniques to non-destructively examine materials. Tomography refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object from either transmission or reflection data collected by illuminating the object from many different directions.

  17. Radioactive Sediment Transport on Ogaki Dam Reservoir in Fukushima Evacuated Zone: Numerical Simulation Studies by 2-D River Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Susumu; Kitamura, Akihiro; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Machida, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on March 2011 released significant quantities of radionuclides to atmosphere. The most significant nuclide is radioactive cesium isotopes. Therefore, the movement of the cesium is one of the critical issues for the environmental assessment. Since the cesium is strongly sorbed by soil particles, the cesium transport can be regarded as the sediment transport which is mainly brought about by the aquatic system such as a river and a lake. In this research, our target is the sediment transport on Ogaki dam reservoir which is located in about 16 km northwest from FDNPP. The reservoir is one of the principal irrigation dam reservoirs in Fukushima Prefecture and its upstream river basin was heavily contaminated by radioactivity. We simulate the sediment transport on the reservoir using 2-D river simulation code named Nays2D originally developed by Shimizu et al. (The latest version of Nays2D is available as a code included in iRIC (http://i-ric.org/en/), which is a river flow and riverbed variation analysis software package). In general, a 2-D simulation code requires a huge amount of calculation time. Therefore, we parallelize the code and execute it on a parallel computer. We examine the relationship between the behavior of the sediment transport and the height of the reservoir exit. The simulation result shows that almost all the sand that enter into the reservoir deposit close to the entrance of the reservoir for any height of the exit. The amounts of silt depositing within the reservoir slightly increase by raising the height of the exit. However, that of the clay dramatically increases. Especially, more than half of the clay deposits, if the exit is sufficiently high. These results demonstrate that the water level of the reservoir has a strong influence on the amount of the clay discharged from the reservoir. As a result, we conclude that the tuning of the water level has a possibility for controlling the

  18. Pangolin v1.0, a conservative 2-D transport model for large scale parallel calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praga, A.; Cariolle, D.; Giraud, L.

    2014-07-01

    To exploit the possibilities of parallel computers, we designed a large-scale bidimensional atmospheric transport model named Pangolin. As the basis for a future chemistry-transport model, a finite-volume approach was chosen both for mass preservation and to ease parallelization. To overcome the pole restriction on time-steps for a regular latitude-longitude grid, Pangolin uses a quasi-area-preserving reduced latitude-longitude grid. The features of the regular grid are exploited to improve parallel performances and a custom domain decomposition algorithm is presented. To assess the validity of the transport scheme, its results are compared with state-of-the-art models on analytical test cases. Finally, parallel performances are shown in terms of strong scaling and confirm the efficient scalability up to a few hundred of cores.

  19. Transport Equations Resolution By N-BEE Anti-Dissipative Scheme In 2D Model Of Low Pressure Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kraloua, B.; Hennad, A.

    2008-09-23

    The aim of this paper is to determine electric and physical properties by 2D modelling of glow discharge low pressure in continuous regime maintained by term constant source. This electric discharge is confined in reactor plan-parallel geometry. This reactor is filled by Argon monatomic gas. Our continuum model the order two is composed the first three moments the Boltzmann's equations coupled with Poisson's equation by self consistent method. These transport equations are discretized by the finite volumes method. The equations system is resolved by a new technique, it is about the N-BEE explicit scheme using the time splitting method.

  20. Neutrons and Granite: Transport and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, P J

    2004-04-13

    In typical ground materials, both energy deposition and radionuclide production by energetic neutrons vary with the incident particle energy in a non-monotonic way. We describe the overall balance of nuclear reactions involving neutrons impinging on granite to demonstrate these energy-dependencies. While granite is a useful surrogate for a broad range of soil and rock types, the incorporation of small amounts of water (hydrogen) does alter the balance of nuclear reactions.

  1. Atmospheric Nitrogen Trifluoride: Optimized emission estimates using 2-D and 3-D Chemical Transport Models from 1973-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy, D. J.; Rigby, M. L.; Prinn, R. G.; Muhle, J.; Weiss, R. F.

    2009-12-01

    We present optimized annual global emissions from 1973-2008 of nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), a powerful greenhouse gas which is not currently regulated by the Kyoto Protocol. In the past few decades, NF3 production has dramatically increased due to its usage in the semiconductor industry. Emissions were estimated through the 'pulse-method' discrete Kalman filter using both a simple, flexible 2-D 12-box model used in the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) network and the Model for Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART v4.5), a full 3-D atmospheric chemistry model. No official audited reports of industrial NF3 emissions are available, and with limited information on production, a priori emissions were estimated using both a bottom-up and top-down approach with two different spatial patterns based on semiconductor perfluorocarbon (PFC) emissions from the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR v3.2) and Semiconductor Industry Association sales information. Both spatial patterns used in the models gave consistent results, showing the robustness of the estimated global emissions. Differences between estimates using the 2-D and 3-D models can be attributed to transport rates and resolution differences. Additionally, new NF3 industry production and market information is presented. Emission estimates from both the 2-D and 3-D models suggest that either the assumed industry release rate of NF3 or industry production information is still underestimated.

  2. High Conductance 2D Transport around the Hall Mobility Peak in Electrolyte-Gated Rubrene Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei; Wang, Shun; Zhang, Xin; Leighton, C.; Frisbie, C. Daniel

    2014-12-01

    We report the observation of the Hall effect at hole densities up to 6 ×1013 cm-2 (0.3 holes/molecule ) on the surface of electrolyte-gated rubrene crystals. The perplexing peak in the conductance as a function of gate voltage is confirmed to result from a maximum in mobility, which reaches 4 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 2.5 ×1013 cm-2 . Measurements to liquid helium temperatures reveal that this peak is markedly asymmetric, with bandlike and hopping-type transport occurring on the low density side, while unconventional, likely electrostatic-disorder-affected transport dominates the high density side. Most significantly, near the mobility peak the temperature coefficient of the resistance remains positive to as low as 120 K, the low temperature resistance becomes weakly temperature dependent, and the conductance reaches within a factor of 2 of e2/h , revealing conduction unprecedentedly close to a two-dimensional metallic state.

  3. WHISTBT: a 1-1/2-D radial-transport code for bumpy tori

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, D.E.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.; Lee, D.K.

    1983-10-01

    The computer code WHISTBT has been developed from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory WHIST code to study radial transport in bumpy tori. The code can handle both positive and negative ad hoc electric fields for devices ranging from the size of ELMO Bumpy Torus-Scale (EBT-S) to a reactor-type device, EBT-R. Fueling can be by gas puffing or pellets; heating can be by injection of rf power or neutral beams.

  4. 2D coherent charge transport in highly ordered conducting polymers doped by solid state diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Keehoon; Watanabe, Shun; Broch, Katharina; Sepe, Alessandro; Brown, Adam; Nasrallah, Iyad; Nikolka, Mark; Fei, Zhuping; Heeney, Martin; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-Ichi; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Doping is one of the most important methods to control charge carrier concentration in semiconductors. Ideally, the introduction of dopants should not perturb the ordered microstructure of the semiconducting host. In some systems, such as modulation-doped inorganic semiconductors or molecular charge transfer crystals, this can be achieved by spatially separating the dopants from the charge transport pathways. However, in conducting polymers, dopants tend to be randomly distributed within the conjugated polymer, and as a result the transport properties are strongly affected by the resulting structural and electronic disorder. Here, we show that in the highly ordered lamellar microstructure of a regioregular thiophene-based conjugated polymer, a small-molecule p-type dopant can be incorporated by solid state diffusion into the layers of solubilizing side chains without disrupting the conjugated layers. In contrast to more disordered systems, this allows us to observe coherent, free-electron-like charge transport properties, including a nearly ideal Hall effect in a wide temperature range, a positive magnetoconductance due to weak localization and the Pauli paramagnetic spin susceptibility.

  5. 2D simulations of transport dynamics during tokamak fuelling by supersonic molecular beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Xia, T. Y.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2014-04-01

    Time-dependent transport of both plasma and neutrals is simulated during supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) yielding the evolution of edge plasma and neutral profiles. The SMBI model is included as a module, called trans-neut, within the original BOUT++ boundary plasma turbulence code. Results of calculations are reported for the realistic divertor geometry of the HL-2A tokamak. The model can also be used to study the effect of gas puffing. A seven-field fluid model couples plasma density, heat, and momentum transport equations together with neutral density and momentum transport equations for both molecules and atoms. Collisional interactions between molecules, atoms, and plasma include dissociation, ionization, recombination and charge-exchange effects. Sheath boundary conditions and particle recycling are applied at both the wall and the divertor plates. A localized boundary condition of constant molecular flux (product of density times speed) is applied at the outermost flux surface to model the SMBI. Steady state profiles with and without particle recycling are achieved before SMBI. During SMBI, the simulation shows that neutrals can penetrate several centimetres inside the last closed (magnetic) flux surface (LCFS). Along the SMBI path, plasma density increases while plasma temperature decreases. The molecule penetration depth depends on both the SMBI flux and the initial plasma density and temperature along its path. As the local plasma density increases substantially, molecule and atom penetration depths decrease due to their higher dissociation and ionization rates if the electron temperature does not drop too low. Dynamic poloidal spreading of the enhanced plasma density region is observed due to rapid ion flow along the magnetic field (parallel) driven by a parallel pressure asymmetry during SMBI. Profile relaxation in the radial and poloidal directions is simulated after SMBI termination, showing that the plasma returns to pre-SMBI conditions on

  6. Developing a 2D vertical flow and sediment transport model for open channels using the Youngs-VOF method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongmiao; Tang, Jun; Wu, Xiuguang; Lin, Changning; Liu, Lijun; Chen, Jian

    2016-05-01

    A 2D vertical (2DV) numerical model, without σ-coordinate transformation in the vertical direction, is developed for the simulation of fl ow and sediment transport in open channels. In the model, time-averaged Reynolds equations are closed by the k-ɛ nonlinear turbulence model. The modifi ed Youngs-VOF method is introduced to capture free surface dynamics, and the free surface slope is simulated using the ELVIRA method. Based on the power-law scheme, the k-ɛ model and the suspended-load transport model are solved numerically with an implicit scheme applied in the vertical plane and an explicit scheme applied in the horizontal plane. Bedload transport is modeled using the Euler-WENO scheme, and the grid-closing skill is adopted to deal with the moving channel bed boundary. Verifi cation of the model using laboratory data shows that the model is able to adequately simulate fl ow and sediment transport in open channels, and is a good starting point for the study of sediment transport dynamics in strong nonlinear fl ow scenarios.

  7. Discontinuous diffusion synthetic acceleration for S{sub n} transport on 2D arbitrary polygonal meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Turcksin, Bruno Ragusa, Jean C.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) technique applied to the S{sub n} radiation transport equation is developed using Piece-Wise Linear Discontinuous (PWLD) finite elements on arbitrary polygonal grids. The discretization of the DSA equations employs an Interior Penalty technique, as is classically done for the stabilization of the diffusion equation using discontinuous finite element approximations. The penalty method yields a system of linear equations that is Symmetric Positive Definite (SPD). Thus, solution techniques such as Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) can be effectively employed. Algebraic MultiGrid (AMG) and Symmetric Gauss–Seidel (SGS) are employed as conjugate gradient preconditioners for the DSA system. AMG is shown to be significantly more efficient than SGS. Fourier analyses are carried out and we show that this discontinuous finite element DSA scheme is always stable and effective at reducing the spectral radius for iterative transport solves, even for grids with high-aspect ratio cells. Numerical results are presented for different grid types: quadrilateral, hexagonal, and polygonal grids as well as grids with local mesh adaptivity.

  8. Coherent heat transport in 2D phononic crystals with acoustic impedance mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arantes, A.; Anjos, V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we have calculated the cumulative thermal conductivities of micro-phononic crystals formed by different combinations of inclusions and matrices at a sub-Kelvin temperature regime. The low-frequency phonon spectra (up to tens of GHz) were obtained by solving the generalized wave equation for inhomogeneous media with the plane wave expansion method. The thermal conductivity was calculated from Boltzmann transport theory highlighting the role of the low-frequency thermal phonons and neglecting phonon-phonon scattering. A purely coherent thermal transport regime was assumed throughout the structures. Our findings show that the cumulative thermal conductivity drops dramatically when compared with their bulk counterpart. Depending on the structural composition this reduction may be attributed to the phonon group velocity due to a flattening of the phonon dispersion relation, the extinction of phonon modes in the density of states or due to the presence of complete band gaps. According to the contrast between the inclusions and the matrices, three types of two dimensional phononic crystals were considered: carbon/epoxy, carbon/polyethylene and tungsten/silicon, which correspond respectively to a moderate, strong and very strong mismatch in the mechanical properties of these materials.

  9. High conductance 2D transport around the Hall mobility peak in electrolyte-gated rubrene crystals.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Wang, Shun; Zhang, Xin; Leighton, C; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2014-12-12

    We report the observation of the Hall effect at hole densities up to 6×10¹³ cm⁻² (0.3  holes/molecule) on the surface of electrolyte-gated rubrene crystals. The perplexing peak in the conductance as a function of gate voltage is confirmed to result from a maximum in mobility, which reaches 4  cm² V⁻¹ s⁻¹ at 2.5×10¹³ cm⁻². Measurements to liquid helium temperatures reveal that this peak is markedly asymmetric, with bandlike and hopping-type transport occurring on the low density side, while unconventional, likely electrostatic-disorder-affected transport dominates the high density side. Most significantly, near the mobility peak the temperature coefficient of the resistance remains positive to as low as 120 K, the low temperature resistance becomes weakly temperature dependent, and the conductance reaches within a factor of 2 of e²/h, revealing conduction unprecedentedly close to a two-dimensional metallic state. PMID:25541790

  10. Discontinuous diffusion synthetic acceleration for Sn transport on 2D arbitrary polygonal meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcksin, Bruno; Ragusa, Jean C.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) technique applied to the Sn radiation transport equation is developed using Piece-Wise Linear Discontinuous (PWLD) finite elements on arbitrary polygonal grids. The discretization of the DSA equations employs an Interior Penalty technique, as is classically done for the stabilization of the diffusion equation using discontinuous finite element approximations. The penalty method yields a system of linear equations that is Symmetric Positive Definite (SPD). Thus, solution techniques such as Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) can be effectively employed. Algebraic MultiGrid (AMG) and Symmetric Gauss-Seidel (SGS) are employed as conjugate gradient preconditioners for the DSA system. AMG is shown to be significantly more efficient than SGS. Fourier analyses are carried out and we show that this discontinuous finite element DSA scheme is always stable and effective at reducing the spectral radius for iterative transport solves, even for grids with high-aspect ratio cells. Numerical results are presented for different grid types: quadrilateral, hexagonal, and polygonal grids as well as grids with local mesh adaptivity.

  11. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  12. Parallel FE Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.; Lorenz, J.

    1999-03-02

    A novel solution method has been developed to solve the coupled electron-photon transport problem on an unstructured triangular mesh. Instead of tackling the first-order form of the linear Boltzmann equation, this approach is based on the second-order form in conjunction with the conventional multi-group discrete-ordinates approximation. The highly forward-peaked electron scattering is modeled with a multigroup Legendre expansion derived from the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The finite element method is used to treat the spatial dependence. The solution method is unique in that the space-direction dependence is solved simultaneously, eliminating the need for the conventional inner iterations, a method that is well suited for massively parallel computers.

  13. Monte Carlo Simulations of Charge Transport in 2D Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Gagorik, Adam G; Mohin, Jacob W; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Hutchison, Geoffrey R

    2013-01-01

    The effect of morphology on charge transport in organic photovoltaics is assessed using Monte Carlo. In isotopic two-phase morphologies, increasing the domain size from 6.3 to 18.3 nm improves the fill factor by 11.6%, a result of decreased tortuosity and relaxation of Coulombic barriers. Additionally, when small aggregates of electron acceptors are interdispersed into the electron donor phase, charged defects form in the system, reducing fill factors by 23.3% on average, compared with systems without aggregates. In contrast, systems with idealized connectivity show a 3.31% decrease in fill factor when domain size was increased from 4 to 64 nm. We attribute this to a decreased rate of exciton separation at donor-acceptor interfaces. Finally, we notice that the presence of Coulomb interactions increases device performance as devices become smaller. The results suggest that for commonly found isotropic morphologies the Coulomb interactions between charge carriers dominates exciton separation effects.

  14. Transport of aurorally produced N/2D/ by winds in the high latitude thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerard, J.-C.; Roble, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    A time-dependent, two-dimensional model is developed for describing the meridional circulation of thermospheric odd nitrogen species produced in the auroral zone. The model is based on a previous model by Roble and Gary (1979) extended to upper altitude transport of the nitrogen species. Assumptions made include the existence of a steady neutral wind flowing from low to high latitudes, and an initial background due to scattered Lyman-beta and nightglow emissions. The aurora is also assumed as steady, along with a constant ion production. Predictions made using the model are compared with observations with the Atmosphere Explorer C spacecraft and rocket sounding measurements of the 5200 A distribution near the day-side polar cusp. The model requires thermospheric winds of 100-200 m/sec, flowing from day to nightside. Convective velocities near 1000 m/sec were detected by the Explorer spacecraft, as well as a day-to-nightside flow at the cusp.

  15. Interannual variability of carbon cycle implied by a 2-d atmospheric transport model.

    PubMed

    Can, Li; Xu, Li; Shao, Min; Zhang, Ren-Jian

    2004-01-01

    A 2-dimensional atmospheric transport model is deployed in a simplified CO2 inverse study. Calculated carbon flux distribution for the interval from 1981 to 1997 confirms the existence of a terrestrial carbon sink in mid-high latitude area of North Hemisphere. Strong interannual variability exists in carbon flux patterns, implying a possible link with ENSO and other natural episodes such as Pinatubo volcano eruption in 1991. Mechanism of this possible link was investigated with statistic method. Correlation analysis indicated that in North Hemisphere, climatic factors such as temperature and precipitation, to some extend, could influence the carbon cycle process of land and ocean, thus cause considerable change in carbon flux distribution. In addition, correlation study also demonstrated the possible, important role of Asian terrestrial ecosystems in carbon cycle. PMID:15559811

  16. The Lattice Boltzmann Method applied to neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Erasmus, B.; Van Heerden, F. A.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the applicability of the Lattice Boltzmann Method to neutron transport is investigated. One of the main features of the Lattice Boltzmann method is the simultaneous discretization of the phase space of the problem, whereby particles are restricted to move on a lattice. An iterative solution of the operator form of the neutron transport equation is presented here, with the first collision source as the starting point of the iteration scheme. A full description of the discretization scheme is given, along with the quadrature set used for the angular discretization. An angular refinement scheme is introduced to increase the angular coverage of the problem phase space and to mitigate lattice ray effects. The method is applied to a model problem to investigate its applicability to neutron transport and the results are compared to a reference solution calculated, using MCNP. (authors)

  17. Neutron transport study of a beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaial, Anas M.

    Neutron radiography has the ability to differentiate between gas and liquid in two-phase flow due both to the density difference and the high neutron scattering probability of hydrogen. Previous studies have used dynamic neutron radiography -- in both real-time and high-speed -- for air-water, steam-water and gas-liquid metal two-phase flow measurements. Radiography with thermal neutrons is straightforward and efficient as thermal neutrons are easier to detect with relatively higher efficiency and can be easily extracted from nuclear reactor beam ports. The quality of images obtained using neutron radiography and the imaging speed depend on the neutron beam intensity at the imaging plane. A high quality neutron beam, with thermal neutron intensity greater than 3.0x 10 6 n/cm2-s and a collimation ratio greater than 100 at the imaging plane, is required for effective dynamic neutron radiography up to 2000 frames per second. The primary objectives of this work are: (1) to optimize a neutron radiography facility for dynamic neutron radiography applications and (2) to investigate a new technique for three-dimensional neutron radiography using information obtained from neutron scattering. In this work, neutron transport analysis and experimental validation of a dynamic neutron radiography facility is studied with consideration of real-time and high-speed neutron radiography requirements. A beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility, for a target thermal neutron flux of 1.0x107 n/cm2-s, has been analyzed, constructed and experimentally verified at the McMaster Nuclear Reactor. The neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance is evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes using copper activation flux-mapping technique. The development of different facility components, such as beam tube liner, gamma ray filter, beam shutter and biological shield, is achieved analytically using neutron attenuation and divergence theories. Monte

  18. Computation of neutron fluxes in clusters of fuel pins arranged in hexagonal assemblies (2D and 3D)

    SciTech Connect

    Prabha, H.; Marleau, G.

    2012-07-01

    For computations of fluxes, we have used Carvik's method of collision probabilities. This method requires tracking algorithms. An algorithm to compute tracks (in 2D and 3D) has been developed for seven hexagonal geometries with cluster of fuel pins. This has been implemented in the NXT module of the code DRAGON. The flux distribution in cluster of pins has been computed by using this code. For testing the results, they are compared when possible with the EXCELT module of the code DRAGON. Tracks are plotted in the NXT module by using MATLAB, these plots are also presented here. Results are presented with increasing number of lines to show the convergence of these results. We have numerically computed volumes, surface areas and the percentage errors in these computations. These results show that 2D results converge faster than 3D results. The accuracy on the computation of fluxes up to second decimal is achieved with fewer lines. (authors)

  19. Computing the moments of the neutron population using deterministic neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fichtl, E. D.; Baker, R. S.

    2013-07-01

    It is important to treat the inherent stochasticity of the fission process in systems where the behavior of the system is stochastic. This occurs when there are few neutrons in the system, or when the neutron source is weak. In order to characterize such systems, the capability to compute the first four moments of the neutron population distribution has been added to the deterministic neutral particle transport code, PARTISN. The moments are then fitted to probability density functions from the Pearson family. PARTISN is compared against MCNP6, with which it agrees well. (authors)

  20. Calibration of the 2D Hydrodynamic Model Floodos and Implications of Distributed Friction on Sediment Transport Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croissant, T.; Lague, D.; Davy, P.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical models of floodplain dynamics often use a simplified 1D description of flow hydraulics and sediment transport that cannot fully account for differential friction between vegetated banks and low friction in the main channel. Key parameters of such models are the friction coefficient and the description of the channel bathymetry which strongly influence predicted water depth and velocity, and therefore sediment transport capacity. In this study, we use a newly developed 2D hydrodynamic model, Floodos, whose efficiency is a major advantage for exploring channel morphodynamics from a flood event to millennial time scales. We evaluate the quality of Floodos predictions in the Whataroa river, New Zealand and assess the effect of a spatially distributed friction coefficient (SDFC) on long term sediment transport. Predictions from the model are compared to water depth data from a gauging station located on the Whataroa River in Southern Alps, New Zealand. The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the 2.5 km long studied reach is derived from a 2010 LiDAR acquisition with 2 m resolution and an interpolated bathymetry. The several large floods experienced by this river during 2010 allow us to access water depth for a wide range of possible river discharges and to retrieve the scaling between these two parameters. The high resolution DEM used has a non-negligible part of submerged bathymetry that airborne LiDAR was not able to capture. Bathymetry can be reconstructed by interpolation methods that introduce several uncertainties concerning water depth predictions. We address these uncertainties inherent to the interpolation using a simplified channel with a geometry (slope and width) similar to the Whataroa river. We then explore the effect of a SDFC on velocity pattern, water depth and sediment transport capacity and discuss its relevance on long term predictions of sediment transport and channel morphodynamics.

  1. Note: Reliable and non-contact 6D motion tracking system based on 2D laser scanners for cargo transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2014-10-01

    Maritime transportation demands an accurate measurement system to track the motion of oscillating container boxes in real time. However, it is a challenge to design a sensor system that can provide both reliable and non-contact methods of 6-DOF motion measurements of a remote object for outdoor applications. In the paper, a sensor system based on two 2D laser scanners is proposed for detecting the relative 6-DOF motion of a crane load in real time. Even without implementing a camera, the proposed system can detect the motion of a remote object using four laser beam points. Because it is a laser-based sensor, the system is expected to be highly robust to sea weather conditions.

  2. Note: Reliable and non-contact 6D motion tracking system based on 2D laser scanners for cargo transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2014-10-15

    Maritime transportation demands an accurate measurement system to track the motion of oscillating container boxes in real time. However, it is a challenge to design a sensor system that can provide both reliable and non-contact methods of 6-DOF motion measurements of a remote object for outdoor applications. In the paper, a sensor system based on two 2D laser scanners is proposed for detecting the relative 6-DOF motion of a crane load in real time. Even without implementing a camera, the proposed system can detect the motion of a remote object using four laser beam points. Because it is a laser-based sensor, the system is expected to be highly robust to sea weather conditions.

  3. Optimization of a neutron detector design using adjoint transport simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, C.; Manalo, K.; Huang, M.; Chin, M.; Edgar, C.; Applegate, S.; Sjoden, G.

    2012-07-01

    A synthetic aperture approach has been developed and investigated for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) detection in vehicles passing a checkpoint at highway speeds. SNM is postulated to be stored in a moving vehicle and detector assemblies are placed on the road-side or in chambers embedded below the road surface. Neutron and gamma spectral awareness is important for the detector assembly design besides high efficiencies, so that different SNMs can be detected and identified with various possible shielding settings. The detector assembly design is composed of a CsI gamma-ray detector block and five neutron detector blocks, with peak efficiencies targeting different energy ranges determined by adjoint simulations. In this study, formulations are derived using adjoint transport simulations to estimate detector efficiencies. The formulations is applied to investigate several neutron detector designs for Block IV, which has its peak efficiency in the thermal range, and Block V, designed to maximize the total neutron counts over the entire energy spectrum. Other Blocks detect different neutron energies. All five neutron detector blocks and the gamma-ray block are assembled in both MCNP and deterministic simulation models, with detector responses calculated to validate the fully assembled design using a 30-group library. The simulation results show that the 30-group library, collapsed from an 80-group library using an adjoint-weighting approach with the YGROUP code, significantly reduced the computational cost while maintaining accuracy. (authors)

  4. Optimized purification of a heterodimeric ABC transporter in a highly stable form amenable to 2-D crystallization.

    PubMed

    Galián, Carmen; Manon, Florence; Dezi, Manuela; Torres, Cristina; Ebel, Christine; Lévy, Daniel; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Optimized protocols for achieving high-yield expression, purification and reconstitution of membrane proteins are required to study their structure and function. We previously reported high-level expression in Escherichia coli of active BmrC and BmrD proteins from Bacillus subtilis, previously named YheI and YheH. These proteins are half-transporters which belong to the ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) superfamily and associate in vivo to form a functional transporter able to efflux drugs. In this report, high-yield purification and functional reconstitution were achieved for the heterodimer BmrC/BmrD. In contrast to other detergents more efficient for solubilizing the transporter, dodecyl-ß-D-maltoside (DDM) maintained it in a drug-sensitive and vanadate-sensitive ATPase-competent state after purification by affinity chromatography. High amounts of pure proteins were obtained which were shown either by analytical ultracentrifugation or gel filtration to form a monodisperse heterodimer in solution, which was notably stable for more than one month at 4°C. Functional reconstitution using different lipid compositions induced an 8-fold increase of the ATPase activity (k(cat)∼5 s(-1)). We further validated that the quality of the purified BmrC/BmrD heterodimer is suitable for structural analyses, as its reconstitution at high protein densities led to the formation of 2-D crystals. Electron microscopy of negatively stained crystals allowed the calculation of a projection map at 20 Å resolution revealing that BmrC/BmrD might assemble into oligomers in a lipidic environment. PMID:21602923

  5. 3D Multigroup Sn Neutron Transport Code

    2001-02-14

    ATTILA is a 3D multigroup transport code with arbitrary order ansotropic scatter. The transport equation is solved in first order form using a tri-linear discontinuous spatial differencing on an arbitrary tetrahedral mesh. The overall solution technique is source iteration with DSA acceleration of the scattering source. Anisotropic boundary and internal sources may be entered in the form of spherical harmonics moments. Alpha and k eigenvalue problems are allowed, as well as fixed source problems. Forwardmore » and adjoint solutions are available. Reflective, vacumn, and source boundary conditions are available. ATTILA can perform charged particle transport calculations using slowing down (CSD) terms. ATTILA can also be used to peform infra-red steady-state calculations for radiative transfer purposes.« less

  6. CMFD acceleration of spatial domain-decomposed neutron transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, B. W.; Larsen, E. W.

    2012-07-01

    A significant limitation to parallelizing the solution of neutron transport problems is the need for sweeps across the entirety of the problem domain. Angular domain decomposition is common practice, as the equations for each direction are independent aside from their shared scattering/fission source. Accordingly, spatial domain decomposition does not naturally arise in the transport equations and is therefore less frequent in practice. In this paper, we show that a neutron transport domain can be straightforwardly divided into independent, parallelizable sweep regions, globally linked with the standard CMFD method, with an additional update equation. We verify, theoretically (via Fourier analysis) and computationally, that the convergence properties of this method are stable and nominally as rapid as standard CMFD. (authors)

  7. A deterministic method for transient, three-dimensional neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Goluoglu, S.; Bentley, C.; DeMeglio, R.; Dunn, M.; Norton, K.; Pevey, R.; Suslov, I.; Dodds, H.L.

    1998-05-01

    A deterministic method for solving the time-dependent, three-dimensional Boltzmann transport equation with explicit representation of delayed neutrons has been developed and evaluated. The methodology used in this study for the time variable of the neutron flux is known as the improved quasi-static (IQS) method. The position, energy, and angle-dependent neutron flux is computed deterministically by using the three-dimensional discrete ordinates code TORT. This paper briefly describes the methodology and selected results. The code developed at the University of Tennessee based on this methodology is called TDTORT. TDTORT can be used to model transients involving voided and/or strongly absorbing regions that require transport theory for accuracy. This code can also be used to model either small high-leakage systems, such as space reactors, or asymmetric control rod movements. TDTORT can model step, ramp, step followed by another step, and step followed by ramp type perturbations. It can also model columnwise rod movement. A special case of columnwise rod movement in a three-dimensional model of a boiling water reactor (BWR) with simple adiabatic feedback is also included. TDTORT is verified through several transient one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional benchmark problems. The results show that the transport methodology and corresponding code developed in this work have sufficient accuracy and speed for computing the dynamic behavior of complex multi-dimensional neutronic systems.

  8. Graphical User Interface for Simplified Neutron Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Randolph; Carter, Leland L

    2011-07-18

    A number of codes perform simple photon physics calculations. The nuclear industry is lacking in similar tools to perform simplified neutron physics shielding calculations. With the increased importance of performing neutron calculations for homeland security applications and defense nuclear nonproliferation tasks, having an efficient method for performing simple neutron transport calculations becomes increasingly important. Codes such as Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) can perform the transport calculations; however, the technical details in setting up, running, and interpreting the required simulations are quite complex and typically go beyond the abilities of most users who need a simple answer to a neutron transport calculation. The work documented in this report resulted in the development of the NucWiz program, which can create an MCNP input file for a set of simple geometries, source, and detector configurations. The user selects source, shield, and tally configurations from a set of pre-defined lists, and the software creates a complete MCNP input file that can be optionally run and the results viewed inside NucWiz.

  9. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOEpatents

    Vujic, Jasmina L.

    1993-01-01

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values.

  10. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOEpatents

    Vujic, J.L.

    1993-11-30

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values. 28 figures.

  11. FPGA Implementation of 2D Signals Encoder Using QMF Based Dyadic DWT: Application to Neutron Tomography Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadi, S.; Touiza, M.; Guessoum, A.

    In this study, we present an implementation on FPGA of 2D signals Encoder/Decoder using dyadic Discrete Wavelet Transform based on quadrature mirror filters, by applying fast wavelet Mallat`s algorithm. The wavelet coefficients will be encoded by Huffman code in order to be transmitted progressively through an Ethernet TCP/IP based connection. The proposed study is implemented and synthesized in VHDL for Xilinx Virtex-IIV2MB1000 FPGA device using ISE 8.1 and simulated on Modelsim PE 6.0d. The synthesis results are presented in detail. The proposed design can substantially accelerate the DWT and the possible reconfiguration can be exploited to reach a higher performance in the future. The system is designed to be integrated as an extension to the nuclear imaging system implemented around our nuclear research reactor. Assuming a Pentium4 processor with clock frequency of 3.3 GHz for the Matlab software implementation, a speed up of over 5 times for a picture size of 256 x 256 was achieved.

  12. The AN neutron transport by nodal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barbarino, A.; Tomatis, D.

    2013-07-01

    The two group diffusion model combined to a nodal approach in space is the preferred scheme for the industrial simulation of nuclear water reactors. The main selling point is the speed of computation, allowing a large number of parametric studies. Anyway, the drawbacks of the underlying diffusion equation may arise with highly heterogeneous interfaces, often encountered in modern UO{sub 2} and MO{sub x} fuel loading patterns, and boron less controlled systems. This paper aims at showing how the simplified AN transport model, equivalent to the well known SPN, can be implemented in standard diffusion codes with minor modifications. Some numerical results are illustrated. (authors)

  13. Neutron imaging of ion transport in mesoporous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ketki; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Walker, Lakeisha M H; Voisin, Sophie; Mayes, Richard T; Kiggans, Jim O; Yiacoumi, Sotira; DePaoli, David W; Dai, Sheng; Tsouris, Costas

    2013-07-28

    Neutron imaging is presented as a tool for quantifying the diffusion of ions inside porous materials, such as carbon electrodes used in the desalination process via capacitive deionization and in electrochemical energy-storage devices. Monolithic mesoporous carbon electrodes of ∼10 nm pore size were synthesized based on a soft-template method. The electrodes were used with an aqueous solution of gadolinium nitrate in an electrochemical flow-through cell designed for neutron imaging studies. Sequences of neutron images were obtained under various conditions of applied potential between the electrodes. The images revealed information on the direction and magnitude of ion transport within the electrodes. From the time-dependent concentration profiles inside the electrodes, the average value of the effective diffusion coefficient for gadolinium ions was estimated to be 2.09 ± 0.17 × 10(-11) m(2) s(-1) at 0 V and 1.42 ± 0.06 × 10(-10) m(2) s(-1) at 1.2 V. The values of the effective diffusion coefficient obtained from neutron imaging experiments can be used to evaluate model predictions of the ion transport rate in capacitive deionization and electrochemical energy-storage devices.

  14. Neutron transport calculations using Quasi-Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    1997-07-01

    This paper examines the use of quasirandom sequences of points in place of pseudorandom points in Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations. For two simple demonstration problems, the root mean square error, computed over a set of repeated runs, is found to be significantly less when quasirandom sequences are used ({open_quotes}Quasi-Monte Carlo Method{close_quotes}) than when a standard Monte Carlo calculation is performed using only pseudorandom points.

  15. Electron transport through nuclear pasta in magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a simple model for electron transport in a possible layer of exotic nuclear clusters (in the so-called nuclear pasta layer) between the crust and liquid core of a strongly magnetized neutron star. The electron transport there can be strongly anisotropic and gyrotropic. The anisotropy is produced by different electron effective collision frequencies along and across local symmetry axis in domains of exotic ordered nuclear clusters and by complicated effects of the magnetic field. We also calculate averaged kinetic coefficients in case local domains are freely oriented. Possible applications of the obtained results and open problems are outlined.

  16. Quantum transport equation for systems with rough surfaces and its application to ultracold neutrons in a quantizing gravity field

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, M.; Meyerovich, A. E.

    2014-12-15

    We discuss transport of particles along random rough surfaces in quantum size effect conditions. As an intriguing application, we analyze gravitationally quantized ultracold neutrons in rough waveguides in conjunction with GRANIT experiments (ILL, Grenoble). We present a theoretical description of these experiments in the biased diffusion approximation for neutron mirrors with both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) roughness. All system parameters collapse into a single constant which determines the depletion times for the gravitational quantum states and the exit neutron count. This constant is determined by a complicated integral of the correlation function (CF) of surface roughness. The reliable identification of this CF is always hindered by the presence of long fluctuation-driven correlation tails in finite-size samples. We report numerical experiments relevant for the identification of roughness of a new GRANIT waveguide and make predictions for ongoing experiments. We also propose a radically new design for the rough waveguide.

  17. Hepcidin and 1,25(OH)2D3 effectively restore Ca2+ transport in β-thalassemic mice: reciprocal phenomenon of Fe2+ and Ca2+ absorption.

    PubMed

    Kraidith, Kamonshanok; Svasti, Saovaros; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Vadolas, Jim; Chaimana, Rattana; Lapmanee, Sarawut; Suntornsaratoon, Panan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Fucharoen, Suthat; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2016-07-01

    Previously, β-thalassemia, an inherited anemic disorder with iron overload caused by loss-of-function mutation of β-globin gene, has been reported to induce osteopenia and impaired whole body calcium metabolism, but the pathogenesis of aberrant calcium homeostasis remains elusive. Herein, we investigated how β-thalassemia impaired intestinal calcium absorption and whether it could be restored by administration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] or hepcidin, the latter of which was the liver-derived antagonist of intestinal iron absorption. The results showed that, in hemizygous β-globin knockout (BKO) mice, the duodenal calcium transport was lower than that in wild-type littermates, and severity was especially pronounced in female mice. Both active and passive duodenal calcium fluxes in BKO mice were found to be less than those in normal mice. This impaired calcium transport could be restored by 7-day 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment. The 1,25(OH)2D3-induced calcium transport was diminished by inhibitors of calcium transporters, e.g., L-type calcium channel, NCX1, and PMCA1b, as well as vesicular transport inhibitors. Interestingly, the duodenal calcium transport exhibited an inverse correlation with transepithelial iron transport, which was markedly enhanced in thalassemic mice. Thus, 3-day subcutaneous hepcidin injection and acute direct hepcidin exposure in the Ussing chamber were capable of restoring the thalassemia-associated impairment of calcium transport; however, the positive effect of hepcidin on calcium transport was completely blocked by proteasome inhibitors MG132 and bortezomib. In conclusion, both 1,25(OH)2D3 and hepcidin could be used to alleviate the β-thalassemia-associated impairment of calcium absorption. Therefore, our study has shed light on the development of a treatment strategy to rescue calcium dysregulation in β-thalassemia. PMID:27245334

  18. Neutron transport in WIMS by the characteristics method

    SciTech Connect

    Halsall, M.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The common methods of solving the neutron transport equation in reactor assembly geometries involve some geometric approximation. The standard differential transport methods and diffusion methods rely on pin-cell smearing, and transmission probability methods make approximations to the boundary fluxes linking pin cells. Integral transport methods (collision probabilities) can cope with pin geometries by numerical integration but require excessive computing times that increase with the square of the number of regions. The characteristics method in WIMS, known as CACTUS, solves the differential transport equation by a numerical tracking technique whose accuracy is limited only by computing resources; in its WIMS implementation it can handle any pin-type geometry without the need for preliminary spatial smearing.

  19. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.

    2000-01-01

    A low-energy neutron transport algorithm for use in space radiation protection is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multigroup analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. This analysis is accomplished by solving a realistic but simplified neutron transport test problem. The test problem is analyzed by using numerical and analytical procedures to obtain an accurate solution within specified error bounds. Results from the test problem are then used for determining mean values associated with rescattering terms that are associated with a multigroup solution of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through the evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for a water and an aluminum-water shield-target configuration is then compared with LAHET and MCNPX Monte Carlo code calculations for the same shield-target configuration. The algorithm developed showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a two-directional solution of the evaporation source showed even further improvement of the fluence near the front of the water target where diffusion from the front surface is important.

  20. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for HZETRN2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaba, Tony

    NASA's new space exploration initiative includes plans for long term human presence in space thereby placing new emphasis on space radiation analyses. In particular, a systematic effort of verification, validation and uncertainty quantification of the tools commonly used for radiation analysis for vehicle design and mission planning has begun. In this paper, the numerical error associated with energy discretization in HZETRN2006 is addressed; large errors in the low-energy portion of the neutron fluence spectrum are produced due to a numerical truncation error in the transport algorithm. It is shown that the truncation error results from the narrow energy domain of the neutron elastic spectral distributions, and that an extremely fine energy grid is required in order to adequately resolve the problem under the current formulation. Since adding a sufficient number of energy points will render the code computationally inefficient, we revisit the light-ion transport theory developed for HZETRN2006 and focus on neutron elastic interactions. The new approach that is developed numerically integrates with adequate resolution in the energy domain without affecting the run-time of the code and is easily incorporated into the current code. Efforts were also made to optimize the computational efficiency of the light-ion propagator; a brief discussion of the efforts is given along with run-time comparisons between the original and updated codes. Convergence testing is then completed by running the code for various environments and shielding materials with many different energy grids to ensure stability of the proposed method.

  1. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Simulation of carrier transport in heterostructures using the 2D self-consistent full-band ensemble Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangliang, Wei; Xiaoyan, Liu; Gang, Du; Ruqi, Han

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate a two-dimensional (2D) full-band ensemble Monte-Carlo simulator for heterostructures, which deals with carrier transport in two different semiconductor materials simultaneously as well as at the boundary by solving self-consistently the 2D Poisson and Boltzmann transport equations (BTE). The infrastructure of this simulator, including the energy bands obtained from the empirical pseudo potential method, various scattering mechanics employed, and the appropriate treatment of the carrier transport at the boundary between two different semiconductor materials, is also described. As verification and calibration, we have performed a simulation on two types of silicon-germanium (Si-Ge) heterojunctions with different doping profiles—the p-p homogeneous type and the n-p inhomogeneous type. The current-voltage characteristics are simulated, and the distributions of potential and carrier density are also plotted, which show the validity of our simulator.

  2. Stochastic analog neutron transport with TRIPOLI-4 and FREYA: Bayesian uncertainty quantification for neutron multiplicity counting

    DOE PAGES

    Verbeke, J. M.; Petit, O.

    2016-06-01

    From nuclear safeguards to homeland security applications, the need for the better modeling of nuclear interactions has grown over the past decades. Current Monte Carlo radiation transport codes compute average quantities with great accuracy and performance; however, performance and averaging come at the price of limited interaction-by-interaction modeling. These codes often lack the capability of modeling interactions exactly: for a given collision, energy is not conserved, energies of emitted particles are uncorrelated, and multiplicities of prompt fission neutrons and photons are uncorrelated. Many modern applications require more exclusive quantities than averages, such as the fluctuations in certain observables (e.g., themore » neutron multiplicity) and correlations between neutrons and photons. In an effort to meet this need, the radiation transport Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® was modified to provide a specific mode that models nuclear interactions in a full analog way, replicating as much as possible the underlying physical process. Furthermore, the computational model FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) was coupled with TRIPOLI-4 to model complete fission events. As a result, FREYA automatically includes fluctuations as well as correlations resulting from conservation of energy and momentum.« less

  3. A concurrent, multigroup, discrete ordinates model of neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M.R.; Still, C.H.

    1993-10-22

    The authors present an algorithm for the concurrent solution of the linear system arising from a multigroup, discrete ordinates model of neutron transport. The target architectures consist of distributed memory computers ranging from workstation clusters to massively parallel computers. Based on an analysis of the memory requirement and floating point complexity of matrix-vector multiplication in the iterative solution of the linear system, the authors propose a data layout and communication strategy designed to achieve scalability with respect to all phase space variables. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the algorithm on the nCUBE/2.

  4. A killer micro attack on 3D neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M.R.; Ferguson, J.M.

    1990-11-01

    We describe the deterministic solution of the neutron transport equation and the computation of the effective criticality of three-dimensional assemblies using the BBN TC2000 killer micros. We observe that the performance of our research code PTRAN running on 48 processors of the TC2000 is competitive with the partially vectorizable version running on a single Cray Y/MP processor. This performance scales well with the number of processors on real problems, including those that are not load balanced a priori. To obtain this performance, we explicitly specify and exploit data locality and data dependence using domain decomposition and dynamic job scheduling. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Current status of the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, J.

    2006-07-01

    PSG is a new Monte Carlo neutron transport code, developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The code is mainly intended for fuel assembly-level reactor physics calculations, such as group constant generation for deterministic reactor simulator codes. This paper presents the current status of the project and the essential capabilities of the code. Although the main application of PSG is in lattice calculations, the geometry is not restricted in two dimensions. This paper presents the validation of PSG against the experimental results of the three-dimensional MOX fuelled VENUS-2 reactor dosimetry benchmark. (authors)

  6. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I. Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  7. Structures of the fractional spaces generated by the difference neutron transport operator

    SciTech Connect

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Taskin, Abdulgafur

    2015-09-18

    The initial boundary value problem for the neutron transport equation is considered. The first, second and third order of accuracy difference schemes for the approximate solution of this problem are presented. Highly accurate difference schemes for neutron transport equation based on Padé approximation are constructed. In applications, stability estimates for solutions of difference schemes for the approximate solution of the neutron transport equation are obtained.The positivity of the neutron transport operator in Slobodeckij spaces is proved. Numerical techniques are developed and algorithms are tested on an example in MATLAB.

  8. Neutron transport in doubly heterogeneous media of high temperature reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gert, Godfree

    The AGENT code methodology was extended to include the ability to simulate the neutronics of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). This involved changes to both the geometry and flux solver modules. Changes to the geometry module included the extension of the AGENT lattice mode to model hexagonal assemblies. This involved the modification of existing primitive bodies and the addition of new ones to the AGENT library of primitive bodies. Changes to the flux solver enables AGENT to treat the Double Heterogeneity problem that results from the random distribution of the fuel grains in the graphite matrix of the VHTR fuel region. The implemented Double Heterogeneity treatment uses renewal theory with a Poisson and an isotropic distributions assumed for the chord lengths in the graphite matrix and the fuel grain regions respectively. Assuming collisionless transport, the resulting set of closed renewal equations are used to derive the analytical expressions for the flux along the neutron paths in the matrix and fuel grain regions. First flight collision and escape probabilities are used to solve for the flux in the fuel grain regions and combined with the Method of Characteristics the neutron flux in the entire double heterogeneous region is solved. The resulting modifications to the AGENT code have been verified against relevant benchmarks.

  9. High-pressure melt growth and transport properties of SiP, SiAs, GeP, and GeAs 2D layered semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreteau, C.; Michon, B.; Besnard, C.; Giannini, E.

    2016-06-01

    Silicon and Germanium monopnictides SiP, SiAs, GeP and GeAs form a family of 2D layered semiconductors. We have succeeded in growing bulk single crystals of these compounds by melt-growth under high pressure (0.5-1 GPa) in a cubic anvil hot press. Large (mm-size), shiny, micaceous crystals of GeP, GeAs and SiAs were obtained, and could be exfoliated into 2D flakes. Small and brittle crystals of SiP were yielded by this method. High-pressure sintered polycrystalline SiP and GeAs have also been successfully used as a precursor in the Chemical Vapor Transport growth of these crystals in the presence of I2 as a transport agent. All compounds are found to crystallize in the expected layered structure and do not undergo any structural transition at low temperature, as shown by Raman spectroscopy down to T=5 K. All materials exhibit a semiconducting behavior. The electrical resistivity of GeP, GeAs and SiAs is found to depend on temperature following a 2D-Variable Range Hopping conduction mechanism. The availability of bulk crystals of these compounds opens new perspectives in the field of 2D semiconducting materials for device applications.

  10. Dopamine D1, D2, D3 Receptors, Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Type-2 (VMAT2) and Dopamine Transporter (DAT) Densities in Aged Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianjun; Xu, Jinbin; Cairns, Nigel J.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Mach, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine D1, D2, D3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2), and dopamine transporter (DAT) densities were measured in 11 aged human brains (aged 77–107.8, mean: 91 years) by quantitative autoradiography. The density of D1 receptors, VMAT2, and DAT was measured using [3H]SCH23390, [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [3H]WIN35428, respectively. The density of D2 and D3 receptors was calculated using the D3-preferring radioligand, [3H]WC-10 and the D2-preferring radioligand [3H]raclopride using a mathematical model developed previously by our group. Dopamine D1, D2, and D3 receptors are extensively distributed throughout striatum; the highest density of D3 receptors occurred in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). The density of the DAT is 10–20-fold lower than that of VMAT2 in striatal regions. Dopamine D3 receptor density exceeded D2 receptor densities in extrastriatal regions, and thalamus contained a high level of D3 receptors with negligible D2 receptors. The density of dopamine D1 linearly correlated with D3 receptor density in the thalamus. The density of the DAT was negligible in the extrastriatal regions whereas the VMAT2 was expressed in moderate density. D3 receptor and VMAT2 densities were in similar level between the aged human and aged rhesus brain samples, whereas aged human brain samples had lower range of densities of D1 and D2 receptors and DAT compared with the aged rhesus monkey brain. The differential density of D3 and D2 receptors in human brain will be useful in the interpretation of PET imaging studies in human subjects with existing radiotracers, and assist in the validation of newer PET radiotracers having a higher selectivity for dopamine D2 or D3 receptors. PMID:23185343

  11. Two-dimensional time dependent Riemann solvers for neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Thomas A. . E-mail: tabrunn@sandia.gov; Holloway, James Paul

    2005-11-20

    A two-dimensional Riemann solver is developed for the spherical harmonics approximation to the time dependent neutron transport equation. The eigenstructure of the resulting equations is explored, giving insight into both the spherical harmonics approximation and the Riemann solver. The classic Roe-type Riemann solver used here was developed for one-dimensional problems, but can be used in multidimensional problems by treating each face of a two-dimensional computation cell in a locally one-dimensional way. Several test problems are used to explore the capabilities of both the Riemann solver and the spherical harmonics approximation. The numerical solution for a simple line source problem is compared to the analytic solution to both the P{sub 1} equation and the full transport solution. A lattice problem is used to test the method on a more challenging problem.

  12. No association between schizophrenia and polymorphisms within the genes for debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) and the dopamine transporter (DAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.; Williams, J.; Asherson, P.; McGuffin, P.; Owen, M.

    1995-02-27

    It has been suggested that the cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase, debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase, is involved in the catabolism and processing of neurotransmitters subsequent to their reuptake into target cells. It is also thought to be related to the dopamine transporter that acts to take released dopamine back up into presynaptic terminals. The present study used the association approach to test the hypothesis that mutations in the genes for debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) and the dopamine transporter (DAT) confer susceptibility to schizophrenia. There were no differences in allele or genotype frequencies between patients and controls in the mutations causing the poor metaboliser phenotype in CYP2D6. In addition there was no association found between schizophrenia and a 48 bp repeat within the 3{prime} untranslated region of DAT. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Adam J.; Lee, John C.

    2016-02-01

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  14. Neutron Transport Models and Methods for HZETRN and Coupling to Low Energy Light Ion Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, S.R.; Slaba, T.C.; Heinbockel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircraft exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETCHEDS and FLUKA, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light ion (A<4) transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  15. A killer micro attack on 3D neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M.R.; Ferguson, J.M.

    1990-11-16

    In this paper, we describe the deterministic solution of the neutron transport equation and the computation of the effective criticality of three-dimensional assemblies using the BBN TC2000 killer micros. We observe that the performance of our research code PTRAN running on 48 processors of the TC2000 is competitive with the partially vectorizable version running on a single Cray Y/MP processor. This performance scales well with the number of processors on real problems, including those that are not load balanced a priori. To obtain this performance, we explicitly specify and exploit data locality and data dependence using domain decomposition and dynamic job scheduling. From the results obtained here, it appears that, at least for this application, a production machine based on the TC2000 architecture with more powerful processors and a commensurate increase in switch speed could yield a significant gain in our design capability. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Status of the solar and infrared radiation submodels in the LLNL 1-D and 2-D chemical-transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Ellis, J.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have implemented a series of state of the art radiation transport submodels in previously developed one dimensional and two dimensional chemical transport models of the troposphere and stratosphere. These submodels provide the capability of calculating accurate solar and infrared heating rates. They are a firm basis for further radiation submodel development as well as for studying interactions between radiation and model dynamics under varying conditions of clear sky, clouds, and aerosols. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Coupled full core neutron transport/CFD simulations of pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kochunas, B.; Stimpson, S.; Collins, B.; Downar, T.; Brewster, R.; Baglietto, E.; Yan, J.

    2012-07-01

    Recently as part of the CASL project, a capability to perform 3D whole-core coupled neutron transport and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations was demonstrated. This work uses the 2D/1D transport code DeCART and the commercial CFD code STAR-CCM+. It builds on previous CASL work demonstrating coupling for smaller spatial domains. The coupling methodology is described along with the problem simulated and results are presented for fresh hot full power conditions. An additional comparison is made to an equivalent model that uses lower order T/H feedback to assess the importance and cost of high fidelity feedback to the neutronics problem. A simulation of a quarter core Combustion Engineering (CE) PWR core was performed with the coupled codes using a Fixed Point Gauss-Seidel iteration technique. The total approximate calculation requirements are nearly 10,000 CPU hours and 1 TB of memory. The problem took 6 coupled iterations to converge. The CFD coupled model and low order T/H feedback model compared well for global solution parameters, with a difference in the critical boron concentration and average outlet temperature of 14 ppm B and 0.94 deg. C, respectively. Differences in the power distribution were more significant with maximum relative differences in the core-wide pin peaking factor (Fq) of 5.37% and average relative differences in flat flux region power of 11.54%. Future work will focus on analyzing problems more relevant to CASL using models with less approximations. (authors)

  18. HSCT Assessment Calculations with the AER 2-D Model: Sensitivities to Transport Formulation, PSC Formulation, Interannual Temperature Variation. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Shia, Run-Lie; Jackman, Charles; Fleming, Eric; Considine, David; Kinnison, Douglas; Connell, Peter; Rotman, Douglas

    1998-01-01

    The summary are: (1) Some chemical differences in background atmosphere are surprisingly large (NOY). (2) Differences in model transport explain a majority of the intertnodel differences in the absence of PSCs. (3) With PSCS, large differences exist in predicted O3 depletion between models with the same transport. (4) AER/LLNL model calculates more O3 depletion in NH than LLNL. (5) AER/GSFC model cannot match calculated O3 depletion of GSFC model in SH. and (6) Results sensitive to interannual temperature variations (at least in NH).

  19. Experimental validation of GADRAS's coupled neutron-photon inverse radiation transport solver.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Harding, Lee T.

    2010-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed an inverse radiation transport solver that applies nonlinear regression to coupled neutron-photon deterministic transport models. The inverse solver uses nonlinear regression to fit a radiation transport model to gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity counting measurements. The subject of this paper is the experimental validation of that solver. This paper describes a series of experiments conducted with a 4.5 kg sphere of {alpha}-phase, weapons-grade plutonium. The source was measured bare and reflected by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spherical shells with total thicknesses between 1.27 and 15.24 cm. Neutron and photon emissions from the source were measured using three instruments: a gross neutron counter, a portable neutron multiplicity counter, and a high-resolution gamma spectrometer. These measurements were used as input to the inverse radiation transport solver to evaluate the solver's ability to correctly infer the configuration of the source from its measured radiation signatures.

  20. Complex quantum transport in a modulation doped strained Ge quantum well heterostructure with a high mobility 2D hole gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, C.; Casteleiro, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.

    2016-09-01

    The complex quantum transport of a strained Ge quantum well (QW) modulation doped heterostructure with two types of mobile carriers has been observed. The two dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in the Ge QW exhibits an exceptionally high mobility of 780 000 cm2/Vs at temperatures below 10 K. Through analysis of Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance of this 2DHG below 2 K, the hole effective mass is found to be 0.065 m0. Anomalous conductance peaks are observed at higher fields which deviate from standard Shubnikov de-Haas and quantum Hall effect behaviour due to conduction via multiple carrier types. Despite this complex behaviour, analysis using a transport model with two conductive channels explains this behaviour and allows key physical parameters such as the carrier effective mass, transport, and quantum lifetimes and conductivity of the electrically active layers to be extracted. This finding is important for electronic device applications, since inclusion of highly doped interlayers which are electrically active, for enhancement of, for example, room temperature carrier mobility, does not prevent analysis of quantum transport in a QW.

  1. The effect of electron-hole scattering on transport properties of a 2D semimetal in the HgTe quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Entin, M. V.; Magarill, L. I.; Olshanetsky, E. B. Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2013-11-15

    The influence of e-h scattering on the conductivity and magnetotransport of 2D semimetallic HgTe is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The presence of e-h scattering leads to the friction between electrons and holes resulting in a large temperature-dependent contribution to the transport coefficients. The coefficient of friction between electrons and holes is determined. The comparison of experimental data with the theory shows that the interaction between electrons and holes based on the long-range Coulomb potential strongly underestimates the e-h friction. The experimental results are in agreement with the model of strong short-range e-h interaction.

  2. A 2D transient numerical model combining heat/mass transport effects in a tubular solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollayi Barzi, Y.; Ghassemi, M.; Hamedi, M. H.

    The purpose of this study is to present a 2D transient numerical model to predict the dynamic behavior of a tubular SOFC. In this model, the transient conservation equations (momentum, species and energy equations) are solved numerically and electrical and electrochemical outputs are calculated with an equivalent electrical circuit for the cell. The developed model determines the cell electrical and thermal responses to the variation of load current. Also it predicts the local EMF, state variables (pressure, temperature and species concentration) and cell performance for different cell load currents. Using this comprehensive model the dynamic behavior of Tubular SOFC is studied. First an initial steady state operating condition is set for the SOFC model and then the time response of the fuel cell to changes of some interested input parameters (like electrical load) is analyzed. The simulation starts when the cell is at the steady state in a specific output load. When the load step change takes place, the solution continues to reach to the new steady state condition. Then the cell transient behavior is analyzed. The results show that when the load current is stepped up, the output voltage decreases to a new steady state voltage in about 67 min.

  3. Solution-processed 2D niobium diselenide nanosheets as efficient hole-transport layers in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xing; Cui, Wei; Song, Tao; Liu, Changhai; Shi, Xiaoze; Wang, Suidong; Sun, Baoquan

    2014-02-01

    Thin-layer, two-dimensional NbSe2 nanosheets with lower trap density have been obtained and act as an alternative hole-transporting layer to replace MoO3 in organic solar cells. If poly({4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl}{3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl}):[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester acts as an active layer, a power conversion efficiency of 8.10 % has been achieved without any further thermal treatment. The properties of this hole-transporting layer were investigated and the improvements in the devices are discussed.

  4. Section 1. Simulation of surface-water integrated flow and transport in two-dimensions: SWIFT2D user's manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical model for simulation of surface-water integrated flow and transport in two (horizontal-space) dimensions is documented. The model solves vertically integrated forms of the equations of mass and momentum conservation and solute transport equations for heat, salt, and constituent fluxes. An equation of state for salt balance directly couples solution of the hydrodynamic and transport equations to account for the horizontal density gradient effects of salt concentrations on flow. The model can be used to simulate the hydrodynamics, transport, and water quality of well-mixed bodies of water, such as estuaries, coastal seas, harbors, lakes, rivers, and inland waterways. The finite-difference model can be applied to geographical areas bounded by any combination of closed land or open water boundaries. The simulation program accounts for sources of internal discharges (such as tributary rivers or hydraulic outfalls), tidal flats, islands, dams, and movable flow barriers or sluices. Water-quality computations can treat reactive and (or) conservative constituents simultaneously. Input requirements include bathymetric and topographic data defining land-surface elevations, time-varying water level or flow conditions at open boundaries, and hydraulic coefficients. Optional input includes the geometry of hydraulic barriers and constituent concentrations at open boundaries. Time-dependent water level, flow, and constituent-concentration data are required for model calibration and verification. Model output consists of printed reports and digital files of numerical results in forms suitable for postprocessing by graphical software programs and (or) scientific visualization packages. The model is compatible with most mainframe, workstation, mini- and micro-computer operating systems and FORTRAN compilers. This report defines the mathematical formulation and computational features of the model, explains the solution technique and related model constraints, describes the

  5. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: Quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling.

  6. 2D coherent charge transport in highly ordered conducting polymers doped by solid state diffusion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Keehoon; Watanabe, Shun; Broch, Katharina; Sepe, Alessandro; Brown, Adam; Nasrallah, Iyad; Nikolka, Mark; Fei, Zhuping; Heeney, Martin; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-Ichi; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Doping is one of the most important methods to control charge carrier concentration in semiconductors. Ideally, the introduction of dopants should not perturb the ordered microstructure of the semiconducting host. In some systems, such as modulation-doped inorganic semiconductors or molecular charge transfer crystals, this can be achieved by spatially separating the dopants from the charge transport pathways. However, in conducting polymers, dopants tend to be randomly distributed within the conjugated polymer, and as a result the transport properties are strongly affected by the resulting structural and electronic disorder. Here, we show that in the highly ordered lamellar microstructure of a regioregular thiophene-based conjugated polymer, a small-molecule p-type dopant can be incorporated by solid state diffusion into the layers of solubilizing side chains without disrupting the conjugated layers. In contrast to more disordered systems, this allows us to observe coherent, free-electron-like charge transport properties, including a nearly ideal Hall effect in a wide temperature range, a positive magnetoconductance due to weak localization and the Pauli paramagnetic spin susceptibility.

  7. 2D coherent charge transport in highly ordered conducting polymers doped by solid state diffusion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Keehoon; Watanabe, Shun; Broch, Katharina; Sepe, Alessandro; Brown, Adam; Nasrallah, Iyad; Nikolka, Mark; Fei, Zhuping; Heeney, Martin; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-Ichi; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Doping is one of the most important methods to control charge carrier concentration in semiconductors. Ideally, the introduction of dopants should not perturb the ordered microstructure of the semiconducting host. In some systems, such as modulation-doped inorganic semiconductors or molecular charge transfer crystals, this can be achieved by spatially separating the dopants from the charge transport pathways. However, in conducting polymers, dopants tend to be randomly distributed within the conjugated polymer, and as a result the transport properties are strongly affected by the resulting structural and electronic disorder. Here, we show that in the highly ordered lamellar microstructure of a regioregular thiophene-based conjugated polymer, a small-molecule p-type dopant can be incorporated by solid state diffusion into the layers of solubilizing side chains without disrupting the conjugated layers. In contrast to more disordered systems, this allows us to observe coherent, free-electron-like charge transport properties, including a nearly ideal Hall effect in a wide temperature range, a positive magnetoconductance due to weak localization and the Pauli paramagnetic spin susceptibility. PMID:27159015

  8. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part I: Seasonal variation of atmospheric composition without meridional transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, V.; Cavalié, T.; Dobrijevic, M.; Hersant, F.; Greathouse, T. K.

    2015-09-01

    Saturn's axial tilt of 26.7° produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along Saturn's orbital path. A new time-dependent 2D photochemical model is presented to study the seasonal evolution of Saturn's stratospheric composition. This study focuses on the impact of the seasonally variable thermal field on the main stratospheric C2-hydrocarbon chemistry (C2H2 and C2H6) using a realistic radiative climate model. Meridional mixing and advective processes are implemented in the model but turned off in the present study for the sake of simplicity. The results are compared to a simple study case where a latitudinally and temporally steady thermal field is assumed. Our simulations suggest that, when the seasonally variable thermal field is accounted for, the downward diffusion of the seasonally produced hydrocarbons is faster due to the seasonal compression of the atmospheric column during winter. This effect increases with increasing latitudes which experience the most important thermal changes in the course of the seasons. The seasonal variability of C2H2 and C2H6 therefore persists at higher-pressure levels with a seasonally-variable thermal field. Cassini limb-observations of C2H2 and C2H6 (Guerlet, S. et al. [2009]. Icarus 203, 214-232) are reasonably well-reproduced from the equator to 40° in both hemispheres in the 0.1-1 mbar pressure range. At lower pressure levels, the models only fit the Cassini observations in the northern hemisphere, from the equator to 40°N. Beyond 40° in both hemispheres, deviations from the pure photochemical predictions, mostly in the southern hemisphere, suggest the presence of large-scale stratospheric dynamics.

  9. A Piecewise Linear Discontinuous Finite Element Spatial Discretization of the Transport Equation in 2D Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Adams, M L; Chang, J H

    2008-10-01

    We present a new spatial discretization of the discrete-ordinates transport equation in two-dimensional cylindrical (RZ) geometry for arbitrary polygonal meshes. This discretization is a discontinuous finite element method that utilizes the piecewise linear basis functions developed by Stone and Adams. We describe an asymptotic analysis that shows this method to be accurate for many problems in the thick diffusion limit on arbitrary polygons, allowing this method to be applied to radiative transfer problems with these types of meshes. We also present numerical results for multiple problems on quadrilateral grids and compare these results to the well-known bi-linear discontinuous finite element method.

  10. De-Li-DAQ-2D - a new data acquisition system for position-sensitive neutron detectors with delay-line readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchanovskiy, F. V.; Murashkevich, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    Software for a data acquisition system of modern one- and two-dimensional position-sensitive detectors with delay-line readout, which includes a software interface to a new electronic module De-Li-DAQ-2D with a USB interface, is presented. The new system after successful tests on the stand and on several spectrometers of the IBR-2 reactor has been integrated into the software complex SONIX+ [1]. The De-Li- DAQ-2D module [2] contains an 8-channel time-code converter (TDC-GPX) with a time resolution of 80 ps, field programmable gate array (FPGA), 1 Gbyte histogram memory and high-speed interface with a fiber-optic communication line. A real count rate is no less than 106 events/s. The De-Li-DAQ-2D module is implemented in the NIM standard. The De-Li-DAQ-2D module can operate in two modes: histogram mode and list mode.

  11. Modelling river bank erosion using a 2D depth-averaged numerical model of flow and non-cohesive, non-uniform sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kadi Abderrezzak, Kamal; Die Moran, Andrés; Tassi, Pablo; Ata, Riadh; Hervouet, Jean-Michel

    2016-07-01

    Bank erosion can be an important form of morphological adjustment in rivers. With the advances made in computational techniques, two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical models have become valuable tools for resolving many engineering problems dealing with sediment transport. The objective of this research work is to present a simple, new, bank-erosion operator that is integrated into a 2D Saint-Venant-Exner morphodynamic model. The numerical code is based on an unstructured grid of triangular elements and finite-element algorithms. The slope of each element in the grid is compared to the angle of repose of the bank material. Elements for which the slope is too steep are tilted to bring them to the angle of repose along a horizontal axis defined such that the volume loss above the axis is equal to the volume gain below, thus ensuring mass balance. The model performance is assessed using data from laboratory flume experiments and a scale model of the Old Rhine. For the flume experiment case with uniform bank material, relevant results are obtained for bank geometry changes. For the more challenging case (i.e. scale model of the Old Rhine with non-uniform bank material), the numerical model is capable of reproducing the main features of the bank failure, induced by the newly designed groynes, as well as the transport of the mobilized sediment material downstream. Some deviations between the computed results and measured data are, however, observed. They are ascribed to the effects of three-dimensional (3D) flow structures, pore pressure and cohesion, which are not considered in the present 2D model.

  12. Time-reversal breaking and spin transport induced by magnetic impurities in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshan, V.; Ketabi, S. A.; Moghaddam, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    We employed the formalism of bond currents, expressed in terms of non-equilibrium Green’s function to obtain the local currents and transport features of zigzag silicene ribbon in the presence of magnetic impurity. When only intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit interactions are present, silicene behaves as a two-dimensional topological insulator with gapless edge states. But in the presence of finite intrinsic spin-orbit interaction, the edge states start to penetrate into the bulk of the sample by increasing Rashba interaction strength. The exchange interaction induced by local impurities breaks the time-reversal symmetry of the gapless edge states and influences the topological properties strongly. Subsequently, the singularity of partial Berry curvature disappears and the silicene nanoribbon becomes a trivial insulator. On the other hand, when the concentration of the magnetic impurities is low, the edge currents are not affected significantly. In this case, when the exchange field lies in the x-y plane, the spin mixing around magnetic impurity is more profound rather than the case in which the exchange field is directed along the z-axis. Nevertheless, when the exchange field of magnetic impurities is placed in the x-y plane, a spin-polarized conductance is observed. The resulting conductance polarization can be tuned by the concentration of the impurities and even completely polarized spin transport is achievable.

  13. Time-reversal breaking and spin transport induced by magnetic impurities in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshan, V.; Ketabi, S. A.; Moghaddam, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    We employed the formalism of bond currents, expressed in terms of non-equilibrium Green’s function to obtain the local currents and transport features of zigzag silicene ribbon in the presence of magnetic impurity. When only intrinsic and Rashba spin–orbit interactions are present, silicene behaves as a two-dimensional topological insulator with gapless edge states. But in the presence of finite intrinsic spin–orbit interaction, the edge states start to penetrate into the bulk of the sample by increasing Rashba interaction strength. The exchange interaction induced by local impurities breaks the time-reversal symmetry of the gapless edge states and influences the topological properties strongly. Subsequently, the singularity of partial Berry curvature disappears and the silicene nanoribbon becomes a trivial insulator. On the other hand, when the concentration of the magnetic impurities is low, the edge currents are not affected significantly. In this case, when the exchange field lies in the x–y plane, the spin mixing around magnetic impurity is more profound rather than the case in which the exchange field is directed along the z-axis. Nevertheless, when the exchange field of magnetic impurities is placed in the x–y plane, a spin-polarized conductance is observed. The resulting conductance polarization can be tuned by the concentration of the impurities and even completely polarized spin transport is achievable.

  14. Multigroup Time-Independent Neutron Transport Code System for Plane or Spherical Geometry.

    1986-12-01

    Version 00 PALLAS-PL/SP solves multigroup time-independent one-dimensional neutron transport problems in plane or spherical geometry. The problems solved are subject to a variety of boundary conditions or a distributed source. General anisotropic scattering problems are treated for solving deep-penetration problems in which angle-dependent neutron spectra are calculated in detail.

  15. Cooperative learning of neutron diffusion and transport theories

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Michael A.

    1999-04-30

    A cooperative group instructional strategy is being used to teach a unit on neutron transport and diffusion theory in a first-year-graduate level, Reactor Theory course that was formerly presented in the traditional lecture/discussion style. Students are divided into groups of two or three for the duration of the unit. Class meetings are divided into traditional lecture/discussion segments punctuated by cooperative group exercises. The group exercises were designed to require the students to elaborate, summarize, or practice the material presented in the lecture/discussion segments. Both positive interdependence and individual accountability are fostered by adjusting individual grades on the unit exam by a factor dependent upon group achievement. Group collaboration was also encouraged on homework assignments by assigning each group a single grade on each assignment. The results of the unit exam have been above average in the two classes in which the cooperative group method was employed. In particular, the problem solving ability of the students has shown particular improvement. Further,the students felt that the cooperative group format was both more educationally effective and more enjoyable than the lecture/discussion format.

  16. Ag transport in high temperature neutron irradiated 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, J. H.; Neethling, J. H.

    2014-02-01

    The effect of high temperature neutron irradiation on the ability of a Pd-Ag mixture to penetrate 3C-SiC has been investigated. Previous work has revealed enhanced Ag transport in SiC in the presence of the fission product Pd. In this work it has been shown that high temperature neutron irradiation leads to enhanced transport of this Pd-Ag mixture as compared to unirradiated material and that both high irradiation temperature and high neutron fluence is required for significant transport enhancement. The results suggest that grain boundary type and misorientation is not significantly altered by high temperature neutron irradiation, suggesting that these characteristics play only a secondary role in Pd-Ag transport.

  17. 2D dual permeability modeling of flow and transport in a two-scale structured lignitic mine soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, J.; Gerke, H. H.; Vogel, T.; Maurer, T.; Buczko, U.

    2009-04-01

    Two-dimensional single- and dual-permeability simulations are used to analyze water and solute fluxes in heterogeneous lignitic mine soil at a forest-reclaimed mine spoil heap. The soil heterogeneity on this experimental site "Bärenbrücker Höhe" resulted from inclined dumping structures and sediment mixtures that consist of sand with lignitic dust and embedded lignitic fragments. Observations on undisturbed field suction-cell lysimeters including tracer experiments revealed funneling-type preferential flow with lateral water and bromide movement along inclined sediment structures. The spatial distribution of soil structures and fragment distributions was acquired by a digital camera and identified by a supervised classification of the digital profile image. First, a classical single-domain modeling approach was used, with spatially variable scaling factors inferred from image analyses. In the next step, a two-continuum scenario was constructed to examine additional effects of nonequilibrium on the flow regime. The scaling factors used for the preferential flow domain are here obtained from the gradient of the grayscale images. So far, the single domain scenarios failed to predict the bromide leaching patterns although water effluent could be described. Dual-permeability model allows the incorporation of structural effects and can be used as a tool to further testing other approaches that account for structure effects. The numerical study suggests that additional experiments are required to obtain better understanding of the highly complex transport processes on this experimental site.

  18. Standard and goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement applied to radiation transport on 2D unstructured triangular meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang; Jean C. Ragusa

    2011-02-01

    Standard and goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) techniques are presented for the linear Boltzmann transport equation. A posteriori error estimates are employed to drive the AMR process and are based on angular-moment information rather than on directional information, leading to direction-independent adapted meshes. An error estimate based on a two-mesh approach and a jump-based error indicator are compared for various test problems. In addition to the standard AMR approach, where the global error in the solution is diminished, a goal-oriented AMR procedure is devised and aims at reducing the error in user-specified quantities of interest. The quantities of interest are functionals of the solution and may include, for instance, point-wise flux values or average reaction rates in a subdomain. A high-order (up to order 4) Discontinuous Galerkin technique with standard upwinding is employed for the spatial discretization; the discrete ordinates method is used to treat the angular variable.

  19. Neutron production and time resolution of a new class moderator for pulsed neutron diffraction. Measurements and transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, R. E.; Florido, P. C.; Granada, J. R.; Dawidowski, J.; Gillette, V. H.

    1992-06-01

    Measurements of neutron pulse time-width and intensity have been carried out on grids of small moderators placed side by side and decoupled by cadium strips; a moderator concept introduced by the authors through previous publications. Transport calculations are based on the standard reactor code DOT 3.5 with the ENDF-B IV nuclear data library.

  20. Angular neutron transport investigation in the HZETRN free-space ion and nucleon transport and shielding computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; Wilson, J.W.

    1997-05-01

    Extension of the high charge and energy (HZE) transport computer program HZETRN for angular transport of neutrons is considered. For this paper, only light ion transport, He{sup 4} and lighter, will be analyzed using a pure solar proton source. The angular transport calculator is the ANISN/PC program which is being controlled by the HZETRN program. The neutron flux values are compared for straight-ahead transport and angular transport in one dimension. The shield material is aluminum and the target material is water. The thickness of these materials is varied; however, only the largest model calculated is reported which is 50 gm/cm{sup 2} of aluminum and 100 gm/cm{sup 2} of water. The flux from the ANISN/PC calculation is about two orders of magnitude lower than the flux from HZETRN for very low energy neutrons. It is only a magnitude lower for the neutrons in the 10 to 20 MeV range in the aluminum and two orders lower in the water. The major reason for this difference is in the transport modes: straight-ahead versus angular. The angular treatment allows a longer path length than the straight-ahead approximation. Another reason is the different cross section sets used by the ANISN/PC-BUGLE-80 mode and the HZETRN mode. The next step is to investigate further the differences between the two codes and isolate the differences to just the angular versus straight-ahead transport mode. Then, create a better coupling between the angular neutron transport and the charged particle transport.

  1. Transport and deposition of polymer-modified Fe0 nanoparticles in 2-D heterogeneous porous media: effects of particle concentration, Fe0 content, and coatings.

    PubMed

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Cihan, Abdullah; Kim, Hye-Jin; Mital, Menka; Illangasekare, Tissa; Lowry, Gregory V

    2010-12-01

    Concentrated suspensions of polymer-modified Fe(0) nanoparticles (NZVI) are injected into heterogeneous porous media for groundwater remediation. This study evaluated the effect of porous media heterogeneity and the dispersion properties including particle concentration, Fe(0) content, and adsorbed polymer mass and layer thickness which are expected to affect the delivery and emplacement of NZVI in heterogeneous porous media in a two-dimensional (2-D) cell. Heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity had a significant impact on the deposition of NZVI. Polymer modified NZVI followed preferential flow paths and deposited in the regions where fluid shear is insufficient to prevent NZVI agglomeration and deposition. NZVI transported in heterogeneous porous media better at low particle concentration (0.3 g/L) than at high particle concentrations (3 and 6 g/L) due to greater particle agglomeration at high concentration. High Fe(0) content decreased transport during injection due to agglomeration promoted by magnetic attraction. NZVI with a flat adsorbed polymeric layer (thickness ∼30 nm) could not be transported effectively due to pore clogging and deposition near the inlet, while NZVI with a more extended adsorbed layer thickness (i.e., ∼70 nm) were mobile in porous media. This study indicates the importance of characterizing porous media heterogeneity and NZVI dispersion properties as part of the design of a robust delivery strategy for NZVI in the subsurface. PMID:21058703

  2. Transport and deposition of polymer-modified Fe0 nanoparticles in 2-D heterogeneous porous media: effects of particle concentration, Fe0 content, and coatings.

    PubMed

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Cihan, Abdullah; Kim, Hye-Jin; Mital, Menka; Illangasekare, Tissa; Lowry, Gregory V

    2010-12-01

    Concentrated suspensions of polymer-modified Fe(0) nanoparticles (NZVI) are injected into heterogeneous porous media for groundwater remediation. This study evaluated the effect of porous media heterogeneity and the dispersion properties including particle concentration, Fe(0) content, and adsorbed polymer mass and layer thickness which are expected to affect the delivery and emplacement of NZVI in heterogeneous porous media in a two-dimensional (2-D) cell. Heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity had a significant impact on the deposition of NZVI. Polymer modified NZVI followed preferential flow paths and deposited in the regions where fluid shear is insufficient to prevent NZVI agglomeration and deposition. NZVI transported in heterogeneous porous media better at low particle concentration (0.3 g/L) than at high particle concentrations (3 and 6 g/L) due to greater particle agglomeration at high concentration. High Fe(0) content decreased transport during injection due to agglomeration promoted by magnetic attraction. NZVI with a flat adsorbed polymeric layer (thickness ∼30 nm) could not be transported effectively due to pore clogging and deposition near the inlet, while NZVI with a more extended adsorbed layer thickness (i.e., ∼70 nm) were mobile in porous media. This study indicates the importance of characterizing porous media heterogeneity and NZVI dispersion properties as part of the design of a robust delivery strategy for NZVI in the subsurface.

  3. Hopping energy and percolation-type transport in p-GaAs low densities near the 2D metal-insulator transition at zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlimi, S.; El kaaouachi, A.; Narjis, A.; Limouny, L.; Sybous, A.; Errai, M.

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the temperature dependence of resistivity of a high mobility two-dimensional holes system grown on the (311) GaAs surface in the absence of the magnetic field near the metal-insulator transition. The Coulomb hopping was found in a wide range of temperature and carrier density. Quantitative analysis of our results suggests that a crossover from Efros-Shklovskii to Mott variable range hopping due to screening phenomenon when the hopping distance increases. We found that using the 2D single particle hopping amplitude CES gives unreasonably high localization lengths. Therefore, we believe that electrical transport is dominated by correlated hopping and the hopping amplitude must be renormalized by a reduction factor A≈1.6. The localization length appears to diverge in a power-law fashion near the transition point. The analysis of the hopping gives results consistent with the prediction of the critical point from a recent study of percolation and other experiences.

  4. SUTRA: A model for 2D or 3D saturated-unsaturated, variable-density ground-water flow with solute or energy transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, Clifford I.; Provost, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    SUTRA (Saturated-Unsaturated Transport) is a computer program that simulates fluid movement and the transport of either energy or dissolved substances in a subsurface environment. This upgraded version of SUTRA adds the capability for three-dimensional simulation to the former code (Voss, 1984), which allowed only two-dimensional simulation. The code employs a two- or three-dimensional finite-element and finite-difference method to approximate the governing equations that describe the two interdependent processes that are simulated: 1) fluid density-dependent saturated or unsaturated ground-water flow; and 2) either (a) transport of a solute in the ground water, in which the solute may be subject to: equilibrium adsorption on the porous matrix, and both first-order and zero-order production or decay; or (b) transport of thermal energy in the ground water and solid matrix of the aquifer. SUTRA may also be used to simulate simpler subsets of the above processes. A flow-direction-dependent dispersion process for anisotropic media is also provided by the code and is introduced in this report. As the primary calculated result, SUTRA provides fluid pressures and either solute concentrations or temperatures, as they vary with time, everywhere in the simulated subsurface system. SUTRA flow simulation may be employed for two-dimensional (2D) areal, cross sectional and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of saturated ground-water flow systems, and for cross sectional and 3D modeling of unsaturated zone flow. Solute-transport simulation using SUTRA may be employed to model natural or man-induced chemical-species transport including processes of solute sorption, production, and decay. For example, it may be applied to analyze ground-water contaminant transport problems and aquifer restoration designs. In addition, solute-transport simulation with SUTRA may be used for modeling of variable-density leachate movement, and for cross sectional modeling of saltwater intrusion in

  5. Multigroup Neutron/Gamma-Ray Direct Integration Transport Code System for Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Geometry.

    1980-10-15

    Version 00 PALLAS-2DCY-FX is a code for direct integration of the transport equation in two-dimensional (r,z) geometry. It solves the energy and angular-dependent Boltzmann transport equation with general anisotropic scattering in cylindrical geometry. Its principal applications are to neutron or gamma-ray transport problems in the forward mode. The code is particularly designed for and suited to the solution of deep penetration radiation transport problems with an external (fixed) source.

  6. Cosmic ray heliospheric transport study with neutron monitor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Ygbuhay, R. C.; Modzelewska, R.; Dorman, L. I.; Alania, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    Determining transport coefficients for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) propagation in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) poses a fundamental challenge in modeling cosmic ray modulation processes. GCR scattering in the solar wind involves wave-particle interaction, the waves being Alfven waves which propagate along the ambient field (B). Empirical values at 1 AU are determined for the components of the diffusion tensor for GCR propagation in the heliosphere using neutron monitor (NM) data. At high rigidities, particle density gradients and mean free paths at 1 AU in B can only be computed from the solar diurnal anisotropy (SDA) represented by a vector A (components Ar, Aϕ, and Aθ) in a heliospherical polar coordinate system. Long-term changes in SDA components of NMs (with long track record and the median rigidity of response Rm ~ 20 GV) are used to compute yearly values of the transport coefficients for 1963-2013. We confirm the previously reported result that the product of the parallel (to B) mean free path (λ||) and radial density gradient (Gr) computed from NM data exhibits a weak Schwabe cycle (11y) but strong Hale magnetic cycle (22y) dependence. Its value is most depressed in solar activity minima for positive (p) polarity intervals (solar magnetic field in the Northern Hemisphere points outward from the Sun) when GCRs drift from the polar regions toward the helioequatorial plane and out along the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), setting up a symmetric gradient Gθs pointing away from HCS. Gr drives all SDA components and λ|| Gr contributes to the diffusive component (Ad) of the ecliptic plane anisotropy (A). GCR transport is commonly discussed in terms of an isotropic hard sphere scattering (also known as billiard-ball scattering) in the solar wind plasma. We use it with a flat HCS model and the Ahluwalia-Dorman master equations to compute the coefficients α (=λ⊥/λ∥) and ωτ (a measure of turbulence in the solar wind) and transport

  7. Neutron interaction and their transport with bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Esther Kalpana; Radhika, K.

    2015-05-15

    In the current paper an attempt was made to study and provide fundamental information about neutron interactions that are important to nuclear material measurements. The application of this study is explained about macroscopic interactions with bulk compound materials through a program in DEV C++ language which is done by enabling interaction of neutrons in nature. The output of the entire process depends upon the random number (i.e., incident neutron number), thickness of the material and mean free path as input parameters. Further the current study emphasizes on the usage of materials in shielding.

  8. Neutron interaction and their transport with bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Esther Kalpana; Radhika, K.

    2015-05-01

    In the current paper an attempt was made to study and provide fundamental information about neutron interactions that are important to nuclear material measurements. The application of this study is explained about macroscopic interactions with bulk compound materials through a program in DEV C++ language which is done by enabling interaction of neutrons in nature. The output of the entire process depends upon the random number (i.e., incident neutron number), thickness of the material and mean free path as input parameters. Further the current study emphasizes on the usage of materials in shielding.

  9. MCNPX Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport in SiC semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, K.; Zat'ko, B.; Šagátová, A.; Pavlovič, M.; Nečas, V.; Stacho, M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate particle transport properties of a fast neutron detector based on silicon carbide. MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was used in our study because it allows seamless particle transport, thus not only interacting neutrons can be inspected but also secondary particles can be banked for subsequent transport. Modelling of the fast-neutron response of a SiC detector was carried out for fast neutrons produced by 239Pu-Be source with the mean energy of about 4.3 MeV. Using the MCNPX code, the following quantities have been calculated: secondary particle flux densities, reaction rates of elastic/inelastic scattering and other nuclear reactions, distribution of residual ions, deposited energy and energy distribution of pulses. The values of reaction rates calculated for different types of reactions and resulting energy deposition values showed that the incident neutrons transfer part of the carried energy predominantly via elastic scattering on silicon and carbon atoms. Other fast-neutron induced reactions include inelastic scattering and nuclear reactions followed by production of α-particles and protons. Silicon and carbon recoil atoms, α-particles and protons are charged particles which contribute to the detector response. It was demonstrated that although the bare SiC material can register fast neutrons directly, its detection efficiency can be enlarged if it is covered by an appropriate conversion layer. Comparison of the simulation results with experimental data was successfully accomplished.

  10. Snow shielding factors for cosmogenic nuclide dating inferred from Monte Carlo neutron transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweck, Christopher; Zreda, Marek; Desilets, Darin

    2013-10-01

    Conventional formulations of changes in cosmogenic nuclide production rates with snow cover are based on a mass-shielding approach, which neglects the role of neutron moderation by hydrogen. This approach can produce erroneous correction factors and add to the uncertainty of the calculated cosmogenic exposure ages. We use a Monte Carlo particle transport model to simulate fluxes of secondary cosmic-ray neutrons near the surface of the Earth and vary surface snow depth to show changes in neutron fluxes above rock or soil surface. To correspond with shielding factors for spallation and low-energy neutron capture, neutron fluxes are partitioned into high-energy, epithermal and thermal components. The results suggest that high-energy neutrons are attenuated by snow cover at a significantly higher rate (shorter attenuation length) than indicated by the commonly-used mass-shielding formulation. As thermal and epithermal neutrons derive from the moderation of high-energy neutrons, the presence of a strong moderator such as hydrogen in snow increases the thermal neutron flux both within the snow layer and above it. This means that low-energy production rates are affected by snow cover in a manner inconsistent with the mass-shielding approach and those formulations cannot be used to compute snow correction factors for nuclides produced by thermal neutrons. Additionally, as above-ground low-energy neutron fluxes vary with snow cover as a result of reduced diffusion from the ground, low-energy neutron fluxes are affected by snow even if the snow is at some distance from the site where measurements are made.

  11. How to polarise all neutrons in one beam: a high performance polariser and neutron transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, D. Martin; Bentley, P. M.; Pappas, C.

    2016-09-01

    Polarised neutron beams are used in disciplines as diverse as magnetism,soft matter or biology. However, most of these applications often suffer from low flux also because the existing neutron polarising methods imply the filtering of one of the spin states, with a transmission of 50% at maximum. With the purpose of using all neutrons that are usually discarded, we propose a system that splits them according to their polarisation, flips them to match the spin direction, and then focuses them at the sample. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations show that this is achievable over a wide wavelength range and with an outstanding performance at the price of a more divergent neutron beam at the sample position.

  12. Experimental validation of a coupled neutron-photon inverse radiation transport solver.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John K.; Harding, Lee; Mitchell, Dean James

    2010-03-01

    Forward radiation transport is the problem of calculating the radiation field given a description of the radiation source and transport medium. In contrast, inverse transport is the problem of inferring the configuration of the radiation source and transport medium from measurements of the radiation field. As such, the identification and characterization of special nuclear materials (SNM) is a problem of inverse radiation transport, and numerous techniques to solve this problem have been previously developed. The authors have developed a solver based on nonlinear regression applied to deterministic coupled neutron-photon transport calculations. The subject of this paper is the experimental validation of that solver. This paper describes a series of experiments conducted with a 4.5-kg sphere of alpha-phase, weapons-grade plutonium. The source was measured in six different configurations: bare, and reflected by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spherical shells with total thicknesses of 1.27, 2.54, 3.81, 7.62, and 15.24 cm. Neutron and photon emissions from the source were measured using three instruments: a gross neutron counter, a portable neutron multiplicity counter, and a high-resolution gamma spectrometer. These measurements were used as input to the inverse radiation transport solver to characterize the solver's ability to correctly infer the configuration of the source from its measured signatures.

  13. Coupled Neutron Transport and Thermal Fluids Calculations for the VHTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Kevin John; Huning, Alexander J.; Rahnema, Farzad; Garimella, Srinivas

    2014-06-01

    A new multiphysics method is presented for coupled neutronics and thermal fluids calculations in the VHTR. This new method combines the capabilities of two existing solvers: the COMET neutronics solver, and a thermal fluids module designed specifically for the gas-cooled reactor lattice design featured in this next-generation reactor. This paper provides the necessary background on the neutronics and thermal fluids aspects of the new solution strategy and explains the mode of coupling. A test problem is presented in order to prove the efficacy of the new coupled method. Results are given for a whole-core VHTR, including detailed temperature information at the fuel pin level, explicit power calculations of individual pins, and a thermal map of the bulk graphite and coolant temperatures throughout the core. Solutions are determined quickly when compared to other methods which offer the same level of detail and accuracy, and thus justify further research and development of this method in the near future.

  14. Development of deterministic transport methods for low energy neutrons for shielding in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, Barry

    1993-01-01

    Transport of low energy neutrons associated with the galactic cosmic ray cascade is analyzed in this dissertation. A benchmark quality analytical algorithm is demonstrated for use with BRYNTRN, a computer program written by the High Energy Physics Division of NASA Langley Research Center, which is used to design and analyze shielding against the radiation created by the cascade. BRYNTRN uses numerical methods to solve the integral transport equations for baryons with the straight-ahead approximation, and numerical and empirical methods to generate the interaction probabilities. The straight-ahead approximation is adequate for charged particles, but not for neutrons. As NASA Langley improves BRYNTRN to include low energy neutrons, a benchmark quality solution is needed for comparison. The neutron transport algorithm demonstrated in this dissertation uses the closed-form Green's function solution to the galactic cosmic ray cascade transport equations to generate a source of neutrons. A basis function expansion for finite heterogeneous and semi-infinite homogeneous slabs with multiple energy groups and isotropic scattering is used to generate neutron fluxes resulting from the cascade. This method, called the FN method, is used to solve the neutral particle linear Boltzmann transport equation. As a demonstration of the algorithm coded in the programs MGSLAB and MGSEMI, neutron and ion fluxes are shown for a beam of fluorine ions at 1000 MeV per nucleon incident on semi-infinite and finite aluminum slabs. Also, to demonstrate that the shielding effectiveness against the radiation from the galactic cosmic ray cascade is not directly proportional to shield thickness, a graph of transmitted total neutron scalar flux versus slab thickness is shown. A simple model based on the nuclear liquid drop assumption is used to generate cross sections for the galactic cosmic ray cascade. The ENDF/B V database is used to generate the total and scattering cross sections for neutrons in

  15. Computational Transport Modeling of High-Energy Neutrons Found in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brad; Theriot, Corey A.; Rohde, Larry H.; Wu, Honglu

    2012-01-01

    The high charge and high energy (HZE) particle radiation environment in space interacts with spacecraft materials and the human body to create a population of neutrons encompassing a broad kinetic energy spectrum. As an HZE ion penetrates matter, there is an increasing chance of fragmentation as penetration depth increases. When an ion fragments, secondary neutrons are released with velocities up to that of the primary ion, giving some neutrons very long penetration ranges. These secondary neutrons have a high relative biological effectiveness, are difficult to effectively shield, and can cause more biological damage than the primary ions in some scenarios. Ground-based irradiation experiments that simulate the space radiation environment must account for this spectrum of neutrons. Using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHITS), it is possible to simulate a neutron environment that is characteristic of that found in spaceflight. Considering neutron dosimetry, the focus lies on the broad spectrum of recoil protons that are produced in biological targets. In a biological target, dose at a certain penetration depth is primarily dependent upon recoil proton tracks. The PHITS code can be used to simulate a broad-energy neutron spectrum traversing biological targets, and it account for the recoil particle population. This project focuses on modeling a neutron beamline irradiation scenario for determining dose at increasing depth in water targets. Energy-deposition events and particle fluence can be simulated by establishing cross-sectional scoring routines at different depths in a target. This type of model is useful for correlating theoretical data with actual beamline radiobiology experiments. Other work exposed human fibroblast cells to a high-energy neutron source to study micronuclei induction in cells at increasing depth behind water shielding. Those findings provide supporting data describing dose vs. depth across a water-equivalent medium. This

  16. Spallation neutron production and the current intra-nuclear cascade and transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filges, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Enke, M.; Galin, J.; Herbach, C.-M.; Hilscher, D.; Jahnke, U.; Letourneau, A.; Lott, B.; Neef, R.-D.; Nünighoff, K.; Paul, N.; Péghaire, A.; Pienkowski, L.; Schaal, H.; Schröder, U.; Sterzenbach, G.; Tietze, A.; Tishchenko, V.; Toke, J.; Wohlmuther, M.

    A recent renascent interest in energetic proton-induced production of neutrons originates largely from the inception of projects for target stations of intense spallation neutron sources, like the planned European Spallation Source (ESS), accelerator-driven nuclear reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, and also from the application for radioactive beams. In the framework of such a neutron production, of major importance is the search for ways for the most efficient conversion of the primary beam energy into neutron production. Although the issue has been quite successfully addressed experimentally by varying the incident proton energy for various target materials and by covering a huge collection of different target geometries --providing an exhaustive matrix of benchmark data-- the ultimate challenge is to increase the predictive power of transport codes currently on the market. To scrutinize these codes, calculations of reaction cross-sections, hadronic interaction lengths, average neutron multiplicities, neutron multiplicity and energy distributions, and the development of hadronic showers are confronted with recent experimental data of the NESSI collaboration. Program packages like HERMES, LCS or MCNPX master the prevision of reaction cross-sections, hadronic interaction lengths, averaged neutron multiplicities and neutron multiplicity distributions in thick and thin targets for a wide spectrum of incident proton energies, geometrical shapes and materials of the target generally within less than 10% deviation, while production cross-section measurements for light charged particles on thin targets point out that appreciable distinctions exist within these models.

  17. Least-squares finite element discretizations of neutron transport equations in 3 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Manteuffel, T.A; Ressel, K.J.; Starkes, G.

    1996-12-31

    The least-squares finite element framework to the neutron transport equation introduced in is based on the minimization of a least-squares functional applied to the properly scaled neutron transport equation. Here we report on some practical aspects of this approach for neutron transport calculations in three space dimensions. The systems of partial differential equations resulting from a P{sub 1} and P{sub 2} approximation of the angular dependence are derived. In the diffusive limit, the system is essentially a Poisson equation for zeroth moment and has a divergence structure for the set of moments of order 1. One of the key features of the least-squares approach is that it produces a posteriori error bounds. We report on the numerical results obtained for the minimum of the least-squares functional augmented by an additional boundary term using trilinear finite elements on a uniform tesselation into cubes.

  18. Transport analysis of measured neutron energy spectra in a graphite stack with a collimated deuterium-tritium neutron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tsechanski, A.; Ofek, R.; Goldfeld, A.; Shani, G.

    1989-02-01

    The Ben-Gurion University measurements of neutron energy spectra in a graphite stack, resulting from the scattering of 14.7-MeV neutrons streaming through a 6-cm-diam collimator in a 121-cm-thick paraffin wall, have been used as a benchmark for the compatability and accuracy of discrete ordinates, P/sub n/, and transport calculations and as a tool for fusion reactor neutronics. The transport analysis has been carried out with the DOT 4.2 discrete ordinates code and with cross sections processed with the NJOY code. Most of the parameters affecting the accuracy of the flux and L system scattering cross sections in the P/sub n/ approximation, the quadrature set employed, and the energy multigroup structure. First, a spectrum calculated with DOT 4.2, with a detector located on the axis of the system, was compared with a spectrum calculated with the MCNP Monte Carlo code, which was a preliminary verification of the DOT 4.2 results. Both calculated spectra were in good agreement. Next, the DOT 4.2 calculations were compared with the measured spectra. The comparison showed that the discrepancies between the measurements and the calculations increase as the distance between the detector and the system axis increases. This trend indicates that when the flux is determined mainly by multiple scatterings, a more divided multigroup structure should be employed.

  19. L/sub 2/-error estimates for the discrete ordinates method for three-dimensional neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Asadzadeh, M.

    1988-02-01

    We prove L/sub 2/-error estimates for the discrete ordinates method for the angular discretization of the three-dimensional neutron transport equation. The analysis is for monoenergetic three-dimensional transport of neutrons in a homogeneous uniform media and isotropic scattering is assumed. A special quadrature rule with relatively uniformly distributed discrete directions is considered.

  20. Quantifying moisture transport in cementitious materials using neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Catherine L.

    A portion of the concrete pavements in the US have recently been observed to have premature joint deterioration. This damage is caused in part by the ingress of fluids, like water, salt water, or deicing salts. The ingress of these fluids can damage concrete when they freeze and expand or can react with the cementitious matrix causing damage. To determine the quality of concrete for assessing potential service life it is often necessary to measure the rate of fluid ingress, or sorptivity. Neutron imaging is a powerful method for quantifying fluid penetration since it can describe where water has penetrated, how quickly it has penetrated and the volume of water in the concrete or mortar. Neutrons are sensitive to light atoms such as hydrogen and thus clearly detect water at high spatial and temporal resolution. It can be used to detect small changes in moisture content and is ideal for monitoring wetting and drying in mortar exposed to various fluids. This study aimed at developing a method to accurately estimate moisture content in mortar. The common practice is to image the material dry as a reference before exposing to fluid and normalizing subsequent images to the reference. The volume of water can then be computed using the Beer-Lambert law. This method can be limiting because it requires exact image alignment between the reference image and all subsequent images. A model of neutron attenuation in a multi-phase cementitious composite was developed to be used in cases where a reference image is not available. The attenuation coefficients for water, un-hydrated cement, and sand were directly calculated from the neutron images. The attenuation coefficient for the hydration products was then back-calculated. The model can estimate the degree of saturation in a mortar with known mixture proportions without using a reference image for calculation. Absorption in mortars exposed to various fluids (i.e., deionized water and calcium chloride solutions) were investigated

  1. Radiation transport calculations for the ANS (Advanced Neutron Source) beam tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, W.W., Jr.; Lillie, R.A.; Slater, C.O.

    1988-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source facility (ANS) will incorporate a large number of both radial and no-line-of-sight (NLS) beam tubes to provide very large thermal neutron fluxes to experimental facilities. The purpose of this work was to obtain comparisons for the ANS single- and split-core designs of the thermal and damage neutron and gamma-ray scalar fluxes in these beams tubes. For experimental locations far from the reactor cores, angular flux data are required; however, for close-in experimental locations, the scalar fluxes within each beam tube provide a credible estimate of the various signal to noise ratios. In this paper, the coupled two- and three-dimensional radiation transport calculations employed to estimate the scalar neutron and gamma-ray fluxes will be described and the results from these calculations will be discussed. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  2. 2-D numerical simulations of groundwater flow, heat transfer and 4He transport — implications for the He terrestrial budget and the mantle helium heat imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Maria Clara; Patriarche, Delphine; Goblet, Patrick

    2005-09-01

    Because helium and heat production results from a common source, a continental 4He crustal flux of 4.65 * 10 - 14 mol m - 2 s - 1 has been estimated based on heat flow considerations. In addition, because the observed mantle He / heat flux ratio at the proximity of mid-ocean ridges (6.6 * 10 - 14 mol J - 1 ) is significantly lower than the radiogenic production ratio (1.5 * 10 - 12 mol J - 1 ), the presence of a terrestrial helium-heat imbalance was suggested. The latter could be explained by the presence of a layered mantle in which removal of He is impeded from the lower mantle [R.K. O'Nions, E.R. Oxburgh, Heat and helium in the Earth, Nature 306 (1983) 429-431; E.R. Oxburgh, R.K. O'Nions, Helium loss, tectonics, and the terrestrial heat budget, Science 237 (1987) 1583-1588]. van Keken et al. [P.E. van Keken, C.J. Ballentine, D. Porcelli, A dynamical investigation of the heat and helium imbalance, Earth Planet, Sci. Lett. 188 (2001) 421-434] have recently claimed that the helium-heat imbalance remains a robust observation. Such conclusions, however, were reached under the assumption that a steady-state regime was in place for both tracers and that their transport properties are similar at least in the upper portion of the crust. Here, through 2-D simulations of groundwater flow, heat transfer and 4He transport carried out simultaneously in the Carrizo aquifer and surrounding formations in southwest Texas, we assess the legitimacy of earlier assumptions. Specifically, we show that the driving transport mechanisms for He and heat are of a fundamentally different nature for a high range of permeabilities ( k ≤ 10 - 16 m 2) found in metamorphic and volcanic rocks at all depths in the crust. The assumption that transport properties for these two tracers are similar in the crust is thus unsound. We also show that total 4He / heat flux ratios lower than radiogenic production ratios do not reflect a He deficit in the crust or mantle original reservoir. Instead, they

  3. Deterministic methods for time-dependent stochastic neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Randal S

    2009-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for solving the time-dependent survival probability equation in general (lD/2D/3D) geometries using the multi group SNmethod. Although this equation was first formulated by Bell in the early 1960's, it has only been applied to stationary systems (for other than idealized point models) until recently, and detailed descriptions of numerical solution techniques are lacking in the literature. This paper presents such a description and applies it to a dynamic system representative of a figurative criticality accident scenario.

  4. Nonlinear Acceleration Methods for Even-Parity Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. Martin; C. R. E. De Oliveira; H. Park

    2010-05-01

    Convergence acceleration methods for even-parity transport were developed that have the potential to speed up transport calculations and provide a natural avenue for an implicitly coupled multiphysics code. An investigation was performed into the acceleration properties of the introduction of a nonlinear quasi-diffusion-like tensor in linear and nonlinear solution schemes. Using the tensor reduced matrix as a preconditioner for the conjugate gradients method proves highly efficient and effective. The results for the linear and nonlinear case serve as the basis for further research into the application in a full three-dimensional spherical-harmonics even-parity transport code. Once moved into the nonlinear solution scheme, the implicit coupling of the convergence accelerated transport method into codes for other physics can be done seamlessly, providing an efficient, fully implicitly coupled multiphysics code with high order transport.

  5. Numerical solution of the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    This study presents three numerical algorithms to solve the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics. The algorithms have been developed taking into account delayed neutrons and they have been implemented into the novel MCART code, which solves the neutron transport equation for two-dimensional geometry and an arbitrary number of energy groups. The MCART code uses regular mesh for the representation of the spatial domain, it models up-scattering, and takes advantage of OPENMP and OPENGL algorithms for parallel computing and plotting, respectively. The code has been benchmarked with the multiplication factor results of a Boiling Water Reactor, with the analytical results for a prompt jump transient in an infinite medium, and with PARTISN and TDTORT results for cross section and source transients. The numerical simulations have shown that only two numerical algorithms are stable for small time steps.

  6. Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability method with quadratic flux approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shafii, Mohammad Ali Meidianti, Rahma Wildian, Fitriyani, Dian; Tongkukut, Seni H. J.; Arkundato, Artoto

    2014-09-30

    Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method with quadratic flux approach has been carried out. In general, the solution of the neutron transport using the CP method is performed with the flat flux approach. In this research, the CP method is implemented in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh being conducted into non flat flux approach. It means that the neutron flux at any point in the nuclear fuel cell are considered different each other followed the distribution pattern of quadratic flux. The result is presented here in the form of quadratic flux that is better understanding of the real condition in the cell calculation and as a starting point to be applied in computational calculation.

  7. Interaction between serotonin transporter and dopamine D2/D3 receptor radioligand measures is associated with harm avoidant symptoms in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Bailer, Ursula F; Frank, Guido K; Price, Julie C; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Becker, Carl; Mathis, Chester A; Wagner, Angela; Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Putnam, Karen; Schork, Nicholas J; Gamst, Anthony; Kaye, Walter H

    2013-02-28

    Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) have alterations of measures of serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) function, which persist after long-term recovery and are associated with elevated harm avoidance (HA), a measure of anxiety and behavioral inhibition. Based on theories that 5-HT is an aversive motivational system that may oppose a DA-related appetitive system, we explored interactions of positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand measures that reflect portions of these systems. Twenty-seven individuals recovered (REC) from eating disorders (EDs) (7 AN-BN, 11 AN, 9 BN) and nine control women (CW) were analyzed for correlations between [(11)C]McN5652 and [(11)C]raclopride binding. There was a significant positive correlation between [(11)C]McN5652 binding potential (BP(non displaceable(ND))) and [(11)C]Raclopride BP(ND) for the dorsal caudate, antero-ventral striatum (AVS), middle caudate, and ventral and dorsal putamen. No significant correlations were found in CW. [(11)C]Raclopride BP(ND), but not [(11)C]McN5652 BP(ND), was significantly related to HA in REC EDs. A linear regression analysis showed that the interaction between [(11)C]McN5652 BP(ND) and [(11)C]raclopride BP(ND) in the dorsal putamen significantly predicted HA. This is the first study using PET and the radioligands [(11)C]McN5652 and [(11)C]raclopride to show a direct relationship between 5-HT transporter and striatal DA D2/D3 receptor binding in humans, supporting the possibility that 5-HT and DA interactions contribute to HA behaviors in EDs.

  8. Time-independent one-speed neutron transport equation with anisotropic scattering in absorbing media

    SciTech Connect

    Hangelbroek, R. J.

    1980-06-01

    This report treats the time-independent, one-speed neutron transport equation with anisotropic scattering in absorbing media. For nuclear gain operators existence and uniqueness of solutions to the half-space and finite-slab problems are proved in L/sub 2/-space. The formulas needed for explicit calculations are derived by the use of perturbation theory techniques.

  9. Sensitive and transportable gadolinium-core plastic scintillator sphere for neutron detection and counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Carrel, Frédérick; Corre, Gwenolé; Normand, Stéphane; Méchin, Laurence; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    Neutron detection forms a critical branch of nuclear-related issues, currently driven by the search for competitive alternative technologies to neutron counters based on the helium-3 isotope. The deployment of plastic scintillators shows a high potential for efficient detectors, safer and more reliable than liquids, more easily scalable and cost-effective than inorganic. In the meantime, natural gadolinium, through its 155 and mostly 157 isotopes, presents an exceptionally high interaction probability with thermal neutrons. This paper introduces a dual system including a metal gadolinium core inserted at the center of a high-scale plastic scintillator sphere. Incident fast neutrons are thermalized by the scintillator shell and then may be captured with a significant probability by gadolinium 155 and 157 nuclei in the core. The deposition of a sufficient fraction of the capture high-energy prompt gamma signature inside the scintillator shell will then allow discrimination from background radiations by energy threshold, and therefore neutron detection. The scaling of the system with the Monte Carlo MCNPX2.7 code was carried out according to a tradeoff between the moderation of incident fast neutrons and the probability of slow neutron capture by a moderate-cost metal gadolinium core. Based on the parameters extracted from simulation, a first laboratory prototype for the assessment of the detection method principle has been synthetized. The robustness and sensitivity of the neutron detection principle are then assessed by counting measurement experiments. Experimental results confirm the potential for a stable, highly sensitive, transportable and cost-efficient neutron detector and orientate future investigation toward promising axes.

  10. MC++: A parallel, portable, Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Cummings, J.C.; Nolen, S.D.

    1997-03-01

    MC++ is an implicit multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code written in C++ and based on the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. MC++ runs in parallel on and is portable to a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, SMPs, and clusters of UNIX workstations. MC++ is being developed to provide transport capabilities to the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). It is also intended to form the basis of the first transport physics framework (TPF), which is a C++ class library containing appropriate abstractions, objects, and methods for the particle transport problem. The transport problem is briefly described, as well as the current status and algorithms in MC++ for solving the transport equation. The alpha version of the POOMA class library is also discussed, along with the implementation of the transport solution algorithms using POOMA. Finally, a simple test problem is defined and performance and physics results from this problem are discussed on a variety of platforms.

  11. Analytical three-dimensional neutron transport benchmarks for verification of nuclear engineering codes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, B.D.; Kornreich, D.E.

    1997-07-01

    Because of the requirement of accountability and quality control in the scientific world, a demand for high-quality analytical benchmark calculations has arisen in the neutron transport community. The intent of these benchmarks is to provide a numerical standard to which production neutron transport codes may be compared in order to verify proper operation. The overall investigation as modified in the second year renewal application includes the following three primary tasks. Task 1 on two dimensional neutron transport is divided into (a) single medium searchlight problem (SLP) and (b) two-adjacent half-space SLP. Task 2 on three-dimensional neutron transport covers (a) point source in arbitrary geometry, (b) single medium SLP, and (c) two-adjacent half-space SLP. Task 3 on code verification, includes deterministic and probabilistic codes. The primary aim of the proposed investigation was to provide a suite of comprehensive two- and three-dimensional analytical benchmarks for neutron transport theory applications. This objective has been achieved. The suite of benchmarks in infinite media and the three-dimensional SLP are a relatively comprehensive set of one-group benchmarks for isotropically scattering media. Because of time and resource limitations, the extensions of the benchmarks to include multi-group and anisotropic scattering are not included here. Presently, however, enormous advances in the solution for the planar Green`s function in an anisotropically scattering medium have been made and will eventually be implemented in the two- and three-dimensional solutions considered under this grant. Of particular note in this work are the numerical results for the three-dimensional SLP, which have never before been presented. The results presented were made possible only because of the tremendous advances in computing power that have occurred during the past decade.

  12. A 109 neutrons/pulse transportable pulsed D-D neutron source based on flexible head plasma focus unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2016-03-01

    A 17 kJ transportable plasma focus (PF) device with flexible transmission lines is developed and is characterized. Six custom made capacitors are used for the capacitor bank (CB). The common high voltage plate of the CB is fixed to a centrally triggered spark gap switch. The output of the switch is coupled to the PF head through forty-eight 5 m long RG213 cables. The CB has a quarter time-period of 4 μs and an estimated current of 506 kA is delivered to the PF device at 17 kJ (60 μF, 24 kV) energy. The average neutron yield measured using silver activation detector in the radial direction is (7.1 ± 1.4) × 108 neutrons/shot over 4π sr at 5 mbar optimum D2 pressure. The average neutron yield is more in the axial direction with an anisotropy factor of 1.33 ± 0.18. The average neutron energies estimated in the axial as well as in the radial directions are (2.90 ± 0.20) MeV and (2.58 ± 0.20) MeV, respectively. The flexibility of the PF head makes it useful for many applications where the source orientation and the location are important factors. The influence of electromagnetic interferences from the CB as well as from the spark gap on applications area can be avoided by putting a suitable barrier between the bank and the PF head.

  13. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Sagalovsky, Leonid

    1995-09-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutron is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy (FNTS) and pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ration is greater than about 0.01. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projections angles and modest (2 cm) reolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and the reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA technqiues are presented.

  14. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) and Pulsed Fast-Neutron Analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ratio is greater than about 0.01. The Monte-Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projection angles and modest (2 cm) resolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and these reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte-Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA techniques are presented.

  15. Radiative or neutron transport modeling using a lattice Boltzmann equation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindra, H.; Patil, D. V.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE)-based framework is used to obtain the solution for the linear radiative or neutron transport equation. The LBE framework is devised for the integrodifferential forms of these equations which arise due to the inclusion of the scattering terms. The interparticle collisions are neglected, hence omitting the nonlinear collision term. Furthermore, typical representative examples for one-dimensional or two-dimensional geometries and inclusion or exclusion of the scattering term (isotropic and anisotropic) in the Boltzmann transport equation are illustrated to prove the validity of the method. It has been shown that the solution from the LBE methodology is equivalent to the well-known Pn and Sn methods. This suggests that the LBE can potentially provide a more convenient and easy approach to solve the physical problems of neutron and radiation transport.

  16. Radiative or neutron transport modeling using a lattice Boltzmann equation framework.

    PubMed

    Bindra, H; Patil, D V

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE)-based framework is used to obtain the solution for the linear radiative or neutron transport equation. The LBE framework is devised for the integrodifferential forms of these equations which arise due to the inclusion of the scattering terms. The interparticle collisions are neglected, hence omitting the nonlinear collision term. Furthermore, typical representative examples for one-dimensional or two-dimensional geometries and inclusion or exclusion of the scattering term (isotropic and anisotropic) in the Boltzmann transport equation are illustrated to prove the validity of the method. It has been shown that the solution from the LBE methodology is equivalent to the well-known P(n) and S(n) methods. This suggests that the LBE can potentially provide a more convenient and easy approach to solve the physical problems of neutron and radiation transport.

  17. Marine transportation and burial of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel/neutron shield tank package

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) project for dismantling the Shippingport atomic power station. One of the more significant and challenging technical aspects of the project, which is being managed for DOE by General Electric-Nuclear Energy, is the marine transport of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its associated neutron shield tank (NST) to the government-owned Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. Planning of the transport activity, barge transportation operations, and Hanford transportation operations, are discussed. This work will be the first use of barge transportation in the United States of a radioactive RPV package from a decommissioned land-based nuclear power plant. This extensive transportation operation has been accomplished in a timely, safe, and cost-effective manner.

  18. UN Method For The Critical Slab Problem In One-Speed Neutron Transport Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Hakan; Güngör, Süleyman

    2008-11-01

    The Chebyshev polynomial approximation (UN method) is used to solve the critical slab problem in one-speed neutron transport theory using Marshak boundary condition. The isotropic scattering kernel with the combination of forward and backward scattering is chosen for the neutrons in a uniform finite slab. Numerical results obtained by the UN method are presented in the tables together with the results obtained by the well-known PN method for comparison. It is shown that the method converges rapidly with its easily executable equations.

  19. Ageing of a neutron shielding used in transport/storage casks

    SciTech Connect

    Nizeyiman, Fidele; Alami, Aatif; Issard, Herve; Bellenger, Veronique

    2012-07-11

    In radioactive materials transport/storage casks, a mineral-filled vinylester composite is used for neutron shielding which relies on its hydrogen and boron atoms content. During cask service life, this composite is mainly subjected to three types of ageing: hydrothermal ageing, thermal oxidation and neutron irradiation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of hydrothermal ageing on the properties and chemical composition of this polymer composite. At high temperature (120 Degree-Sign C and 140 Degree-Sign C), the main consequence is the strong decrease of mechanical properties induced by the filler/matrix debonding.

  20. Spectral theory of the neutron transport operator in bounded geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhtar-Kharroubi, M.

    1987-05-01

    We give a complete description of the real point spectrum of the transport operator for positive collision operators: necessary and sufficient conditions for existence; necessary and sufficient conditions for finiteness; estimates of the number of eigenvalues; localization of the point spectrum. Finally we indicate some open problems.

  1. Secondary fusion coupled deuteron/triton transport simulation and thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. B.; Wang, K.; Liu, H. G.; Li, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    A Monte Carlo tool RSMC (Reaction Sequence Monte Carlo) was developed to simulate deuteron/triton transportation and reaction coupled problem. The 'Forced particle production' variance reduction technique was used to improve the simulation speed, which made the secondary product play a major role. The mono-energy 14 MeV fusion neutron source was employed as a validation. Then the thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor was studied with our tool. Moreover, an in-core conversion efficiency measurement experiment was performed with {sup 6}LiD and {sup 6}LiH converters. Threshold activation foils was used to indicate the fast and fusion neutron flux. Besides, two other pivotal parameters were calculated theoretically. Finally, the conversion efficiency of {sup 6}LiD is obtained as 1.97x10{sup -4}, which matches well with the theoretical result. (authors)

  2. Monte Carlo Simulations on Neutron Transport and Absorbed Dose in Tissue-Equivalent Phantoms Exposed to High-Flux Epithermal Neutron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartesaghi, G.; Gambarini, G.; Negri, A.; Carrara, M.; Burian, J.; Viererbl, L.

    2010-04-01

    Presently there are no standard protocols for dosimetry in neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments. Because of the high radiation intensity and of the presence at the same time of radiation components having different linear energy transfer and therefore different biological weighting factors, treatment planning in epithermal neutron fields for BNCT is usually performed by means of Monte Carlo calculations; experimental measurements are required in order to characterize the neutron source and to validate the treatment planning. In this work Monte Carlo simulations in two kinds of tissue-equivalent phantoms are described. The neutron transport has been studied, together with the distribution of the boron dose; simulation results are compared with data taken with Fricke gel dosimeters in form of layers, showing a good agreement.

  3. Numerical evaluation of the light transport properties of alternative He-3 neutron detectors using ceramic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzu, A.; Takase, M.; Haruyama, M.; Kurata, N.; Kobayashi, N.; Kureta, M.; Nakamura, T.; Toh, K.; Sakasai, K.; Suzuki, H.; Soyama, K.; Seya, M.

    2015-10-01

    The light transport properties of scintillator light inside alternative He-3 neutron detectors using scintillator sheets have been investigated by a ray-tracing simulation code. The detector consists of a light-reflecting tube, a thin rectangular ceramic scintillator sheet laminated on a glass plate, and two photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs) mounted at both ends of the detector tube. The flashes of light induced on the surface of the scintillator sheet via nuclear interaction between the scintillator and neutrons are detected by the two PMTs. The light output at both ends of various detectors in which the scintillator sheets are installed with several different arrangements were examined and evaluated in comparison with experimental results. The results derived from the simulation reveal that the light transport property is strongly dependent on the arrangement of the scintillator sheet inside the tube and the shape of the tube.

  4. 66 Neutron, 22 Gamma-Ray Group Cross Sections for Radiation Transport for Neutron Energies Up to 400 MeV.

    1995-12-12

    Version 00 For a variety of applications (accelerator shielding, the use of neutrons in radiotherapy, radiation damage studies, etc.) It is necessary to carry out transport calculations involving medium-energy neutrons. HILO86R multigroup cross sections are in the form needed for the CCC-254/ANISN-ORNL and CCC-543/TORT-DORT discrete ordinates codes and in the CCC-474/MORSE-CGA Monte Carlo code.

  5. An Algorithm for the Transport of Anisotropic Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.

    2005-01-01

    One major obstacle to human space exploration is the possible limitations imposed by the adverse effect of long-term exposure to the space environment. Even before human spaceflight began, the potentially brief exposure of astronauts to the very intense random solar particle events (SPE) were of great concern. A new challenge appears in deep space exploration from exposure to the low-intensity heavy-ion flux of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since the missions are of long duration and the accumulated GCR exposures can be high. Because cancer induction rates increase behind low to rather large thicknesses of aluminum shielding, according to available biological data on mammalian exposures to GCR like ions, the shield requirements for a Mars mission are prohibitively expensive in terms of mission launch costs. Therefore, a critical issue in the Human Exploration and Development of Space enterprise is cost effective mitigation of risk associated with ionizing radiation exposure. In order to estimate astronaut risk to GCR exposure and associated cancer risks and health hazards, it is necessary to do shield material studies. To determine an optimum radiation shield material it is necessary to understand nuclear interaction processes such as fragmentation and secondary particle production which is a function of energy dependent cross sections. This requires knowledge of material transmission characteristics either through laboratory testing or improved theoretical modeling. Here ion beam transport theory is of importance in that testing of materials in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are a major emphasis of the present work.

  6. Modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes the modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program. This effort represents a complete 'white sheet of paper' rewrite of the code. In this paper, the motivation driving this project, the design objectives for the new version of the program, and the design choices and their consequences will be discussed. The design itself will also be described, including the important subsystems as well as the key classes within those subsystems.

  7. Systems guide to MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, B.L.; West, J.T.

    1984-06-01

    The subject of this report is the implementation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code - Version 3 (MCNP) on the different types of computer systems, especially the IBM MVS system. The report supplements the documentation of the RSIC computer code package CCC-200/MCNP. Details of the procedure to follow in executing MCNP on the IBM computers, either in batch mode or interactive mode, are provided.

  8. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method applied to the 1-D spherical neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Machorro, Eric . E-mail: machorro@amath.washington.edu

    2007-04-10

    Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods are used to estimate solutions to the non-scattering 1-D spherical neutron transport equation. Various trial and test spaces are compared in the context of a few sample problems whose exact solution is known. Certain trial spaces avoid unphysical behaviors that seem to plague other methods. Comparisons with diamond differencing and simple corner-balancing are presented to highlight these improvements.

  9. Visualization by neutron diffraction of 2D oxygen diffusion in the Sr(0.7)Ho(0.3)CoO(3-δ) cathode for solid-oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Cascos, V; Martínez-Coronado, R; Alonso, J A; Fernández-Díaz, M T

    2014-06-25

    Sr0.7Ho0.3CoO3-δ oxide has been recently described as an excellent cathode material (1274 mW cm(-2) at 850 °C with pure H2 as fuel1) for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with LSGM as electrolyte. In this work, we describe a detailed study of its crystal structure conducted to find out the correlation between the excellent performance as a cathode and the structural features. The tetragonal crystal structure (e.g., I4/mmm) basically contains layers of octahedrally coordinated Co2O6 units alternated with layers of Co1O4 tetrahedra sharing corners. An "in situ" neutron power diffraction (NPD) experiment, between 25 and 800 °C, reveals the presence of a high oxygen deficiency affecting O4 oxygen atoms, with large displacement factors that suggest a large lability and mobility. Difference Fourier maps allow the visualization at high temperatures of the 2D diffusion pathways within the tetrahedral layers, where O3 and O4 oxygens participate. The measured thermal expansion coefficient is 16.61 × 10(-6) K(-1) between 300 and 850 °C, exhibiting an excellent chemical compatibility with the electrolyte. PMID:24873238

  10. Apparatus, Method and Program Storage Device for Determining High-Energy Neutron/Ion Transport to a Target of Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W. (Inventor); Tripathi, Ram K. (Inventor); Badavi, Francis F. (Inventor); Cucinotta, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus, method and program storage device for determining high-energy neutron/ion transport to a target of interest. Boundaries are defined for calculation of a high-energy neutron/ion transport to a target of interest; the high-energy neutron/ion transport to the target of interest is calculated using numerical procedures selected to reduce local truncation error by including higher order terms and to allow absolute control of propagated error by ensuring truncation error is third order in step size, and using scaling procedures for flux coupling terms modified to improve computed results by adding a scaling factor to terms describing production of j-particles from collisions of k-particles; and the calculated high-energy neutron/ion transport is provided to modeling modules to control an effective radiation dose at the target of interest.

  11. Neutrino Transport in Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries: Dynamical Mass Ejection and Neutrino-Driven Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutoku, K.; Kiuchi, K.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present our recent results of numerical-relativity simulations of black hole-neutron star binary mergers incorporating approximate neutrino transport. We in particular discuss dynamical mass ejection and neutrino-driven wind.

  12. A Computer Code System for the Calculation of Reactivity and Kinetic Parameters by One-Dimensional Neutron Transport Perturbation Theory.

    1985-02-01

    Version 00 TP1 is a transport theory code, developed to determine reactivity effects and kinetic parameters such as effective delayed neutron fractions and mean generation time by applying the usual perturbation formalism for one-dimensional geometry.

  13. A Computer Program for the Calculation of Reactivity and Kinetic Parameters by Two-Dimensional Neutron Transport Perturbation Theory.

    1985-02-01

    Version 00 TP2 is a transport theory code, developed to determine reactivity effects and kinetic parameters such as effective delayed neutron fractions and mean generation time by applying the usual perturbation formalism for two-dimensional geometry.

  14. Synergism of the method of characteristics and CAD technology for neutron transport calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Wang, D.; He, T.; Wang, G.; Zheng, H.

    2013-07-01

    The method of characteristics (MOC) is a very popular methodology in neutron transport calculation and numerical simulation in recent decades for its unique advantages. One of the key problems determining whether the MOC can be applied in complicated and highly heterogeneous geometry is how to combine an effective geometry processing method with MOC. Most of the existing MOC codes describe the geometry by lines and arcs with extensive input data, such as circles, ellipses, regular polygons and combination of them. Thus they have difficulty in geometry modeling, background meshing and ray tracing for complicated geometry domains. In this study, a new idea making use of a CAD solid modeler MCAM which is a CAD/Image-based Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics and Radiation Transport developed by FDS Team in China was introduced for geometry modeling and ray tracing of particle transport to remove these geometrical limitations mentioned above. The diamond-difference scheme was applied to MOC to reduce the spatial discretization error of the flat flux approximation in theory. Based on MCAM and MOC, a new MOC code was developed and integrated into SuperMC system, which is a Super Multi-function Computational system for neutronics and radiation simulation. The numerical testing results demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the new idea for geometry treatment in SuperMC. (authors)

  15. Effects of polymorphisms in CYP2D6 and ABC transporters and side effects induced by gefitinib on the pharmacokinetics of the gefitinib metabolite, O-desmethyl gefitinib.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Sato, Kazuhiro; Niioka, Takenori; Takeda, Masahide; Okuda, Yuji; Asano, Mariko; Ito, Hiroshi; Miura, Masatomo

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effects of polymorphisms in CYP2D6, ABCB1, and ABCG2 and the side effects induced by gefitinib on the pharmacokinetics of O-desmethyl gefitinib, the active metabolite of gefitinib. On day 14 after beginning therapy with gefitinib, plasma concentrations of gefitinib and O-desmethyl gefitinib were measured. Patients were grouped into three groups according to their combination of CYP2D6 alleles: homozygous extensive metabolisers (EMs; *1/*1, *1/*2, and *2/*2; n = 13), heterozygous EMs (*1/*5, *2/*5, *1/*10, and *2/*10; n = 18), and intermediate metabolisers (IMs; *5/*10 and *10/*10; n = 5). The median AUC0-24 of O-desmethyl gefitinib in CYP2D6 IMs was 1460 ng h/mL, whereas that in homozygous EMs was 12,523 ng h/mL (P = 0.021 in univariate analysis). The median AUC ratio of O-desmethyl gefitinib to gefitinib differed among homozygous EMs, heterozygous EMs, and IMs at a ratio of 1.41:0.86:0.24 (P = 0.030). On the other hand, there were no significant differences in the AUC0-24 of O-desmethyl gefitinib between ABCB1 and ABCG2 genotypes. In a multivariate analysis, CYP2D6 homozygous EMs (P = 0.012) were predictive for a higher AUC0-24 of O-desmethyl gefitinib. The side effects of diarrhoea, skin rash, and hepatotoxicity induced by gefitinib were unrelated to the AUC0-24 of O-desmethyl gefitinib. CYP2D6 polymorphisms were associated with the formation of O-desmethyl gefitinib from gefitinib. In CYP2D6 homozygous EMs, the plasma concentrations of O-desmethyl gefitinib were higher over 24 h after taking gefitinib than those of the parent compound; however, side effects induced by gefitinib were unrelated to O-desmethyl gefitinib exposure.

  16. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operationa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operation with ~38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ~1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: 1) inconsistent dependence of the post-RFQ beam current on the ion source tilt angle, and 2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  17. Hybrid method of deterministic and probabilistic approaches for multigroup neutron transport problem

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.

    2012-07-01

    A hybrid method of deterministic and probabilistic methods is proposed to solve Boltzmann transport equation. The new method uses a deterministic method, Method of Characteristics (MOC), for the fast and thermal neutron energy ranges and a probabilistic method, Monte Carlo (MC), for the intermediate resonance energy range. The hybrid method, in case of continuous energy problem, will be able to take advantage of fast MOC calculation and accurate resonance self shielding treatment of MC method. As a proof of principle, this paper presents the hybrid methodology applied to a multigroup form of Boltzmann transport equation and confirms that the hybrid method can produce consistent results with MC and MOC methods. (authors)

  18. Benchmark test of transport calculations of gold and nickel activation with implications for neutron kerma at Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, M; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Sawada, S; Munaka, M; Kuramoto, A; Oka, T; Iwatani, K; Shizuma, K; Hasai, H

    1992-11-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a 252Cf fission neutron source to validate the use of the code for the energy spectrum analyses of Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons. Nuclear data libraries used in the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code calculation were ENDF/B-III, ENDF/B-IV, LASL-SUB, and ENDL-73. The neutron moderators used were granite (the main component of which is SiO2, with a small fraction of hydrogen), Newlight [polyethylene with 3.7% boron (natural)], ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), and water (H2O). Each moderator was 65 cm thick. The neutron detectors were gold and nickel foils, which were used to detect thermal and epithermal neutrons (4.9 eV) and fast neutrons (> 0.5 MeV), respectively. Measured activity data from neutron-irradiated gold and nickel foils in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which correspond to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For both gold and nickel detectors, the measured activities and the calculated values agreed within 10%. The slopes of the depth-yield relations in each moderator, except granite, were similar for neutrons detected by the gold and nickel foils. From the results of these studies, the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code was verified to be accurate enough for use with the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, chlorine, and cadmium, and for the incident 252Cf fission spectrum neutrons. PMID:1399639

  19. Benchmark test of transport calculations of gold and nickel activation with implications for neutron kerma at Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, M; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Sawada, S; Munaka, M; Kuramoto, A; Oka, T; Iwatani, K; Shizuma, K; Hasai, H

    1992-11-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a 252Cf fission neutron source to validate the use of the code for the energy spectrum analyses of Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons. Nuclear data libraries used in the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code calculation were ENDF/B-III, ENDF/B-IV, LASL-SUB, and ENDL-73. The neutron moderators used were granite (the main component of which is SiO2, with a small fraction of hydrogen), Newlight [polyethylene with 3.7% boron (natural)], ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), and water (H2O). Each moderator was 65 cm thick. The neutron detectors were gold and nickel foils, which were used to detect thermal and epithermal neutrons (4.9 eV) and fast neutrons (> 0.5 MeV), respectively. Measured activity data from neutron-irradiated gold and nickel foils in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which correspond to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For both gold and nickel detectors, the measured activities and the calculated values agreed within 10%. The slopes of the depth-yield relations in each moderator, except granite, were similar for neutrons detected by the gold and nickel foils. From the results of these studies, the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code was verified to be accurate enough for use with the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, chlorine, and cadmium, and for the incident 252Cf fission spectrum neutrons.

  20. A portable, parallel, object-oriented Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Cummings, J.C.; Nolen, S.D. |

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code using C++ and the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. This transport code, called MC++, currently computes k and {alpha}-eigenvalues and is portable to and runs parallel on a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, clustered SMPs, and individual workstations. It contains appropriate classes and abstractions for particle transport and, through the use of POOMA, for portable parallelism. Current capabilities of MC++ are discussed, along with physics and performance results on a variety of hardware, including all Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) hardware. Current parallel performance indicates the ability to compute {alpha}-eigenvalues in seconds to minutes rather than hours to days. Future plans and the implementation of a general transport physics framework are also discussed.

  1. The potential of detecting intermediate-scale biomass and canopy interception in a coniferous forest using cosmic-ray neutron intensity measurements and neutron transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasen, M.; Looms, M. C.; Bogena, H. R.; Desilets, D.; Zreda, M. G.; Sonnenborg, T. O.; Jensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The water stored in the various compartments of the terrestrial ecosystem (in snow, canopy interception, soil and litter) controls the exchange of the water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere. Therefore, measurements of the water stored within these pools are critical for the prediction of e.g. evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge. The detection of cosmic-ray neutron intensity is a novel non-invasive method for the quantification of continuous intermediate-scale soil moisture. The footprint of the cosmic-ray neutron probe is a hemisphere of a few hectometers and subsurface depths of 10-70 cm depending on wetness. The cosmic-ray neutron method offers measurements at a scale between the point-scale measurements and large-scale satellite retrievals. The cosmic-ray neutron intensity is inversely correlated to the hydrogen stored within the footprint. Overall soil moisture represents the largest pool of hydrogen and changes in the soil moisture clearly affect the cosmic-ray neutron signal. However, the neutron intensity is also sensitive to variations of hydrogen in snow, canopy interception and biomass offering the potential to determine water content in such pools from the signal. In this study we tested the potential of determining canopy interception and biomass using cosmic-ray neutron intensity measurements within the framework of the Danish Hydrologic Observatory (HOBE) and the Terrestrial Environmental Observatories (TERENO). Continuous measurements at the ground and the canopy level, along with profile measurements were conducted at towers at forest field sites. Field experiments, including shielding the cosmic-ray neutron probes with cadmium foil (to remove lower-energy neutrons) and measuring reference intensity rates at complete water saturated conditions (on the sea close to the HOBE site), were further conducted to obtain an increased understanding of the physics controlling the cosmic-ray neutron transport and the equipment used

  2. An Improved Elastic and Nonelastic Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tripathi, R. K.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Shinn, Judy L.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron transport algorithm including both elastic and nonelastic particle interaction processes for use in space radiation protection for arbitrary shield material is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multiple energy grouping and analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through a bidirectional neutron evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for an aluminum water shield-target configuration is then compared with MCNPX and LAHET Monte Carlo calculations for the same shield-target configuration. With the Monte Carlo calculation as a benchmark, the algorithm developed in this paper showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a high-energy bidirectional neutron source based on a formula by Ranft showed even further improvement of the fluence results over previous results near the front of the water target where diffusion out the front surface is important. Effects of improved interaction cross sections are modest compared with the addition of the high-energy bidirectional source terms.

  3. Quantum dynamics of H2, D2, and HD in the small dodecahedral cage of clathrate hydrate: evaluating H2-water nanocage interaction potentials by comparison of theory with inelastic neutron scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minzhong; Sebastianelli, Francesco; Bacić, Zlatko

    2008-06-28

    We have performed rigorous quantum five-dimensional (5D) calculations and analysis of the translation-rotation (T-R) energy levels of one H(2), D(2), and HD molecule inside the small dodecahedral (H(2)O)(20) cage of the structure II clathrate hydrate, which was treated as rigid. The H(2)- cage intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) used previously in the molecular dynamics simulations of the hydrogen hydrates [Alavi et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 024507 (2005)] was employed. This PES, denoted here as SPC/E, combines an effective, empirical water-water pair potential [Berendsen et al., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987)] and electrostatic interactions between the partial charges placed on H(2)O and H(2). The 5D T-R eigenstates of HD were calculated also on another 5D H(2)-cage PES denoted PA-D, used by us earlier to investigate the quantum T-R dynamics of H(2) and D(2) in the small cage [Xu et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 24806 (2006)]. In the PA-D PES, the hydrogen-water pair potential is described by the ab initio 5D PES of the isolated H(2)-H(2)O dimer. The quality of the SPC/E and the PA-D H(2)-cage PESs was tested by direct comparison of the T-R excitation energies calculated on them to the results of two recent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) studies of H(2) and HD inside the small clathrate cage. The translational fundamental and overtone excitations, as well as the triplet splittings of the j=0-->j=1 rotational transitions, of H(2) and HD in the small cage calculated on the SPC/E PES agree very well with the INS results and represent a significant improvement over the results computed on the PA-D PES. Our calculations on the SPC/E PES also make predictions about several spectroscopic observables for the encapsulated H(2), D(2), and HD, which have not been measured yet. PMID:18601373

  4. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, K; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Oka, T; Hasai, H

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate 152Eu and 60Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. PMID:8083048

  5. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: Indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazuo; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hiraoka, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Oka, Takamitsu

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate {sup 152}Eu and {sup 60}Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, K; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Oka, T; Hasai, H

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate 152Eu and 60Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen.

  7. A deterministic solver for the transport of the AlGaN/GaN 2D electron gas including hot-phonon and degeneracy effects

    SciTech Connect

    Galler, M. . E-mail: galler@itp.tu-graz.ac.at; Schuerrer, F. . E-mail: schuerrer@itp.tu-graz.ac.at

    2005-12-10

    The transport of the two-dimensional electron gas formed at an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure in the presence of strain polarization fields is investigated. For this purpose, we develop a deterministic multigroup model to the Boltzmann transport equations. The envelope wave functions for the confined electrons are calculated using a self-consistent Poisson-Schroedinger solver. The electron gas degeneracy and hot phonons are included in our transport equations. Numerical results are given for the dependence of macroscopic quantities on the electric field strength and on time and for the electron and phonon distribution functions. We compare our results to those of Monte Carlo simulations and with experiments.

  8. Geant4 simulations of the neutron production and transport in the n_TOF spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Guerrero, C.; Quesada, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    The neutron production and transport in the spallation target of the n_TOF facility at CERN has been simulated with Geant4. The results obtained with the different hadronic Physics Lists provided by Geant4 have been compared with the experimental neutron flux in n_TOF-EAR1. The best overall agreement in both the absolute value and the energy dependence of the flux from thermal to 1GeV, is obtained with the INCL++ model coupled with the Fritiof Model(FTFP). This Physics List has been thus used to simulate and study the main features of the new n_TOF-EAR2 beam line, currently in its commissioning phase.

  9. Radiation Transport Analysis in Chalcogenide-Based Devices and a Neutron Howitzer Using MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Herbert

    As photons, electrons, and neutrons traverse a medium, they impart their energy in ways that are analytically difficult to describe. Monte Carlo methods provide valuable insight into understanding this behavior, especially when the radiation source or environment is too complex to simplify. This research investigates simulating various radiation sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, characterizing their impact on various materials, and comparing the simulation results to general theory and measurements. A total of five sources were of interest: two photon sources of different incident particle energies (3.83 eV and 1.25 MeV), two electron sources also of different energies (30 keV and 100 keV), and a californium-252 (Cf-252) spontaneous fission neutron source. Lateral and vertical programmable metallization cells (PMCs) were developed by other researchers for exposure to these photon and electron sources, so simplified PMC models were implemented in MCNP to estimate the doses and fluences. Dose rates measured around the neutron source and the predicted maximum activity of activation foils exposed to the neutrons were determined using MCNP and compared to experimental results obtained from gamma-ray spectroscopy. The analytical fluence calculations for the photon and electron cases agreed with MCNP results, and differences are due to MCNP considering particle movements that hand calculations do not. Doses for the photon cases agreed between the analytical and simulated results, while the electron cases differed by a factor of up to 4.8. Physical dose rate measurements taken from the neutron source agreed with MCNP within the 10% tolerance of the measurement device. The activity results had a percent error of up to 50%, which suggests a need to further evaluate the spectroscopy setup.

  10. Application of three-dimensional transport code to the analysis of the neutron streaming experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatani, K.; Slater, C.O.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarized the calculational results of neutron streaming through a Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Prototype coolant pipe chaseway. Particular emphasis is placed on results at bends in the chaseway. Calculations were performed with three three-dimensional codes: the discrete ordinates radiation transport code TORT and Monte Carlo radiation transport code MORSE, which were developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the discrete ordinates code ENSEMBLE, which was developed in Japan. The purpose of the calculations is not only to compare the calculational results with the experimental results, but also to compare the results of TORT and MORSE with those of ENSEMBLE. In the TORT calculations, two types of difference methods, weighted-difference method was applied in ENSEMBLE calculation. Both TORT and ENSEMBLE produced nearly the same calculational results, but differed in the number of iterations required for converging each neutron group. Also, the two types of difference methods in the TORT calculations showed no appreciable variance in the number of iterations required. However, a noticeable disparity in the computer times and some variation in the calculational results did occur. The comparisons of the calculational results with the experimental results, showed for the epithermal neutron flux generally good agreement in the first and second legs and at the first bend where the two-dimensional modeling might be difficult. Results were fair to poor along the centerline of the first leg near the opening to the second leg because of discrete ordinates ray effects. Additionally, the agreement was good throughout the first and second legs for the thermal neutron region. Calculations with MORSE were made. These calculational results and comparisons are described also. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Transporters from H-2b, H-2d, H-2s, H-2k, and H-2g7 (NOD/Lt) haplotype translocate similar sets of peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, T N; Kantesaria, D V; Serreze, D V; Roopenian, D C; Ploegh, H L

    1994-01-01

    The TAP complex transports peptides from the cytosol into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum for presentation by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. A limited degree of sequence polymorphism has been observed for the mouse TAP1 and TAP2 genes by restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis. However, functional polymorphism of the TAP transporter has thus far been observed for the rat only. Here we examine the effect of TAP polymorphism on ATP dependency and peptide specificity of TAP-mediated peptide transport and show that, in the mouse, polymorphism in TAP genes does not measurably alter the function of their gene products. We conclude that TAP polymorphism is unlikely to contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases and that, in the mouse, the specificity of the TAP transporter is matched to that of the F pocket of the class I molecules for which it provides the peptide substrates. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7809164

  12. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  13. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  14. Coupled Neutron-Photon, 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry, Time Dependent, Monte Carlo Transport Code System.

    2013-06-24

    Version 07 TART2012 is a coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo transport code designed to use three-dimensional (3-D) combinatorial geometry. Neutron and/or photon sources as well as neutron induced photon production can be tracked. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART2012 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared tomore » other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART2012 extends the general utility of the code to even more areas of application than available in previous releases by concentrating on improving the physics, particularly with regard to improved treatment of neutron fission, resonance self-shielding, molecular binding, and extending input options used by the code. Several utilities are included for creating input files and displaying TART results and data. TART2012 uses the latest ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, data. New for TART2012 is the use of continuous energy neutron cross sections, in addition to its traditional multigroup cross sections. For neutron interaction, the data are derived using ENDF-ENDL2005 and include both continuous energy cross sections and 700 group neutron data derived using a combination of ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, and ENDL data. The 700 group structure extends from 10-5 eV up to 1 GeV. Presently nuclear data are only available up to 20 MeV, so that only 616 of the groups are currently used. For photon interaction, 701 point photon data were derived using the Livermore EPDL97 file. The new 701 point structure extends from 100 eV up to 1 GeV, and is currently used over this entire energy range. TART2012 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that one use only the most recent version of TART2012 and its data files. Check author’s homepage for related information: http

  15. Petrov-galerkin finite element method for solving the neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, A.; Ferguson, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    A finite element using different trial and test spaces in introduced for solving the neutron transport equation in spherical geometry. It is shown that the widely used discrete ordinates method can also be thought of as such a finite element technique, in which integrals appearing in the difference equations are replaced by one-point Gauss quadrature formulas (midpoint rule). Comparison of accuracy between the new method and the discrete ordinates method is discussed, and numerical examples are given to illustrate the greater accuracy of the new technique.

  16. Applying nonlinear diffusion acceleration to the neutron transport k-Eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Taitano, William

    2015-11-01

    High-order/low-order (or moment-based acceleration) algorithms have been used to significantly accelerate the solution to the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem over the past several years. Recently, the nonlinear diffusion acceleration algorithm has been extended to solve fixed-source problems with anisotropic scattering sources. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can extend this algorithm to k-eigenvalue problems in which the scattering source is anisotropic and a significant acceleration can be achieved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the low-order, diffusion-like eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently using a technique known as nonlinear elimination.

  17. Hybrid method of deterministic and probabilistic approaches for continuous energy neutron transport problem

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Lee, D.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid method of continuous energy Monte Carlo (MC) and multi-group Method of Characteristics (MOC). For a continuous energy neutron transport analysis, the hybrid method employs a continuous energy MC for resonance energy range to treat the resonances accurately and a multi-group MOC for high and low energy ranges for efficiency. Numerical test with a model problem confirms that the hybrid method can produce consistent results with the reference continuous energy MC-only calculation as well as multi-group MOC-only calculation. (authors)

  18. A Two-Dimensional Monte Carlo Code System for Linear Neutron Transport Calculations.

    1980-04-24

    Version 00 KIM (k-infinite-Monte Carlo) solves the steady-state linear neutron transport equation for a fixed source problem or, by successive fixed-source runs, for the eigenvalue problem, in a two-dimensional infinite thermal reactor lattice using the Monte Carlo method. In addition to the combinatorial description of domains, the program allows complex configurations to be represented by a discrete set of points whereby the calculation speed is greatly improved. Configurations are described as the result of overlaysmore » of elementary figures over a basic domain.« less

  19. Applying nonlinear diffusion acceleration to the neutron transport k-Eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Taitano, William

    2015-10-12

    High-order/low-order (or moment-based acceleration) algorithms have been used to significantly accelerate the solution to the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem over the past several years. Recently, the nonlinear diffusion acceleration algorithm has been extended to solve fixed-source problems with anisotropic scattering sources. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can extend this algorithm to k-eigenvalue problems in which the scattering source is anisotropic and a significant acceleration can be achieved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the low-order, diffusion-like eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently using a technique known as nonlinear elimination.

  20. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  1. Documentation and verification of VST2D; a model for simulating transient, Variably Saturated, coupled water-heat-solute Transport in heterogeneous, anisotropic 2-Dimensional, ground-water systems with variable fluid density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a model for simulating transient, Variably Saturated, coupled water-heatsolute Transport in heterogeneous, anisotropic, 2-Dimensional, ground-water systems with variable fluid density (VST2D). VST2D was developed to help understand the effects of natural and anthropogenic factors on quantity and quality of variably saturated ground-water systems. The model solves simultaneously for one or more dependent variables (pressure, temperature, and concentration) at nodes in a horizontal or vertical mesh using a quasi-linearized general minimum residual method. This approach enhances computational speed beyond the speed of a sequential approach. Heterogeneous and anisotropic conditions are implemented locally using individual element property descriptions. This implementation allows local principal directions to differ among elements and from the global solution domain coordinates. Boundary conditions can include time-varying pressure head (or moisture content), heat, and/or concentration; fluxes distributed along domain boundaries and/or at internal node points; and/or convective moisture, heat, and solute fluxes along the domain boundaries; and/or unit hydraulic gradient along domain boundaries. Other model features include temperature and concentration dependent density (liquid and vapor) and viscosity, sorption and/or decay of a solute, and capability to determine moisture content beyond residual to zero. These features are described in the documentation together with development of the governing equations, application of the finite-element formulation (using the Galerkin approach), solution procedure, mass and energy balance considerations, input requirements, and output options. The VST2D model was verified, and results included solutions for problems of water transport under isohaline and isothermal conditions, heat transport under isobaric and isohaline conditions, solute transport under isobaric and isothermal conditions, and coupled water

  2. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  3. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R

    2012-01-01

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  4. The impact of fuel particle size distribution on neutron transport in stochastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.; Pavlou, A. T.; Ji, W.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a study of the particle size distribution impact on neutron transport in three-dimensional stochastic media. An eigenvalue problem is simulated in a cylindrical container consisting of fissile fuel particles with five different size distributions: constant, uniform, power, exponential and Gaussian. We construct 15 cases by altering the fissile particle volume packing fraction and its optical thickness, but keeping the mean chord length of the spherical fuel particle the same at different size distributions. The tallied effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) and flux distribution along axial and radial directions are compared between different size distributions. At low packing fraction and low optical thickness, the size distribution has a significant impact on radiation transport in stochastic media, which can cause as high as {approx}270 pcm difference in k{sub eff} value and {approx}2.6% relative error difference in peak flux. As the packing fraction and optical thickness increase, the impact gradually dissipates. (authors)

  5. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Kalvas, T; Tarvainen, O; Welton, R F; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Stockli, M P

    2012-02-01

    The H(-) injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with ∼38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ∼1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  6. Solution and Study of the Two-Dimensional Nodal Neutron Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Panta Pazos, Ruben; Biasotto Hauser, Eliete; Tullio de Vilhena, Marco

    2002-07-01

    In the last decade Vilhena and coworkers reported an analytical solution to the two-dimensional nodal discrete-ordinates approximations of the neutron transport equation in a convex domain. The key feature of these works was the application of the combined collocation method of the angular variable and nodal approach in the spatial variables. By nodal approach we mean the transverse integration of the SN equations. This procedure leads to a set of one-dimensional S{sub N} equations for the average angular fluxes in the variables x and y. These equations were solved by the old version of the LTS{sub N} method, which consists in the application of the Laplace transform to the set of nodal S{sub N} equations and solution of the resulting linear system by symbolic computation. It is important to recall that this procedure allow us to increase N the order of S{sub N} up to 16. To overcome this drawback we step forward performing a spectral painstaking analysis of the nodal S{sub N} equations for N up to 16 and we begin the convergence of the S{sub N} nodal equations defining an error for the angular flux and estimating the error in terms of the truncation error of the quadrature approximations of the integral term. Furthermore, we compare numerical results of this approach with those of other techniques used to solve the two-dimensional discrete approximations of the neutron transport equation. (authors)

  7. Assessing the Cr(VI) reduction efficiency of a permeable reactive barrier using Cr isotope measurements and 2D reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Christoph; Zink, Sonja; Eggenberger, Urs; Mäder, Urs

    2012-04-01

    In Thun, Switzerland, a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for Cr(VI) reduction by gray cast iron was installed in May 2008. The PRB is composed of a double array of vertical piles containing iron shavings and gravel. The aquifer in Thun is almost saturated with dissolved oxygen and the groundwater flow velocities are ca. 10-15m/day. Two years after PRB installation Cr(VI) concentrations still permanently exceed the Swiss threshold value for contaminated sites downstream of the barrier at selected localities. Groundwater δ(53/52)Cr(SRM979) measurements were used to track Cr(VI) reduction induced by the PRB. δ(53/52)Cr(SRM979) values of two samples downstream of the PRB showed a clear fractionation towards more positive values compared to four samples from the hotspot, which is clear evidence of Cr(VI) reduction induced by the PRB. Another downstream sample did not show a shift to more positive δ(53/52)Cr(SRM979) values. Because this latter location correlates with the highest downstream Cr(VI) concentration it is proposed that a part of the Cr(VI) plume is bypassing the barrier. Using a Rayleigh fractionation model a minimum present-day overall Cr(VI) reduction efficiency of ca. 15% was estimated. A series of 2D model simulations, including the fractionation of Cr isotopes, confirm that only a PRB bypass of parts of the Cr(VI) plume can lead to the observed values. Additionally, the simulations revealed that the proposed bypass occurs due to an insufficient permeability of the individual PRB piles. It is concluded that with this type of PRB a complete and long-lasting Cr(VI) reduction is extremely difficult to achieve for Cr(VI) contaminations located in nearly oxygen and calcium carbonate saturated aquifer in a regime of high groundwater velocities. Additional remediation action would limit the environmental impact and allow to reach target concentrations.

  8. Equations of the surface harmonics method for solving time-dependent neutron transport problems and their verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Time-dependent equations of the surface harmonics method (SHM) are obtained for planar one-dimensional geometry. The equations are verified by calculations of test problems from Benchmark Problem Book ANL-7416, and the capabilities and efficiency of applying the SHM for solving the time-dependent neutron transport equation in the diffusion approximation are demonstrated. The results of the work show that the implementation of the SHG for full-scale computations will make possible substantial progress in the efficient solution of time-dependent problems of neutron transport in nuclear reactors.

  9. Monte Carlo Neutrino Transport through Remnant Disks from Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richers, Sherwood; Kasen, Daniel; O'Connor, Evan; Fernández, Rodrigo; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-11-01

    We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two-dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the cases of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45° from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentially leading to a stronger neutrino-driven wind. Neutrino cooling in the dense midplane of the disk is stronger when using MC transport, leading to a globally higher cooling rate by a factor of a few and a larger leptonization rate by an order of magnitude. We calculate neutrino pair annihilation rates and estimate that an energy of 2.8 × 1046 erg is deposited within 45° of the symmetry axis over 300 ms when a central BH is present. Similarly, 1.9 × 1048 erg is deposited over 3 s when an HMNS sits at the center, but neither estimate is likely to be sufficient to drive a gamma-ray burst jet.

  10. Asymptotic analysis of the several competitive equations to solve the time-dependent neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, U.; Miller, W.F. Jr. |; Morel, J.E.

    1994-10-01

    Using conventional diffusion limit analysis, we asymptotically compare three competitive time-dependent equations (the telegrapher`s equation, the time-dependent Simplified P{sub 2} (SP{sub 2}) equation, and the time-dependent Simplified Evcn-Parity (SEP) equation). The time-dependent SP{sub 2} equation contains higher order asymptotic approximations of the time-dependent transport equation than the other equations in a physical regime in which the time-dependent diffusion equation is the leading order approximation. In addition, we derive the multigroup modified time-dependent SP{sub 2} equation from the multigroup time-dependent transport equation by means of an asymptotic expansion in which the multigroup time-dependent diffusion equation is the leading, order approximation. Numerical comparisons of the timedependent diffusion, the telegrapher`s, the time-dependent SP{sub 2}, and S{sub 8} solutions in 2-D X-Y geometry show that, in most cases, the SP{sub 2} solutions contain most of the transport corrections for the diffusion approximation.

  11. Effect of dietary calcium and 1,25-(OH)2D3 on the expression of calcium transport genes in calbindin-D9k and -D28k double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Oh, Goo Taeg; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2009-02-01

    The phenotypes of calbindin-D9k (CaBP-9k) and -28k (CaBP-28k) single knockout (KO) mice are similar to wild-type (WT) mice due to the compensatory action of other calcium transport proteins. In this study, we generated CaBP-9k/CaBP-28k double knockout (DKO) mice in order to investigate the importance of CaBP-9k and CaBP-28k in active calcium processing. Under normal dietary conditions, DKO mice did not exhibit any changes in phenotype or the expression of active calcium transport genes as compared to WT or CaBP-28k KO mice. Under calcium-deficient dietary conditions, the phenotype and expression of calcium transport genes in CaBP-28k KO mice were similar to WT, whereas in DKO mice, serum calcium levels and bone length were decreased. The intestinal and renal expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid member 6 (TRPV6) mRNA was significantly decreased in DKO mice fed a calcium-deficient diet as compared to CaBP-28k KO or WT mice, and DKO mice died after 4 weeks on a calcium-deficient diet. Body weight, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone length were significantly reduced in all mice fed a calcium and 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3)-deficient diet, as compared to a normal diet, and none of the mice survived more than 4 weeks. These results indicate that deletion of CaBP-28k alone does not affect body calcium homeostasis, but that deletion of CaBP-9k and CaBP-28k has a significant effect on calcium processing under calcium-deficient conditions, confirming the importance of dietary calcium and 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) during growth and development.

  12. Probing multiscale transport and inhomogeneity in a lithium-ion cells using in-situ neutron methods

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Hui; An, Ke; Allu, Srikanth; Pannala, Sreekanth; Li, Jianlin; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Martha, Surendra; Nanda, Jagjit

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate for the first time the lithiation process in graphitic anodes using insitu neutron radiography in a pouch cell format. The neutron absorption contrast shows a direct correlation between degree of lithiation and the discharge voltage plateau. Furthermore, we provide a semi-quantitative comparison between the observed spatial variations of neutron attenuation line profile across the graphite electrode and the calculated lithium concentration profiles computed under similar electrochemical discharge conditions. In conjunction, in situ neutron diffraction of a similar pouch cell under identical test protocol was carried to obtain information about the local phase changes upon lithiation. Combined in-situmore » radiography and diffraction opens up a powerful nondestructive method to understand the multi-scale nature of lithium transport and degradation in practical lithium-ion cells.« less

  13. Probing multiscale transport and inhomogeneity in a lithium-ion cells using in-situ neutron methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hui; An, Ke; Allu, Srikanth; Pannala, Sreekanth; Li, Jianlin; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Martha, Surendra; Nanda, Jagjit

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate for the first time the lithiation process in graphitic anodes using insitu neutron radiography in a pouch cell format. The neutron absorption contrast shows a direct correlation between degree of lithiation and the discharge voltage plateau. Furthermore, we provide a semi-quantitative comparison between the observed spatial variations of neutron attenuation line profile across the graphite electrode and the calculated lithium concentration profiles computed under similar electrochemical discharge conditions. In conjunction, in situ neutron diffraction of a similar pouch cell under identical test protocol was carried to obtain information about the local phase changes upon lithiation. Combined in-situ radiography and diffraction opens up a powerful nondestructive method to understand the multi-scale nature of lithium transport and degradation in practical lithium-ion cells.

  14. Using the transportable, computer-operated, liquid-scintillator fast-neutron spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1988-11-01

    When a detailed energy spectrum is needed for radiation-protection measurements from approximately 1 MeV up to several tens of MeV, organic-liquid scintillators make good neutron spectrometers. However, such a spectrometer requires a sophisticated electronics system and a computer to reduce the spectrum from the recorded data. Recently, we added a Nuclear Instrument Module (NIM) multichannel analyzer and a lap-top computer to the NIM electronics we have used for several years. The result is a transportable fast-neutron spectrometer system. The computer was programmed to guide the user through setting up the system, calibrating the spectrometer, measuring the spectrum, and reducing the data. Measurements can be made over three energy ranges, 0.6--2 MeV, 1.1--8 MeV, or 1.6--16 MeV, with the spectrum presented in 0.1-MeV increments. Results can be stored on a disk, presented in a table, and shown in graphical form. 5 refs., 51 figs.

  15. A POD reduced order model for resolving angular direction in neutron/photon transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Buchan, A.G.; Calloo, A.A.; Goffin, M.G.; Dargaville, S.; Fang, F.; Pain, C.C.; Navon, I.M.

    2015-09-01

    This article presents the first Reduced Order Model (ROM) that efficiently resolves the angular dimension of the time independent, mono-energetic Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). It is based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and uses the method of snapshots to form optimal basis functions for resolving the direction of particle travel in neutron/photon transport problems. A unique element of this work is that the snapshots are formed from the vector of angular coefficients relating to a high resolution expansion of the BTE's angular dimension. In addition, the individual snapshots are not recorded through time, as in standard POD, but instead they are recorded through space. In essence this work swaps the roles of the dimensions space and time in standard POD methods, with angle and space respectively. It is shown here how the POD model can be formed from the POD basis functions in a highly efficient manner. The model is then applied to two radiation problems; one involving the transport of radiation through a shield and the other through an infinite array of pins. Both problems are selected for their complex angular flux solutions in order to provide an appropriate demonstration of the model's capabilities. It is shown that the POD model can resolve these fluxes efficiently and accurately. In comparison to high resolution models this POD model can reduce the size of a problem by up to two orders of magnitude without compromising accuracy. Solving times are also reduced by similar factors.

  16. A comparison of acceleration methods for solving the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Knoll, D.A.

    2014-10-01

    Over the past several years a number of papers have been written describing modern techniques for numerically computing the dominant eigenvalue of the neutron transport criticality problem. These methods fall into two distinct categories. The first category of methods rewrite the multi-group k-eigenvalue problem as a nonlinear system of equations and solve the resulting system using either a Jacobian-Free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method or Nonlinear Krylov Acceleration (NKA), a variant of Anderson Acceleration. These methods are generally successful in significantly reducing the number of transport sweeps required to compute the dominant eigenvalue. The second category of methods utilize Moment-Based Acceleration (or High-Order/Low-Order (HOLO) Acceleration). These methods solve a sequence of modified diffusion eigenvalue problems whose solutions converge to the solution of the original transport eigenvalue problem. This second class of methods is, in our experience, always superior to the first, as most of the computational work is eliminated by the acceleration from the LO diffusion system. In this paper, we review each of these methods. Our computational results support our claim that the choice of which nonlinear solver to use, JFNK or NKA, should be secondary. The primary computational savings result from the implementation of a HOLO algorithm. We display computational results for a series of challenging multi-dimensional test problems.

  17. A comparison of acceleration methods for solving the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Knoll, D. A.

    2014-10-01

    Over the past several years a number of papers have been written describing modern techniques for numerically computing the dominant eigenvalue of the neutron transport criticality problem. These methods fall into two distinct categories. The first category of methods rewrite the multi-group k-eigenvalue problem as a nonlinear system of equations and solve the resulting system using either a Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method or Nonlinear Krylov Acceleration (NKA), a variant of Anderson Acceleration. These methods are generally successful in significantly reducing the number of transport sweeps required to compute the dominant eigenvalue. The second category of methods utilize Moment-Based Acceleration (or High-Order/Low-Order (HOLO) Acceleration). These methods solve a sequence of modified diffusion eigenvalue problems whose solutions converge to the solution of the original transport eigenvalue problem. This second class of methods is, in our experience, always superior to the first, as most of the computational work is eliminated by the acceleration from the LO diffusion system. In this paper, we review each of these methods. Our computational results support our claim that the choice of which nonlinear solver to use, JFNK or NKA, should be secondary. The primary computational savings result from the implementation of a HOLO algorithm. We display computational results for a series of challenging multi-dimensional test problems.

  18. A demonstration of a whole core neutron transport method in a gas cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, K. J.; Rahnema, F.

    2013-07-01

    This paper illustrates a capability of the whole core transport method COMET. Building on previous works which demonstrated the accuracy of the method, this work serves to emphasize the robust capability of the method while also accentuating its efficiency. A set of core configurations is presented based on an operating gas-cooled thermal reactor, Japan's HTTR, and COMET determines the eigenvalue and fission density profile throughout each core configuration. Results for core multiplication factors are compared to MCNP for accuracy and also to compare runtimes. In all cases, the values given by COMET differ by those given by MCNP by less than the uncertainty inherent in the stochastic solution procedure, however, COMET requires runtimes shorter on the order of a few hundred. Figures are provided illustrating the whole core fission density profile, with segments of pins explicitly modeled individually, so that pin-level neutron flux behavior can be seen without any approximation due to simplification strategies such as homogenization. (authors)

  19. Abstract for Guide coating and evaluation techniques for Ultracold Neutron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xinjian; UCNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    UCN are produced by cold neutron flux down-scattering in a solid deuterium source in Area B of Los Alamos National Laboratory and then transported to the experimental decay volume of the UCNA experiment and to other UCN experiments through a sequence of guide tubes. These tubes are coated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) films to maintain UCN polarization and maximize material potential. We will briefly review the UCNA guide system, the requirements for UCNA guides, and the pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) process we use to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. There will be a discussion of some new analysis techniques for both in situ PLD coating and surface structure of the DLC film that are utilized in the UCN experiments. We will present both present and future research and development in UCN guide coating techniques and materials. UCNA Collaboration group.

  20. Radiation transport analyses in support of the SNS Target Station Neutron Beam Line Shutters Title I Design

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.M.; Pevey, R.E.; Lillie, R.A.; Johnson, J.O.

    2000-12-01

    A detailed radiation transport analysis of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) shutters is important for the construction of the SNS because of its impact on conventional facility design, normal operation of the facility, and maintenance operations. Thus far the analysis of the SNS shutter travel gaps has been completed. This analysis was performed using coupled Monte Carlo and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations.

  1. Radiation transport codes for potential applications related to radiobiology and radiotherapy using protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Several Monte Carlo radiation transport computer codes are used to predict quantities of interest in the fields of radiotherapy and radiobiology. The calculational methods are described and comparisions of calculated and experimental results are presented for dose distributions produced by protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions. Comparisons of calculated and experimental cell survival probabilities are also presented.

  2. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-06-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image.

  3. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-01-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image. PMID:27271330

  4. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-01-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image. PMID:27271330

  5. MCNP: a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Godfrey, T.N.K.

    1985-01-01

    MCNP is a very general Monte Carlo neutron photon transport code system with approximately 250 person years of Group X-6 code development invested. It is extremely portable, user-oriented, and a true production code as it is used about 60 Cray hours per month by about 150 Los Alamos users. It has as its data base the best cross-section evaluations available. MCNP contains state-of-the-art traditional and adaptive Monte Carlo techniques to be applied to the solution of an ever-increasing number of problems. Excellent user-oriented documentation is available for all facets of the MCNP code system. Many useful and important variants of MCNP exist for special applications. The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee is the contact point for worldwide MCNP code and documentation distribution. A much improved MCNP Version 3A will be available in the fall of 1985, along with new and improved documentation. Future directions in MCNP development will change the meaning of MCNP to Monte Carlo N Particle where N particle varieties will be transported.

  6. The TORT three-dimensional discrete ordinates neutron/photon transport code (TORT version 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, W.A.; Simpson, D.B.

    1997-10-01

    TORT calculates the flux or fluence of neutrons and/or photons throughout three-dimensional systems due to particles incident upon the system`s external boundaries, due to fixed internal sources, or due to sources generated by interaction with the system materials. The transport process is represented by the Boltzman transport equation. The method of discrete ordinates is used to treat the directional variable, and a multigroup formulation treats the energy dependence. Anisotropic scattering is treated using a Legendre expansion. Various methods are used to treat spatial dependence, including nodal and characteristic procedures that have been especially adapted to resist numerical distortion. A method of body overlay assists in material zone specification, or the specification can be generated by an external code supplied by the user. Several special features are designed to concentrate machine resources where they are most needed. The directional quadrature and Legendre expansion can vary with energy group. A discontinuous mesh capability has been shown to reduce the size of large problems by a factor of roughly three in some cases. The emphasis in this code is a robust, adaptable application of time-tested methods, together with a few well-tested extensions.

  7. DOXCY - A discrete ordinates approximation of neutron transport in heterogeneous rod lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, H.D.; Stegemann, D.

    1987-08-01

    For calculating the fine flux distribution in heterogeneous fuel rod lattices, an exact treatment of the geometry and the use of a high-order approximation of the transport theory is needed. For this purpose, a discrete ordinates solution of the neutron transport equation for mixed geometry has been developed. The discretization of the space is performed in separate one-dimensional cylindrical coordinate systems, imbedded in a two-dimensional rectangular mesh grid. The geometrical link between the cylindrical and the rectangular systems is achieved by approximating the outer circle of each cylindrical system by a polygon with side numbers greater than or equal to8. Thus, each cylindrical geometry is enclosed in a two-dimensional mesh grid consisting of rectangles, trapeziums, and triangles. Because of the different orientation of the angular segmentation in XY and R coordinates, transfer coefficients are derived to calculate the directional flux distribution on the boundary between both systems. A special set of equal-weighted quadrature coefficients (EQ/sub n/) is used to get transfer coefficients, providing a fast and accurate solution. The method is realized in a program called DOXCY, which runs within the nuclear program system RSYST. The program is verified on selected benchmark problems. The numerical results are given, showing the advantage and limits of the method.

  8. On the adequacy of message-passing parallel supercomputers for solving neutron transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1990-01-01

    A coarse-grained, static-scheduling parallelization of the standard iterative scheme used for solving the discrete-ordinates approximation of the neutron transport equation is described. The parallel algorithm is based on a decomposition of the angular domain along the discrete ordinates, thus naturally producing a set of completely uncoupled systems of equations in each iteration. Implementation of the parallel code on Intcl's iPSC/2 hypercube, and solutions to test problems are presented as evidence of the high speedup and efficiency of the parallel code. The performance of the parallel code on the iPSC/2 is analyzed, and a model for the CPU time as a function of the problem size (order of angular quadrature) and the number of participating processors is developed and validated against measured CPU times. The performance model is used to speculate on the potential of massively parallel computers for significantly speeding up real-life transport calculations at acceptable efficiencies. We conclude that parallel computers with a few hundred processors are capable of producing large speedups at very high efficiencies in very large three-dimensional problems. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  9. A new paradigm for local-global coupling in whole-core neutron transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.; Smith, M.; Palmiotti, G,; Nuclear Engineering Division; Northwestern Univ.; INL

    2009-01-01

    A new paradigm that increases the efficiency of whole-core neutron transport calculations without lattice homogenization is introduced. Quasi-reflected interface conditions are formulated to partially decouple periodic lattice effects from global flux gradients. The starting point is the finite subelement form of the variational nodal code VARIANT that eliminates fuel-coolant homogenization through the use of heterogeneous nodes. The interface spherical harmonics expansions that couple pin-cell-sized nodes are divided into low-order and high-order terms, and reflected interface conditions are applied to the high-order terms. Combined with an integral transport method within the node, the new approach dramatically reduces both the formation time and the dimensions of the nodal response matrices and leads to sharply reduced memory requirements and computational time. The method is applied to the two-dimensional C5G7 problem, an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency pressurized water reactor benchmark containing mixed oxide (MOX) and UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies, as well as to a three-dimensional MOX fuel assembly. Results indicate the new approach results in very little loss of accuracy relative to the corresponding full spherical harmonics expansions while reducing computational times by well over an order of magnitude.

  10. Surface harmonics method for two-dimensional time-dependent neutron transport problems of square-lattice nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    Time-dependent equations of the Surface Harmonics Method (SHM) have been derived from the time-dependent neutron transport equation with explicit representation of delayed neutrons for solving the two-dimensional time-dependent problems. These equations have been realized in the SUHAM-TD code. The TWIGL benchmark problem has been used for verification of the SUHAM-TD code. The results of the study showed that computational costs required to achieve necessary accuracy of the solution can be an order of magnitude less than with the use of the conventional finite difference method (FDM). (authors)

  11. U{sub N} Method For The Critical Slab Problem In One-Speed Neutron Transport Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Oeztuerk, Hakan; Guengoer, Sueleyman

    2008-11-11

    The Chebyshev polynomial approximation (U{sub N} method) is used to solve the critical slab problem in one-speed neutron transport theory using Marshak boundary condition. The isotropic scattering kernel with the combination of forward and backward scattering is chosen for the neutrons in a uniform finite slab. Numerical results obtained by the U{sub N} method are presented in the tables together with the results obtained by the well-known P{sub N} method for comparison. It is shown that the method converges rapidly with its easily executable equations.

  12. A Complex-Geometry Validation Experiment for Advanced Neutron Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Anthony W. LaPorta; Joseph W. Nielsen; James Parry; Mark D. DeHart; Samuel E. Bays; William F. Skerjanc

    2013-11-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a focused effort to upgrade legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols used for support of core fuel management and experiment management in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its companion critical facility (ATRC) at the INL.. This will be accomplished through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate new Verification and Validation (V&V) protocols, over the next 12-18 months. Stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and nuclear data packages that support this effort include MCNP5[1], SCALE/KENO6[2], HELIOS[3], SCALE/NEWT[2], and ATTILA[4]. Furthermore, a capability for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI[5] system has also been implemented. Finally, we are also evaluating the Serpent[6] and MC21[7] codes, as additional verification tools in the near term as well as for possible applications to full three-dimensional Monte Carlo based fuel management modeling in the longer term. On the experimental side, several new benchmark-quality code validation measurements based on neutron activation spectrometry have been conducted using the ATRC. Results for the first four experiments, focused on neutron spectrum measurements within the Northwest Large In-Pile Tube (NW LIPT) and in the core fuel elements surrounding the NW LIPT and the diametrically opposite Southeast IPT have been reported [8,9]. A fifth, very recent, experiment focused on detailed measurements of the element-to-element core power distribution is summarized here and examples of the use of the measured data for validation of corresponding MCNP5, HELIOS, NEWT, and Serpent computational models using modern least-square adjustment methods are provided.

  13. A Novel Algorithm for Solving the Multidimensional Neutron Transport Equation on Massively Parallel Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Yousry

    2014-06-10

    We employ the Integral Transport Matrix Method (ITMM) as the kernel of new parallel solution methods for the discrete ordinates approximation of the within-group neutron transport equation. The ITMM abandons the repetitive mesh sweeps of the traditional source iterations (SI) scheme in favor of constructing stored operators that account for the direct coupling factors among all the cells' fluxes and between the cells' and boundary surfaces' fluxes. The main goals of this work are to develop the algorithms that construct these operators and employ them in the solution process, determine the most suitable way to parallelize the entire procedure, and evaluate the behavior and parallel performance of the developed methods with increasing number of processes, P. The fastest observed parallel solution method, Parallel Gauss-Seidel (PGS), was used in a weak scaling comparison with the PARTISN transport code, which uses the source iteration (SI) scheme parallelized with the Koch-baker-Alcouffe (KBA) method. Compared to the state-of-the-art SI-KBA with diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA), this new method- even without acceleration/preconditioning-is completitive for optically thick problems as P is increased to the tens of thousands range. For the most optically thick cells tested, PGS reduced execution time by an approximate factor of three for problems with more than 130 million computational cells on P = 32,768. Moreover, the SI-DSA execution times's trend rises generally more steeply with increasing P than the PGS trend. Furthermore, the PGS method outperforms SI for the periodic heterogeneous layers (PHL) configuration problems. The PGS method outperforms SI and SI-DSA on as few as P = 16 for PHL problems and reduces execution time by a factor of ten or more for all problems considered with more than 2 million computational cells on P = 4.096.

  14. Radiation transport requirements for clinical applications of neutron capture therapy: The rtt-MC Monte Carlo module

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, F.J.; Wessol, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    The rtt-MC dose calculation module of the BNCT-Rtpe treatment planning system has been developed specifically for boron neutron cancer therapy. Due to the complicated nature of combined gamma, fast-, epithermal- and thermal-energy neutron transport in tissue, all approaches to treatment planning to date for this treatment modality rely on Monte Carlo or three-dimensional discrete ordinates methods. Simple, fast and accurate methods for this modality have simply not been developed. In this paper the authors discuss some of the unique attributes of this therapy and the approaches they have used to begin to merge into clinical applications. As this paper is under draft, the modern implementation of boron neutron cancer therapy in the US is being realized. Research of skin and tumor effect for superficial melanoma of the extremities has been initiated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and brain cancer therapy (using this planning system) has begun at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  15. Study of the response of a lithium yttrium borate scintillator based neutron rem counter by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, C.; Tyagi, Mohit; Biju, K.; Shanbhag, A. A.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2015-12-01

    The scarcity and the high cost of 3He has spurred the use of various detectors for neutron monitoring. A new lithium yttrium borate scintillator developed in BARC has been studied for its use in a neutron rem counter. The scintillator is made of natural lithium and boron, and the yield of reaction products that will generate a signal in a real time detector has been studied by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. A 2 cm lead introduced to enhance the gamma rejection shows no appreciable change in the shape of the fluence response or in the yield of reaction products. The fluence response when normalized at the average energy of an Am-Be neutron source shows promise of being used as rem counter.

  16. Neutron scattering studies of structure, hydrothermal stability and transport in porous silica catalyst supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Rachel A.

    Mesoporous materials are interesting as catalyst supports, because molecules can move efficiently in and out of the pore network, but they must be stable in water if they are to be used for the production of biofuels. Before investigating hydrothermal stability and transport properties, the pore structure of SBA-15 was characterized using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and non-local density functional theory (NLDFT) analysis of nitrogen sorption isotherms. A new Contrast Matching SANS method, using a range of probe molecules to directly probe the micropore size, gave a pore size distribution onset of 6 ± 0.2 Å, consistent with cylindrical pores formed from polymer template strands that unravel into the silica matrix. Diffraction intensity analysis of SANS measurements, combined with pore size distributions calculated from NLDFT, showed that the secondary pores are distributed relatively uniformly throughout the silica framework. The hydrothermal stability of SBA-15 was evaluated using a post-calcination hydrothermal treatment in both liquid and vapor phase water. The results were consistent with a degradation mechanism in which silica dissolves from regions of small positive curvature, e.g. near the entrance to the secondary pores, and is re-deposited deeper into the framework. Under water treatment at 115 °C, the mesopore diameter increases and the intra-wall void fraction decreases significantly. The behavior is similar for steam treatment, but occurs more slowly, suggesting that transport is faster when condensation occurs in the pores. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements of methane in SBA-15 probed the rotational and translational motion as a function of temperature and loading. A qualitative analysis of the QENS data suggested that for the initial dose of methane at 100 K, the self diffusion constant is similar in magnitude to literature values for methane in ZSM-5 and Y-zeolite, showing that the secondary pores trap methane and limit

  17. Development of a transportable neutron activation analysis system to quantify manganese in bone in vivo: feasibility and methodology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingzi; Koltick, David; Byrne, Patrick; Wang, Haoyu; Zheng, Wei; Nie, Linda H

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the methodology and feasibility of developing a transportable neutron activation analysis (NAA) system to quantify manganese (Mn) in bone using a portable deuterium–deuterium (DD) neutron generator as the neutron source. Since a DD neutron generator was not available in our laboratory, a deuterium–tritium (DT) neutron generator was used to obtain experimental data and validate the results from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. After validation, MC simulations using a DD generator as the neutron source were then conducted. Different types of moderators and reflectors were simulated, and the optimal thicknesses for the moderator and reflector were determined. To estimate the detection limit (DL) of the system, and to observe the interference of the magnesium (Mg) γ line at 844 keV to the Mn γ line at 847 keV, three hand phantoms with Mn concentrations of 30 parts per million (ppm), 150 ppm, and 500 ppm were made and irradiated by the DT generator system. The Mn signals in these phantoms were then measured using a 50% high-efficiency high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The DL was calculated to be about 4.4 ppm for the chosen irradiation, decay, and measurement time. This was calculated to be equivalent to a DL of about 3.3 ppm for the DD generator system. To achieve this DL with one 50% high-efficiency HPGe detector, the dose to the hand was simulated to be about 37 mSv, with the total body equivalent dose being about 23μSv. In conclusion, it is feasible to develop a transportable NAA system to quantify Mn in bone in vivo with an acceptable radiation exposure to the subject. PMID:24165395

  18. Development of a transportable neutron activation analysis system to quantify manganese in bone in vivo: feasibility and methodology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingzi; Koltick, David; Byrne, Patrick; Wang, Haoyu; Zheng, Wei; Nie, Linda H

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the methodology and feasibility of developing a transportable neutron activation analysis (NAA) system to quantify manganese (Mn) in bone using a portable deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator as the neutron source. Since a DD neutron generator was not available in our laboratory, a deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator was used to obtain experimental data and validate the results from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. After validation, MC simulations using a DD generator as the neutron source were then conducted. Different types of moderators and reflectors were simulated, and the optimal thicknesses for the moderator and reflector were determined. To estimate the detection limit (DL) of the system, and to observe the interference of the magnesium (Mg) γ line at 844 keV to the Mn γ line at 847 keV, three hand phantoms with Mn concentrations of 30 parts per million (ppm), 150 ppm, and 500 ppm were made and irradiated by the DT generator system. The Mn signals in these phantoms were then measured using a 50% high-efficiency high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The DL was calculated to be about 4.4 ppm for the chosen irradiation, decay, and measurement time. This was calculated to be equivalent to a DL of about 3.3 ppm for the DD generator system. To achieve this DL with one 50% high-efficiency HPGe detector, the dose to the hand was simulated to be about 37 mSv, with the total body equivalent dose being about 23µSv. In conclusion, it is feasible to develop a transportable NAA system to quantify Mn in bone in vivo with an acceptable radiation exposure to the subject.

  19. The interplay between proto{endash}neutron star convection and neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzacappa, A.; Calder, A.C.; Guidry, M.W.; Strayer, M.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Strayer, M.R.; Umar, A.S. Bruenn, S.W. Blondin, J.M.

    1998-02-01

    We couple two-dimensional hydrodynamics to realistic one-dimensional multigroup flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport to investigate proto{endash}neutron star convection in core-collapse supernovae, and more specifically, the interplay between its development and neutrino transport. Our initial conditions, time-dependent boundary conditions, and neutrino distributions for computing neutrino heating, cooling, and deleptonization rates are obtained from one-dimensional simulations that implement multigroup flux-limited diffusion and one-dimensional hydrodynamics. The development and evolution of proto{endash}neutron star convection are investigated for both 15 and 25M{sub {circle_dot}} models, representative of the two classes of stars with compact and extended iron cores, respectively. For both models, in the absence of neutrino transport, the angle-averaged radial and angular convection velocities in the initial Ledoux unstable region below the shock after bounce achieve their peak values in {approximately}20ms, after which they decrease as the convection in this region dissipates. The dissipation occurs as the gradients are smoothed out by convection. This initial proto{endash}neutron star convection episode seeds additional convectively unstable regions farther out beneath the shock. The additional proto{endash}neutron star convection is driven by successive negative entropy gradients that develop as the shock, in propagating out after core bounce, is successively strengthened and weakened by the oscillating inner core. The convection beneath the shock distorts its sphericity, but on the average the shock radius is not boosted significantly relative to its radius in our corresponding one-dimensional models. In the presence of neutrino transport, proto{endash}neutron star convection velocities are too small relative to bulk inflow velocities to result in any significant convective transport of entropy and leptons. This is evident in our two-dimensional entropy

  20. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  1. A discrete ordinates approximation to the neutron transport equation applied to generalized geometries

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1992-12-01

    A method for applying the discrete ordinates method for solution of the neutron transport equation in arbitary two-dimensional meshes has been developed. The finite difference approach normally used to approximate spatial derivatives in extrapolating angular fluxes across a cell is replaced by direct solution of the characteristic form of the transport equation for each discrete direction. Thus, computational cells are not restricted to the traditional shape of a mesh element within a given coordinate system. However, in terms of the treatment of energy and angular dependencies, this method resembles traditional discrete ordinates techniques. Using the method developed here, a general two-dimensional space can be approximated by an irregular mesh comprised of arbitrary polygons. The present work makes no assumptions about the orientations or the number of sides in a given cell, and computes all geometric relationships between each set of sides in each cell for each discrete direction. A set of non-reentrant polygons can therefore be used to represent any given two dimensional space. Results for a number of test problems have been compared to solutions obtained from traditional methods, with good agreement. Comparisons include benchmarks against analytical results for problems with simple geometry, as well numerical results obtained from traditional discrete ordinates methods by applying the ANISN and TWOTRAN computer programs. Numerical results were obtained for problems ranging from simple one-dimensional geometry to complicated multidimensional configurations. These results have demonstrated the ability of the developed method to closely approximate complex geometrical configurations and to obtain accurate results for problems that are extremely difficult to model using traditional methods.

  2. A fully coupled Monte Carlo/discrete ordinates solution to the neutron transport equation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Filippone, W.L.; Baker, R.S.

    1990-12-31

    The neutron transport equation is solved by a hybrid method that iteratively couples regions where deterministic (S{sub N}) and stochastic (Monte Carlo) methods are applied. Unlike previous hybrid methods, the Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are fully coupled in the sense that no assumption is made about geometrical separation or decoupling. The hybrid method provides a new means of solving problems involving both optically thick and optically thin regions that neither Monte Carlo nor S{sub N} is well suited for by themselves. The fully coupled Monte Carlo/S{sub N} technique consists of defining spatial and/or energy regions of a problem in which either a Monte Carlo calculation or an S{sub N} calculation is to be performed. The Monte Carlo region may comprise the entire spatial region for selected energy groups, or may consist of a rectangular area that is either completely or partially embedded in an arbitrary S{sub N} region. The Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are then connected through the common angular boundary fluxes, which are determined iteratively using the response matrix technique, and volumetric sources. The hybrid method has been implemented in the S{sub N} code TWODANT by adding special-purpose Monte Carlo subroutines to calculate the response matrices and volumetric sources, and linkage subrountines to carry out the interface flux iterations. The common angular boundary fluxes are included in the S{sub N} code as interior boundary sources, leaving the logic for the solution of the transport flux unchanged, while, with minor modifications, the diffusion synthetic accelerator remains effective in accelerating S{sub N} calculations. The special-purpose Monte Carlo routines used are essentially analog, with few variance reduction techniques employed. However, the routines have been successfully vectorized, with approximately a factor of five increase in speed over the non-vectorized version.

  3. Oxygen transport pathways in Ruddlesden–Popper structured oxides revealed via in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-09-21

    Ruddlesden-Popper structured oxides, general form An+1BnO3n+1, consist of n-layers of the perovskite structure stacked in between rock-salt layers, and have potential application in solid oxide electrochemical cells and ion transport membrane reactors. Three materials with constant Co/Fe ratio, LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2), and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3) were synthesized and studied via in situ neutron powder diffraction between 765 K and 1070 K at a pO2 of 10-1 atm. Then, the structures were fit to a tetragonal I4/mmm space group, and were found to have increased total oxygen vacancy concentration in the order La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ > LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δmore » > LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ, following the trend predicted for charge compensation upon increasing Sr2+/La3+ ratio. The oxygen vacancies within the material were almost exclusively located within the perovskite layers for all of the crystal structures with only minimal vacancy formation in the rock-salt layer. Finally, analysis of the concentration of these vacancies at each distinct crystallographic site and the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters for the oxygen sites reveals potential preferred oxygen transport pathways through the perovskite layers.« less

  4. Inversion of Source and Transport Parameters of Relativistic SEPs from Neutron Monitor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueda, Neus; Bütikofer, Rolf; Vainio, Rami; Heber, Bernd; Afanasiev, Alexander; Malandraki, Olga E.

    2016-04-01

    We present a new methodology to study the release processes of relativistic solar energetic particles (SEPs) based on the direct inversion of Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) observed by the worldwide network of neutron monitors (NMs). The new approach makes use of several models, including: the propagation of relativistic SEPs from the Sun to the Earth, their transport in the Earth's magnetosphere and atmosphere, as well as the detection of the nucleon component of the secondary cosmic rays by ground based NMs. The combination of these models allows us to compute the expected ground-level NM counting rates for a series of instantaneous releases from the Sun. The amplitudes of the source components are then inferred by fitting the NM observations with the modeled NM counting rate increases. Within the HESPERIA project, we will develop the first software package for the direct inversion of GLEs and we will make it freely available for the solar and heliospheric communities. Acknowledgement: This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324.

  5. A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    1998-06-12

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly fast: if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system canmore » save you a great deal of time and energy. TART 97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and ist data files.« less

  6. A 10(9) neutrons/pulse transportable pulsed D-D neutron source based on flexible head plasma focus unit.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R K; Srivastava, R; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2016-03-01

    A 17 kJ transportable plasma focus (PF) device with flexible transmission lines is developed and is characterized. Six custom made capacitors are used for the capacitor bank (CB). The common high voltage plate of the CB is fixed to a centrally triggered spark gap switch. The output of the switch is coupled to the PF head through forty-eight 5 m long RG213 cables. The CB has a quarter time-period of 4 μs and an estimated current of 506 kA is delivered to the PF device at 17 kJ (60 μF, 24 kV) energy. The average neutron yield measured using silver activation detector in the radial direction is (7.1 ± 1.4) × 10(8) neutrons/shot over 4π sr at 5 mbar optimum D2 pressure. The average neutron yield is more in the axial direction with an anisotropy factor of 1.33 ± 0.18. The average neutron energies estimated in the axial as well as in the radial directions are (2.90 ± 0.20) MeV and (2.58 ± 0.20) MeV, respectively. The flexibility of the PF head makes it useful for many applications where the source orientation and the location are important factors. The influence of electromagnetic interferences from the CB as well as from the spark gap on applications area can be avoided by putting a suitable barrier between the bank and the PF head. PMID:27036774

  7. A 10(9) neutrons/pulse transportable pulsed D-D neutron source based on flexible head plasma focus unit.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R K; Srivastava, R; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2016-03-01

    A 17 kJ transportable plasma focus (PF) device with flexible transmission lines is developed and is characterized. Six custom made capacitors are used for the capacitor bank (CB). The common high voltage plate of the CB is fixed to a centrally triggered spark gap switch. The output of the switch is coupled to the PF head through forty-eight 5 m long RG213 cables. The CB has a quarter time-period of 4 μs and an estimated current of 506 kA is delivered to the PF device at 17 kJ (60 μF, 24 kV) energy. The average neutron yield measured using silver activation detector in the radial direction is (7.1 ± 1.4) × 10(8) neutrons/shot over 4π sr at 5 mbar optimum D2 pressure. The average neutron yield is more in the axial direction with an anisotropy factor of 1.33 ± 0.18. The average neutron energies estimated in the axial as well as in the radial directions are (2.90 ± 0.20) MeV and (2.58 ± 0.20) MeV, respectively. The flexibility of the PF head makes it useful for many applications where the source orientation and the location are important factors. The influence of electromagnetic interferences from the CB as well as from the spark gap on applications area can be avoided by putting a suitable barrier between the bank and the PF head.

  8. Nodal collocation approximation for the multidimensional PL equations applied to transport source problems

    SciTech Connect

    Verdu, G.; Capilla, M.; Talavera, C. F.; Ginestar, D.

    2012-07-01

    PL equations are classical high order approximations to the transport equations which are based on the expansion of the angular dependence of the angular neutron flux and the nuclear cross sections in terms of spherical harmonics. A nodal collocation method is used to discretize the PL equations associated with a neutron source transport problem. The performance of the method is tested solving two 1D problems with analytical solution for the transport equation and a classical 2D problem. (authors)

  9. Transport in fuel cells: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and neutron imaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Douglas Scott

    This dissertation focuses on two powerful methods of performing in-situ studies of transport limitations in fuel cells. The first is electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) while the second is neutron imaging. Three fuel cell systems are studied in this work: polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and enzyme fuel cells (EFCs). The first experimental section of this dissertation focuses on application of EIS and neutron imaging to an operating PEMFC. The effects of cathode-side humidity and flow rate, as well as cell temperature and a transient response to cathode-side humidity, were studied for a PEMFC via EIS. It was found that increased air humidity in the cathode resulted in greatly reduced cathode resistance as well as a significant reduction in membrane resistance. The anode resistance was only slightly reduced in this case. Increased air flow rate was observed to have little effect on any resistance in the PEMFC, though slight reductions in both the anode and the cathode were observed. Increased cell temperature resulted in decreased cathode and anode resistances. Finally, the transient response to increased humidity exhibited unstable behavior for both the anode and the cathode resistances and the PEMFC power output. Neutron imaging allowed the calculation of water content throughout the PEMFC, showing a maximum in water content at the cathode gas diffusion layer - membrane interface. The second experimental section of this dissertation delves into the world of microbial fuel cells. Multiple long-term observations of changes in internal resistances were performed and illustrated the reduction in anode resistance as the bacterial community was established. Over this same time period, the cathode resistance was observed to have increased; these two phenomena suggest that the anode improved over time while the cathode suffered from degradation. Increased anode fluid ionic strength and flow rate both led to significant

  10. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  11. Transport calculation of neutrons leaked to the surroundings of the facilities by the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura.

    PubMed

    Imanaka, T

    2001-09-01

    A transport calculation of the neutrons leaked to the environment by the JCO criticality accident was carried out based on three-dimensional geometrical models of the buildings within the JCO territory. Our work started from an initial step to simulate the leakage process of neutrons from the precipitation tank, and proceeded to a step to calculate the neutron propagation throughout the JCO facilities. The total fission number during the accident in the precipitation tank was evaluated to be 2.5 x 10(18) by comparing the calculated neutron-induced activities per 235U fission with the measured values in a stainless-steel net sample taken 2 m from the precipitation tank. Shield effects by various structures within the JCO facilities were evaluated by comparing the present results with a previous calculation using two-dimensional models which suppose a point source of the fission spectrum in the air above the ground without any shield structures. The shield effect by the precipitation tank, itself, was obtained to be a factor of 3. The shield factor by the conversion building varied between 1.1 and 2, depending on the direction from the building. The shield effect by the surrounding buildings within the JCO territory was between I and 5, also depending on the direction.

  12. Oxygen transport pathways in Ruddlesden–Popper structured oxides revealed via in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-09-21

    Ruddlesden-Popper structured oxides, general form An+1BnO3n+1, consist of n-layers of the perovskite structure stacked in between rock-salt layers, and have potential application in solid oxide electrochemical cells and ion transport membrane reactors. Three materials with constant Co/Fe ratio, LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2), and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3) were synthesized and studied via in situ neutron powder diffraction between 765 K and 1070 K at a pO2 of 10-1 atm. Then, the structures were fit to a tetragonal I4/mmm space group, and were found to have increased total oxygen vacancy concentration in the order La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ > LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ > LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ, following the trend predicted for charge compensation upon increasing Sr2+/La3+ ratio. The oxygen vacancies within the material were almost exclusively located within the perovskite layers for all of the crystal structures with only minimal vacancy formation in the rock-salt layer. Finally, analysis of the concentration of these vacancies at each distinct crystallographic site and the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters for the oxygen sites reveals potential preferred oxygen transport pathways through the perovskite layers.

  13. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  14. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  15. Visualization of root water uptake: quantification of deuterated water transport in roots using neutron radiography and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kroener, Eva; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure water fluxes in soil and plants. Here, we describe a new method to noninvasively quantify water fluxes in roots. To this end, neutron radiography was used to trace the transport of deuterated water (D2O) into roots. The results showed that (1) the radial transport of D2O from soil to the roots depended similarly on diffusive and convective transport and (2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To quantify the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we introduced a convection-diffusion model to simulate the D2O transport in roots. The model takes into account different pathways of water across the root tissue, the endodermis as a layer with distinct transport properties, and the axial transport of D2O in the xylem. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modeling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots. For a 24-d-old lupine (Lupinus albus) grown in a soil with uniform water content, root water uptake was higher in the proximal parts of lateral roots and decreased toward the distal parts. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along the root systems.

  16. Visualization of Root Water Uptake: Quantification of Deuterated Water Transport in Roots Using Neutron Radiography and Numerical Modeling[C

    PubMed Central

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kroener, Eva; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure water fluxes in soil and plants. Here, we describe a new method to noninvasively quantify water fluxes in roots. To this end, neutron radiography was used to trace the transport of deuterated water (D2O) into roots. The results showed that (1) the radial transport of D2O from soil to the roots depended similarly on diffusive and convective transport and (2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To quantify the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we introduced a convection-diffusion model to simulate the D2O transport in roots. The model takes into account different pathways of water across the root tissue, the endodermis as a layer with distinct transport properties, and the axial transport of D2O in the xylem. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modeling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots. For a 24-d-old lupine (Lupinus albus) grown in a soil with uniform water content, root water uptake was higher in the proximal parts of lateral roots and decreased toward the distal parts. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along the root systems. PMID:25189533

  17. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah; Uhoya, Walter; Tsoi, Georgiy; Wenger, Lowell E; Vohra, Yogesh; Chesnut, Gary Neal; Weir, S. T.; Tulk, Christopher A; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2012-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Neel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa(-1) up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  18. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sarah A; Uhoya, Walter O; Tsoi, Georgiy M; Wenger, Lowell E; Vohra, Yogesh K; Chesnut, Gary N; Weir, Samuel T; Tulk, Christopher A; dos Santos, Antonio M

    2012-05-30

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Néel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa(-1) up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  19. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Uhoya, Walter O.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Wenger, Lowell E.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Chesnut, Gary N.; Weir, Samuel T.; Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.

    2012-05-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Néel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa-1 up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  20. Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Transport Calculations Involving Incident Neutrons and Protons of Energy Up to 100 MeV.

    1993-08-09

    Version 00 This data base was developed for use in Monte Carlo or discrete ordinate transport codes, for example, the general Monte Carlo code MCNP. Various modules of the NJOY processing code system have been enhanced to permit processing of the ENDF/B-VI formatted evaluations into both continuous-energy and multi-group format. The transport data files for all 18 projectile-plus-target systems have been processed through NJOY, and coupled multi-particle, multi-group transport libraries for MCNP now exist. Inmore » addition, pointwise MCNP libraries to 100 MeV for incident neutrons have been prepared for the nine targets. The production version of the MCNP code is being modified to handle the new pointwise libraries. The production version of MCNP already supports the use of coupled multi-group libraries.« less

  1. Developing Sediment Transport and Dredging Prediction Model of Ohio River at Olmsted Locks and Dams Area using HEC-RAS (1D/2D)By Ganesh Raj Ghimire1 and Bruce A. Devantier 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment deposition is a serious issue in the construction and operation of large reservoir and inland navigation projects in the United States and around the world. Olmsted Locks and Dams in the Ohio River navigation system is facing similar challenges of huge sediment deposition during the ongoing in-wet construction methodology since 1993. HEC-RAS 5.0 integrated with ArcGIS, will be used to yield unsteady 2D hydrodynamic model of Ohio River at Olmsted area. Velocity, suspended sediment, bed sediment and hydrographic survey data acquired from public archives of USGS and USACE Louisville District will be input into the model. Calibration and validation of model will be performed against the measured stage, flow and velocity data. It will be subjected to completely unsteady 1D sediment transport modeling new to HEC-RAS 5.0 which incorporates sediment load and bed gradation via a DSS file, commercial dredging and BSTEM model. Sediment model will be calibrated to replicate the historical bed volume changes. Excavated cross-sections at Olmsted area will also be used to predict the sediment volume trapped inside the ditch over the period between excavations and placement of dam shells at site. Model will attempt to replicate historical dredging volume data and compare with the deposition volume from simulation model to formulate the dredging prediction model. Hence, the results of this research will generate a model that can form a basis for scheduling the dredging event prior to the placement of off-shore cast shells replacing the current as and when required approach of dredging plan. 1 Graduate Student, Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois, 62901-6603 2 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois, 62901-6603

  2. An analytical discrete ordinates solution for a nodal model of a two-dimensional neutron transport problem

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, J. F. P.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, an analytical discrete ordinates method is used to solve a nodal formulation of a neutron transport problem in x, y-geometry. The proposed approach leads to an important reduction in the order of the associated eigenvalue systems, when combined with the classical level symmetric quadrature scheme. Auxiliary equations are proposed, as usually required for nodal methods, to express the unknown fluxes at the boundary introduced as additional unknowns in the integrated equations. Numerical results, for the problem defined by a two-dimensional region with a spatially constant and isotropically emitting source, are presented and compared with those available in the literature. (authors)

  3. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan C. White

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second, the ability to

  4. General Purpose Monte Carlo Multigroup Neutron and Gamma-Ray Transport Code System. We recommend C00474/ALLCP/02 MORSE-CGA.

    1991-08-01

    Version: 00 The original MORSE code was a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. It was designed as a tool for solving most shielding problems. Through the use of multigroup cross sections, the solution of neutron, gamma-ray, or coupled neutron-gamma-ray problems could be obtained in either the forward or adjoint mode. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry could be used with an albedo option available atmore » any material surface. Isotropic or anisotropic scattering up to a P16 expansion of the angular distribution was allowed. MORSE-CG incorporated the Mathematical Applications, Inc. (MAGI) combinatorial geometry routines. MORSE-B modifies the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport computer code MORSE-CG by adding routines which allow various flexible options.« less

  5. Transport analysis of measured neutron leakage spectra from spheres as tests of evaluated high energy cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, D. D.; Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.

    1973-01-01

    Integral tests of evaluated ENDF/B high-energy cross sections have been made by comparing measured and calculated neutron leakage flux spectra from spheres of various materials. An Am-Be (alpha,n) source was used to provide fast neutrons at the center of the test spheres of Be, CH2, Pb, Nb, Mo, Ta, and W. The absolute leakage flux spectra were measured in the energy range 0.5 to 12 MeV using a calibrated NE213 liquid scintillator neutron spectrometer. Absolute calculations of the spectra were made using version 3 ENDF/B cross sections and an S sub n discrete ordinates multigroup transport code. Generally excellent agreement was obtained for Be, CH2, Pb, and Mo, and good agreement was observed for Nb although discrepancies were observed for some energy ranges. Poor comparative results, obtained for Ta and W, are attributed to unsatisfactory nonelastic cross sections. The experimental sphere leakage flux spectra are tabulated and serve as possible benchmarks for these elements against which reevaluated cross sections may be tested.

  6. Neutron Diffraction and Electrical Transport Studies on Magnetic Transition in Terbium at High Pressures and Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sarah; Montgomery, Jeffrey; Tsoi, Georgiy; Vohra, Yogesh; Weir, Samuel; Tulk, Christopher; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a helical antiferromagnetic to a ferromagnetic ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements using designer diamonds show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The temperature of the ferromagnetic transition decreases at a rate of -16.7 K/GPa till 3.6 GPa, where terbium undergoes a structural transition from hexagonal close packed (hcp) to an α-Sm phase. Above this pressure, the electrical resistance measurements no longer exhibit a change in slope. In order to confirm the change in magnetic phase suggested by the electrical resistance measurements, neutron diffraction measurements were conducted at the SNAP beamline at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Measurements were made at pressures to 5.3 GPa and temperatures as low as 90 K. An abrupt increase in peak intensity in the neutron diffraction spectra signaled the onset of magnetic order below the Curie temperature. A magnetic phase diagram of rare earth metal terbium will be presented to 5.3 GPa and 90 K based on these studies.

  7. Boronophenylalanine, a boron delivery agent for boron neutron capture therapy, is transported by ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2.

    PubMed

    Wongthai, Printip; Hagiwara, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Wei, Ling; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kato, Itsuro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2015-03-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy relies on the selective delivery of boron carriers to malignant cells. p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA), a boron delivery agent, has been proposed to be localized to cells through transporter-mediated mechanisms. In this study, we screened aromatic amino acid transporters to identify BPA transporters. Human aromatic amino acid transporters were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined for BPA uptake and kinetic parameters. The roles of the transporters in BPA uptake were characterized in cancer cell lines. For the quantitative assessment of BPA uptake, HPLC was used throughout the study. Among aromatic amino acid transporters, ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 were found to transport BPA with Km values of 137.4 ± 11.7, 20.3 ± 0.8 and 88.3 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Uptake experiments in cancer cell lines revealed that the LAT1 protein amount was the major determinant of BPA uptake at 100 μM, whereas the contribution of ATB(0,+) became significant at 1000 μM, accounting for 20-25% of the total BPA uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 transport BPA at affinities comparable with their endogenous substrates, suggesting that they could mediate effective BPA uptake in vivo. The high and low affinities of LAT1 and ATB(0,+), respectively, differentiate their roles in BPA uptake. ATB(0,+), as well as LAT1, could contribute significantly to the tumor accumulation of BPA at clinical dose.

  8. The effect of biological shielding on fast neutron and photon transport in the VVER-1000 mock-up model placed in the LR-0 reactor.

    PubMed

    Košťál, Michal; Cvachovec, František; Milčák, Ján; Mravec, Filip

    2013-05-01

    The paper is intended to show the effect of a biological shielding simulator on fast neutron and photon transport in its vicinity. The fast neutron and photon fluxes were measured by means of scintillation spectroscopy using a 45×45 mm(2) and a 10×10 mm(2) cylindrical stilbene detector. The neutron spectrum was measured in the range of 0.6-10 MeV and the photon spectrum in 0.2-9 MeV. The results of the experiment are compared with calculations. The calculations were performed with various nuclear data libraries.

  9. DYNA2D96. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    DYNA2D is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  10. 2D Spinodal Decomposition in Forced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, Patrick; Chacon, Luis; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a second order phase transition for binary fluid mixture, from one thermodynamic phase to form two coexisting phases. The governing equation for this coarsening process below critical temperature, Cahn-Hilliard Equation, is very similar to 2D MHD Equation, especially the conserved quantities have a close correspondence between each other, so theories for MHD turbulence are used to study spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence. Domain size is increased with time along with the inverse cascade, and the length scale can be arrested by a forced turbulence with direct cascade. The two competing mechanisms lead to a stabilized domain size length scale, which can be characterized by Hinze Scale. The 2D spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence is studied by both theory and simulation with ``pixie2d.'' This work focuses on the relation between Hinze scale and spectra and cascades. Similarities and differences between spinodal decomposition and MHD are investigated. Also some transport properties are studied following MHD theories. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  11. The coupling of the neutron transport application RATTLESNAKE to the nuclear fuels performance application BISON under the MOOSE framework

    SciTech Connect

    Gleicher, Frederick N.; Williamson, Richard L.; Ortensi, Javier; Wang, Yaqi; Spencer, Benjamin W.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Hales, Jason D.; Martineau, Richard C.

    2014-10-01

    The MOOSE neutron transport application RATTLESNAKE was coupled to the fuels performance application BISON to provide a higher fidelity tool for fuel performance simulation. This project is motivated by the desire to couple a high fidelity core analysis program (based on the self-adjoint angular flux equations) to a high fidelity fuel performance program, both of which can simulate on unstructured meshes. RATTLESNAKE solves self-adjoint angular flux transport equation and provides a sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux with resonance treatment during burnup or a fast transient. BISON solves the coupled thermomechanical equations for the fuel on a sub-millimeter scale. Both applications are able to solve their respective systems on aligned and unaligned unstructured finite element meshes. The power density and local burnup was transferred from RATTLESNAKE to BISON with the MOOSE Multiapp transfer system. Multiple depletion cases were run with one-way data transfer from RATTLESNAKE to BISON. The eigenvalues are shown to agree well with values obtained from the lattice physics code DRAGON. The one-way data transfer of power density is shown to agree with the power density obtained from an internal Lassman-style model in BISON.

  12. 3-D Deep Penetration Neutron Imaging of Thick Absorgin and Diffusive Objects Using Transport Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ragusa, Jean; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    here explores the inverse problem of optical tomography applied to heterogeneous domains. The neutral particle transport equation was used as the forward model for how neutral particles stream through and interact within these heterogeneous domains. A constrained optimization technique that uses Newtons method served as the basis of the inverse problem. Optical tomography aims at reconstructing the material properties using (a) illuminating sources and (b) detector readings. However, accurate simulations for radiation transport require that the particle (gamma and/or neutron) energy be appropriate discretize in the multigroup approximation. This, in turns, yields optical tomography problems where the number of unknowns grows (1) about quadratically with respect to the number of energy groups, G, (notably to reconstruct the scattering matrix) and (2) linearly with respect to the number of unknown material regions. As pointed out, a promising approach could rely on algorithms to appropriately select a material type per material zone rather than G2 values. This approach, though promising, still requires further investigation: (a) when switching from cross-section values unknowns to material type indices (discrete integer unknowns), integer programming techniques are needed since derivative information is no longer available; and (b) the issue of selecting the initial material zoning remains. The work reported here proposes an approach to solve the latter item, whereby a material zoning is proposed using one-group or few-groups transport approximations. The capabilities and limitations of the presented method were explored; they are briefly summarized next and later described in fuller details in the Appendices. The major factors that influenced the ability of the optimization method to reconstruct the cross sections of these domains included the locations of the sources used to illuminate the domains, the number of separate experiments used in the reconstruction, the

  13. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  14. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  15. FASTER 3: A generalized-geometry Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    The theory used in FASTER-III, a Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in complex geometries, is outlined. The program includes the treatment of geometric regions bounded by quadratic and quadric surfaces with multiple radiation sources which have specified space, angle, and energy dependence. The program calculates, using importance sampling, the resulting number and energy fluxes at specified point, surface, and volume detectors. It can also calculate minimum weight shield configuration meeting a specified dose rate constraint. Results are presented for sample problems involving primary neutron, and primary and secondary photon, transport in a spherical reactor shield configuration.

  16. Innovative and Advanced Coupled Neutron Transport and Thermal Hydraulic Method (Tool) for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of VHTR/NGNP Prismatic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rahnema, Farzad; Garimeela, Srinivas; Ougouag, Abderrafi; Zhang, Dingkang

    2013-11-29

    This project will develop a 3D, advanced coarse mesh transport method (COMET-Hex) for steady- state and transient analyses in advanced very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). The project will lead to a coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulic (T/H) core simulation tool with fuel depletion capability. The computational tool will be developed in hexagonal geometry, based solely on transport theory without (spatial) homogenization in complicated 3D geometries. In addition to the hexagonal geometry extension, collaborators will concurrently develop three additional capabilities to increase the code’s versatility as an advanced and robust core simulator for VHTRs. First, the project team will develop and implement a depletion method within the core simulator. Second, the team will develop an elementary (proof-of-concept) 1D time-dependent transport method for efficient transient analyses. The third capability will be a thermal hydraulic method coupled to the neutronics transport module for VHTRs. Current advancements in reactor core design are pushing VHTRs toward greater core and fuel heterogeneity to pursue higher burn-ups, efficiently transmute used fuel, maximize energy production, and improve plant economics and safety. As a result, an accurate and efficient neutron transport, with capabilities to treat heterogeneous burnable poison effects, is highly desirable for predicting VHTR neutronics performance. This research project’s primary objective is to advance the state of the art for reactor analysis.

  17. Diurnally modulating neutron flux in the Moon's high-latitudes: Evidence for transported hydrogen volatiles and/ or complex regolith compositions in topographic slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClanahan, Timothy; Mirofanov, Igor; Boynton, William; Chin, Gordon; Livengood, Timothy; Su, Jiao Jang; Sagdeev, Raold; Parsons, Ann; Evans, Larry; Starr, Richard; Hamara, Dave; Bodnarik, Julia; Williams, Jeane-Pierre; Mazarico, Erwan; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton; Murray, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    We report evidence that the Moon's diurnally modulating neutron flux is being forced by a latitude dependent mix of 1) transient hydrogen-bearing volatiles near the surface in the upper latitudes and 2) regolith temperature variation in lower latitudes. In this study we investigate diurnally varying neutron flux measurements from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector's Collimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons (LEND CSETN) and surface temperature observations from the Diviner radiometer poleward of >±45°. Our presentation shows that the modulating neutron flux is not consistent with a regolith temperature control for latitudes >70°. The anticorrelation may be evidence for transported lunar hydrogen volatiles or highly non-uniform regolith compositional dynamics. Observational evidence is consistent with regolith temperature being the source of the neutron flux modulation in the northern mare (45° to 60°) and may be related to its mafic composition and fast neutron contributions. Predictions for hypothesized regolith temperature effects are evaluated using insolation inferred from the Lunar Observing Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography.

  18. Fast Neutron Transport in the Biological Shielding Model and Other Regions of the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košťál, Michal; Milčák, Ján; Cvachovec, František; Jánský, Bohumil; Rypar, Vojtěch; Juříček, Vlastimil; Novák, Evžen; Egorov, Alexander; Zaritskiy, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    A set of benchmark experiments was carried out in the full scale VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0 in order to validate neutron transport calculation methodologies and to perform the optimization of the shape and locations of neutron flux operation monitors channels inside the shielding of the new VVER-1000 type reactors. Compared with previous experiments on the VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0, the fast neutron spectra were measured in the extended neutron energy interval (0.1-10 MeV) and new calculations were carried out with the MCNPX code using various nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B VII.0, JEFF 3.1, JENDL 3.3, JENDL 4, ROSFOND 2009, and CENDL 3.1). Measurements and calculations were carried out at different points in the mock-up. The calculation and experimental data are compared.

  19. Determination of neutron flux distribution by using ANISN, a one-dimensional discrete S sub n ordinates transport code with anisotropic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghorai, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use a one-dimensional discrete coordinates transport code called ANISN in order to determine the energy-angle-spatial distribution of neutrons in a 6-feet cube rock box which houses a D-T neutron generator at its center. The project was two-fold. The first phase of the project involved adaptation of the ANISN code written for an IBM 360/75/91 computer to the UNIVAC system at JSC. The second phase of the project was to use the code with proper geometry, source function and rock material composition in order to determine the neutron flux distribution around the rock box when a 14.1 MeV neutron generator placed at its center is activated.

  20. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Chesnut, Gary N.; Weir, Samuel T.; Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.

    2013-06-11

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The temperature of this ferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 240 K at ambient pressure at a rate of –16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of ferromagnetic order is suppressed. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 K to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the ferromagnetic ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. Furthermore, a change in ferromagnetic ordering as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure to an α-Sm type structure at high pressures.

  1. General Purpose Monte Carlo Codes for Neutron and Photon Transport Calculations based on Continuous Energy and Multigroup Methods.

    2008-02-29

    Version 00 (1) Problems to be solved: MVP/GMVP II can solve eigenvalue and fixed-source problems. The multigroup code GMVP can solve forward and adjoint problems for neutron, photon and neutron-photon coupled transport. The continuous-energy code MVP can solve only the forward problems. Both codes can also perform time-dependent calculations. (2) Geometry description: MVP/GMVP employs combinatorial geometry to describe the calculation geometry. It describes spatial regions by the combination of the 3-dimensional objects (BODIes). Currently, themore » following objects (BODIes) can be used. - BODIes with linear surfaces : half space, parallelepiped, right parallelepiped, wedge, right hexagonal prism - BODIes with quadratic surface and linear surfaces : cylinder, sphere, truncated right cone, truncated elliptic cone, ellipsoid by rotation, general ellipsoid - Arbitrary quadratic surface and torus The rectangular and hexagonal lattice geometry can be used to describe the repeated geometry. Furthermore, the statistical geometry model is available to treat coated fuel particles or pebbles for high temperature reactors. (3) Particle sources: The various forms of energy-, angle-, space- and time-dependent distribution functions can be specified. See Abstract for more detail.« less

  2. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah; Montgomery, Jeffrey M; Tsoi, Georgiy; Vohra, Yogesh; Chesnut, Gary Neal; Weir, S. T.; Tulk, Christopher A; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2013-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare-earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic (FM) order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the FM Curie temperature. The temperature of this FM transition decreases at a rate of-16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of FM order is suppressed. The neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the FM ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. A disappearance of FM ordering was observed as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa and is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed structure to an -Sm-type structure at high pressures.

  3. Application of 3-dimensional radiation transport codes to the analysis of the CRBR prototypic coolant pipe chaseway neutron streaming experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatani, K. )

    1992-08-01

    This report summarizes the calculational results from analyses of a Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) prototypic coolant pipe chaseway neutron streaming experiment Comparisons of calculated and measured results are presented, major emphasis being placed on results at bends in the chaseway. Calculations were performed with three three-dimensional radiation transport codes: the discrete ordinates code TORT and the Monte Carlo code MORSE, both developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the discrete ordinates code ENSEMBLE, developed by Japan. The calculated results from the three codes are compared (1) with previously-calculated DOT3.5 two-dimensional results, (2) among themselves, and (3) with measured results. Calculations with TORT used both the weighted-difference and nodal methods. Only the weighted-difference method was used in ENSEMBLE. When the calculated results were compared to measured results, it was found that calculation-to-experiment (C/E) ratios were good in the regions of the chaseway where two-dimensional modeling might be difficult and where there were no significant discrete ordinates ray effects. Excellent agreement was observed for responses dominated by thermal neutron contributions. MORSE-calculated results and comparisons are described also, and detailed results are presented in an appendix.

  4. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Chesnut, Gary N.; Weir, Samuel T.; Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.

    2013-06-11

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The temperature of this ferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 240 K at ambient pressure at a rate of –16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of ferromagnetic order is suppressed. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function ofmore » pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 K to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the ferromagnetic ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. Furthermore, a change in ferromagnetic ordering as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure to an α-Sm type structure at high pressures.« less

  5. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Chesnut, Gary N.; Weir, Samuel T.; Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.

    2013-08-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare-earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic (FM) order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the FM Curie temperature. The temperature of this FM transition decreases at a rate of-16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of FM order is suppressed. The neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the FM ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. A disappearance of FM ordering was observed as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa and is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed structure to an α-Sm-type structure at high pressures.

  6. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, Elliott D; Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Mosher, Scott W; Grove, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).

  7. Electrostatic design and beam transport for a folded tandem electrostatic quadrupole accelerator facility for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Vento, V Thatar; Bergueiro, J; Cartelli, D; Valda, A A; Kreiner, A J

    2011-12-01

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), we discuss here the electrostatic design of the machine, including the accelerator tubes with electrostatic quadrupoles and the simulations for the transport and acceleration of a high intensity beam.

  8. Some special properties of the neutron transport operator in bounded geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhtar-Kharroubi, M.

    1987-11-01

    Existence and nonexistence eigenvalue results are given. We also estimate the leading eigenvalue of the transport operator in terms of some geometrical parameters of the configuration space. Some results related to the criticality problem are given.

  9. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  10. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  11. Analytical Tests for Ray Effect Errors in Discrete Ordinate Methods for Solving the Neutron Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B

    2004-03-22

    This paper contains three analytical solutions of transport problems which can be used to test ray-effect errors in the numerical solutions of the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). We derived the first two solutions and the third was shown to us by M. Prasad. Since this paper is intended to be an internal LLNL report, no attempt was made to find the original derivations of the solutions in the literature in order to cite the authors for their work.

  12. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  13. Transport Properties of 2D-Electron Gas in a InGaAs/GaAs DQW in a Vicinity of Low Magnetic-Field-Induced Insulator-Quantum Hall Liquid Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapov, Yu. G.; Yakunin, M. V.; Gudina, S. V.; Harus, G. I.; Neverov, V. N.; Shelushinina, N. G.; Podgornyh, S. M.; Uskova, E. A.; Zvonkov, B. N.

    2007-04-01

    The resistivity ρ of low mobility dilute 2D-elecron gas in a InGaAs/GaAs double quantum well (DQW) exhibits the monotonic "insulating-like" temperature dependence (dρ/dT < 0) at T = 1.8-70K in zero magnetic field. This temperature interval corresponds to a ballistic regime (kBTτ/ℏ > 0.1) for our samples. We observed the coexistence of both the quantum Hall (QH) effect for the filling factors v = 2, 4 and the low magnetic field insulator — QH liquid (with v = 10) transition.

  14. Neutron transport-burnup code MCORGS and its application in fusion fission hybrid blanket conceptual research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xue-Ming; Peng, Xian-Jue

    2016-09-01

    Fusion science and technology has made progress in the last decades. However, commercialization of fusion reactors still faces challenges relating to higher fusion energy gain, irradiation-resistant material, and tritium self-sufficiency. Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactors (FFHR) can be introduced to accelerate the early application of fusion energy. Traditionally, FFHRs have been classified as either breeders or transmuters. Both need partition of plutonium from spent fuel, which will pose nuclear proliferation risks. A conceptual design of a Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactor for Energy (FFHR-E), which can make full use of natural uranium with lower nuclear proliferation risk, is presented. The fusion core parameters are similar to those of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. An alloy of natural uranium and zirconium is adopted in the fission blanket, which is cooled by light water. In order to model blanket burnup problems, a linkage code MCORGS, which couples MCNP4B and ORIGEN-S, is developed and validated through several typical benchmarks. The average blanket energy Multiplication and Tritium Breeding Ratio can be maintained at 10 and 1.15 respectively over tens of years of continuous irradiation. If simple reprocessing without separation of plutonium from uranium is adopted every few years, FFHR-E can achieve better neutronic performance. MCORGS has also been used to analyze the ultra-deep burnup model of Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) from LLNL, and a new blanket design that uses Pb instead of Be as the neutron multiplier is proposed. In addition, MCORGS has been used to simulate the fluid transmuter model of the In-Zinerater from Sandia. A brief comparison of LIFE, In-Zinerater, and FFHR-E will be given.

  15. Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

  16. An Intercomparison of 2-D Models Within a Common Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.; Considine, David B.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A model intercomparison among the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) 2-D model, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D model, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D model allows us to separate differences due to model transport from those due to the model's chemical formulation. This is accomplished by constructing two hybrid models incorporating the transport parameters of the GSFC and LLNL models within the AER model framework. By comparing the results from the native models (AER and e.g. GSFC) with those from the hybrid model (e.g. AER chemistry with GSFC transport), differences due to chemistry and transport can be identified. For the analysis, we examined an inert tracer whose emission pattern is based on emission from a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) fleet; distributions of trace species in the 2015 atmosphere; and the response of stratospheric ozone to an HSCT fleet. Differences in NO(y) in the upper stratosphere are found between models with identical transport, implying different model representations of atmospheric chemical processes. The response of O3 concentration to HSCT aircraft emissions differs in the models from both transport-dominated differences in the HSCT-induced perturbations of H2O and NO(y) as well as from differences in the model represent at ions of O3 chemical processes. The model formulations of cold polar processes are found to be the most significant factor in creating large differences in the calculated ozone perturbations

  17. Quantitative imaging of water transport in soil and roots using neutron radiography, D2O and a new numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, M.; Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is currently limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure the water fluxes in soil and plants. Our study aimed to develop a new non-destructive method to measure the local fluxes of water into roots of plants growing in soils. We injected deuterated water (D2O) near the roots of lupines growing in sandy soils, and we used neutron radiography to image the transport of D2O through the root system. The experiments were performed during day, when plants were transpiring, and at night, when transpiration was reduced. The radiographs showed that: 1) the radial transport of D2O from soil and roots depended similarly to diffusion and convection; and 2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To determine the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we simulated the D2O transport in soils and roots. A dual porosity model was used to describe the apoplastic and symplastic pathways of water across the root tissue. Other features such as the endodermis and the xylem were also included in the model. The D2O transport was modelled solving a convection-diffusion numerical model in soil and plants. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that at night the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modelling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots. For 24 day-old lupine grown in a sandy soil with uniform water content, our modelling results showed that root water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the roots near soil surface and it decreased toward the distal parts. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along root systems growing in soils. Future applications of this method include the characterization of varying root systems, the radial and axial hydraulic conductivity of different root

  18. Pillar Structured Thermal Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R; Conway, A; Reinhardt, C; Graff, R; Wang, T; Deo, N; Cheung, C

    2008-06-10

    This work describes an innovative solid state device structure that leverages advanced semiconductor fabrication technology to produce an efficient device for thermal neutron detection which we have coined the 'Pillar Detector'. State-of-the-art thermal neutron detectors have shortcomings in simultaneously achieving high efficiency, low operating voltage while maintaining adequate fieldability performance. By using a three dimensional silicon PIN diode pillar array filled with isotopic {sup 10}boron ({sup 10}B), a high efficiency device is theoretically possible. Here we review the design considerations for going from a 2-D to 3-D device and discuss the materials trade-offs. The relationship between the geometrical features and efficiency within our 3-D device is investigated by Monte Carlo radiation transport method coupled with finite element drift-diffusion carrier transport simulations. To benchmark our simulations and validate the predicted efficiency scaling, experimental results of a prototype device are illustrated. The fabricated pillar structures reported in this work are composed of 2 {micro}m diameter silicon pillars with a 2 {micro}m spacing and pillar height of 12 {micro}m. The pillar detector with a 12 {micro}m height achieved a thermal neutron detection efficiency of 7.3% at a reverse bias of -2 V.

  19. The use of symbolic computation in radiative, energy, and neutron transport calculations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, J.I.

    1997-09-01

    This investigation used sysmbolic manipulation in developing analytical methods and general computational strategies for solving both linear and nonlinear, regular and singular integral and integro-differential equations which appear in radiative and mixed-mode energy transport. Contained in this report are seven papers which present the technical results as individual modules.

  20. Updated version of the DOT 4 one- and two-dimensional neutron/photon transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, W.A.; Childs, R.L.

    1982-07-01

    DOT 4 is designed to allow very large transport problems to be solved on a wide range of computers and memory arrangements. Unusual flexibilty in both space-mesh and directional-quadrature specification is allowed. For example, the radial mesh in an R-Z problem can vary with axial position. The directional quadrature can vary with both space and energy group. Several features improve performance on both deep penetration and criticality problems. The program has been checked and used extensively.

  1. General Purpose Monte Carlo Multigroup Neutron and Gamma-Ray Transport Code System with Array Geometry Capability. We recommend C00474/ALLCP/02 MORSE-CGA.

    1991-05-01

    Version 00 MORSE-CGA was developed to add the capability of modelling rectangular lattices for nuclear reactor cores or for multipartitioned structures. It thus enhances the capability of the MORSE code system. The MORSE code is a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. It has been designed as a tool for solving most shielding problems. Through the use of multigroup cross sections, the solution of neutron, gamma-ray, or coupled neutron-gamma-ray problems may be obtainedmore » in either the forward or adjoint mode. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry may be used with an albedo option available at any material surface. Isotropic or anisotropic scattering up to a P16 expansion of the angular distribution is allowed.« less

  2. Transport and Mixing of r-process Elements in Neutron Star Binary Merger Blast Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Naiman, Jill; Shen, Sijing; Lee, William H.

    2016-10-01

    The r-process nuclei are robustly synthesized in the material ejected during neutron star binary mergers (NSBMs). If NSBMs are indeed solely responsible for the solar system r-process abundances, a galaxy like our own would be required to host a few NSBMs per million years, with each event ejecting, on average, about 5 × 10‑2 M ⊙ of r-process material. Because the ejecta velocities in the tidal tail are significantly larger than those in ordinary supernovae, NSBMs deposit a comparable amount of energy into the ISM. In contrast to extensive efforts studying spherical models for supernova remnant evolution, calculations quantifying the impact of NSBM ejecta in the ISM have been lacking. To better understand their evolution, we perform a suite of three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of isolated NSBM ejecta expanding in environments with conditions adopted from Milky-Way-like galaxy simulations. Although the remnant morphology is highly complex at early times, the subsequent radiative evolution is remarkably similar to that of a standard supernova. This implies that sub-resolution supernova feedback models can be used in galaxy-scale simulations that are unable to resolve the key evolutionary phases of NSBMs. Among other quantities, we examine the radius, mass, and kinetic energy content of the remnant at shell formation. We find that the shell formation epoch is attained when the swept-up mass is about 103(n H/1 cm‑3)‑2/7 M ⊙ at this point, the mass fraction of r-process material is enhanced up to two orders of magnitude in relation to a solar metallicity ISM.

  3. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheisari, R.; Firoozabadi, M. M.; Mohammadi, H.

    2014-01-01

    A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN) production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN) flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source) was modeled based on an arrangement of D2O and solid D2 (sD2). The D2O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD2 as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D) neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (ρ - z) geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD2. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD2 volume) equal to 6.79 × 106 cm-2s-1 and 2.20 ×105 cm-3s-1, respectively.

  4. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Gheisari, R.; Firoozabadi, M. M.; Mohammadi, H.

    2014-01-15

    A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN) production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN) flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source) was modeled based on an arrangement of D{sub 2}O and solid D{sub 2} (sD{sub 2}). The D{sub 2}O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD{sub 2} as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D) neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (ρ − z) geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD{sub 2}. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD{sub 2} volume) equal to 6.79 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} and 2.20 ×10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}s{sup −1}, respectively.

  5. Simulation of PWR plant by a new version of TRAC-PF1 code including a three-dimensional neutronic model and a transport boron model

    SciTech Connect

    Alloggio, G.; Brega, E.; Basile, D.; Guandalini, R.; Pollachini, L.

    1996-08-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting a solution method for time-dependent problems coupling thermal-hydraulic behavior and neutronic changes during selected transients in Pressurized Water Reactors. A two-group three-dimensional reactor kinetics model, based on the Analytical Nodal Method with a detailed feedback model, has been implemented in TRAC-PF1 code replacing the original point-kinetics approximation. A geometry conversion was done to match, in the core discretization, the cylindrical geometry of the TRAC-PF1 with the Cartesian geometry of the three-dimensional neutronic model. In this version of TRAC-PFI, named TRAC-EN for IBM computers, a Boron transport model has been implemented. The transient Boron concentration is computed from a Boron mass balance after the coolant mass, energy and momentum balances have been completed. In order to evaluate the new code capabilities, a model of the two-loops 600 MW Westinghouse reactor was implemented. Some specific PWR transients that exhibit interesting nuclear and thermal-hydraulic responses, e.g., control rod ejection and pressurization transients, are presented. To check the Boron transport model, a local Boron dilution transient was analyzed. The results obtained by using the space and time dependent neutronic model can not be predicted by point kinetics approximation. Furthermore, some events that apparently concern only the core, are also involving the primary circuit the responses of which can not be neglected because they affect the neutronic behavior.

  6. Preliminary time-of-flight neutron diffraction studies of Escherichia coli ABC transport receptor phosphate-binding protein at the Protein Crystallography Station

    PubMed Central

    Sippel, K. H.; Bacik, J.; Quiocho, F. A.; Fisher, S. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate is an essential molecule for all known life. Organisms have developed many mechanisms to ensure an adequate supply, even in low-phosphate conditions. In prokaryotes phosphate transport is instigated by the phosphate-binding protein (PBP), the initial receptor for the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) phosphate transporter. In the crystal structure of the PBP–phosphate complex, the phosphate is completely desolvated and sequestered in a deep cleft and is bound by 13 hydrogen bonds: 12 to protein NH and OH donor groups and one to a carboxylate acceptor group. The carboxylate plays a key recognition role by accepting a phosphate hydrogen. PBP phosphate affinity is relatively consistent across a broad pH range, indicating the capacity to bind monobasic (H2PO4 −) and dibasic (HPO4 2−) phosphate; however, the mechanism by which it might accommodate the second hydrogen of monobasic phosphate is unclear. To answer this question, neutron diffraction studies were initiated. Large single crystals with a volume of 8 mm3 were grown and subjected to hydrogen/deuterium exchange. A 2.5 Å resolution data set was collected on the Protein Crystallography Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Initial refinement of the neutron data shows significant nuclear density, and refinement is ongoing. This is the first report of a neutron study from this superfamily. PMID:24915101

  7. Utilization of Monte Carlo Calculations in Radiation Transport Analyses to Support the Design of the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    2000-10-23

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has given the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project approval to begin Title I design of the proposed facility to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and construction is scheduled to commence in FY01 . The SNS initially will consist of an accelerator system capable of delivering an {approximately}0.5 microsecond pulse of 1 GeV protons, at a 60 Hz frequency, with 1 MW of beam power, into a single target station. The SNS will eventually be upgraded to a 2 MW facility with two target stations (a 60 Hz station and a 10 Hz station). The radiation transport analysis, which includes the neutronic, shielding, activation, and safety analyses, is critical to the design of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed SNS, and the Monte Carlo method is the cornerstone of the radiation transport analyses.

  8. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  9. Comparison of the 3-D Deterministic Neutron Transport Code Attila® To Measure Data, MCNP And MCNPX For The Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    D. Scott Lucas; D. S. Lucas

    2005-09-01

    An LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project is underway at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to apply the three-dimensional multi-group deterministic neutron transport code (Attila®) to criticality, flux and depletion calculations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper discusses the development of Attila models for ATR, capabilities of Attila, the generation and use of different cross-section libraries, and comparisons to ATR data, MCNP, MCNPX and future applications.

  10. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  11. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  12. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  13. Coupled multi-group neutron photon transport for the simulation of high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.

    2009-08-01

    The accurate and efficient simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems is necessary for several important radiation detection applications. Examples include the detection of nuclear threats concealed in cargo containers and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for nondestructive determination of elemental composition of unknown samples.

  14. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  15. Development and characterization of a high yield transportable pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rishi; Mishra, Ekansh; Dhang, Prosenjit; Sagar, Karuna; Meena, Manraj; Shyam, Anurag

    2016-09-01

    The results of characterization experiments carried out on a newly developed dense plasma focus device based intense pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system are reported. Its high current sealed pseudospark switch based low inductance capacitor bank with maximum stored energy of ˜10 kJ is segregated into four modules of ˜2.5 kJ each and it cumulatively delivers peak current in the range of 400 kA-600 kA (corresponding to charging voltage range of 14 kV-18 kV) in a quarter time period of ˜2 μs. The neutron yield performance of this device has been optimized by discretely varying deuterium filling gas pressure in the range of 6 mbar-11 mbar at ˜17 kV/550 kA discharge. At ˜7 kJ/8.5 mbar operation, the average neutron yield has been measured to be in the order of ˜4 × 109 neutrons/pulse which is the highest ever reported neutron yield from a plasma focus device with the same stored energy. The average forward to radial anisotropy in neutron yield is found to be ˜2. The entire system is contained on a moveable trolley having dimensions 1.5 m × 1 m × 0.7 m and its operation and control (up to the distance of 25 m) are facilitated through optically isolated handheld remote console. The overall compactness of this system provides minimum proximity to small as well as large samples for irradiation. The major intended application objective of this high neutron yield dense plasma focus device development is to explore the feasibility of active neutron interrogation experiments by utilization of intense pulsed neutron sources.

  16. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  17. Characterization of the high-energy neutron beam of the PRISMA beamline using a diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Frost, C. D.; Minniti, T.; Schooneveld, E.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-07-01

    The high-energy neutron component (En > 10 MeV) of the neutron spectrum of PRISMA, a beam-line at the ISIS spallation source, has been characterized for the first time. Neutron measurements using a Single-crystal Diamond Detector at a short-pulse source are obtained by a combination of pulse height and time of flight analysis. An XY scan provides a 2D map of the high-energy neutron beam which has a diameter of about 40 mm. The high neutron flux, that has been found to be (3.8 ± 0.7) · 105 cm‑2s‑1 for En > 10 MeV in the centre, opens up for a possible application of the beam-line as a high-energy neutron irradiation position. Results are of interest for the development of the ChipIR beam-line, which will feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for chip irradiation experiment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that diamond detectors can be used at spallation sources to investigate the transport of high-energy neutrons down instruments which is of interest in general to designers as high-energy neutrons are a source of background in thermal beamlines.

  18. Characterization of the high-energy neutron beam of the PRISMA beamline using a diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Frost, C. D.; Minniti, T.; Schooneveld, E.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-07-01

    The high-energy neutron component (En > 10 MeV) of the neutron spectrum of PRISMA, a beam-line at the ISIS spallation source, has been characterized for the first time. Neutron measurements using a Single-crystal Diamond Detector at a short-pulse source are obtained by a combination of pulse height and time of flight analysis. An XY scan provides a 2D map of the high-energy neutron beam which has a diameter of about 40 mm. The high neutron flux, that has been found to be (3.8 ± 0.7) · 105 cm-2s-1 for En > 10 MeV in the centre, opens up for a possible application of the beam-line as a high-energy neutron irradiation position. Results are of interest for the development of the ChipIR beam-line, which will feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for chip irradiation experiment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that diamond detectors can be used at spallation sources to investigate the transport of high-energy neutrons down instruments which is of interest in general to designers as high-energy neutrons are a source of background in thermal beamlines.

  19. 2d PDE Linear Asymmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ILUCG2 (Incomplete LU factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d problems) was developed to solve a linear asymmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as plasma diffusion, equilibria, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These equations share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized with finite-difference or finite-elementmore » methods, the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ILUCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. A generalization of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For problems having a symmetric matrix ICCG2 should be used since it runs up to four times faster and uses approximately 30% less storage. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source, containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  20. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  1. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  2. 2D materials: to graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2011-01-01

    This review is an attempt to illustrate the different alternatives in the field of 2D materials. Graphene seems to be just the tip of the iceberg and we show how the discovery of alternative 2D materials is starting to show the rest of this iceberg. The review comprises the current state-of-the-art of the vast literature in concepts and methods already known for isolation and characterization of graphene, and rationalizes the quite disperse literature in other 2D materials such as metal oxides, hydroxides and chalcogenides, and metal-organic frameworks.

  3. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  4. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  5. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  6. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  7. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  8. FASTER 3: A generalized-geometry Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    A description of the FASTER-III program for Monte Carlo Carlo calculation of photon and neutron transport in complex geometries is presented. Major revisions include the capability of calculating minimum weight shield configurations for primary and secondary radiation and optimal importance sampling parameters. The program description includes a users manual describing the preparation of input data cards, the printout from a sample problem including the data card images, definitions of Fortran variables, the program logic, and the control cards required to run on the IBM 7094, IBM 360, UNIVAC 1108 and CDC 6600 computers.

  9. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  10. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  11. The relative diffusive transport rate of SrI2 in water changes over the nanometer length scale as measured by coherent quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Faraone, Antonio

    2016-05-14

    X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to provide insight into the structures of ionic solutions for over a century, but the probes have covered distances shorter than 8 Å. For the non-hydrolyzing salt SrI2 in aqueous solution, a locally ordered lattice of ions exists that scatters slow neutrons coherently down to at least 0.1 mol L(-1) concentration, where the measured average distance between scatterers is over 18 Å. To investigate the motions of these scatterers, coherent quasielastic neutron scattering (CQENS) data on D2O solutions with SrI2 at 1, 0.8, 0.6, and 0.4 mol L(-1) concentrations was obtained to provide an experimental measure of the diffusive transport rate for the motion between pairs of ions relative to each other. Because CQENS measures the motion of one ion relative to another, the frame of reference is centered on an ion, which is unique among all diffusion measurement methods. We call the measured quantity the pairwise diffusive transport rate Dp. In addition to this ion centered frame of reference, the diffusive transport rate can be measured as a function of the momentum transfer q, where q = (4π/λ)sin θ with a scattering angle of 2θ. Since q is related to the interion distance (d = 2π/q), for the experimental range 0.2 Å(-1)≤q≤ 1.0 Å(-1), Dp is, then, measured over interion distances from 40 Å to ≈6 Å. We find the measured diffusional transport rates increase with increasing distance between scatterers over the entire range covered and interpret this behavior to be caused by dynamic coupling among the ions. Within the model of Fickian diffusion, at the longer interionic distances Dp is greater than the Nernst-Hartley value for an infinitely dilute solution. For these nm-distance diffusional transport rates to conform with the lower, macroscopically measured diffusion coefficients, we propose that local, coordinated counter motion of at least pairs of ions is part of the transport process. PMID:27096293

  12. Glitter in a 2D monolayer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-10-21

    We predict a highly stable and robust atomically thin gold monolayer with a hexagonal close packed lattice stabilized by metallic bonding with contributions from strong relativistic effects and aurophilic interactions. We have shown that the framework of the Au monolayer can survive 10 ps MD annealing simulations up to 1400 K. The framework is also able to survive large motions out of the plane. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk we observe significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.94 vs. 0.52 eV per bond). This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. It is a non-magnetic metal, and was found to be the global minima in the 2D space. Phonon dispersion calculations demonstrate high kinetic stability with no negative modes. This 2D gold monolayer corresponds to the top monolayer of the bulk Au(111) face-centered cubic lattice. The close-packed lattice maximizes the aurophilic interactions. We find that the electrons are completely delocalized in the plane and behave as 2D nearly free electron gas. We hope that the present work can inspire the experimental fabrication of novel free standing 2D metal systems.

  13. 2d index and surface operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadde, Abhijit; Gukov, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we compute the superconformal index of 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theories. The 2d superconformal index, a.k.a. flavored elliptic genus, is computed by a unitary matrix integral much like the matrix integral that computes the 4d superconformal index. We compute the 2d index explicitly for a number of examples. In the case of abelian gauge theories we see that the index is invariant under flop transition and under CY-LG correspondence. The index also provides a powerful check of the Seiberg-type duality for non-abelian gauge theories discovered by Hori and Tong. In the later half of the paper, we study half-BPS surface operators in = 2 super-conformal gauge theories. They are engineered by coupling the 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theory living on the support of the surface operator to the 4d = 2 theory, so that different realizations of the same surface operator with a given Levi type are related by a 2d analogue of the Seiberg duality. The index of this coupled system is computed by using the tools developed in the first half of the paper. The superconformal index in the presence of surface defect is expected to be invariant under generalized S-duality. We demonstrate that it is indeed the case. In doing so the Seiberg-type duality of the 2d theory plays an important role.

  14. Boronophenylalanine, a boron delivery agent for boron neutron capture therapy, is transported by ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2

    PubMed Central

    Wongthai, Printip; Hagiwara, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Wei, Ling; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kato, Itsuro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy relies on the selective delivery of boron carriers to malignant cells. p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA), a boron delivery agent, has been proposed to be localized to cells through transporter-mediated mechanisms. In this study, we screened aromatic amino acid transporters to identify BPA transporters. Human aromatic amino acid transporters were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined for BPA uptake and kinetic parameters. The roles of the transporters in BPA uptake were characterized in cancer cell lines. For the quantitative assessment of BPA uptake, HPLC was used throughout the study. Among aromatic amino acid transporters, ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2 were found to transport BPA with Km values of 137.4 ± 11.7, 20.3 ± 0.8 and 88.3 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Uptake experiments in cancer cell lines revealed that the LAT1 protein amount was the major determinant of BPA uptake at 100 μM, whereas the contribution of ATB0,+ became significant at 1000 μM, accounting for 20–25% of the total BPA uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2 transport BPA at affinities comparable with their endogenous substrates, suggesting that they could mediate effective BPA uptake in vivo. The high and low affinities of LAT1 and ATB0,+, respectively, differentiate their roles in BPA uptake. ATB0,+, as well as LAT1, could contribute significantly to the tumor accumulation of BPA at clinical dose. PMID:25580517

  15. Effect of resonance structure on 14-MeV Monte Carlo neutron transport in nitrogen and air

    SciTech Connect

    Plechaty, E.F.

    1982-10-20

    The results of Monte Carlo calculations can be sensitive to methods used to treat cross sections. This sensitivity can be emphasized by studying one isotope of an element or material that has a resonance region. Very few naturally occurring materials exist in a mono-isotopic form, but when such a material is an important part of a problem, care should be exercised in the selection of a code to be used for the calculations. It is recommended that the ALICE code, that uses a multiband treatment for cross sections, be used at LLNL for neutronic and neutron-induced photonic problems.

  16. Sodium Ion Transport Mechanisms in Antiperovskite Electrolytes Na3OBr and Na4OI2: An in Situ Neutron Diffraction Study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Yonggang; Li, Shuai; Howard, John W; Neuefeind, Jörg; Ren, Yang; Wang, Hui; Liang, Chengdu; Yang, Wenge; Zou, Ruqiang; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-06-20

    Na-rich antiperovskites are recently developed solid electrolytes with enhanced sodium ionic conductivity and show promising functionality as a novel solid electrolyte in an all solid-state battery. In this work, the sodium ionic transport pathways of the parent compound Na3OBr, as well as the modified layered antiperovskite Na4OI2, were studied and compared through temperature-dependent neutron diffraction combined with the maximum entropy method. In the cubic Na3OBr antiperovskite, the nuclear density distribution maps at 500 K indicate that sodium ions hop within and among oxygen octahedra, and Br(-) ions are not involved. In the tetragonal Na4OI2 antiperovskite, Na ions, which connect octahedra in the ab plane, have the lowest activation energy barrier. The transport of sodium ions along the c axis is assisted by I(-) ions. PMID:27251879

  17. Comparison of Analysis Results Between 2D/1D Synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G in the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung Lim, Mi; Maeng, Young Jae; Fero, Arnold H.; Anderson, Stanwood L.

    2016-02-01

    The 2D/1D synthesis methodology has been used to calculate the fast neutron (E > 1.0 MeV) exposure to the beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel. This method uses the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinates code and the BUGLE-96 cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VI. RAPTOR-M3G (RApid Parallel Transport Of Radiation-Multiple 3D Geometries) which performs full 3D calculations was developed and is based on domain decomposition algorithms, where the spatial and angular domains are allocated and processed on multi-processor computer architecture. As compared to traditional single-processor applications, this approach reduces the computational load as well as the memory requirement per processor. Both methods are applied to surveillance test results for the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP)-OPR (Optimized Power Reactor) 1000 MW. The objective of this paper is to compare the results of the KSNP surveillance program between 2D/1D synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G. Each operating KSNP has a reactor vessel surveillance program consisting of six surveillance capsules located between the core and the reactor vessel in the downcomer region near the reactor vessel wall. In addition to the In-Vessel surveillance program, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry (EVND) program has been implemented. In order to estimate surveillance test results, cycle-specific forward transport calculations were performed by 2D/1D synthesis and by RAPTOR-M3G. The ratio between measured and calculated (M/C) reaction rates will be discussed. The current plan is to install an EVND system in all of the Korea PWRs including the new reactor type, APR (Advanced Power Reactor) 1400 MW. This work will play an important role in establishing a KSNP-specific database of surveillance test results and will employ RAPTOR-M3G for surveillance dosimetry location as well as positions in the KSNP reactor vessel.

  18. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule—CN—noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  19. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  20. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology. PMID:27541575

  1. 2D numerical modelling of meandering channel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    XIAO, Y.; ZHOU, G.; YANG, F. S.

    2016-03-01

    A 2D depth-averaged model for hydrodynamic sediment transport and river morphological adjustment was established. The sediment transport submodel takes into account the influence of non-uniform sediment with bed surface armoring and considers the impact of secondary flow in the direction of bed-load transport and transverse slope of the river bed. The bank erosion submodel incorporates a simple simulation method for updating bank geometry during either degradational or aggradational bed evolution. Comparison of the results obtained by the extended model with experimental and field data, and numerical predictions validate that the proposed model can simulate grain sorting in river bends and duplicate the characteristics of meandering river and its development. The results illustrate that by using its control factors, the improved numerical model can be applied to simulate channel evolution under different scenarios and improve understanding of patterning processes.

  2. Comparison of light transport-incorporated MCNPX and FLUKA codes in generating organic scintillators responses to neutrons and gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, M.; Ghal-Eh, N.

    2015-08-01

    The NE102 plastic scintillator response to 137Cs gamma rays and NE213 liquid scintillator response to both mono-energetic and 241Am-Be neutrons have been modeled using FLUKA's EVENTBIN and MCNPX's PTRAC cards. The comparison made in different energy regions confirms that the overall difference is less than 6%.

  3. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  4. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  5. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  6. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  7. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  8. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  9. Pore characteristics and their emergent effect on water adsorption and transport in clays using small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hartl, M.; Wang, Y.; Hjelm, R.

    2013-12-01

    In nuclear waste management, clays are canonical materials in the construction of engineered barriers. They are also naturally occurring reactive minerals which play an important role in retention and colloidal facilitated reactive transport in subsurface systems. Knowledge of total and accessible porosity in clays is crucial in determining fluids transport behavior in clays. It will provide fundamental insight on the performance efficiency of specific clays as a barrier material and their role in regulating radionuclide transport in subsurface environments. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the change in pore characteristics of clays as function of moisture content, and to determine their pore character in relation to their water retention capacity. Recent developments in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques allow quantitative measurement of pore morphology and size distribution of various materials in their pristine state under various sample environments (exposure to solution, high temperature, and so on). Furthermore, due to dramatic different neutron scattering properties of hydrogen and deuterium, one can readily use contrast variation, which is the isotopic labeling with various ratios of H and D (e.g. mixture of H2O/D2O) to highlight or suppress features of the sample. This is particularly useful in the study of complex pore system such as clays. In this study, we have characterized the pore structures for a number of clays including clay minerals and field samples which are relevant to high-level waste systems under various sample environments (e.g., humidity, temperature and pressure) using SANS. Our results suggest that different clays show unique pore features under various sample environments. To distinguish between accessible/non-accessible pores and the nature of pore filling (e.g. the quantity of H2O adsorbed by clays, and the distribution of H2O in relation to pore character) to water, clays were exposed for

  10. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  11. PARCEQ2D heat transfer grid sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Saladino, A.J.; Praharaj, S.C.; Collins, F.G. Tennessee Univ., Tullahoma )

    1991-01-01

    The material presented in this paper is an extension of two-dimensional Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) results shown previously. This study has focused on the heating rate calculations to the AFE obtained from an equilibrium real gas code, with attention placed on the sensitivity of grid dependence and wall temperature. Heat transfer results calculated by the PARCEQ2D code compare well with those computed by other researchers. Temperature convergence in the case of kinetic transport has been accomplished by increasing the wall temperature gradually from 300 K to the wall temperature of 1700 K. 28 refs.

  12. PARCEQ2D heat transfer grid sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saladino, Anthony J.; Praharaj, Sarat C.; Collins, Frank G.

    1991-01-01

    The material presented in this paper is an extension of two-dimensional Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) results shown previously. This study has focused on the heating rate calculations to the AFE obtained from an equilibrium real gas code, with attention placed on the sensitivity of grid dependence and wall temperature. Heat transfer results calculated by the PARCEQ2D code compare well with those computed by other researchers. Temperature convergence in the case of kinetic transport has been accomplished by increasing the wall temperature gradually from 300 K to the wall temperature of 1700 K.

  13. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  14. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  15. Using Neutron Radiography to Quantify Water Transport and the Degree of Saturation in Entrained Air Cement Based Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Catherine L.; Bentz, Dale P.; Hussey, Daniel S.; Jacobson, David L.; Weiss, W. Jason

    Air entrainment is commonly added to concrete to help in reducing the potential for freeze thaw damage. It is hypothesized that the entrained air voids remain unsaturated or partially saturated long after the smaller pores fill with water. Small gel and capillary pores in the cement matrix fill quickly on exposure to water, but larger pores (entrapped and entrained air voids) require longer times or other methods to achieve saturation. As such, it is important to quantitatively determine the water content and degree of saturation in air entrained cementitious materials. In order to further investigate properties of cement-based mortar, a model based on Beer's Law has been developed to interpret neutron radiographs. This model is a powerful tool for analyzing images acquired from neutron radiography. A mortar with a known volume of aggregate, water to cement ratio and degree of hydration can be imaged and the degree of saturation can be estimated.

  16. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  17. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  18. Report of the 1988 2-D Intercomparison Workshop, chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Brasseur, Guy; Soloman, Susan; Guthrie, Paul D.; Garcia, Rolando; Yung, Yuk L.; Gray, Lesley J.; Tung, K. K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Isaken, Ivar

    1989-01-01

    Several factors contribute to the errors encountered. With the exception of the line-by-line model, all of the models employ simplifying assumptions that place fundamental limits on their accuracy and range of validity. For example, all 2-D modeling groups use the diffusivity factor approximation. This approximation produces little error in tropospheric H2O and CO2 cooling rates, but can produce significant errors in CO2 and O3 cooling rates at the stratopause. All models suffer from fundamental uncertainties in shapes and strengths of spectral lines. Thermal flux algorithms being used in 2-D tracer tranport models produce cooling rates that differ by as much as 40 percent for the same input model atmosphere. Disagreements of this magnitude are important since the thermal cooling rates must be subtracted from the almost-equal solar heating rates to derive the net radiative heating rates and the 2-D model diabatic circulation. For much of the annual cycle, the net radiative heating rates are comparable in magnitude to the cooling rate differences described. Many of the models underestimate the cooling rates in the middle and lower stratosphere. The consequences of these errors for the net heating rates and the diabatic circulation will depend on their meridional structure, which was not tested here. Other models underestimate the cooling near 1 mbar. Suchs errors pose potential problems for future interactive ozone assessment studies, since they could produce artificially-high temperatures and increased O3 destruction at these levels. These concerns suggest that a great deal of work is needed to improve the performance of thermal cooling rate algorithms used in the 2-D tracer transport models.

  19. 2-D soft x-ray arrays in the EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kaiyun; Xu, Liqing; Hu, Liqun; Duan, Yanmin; Li, Xueqin; Yuan, Yi; Mao, Songtao; Sheng, Xiuli; Zhao, Jinlong

    2016-06-01

    A high spatial and temporal resolution soft x-ray (SXR) imaging diagnostic has been installed in EAST for the study of magnetohydrodynamics activities and core high-Z impurity transport. Up to 122 lines of sight view the poloidal plasma from three directions (two up-down symmetrical horizontal arrays and one vertical array), which renders the diagnostic able to provide detailed tomographic reconstructions under various conditions. Fourier-Bessel method based on flux coordinates was employed for 2-D SXR tomographic reconstruction. Examples of several events measured by SXR diagnostic in EAST are shown, namely the crash patterns of sawtooth, periodical burst of edge localized modes, and the transport of high-Z intrinsic impurities.

  20. Interpretive 2-D treatment of scrape-off-layer plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M.; Allen, A.; Daughton, W.

    1996-12-31

    The width of the scrape-off-layer in a tokamak is determined by cross field transport. In Alcator C-mod the plasma parameters in the scrape-off-layer are measured at upstream and divertor plate locations. We solve a 2-D scrape-off-layer heat conduction equation in the flux geometry (as determined by EFIT) of the C-mod experiment. Bolometric measurements are utilized for the radiative loss term. We use the end wall probe measurements of electron temperature as a boundary condition and the fast scanning probe measurements of upstream temperature are treated as constraints to determine the cross field transport and thermal conductivity. Results are compared with 1-D onion-skin-model predictions.

  1. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  2. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  3. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  4. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  5. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  6. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  7. 2D photonic-crystal optomechanical nanoresonator.

    PubMed

    Makles, K; Antoni, T; Kuhn, A G; Deléglise, S; Briant, T; Cohadon, P-F; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Pinard, L; Michel, C; Dolique, V; Flaminio, R; Cagnoli, G; Robert-Philip, I; Heidmann, A

    2015-01-15

    We present the optical optimization of an optomechanical device based on a suspended InP membrane patterned with a 2D near-wavelength grating (NWG) based on a 2D photonic-crystal geometry. We first identify by numerical simulation a set of geometrical parameters providing a reflectivity higher than 99.8% over a 50-nm span. We then study the limitations induced by the finite value of the optical waist and lateral size of the NWG pattern using different numerical approaches. The NWG grating, pierced in a suspended InP 265-nm thick membrane, is used to form a compact microcavity involving the suspended nanomembrane as an end mirror. The resulting cavity has a waist size smaller than 10 μm and a finesse in the 200 range. It is used to probe the Brownian motion of the mechanical modes of the nanomembrane. PMID:25679837

  8. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  9. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  10. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  11. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  12. Magnetic gating of a 2D topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiaoqian; Burton, J D; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y

    2016-09-28

    Deterministic control of transport properties through manipulation of spin states is one of the paradigms of spintronics. Topological insulators offer a new playground for exploring interesting spin-dependent phenomena. Here, we consider a ferromagnetic 'gate' representing a magnetic adatom coupled to the topologically protected edge state of a two-dimensional (2D) topological insulator to modulate the electron transmission of the edge state. Due to the locked spin and wave vector of the transport electrons the transmission across the magnetic gate depends on the mutual orientation of the adatom magnetic moment and the current. If the Fermi energy matches an exchange-split bound state of the adatom, the electron transmission can be blocked due to the full back scattering of the incident wave. This antiresonance behavior is controlled by the adatom magnetic moment orientation so that the transmission of the edge state can be changed from 1 to 0. Expanding this consideration to a ferromagnetic gate representing a 1D chain of atoms shows a possibility to control the spin-dependent current of a strip of a 2D topological insulator by magnetization orientation of the ferromagnetic gate. PMID:27437829

  13. Magnetic gating of a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Xiaoqian; Burton, J. D.; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-09-01

    Deterministic control of transport properties through manipulation of spin states is one of the paradigms of spintronics. Topological insulators offer a new playground for exploring interesting spin-dependent phenomena. Here, we consider a ferromagnetic ‘gate’ representing a magnetic adatom coupled to the topologically protected edge state of a two-dimensional (2D) topological insulator to modulate the electron transmission of the edge state. Due to the locked spin and wave vector of the transport electrons the transmission across the magnetic gate depends on the mutual orientation of the adatom magnetic moment and the current. If the Fermi energy matches an exchange-split bound state of the adatom, the electron transmission can be blocked due to the full back scattering of the incident wave. This antiresonance behavior is controlled by the adatom magnetic moment orientation so that the transmission of the edge state can be changed from 1 to 0. Expanding this consideration to a ferromagnetic gate representing a 1D chain of atoms shows a possibility to control the spin-dependent current of a strip of a 2D topological insulator by magnetization orientation of the ferromagnetic gate.

  14. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  16. A variable-order time-dependent neutron transport method for nuclear reactor kinetics using analytically-integrated space-time characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A. J.; Lee, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    A new time-dependent neutron transport method based on the method of characteristics (MOC) has been developed. Whereas most spatial kinetics methods treat time dependence through temporal discretization, this new method treats time dependence by defining the characteristics to span space and time. In this implementation regions are defined in space-time where the thickness of the region in time fulfills an analogous role to the time step in discretized methods. The time dependence of the local source is approximated using a truncated Taylor series expansion with high order derivatives approximated using backward differences, permitting the solution of the resulting space-time characteristic equation. To avoid a drastic increase in computational expense and memory requirements due to solving many discrete characteristics in the space-time planes, the temporal variation of the boundary source is similarly approximated. This allows the characteristics in the space-time plane to be represented analytically rather than discretely, resulting in an algorithm comparable in implementation and expense to one that arises from conventional time integration techniques. Furthermore, by defining the boundary flux time derivative in terms of the preceding local source time derivative and boundary flux time derivative, the need to store angularly-dependent data is avoided without approximating the angular dependence of the angular flux time derivative. The accuracy of this method is assessed through implementation in the neutron transport code DeCART. The method is employed with variable-order local source representation to model a TWIGL transient. The results demonstrate that this method is accurate and more efficient than the discretized method. (authors)

  17. Interfacing graphene and related 2D materials with the 3D world.

    PubMed

    Tománek, David

    2015-04-10

    An important prerequisite to translating the exceptional intrinsic performance of 2D materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides into useful devices precludes their successful integration within the current 3D technology. This review provides theoretical insight into nontrivial issues arising from interfacing 2D materials with 3D systems including epitaxy and ways to accommodate lattice mismatch, the key role of contact resistance and the effect of defects in electrical and thermal transport.

  18. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  19. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  20. MCNP: Neutron benchmark problems

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, D.J.; Cardon, D.A.; Uhle, J.L.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1991-11-01

    The recent widespread and increased use of radiation transport codes has produced greater user and institutional demand for assurances that such codes give correct results. Responding to these requirements for code validation, the general purpose Monte Carlo transport code MCNP has been tested on criticality, pulsed sphere, and shielding neutron problem families. Results for each were compared to experimental data. MCNP successfully predicted the experimental results of all three families within the expected data and statistical uncertainties. These successful predictions demonstrate that MCNP can successfully model a broad spectrum of neutron transport problems. 18 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Californium-252: A New Isotopic Source for Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Reinig, W.C.

    2001-08-29

    This report discusses a new isotopic source for neutron radiography, Californium-252. Nuclear reactors are the usual source of neutrons for radiography, primarily because of their intense neutron beams. If neutron radiography is to have widespread use, intense transportable neutron sources are required that can be used in plants, in laboratories and in the field.

  2. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  3. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  4. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  5. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  6. Multienzyme Inkjet Printed 2D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Efrat; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mandler, Daniel

    2015-08-19

    The use of printing to produce 2D arrays is well established, and should be relatively facile to adapt for the purpose of printing biomaterials; however, very few studies have been published using enzyme solutions as inks. Among the printing technologies, inkjet printing is highly suitable for printing biomaterials and specifically enzymes, as it offers many advantages. Formulation of the inkjet inks is relatively simple and can be adjusted to a variety of biomaterials, while providing nonharmful environment to the enzymes. Here we demonstrate the applicability of inkjet printing for patterning multiple enzymes in a predefined array in a very straightforward, noncontact method. Specifically, various arrays of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx), invertase (INV) and horseradish peroxidase (HP) were printed on aminated glass surfaces, followed by immobilization using glutardialdehyde after printing. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for imaging the printed patterns and to ascertain the enzyme activity. The successful formation of 2D arrays consisting of enzymes was explored as a means of developing the first surface confined enzyme based logic gates. Principally, XOR and AND gates, each consisting of two enzymes as the Boolean operators, were assembled, and their operation was studied by SECM. PMID:26214072

  7. Surface delta interaction in the g7/2 - d5/2 model space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaofei; Zamick, Larry

    2016-05-01

    Using an attractive surface delta interaction we obtain wave functions for 2 neutrons (or neutron holes) in the g7/2 -d5/2 model space. If we take the single particle energies to be degenerate we find that the g factors for I = 2 , 4 and 6 are all the same G (J) =gl, the orbital g factor of the nucleon. For a free neutron gl = 0, so in this case all 2 particles or 2 holes' g factors are equal to zero. Only the orbital part of the g-factors contributes - the spin part cancels out. We then consider the effects of introducing a single energy splitting between the 2 orbits. We make a linear approximation for all other n values.

  8. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  9. Chaotic advection in 2D anisotropic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Stephen; Speetjens, Michel; Trieling, Ruben; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Traditional methods for heat recovery from underground geothermal reservoirs employ a static system of injector-producer wells. Recent studies in literature have shown that using a well-devised pumping scheme, through actuation of multiple injector-producer wells, can dramatically enhance production rates due to the increased scalar / heat transport by means of chaotic advection. However the effect of reservoir anisotropy on kinematic mixing and heat transport is unknown and has to be incorporated and studied for practical deployment in the field. As a first step, we numerically investigate the effect of anisotropy (both magnitude and direction) on (chaotic) advection of passive tracers in a time-periodic Darcy flow within a 2D circular domain driven by periodically reoriented diametrically opposite source-sink pairs. Preliminary results indicate that anisotropy has a significant impact on the location, shape and size of coherent structures in the Poincare sections. This implies that the optimal operating parameters (well spacing, time period of well actuation) may vary strongly and must be carefully chosen so as to enhance subsurface transport. This work is part of the research program of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). This research program is co-financed by Shell Global Solutions International B.V.

  10. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  11. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  12. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  13. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  14. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  15. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  16. Helical Quantum Edge Gears in 2D Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yang-Zhi; Levchenko, Alex; Foster, Matthew

    A remarkable and as-yet-unexploited aspect of topological insulator (TI) physics is the topology of the edge states, i.e. the fact that the edge liquid of a 2D TI forms a closed, unbreakable loop in the absence of electrical contacts or magnetic fields. We propose a novel experimental setup in which edge loops rotate as interlocking ``gears'' through Coulomb drag, in TIs with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. We show that two-terminal transport can measure the Luttinger liquid parameter K, a quantity that is otherwise notoriously difficult to measure. In the low-temperature (T --> 0) perfect drag regime, the conductance is (e2 / h) (2 K + 1) / (K + 1) . At higher T we predict a conductivity ~T - 4 K + 3 . Our results should trigger new experiments and may open a new venue for edge gear-based electronic devices.Ref: Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 186404 (2015)

  17. Enhancement of biomixing by swimming cells in 2D films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollub, Jerry; Kurtuldu, Huseyin; Guasto, Jeffrey; Johnson, Karl

    2011-11-01

    Fluid mixing in active suspensions of microorganisms is important to ecological phenomena and shows surprising statistical behavior. We investigate the mixing produced by swimming unicellular algal cells (Chlamydomonas) in quasi-2D films by tracking the motions of cells and of microscopic passive tracer particles advected by the fluid. The reduced spatial dimension of the system leads to long-range flows and a surprisingly strong dependence of tracer transport on the swimmer concentration. The mean square displacements are well described by a stochastic Langevin model, with an effective diffusion coefficient D growing as the 3/2 power of the swimmer concentration, due to the interaction of tracer particles with multiple swimmers. We also discuss the anomalous probability distributions of tracer displacements, which become Gaussian at high concentration, but show strong power-law tails at low concentration. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-0803153.

  18. CYP2D6*36 gene arrangements within the cyp2d6 locus: association of CYP2D6*36 with poor metabolizer status.

    PubMed

    Gaedigk, Andrea; Bradford, L Dianne; Alander, Sarah W; Leeder, J Steven

    2006-04-01

    Unexplained cases of CYP2D6 genotype/phenotype discordance continue to be discovered. In previous studies, several African Americans with a poor metabolizer phenotype carried the reduced function CYP2D6*10 allele in combination with a nonfunctional allele. We pursued the possibility that these alleles harbor either a known sequence variation (i.e., CYP2D6*36 carrying a gene conversion in exon 9 along the CYP2D6*10-defining 100C>T single-nucleotide polymorphism) or novel sequences variation(s). Discordant cases were evaluated by long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to test for gene rearrangement events, and a 6.6-kilobase pair PCR product encompassing the CYP2D6 gene was cloned and entirely sequenced. Thereafter, allele frequencies were determined in different study populations comprising whites, African Americans, and Asians. Analyses covering the CYP2D7 to 2D6 gene region established that CYP2D6*36 did not only exist as a gene duplication (CYP2D6*36x2) or in tandem with *10 (CYP2D6*36+*10), as previously reported, but also by itself. This "single" CYP2D6*36 allele was found in nine African Americans and one Asian, but was absent in the whites tested. Ultimately, the presence of CYP2D6*36 resolved genotype/phenotype discordance in three cases. We also discovered an exon 9 conversion-positive CYP2D6*4 gene in a duplication arrangement (CYP2D6*4Nx2) and a CYP2D6*4 allele lacking 100C>T (CYP2D6*4M) in two white subjects. The discovery of an allele that carries only one CYP2D6*36 gene copy provides unequivocal evidence that both CYP2D6*36 and *36x2 are associated with a poor metabolizer phenotype. Given a combined frequency of between 0.5 and 3% in African Americans and Asians, genotyping for CYP2D6*36 should improve the accuracy of genotype-based phenotype prediction in these populations.

  19. Magnetoresistance in Co/2D MoS2/Co and Ni/2D MoS2/Ni junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Ye, Meng; Wang, Yangyang; Quhe, Ruge; Pan, Yuanyuan; Guo, Ying; Song, Zhigang; Yang, Jinbo; Guo, Wanlin; Lu, Jing

    2016-06-28

    Semiconducting single-layer (SL) and few-layer MoS2 have a flat surface, free of dangling bonds. Using density functional theory coupled with non-equilibrium Green's function method, we investigate the spin-polarized transport properties of Co/2D MoS2/Co and Ni/2D MoS2/Ni junctions with MoS2 layer numbers of N = 1, 3, and 5. Well-defined interfaces are formed between MoS2 and metal electrodes. The junctions with a SL MoS2 spacer are almost metallic owing to the strong coupling between MoS2 and the ferromagnets, while those are tunneling with a few layer MoS2 spacer. Both large magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance are found when fcc or hcp Co is used as an electrode. Therefore, flat single- and few-layer MoS2 can serve as an effective nonmagnetic spacer in a magnetoresistance or tunneling magnetoresistance device with a well-defined interface.

  20. Magnetoresistance in Co/2D MoS2/Co and Ni/2D MoS2/Ni junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Ye, Meng; Wang, Yangyang; Quhe, Ruge; Pan, Yuanyuan; Guo, Ying; Song, Zhigang; Yang, Jinbo; Guo, Wanlin; Lu, Jing

    2016-06-28

    Semiconducting single-layer (SL) and few-layer MoS2 have a flat surface, free of dangling bonds. Using density functional theory coupled with non-equilibrium Green's function method, we investigate the spin-polarized transport properties of Co/2D MoS2/Co and Ni/2D MoS2/Ni junctions with MoS2 layer numbers of N = 1, 3, and 5. Well-defined interfaces are formed between MoS2 and metal electrodes. The junctions with a SL MoS2 spacer are almost metallic owing to the strong coupling between MoS2 and the ferromagnets, while those are tunneling with a few layer MoS2 spacer. Both large magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance are found when fcc or hcp Co is used as an electrode. Therefore, flat single- and few-layer MoS2 can serve as an effective nonmagnetic spacer in a magnetoresistance or tunneling magnetoresistance device with a well-defined interface. PMID:27257639

  1. Measurements of Schottky barrier heights formed from metals and 2D transition metal dichalcogedides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changsik; Moon, Inyong; Nam, Seunggeol; Cho, Yeonchoo; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Park, Seongjun; Yoo, Won Jong

    Schottky barrier height (SBH) is an important parameter that needs to be considered for designing electronic devices. However, for two dimensional (2D) materials based devices, SBH control is limited by 2D structure induced quantum confinement and 2D surface induced Fermi level pinning. In this work, we explore differences in measuring SBH between 2D and 3D materials. Recently, low temperature I-V measurement has been reported to extract SBH based on thermionic emission equation for Schottky diode. However, 2D devices are not real Schottky diode in that both source and drain metal electrodes make Schottky contact. According to our experimental results, SBH extracted from linear slope of ln (I/T3/2) against 1/T show widely diverse values, dependent on applied voltage bias and tested temperature which affect carrier transport including tunneling or thermionic emission across the metal-2D material interface. In this work, we wish to demonstrate the method to determine SBH and Fermi level pinning which are attributed to 2D transition metal dichalcogedides, differently from conventional 3D materials. .

  2. Few-layer III-VI and IV-VI 2D semiconductor transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Liu, Mei; Kumar, Rajesh; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang C.; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Gao, Xuan

    Since the discovery of atomically thin graphene, a large variety of exfoliable 2D materials have been thoroughly explored for their exotic transport behavior and promises in technological breakthroughs. While most attention on 2D materials beyond graphene is focused on transition metal-dichalcogenides, relatively less attention is paid to layered III-VI and IV-VI semiconductors such as InSe, SnSe etc which bear stronger potential as 2D materials with high electron mobility or thermoelectric figure of merit. We will discuss our recent work on few-layer InSe 2D field effect transistors which exhibit carrier mobility approaching 1000 cm2/Vs and ON-OFF ratio exceeding 107 at room temperature. In addition, the fabrication and device performance of transistors made of mechanically exfoliated multilayer IV-VI semiconductor SnSe and SnSe2 will be discussed.

  3. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  4. Neutron beam characterization measurements at the Manuel Lujan Jr. neutron scattering center

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal; Muhrer, Guenter; Daemen, Luke L; Kelsey, Charles T; Duran, Michael A; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the neutron beam characteristics of neutron moderators at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE. The absolute thermal neutron flux, energy spectra and time emission spectra were measured for the high resolution and high intensity decoupled water, partially coupled liquid hydrogen and partially coupled water moderators. The results of our experimental study will provide an insight into aging of different target-moderator-reflector-shield components as well as new experimental data for benchmarking of neutron transport codes.

  5. Quantum Diffusion on Molecular Tubes: Universal Scaling of the 1D to 2D Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Chern; Lee, Chee Kong; Moix, Jeremy M.; Knoester, Jasper; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-05-01

    The transport properties of disordered systems are known to depend critically on dimensionality. We study the diffusion coefficient of a quantum particle confined to a lattice on the surface of a tube, where it scales between the 1D and 2D limits. It is found that the scaling relation is universal and independent of the temperature, disorder, and noise parameters, and the essential order parameter is the ratio between the localization length in 2D and the circumference of the tube. Phenomenological and quantitative expressions for transport properties as functions of disorder and noise are obtained and applied to real systems: In the natural chlorosomes found in light-harvesting bacteria the exciton transfer dynamics is predicted to be in the 2D limit, whereas a family of synthetic molecular aggregates is found to be in the homogeneous limit and is independent of dimensionality.

  6. Quantum Diffusion on Molecular Tubes: Universal Scaling of the 1D to 2D Transition.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chern; Lee, Chee Kong; Moix, Jeremy M; Knoester, Jasper; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-05-13

    The transport properties of disordered systems are known to depend critically on dimensionality. We study the diffusion coefficient of a quantum particle confined to a lattice on the surface of a tube, where it scales between the 1D and 2D limits. It is found that the scaling relation is universal and independent of the temperature, disorder, and noise parameters, and the essential order parameter is the ratio between the localization length in 2D and the circumference of the tube. Phenomenological and quantitative expressions for transport properties as functions of disorder and noise are obtained and applied to real systems: In the natural chlorosomes found in light-harvesting bacteria the exciton transfer dynamics is predicted to be in the 2D limit, whereas a family of synthetic molecular aggregates is found to be in the homogeneous limit and is independent of dimensionality. PMID:27232033

  7. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  8. Discontinuous isogeometric analysis methods for the first-order form of the neutron transport equation with discrete ordinate (SN) angular discretisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, A. R.; Welch, J. A.; Kópházi, J.; Eaton, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper two discontinuous Galerkin isogeometric analysis methods are developed and applied to the first-order form of the neutron transport equation with a discrete ordinate (SN) angular discretisation. The discontinuous Galerkin projection approach was taken on both an element level and the patch level for a given Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) patch. This paper describes the detailed dispersion analysis that has been used to analyse the numerical stability of both of these schemes. The convergence of the schemes for both smooth and non-smooth solutions was also investigated using the method of manufactured solutions (MMS) for multidimensional problems and a 1D semi-analytical benchmark whose solution contains a strongly discontinuous first derivative. This paper also investigates the challenges posed by strongly curved boundaries at both the NURBS element and patch level with several algorithms developed to deal with such cases. Finally numerical results are presented both for a simple pincell test problem as well as the C5G7 quarter core MOX/UOX small Light Water Reactor (LWR) benchmark problem. These numerical results produced by the isogeometric analysis (IGA) methods are compared and contrasted against linear and quadratic discontinuous Galerkin finite element (DGFEM) SN based methods.

  9. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  10. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations.

  11. Simulation of the full-core pin-model by JMCT Monte Carlo neutron-photon transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Li, G.; Zhang, B.; Shu, L.; Shangguan, D.; Ma, Y.; Hu, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Since the large numbers of cells over a million, the tallies over a hundred million and the particle histories over ten billion, the simulation of the full-core pin-by-pin model has become a real challenge for the computers and the computational methods. On the other hand, the basic memory of the model has exceeded the limit of a single CPU, so the spatial domain and data decomposition must be considered. JMCT (J Monte Carlo Transport code) has successful fulfilled the simulation of the full-core pin-by-pin model by the domain decomposition and the nested parallel computation. The k{sub eff} and flux of each cell are obtained. (authors)

  12. 2-D MHD numerical simulations of EML plasma armatures with ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, G. C.; Huerta, M. A.; Thio, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    We use a 2-D) resistive MHD code to simulate an EML plasma armature. The energy equation includes Ohmic heating, radiation heat transport and the ideal gas equation of state, allowing for variable ionization using the Saha equations. We calculate rail ablation taking into account the flow of heat into the interior of the rails. Our simulations show the development of internal convective flows and secondary arcs. We use an explicit Flux Corrected Transport algorithm to advance all quantities in time.

  13. 2-D Animation's Not Just for Mickey Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of two-dimensional (2-D) animation; highlights include character animation, painting issues, and motion graphics. Sidebars present Silicon Graphics animations tools and 2-D animation programs for the desktop computer. (DGM)

  14. Effects of Agent's Repulsion in 2d Flocking Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Najem; Tarras, Iliass; Mazroui, M'hammed; Boughaleb, Yahya

    In nature many animal groups, such as fish schools or bird flocks, clearly display structural order and appear to move as a single coherent entity. In order to understand the complex behavior of these systems, many models have been proposed and tested so far. This paper deals with an extension of the Vicsek model, by including a second zone of repulsion, where each agent attempts to maintain a minimum distance from the others. The consideration of this zone in our study seems to play an important role during the travel of agents in the two-dimensional (2D) flocking models. Our numerical investigations show that depending on the basic ingredients such as repulsion radius (R1), effect of density of agents (ρ) and noise (η), our nonequilibrium system can undergo a kinetic phase transition from no transport to finite net transport. For different values of ρ, kinetic phase diagrams in the plane (η ,R1) are found. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  16. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  17. Position control using 2D-to-2D feature correspondences in vision guided cell micromanipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanliang; Han, Mingli; Shee, Cheng Yap; Ang, Wei Tech

    2007-01-01

    Conventional camera calibration that utilizes the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the camera and the objects has certain limitations for micro-level cell operations due to the presence of hardware deviations and external disturbances during the experimental process, thereby invalidating the extrinsic parameters. This invalidation is often neglected in macro-world visual servoing and affects the visual image processing quality, causing deviation from the desired position in micro-level cell operations. To increase the success rate of vision guided biological micromanipulations, a novel algorithm monitoring the changing image pattern of the manipulators including the injection micropipette and cell holder is designed and implemented based on 2 dimensional (2D)-to 2D feature correspondences and can adjust the manipulator and perform position control simultaneously. When any deviation is found, the manipulator is retracted to the initial focusing plane before continuing the operation.

  18. Neutron structural characterization, inversion degree and transport properties of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel prepared by the hydroxide route

    SciTech Connect

    Sagua, A.; Lescano, Gabriela M.; Alonso, J.A.; Martínez-Coronado, R.; Fernández-Díaz, M.T.; Morán, E.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A pure specimen has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. This spinel, studied by NPD, shows an important inversion degree, λ = 0.80. A bond-valence study shows that the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected 3+ and 2+ values, respectively. The mixed valence Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} accounts for a hopping mechanism between adjacent octahedral sites, leading to a significant conductivity. Highlights: ► A low-temperature hydroxide route allowed preparing almost pure specimens of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. ► NPD essential to determine inversion degree; contrasting Ni and Mn for neutrons. ► Bond valence establishes valence state of octahedral and tetrahedral Ni and Mn ions. ► Thermal analysis, transport measurements complement characterization of this oxide. ► A structure–properties relationship is established. -- Abstract: The title compound has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. The crystal structure has been investigated at room temperature from high-resolution neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data. It crystallizes in a cubic spinel structure, space group Fd3{sup ¯}m, Z = 8, with a = 8.3940(2) Å at 295 K. The crystallographic formula is (Ni{sub 0.202(1)}Mn{sub 0.798(1)}){sub 8a}(Ni{sub 0.790(1)}Mn{sub 1.210(1)}){sub 16d}O{sub 4} where 8a and 16d stand for the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure, respectively. There is a significant inversion degree of the spinel structure, λ = 0.80. In fact, the variable parameter for the oxygen position, u = 0.2636(4), is far from that expected (u = 0.25) for normal spinels. From a bond-valence study, it seems that the valence distribution in NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is not as trivial as expected (Ni{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+}), but clearly the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected +3 and +2 values, respectively. The mixed valence observed at

  19. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  20. 'Brukin2D': a 2D visualization and comparison tool for LC-MS data

    PubMed Central

    Tsagkrasoulis, Dimosthenis; Zerefos, Panagiotis; Loudos, George; Vlahou, Antonia; Baumann, Marc; Kossida, Sophia

    2009-01-01

    Background Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) is a commonly used technique to resolve complex protein mixtures. Visualization of large data sets produced from LC-MS, namely the chromatogram and the mass spectra that correspond to its compounds is the focus of this work. Results The in-house developed 'Brukin2D' software, built in Matlab 7.4, which is presented here, uses the compound data that are exported from the Bruker 'DataAnalysis' program, and depicts the mean mass spectra of all the chromatogram compounds from one LC-MS run, in one 2D contour/density plot. Two contour plots from different chromatograph runs can then be viewed in the same window and automatically compared, in order to find their similarities and differences. The results of the comparison can be examined through detailed mass quantification tables, while chromatogram compound statistics are also calculated during the procedure. Conclusion 'Brukin2D' provides a user-friendly platform for quick, easy and integrated view of complex LC-MS data. The software is available at . PMID:19534737

  1. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) by methadone.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D; Otton, S V; Sproule, B A; Busto, U; Inaba, T; Kalow, W; Sellers, E M

    1993-01-01

    1. In microsomes prepared from three human livers, methadone competitively inhibited the O-demethylation of dextromethorphan, a marker substrate for CYP2D6. The apparent Ki value of methadone ranged from 2.5 to 5 microM. 2. Two hundred and fifty-two (252) white Caucasians, including 210 unrelated healthy volunteers and 42 opiate abusers undergoing treatment with methadone were phenotyped using dextromethorphan as the marker drug. Although the frequency of poor metabolizers was similar in both groups, the extensive metabolizers among the opiate abusers tended to have higher O-demethylation metabolic ratios and to excrete less of the dose as dextromethorphan metabolites than control extensive metabolizer subjects. These data suggest inhibition of CYP2D6 by methadone in vivo as well. 3. Because methadone is widely used in the treatment of opiate abuse, inhibition of CYP2D6 activity in these patients might contribute to exaggerated response or unexpected toxicity from drugs that are substrates of this enzyme. PMID:8448065

  2. A Monte Carlo neutron transport code for eigenvalue calculations on a dual-GPU system and CUDA environment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.; Ding, A.; Ji, W.; Xu, X. G.; Carothers, C. D.; Brown, F. B.

    2012-07-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is able to accurately calculate eigenvalues in reactor analysis. Its lengthy computation time can be reduced by general-purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units (GPU), one of the latest parallel computing techniques under development. The method of porting a regular transport code to GPU is usually very straightforward due to the 'embarrassingly parallel' nature of MC code. However, the situation becomes different for eigenvalue calculation in that it will be performed on a generation-by-generation basis and the thread coordination should be explicitly taken care of. This paper presents our effort to develop such a GPU-based MC code in Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) environment. The code is able to perform eigenvalue calculation under simple geometries on a multi-GPU system. The specifics of algorithm design, including thread organization and memory management were described in detail. The original CPU version of the code was tested on an Intel Xeon X5660 2.8 GHz CPU, and the adapted GPU version was tested on NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. Double-precision floating point format was used throughout the calculation. The result showed that a speedup of 7.0 and 33.3 were obtained for a bare spherical core and a binary slab system respectively. The speedup factor was further increased by a factor of {approx}2 on a dual GPU system. The upper limit of device-level parallelism was analyzed, and a possible method to enhance the thread-level parallelism was proposed. (authors)

  3. Nano-scale electronic and optoelectronic devices based on 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenjuan

    In the last few years, the research community has been rapidly growing interests in two-dimensional (2D) crystals and their applications. The properties of these 2D crystals are diverse -- ranging from semi-metal such as graphene, semiconductors such as MoS2, to insulator such as boron nitride. These 2D crystals have many unique properties as compared to their bulk counterparts due to their reduced dimensionality and symmetry. A key difference is the band structures, which lead to distinct electronic and photonic properties. The 2D nature of the material also plays an important role in defining their exceptional properties of mechanical strength, surface sensitivity, thermal conductivity, tunable band-gap and their interaction with light. These unique properties of 2D crystals open up a broad territory of applications in computing, communication, energy, and medicine. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the electrical properties of graphene and MoS2, in particular current transport and band-gap engineering in graphene, interface between gate dielectrics and graphene, and gap states in MoS2. I will also present our work on the nano-scale electronic devices (RF and logic devices) and photonic devices (plasmonic devices and photo-detectors) based on these 2D crystals.

  4. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  5. Assessment and improvement of the 2D/1D method stability in DeCART

    SciTech Connect

    Stimpson, S.; Young, M.; Collins, B.; Kelley, B.; Downar, T.

    2013-07-01

    As part of ongoing work with Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the 2D/1D code, DeCART, has demonstrated some of the advantages of the 2D/1D method with respect to realistic, full-core analysis, particularly over explicit 3D transport methods, which generally have higher memory and computation requirements. The 2D/1D method performs 2D-radial transport sweeps coupled with ID-axial diffusion calculations to provide a full 3D simulation. DeCART employs the 2D method of characteristics for the radial sweeps and ID one-node nodal diffusion for the axial sweeps, coupling the two methods with transverse leakages to ensure a more consistent representation of the transport equation. It has been observed that refinement of the axial plane thickness leads to instabilities in the calculation scheme. This work assesses the sources of these instabilities and the approaches to improve them, especially with respect to negative scattering cross sections and the tightness of the 2D-radial/ID-axial coupling schemes. Fourier analyses show that the existing iteration scheme is not unconditionally stable, suggesting a tighter coupling scheme is required. For this reason 3D-CMFD has been implemented, among other developments, to ensure more stable calculation. A matrix of test cases has been used to assess the convergence, with the primary parameter being the axial plane thickness, which has been refined down to 1 cm. These cases demonstrate the issues observed and how the modification improve the stability. However, it is apparent that more work is necessary to ensure unconditional stability. (authors)

  6. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  7. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  8. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  9. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  10. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  11. Imaging with polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Martin; Manke, Ingo; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Strobl, Markus; Banhart, John

    2009-04-01

    Neutrons have zero net electrical charge and can thus penetrate deeply into matter, but their intrinsic magnetic moment makes them highly sensitive to magnetic fields. These properties have been combined with radiographic (2D) and tomographic (3D) imaging methods to provide a unique technique to probe macroscopic magnetic phenomena both within and around bulk matter. Based on the spin-rotation of a polarized neutron beam as it passes through a magnetic field, this method allows the direct, real-space visualization of magnetic field distributions. It has been used to investigate the Meissner effect in a type I (Pb) and a type II (YBCO) superconductor, flux trapping in a type I (Pb) superconductor, and the electromagnetic field associated with a direct current flowing in a solenoid. The latter results have been compared to predictions calculated using the Biot-Savart law and have been found to agree well.

  12. Modeling the tagged-neutron UXO identification technique using the Geant4 toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Y.; Mitra S.; Zhu X.; Wang Y.

    2011-10-16

    It is proposed to use 14 MeV neutrons tagged by the associated particle neutron time-of-flight technique (APnTOF) to identify the fillers of unexploded ordnances (UXO) by characterizing their carbon, nitrogen and oxygen contents. To facilitate the design and construction of a prototype system, a preliminary simulation model was developed, using the Geant4 toolkit. This work established the toolkit environment for (a) generating tagged neutrons, (b) their transport and interactions within a sample to induce emission and detection of characteristic gamma-rays, and (c) 2D and 3D-image reconstruction of the interrogated object using the neutron and gamma-ray time-of-flight information. Using the modeling, this article demonstrates the novelty of the tagged-neutron approach for extracting useful signals with high signal-to-background discrimination of an object-of-interest from that of its environment. Simulations indicated that an UXO filled with the RDX explosive, hexogen (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}N{sub 6}), can be identified to a depth of 20 cm when buried in soil.

  13. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  14. Phase-sensitive two-dimensional neutron shearing interferometer and Hartmann sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Kevin

    2015-12-08

    A neutron imaging system detects both the phase shift and absorption of neutrons passing through an object. The neutron imaging system is based on either of two different neutron wavefront sensor techniques: 2-D shearing interferometry and Hartmann wavefront sensing. Both approaches measure an entire two-dimensional neutron complex field, including its amplitude and phase. Each measures the full-field, two-dimensional phase gradients and, concomitantly, the two-dimensional amplitude mapping, requiring only a single measurement.

  15. Iterative 2D deconvolution of portal imaging radiographs.

    PubMed

    Looe, Hui Khee; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay C; Poppe, Björn

    2011-01-01

    Portal imaging has become an integral part of modern radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT and IGRT. It serves to verify the accuracy of day-to-day patient positioning, a prerequisite for treatment success. However, image blurring attributable to different physical and geometrical effects, analysed in this work, impairs the image quality of the portal images, and anatomical structures cannot always be clearly outlined. A 2D iterative deconvolution method was developed to reduce this image blurring. The affiliated data basis was generated by the separate measurement of the components contributing to image blurring. Secondary electron transport and pixel size within the EPID, as well as geometrical penumbra due to the finite photon source size were found to be the major contributors, whereas photon scattering in the patient is less important. The underlying line-spread kernels of these components were shown to be Lorentz functions. This implies that each of these convolution kernels and also their combination can be characterized by a single characteristic, the width parameter λ of the Lorentz function. The overall resulting λ values were 0.5mm for 6 MV and 0.65 mm for 15 MV. Portal images were deconvolved using the point-spread function derived from the Lorentz function together with the experimentally determined λ values. The improvement of the portal images was quantified in terms of the modulation transfer function of a bar pattern. The resulting clinical images show a clear enhancement of sharpness and contrast.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of 2D molybdenum carbide (MXene)

    DOE PAGES

    Halim, Joseph; Kota, Sankalp; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Naguib, Michael; Zhao, Meng -Qiang; Moon, Eun Ju; Pitock, Jeremy; Nanda, Jagjit; May, Steven J.; Gogotsi, Yury; et al

    2016-02-17

    Large scale synthesis and delamination of 2D Mo2CT x (where T is a surface termination group) has been achieved by selectively etching gallium from the recently discovered nanolaminated, ternary transition metal carbide Mo2Ga2C. Different synthesis and delamination routes result in different flake morphologies. The resistivity of free-standing Mo2CT x films increases by an order of magnitude as the temperature is reduced from 300 to 10 K, suggesting semiconductor-like behavior of this MXene, in contrast to Ti3C2T x which exhibits metallic behavior. At 10 K, the magnetoresistance is positive. Additionally, changes in electronic transport are observed upon annealing of the films.more » When 2 μm thick films are tested as electrodes in supercapacitors, capacitances as high as 700 F cm–3 in a 1 m sulfuric acid electrolyte and high capacity retention for at least 10,000 cycles at 10 A g–1 are obtained. Free-standing Mo2CT x films, with ≈8 wt% carbon nanotubes, perform well when tested as an electrode material for Li-ions, especially at high rates. In conclusion, at 20 and 131 C cycling rates, stable reversible capacities of 250 and 76 mAh g–1, respectively, are achieved for over 1000 cycles.« less

  17. 2-D Inhomogeneous Modeling of the Solar CO Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, T. R.

    1996-05-01

    The recent discovery of off-limb emissions in the mid-IR ( ~ 5 mu m) vibration-rotation bands of solar carbon monoxide (CO) has sparked new interest in the formation of the molecular lines, and their ability to diagnose thermal conditions at high altitudes. The off-limb extensions of the strong CO lines indicate the penetration of cool material (T ~ 3500 K) several hundred kilometers into the otherwise hot (T ~ 6000 K) chromosphere. The origin of the cool gas, and its role in the thermal energy balance, remain controversial. The interpretation of the CO observations must rely heavily upon numerical modeling, in particular highly-inhomogeneous thermal structures arrayed in a 2-D scheme that can properly treat the geometry of the grazing rays at the solar limb. The radiation transport, itself, is especially simple for the CO off-limb emissions, because the fundamental bands form quite close to LTE (high collision rates; low spontaneous decay rates) and the background continuum is purely thermal as well (f--f transitions in H(-) and H). Thus, the geometrical aspects of the problem can be treated in considerably more detail than would be practical for typical NLTE scattering lines. I describe the recent modeling efforts, and the diagnostic potential of the CO bands for future observational studies of inhomogeneous surface structure on the Sun, and on other stars of late spectral type. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-9218063 to the University of Colorado.

  18. 2-D Chemical-Dynamical Modeling of Venus's Sulfur Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierson, Carver J.; Zhang, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Over the last decade a combination of ground based and Venus Express observations have been made of the concentration of sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere, both above [1, 2] and below the clouds [3, 4]. These observations put constraints on both the vertical and meridional variations of the major sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere.. It has also been observed that SO2 concentrations varies on both timescales of hours and years [1,4]. The spatial and temporal distribution of tracer species is owing to two possibilities: mutual chemical interaction and dynamical tracer transport.Previous Chemical modeling of Venus's middle atmosphere has only been explored in 1-D. We will present the first 2-D (altitude and latitude) chemical-dynamical model for Venus's middle atmosphere. The sulfur chemistry is based on of the 1D model of Zhang et al. 2012 [5]. We do model runs over multiple Venus decades testing two scenarios: first one with varying sulfur fluxes from below, and second with secular dynamical perturbations in the atmosphere [6]. By comparing to Venus Express and ground based observations, we put constraints on the dynamics of Venus's middle atmosphere.References: [1] Belyaev et al. Icarus 2012 [2] Marcq et al. Nature geoscience, 2013 [3] Marcq et al. JGR:Planets, 2008 [4] Arney et al. JGR:Planets, 2014 [5] Zhang et al. Icarus 2012 [6] Parish et al. Icarus 2012

  19. Gravitational Wave Signals from 2D and 3D Core Collapse Supernova Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Konstantin; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Marronetti, Pedro; Bruenn, Stephen; Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Harris, J. Austin; Endeve, Eirik; Blondin, John

    2016-03-01

    We study two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) core-collapse supernovae (CCSN) using our first-principles CCSN simulations performed with the neutrino hydrodynamics code CHIMERA. The following physics is included: Newtonian hydrodynamics with a nuclear equation of state capable of describing matter in both NSE and non-NSE, MGFLD neutrino transport with realistic neutrino interactions, an effective GR gravitational potential, and a nuclear reaction network. Both our 2D and 3D models achieve explosion, which in turn enables us to determine their complete gravitational wave signals. In this talk, we present them, and we analyze the similarities and differences between the 2D and 3D signals.

  20. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  1. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  2. Slow neutron leakage spectra from spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S G; Carpenter, J M; Prael, R E

    1980-02-01

    An efficient technique is described for Monte Carlo simulation of neutron beam spectra from target-moderator-reflector assemblies typical of pulsed spallation neutron sources. The technique involves the scoring of the transport-theoretical probability that a neutron will emerge from the moderator surface in the direction of interest, at each collision. An angle-biasing probability is also introduced which further enhances efficiency in simple problems. These modifications were introduced into the VIM low energy neutron transport code, representing the spatial and energy distributions of the source neutrons approximately as those of evaporation neutrons generated through the spallation process by protons of various energies. The intensity of slow neutrons leaking from various reflected moderators was studied for various neutron source arrangements. These include computations relating to early measurements on a mockup-assembly, a brief survey of moderator materials and sizes, and a survey of the effects of varying source and moderator configurations with a practical, liquid metal cooled uranium source Wing and slab, i.e., tangential and radial moderator arrangements, and Be vs CH/sub 2/ reflectors are compared. Results are also presented for several complicated geometries which more closely represent realistic arrangements for a practical source, and for a subcritical fission multiplier such as might be driven by an electron linac. An adaptation of the code was developed to enable time dependent calculations, and investigated the effects of the reflector, decoupling and void liner materials on the pulse shape.

  3. New Multi-group Transport Neutronics (PHISICS) Capabilities for RELAP5-3D and its Application to Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-10-01

    PHISICS is a neutronics code system currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. The different modules for PHISICS currently under development are a nodal and semi-structured transport core solver (INSTANT), a depletion module (MRTAU) and a cross section interpolation (MIXER) module. The INSTANT module is the most developed of the mentioned above. Basic functionalities are ready to use, but the code is still in continuous development to extend its capabilities. This paper reports on the effort of coupling the nodal kinetics code package PHISICS (INSTANT/MRTAU/MIXER) to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D, to enable full core and system modeling. This will enable the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5-3D (NESTLE). In the second part of the paper, an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark is given. This benchmark has been approved by the OECD, and is based on the General Atomics 350 MW Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) design. The benchmark includes coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics exercises that require more capabilities than RELAP5-3D with NESTLE offers. Therefore, the MHTGR benchmark makes extensive use of the new PHISICS/RELAP5-3D coupling capabilities. The paper presents the preliminary results of the three steady state exercises specified in Phase I of the benchmark using PHISICS/RELAP5-3D.

  4. Latent heat induced rotation limited aggregation in 2D ice nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Siekman, Martin H; Kooij, E Stefan; Lohse, Detlef; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Poelsema, Bene

    2015-07-21

    The basic science responsible for the fascinating shapes of ice crystals and snowflakes is still not understood. Insufficient knowledge of the interaction potentials and the lack of relevant experimental access to the growth process are to blame for this failure. Here, we study the growth of fractal nanostructures in a two-dimensional (2D) system, intercalated between mica and graphene. Based on our scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, we provide compelling evidence that these fractals are 2D ice. They grow while they are in material contact with the atmosphere at 20 °C and without significant thermal contact to the ambient. The growth is studied in situ, in real time and space at the nanoscale. We find that the growing 2D ice nanocrystals assume a fractal shape, which is conventionally attributed to Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA). However, DLA requires a low mass density mother phase, in contrast to the actual currently present high mass density mother phase. Latent heat effects and consequent transport of heat and molecules are found to be key ingredients for understanding the evolution of the snow (ice) flakes. We conclude that not the local availability of water molecules (DLA), but rather them having the locally required orientation is the key factor for incorporation into the 2D ice nanocrystal. In combination with the transport of latent heat, we attribute the evolution of fractal 2D ice nanocrystals to local temperature dependent rotation limited aggregation. The ice growth occurs under extreme supersaturation, i.e., the conditions closely resemble the natural ones for the growth of complex 2D snow (ice) flakes and we consider our findings crucial for solving the "perennial" snow (ice) flake enigma. PMID:26203037

  5. Latent heat induced rotation limited aggregation in 2D ice nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Siekman, Martin H.; Kooij, E. Stefan; Lohse, Detlef; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2015-07-01

    The basic science responsible for the fascinating shapes of ice crystals and snowflakes is still not understood. Insufficient knowledge of the interaction potentials and the lack of relevant experimental access to the growth process are to blame for this failure. Here, we study the growth of fractal nanostructures in a two-dimensional (2D) system, intercalated between mica and graphene. Based on our scanning tunneling spectroscopy data, we provide compelling evidence that these fractals are 2D ice. They grow while they are in material contact with the atmosphere at 20 °C and without significant thermal contact to the ambient. The growth is studied in situ, in real time and space at the nanoscale. We find that the growing 2D ice nanocrystals assume a fractal shape, which is conventionally attributed to Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA). However, DLA requires a low mass density mother phase, in contrast to the actual currently present high mass density mother phase. Latent heat effects and consequent transport of heat and molecules are found to be key ingredients for understanding the evolution of the snow (ice) flakes. We conclude that not the local availability of water molecules (DLA), but rather them having the locally required orientation is the key factor for incorporation into the 2D ice nanocrystal. In combination with the transport of latent heat, we attribute the evolution of fractal 2D ice nanocrystals to local temperature dependent rotation limited aggregation. The ice growth occurs under extreme supersaturation, i.e., the conditions closely resemble the natural ones for the growth of complex 2D snow (ice) flakes and we consider our findings crucial for solving the "perennial" snow (ice) flake enigma.

  6. RCPO1 - A Monte Carlo program for solving neutron and photon transport problems in three dimensional geometry with detailed energy description and depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Ondis, L.A., II; Tyburski, L.J.; Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-03-01

    The RCP01 Monte Carlo program is used to analyze many geometries of interest in nuclear design and analysis of light water moderated reactors such as the core in its pressure vessel with complex piping arrangement, fuel storage arrays, shipping and container arrangements, and neutron detector configurations. Written in FORTRAN and in use on a variety of computers, it is capable of estimating steady state neutron or photon reaction rates and neutron multiplication factors. The energy range covered in neutron calculations is that relevant to the fission process and subsequent slowing-down and thermalization, i.e., 20 MeV to 0 eV. The same energy range is covered for photon calculations.

  7. Results of an attempt to measure increased rates of the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n in a nonelectrochemical cold fusion experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Decker, Arthur J.; Blue, James W.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was performed to look for evidence of deuterium fusion in palladium. The experiment, which involved introducing deuterium into the palladium filter of a hydrogen purifier, was designed to detect neutrons produced in the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n as well as heat production. The neutron counts for deuterium did not differ significantly from background or from the counts for a hydrogen control. Heat production was detected when deuterium, but not hydrogen, was pumped from the purifier.

  8. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various filemore » formats, are also provided in the library.« less

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) (2dFGRS Team, 1998-2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colless, M.; Dalton, G.; Maddox, S.; Sutherland, W.; Norberg, P.; Cole, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bridges, T.; Cannon, R.; Collins, C.; Couch, W.; Cross, N.; Deeley, K.; de Propris, R.; Driver, S. P.; Efstathiou, G.; Ellis, R. S.; Frenk, C. S.; Glazebrook, K.; Jackson, C.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, I.; Lumsden, S.; Madgwick, D.; Peacock, J. A.; Peterson, B. A.; Price, I.; Seaborne, M.; Taylor, K.

    2007-11-01

    The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) is a major spectroscopic survey taking full advantage of the unique capabilities of the 2dF facility built by the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The 2dFGRS is integrated with the 2dF QSO survey (2QZ, Cat. VII/241). The 2dFGRS obtained spectra for 245591 objects, mainly galaxies, brighter than a nominal extinction-corrected magnitude limit of bJ=19.45. Reliable (quality>=3) redshifts were obtained for 221414 galaxies. The galaxies cover an area of approximately 1500 square degrees selected from the extended APM Galaxy Survey in three regions: a North Galactic Pole (NGP) strip, a South Galactic Pole (SGP) strip, and random fields scattered around the SGP strip. Redshifts are measured from spectra covering 3600-8000 Angstroms at a two-pixel resolution of 9.0 Angstrom and a median S/N of 13 per pixel. All redshift identifications are visually checked and assigned a quality parameter Q in the range 1-5; Q>=3 redshifts are 98.4% reliable and have an rms uncertainty of 85 km/s. The overall redshift completeness for Q>=3 redshifts is 91.8% but this varies with magnitude from 99% for the brightest galaxies to 90% for objects at the survey limit. The 2dFGRS data base is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/2dFGRS/. (6 data files).

  10. Klassifikation von Standardebenen in der 2D-Echokardiographie mittels 2D-3D-Bildregistrierung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmeir, Christoph; Subramanian, Navneeth

    Zum Zweck der Entwicklung eines Systems, das einen unerfahrenen Anwender von Ultraschall (US) zur Aufnahme relevanter anatomischer Strukturen leitet, untersuchen wir die Machbarkeit von 2D-US zu 3D-CT Registrierung. Wir verwenden US-Aufnahmen von Standardebenen des Herzens, welche zu einem 3D-CT-Modell registriert werden. Unser Algorithmus unterzieht sowohl die US-Bilder als auch den CT-Datensatz Vorverarbeitungsschritten, welche die Daten durch Segmentierung auf wesentliche Informationen in Form von Labein für Muskel und Blut reduzieren. Anschließend werden diese Label zur Registrierung mittels der Match-Cardinality-Metrik genutzt. Durch mehrmaliges Registrieren mit verschiedenen Initialisierungen ermitteln wir die im US-Bild sichtbare Standardebene. Wir evaluierten die Methode auf sieben US-Bildern von Standardebenen. Fünf davon wurden korrekt zugeordnet.

  11. Epitaxial 2D SnSe2/ 2D WSe2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Aretouli, Kleopatra Emmanouil; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Tsipas, Polychronis; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Kelaidis, Nicolaos; Psycharis, Vassilis; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-09-01

    van der Waals heterostructures of 2D semiconductor materials can be used to realize a number of (opto)electronic devices including tunneling field effect devices (TFETs). It is shown in this work that high quality SnSe2/WSe2 vdW heterostructure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates using a Bi2Se3 buffer layer. A valence band offset of 0.8 eV matches the energy gap of SnSe2 in such a way that the VB edge of WSe2 and the CB edge of SnSe2 are lined up, making this materials combination suitable for (nearly) broken gap TFETs. PMID:27537619

  12. CVMAC 2D Program: A method of converting 3D to 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Lown, J.

    1990-06-20

    This paper presents the user with a method of converting a three- dimensional wire frame model into a technical illustration, detail, or assembly drawing. By using the 2D Program, entities can be mapped from three-dimensional model space into two-dimensional model space, as if they are being traced. Selected entities to be mapped can include circles, arcs, lines, and points. This program prompts the user to digitize the view to be mapped, specify the layers in which the new two-dimensional entities will reside, and select the entities, either by digitizing or windowing. The new two-dimensional entities are displayed in a small view which the program creates in the lower left corner of the drawing. 9 figs.

  13. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  14. 2D Four-Channel Perfect Reconstruction Filter Bank Realized with the 2D Lattice Filter Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, S.; Ertüzün, A.

    2006-12-01

    A novel orthogonal 2D lattice structure is incorporated into the design of a nonseparable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction filter bank. The proposed filter bank is obtained by using the polyphase decomposition technique which requires the design of an orthogonal 2D lattice filter. Due to constraint of perfect reconstruction, each stage of this lattice filter bank is simply parameterized by two coefficients. The perfect reconstruction property is satisfied regardless of the actual values of these parameters and of the number of the lattice stages. It is also shown that a separable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction lattice filter bank can be constructed from the 1D lattice filter and that this is a special case of the proposed 2D lattice filter bank under certain conditions. The perfect reconstruction property of the proposed 2D lattice filter approach is verified by computer simulations.

  15. Multiyear Statistics of 2-D Shortwave Radiative Effects at Three ARM Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the importance of horizontal photon transport effects, which are not considered in the 1-D calculations of solar radiative heating used by most atmospheric dynamical models. In particular, the paper analyzes the difference between 2-D and 1-D radiative calculations for 2-D vertical cross-sections of clouds that were observed at three sites over 2- to 3-year periods. The results show that 2-D effects increase multiyear 24-hour average total solar absorption by about 4.1 W/sq m, 1.2 W/sq m, and 0.3 W/sq m at a tropical, mid-latitude, and arctic site, respectively. However, 2-D effects are often much larger than these average values, especially for high sun and for convective clouds. The results also reveal a somewhat unexpected behavior, that horizontal photon transport often enhances solar heating even for oblique sun. These findings underscore the need for fast radiation calculation methods that can allow atmospheric dynamical simulations to consider the inherently multidimensional nature of shortwave radiative processes.

  16. Neutron transport in random media

    SciTech Connect

    Makai, M.

    1996-08-01

    The survey reviews the methods available in the literature which allow a discussion of corium recriticality after a severe accident and a characterization of the corium. It appears that to date no one has considered the eigenvalue problem, though for the source problem several approaches have been proposed. The mathematical formulation of a random medium may be approached in different ways. Based on the review of the literature, we can draw three basic conclusions. The problem of static, random perturbations has been solved. The static case is tractable by the Monte Carlo method. There is a specific time dependent case for which the average flux is given as a series expansion.

  17. Functional characterization of CYP2D6 enhancer polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danxin; Papp, Audrey C.; Sun, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    CYP2D6 metabolizes nearly 25% of clinically used drugs. Genetic polymorphisms cause large inter-individual variability in CYP2D6 enzyme activity and are currently used as biomarker to predict CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotype. Previously, we had identified a region 115 kb downstream of CYP2D6 as enhancer for CYP2D6, containing two completely linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs133333 and rs5758550, associated with enhanced transcription. However, the enhancer effect on CYP2D6 expression, and the causative variant, remained to be ascertained. To characterize the CYP2D6 enhancer element, we applied chromatin conformation capture combined with the next-generation sequencing (4C assays) and chromatin immunoprecipitation with P300 antibody, in HepG2 and human primary culture hepatocytes. The results confirmed the role of the previously identified enhancer region in CYP2D6 expression, expanding the number of candidate variants to three highly linked SNPs (rs133333, rs5758550 and rs4822082). Among these, only rs5758550 demonstrated regulating enhancer activity in a reporter gene assay. Use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats mediated genome editing in HepG2 cells targeting suspected enhancer regions decreased CYP2D6 mRNA expression by 70%, only upon deletion of the rs5758550 region. These results demonstrate robust effects of both the enhancer element and SNP rs5758550 on CYP2D6 expression, supporting consideration of rs5758550 for CYP2D6 genotyping panels to yield more accurate phenotype prediction. PMID:25381333

  18. Multi-purpose neutron radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.P.; Bryant, L.E.; Berry, P.

    1996-07-01

    A conceptual design is given for a low cost, multipurpose radiography system suited for the needs of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The proposed neutron source is californium-252. One purpose is to provide an in-house capability for occasional, reactor quality, neutron radiography thus replacing the recently closed Omega-West Reactor. A second purpose is to provide a highly reliable standby transportable neutron radiography system. A third purpose is to provide for transportable neutron probe gamma spectroscopy techniques. The cost is minimized by shared use of an existing x-ray facility, and by use of an existing transport cask. The achievable neutron radiography and radioscopy performance characteristics have been verified. The demonstrated image qualities range from high resolution gadolinium - SR film, with L:D = 100:1, to radioscopy using a LIXI image with L:D = 30:1 and neutron fluence 3.4 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}.

  19. An Incompressible 2D Didactic Model with Singularity and Explicit Solutions of the 2D Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Dongho; Constantin, Peter; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-09-01

    We give an example of a well posed, finite energy, 2D incompressible active scalar equation with the same scaling as the surface quasi-geostrophic equation and prove that it can produce finite time singularities. In spite of its simplicity, this seems to be the first such example. Further, we construct explicit solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations whose gradients grow exponentially in time for all time. In addition, we introduce a variant of the 2D Boussinesq equations which is perhaps a more faithful companion of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations than the usual 2D Boussinesq equations.

  20. Correlation between reconstructive phase transitions and transport properties from SrCoO 2.5 brownmillerite: A neutron diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Calle, C.; Aguadero, A.; Alonso, J. A.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.

    2008-12-01

    Temperature dependent X-ray and neutron powder diffraction have been exploited to revisit the structural evolution of SrCoO 2.5 brownmillerite-like phase from room temperature to 1200 °C, in complement with DTA-TG, conductivity and thermal expansion measurements. Three different polymorphs have been identified: the orthorhombic "O" brownmillerite phase between room temperature and 653 °C, the hexagonal "H" phase between 653 °C and 920 °C, and the cubic perovskite "C" above 920 °C, which is transformed again, by cooling, into the "H" phase at 774 °C. The metastable "O" brownmillerite phase can only be obtained by quenching in liquid N 2 from 1000 °C. The refinement of the crystal and magnetic structures of SrCoO 2.5 from NPD data collected " in situ" as a function of temperature in an air atmosphere led to define structural details of the very distinct coordination polyhedra present in the different polymorphs, which have been correlated with the transport properties. The conductivity shows little dependence up to 250 °C, and it abruptly increases above this temperature, which is concomitant with a contraction of the Co2-O3 bonds of the tetrahedral CoO 4 units of the "O" brownmillerite structure at 350 °C, suggesting the presence of an insulator-to-metal transition in this structural polymorph. The dramatic reduction of conductivity above 500 °C is connected with the transformation to the "H" polymorph, with a complete oxygen sublattice and a face-sharing octahedral framework with a poor 1D electronic conduction. Further heating above 900 °C boosts again the conductivity when the sample is entering the cubic perovskite region, characterized by a 3D vertex-sharing network of CoO 6 octahedra. The total conductivity displays a maximum value of 150 S cm -1 at 900 °C and it increases during the cooling run, thus displaying a characteristic metallic behaviour for the "C" phase. This polymorph presents conductivity values substantially above the required 100 S

  1. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  2. Neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Andrew C; Jardret, Vincent D

    2009-04-07

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  3. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  4. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  5. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density. PMID:27334788

  6. CYP2D6: novel genomic structures and alleles

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Whitney E.; Walker, Denise L.; O’Kane, Dennis J.; Mrazek, David A.; Fisher, Pamela K.; Dukek, Brian A.; Bruflat, Jamie K.; Black, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective CYP2D6 is a polymorphic gene. It has been observed to be deleted, to be duplicated and to undergo recombination events involving the CYP2D7 pseudogene and surrounding sequences. The objective of this study was to discover the genomic structure of CYP2D6 recombinants that interfere with clinical genotyping platforms that are available today. Methods Clinical samples containing rare homozygous CYP2D6 alleles, ambiguous readouts, and those with duplication signals and two different alleles were analyzed by long-range PCR amplification of individual genes, PCR fragment analysis, allele-specific primer extension assay, and DNA sequencing to characterize alleles and genomic structure. Results Novel alleles, genomic structures, and the DNA sequence of these structures are described. Interestingly, in 49 of 50 DNA samples that had CYP2D6 gene duplications or multiplications where two alleles were detected, the chromosome containing the duplication or multiplication had identical tandem alleles. Conclusion Several new CYP2D6 alleles and genomic structures are described which will be useful for CYP2D6 genotyping. The findings suggest that the recombination events responsible for CYP2D6 duplications and multiplications are because of mechanisms other than interchromosomal crossover during meiosis. PMID:19741566

  7. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  8. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices.

  9. Van der Waals stacked 2D layered materials for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Qixing; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhuo; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2016-06-01

    The band gaps of many atomically thin 2D layered materials such as graphene, black phosphorus, monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides and hBN range from 0 to 6 eV. These isolated atomic planes can be reassembled into hybrid heterostructures made layer by layer in a precisely chosen sequence. Thus, the electronic properties of 2D materials can be engineered by van der Waals stacking, and the interlayer coupling can be tuned, which opens up avenues for creating new material systems with rich functionalities and novel physical properties. Early studies suggest that van der Waals stacked 2D materials work exceptionally well, dramatically enriching the optoelectronics applications of 2D materials. Here we review recent progress in van der Waals stacked 2D materials, and discuss their potential applications in optoelectronics.

  10. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Moon, S.; White, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron detector and additional analysis corrections lead to slightly changed neutron fluxes. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with the reported experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. The experimental fluxes obtained agree with those of Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV.

  11. Driven microswimmers on a 2D substrate: A stochastic towed sled model

    SciTech Connect

    Marchegiani, Giampiero; Marchesoni, Fabio

    2015-11-14

    We investigate, both numerically and analytically, the diffusion properties of a stochastic sled sliding on a substrate, subject to a constant towing force. The problem is motivated by the growing interest in controlling transport of artificial microswimmers in 2D geometries at low Reynolds numbers. We simulated both symmetric and asymmetric towed sleds. Remarkable properties of their mobilities and diffusion constants include sidewise drifts and excess diffusion peaks. We interpret our numerical findings by making use of stochastic approximation techniques.

  12. EDGE2D Simulations of JET{sup 13}C Migration Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan; J.P. Coad; G. Corrigan; G.F. Matthews; J. Spence

    2004-06-16

    Material migration has received renewed interest due to tritium retention associated with carbon transport to remote vessel locations. Those results influence the desirability of carbon usage on ITER. Subsequently, additional experiments have been performed, including tracer experiments attempting to identify material migration from specific locations. In this paper, EDGE2D models a well-diagnosed JET{sup 13}C tracer migration experiment. The role of SOL flows upon the migration patterns is identified.

  13. In Situ Synthesis of Metal Sulfide Nanoparticles Based on 2D Metal-Organic Framework Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qipeng; Zhao, Meiting; Chen, Junze; Chen, Bo; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhang, Xiao; Huang, Ying; Yang, Jian; Cao, Feifei; Yu, Yifu; Ping, Jianfeng; Zhang, Zhicheng; Wu, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    A facile in situ synthetic method is developed to synthesize metal sulfide nanoparticles based on 2D M-TCPP (M = Cu, Cd, or Co, TCPP = tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin)) metal-organic framework nanosheets. The obtained CuS/Cu-TCPP composite nanosheet is used as the active material in photoelectrochemical cells, showing notably increased photocurrent due to the improved exciton separation and charge carrier transport.

  14. Estrogen-Induced Cholestasis Leads to Repressed CYP2D6 Expression in CYP2D6-Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xian

    2015-01-01

    Cholestasis activates bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and subsequently enhances hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). We previously demonstrated that SHP represses the transactivation of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen-induced cholestasis on CYP2D6 expression. Estrogen-induced cholestasis occurs in subjects receiving estrogen for contraception or hormone replacement, or in susceptible women during pregnancy. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, cholestasis triggered by administration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at a high dose led to 2- to 3-fold decreases in CYP2D6 expression. This was accompanied by increased hepatic SHP expression and subsequent decreases in the recruitment of HNF4α to CYP2D6 promoter. Interestingly, estrogen-induced cholestasis also led to increased recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) α, but not that of FXR, to Shp promoter, suggesting a predominant role of ERα in transcriptional regulation of SHP in estrogen-induced cholestasis. EE2 at a low dose (that does not cause cholestasis) also increased SHP (by ∼50%) and decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 1.5-fold) in Tg-CYP2D6 mice, the magnitude of differences being much smaller than that shown in EE2-induced cholestasis. Taken together, our data indicate that EE2-induced cholestasis increases SHP and represses CYP2D6 expression in Tg-CYP2D6 mice in part through ERα transactivation of Shp promoter. PMID:25943116

  15. Neutron and Gamma-ray Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, Anatoly V.; Sasao, Mamiko; Kaschuck, Yuri A.; Kiptily, Vasily G.; Popovichev, Sergey V.; Nishitani, Takeo; Bertalot, Luciano

    2008-03-12

    Due to high neutron and gamma-ray yields and large size plasmas many future fusion reactor plasma parameters such as fusion power, fusion power density, ion temperature, fuel mixture, fast ion energy and spatial distributions can be well measured by various fusion product diagnostics. Neutron diagnostics provide information on fusion reaction rate, which indicates how close is the plasma to the ultimate goal of nuclear fusion and fusion power distribution in the plasma core, which is crucial for optimization of plasma breakeven and burn. Depending on the plasma conditions neutron and gamma-ray diagnostics can provide important information, namely about dynamics of fast ion energy and spatial distributions during neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and generated by fast ions MHD instabilities. The influence of the fast particle population on the 2-D neutron source profile was clearly demonstrated in JET experiments. 2-D neutron and gamma-ray source measurements could be important for driven plasma heating profile optimization in fusion reactors. To meat the measurement requirements in ITER the planned set of neutron and gamma ray diagnostics includes radial and vertical neutron and gamma cameras, neutron flux monitors, neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The necessity of using massive radiation shielding strongly influences the diagnostic designs in fusion reactor, determines angular fields of view of neutron and gamma-ray cameras and spectrometers and gives rise to unavoidable difficulties in the absolute calibration. The development, testing in existing tokomaks and a possible engineering integration of neuron and gamma-ray diagnostic systems into ITER are presented.

  16. Neutron and Gamma-ray Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, Anatoly V.; Sasao, Mamiko; Kaschuck, Yuri A.; Kiptily, Vasily G.; Nishitani, Takeo; Popovichev, Sergey V.; Bertalot, Luciano

    2008-03-01

    Due to high neutron and gamma-ray yields and large size plasmas many future fusion reactor plasma parameters such as fusion power, fusion power density, ion temperature, fuel mixture, fast ion energy and spatial distributions can be well measured by various fusion product diagnostics. Neutron diagnostics provide information on fusion reaction rate, which indicates how close is the plasma to the ultimate goal of nuclear fusion and fusion power distribution in the plasma core, which is crucial for optimization of plasma breakeven and burn. Depending on the plasma conditions neutron and gamma-ray diagnostics can provide important information, namely about dynamics of fast ion energy and spatial distributions during neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and generated by fast ions MHD instabilities. The influence of the fast particle population on the 2-D neutron source profile was clearly demonstrated in JET experiments. 2-D neutron and gamma-ray source measurements could be important for driven plasma heating profile optimization in fusion reactors. To meat the measurement requirements in ITER the planned set of neutron and gamma ray diagnostics includes radial and vertical neutron and gamma cameras, neutron flux monitors, neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The necessity of using massive radiation shielding strongly influences the diagnostic designs in fusion reactor, determines angular fields of view of neutron and gamma-ray cameras and spectrometers and gives rise to unavoidable difficulties in the absolute calibration. The development, testing in existing tokomaks and a possible engineering integration of neuron and gamma-ray diagnostic systems into ITER are presented.

  17. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-01

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  18. INVITED ARTICLE: Towards dense, realistic granular media in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luding, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The development of an applicable theory for granular matter—with both qualitative and quantitative value—is a challenging prospect, given the multitude of states, phases and (industrial) situations it has to cover. Given the general balance equations for mass, momentum and energy, the limiting case of dilute and almost elastic granular gases, where kinetic theory works perfectly well, is the starting point. In most systems, low density co-exists with very high density, where the latter is an open problem for kinetic theory. Furthermore, many additional nonlinear phenomena and material properties are important in realistic granular media, involving, e.g.: (i) multi-particle interactions and elasticity (ii) strong dissipation, (iii) friction, (iv) long-range forces and wet contacts, (v) wide particle size distributions and (vi) various particle shapes. Note that, while some of these issues are more relevant for high density, others are important for both low and high densities; some of them can be dealt with by means of kinetic theory, some cannot. This paper is a review of recent progress towards more realistic models for dense granular media in 2D, even though most of the observations, conclusions and corrections given are qualitatively true also in 3D. Starting from an elastic, frictionless and monodisperse hard sphere gas, the (continuum) balance equations of mass, momentum and energy are given. The equation of state, the (Navier-Stokes level) transport coefficients and the energy-density dissipation rate are considered. Several corrections are applied to those constitutive material laws—one by one—in order to account for the realistic physical effects and properties listed above.

  19. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  20. Practical Algorithm For Computing The 2-D Arithmetic Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Irving S.; Choi, Y. Y.; Yu, Xiaoli

    1989-05-01

    Recently, Tufts and Sadasiv [10] exposed a method for computing the coefficients of a Fourier series of a periodic function using the Mobius inversion of series. They called this method of analysis the Arithmetic Fourier Transform(AFT). The advantage of the AFT over the FN 1' is that this method of Fourier analysis needs only addition operations except for multiplications by scale factors at one stage of the computation. The disadvantage of the AFT as they expressed it originally is that it could be used effectively only to compute finite Fourier coefficients of a real even function. To remedy this the AFT developed in [10] is extended in [11] to compute the Fourier coefficients of both the even and odd components of a periodic function. In this paper, the improved AFT [11] is extended to a two-dimensional(2-D) Arithmetic Fourier Transform for calculating the Fourier Transform of two-dimensional discrete signals. This new algorithm is based on both the number-theoretic method of Mobius inversion of double series and the complex conjugate property of Fourier coefficients. The advantage of this algorithm over the conventional 2-D FFT is that the corner-turning problem needed in a conventional 2-D Discrete Fourier Transform(DFT) can be avoided. Therefore, this new 2-D algorithm is readily suitable for VLSI implementation as a parallel architecture. Comparing the operations of 2-D AFT of a MxM 2-D data array with the conventional 2-D FFT, the number of multiplications is significantly reduced from (2log2M)M2 to (9/4)M2. Hence, this new algorithm is faster than the FFT algorithm. Finally, two simulation results of this new 2-D AFT algorithm for 2-D artificial and real images are given in this paper.