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Sample records for 2-d neutron transport

  1. Geometric Correction in Diffusive Limit of Neutron Transport Equation in 2D Convex Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yan; Wu, Lei

    2017-10-01

    Consider the steady neutron transport equation with diffusive boundary condition. In Wu and Guo (Commun Math Phys 336:1473-1553, 2015) and Wu et al. (J Stat Phys 165:585-644, 2016), it was discovered that geometric correction is necessary for the Milne problem of Knudsen-layer construction in a disk or annulus. In this paper, we establish the diffusive limit for a 2D convex domain. Our contribution relies on novel weighted W^{1,∞} estimates for the Milne problem with geometric correction in the presence of a convex domain, as well as an L^{2m}-L^{∞} framework which yields stronger remainder estimates.

  2. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; Young, Mitchell T.H.; Kochunas, Brendan; Graham, Aaron; Larsen, Edward W.; Downar, Thomas; Godfrey, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    A consistent “2D/1D” neutron transport method is derived from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. This paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. Several applications have been performed on both leadership-class and industry-class computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.

  3. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; Young, Mitchell T. H.; Kochunas, Brendan; Graham, Aaron; Larsen, Edward W.; Downar, Thomas; Godfrey, Andrew

    2016-08-25

    We derived a consistent “2D/1D” neutron transport method from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. Our paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. We also performed several applications on both leadership-class and industry-class computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.

  4. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; Young, Mitchell T. H.; Kochunas, Brendan; Graham, Aaron; Larsen, Edward W.; Downar, Thomas; Godfrey, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    A consistent "2D/1D" neutron transport method is derived from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. This paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. Several applications have been performed on both leadership-class and industry-class computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.

  5. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; ...

    2016-08-25

    We derived a consistent “2D/1D” neutron transport method from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. Our paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. We also performed several applications on both leadership-class and industry-classmore » computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.« less

  6. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; Young, Mitchell T. H.; Kochunas, Brendan; Graham, Aaron; Larsen, Edward W.; Downar, Thomas; Godfrey, Andrew

    2016-08-25

    We derived a consistent “2D/1D” neutron transport method from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. Our paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. We also performed several applications on both leadership-class and industry-class computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.

  7. A Variational Nodal Approach to 2D/1D Pin Resolved Neutron Transport for Pressurized Water Reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Tengfei; Lewis, E. E.; Smith, M. A.; ...

    2017-04-18

    A two-dimensional/one-dimensional (2D/1D) variational nodal approach is presented for pressurized water reactor core calculations without fuel-moderator homogenization. A 2D/1D approximation to the within-group neutron transport equation is derived and converted to an even-parity form. The corresponding nodal functional is presented and discretized to obtain response matrix equations. Within the nodes, finite elements in the x-y plane and orthogonal functions in z are used to approximate the spatial flux distribution. On the radial interfaces, orthogonal polynomials are employed; on the axial interfaces, piecewise constants corresponding to the finite elements eliminate the interface homogenization that has been a challenge for method ofmore » characteristics (MOC)-based 2D/1D approximations. The angular discretization utilizes an even-parity integral method within the nodes, and low-order spherical harmonics (PN) on the axial interfaces. The x-y surfaces are treated with high-order PN combined with quasi-reflected interface conditions. Furthermore, the method is applied to the C5G7 benchmark problems and compared to Monte Carlo reference calculations.« less

  8. BOXER: Fine-flux Cross Section Condensation, 2D Few Group Diffusion and Transport Burnup Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-01

    Neutron transport, calculation of multiplication factor and neutron fluxes in 2-D configurations: cell calculations, 2-D diffusion and transport, and burnup. Preparation of a cross section library for the code BOXER from a basic library in ENDF/B format (ETOBOX).

  9. Ion Transport in 2-D Graphene Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Quan; Foo, Elbert; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Graphene membranes have recently attracted wide attention due to its great potential in water desalination and selective molecular sieving. Further developments of these membranes, including enhancing their mass transport rate and/or molecular selectivity, rely on the understanding of fundamental transport mechanisms through graphene membranes, which has not been studied experimentally before due to fabrication and measurement difficulties. Herein we report the fabrication of the basic constituent of graphene membranes, i.e. 2-D single graphene nanochannels (GNCs) and the study of ion transport in these channels. A modified bonding technique was developed to form GNCs with well-defined geometry and uniform channel height. Ion transport in such GNCs was studied using DC conductance measurement. Our preliminary results showed that the ion transport in GNCs is still governed by surface charge at low concentrations (10-6M to 10-4M). However, GNCs exhibits much higher ionic conductances than silica nanochannels with the same geometries in the surface-charge-governed regime. This conductance enhancement can be attributed to the pre-accumulation of charges on graphene surfaces. The work is supported by the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  10. A large 2D PSD for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, R. B.; Smith, G. C.; Watt, G.; Boldeman, J. W.

    1997-02-01

    A 2D PSD based on a MWPC has been constructed for a small angle neutron scattering instrument. The active area of the detector was 640 × 640 mm 2. To meet the specifications for neutron detection efficiency and spatial resolution, and to minimise parallax, the gas mixture was 190 kPa 3He plus 100 kPa CF 4, and the active volume had a thickness of 30 mm. The design maximum neutron count rate of the detector was 10 5 events per secod. The (calculated) neutron detection efficiency was 60% for 2 Å neutrons and the (measured) neutron energy resolution on the anode grid was typically 20% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active area was determined using the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 × 5 mm 2) was thereby defined by the wire geometry. A 16-channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator module has been developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1 V/fC, noise line width of 0.4 fC (fwhm) and channel-to-channel cross-talk of less than 5%. The Proportional Counter Operating System (PCOS III) (LeCroy Corp, USA) was used for event encoding. The ECL signals produced by the 16 channel modules were latched in PCOS III by a trigger pulse from the anode and the fast encoders produce a position and width for each event. The information was transferred to a UNIX workstation for accumulation and online display.

  11. A large 2D PSD for thermal neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, R.B.; Watt, G.; Boldeman, J.W.; Smith, G.C.

    1996-12-31

    A 2D PSD based on a MWPC has been constructed for a small angle neutron scattering instrument. The active area of the detector was 640 x 640 mm{sup 2}. To meet the specifications for neutron detection efficiency and spatial resolution, and to minimize parallax, the gas mixture was 190 kPa {sup 3}He plus 100 kPa CF{sub 4} and the active volume had a thickness of 30 mm. The design maximum neutron count-rate of the detector was 10{sup 5} events per second. The (calculated) neutron detection efficiency was 60% for 2{angstrom} neutrons and the (measured) neutron energy resolution on the anode grid was typically 20% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active area was determined using the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 x 5 mm{sup 2}) was thereby defined by the wire geometry. A 16 channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator module has been developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1 V/fC, noise linewidth of 0.4 fC (fwhm) and channel-to-channel cross-talk of less than 5%. The Proportional Counter Operating System (PCOS III) (LeCroy Corp USA) was used for event encoding. The ECL signals produced by the 16 channel modules were latched in PCOS III by a trigger pulse from the anode and the fast encoders produce a position and width for each event. The information was transferred to a UNIX workstation for accumulation and online display.

  12. A Detector for 2-D Neutron Imaging for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Britton Jr, Charles L; Bryan, Bill; Wintenberg, Alan Lee; Clonts, Lloyd G; Warmack, Robert J Bruce; McKnight, Timothy E; Frank, Steven Shane; Cooper, Ronald G; Dudney, Nancy J; Veith, Gabriel M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract - We have designed, built, and tested a 2-D pixellated thermal neutron detector. The detector is modeled after the MicroMegas-type structure previously published for collider-type experiments. The detector consists of a 4X4 square array of 1 cm 2 pixels each of which is connected to an individual preamplifier-shaper-data acquisition system. The neutron converter is a 10B film on an aluminum substrate. We describe the construction of the detector and the test results utilizing 252Cf sources in Lucite to thermalize the neutrons.Drift electrode (Aluminum) Converter (10B) 3 mm Conversion gap neutron (-900 V)

  13. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculations assume local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  14. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1988-08-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculation assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  15. A New 2D-Transport, 1D-Diffusion Approximation of the Boltzmann Transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17

    The work performed in this project consisted of the derivation, implementation, and testing of a new, computationally advantageous approximation to the 3D Boltz- mann transport equation. The solution of the Boltzmann equation is the neutron flux in nuclear reactor cores and shields, but solving this equation is difficult and costly. The new “2D/1D” approximation takes advantage of a special geometric feature of typical 3D reactors to approximate the neutron transport physics in a specific (ax- ial) direction, but not in the other two (radial) directions. The resulting equation is much less expensive to solve computationally, and its solutions are expected to be sufficiently accurate for many practical problems. In this project we formulated the new equation, discretized it using standard methods, developed a stable itera- tion scheme for solving the equation, implemented the new numerical scheme in the MPACT code, and tested the method on several realistic problems. All the hoped- for features of this new approximation were seen. For large, difficult problems, the resulting 2D/1D solution is highly accurate, and is calculated about 100 times faster than a 3D discrete ordinates simulation.

  16. IUPAP Award: Ion transport in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenzhong

    Intercalation in 2D materials drastically influences both physical and chemical properties, which leads to a new degree of freedom for fundamental studies and expands the potential applications of 2D materials. In this talk, I will discuss our work in the past two years related to ion intercalation of 2D materials, including insertion of Li and Na ions in graphene and MoS2. We focused on both fundamental mechanism and potential application, e.g. we measured in-situ optical transmittance spectra and electrical transport properties of few-layer graphene (FLG) nanostructures upon electrochemical lithiation/delithiation. By observing a simultaneous increase of both optical transmittance and DC conductivity, strikingly different from other materials, we proposed its application as a next generation transparent electrode.

  17. Electron hopping transport in 2D zinc oxide nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Dunliang; Lai, Jian-Jhong; Lin, Yen-Fu; Zhai, Jianpang; Li, Irene Ling; Tian, Feng; Wang, Shulin; Hua, Ping; Ku, Ming-Ming; Jian, Wen-Bin; Ruan, Shuangchen; Tang, Zikang

    2017-06-01

    A sequential hydrothermal process was used to synthesize ZnO nanostructures on Si substrates. The synthesized ZnO nanostructures were inspected and presented a morphology of 2D structures, named nanoflakes. These ZnO nanoflakes had a thickness of tens of nanometers. An energy dispersive x-ray spectrum revealed their composition of only Zn and O elements. In addition, its crystalline structure was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The nanoflakes were then dispersed for another morphology measurement using atomic force microscopy and their average thickness was determined. The dispersed nanoflakes were further contacted with metal electrodes for electron transport measurements. Through the analysis of temperature-dependent resistivity, it was confirmed that the electron transport in such ZnO nanoflakes agrees well with the theory of Mott’s 2D variable range hopping. The nature of the 2D electron system in the ZnO nanoflakes points to potential applications of this 2D semiconductor as a new channel material for electronics.

  18. Consistency between 2D-3D Sediment Transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaret, Catherine; Jodeau, Magali

    2017-04-01

    Sediment transport models have been developed and applied by the engineering community to estimate transport rates and morphodynamic bed evolutions in river flows, coastal and estuarine conditions. Environmental modelling systems like the open-source Telemac modelling system include a hierarchy of models from 1D (Mascaret), 2D (Telemac-2D/Sisyphe) and 3D (Telemac-3D/Sedi-3D) and include a wide range of processes to represent sediment flow interactions under more and more complex situations (cohesive, non-cohesive and mixed sediment). Despite some tremendous progresses in the numerical techniques and computing resources, the quality/accuracy of model results mainly depend on the numerous choices and skills of the modeler. In complex situations involving stratification effects, complex geometry, recirculating flows… 2D model assumptions are no longer valid. A full 3D turbulent flow model is then required in order to capture the vertical mixing processes and to represent accurately the coupled flow/sediment distribution. However a number of theoretical and numerical difficulties arise when dealing with sediment transport modelling in 3D which will be high-lighted : (1) Dependency of model results to the vertical grid refinement and choice of boundary conditions and numerical scheme (2) The choice of turbulence model determines also the sediment vertical distribution which is governed by a balance between the downward settling term and upward turbulent diffusion. (3) The use of different numerical schemes for both hydrodynamics (mean and turbulent flow) and sediment transport modelling can lead to some inconsistency including a mismatch in the definition of numerical cells and definition of boundary conditions. We discuss here those present issues and present some detailed comparison between 2D and 3D simulations on a set of validation test cases which are available in the Telemac 7.2 release using both cohesive and non-cohesive sediments.

  19. Neutron transport simulation (selected topics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, P.

    2009-10-01

    Neutron transport simulation is usually performed for criticality, power distribution, activation, scattering, dosimetry and shielding problems, among others. During the last fifteen years, innovative technological applications have been proposed (Accelerator Driven Systems, Energy Amplifiers, Spallation Neutron Sources, etc.), involving the utilization of intermediate energies (hundreds of MeV) and high-intensity (tens of mA) proton accelerators impinging in targets of high Z elements. Additionally, the use of protons, neutrons and light ions for medical applications (hadrontherapy) impose requirements on neutron dosimetry-related quantities (such as kerma factors) for biologically relevant materials, in the energy range starting at several tens of MeV. Shielding and activation related problems associated to the operation of high-energy proton accelerators, emerging space-related applications and aircrew dosimetry-related topics are also fields of intense activity requiring as accurate as possible medium- and high-energy neutron (and other hadrons) transport simulation. These applications impose specific requirements on cross-section data for structural materials, targets, actinides and biologically relevant materials. Emerging nuclear energy systems and next generation nuclear reactors also impose requirements on accurate neutron transport calculations and on cross-section data needs for structural materials, coolants and nuclear fuel materials, aiming at improved safety and detailed thermal-hydraulics and radiation damage studies. In this review paper, the state-of-the-art in the computational tools and methodologies available to perform neutron transport simulation is presented. Proton- and neutron-induced cross-section data needs and requirements are discussed. Hot topics are pinpointed, prospective views are provided and future trends identified.

  20. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  1. Parameterising root system growth models using 2D neutron radiography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Leitner, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Root architecture is a key factor for plant acquisition of water and nutrients from soil. In particular in view of a second green revolution where the below ground parts of agricultural crops are important, it is essential to characterise and quantify root architecture and its effect on plant resource acquisition. Mathematical models can help to understand the processes occurring in the soil-plant system, they can be used to quantify the effect of root and rhizosphere traits on resource acquisition and the response to environmental conditions. In order to do so, root architectural models are coupled with a model of water and solute transport in soil. However, dynamic root architectural models are difficult to parameterise. Novel imaging techniques such as x-ray computed tomography, neutron radiography and magnetic resonance imaging enable the in situ visualisation of plant root systems. Therefore, these images facilitate the parameterisation of dynamic root architecture models. These imaging techniques are capable of producing 3D or 2D images. Moreover, 2D images are also available in the form of hand drawings or from images of standard cameras. While full 3D imaging tools are still limited in resolutions, 2D techniques are a more accurate and less expensive option for observing roots in their environment. However, analysis of 2D images has additional difficulties compared to the 3D case, because of overlapping roots. We present a novel algorithm for the parameterisation of root system growth models based on 2D images of root system. The algorithm analyses dynamic image data. These are a series of 2D images of the root system at different points in time. Image data has already been adjusted for missing links and artefacts and segmentation was performed by applying a matched filter response. From this time series of binary 2D images, we parameterise the dynamic root architecture model in the following way: First, a morphological skeleton is derived from the binary

  2. Intrinsic limitations of spin transport in 2D membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang

    2014-03-01

    Two dimensional membranes have become the playground for both theorists and experimentalists due to their unique intrinsic properties emerged from simple lattice structures. They are the new focus of spintronic applications. Therefore, it is important that we have a clear view of the relaxation processes in spin transport, limited by their intrinsic and symmetry structures. In this talk, we present our findings by systematically applying group theory to the coupling of phonons and transport carriers in spin-dependent scattering. Scattering by phonon is amplified in 2D membranes due to its unique and populous flexural mode. Opposite spin coupling by one flexural phonon is allowed by symmetry, unlike the momentum scattering by higher-order two flexural phonons. Furthermore, we specifically discuss the ultrafast electron spin relaxation in single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (SL-TMDs). The additional factor stems from the decoupling of tiny conduction band spin splitting and the large spin scattering constant. The former results from conduction band orbital orientation, while the latter comes from inter-band coupling and reflects the atomic SOC strength. We will present that the essential use of group theory (invariant quantities) elucidates various spin-dependent selection rules of electron/hole-phonon interaction, within and between all relevant band-valley edges. Multiple potential applications of the derived results can be explored in transport problems, such as the strain effects, spin Gunn effect, hot exciton dynamics, and the scattering angle and spin anisotropy dependence. We compare different 2D membranes (graphene, SL-TMD, silicene and germanene) from general consideration of the lattice and band-edge symmetries. This work is supported by NRI-NSF, NSF, and DTRA Contracts No. DMR-1124601, No. ECCS-1231570, and No. HDTRA1-13-1-0013, respectively.

  3. Coupled Neutron Transport for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircrafts exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETC-HEDS, FLUKA, and MCNPX, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light particle transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  4. Influence of the neutron transport tube on neutron resonance densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitatani, Fumito; Tsuchiya, Harufumi; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Takamine, Jun; Hori, Junichi; Sano, Tadafumi

    2017-09-01

    Neutron Resonance Densitometry (NRD) is a non-destructive assay technique of nuclear materials in particle-like debris that contains various materials. An aim of NRD is to quantify nuclear materials in a melting fuel of Fukusima Daiichi plant, spent nuclear fuel and annihilation disposal fuel etc. NRD consists of two techniques of Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) and Neutron Resonance Capture Analysis (NRCA) or Prompt Gamma-ray Analysis (PGA). A density of nuclear material isotopes is decided with NRTA. The materials absorbing a neutron in a wide energy range such as boron in a sample are identified by NRCA/PGA. The information of NRCA/PGA is used in NRTA analysis to quantify nuclear material isotopes. A neutron time of flight (TOF) method is used in NRD measurements. A facility, consisting of a neutron source, a neutron flight path, and a detector is required. A short flight path and a strong neutron source are needed to downsize such a facility and put NRD into practical use. A neutron transport tube covers a flight path to prevent noises. In order to investigate the effect of neutron transport tube and pulse width of a neutron source, we carried out NRTA experiments with a 2-m short neutron transport tube constructed at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute - Linear Accelerator (KURRI-LINAC), and impacts of shield of neutron transport tube and influence of pulse width of a neutron source were examined. A shield of the neutron transport tube reduced a background and had a good influence on the measurement. The resonance dips of 183W at 27 eV was successfully observed with a pulse width of a neutron source less than 2 μs.

  5. A feasibility study using radiochromic films for fast neutron 2D passive dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Samuel L; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Howell, Calvin R; Crowell, Alexander S; Fallin, Brent; Tonchev, Anton P; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is threefold: (1) to establish sensitivity of XRQA and EBT radiochromic films to fast neutron exposure; (2) to develop a film response to radiation dose calibration curve and (3) to investigate a two-dimensional (2D) film dosimetry technique for use in establishing an experimental setup for a radiobiological irradiation of mice and to assess the dose to the mice in this setup. The films were exposed to a 10 MeV neutron beam via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction. The XRQA film response was a factor of 1.39 greater than EBT film response to the 10 MeV neutron beam when exposed to a neutron dose of 165 cGy. A film response-to-soft tissue dose calibration function was established over a range of 0–10 Gy and had a goodness of fit of 0.9926 with the calibration data. The 2D film dosimetry technique estimated the neutron dose to the mice by measuring the dose using a mouse phantom and by placing a piece of film on the exterior of the experimental mouse setup. The film results were benchmarked using Monte Carlo and aluminum (Al) foil activation measurements. The radiochromic film, Monte Carlo and Al foil dose measurements were strongly correlated, and the film within the mouse phantom agreed to better than 7% of the externally mounted films. These results demonstrated the potential application of radiochromic films for passive 2D neutron dosimetry. PMID:20693612

  6. Photocarrier transport in 2D macroporous silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, L.; Onyshchenko, V.; Sachenko, A.

    2010-12-01

    The mechanisms of photocarrier transport through a barrier in the surface space-charge region (SCR) of 2D macroporous silicon structures have been studied at photon energies comparable to that of the silicon indirect band-to-band transition. It was found that the photoconductivity relaxation time was determined by the light modulation of barrier on the macropore surface; as a result, the relaxation itself obeyed the logarithmic law. The temperature dependence of the photoconductivity relaxation time was determined by the thermionic emission mechanism of the current transport in the SCR at temperatures T > 180 K, and by the tunnel current flow at T < 100 K, with temperature-independent tunnelling probability. The photo-emf was found to become saturated or reverse its sign to negative at temperatures below 130 K because of light absorption due to optical transitions via surface electronic states close to the silicon conduction band. In this case, the surface band bending increases due to the growth of a negative charge of the semiconductor surface. The equilibrium electrons in the bulk and photoexcited holes on the macropore surface recombine through the channel of multistage tunnel recombination between the conduction and valence bands.

  7. 2D DEM model of sand transport with wind interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oger, L.; Valance, A.

    2013-06-01

    The advance of the dunes in the desert is a threat to the life of the local people. The dunes invade houses, agricultural land and perturb the circulation on the roads. It is therefore very important to understand the mechanism of sand transport in order to fight against desertification. Saltation in which sand grains are propelled by the wind along the surface in short hops, is the primary mode of blown sand movement [1]. The saltating grains are very energetic and when impact a sand surface, they rebound and consequently eject other particles from the sand bed. The ejected grains, called reptating grains, contribute to the augmentation of the sand flux. Some of them can be promoted to the saltation motion. We use a mechanical model based on the Discrete Element Method to study successive collisions of incident energetic beads with granular packing in the context of Aeolian saltation transport. We investigate the collision process for the case where the incident bead and those from the packing have identical mechanical properties. We analyze the features of the consecutive collision processes made by the transport of the saltating disks by a wind in which its profile is obtained from the counter-interaction between air flow and grain flows. We used a molecular dynamics method known as DEM (soft Discrete Element Method) with a initial static packing of 20000 2D particles. The dilation of the upper surface due to the consecutive collisions is responsible for maintaining the flow at a given energy input due to the wind.

  8. The HB-2D Polarized Neutron Development Beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Lowell; Hamilton, WA; Zhao, JK; Robertson, JL

    2016-09-01

    The Polarized Neutron Development beamline, recently commissioned at the HB-2D position on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides a tool for development and testing of polarizers, polarized neutron devices, and prototyping of polarized neutron techniques. With available monochromators including pyrolytic graphite and polarizing enriched Fe-57 (Si), the instrument has operated at 4.25 and 2.6 Å wavelengths, using crystal, supermirror, or He-3 polarizers and analyzers in various configurations. The Neutron Optics and Development Team has used the beamline for testing of He-3 polarizers for use at other HFIR and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) instruments, as well as a variety of flipper devices. Recently, we have acquired new supermirror polarizers which have improved the instrument performance. The team and collaborators also have continuing demonstration experiments of spin-echo focusing techniques, and plans to conduct polarized diffraction measurements. The beamline is also used to support a growing use of polarization techniques at present and future instruments at SNS and HFIR.

  9. Coupling 2-D cylindrical and 3-D x-y-z transport computations

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Shumays, I.K.; Yehnert, C.E.; Pitcairn, T.N.

    1998-06-30

    This paper describes a new two-dimensional (2-D) cylindrical geometry to three-dimensional (3-D) rectangular x-y-z splice option for multi-dimensional discrete ordinates solutions to the neutron (photon) transport equation. Of particular interest are the simple transformations developed and applied in order to carry out the required spatial and angular interpolations. The spatial interpolations are linear and equivalent to those applied elsewhere. The angular interpolations are based on a high order spherical harmonics representation of the angular flux. Advantages of the current angular interpolations over previous work are discussed. An application to an intricate streaming problem is provided to demonstrate the advantages of the new method for efficient and accurate prediction of particle behavior in complex geometries.

  10. Neutron Transport Simulations for NIST Neutron Lifetime Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangchen; BL2 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Neutrons in stable nuclei can exist forever; a free neutron lasts for about 15 minutes on average before it beta decays to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino. Precision measurements of the neutron lifetime test the validity of weak interaction theory and provide input into the theory of the evolution of light elements in the early universe. There are two predominant ways of measuring the neutron lifetime: the bottle method and the beam method. The bottle method measures decays of ultracold neutrons that are stored in a bottle. The beam method measures decay protons in a beam of cold neutrons of known flux. An improved beam experiment is being prepared at the National Institute of Science and Technology (Gaithersburg, MD) with the goal of reducing statistical and systematic uncertainties to the level of 1 s. The purpose of my studies was to develop computer simulations of neutron transport to determine the beam collimation and study the neutron distribution's effect on systematic effects for the experiment, such as the solid angle of the neutron flux monitor. The motivation for the experiment and the results of this work will be presented. This work was supported, in part, by a Grant to Gettysburg College from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program.

  11. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, B.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on an equal footing. Electron bandstructure is treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. We present the results of our simulations of MIT 25 and 90 nm "well-tempered" MOSFETs and compare them to those of classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are consistent with 1D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and subthreshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller leakage current than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current.

  12. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, B.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on an equal footing. Electron bandstructure is treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. We present the results of our simulations of MIT 25 and 90 nm "well-tempered" MOSFETs and compare them to those of classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are consistent with 1D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and subthreshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller leakage current than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current.

  13. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density- gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Quantum simulations are focused on MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well- tempered" MOSFETs and compared to classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are quantitatively consistent with I D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and sub-threshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  14. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density- gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Quantum simulations are focused on MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well- tempered" MOSFETs and compared to classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are quantitatively consistent with I D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and sub-threshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  15. Turbulent transport in 2D collisionless guide field reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, P. A.; Büchner, J.; Kilian, P.

    2017-02-01

    Transport in hot and dilute, i.e., collisionless, astrophysical and space, plasmas is called "anomalous." This transport is due to the interaction between the particles and the self-generated turbulence by their collective interactions. The anomalous transport has very different and not well known properties compared to the transport due to binary collisions, dominant in colder and denser plasmas. Because of its relevance for astrophysical and space plasmas, we explore the excitation of turbulence in current sheets prone to component- or guide-field reconnection, a process not well understood yet. This configuration is typical for stellar coronae, and it is created in the laboratory for which a 2.5D geometry applies. In our analysis, in addition to the immediate vicinity of the X-line, we also include regions outside and near the separatrices. We analyze the anomalous transport properties by using 2.5D Particle-in-Cell code simulations. We split off the mean slow variation (in contrast to the fast turbulent fluctuations) of the macroscopic observables and determine the main transport terms of the generalized Ohm's law. We verify our findings by comparing with the independently determined slowing-down rate of the macroscopic currents (due to a net momentum transfer from particles to waves) and with the transport terms obtained by the first order correlations of the turbulent fluctuations. We find that the turbulence is most intense in the "low density" separatrix region of guide-field reconnection. It is excited by streaming instabilities, is mainly electrostatic and "patchy" in space, and so is the associated anomalous transport. Parts of the energy exchange between turbulence and particles are reversible and quasi-periodic. The remaining irreversible anomalous resistivity can be parametrized by an effective collision rate ranging from the local ion-cyclotron to the lower-hybrid frequency. The contributions to the parallel and the perpendicular (to the magnetic

  16. NEPHTIS: Core depletion validation relying on 2D transport core calculations with the APOLLO2 code

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, F.; Raepsaet, X.; Groizard, M.; Poinot, C.

    2006-07-01

    The CEA, in collaboration with EDF and AREVA-NP, is developing a core modelling tool called NEPHTIS, for Neutronic Process for HTGR Innovating Systems and dedicated at present day to the prismatic block-type HTGR (High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors). Due to the lack of usable HTGR experimental results, the confidence in this neutronic computational tool relies essentially on comparisons to reference or best-estimate calculations. In the present analysis, the Aleppo deterministic transport code has been selected as reference for validating core depletion simulations carried out within NEPHTIS. These reference calculations were performed on fully detailed 2D core configurations using the Method of Characteristics. The latter has been validated versus Monte Carlo method for different static core configurations [1], [2] and [3]. All the presented results come from an annular HTGR core loaded with uranium-based fuel (15% enrichment). During the core depletion validation, reactivity, reaction rates distributions and nuclei concentrations have been compared. In addition, the impact of various physical and geometrical parameters such as the core loading (one-through or batch-wise reloading) and the amount of burnable poison has been investigated during the validation phases. The results confirm that NEPHTIS is able to predict the core reactivity with uncertainties of {+-}350 pcm. At the end of the core irradiation, the U-235 consumption is calculated within {+-} 0, 7 % while the plutonium mass discharged from the core is calculated within {+-}1 %. As far as the core power distributions are concerned, small discrepancies ( and < 2.3 %) can be observed on the fuel block-averaged power distribution in the core. (authors)

  17. Screening and transport in 2D semiconductor systems at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Das Sarma, S.; Hwang, E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature carrier transport properties in 2D semiconductor systems can be theoretically well-understood within RPA-Boltzmann theory as being limited by scattering from screened Coulomb disorder arising from random quenched charged impurities in the environment. In this work, we derive a number of analytical formula, supported by realistic numerical calculations, for the relevant density, mobility, and temperature range where 2D transport should manifest strong intrinsic (i.e., arising purely from electronic effects) metallic temperature dependence in different semiconductor materials arising entirely from the 2D screening properties, thus providing an explanation for why the strong temperature dependence of the 2D resistivity can only be observed in high-quality and low-disorder 2D samples and also why some high-quality 2D materials manifest much weaker metallicity than other materials. We also discuss effects of interaction and disorder on the 2D screening properties in this context as well as compare 2D and 3D screening functions to comment why such a strong intrinsic temperature dependence arising from screening cannot occur in 3D metallic carrier transport. Experimentally verifiable predictions are made about the quantitative magnitude of the maximum possible low-temperature metallicity in 2D systems and the scaling behavior of the temperature scale controlling the quantum to classical crossover. PMID:26572738

  18. Screening and transport in 2D semiconductor systems at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Das Sarma, S; Hwang, E H

    2015-11-17

    Low temperature carrier transport properties in 2D semiconductor systems can be theoretically well-understood within RPA-Boltzmann theory as being limited by scattering from screened Coulomb disorder arising from random quenched charged impurities in the environment. In this work, we derive a number of analytical formula, supported by realistic numerical calculations, for the relevant density, mobility, and temperature range where 2D transport should manifest strong intrinsic (i.e., arising purely from electronic effects) metallic temperature dependence in different semiconductor materials arising entirely from the 2D screening properties, thus providing an explanation for why the strong temperature dependence of the 2D resistivity can only be observed in high-quality and low-disorder 2D samples and also why some high-quality 2D materials manifest much weaker metallicity than other materials. We also discuss effects of interaction and disorder on the 2D screening properties in this context as well as compare 2D and 3D screening functions to comment why such a strong intrinsic temperature dependence arising from screening cannot occur in 3D metallic carrier transport. Experimentally verifiable predictions are made about the quantitative magnitude of the maximum possible low-temperature metallicity in 2D systems and the scaling behavior of the temperature scale controlling the quantum to classical crossover.

  19. 2D numerical simulation of the MEP energy-transport model with a finite difference scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, V. . E-mail: romano@dmi.unict.it

    2007-02-10

    A finite difference scheme of Scharfetter-Gummel type is used to simulate a consistent energy-transport model for electron transport in semiconductors devices, free of any fitting parameters, formulated on the basis of the maximum entropy principle. Simulations of silicon n{sup +}-n-n{sup +} diodes, 2D-MESFET and 2D-MOSFET and comparisons with the results obtained by a direct simulation of the Boltzmann transport equation and with other energy-transport models, known in the literature, show the validity of the model and the robustness of the numerical scheme.

  20. Conceptual design of a neutron diagnostic for 2-D deuterium power density map reconstruction in MITICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebai, M.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G.; Muraro, A.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M.; Murtas, F.; Cavenago, M.; Gorini, G.

    2017-01-01

    A neutron diagnostic based on Gas Electron Multiplier is proposed for the MITICA beam injector test facility. The detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM) and aims at providing the beam intensity profile on the horizontal direction by measuring the neutron emission from the beam dump surface by placing a detector right behind the dump. CNESM uses Gas Electron Multiplier detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil, named nGEM. The cathode, made of a thin polythene film and an aluminium film, is designed for detection of neutrons emitted with and angle between 30 and 70 degrees with respect to the deuterium beam axis. Neutron scattering in the dump and neutron detection with the nGEM were simulated with the MCNP6.1.1 code.

  1. Quantum transport in neutron-irradiated modulation-doped heterojunctions. I. Fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, W.; Zhou, J.; Huang, Y.; Cai, L.

    1988-12-15

    We have investigated the characteristics of low-temperature quantum transport in Al/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As/GaAs modulation-doped heterojunctions irradiated by fast neutrons of about 14 MeV energy. The concentration and the mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas (2D EG) under low magnetic fields decrease with increase in the concentrations of scatterers, such as ionized impurities, lattice defects, and interface roughness. On the other hand, under strong magnetic fields, the Hall plateau broadening associated with the Landau localized states, and the Shubnikov--de Hass (SdH) oscillation enhancement associated with the Landau extended states, increase markedly after fast-neutron irradiation.

  2. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Walker, Steven A.; Badavi, Francis F.

    2010-01-01

    Long term human presence in space requires the inclusion of radiation constraints in mission planning and the design of shielding materials, structures, and vehicles. In this paper, the numerical error associated with energy discretization in HZETRN is addressed. An inadequate numerical integration scheme in the transport algorithm is shown to produce large errors in the low energy portion of the neutron and light ion fluence spectra. It is further shown that the errors result from the narrow energy domain of the neutron elastic cross section spectral distributions, and that an extremely fine energy grid is required to resolve the problem under the current formulation. Two numerical methods are developed to provide adequate resolution in the energy domain and more accurately resolve the neutron elastic interactions. Convergence testing is completed by running the code for various environments and shielding materials with various energy grids to ensure stability of the newly implemented method.

  3. A deterministic method for transient, three-dimensional neutron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goluoglu, Sedat

    A deterministic method for solving the time-dependent, three-dimensional Boltzmann transport equation with explicit representation of delayed neutrons has been developed and evaluated. The methodology used in this study for the time variable is the improved quasi-static (IQS) method. The position, energy, and angle variables of the neutron flux are computed using the three-dimensional (3-D) discrete ordinates code TORT. The resulting time-dependent, 3-D code is called TDTORT. The flux shape calculated by TORT is used to compute the point kinetics parameters (e.g., reactivity, generation time, etc.). The amplitude function is calculated by solving the point kinetics equations using LSODE (Livermore Solver of Ordinary differential Equations). Several transient 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D benchmark problems are used to verify TDTORT. The results show that methodology and code developed in this work have sufficient accuracy and speed to serve as a benchmarking tool for other less accurate models and codes. More importantly, a new computational tool based on transport theory now exists for analyzing the dynamic behavior of complex neutronic systems.

  4. A Polar Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transport Method for 2D ALE Meshes in HYDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Britton; Marinak, Marty; Weber, Chris; Peterson, Luc

    2016-10-01

    The Polar Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transport Method in HYDRA has been extended to handle general 2D r-z meshes. Previously the method was only for orthogonal 2D meshes. The new method can be employed with the ALE methodology for managing mesh motion that is used to simulate Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities on NIF capsule implosions. The results of an examination of this kind will be compared to those obtained by the corresponding diffusion method. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Effects of magnetic impurities on transport in 2D topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Xiaoqian; Burton, J. D.; Tsymbal, Evgeny

    Understanding the transport properties of topological insulators could bring such materials from fundamental research to potential applications. Here we report on the theoretical investigations of the effects of magnetic impurities on transport properties of model two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs). We utilize the tight-binding form of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model and investigate the transport properties by employing the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. We explore the current distribution in 2D TIs resulting from scattering by a magnetic impurity which breaks time-reversal symmetry. We find that a magnetic impurity could drive anti-resonant behavior of the conductance, as revealed from full backscattering of the electron current flowing at one of the edges of the TI. This phenomenon occurs due to spin-flip scattering when the Fermi energy matches the impurity state and the magnetic moment of the impurity is aligned along the TI edge. Additionally, we explore the effect of an external magnetic gate attached to the system and show that changing the magnetization orientation within the gate allows the control of conductance. This geometric setup could be realized experimentally providing the opportunity to tune transport properties of 2D TIs by a magnetic gate.

  6. A depth-averaged 2-D model of flow and sediment transport in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Alejandro; Wu, Weiming; Beck, Tanya M.

    2016-11-01

    A depth-averaged 2-D model has been developed to simulate unsteady flow and nonuniform sediment transport in coastal waters. The current motion is computed by solving the phase-averaged 2-D shallow water flow equations reformulated in terms of total-flux velocity, accounting for the effects of wave radiation stresses and general diffusion or mixing induced by current, waves, and wave breaking. The cross-shore boundary conditions are specified by assuming fully developed longshore current and wave setup that are determined using the reduced 1-D momentum equations. A 2-D wave spectral transformation model is used to calculate the wave height, period, direction, and radiation stresses, and a surface wave roller model is adopted to consider the effects of surface roller on the nearshore currents. The nonequilibrium transport of nonuniform total-load sediment is simulated, considering sediment entrainment by current and waves, the lag of sediment transport relative to the flow, and the hiding and exposure effect of nonuniform bed material. The flow and sediment transport equations are solved using an implicit finite volume method on a variety of meshes including nonuniform rectangular, telescoping (quadtree) rectangular, and hybrid triangular/quadrilateral meshes. The flow and wave models are integrated through a carefully designed steering process. The model has been tested in three field cases, showing generally good performance.

  7. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-31

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  8. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  9. Impact of high speed civil transports on stratospheric ozone: A 2-D model investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, D.E.; Connell, P.S.

    1996-12-01

    This study investigates the effect on stratospheric ozone from a fleet of proposed High Speed Civil Transports (HSCTs). The new LLNL 2-D operator-split chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere is used for this HSCT investigation. This model is integrated in a diurnal manner, using an implicit numerical solver. Therefore, rate coefficients are not modified by any sort of diurnal average factor. This model also does not make any assumptions on lumping of chemical species into families. Comparisons to previous model-derived HSCT assessment of ozone change are made, both to the previous LLNL 2-D model and to other models from the international assessment modeling community. The sensitivity to the NO{sub x} emission index and sulfate surface area density is also explored.

  10. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  11. ICF target 2D modeling using Monte Carlo SNB electron thermal transport in DRACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory

    2016-10-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet multigroup diffusion electron thermal transport method is adapted into a Monte Carlo (MC) transport method to better model angular and long mean free path non-local effects. The MC model was first implemented in the 1D LILAC code to verify consistency with the iSNB model. Implementation of the MC SNB model in the 2D DRACO code enables higher fidelity non-local thermal transport modeling in 2D implosions such as polar drive experiments on NIF. The final step is to optimize the MC model by hybridizing it with a MC version of the iSNB diffusion method. The hybrid method will combine the efficiency of a diffusion method in intermediate mean free path regions with the accuracy of a transport method in long mean free path regions allowing for improved computational efficiency while maintaining accuracy. Work to date on the method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories and the Univ. of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  12. Surface effects on electronic transport of 2D chalcogenide thin films and nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yeonwoong; Shen, Jie; Cha, Judy J

    2014-01-01

    The renewed interest in two-dimensional materials, particularly transition metal dichalcogenides, has been explosive, evident in a number of review and perspective articles on the topic. Our ability to synthesize and study these 2D materials down to a single layer and to stack them to form van der Waals heterostructures opens up a wide range of possibilities from fundamental studies of nanoscale effects to future electronic and optoelectronic applications. Bottom-up and top-down synthesis and basic electronic properties of 2D chalcogenide materials have been covered in great detail elsewhere. Here, we bring attention to more subtle effects: how the environmental, surface, and crystal defects modify the electronic band structure and transport properties of 2D chalcogenide nanomaterials. Surface effects such as surface oxidation and substrate influence may dominate the overall transport properties, particularly in single layer chalcogenide devices. Thus, understanding such effects is critical for successful applications based on these materials. In this review, we discuss two classes of chalcogenides - Bi-based and Mo-based chalcogenides. The first are topological insulators with unique surface electronic properties and the second are promising for flexible optoelectronic applications as well as hydrogen evolution catalytic reactions.

  13. A Parallel 2D Depth-averaged Hydrodynamic, Sediment Transport and River Morphological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical models of river morphodynamics have become important tools for understanding process-form relationships in river channels through the computation of hydrodynamics, sediment transport and an evolving river bed morphology. While 2D depth-averaged models do not include vertical variation in velocities, they can provide appropriate hydrodynamic results in shallow water environments. Although 2D models are less computationally expensive than 3D models, computation speed is still a concern in many applications, especially in river morphological applications. This paper presents a new parallel 2D hydrodynamic, sediment transport and bed morphology model, developed using Open source Field Operation And Manipulation (OpenFOAM). The model uses the Message Passing Interface (MPI) for parallel computing. Further development and modification of the model are relatively straightforward to accomplish with the OpenFOAM framework. Thus, developers can focus on scientific questions rather than having to write their own code for numerical schemes or learn the intricacies of a particular coding language. The open source platform also allows others to add on to and improve the base model so that it becomes an evolving, community-based computational resource. Model validation and parallel efficiency evaluation will be presented and discussed.

  14. Performance characteristics of the new detector array for the SANS2d instrument on the ISIS spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, D.; Heenan, R.; McPhail, D.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N.; Rogers, S.; Schooneveld, E.; Spill, E.; Terry, A.

    2014-12-01

    The performance of the new position sensitive neutron detector arrays of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) instrument SANS2d is described. The SANS2d instrument is one of the seven instruments currently available for users on the second target station (TS2) of the ISIS spallation neutron source. Since the instrument became operational in 2009 it has used two one metre square multi-wire proportional detectors (MWPC). However, these detectors suffer from a low count rate capability, are easily damaged by excess beam and are then expensive to repair. The new detector arrays each consist of 120 individual position sensitive detector tubes, filled with 15 bar of 3He. Each of the tubes is one metre long and has a diameter of 8mm giving a detector array with an overall area of one square metre. Two such arrays have been built and installed in the SANS2d vacuum tank where they are currently taking user data. For SANS measurements operation of the detector within a vacuum is essential in order to reduce air scattering. A novel, fully engineered approach has been utilised to ensure that the high voltage connections and preamps are located inside the SANS2d vacuum tank at atmospheric pressure, within air tubes and air boxes respectively. The signal processing electronics and data acquisition system are located remotely in a counting house outside of the blockhouse. This allows easy access for maintenance purposes, without the need to remove the detectors from the vacuum tank. The design will be described in detail. A position resolution of 8mm FWHM or less has been measured along the length of the tubes. The initial measurements taken from a standard sample indicate that whilst the detector arrays themselves only represent a moderate improvement in overall detection efficiency (~ 20%), compared to the previous detector, the count rate capability is increased by a factor of 100. A significant advantage of the new array is the ability to change a single tube in situ

  15. Neutron Transport Characteristics of a Nuclear Reactor Based Dynamic Neutron Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Khaial, Anas M.; Harvel, Glenn D.; Chang, Jen-Shih

    2006-07-01

    An advanced dynamic neutron imaging system has been constructed in the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR) for nondestructive testing and multi-phase flow studies in energy and environmental applications. A high quality neutron beam is required with a thermal neutron flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}-s and a collimation ratio of 120 at image plane to promote high-speed neutron imaging up to 2000 frames per second. Neutron source strength and neutron transport have been experimentally and numerically investigated. Neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance was evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes, and simple analytical neutron transport calculations were performed based upon these measured neutron fluxes to predict facility components in accordance with high-speed dynamic neutron imaging and operation safety requirements. Monte-Carlo simulations (using MCNP-4B code) with multiple neutron energy groups have also been used to validate neutron beam parameters and to ensure shielding capabilities of facility shutter and cave walls. Neutron flux distributions at the image plane and the neutron beam characteristics were experimentally measured by irradiating a two-dimensional array of Copper foils and using a real-time neutron radiography system. The neutron image characteristics -- such as neutron flux, image size, beam quality -- measured experimentally and predicted numerically for beam tube, beam shutter and radiography cave are compared and discussed in detail in this paper. The experimental results show that thermal neutron flux at image plane is nearly uniform over an imaging area of 20.0-cm diameter and its magnitude ranges from 8.0 x 10{sup 6} - 1.0 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}-sec while the neutron-to-gamma ratio is 6.0 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}-{mu}Sv. (authors)

  16. Statistics of mesoscopic fluctuations in transport properties of a 2D disordered metallic conductor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mill, David S. W.; Tartakovski, Alex V.

    1996-03-01

    Using the exact scaling (``evolution'') equations for the transfer and scattering matrices, we consider statistics of mesoscopic fluctuations of the conductance in a 2D weakly disordered conductor. The bulk of the distribution in the metallic region is shown to be normal Gaussian, while the tails are logarithmically normal. Thus, we reproduce in a more direct way the result of renormalization group treatment by Al'tshuler, Kravtsov, and Lerner. We compute the quantum correction δ A and the variance Var A due to weak localization for a general transport property A=sum_na(T_n) in 2D. This result generalizes the theory of weak localization for the conductance to all linear statistics on the transmission eigenvalues T_1,T_2,ldots T_N.

  17. Hydrogen self-dynamics in liquid H2-D2 mixtures studied through inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colognesi, Daniele; Bafile, Ubaldo; Celli, Milva; Neumann, Martin; Orecchini, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    We have measured the dynamic structure factor of liquid para-hydrogen mixed with normal deuterium (T =20 K ) at two different concentration levels using incoherent inelastic neutron scattering. This choice has been made since the presence of D2 modifies the self-dynamics of H2 in a highly nontrivial way, acting both on its pseudophononic and its diffusive parts in a tunable way. After an accurate data reduction, recorded neutron spectra were studied through the modified Young and Koppel model and the H2 center-of-mass self-dynamics structure factor was finally extracted for the two mixtures. Some physical quantities (i.e., self-diffusion coefficient and mean kinetic energy) were determined and compared with accurate quantum calculations, which, in addition, also provided estimates of the velocity autocorrelation function for the H2 centers of mass. These estimates, in conjunction with the Gaussian approximation, were used to simulate the H2 center-of-mass self-dynamics structure factor in the same range as the experimental one. The agreement between measured and calculated spectra was globally good, but some discrepancies proved the unquestionable breakdown of the Gaussian approximation in these semiquantum systems at a level comparable to that already observed in pure liquid para-hydrogen.

  18. New approach to creation of geometrical module for nuclear reactor neutron transport computer simulation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Poveschenko, T.; Poveschenko, O.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the new approach to creation of geometrical module for nuclear reactor neutron transport computer simulation analysis so called the differential cross method. It is elaborated for detecting boards between physical zones. It is proposed to use GMSH open source mesh editor extended by some features: a special option and a special kind of mesh (cubic background mesh).This method is aimed into Monte Carlo Method as well as for deterministic neutron transport methods. Special attention is attended for reactor core composed of a set of material zones with complicate geometrical boundaries. The idea of this approach is described. In general case method works for 3-D space. Algorithm of creation of the geometrical module is given. 2-D neutron transport benchmark-test for RBMK reactor cluster cell is described. It demonstrates the ability of this approach to provide flexible definition of geometrical meshing with preservation of curved surface or any level of heterogeneity. (authors)

  19. A plastic scintillator-based 2D thermal neutron mapping system for use in BNCT studies.

    PubMed

    Ghal-Eh, N; Green, S

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a scintillator-based measurement instrument is proposed which is capable of measuring a two-dimensional map of thermal neutrons within a phantom based on the detection of 2.22MeV gamma rays generated via nth+H→D+γ reaction. The proposed instrument locates around a small rectangular water phantom (14cm×15cm×20cm) used in Birmingham BNCT facility. The whole system has been simulated using MCNPX 2.6. The results confirm that the thermal flux peaks somewhere between 2cm and 4cm distance from the system entrance which is in agreement with previous studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Computer Code for 2-D Transport Calculations in x-y Geometry Using the Interface Current Method.

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-01

    Version 00 RICANT performs 2-dimensional neutron transport calculations in x-y geometry using the interface current method. In the interface current method, the angular neutron currents crossing region surfaces are expanded in terms of the Legendre polynomials in the two half-spaces made by the region surfaces.

  1. Stable Difference Schemes for the Neutron Transport Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Taskin, Abdulgafur

    2011-09-01

    The initial boundary value problem for the neutron transport equation is considered. The first and second orders of accuracy difference schemes for the approximate solution of this problem are presented. In applications, the stability estimates for solutions of difference schemes for the approximate solution of the neutron transport equation are obtained. Numerical techniques are developed and algorithms are tested on an example in MATLAB.

  2. Momentum Transport: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to investigate the momentum budgets associated with several convective systems that developed during the TOGA COARE IOP (west Pacific warm pool region) and GATE (east Atlantic region). The tool for this study is the improved Goddard Cumulas Ensemble (GCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysical scheme, explicit cloud radiative interactive processes and air-sea interactive surface processes. The model domain contains 256 x 256 grid points (with 2 km resolution) in the horizontal and 38 grid points (to a depth of 22 km) in the vertical. The 2D domain has 1024 grid points. The simulations were performed over a 7-day time period (December 19-26, 1992, for TOGA COARE and September 1-7, 1994 for GATE). Cyclic literal boundary conditions are required for this type of long-term integration. Two well organized squall systems (TOGA, COARE February 22, 1993, and GATE September 12, 1994) were also simulated using the 3D GCE model. Only 9 h simulations were required to cover the life time of the squall systems. the lateral boundary conditions were open for these two squall systems simulations. the following will be examined: (1) the momentum budgets in the convective and stratiform regions, (2) the relationship between momentum transport and cloud organization (i.e., well organized squall lines versus less organized convective), (3) the differences and similarities in momentum transport between 2D and 3D simulated convective systems, and (4) the differences and similarities in momentum budgets between cloud systems simulated with open and cyclic lateral boundary conditions. Preliminary results indicate that there are only small differences between 2D and 3D simulated momentum budgets. Major differences occur, however, between momentum budgets associated with squall systems simulated using different lateral boundary conditions.

  3. An Implicit 2-D Depth-Averaged Finite-Volume Model of Flow and Sediment Transport in Coastal Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional depth-averaged circulation model CMS- M2D : Version 3.0, Report 2: Sediment transport and morphology change, Technical Report ERDC/CHL TR...dimensional depth-averaged circulation model M2D : Version 2.0, Report 1, Technical documentation and user’s guide. ERDC/CHL TR-04-2, Coastal and Hydraulics

  4. Kinetic parameter estimation in N. europaea biofilms using a 2-D reactive transport model.

    PubMed

    Lauchnor, Ellen G; Semprini, Lewis; Wood, Brian D

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms of the ammonia oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea were cultivated to study microbial processes associated with ammonia oxidation in pure culture. We explored the hypothesis that the kinetic parameters of ammonia oxidation in N. europaea biofilms were in the range of those determined with batch suspended cells. Oxygen and pH microelectrodes were used to measure dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH above and inside biofilms and reactive transport modeling was performed to simulate the measured DO and pH profiles. A two dimensional (2-D) model was used to simulate advection parallel to the biofilm surface and diffusion through the overlying fluid while reaction and diffusion were simulated in the biofilm. Three experimental studies of microsensor measurements were performed with biofilms: i) NH3 concentrations near the Ksn value of 40 μM determined in suspended cell tests ii) Limited buffering capacity which resulted in a pH gradient within the biofilms and iii) NH3 concentrations well below the Ksn value. Very good fits to the DO concentration profiles both in the fluid above and in the biofilms were achieved using the 2-D model. The modeling study revealed that the half-saturation coefficient for NH3 in N. europaea biofilms was close to the value measured in suspended cells. However, the third study of biofilms with low availability of NH3 deviated from the model prediction. The model also predicted shifts in the DO profiles and the gradient in pH that resulted for the case of limited buffering capacity. The results illustrate the importance of incorporating both key transport and chemical processes in a biofilm reactive transport model.

  5. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  6. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  7. Simulation and analysis of solute transport in 2D fracture/pipe networks: The SOLFRAC program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Jacques; Porel, Gilles; Delay, Fred; Ubertosi, Fabrice; Bernard, Stéphane; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2007-01-01

    The Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) method has been recently developed by Delay and Bodin [Delay, F. and Bodin, J., 2001. Time domain random walk method to simulate transport by advection-dispersion and matrix diffusion in fracture networks. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(21): 4051-4054.] and Bodin et al. [Bodin, J., Porel, G. and Delay, F., 2003c. Simulation of solute transport in discrete fracture networks using the time domain random walk method. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 6566: 1-8.] for simulating solute transport in discrete fracture networks. It is assumed that the fracture network can reasonably be represented by a network of interconnected one-dimensional pipes (i.e. flow channels). Processes accounted for are: (1) advection and hydrodynamic dispersion in the channels, (2) matrix diffusion, (3) diffusion into stagnant zones within the fracture planes, (4) sorption reactions onto the fracture walls and in the matrix, (5) linear decay, and (6) mass sharing at fracture intersections. The TDRW method is handy and very efficient in terms of computation costs since it allows for the one-step calculation of the particle residence time in each bond of the network. This method has been programmed in C++, and efforts have been made to develop an efficient and user-friendly software, called SOLFRAC. This program is freely downloadable at the URL http://labo.univ-poitiers.fr/hydrasa/intranet/telechargement.htm. It calculates solute transport into 2D pipe networks, while considering different types of injections and different concepts of local dispersion within each flow channel. Post-simulation analyses are also available, such as the mean velocity or the macroscopic dispersion at the scale of the entire network. The program may be used to evaluate how a given transport mechanism influences the macroscopic transport behaviour of fracture networks. It may also be used, as is the case, e.g., with analytical solutions, to interpret laboratory or field tracer test experiments

  8. Simulation and analysis of solute transport in 2D fracture/pipe networks: the SOLFRAC program.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Jacques; Porel, Gilles; Delay, Fred; Ubertosi, Fabrice; Bernard, Stéphane; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2007-01-05

    The Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) method has been recently developed by Delay and Bodin [Delay, F. and Bodin, J., 2001. Time domain random walk method to simulate transport by advection-dispersion and matrix diffusion in fracture networks. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(21): 4051-4054.] and Bodin et al. [Bodin, J., Porel, G. and Delay, F., 2003c. Simulation of solute transport in discrete fracture networks using the time domain random walk method. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 6566: 1-8.] for simulating solute transport in discrete fracture networks. It is assumed that the fracture network can reasonably be represented by a network of interconnected one-dimensional pipes (i.e. flow channels). Processes accounted for are: (1) advection and hydrodynamic dispersion in the channels, (2) matrix diffusion, (3) diffusion into stagnant zones within the fracture planes, (4) sorption reactions onto the fracture walls and in the matrix, (5) linear decay, and (6) mass sharing at fracture intersections. The TDRW method is handy and very efficient in terms of computation costs since it allows for the one-step calculation of the particle residence time in each bond of the network. This method has been programmed in C++, and efforts have been made to develop an efficient and user-friendly software, called SOLFRAC. This program is freely downloadable at the URL (labo.univ-poitiers.fr/hydrasa/intranet/telechargement.htm). It calculates solute transport into 2D pipe networks, while considering different types of injections and different concepts of local dispersion within each flow channel. Post-simulation analyses are also available, such as the mean velocity or the macroscopic dispersion at the scale of the entire network. The program may be used to evaluate how a given transport mechanism influences the macroscopic transport behaviour of fracture networks. It may also be used, as is the case, e.g., with analytical solutions, to interpret laboratory or field tracer test experiments performed

  9. How to characterize thermal transport capability of 2D materials fairly? - Sheet thermal conductance and the choice of thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xufei; Varshney, Vikas; Lee, Jonghoon; Pang, Yunsong; Roy, Ajit K.; Luo, Tengfei

    2017-02-01

    Thermal transport capability of monolayer 2D materials has been under constant spotlight. However, different definitions of thickness in literature have led to ambiguity towards predicting thermal conductivity values and thus in understanding the heat transfer capability of different monolayer 2D materials. We argue that the same thickness should be used and a 'sheet thermal conductance' should be defined as an intensive 2D material property when characterizing the heat transfer capability of 2D materials. When converting literature thermal conductivity values of monolayer materials to this new property, some new features that were not displayed when using different thicknesses show up.

  10. A sequential partly iterative approach for multicomponent reactive transport with CORE2D

    SciTech Connect

    Samper, J.; Xu, T.; Yang, C.

    2008-11-01

    CORE{sup 2D} V4 is a finite element code for modeling partly or fully saturated water flow, heat transport and multicomponent reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. It can handle coupled microbial processes and geochemical reactions such as acid-base, aqueous complexation, redox, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/exsolution, ion exchange, sorption via linear and nonlinear isotherms, sorption via surface complexation. Hydraulic parameters may change due to mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. Coupled transport and chemical equations are solved by using sequential iterative approaches. A sequential partly-iterative approach (SPIA) is presented which improves the accuracy of the traditional sequential noniterative approach (SNIA) and is more efficient than the general sequential iterative approach (SIA). While SNIA leads to a substantial saving of computing time, it introduces numerical errors which are especially large for cation exchange reactions. SPIA improves the efficiency of SIA because the iteration between transport and chemical equations is only performed in nodes with a large mass transfer between solid and liquid phases. The efficiency and accuracy of SPIA are compared to those of SIA and SNIA using synthetic examples and a case study of reactive transport through the Llobregat Delta aquitard in Spain. SPIA is found to be as accurate as SIA while requiring significantly less CPU time. In addition, SPIA is much more accurate than SNIA with only a minor increase in computing time. A further enhancement of the efficiency of SPIA is achieved by improving the efficiency of the Newton-Raphson method used for solving chemical equations. Such an improvement is obtained by working with increments of log-concentrations and ignoring the terms of the Jacobian matrix containing derivatives of activity coefficients. A proof is given for the symmetry and non-singularity of the Jacobian matrix

  11. Transport in vertically stacked hetero-structures from 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fan; Ilatikhameneh, Hesameddin; Tan, Yaohua; Valencia, Daniel; Klimeck, Gerhard; Rahman, Rajib

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the transport of tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) based on vertically stacked hereto-structures from 2D transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials is investigated by atomistic quantum transport simulations. WTe2-MoS2 combination was chosen due to the formation of a broken gap hetero-junction which is desirable for TFETs. There are two assumptions behind the MoS2-WTe2 hetero-junction tight binding (TB) model: 1) lattice registry. 2) The S - Te parameters being the average of the S - S and Te - Te parameters of bilayer MoS2 and WTe2. The computed TB bandstructure of the hetero-junction agrees well with the bandstructure obtained from density functional theory (DFT) in the energy range of interest for transport. NEGF (Non-Equilibrium Green’s Function) equations within the tight binding description is then utilized for device transfer characteristic calculation. Results show 1) energy filtering is the switching mechanism; 2) the length of the extension region is critical for device to turn off; 3) MoS2-WTe2 interlayer TFET can achieve a large on-current of 1000µA/µm with VDD = 0.3V, which suggests interlayer TFET can solve the low ON current problem of TFETs and can be a promising candidate for low power applications.

  12. The Method of Characteristics for 2-D Multigroup and Pointwise Transport Calculations in SCALE/CENTRM

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kang Seog; Williams, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    SCALE 6 computes problem-dependent multigroup (MG) cross sections through a combination of the conventional Bondarenko shielding-factor method and a deterministic pointwise (PW) transport calculation of the fine-structure spectra in the resolved resonance and thermal energy ranges. The PW calculation is performed by the CENTRM code using a 1-D cylindrical Wigner-Seitz model with the white boundary condition instead of the real rectangular cell shape to represent a lattice unit cell. The pointwise fluxes computed by CENTRM are not exact because a 1-D model is used for the transport calculation, which introduces discrepancies in the MG self-shielded cross sections, resulting in some deviation in the eigenvalue. In order to solve this problem, the method of characteristics (MOC) has been applied to enable the CENTRM PW transport calculation for a 2-D square pin cell. The computation results show that the new BONAMI/CENTRM-MOC procedure produces very precise self-shielded cross sections compared to MCNP reaction rates.

  13. Magnetic field devices for neutron spin transport and manipulation in precise neutron spin rotation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Velázquez, M.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Crawford, C.; Snow, W. M.

    2017-05-01

    The neutron spin is a critical degree of freedom for many precision measurements using low-energy neutrons. Fundamental symmetries and interactions can be studied using polarized neutrons. Parity-violation (PV) in the hadronic weak interaction and the search for exotic forces that depend on the relative spin and velocity, are two questions of fundamental physics that can be studied via the neutron spin rotations that arise from the interaction of polarized cold neutrons and unpolarized matter. The Neutron Spin Rotation (NSR) collaboration developed a neutron polarimeter, capable of determining neutron spin rotations of the order of 10-7 rad per meter of traversed material. This paper describes two key components of the NSR apparatus, responsible for the transport and manipulation of the spin of the neutrons before and after the target region, which is surrounded by magnetic shielding and where residual magnetic fields need to be below 100 μG. These magnetic field devices, called input and output coils, provide the magnetic field for adiabatic transport of the neutron spin in the regions outside the magnetic shielding while producing a sharp nonadiabatic transition of the neutron spin when entering/exiting the low-magnetic-field region. In addition, the coils are self contained, forcing the return magnetic flux into a compact region of space to minimize fringe fields outside. The design of the input and output coils is based on the magnetic scalar potential method.

  14. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; ...

    2016-04-12

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV andmore » a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. As a result, the multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.« less

  15. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Dazeley, S.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Sweany, M. D.; Vetter, K.

    2016-08-01

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV and a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. The multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.

  16. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Dazeley, S.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Sweany, M. D.; Vetter, K.

    2016-04-12

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV and a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. As a result, the multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.

  17. Transport simulations of the C-2 and C-2U Field Reversed Configurations with the Q2D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofri, Marco; Dettrick, Sean; Barnes, Daniel; Tajima, Toshiki; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    The Q2D code is a 2D MHD code, which includes a neutral fluid and separate ion and electron temperatures, coupled with a 3D Monte Carlo code, which is used to calculate source terms due to neutral beams. Q2D has been benchmarked against the 1D transport code Q1D and is used to simulate the evolution of the C-2 and C-2U field reversed configuration experiments [1]. Q2D simulations start from an initial equilibrium and transport coefficients are chosen to match C-2 experimental data. C-2U is an upgrade of C-2, with more beam power and angled beam injection, which demonstrates plasma sustainment for 5 + ms. The simulations use the same transport coefficients for C-2 and C-2U, showing the formation of a steady state in C-2U, sustained by fast ion pressure and current drive.

  18. VIM2/13. Continuous Energy MC Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1984-04-01

    VIM solves the three-dimensional steady-state multiplication eigenvalue or fixed source neutron transport problem using continuous energy-dependent nuclear data. It was designed for the analysis of fast critical experiments.

  19. Neutron Stars—Cooling and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekhin, Alexander Y.; Pons, José A.; Page, Dany

    2015-10-01

    Observations of thermal radiation from neutron stars can potentially provide information about the states of supranuclear matter in the interiors of these stars with the aid of the theory of neutron-star thermal evolution. We review the basics of this theory for isolated neutron stars with strong magnetic fields, including most relevant thermodynamic and kinetic properties in the stellar core, crust, and blanketing envelopes.

  20. Influence of Transport on Two-Dimensional Model Simulation. Tracer Sensitivity to 2-D Model Transport. 1; Long Lived Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Considine, David B.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we examine the sensitivity of long lived tracers to changes in the base transport components in our 2-D model. Changes to the strength of the residual circulation in the upper troposphere and stratosphere and changes to the lower stratospheric K(sub zz) had similar effects in that increasing the transport rates decreased the overall stratospheric mean age, and increased the rate of removal of material from the stratosphere. Increasing the stratospheric K(sub yy) increased the mean age due to the greater recycling of air parcels through the middle atmosphere, via the residual circulation, before returning to the troposphere. However, increasing K(sub yy) along with self-consistent increases in the corresponding planetary wave drive, which leads to a stronger residual circulation, more than compensates for the K(sub yy)-effect, and produces significantly younger ages throughout the stratosphere. Simulations with very small tropical stratospheric K(sub yy) decreased the globally averaged age of air by as much as 25% in the middle and upper stratosphere, and resulted in substantially weaker vertical age gradients above 20 km in the extratropics. We found only very small stratospheric tracer sensitivity to the magnitude of the horizontal mixing across the tropopause, and to the strength of the mesospheric gravity wave drag and diffusion used in the model. We also investigated the transport influence on chemically active tracers and found a strong age-tracer correlation, both in concentration and calculated lifetimes. The base model transport gives the most favorable overall comparison with a variety of inert tracer observations, and provides a significant improvement over our previous 1995 model transport. Moderate changes to the base transport were found to provide modest agreement with some of the measurements. Transport scenarios with residence times ranging from moderately shorter to slightly longer relative to the base case simulated N2O lifetimes

  1. Sparsity and level set regularization for diffuse optical tomography using a transport model in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Kernel; Dorn, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we address an inverse problem for the time-dependent linear transport equation (or radiative transfer equation) in 2D having in mind applications in diffuse optical tomography (DOT). We propose two new reconstruction algorithms which so far have not been applied to such a situation and compare their performances in certain practically relevant situations. The first of these reconstruction algorithms uses a sparsity promoting regularization scheme, whereas the second one uses a simultaneous level set reconstruction scheme for two parameters of the linear transport equation. We will also compare the results of both schemes with a third scheme which is a more traditional L 2-based Landweber-Kaczmarz scheme. We focus our attention on the DOT application of imaging the human head of a neonate where the simpler diffusion approximation is not well-suited for the inversion due to the presence of a clear layer beneath the skull which is filled with ‘low-scattering’ cerebrospinal fluid. This layer, even if its location and characteristics are known a priori, poses significant difficulties for most reconstruction schemes due to its ‘wave-guiding’ property which reduces sensitivity of the data to the interior regions. A further complication arises due to the necessity to reconstruct simultaneously two different parameters of the linear transport equation, the scattering and the absorption cross-section, from the same data set. A significant ‘cross-talk’ between these two parameters is usually expected. Our numerical experiments indicate that each of the three considered reconstruction schemes do have their merits and perform differently but reasonably well when the clear layer is a priori known. We also demonstrate the behavior of the three algorithms in the particular situation where the clear layer is unknown during the reconstruction.

  2. Scattered Neutron Tomography Based on A Neutron Transport Inverse Problem

    SciTech Connect

    William Charlton

    2007-07-01

    Neutron radiography and computed tomography are commonly used techniques to non-destructively examine materials. Tomography refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object from either transmission or reflection data collected by illuminating the object from many different directions.

  3. Neutron-transport equation in a general curvelinear coordinate system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H

    1981-01-01

    Different from a fission reactor, a fusion reactor has complex geometry, such as toroidal geometry. Neutron transport equation for the toroidal coordinate system has been derived by using coordinate transformation from the cartesian coordinate. These methods require rather tedious calculations. Presented here is a simple method to formulate the neutron transport equation in the general curvelinear coordinate system. The equations for parabolic cylinder and toroidal coordinate systems are derived as an example.

  4. Improvement of transport-corrected scattering stability and performance using a Jacobi inscatter algorithm for 2D-MOC

    DOE PAGES

    Stimpson, Shane; Collins, Benjamin; Kochunas, Brendan

    2017-03-10

    The MPACT code, being developed collaboratively by the University of Michigan and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is the primary deterministic neutron transport solver being deployed within the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) as part of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). In many applications of the MPACT code, transport-corrected scattering has proven to be an obstacle in terms of stability, and considerable effort has been made to try to resolve the convergence issues that arise from it. Most of the convergence problems seem related to the transport-corrected cross sections, particularly when used in the 2Dmore » method of characteristics (MOC) solver, which is the focus of this work. Here in this paper, the stability and performance of the 2-D MOC solver in MPACT is evaluated for two iteration schemes: Gauss-Seidel and Jacobi. With the Gauss-Seidel approach, as the MOC solver loops over groups, it uses the flux solution from the previous group to construct the inscatter source for the next group. Alternatively, the Jacobi approach uses only the fluxes from the previous outer iteration to determine the inscatter source for each group. Consequently for the Jacobi iteration, the loop over groups can be moved from the outermost loop$-$as is the case with the Gauss-Seidel sweeper$-$to the innermost loop, allowing for a substantial increase in efficiency by minimizing the overhead of retrieving segment, region, and surface index information from the ray tracing data. Several test problems are assessed: (1) Babcock & Wilcox 1810 Core I, (2) Dimple S01A-Sq, (3) VERA Progression Problem 5a, and (4) VERA Problem 2a. The Jacobi iteration exhibits better stability than Gauss-Seidel, allowing for converged solutions to be obtained over a much wider range of iteration control parameters. Additionally, the MOC solve time with the Jacobi approach is roughly 2.0-2.5× faster per sweep. While the performance and stability of

  5. Simplified behaviors from increased heterogeneity: I. 2-D uranium transport experiments at the decimeter scale.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew W; Rodriguez, Derrick R; Honeyman, Bruce D

    2013-05-01

    Intermediate scale tank studies were conducted to examine the effects of physical heterogeneity of aquifer material on uranium desorption and subsequent transport in order to bridge the scaling gap between bench and field scale systems. Uranium contaminated sediment from a former uranium mill field site was packed into two 2-D tanks with internal dimensions of 2.44×1.22×0.076 m (tank 1) and 2.44×0.61×0.076 m (tank 2). Tank 1 was packed in a physically homogenous manner, and tank 2 was packed with long lenses of high and low conductivities resulting in different flow fields within the tanks. Chemical gradients within the flow domain were altered by temporal changes in influent water chemistry. The uranium source was desorption from the sediment. Despite the physical differences in the flow fields, there were minimal differences in global uranium leaching behavior between the two tanks. The dominant uranium species in both tanks over time and space was Ca2UO2(CO3)3(0). However, the uranium/alkalinity relationships varied as a function of time in tank 1 and were independent of time in tank 2. After planned stop-flow events, small, short-lived rebounds were observed in tank 1 while no rebound of uranium concentrations was observed in tank 2. Despite appearing to be in local equilibrium with respect to uranium desorption, a previously derived surface complexation model was insufficient to describe uranium partitioning within the flow domain. This is the first in a pair of papers; the companion paper presents an intermediate scale 3-D tank experiment and inter-tank comparisons. For these systems, physical heterogeneity at or above the decimeter scale does not affect global scale uranium desorption and transport. Instead, uranium fluxes are controlled by chemistry dependent desorption patterns induced by changing the influent ionic composition.

  6. Ensemble Solute Transport in 2-D Operator-Stable Random Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnig, N. D.; Benson, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The heterogeneous velocity field that exists at many scales in an aquifer will typically cause a dissolved solute plume to grow at a rate faster than Fick's Law predicts. Some statistical model must be adopted to account for the aquifer structure that engenders the velocity heterogeneity. A fractional Brownian motion (fBm) model has been shown to create the long-range correlation that can produce continually faster-than-Fickian plume growth. Previous fBm models have assumed isotropic scaling (defined here by a scalar Hurst coefficient). Motivated by field measurements of aquifer hydraulic conductivity, recent techniques were developed to construct random fields with anisotropic scaling with a self-similarity parameter that is defined by a matrix. The growth of ensemble plumes is analyzed for transport through 2-D "operator- stable" fBm hydraulic conductivity (K) fields. Both the longitudinal and transverse Hurst coefficients are important to both plume growth rates and the timing and duration of breakthrough. Smaller Hurst coefficients in the transverse direction lead to more "continuity" or stratification in the direction of transport. The result is continually faster-than-Fickian growth rates, highly non-Gaussian ensemble plumes, and a longer tail early in the breakthrough curve. Contrary to some analytic stochastic theories for monofractal K fields, the plume growth rate never exceeds Mercado's [1967] purely stratified aquifer growth rate of plume apparent dispersivity proportional to mean distance. Apparent super-Mercado growth must be the result of other factors, such as larger plumes corresponding to either a larger initial plume size or greater variance of the ln(K) field.

  7. Numerical simulation of transport and sequential biodegradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons using CHAIN_2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaerlaekens, J.; Mallants, D.; Imûnek, J.; van Genuchten, M. Th.; Feyen, J.

    1999-12-01

    Microbiological degradation of perchloroethylene (PCE) under anaerobic conditions follows a series of chain reactions, in which, sequentially, trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), vinylchloride (VC) and ethene are generated. First-order degradation rate constants, partitioning coefficients and mass exchange rates for PCE, TCE, c-DCE and VC were compiled from the literature. The parameters were used in a case study of pump-and-treat remediation of a PCE-contaminated site near Tilburg, The Netherlands. Transport, non-equilibrium sorption and biodegradation chain processes at the site were simulated using the CHAIN_2D code without further calibration. The modelled PCE compared reasonably well with observed PCE concentrations in the pumped water. We also performed a scenario analysis by applying several increased reductive dechlorination rates, reflecting different degradation conditions (e.g. addition of yeast extract and citrate). The scenario analysis predicted considerably higher concentrations of the degradation products as a result of enhanced reductive dechlorination of PCE. The predicted levels of the very toxic compound VC were now an order of magnitude above the maximum permissible concentration levels.

  8. Transport coefficients in superfluid neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Tolos, Laura; Manuel, Cristina; Sarkar, Sreemoyee; Tarrus, Jaume

    2016-01-22

    We study the shear and bulk viscosity coefficients as well as the thermal conductivity as arising from the collisions among phonons in superfluid neutron stars. We use effective field theory techniques to extract the allowed phonon collisional processes, written as a function of the equation of state and the gap of the system. The shear viscosity due to phonon scattering is compared to calculations of that coming from electron collisions. We also comment on the possible consequences for r-mode damping in superfluid neutron stars. Moreover, we find that phonon collisions give the leading contribution to the bulk viscosities in the core of the neutron stars. We finally obtain a temperature-independent thermal conductivity from phonon collisions and compare it with the electron-muon thermal conductivity in superfluid neutron stars.

  9. Neutrons and Granite: Transport and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, P J

    2004-04-13

    In typical ground materials, both energy deposition and radionuclide production by energetic neutrons vary with the incident particle energy in a non-monotonic way. We describe the overall balance of nuclear reactions involving neutrons impinging on granite to demonstrate these energy-dependencies. While granite is a useful surrogate for a broad range of soil and rock types, the incorporation of small amounts of water (hydrogen) does alter the balance of nuclear reactions.

  10. Neutron transport study of a beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaial, Anas M.

    Neutron radiography has the ability to differentiate between gas and liquid in two-phase flow due both to the density difference and the high neutron scattering probability of hydrogen. Previous studies have used dynamic neutron radiography -- in both real-time and high-speed -- for air-water, steam-water and gas-liquid metal two-phase flow measurements. Radiography with thermal neutrons is straightforward and efficient as thermal neutrons are easier to detect with relatively higher efficiency and can be easily extracted from nuclear reactor beam ports. The quality of images obtained using neutron radiography and the imaging speed depend on the neutron beam intensity at the imaging plane. A high quality neutron beam, with thermal neutron intensity greater than 3.0x 10 6 n/cm2-s and a collimation ratio greater than 100 at the imaging plane, is required for effective dynamic neutron radiography up to 2000 frames per second. The primary objectives of this work are: (1) to optimize a neutron radiography facility for dynamic neutron radiography applications and (2) to investigate a new technique for three-dimensional neutron radiography using information obtained from neutron scattering. In this work, neutron transport analysis and experimental validation of a dynamic neutron radiography facility is studied with consideration of real-time and high-speed neutron radiography requirements. A beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility, for a target thermal neutron flux of 1.0x107 n/cm2-s, has been analyzed, constructed and experimentally verified at the McMaster Nuclear Reactor. The neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance is evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes using copper activation flux-mapping technique. The development of different facility components, such as beam tube liner, gamma ray filter, beam shutter and biological shield, is achieved analytically using neutron attenuation and divergence theories. Monte

  11. The conflicting role of buckled structure in phonon transport of 2D group-IV and group-V materials.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Dequan; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Ni, Gang; Zhu, Yongyuan; Zhu, Heyuan

    2017-03-20

    Controlling heat transport through material design is one important step toward thermal management in 2D materials. To control heat transport, a comprehensive understanding of how structure influences heat transport is required. It has been argued that a buckled structure is able to suppress heat transport by increasing the flexural phonon scattering. Using a first principles approach, we calculate the lattice thermal conductivity of 2D mono-elemental materials with a buckled structure. Somewhat counterintuitively, we find that although 2D group-V materials have a larger mass and higher buckling height than their group-IV counterparts, the calculated κ of blue phosphorene (106.6 W mK(-1)) is nearly four times higher than that of silicene (28.3 W mK(-1)), while arsenene (37.8 W mK(-1)) is more than fifteen times higher than germanene (2.4 W mK(-1)). We report for the first time that a buckled structure has three conflicting effects: (i) increasing the Debye temperature by increasing the overlap of the pz orbitals, (ii) suppressing the acoustic-optical scattering by forming an acoustic-optical gap, and (iii) increasing the flexural phonon scattering. The former two, corresponding to the harmonic phonon part, tend to enhance κ, while the last one, corresponding to the anharmonic part, suppresses it. This relationship between the buckled structure and phonon behaviour provides insight into how to control heat transport in 2D materials.

  12. Impact of Interface Roughness on the Metallic Transport of Strongly Correlated 2D Holes in GaAs Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goble, Nicholas; Watson, John; Manfra, Michael; Gao, Xuan

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the non-monotonic behavior in the temperature dependent resistance, R(T) , of strongly correlated two-dimensional (2D) carriers in clean semiconductors has been a central issue in the studies of 2D metallic states and metal-insulator transitions. We have studied the transport of high mobility 2D holes in 20nm wide GaAs quantum wells with varying interface roughness by changing the Al fraction x in the AlxGa1-xAs barrier. Prior to this work, no comprehensive study of the non-monotonic resistance peak against controlled barrier characteristics has been conducted. We show that the shape of the electronic contribution to R(T) is qualitatively unchanged throughout all of our measurements, regardless of the percentage of Al in the barrier. It is observed that increasing x or short range interface roughness suppresses both the strength and characteristic temperature scale of the 2D metallicity, pointing to the distinct role of short range versus long range disorder in the 2D metallic transport in this 2D hole system with interaction parameter rs ~ 20. N.G. acknowledges the US DOE GAANN fellowship (P200A090276 & P200A070434). M.J.M. is supported by the Miller Family Foundation and the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DMS (DE-SC0006671). X.P.A.G thanks the NSF for funding support (DMR-0906415).

  13. Advanced Nodal P3/SP3 Axial Transport Solvers for the MPACT 2D/1D Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Stimpson, Shane G; Collins, Benjamin S

    2015-01-01

    As part of its initiative to provide multiphysics simulations of nuclear reactor cores, the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is developing the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator (VERA-CS). The MPACT code, which is the primary neutron transport solver of VERA-CS, employs the two-dimensional/one-dimensional (2D/1D) method to solve 3-dimensional neutron transport problems and provide sub-pin-level resolution of the power distribution. While 2D method of characteristics is used to solve for the transport effects within each plane, 1D-nodal methods are used axially. There have been extensive studies of the 2D/1D method with a variety nodal methods, and the P3/SP3 solver has proved to be an effective method of providing higher-fidelity solutions while maintaining a low computational burden.The current implementation in MPACT wraps a one-node nodal expansion method (NEM) kernel for each moment, iterating between them and performing multiple sweeps to resolve flux distributions. However, it has been observed that this approach is more sensitive to convergence problems. This paper documents the theory and application two new nodal P3/SP3 approaches to be used within the 2D/1D method in MPACT. These two approaches aim to provide enhanced stability compared with the pre-existing one-node approach. Results from the HY-NEM-SP3 solver show that the accuracy is consistent with the one-node formulations and provides improved convergence for some problems; but the solver has issues with cases in thin planes. Although the 2N-SENM-SP3 solver is still under development, it is intended to resolve the issues with HY-NEM-SP3 but it will incur some additional computational burden by necessitating an additional 1D-CMFD-P3 solver to generate the second moment cell-averaged scalar flux.

  14. Ab-initio quantum transport simulation of self-heating in single-layer 2-D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieger, Christian; Szabo, Aron; Bunjaku, Teutë; Luisier, Mathieu

    2017-07-01

    Through advanced quantum mechanical simulations combining electron transport and phonon transport from first-principles, self-heating effects are investigated in n-type transistors with single-layer MoS2, WS2, and black phosphorus as channel materials. The selected 2-D crystals all exhibit different phonon-limited mobility values, as well as electron and phonon properties, which have a direct influence on the increase in their lattice temperature and on the power dissipated inside their channel as a function of the applied gate voltage and electrical current magnitude. This computational study reveals (i) that self-heating plays a much more important role in 2-D materials than in Si nanowires, (ii) that it could severely limit the performance of 2-D devices at high current densities, and (iii) that black phosphorus appears less sensitive to this phenomenon than transition metal dichalcogenides.

  15. Neutron Transport Associated with the Galactic Cosmic Ray Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleterry, Robert Clay, Jr.

    Transport of low energy neutrons associated with the galactic cosmic ray cascade is analyzed in this dissertation. A benchmark quality analytical algorithm is demonstrated for use with B scRYNTRN, a computer program written by the High Energy Physics Division of N scASA Langley Research Center, which is used to design and analyze shielding against the radiation created by the cascade. B scRYNTRN uses numerical methods to solve the integral transport equations for baryons with the straight-ahead approximation, and numerical and empirical methods to generate the interaction probabilities. The straight-ahead approximation is adequate for charged particles, but not for neutrons. As N scASA Langley improves B scRYNTRN to include low energy neutrons, a benchmark quality solution is needed for comparison. The neutron transport algorithm demonstrated in this dissertation uses the closed-form Green's function solution to the galactic cosmic ray cascade transport equations to generate a source of neutrons. A basis function expansion for finite heterogeneous and semi-infinite homogeneous slabs with multiple energy groups and isotropic scattering is used to generate neutron fluxes resulting from the cascade. This method, called the F_{rm N} method, is used to solve the neutral particle linear Boltzmann transport equation. As a demonstration of the algorithm coded in the programs M scGSLAB and M scGSEMI, neutron and ion fluxes are shown for a beam of fluorine ions at 1000 MeV per nucleon incident on semi-infinite and finite aluminum slabs. Also, to demonstrate that the shielding effectiveness against the radiation from the galactic cosmic ray cascade is not directly proportional to shield thickness, a graph of transmitted total neutron scalar flux versus slab thickness is shown. A simple model based on the nuclear liquid drop assumption is used to generate cross sections for the galactic cosmic ray cascade. The E scNDF/B V database is used to generate the total and scattering

  16. Sub-nanosecond multi-channel time-to-digital converter for the 2-D position-sensitive neutron detectors at TriCS and AMOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, Ch.; Greuter, U.; Frey, G.; Zaharko, O.; Koennecke, M.; Schefer, J.; Rasmussen, P.; Schaniel, D.; Clemens, D.; Gabriel, A.; Felsche, J.; Schlumpf, N.

    We have developed an ultra-fast multi-channel time-to-digital converter (mC-TDC). The mC-TDC electronics is used to read out the delay-line-based 2-D detectors of the neutron diffractometer and reflectometer TriCS and AMOR, respectively. The high time resolution of the mC-TDC ( 145 ps) allows the conversion of the position-sensitive detector signals into accurate 2-D scattering coordinates ( 2×2 mm2). The mC-TDC also generates low-jitter time-of-flight signals and incorporates an efficient two-stage pileup-rejection mechanism. Neutron rates exceeding 100000cps can be processed.

  17. Computing the moments of the neutron population using deterministic neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fichtl, E. D.; Baker, R. S.

    2013-07-01

    It is important to treat the inherent stochasticity of the fission process in systems where the behavior of the system is stochastic. This occurs when there are few neutrons in the system, or when the neutron source is weak. In order to characterize such systems, the capability to compute the first four moments of the neutron population distribution has been added to the deterministic neutral particle transport code, PARTISN. The moments are then fitted to probability density functions from the Pearson family. PARTISN is compared against MCNP6, with which it agrees well. (authors)

  18. The Lattice Boltzmann Method applied to neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Erasmus, B.; Van Heerden, F. A.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the applicability of the Lattice Boltzmann Method to neutron transport is investigated. One of the main features of the Lattice Boltzmann method is the simultaneous discretization of the phase space of the problem, whereby particles are restricted to move on a lattice. An iterative solution of the operator form of the neutron transport equation is presented here, with the first collision source as the starting point of the iteration scheme. A full description of the discretization scheme is given, along with the quadrature set used for the angular discretization. An angular refinement scheme is introduced to increase the angular coverage of the problem phase space and to mitigate lattice ray effects. The method is applied to a model problem to investigate its applicability to neutron transport and the results are compared to a reference solution calculated, using MCNP. (authors)

  19. 2-D Path Corrections for Local and Regional Coda Waves: A Test of Transportability

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K M; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D S; Morasca, P

    2005-07-13

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. [2003] has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. We will compare performance of 1-D versus 2-D path corrections in a variety of regions. First, the complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Next, we will compare results for the Italian Alps using high frequency data from the University of Genoa. For Northern California, we used the same station and event distribution and compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7 {le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter

  20. Initial results with the LLNL 2-D chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Connell, P.S.; Grant, K.E.; Tarp, R.; Taylor, K.E.

    1987-09-01

    Significant progress has been made at LLNL in the development of a zonally averaged (two-dimensional) chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere. Although further model development and refinement is being planned the LLNL 2-D model is currently ready to be applied to appropriately designed research studies of stratospheric chemical processes and interactions. Several such studies are now underway. This paper provides a description of the existing 2-D model and discusses some of the pertinent results for evaluating the capabilities of the model. Special attempts at improving the timing of the model are also discussed. 6 figs.

  1. Dietary fructose inhibits lactation-induced adaptations in rat 1,25-(OH)2D3 synthesis and calcium transport

    PubMed Central

    Douard, Veronique; Suzuki, Takuji; Sabbagh, Yves; Lee, Jacklyn; Shapses, Sue; Lin, Sheldon; Ferraris, Ronaldo P.

    2012-01-01

    We recently showed that excessive fructose consumption, already associated with numerous metabolic abnormalities, reduces rates of intestinal Ca2+ transport. Using a rat lactation model with increased Ca2+ requirements, we tested the hypothesis that mechanisms underlying these inhibitory effects of fructose involve reductions in renal synthesis of 1,25-(OH)2D3. Pregnant and virgin (control) rats were fed isocaloric fructose or, as controls, glucose, and starch diets from d 2 of gestation to the end of lactation. Compared to virgins, lactating dams fed glucose or starch had higher rates of intestinal transcellular Ca2+ transport, elevated intestinal and renal expression of Ca2+ channels, Ca2+-binding proteins, and CaATPases, as well as increased levels of 25-(OH)D3 and 1,25-(OH)2D3. Fructose consumption prevented almost all of these lactation-induced increases, and reduced vitamin D receptor binding to promoter regions of Ca2+ channels and binding proteins. Changes in 1,25-(OH)2D3 level were tightly correlated with alterations in expression of 1α-hydroxylase but not with levels of parathyroid hormone and of 24-hydroxylase. Bone mineral density, content, and mechanical strength each decreased with lactation, but then fructose exacerbated these effects. When Ca2+ requirements increase during lactation or similar physiologically challenging conditions, excessive fructose consumption may perturb Ca2+ homeostasis because of fructose-induced reductions in synthesis of 1,25-(OH)2D3.—Douard, V., Suzuki, T., Sabbagh, Y., Lee, J., Shapses, S., Lin, S., Ferraris, R. P. Dietary fructose inhibits lactation-induced adaptations in rat 1,25-(OH)2D3 synthesis and calcium transport. PMID:22038050

  2. Electronic Transport Properties of New 2-D Materials GeH and NaSn2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Cultrara, Nicholas; Arguilla, Maxx; Goldberger, Joshua; Heremans, Joseph

    2-D materials potentially have superior thermoelectric properties compared to traditional 3-D materials due to their layered structure. Here we present electrical and thermoelectric transport properties of 2 types of 2-D materials, GeH and NaSn2As2. GeH is a graphane analog which is prepared using chemical exfoliation of CaGe2 crystals. Intrinsic GeH is proven to be a highly resistive material at room temperature. Resistance and Seebeck coefficient of Ga doped GeH are measured in a cryostat with a gating voltage varying from -100V to 100V. NaSn2As2 is another 2-D system, with Na atom embedded between nearly-2D Sn-As layers. Unlike GeH, NaSn2As2 is a metal based of Hall measurements, with p-type behavior, and with van der Pauw resistances on the order of 5m Ω/square. Thermoelectric transport properties of NaSn2As2 will be reported. This work is support by the NSF EFRI-2DARE project EFRI-1433467.

  3. Performance of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber for event wise, high rate thermal neutron detection with accurate 2D position determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, B.; Alimov, S.; Fiutowski, T.; Schulz, C.; Wilpert, T.

    2014-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) position sensitive detector for neutron scattering applications based on low-pressure gas amplification and micro-strip technology was built and tested with an innovative readout electronics and data acquisition system. This detector contains a thin solid neutron converter and was developed for time- and thus wavelength-resolved neutron detection in single-event counting mode, which improves the image contrast in comparison with integrating detectors. The prototype detector of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) was built with a solid natGd/CsI thermal neutron converter for spatial resolutions of about 100 μm and counting rates up to 107 neutrons/s. For attaining very high spatial resolutions and counting rates via micro-strip readout with centre-of-gravity evaluation of the signal amplitude distributions, a fast, channel-wise, self-triggering ASIC was developed. The front-end chips (MSGCROCs), which are very first signal processing components, are read out into powerful ADC-FPGA boards for on-line data processing and thereafter via Gigabit Ethernet link into the data receiving PC. The workstation PC is controlled by a modular, high performance dedicated software suite. Such a fast and accurate system is crucial for efficient radiography/tomography, diffraction or imaging applications based on high flux thermal neutron beam. In this paper a brief description of the detector concept with its operation principles, readout electronics requirements and design together with the signals processing stages performed in hardware and software are presented. In more detail the neutron test beam conditions and measurement results are reported. The focus of this paper is on the system integration, two dimensional spatial resolution, the time resolution of the readout system and the imaging capabilities of the overall setup. The detection efficiency of the detector prototype is estimated as well.

  4. Theoretical Study of Large-Angle Bending Transport of Microparticles by 2D Acoustic Half-Bessel Beams.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixiang; Qiu, Chunyin; Xu, Shengjun; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-08-17

    Conventional microparticle transports by light or sound are realized along a straight line. Recently, this limit has been overcome in optics as the growing up of the self-accelerating Airy beams, which are featured by many peculiar properties, e.g., bending propagation, diffraction-free and self-healing. However, the bending angles of Airy beams are rather small since they are only paraxial solutions of the two-dimensional (2D) Helmholtz equation. Here we propose a novel micromanipulation by using acoustic Half-Bessel beams, which are strict solutions of the 2D Helmholtz equation. Compared with that achieved by Airy beams, the bending angle of the particle trajectory attained here is much steeper (exceeding 90(o)). The large-angle bending transport of microparticles, which is robust to complex scattering environment, enables a wide range of applications from the colloidal to biological sciences.

  5. Auxetic and Ferroelastic Borophane: A Novel 2D Material with Negative Possion's Ratio and Switchable Dirac Transport Channels.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liangzhi; Ma, Yandong; Tang, Chun; Sun, Ziqi; Du, Aijun; Chen, Changfeng

    2016-12-14

    Recently synthesized atomically thin boron sheets (that is, borophene) provide a fascinating template for new material property discovery. Here, we report findings of an extraordinary combination of unusual mechanical and electronic properties in hydrogenated borophene, known as borophane, from first-principles calculations. This novel 2D material has been shown to exhibit robust Dirac transport physics. Our study unveils that borophane is auxetic with a surprising negative Poisson's ratio stemming from its unique puckered triangle hinge structure and the associated hinge dihedral angle variation under a tensile strain in the armchair direction. Our results also identify borophane to be ferroelastic with a stress-driven 90° lattice rotation in the boron layer, accompanied by a remarkable orientation switch of the anisotropic Dirac transport channels. These outstanding strain-engineered properties make borophane a highly versatile and promising 2D material for innovative applications in microelectromechanical and nanoelectronic devices.

  6. Theoretical Study of Large-Angle Bending Transport of Microparticles by 2D Acoustic Half-Bessel Beams

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yixiang; Qiu, Chunyin; Xu, Shengjun; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-01-01

    Conventional microparticle transports by light or sound are realized along a straight line. Recently, this limit has been overcome in optics as the growing up of the self-accelerating Airy beams, which are featured by many peculiar properties, e.g., bending propagation, diffraction-free and self-healing. However, the bending angles of Airy beams are rather small since they are only paraxial solutions of the two-dimensional (2D) Helmholtz equation. Here we propose a novel micromanipulation by using acoustic Half-Bessel beams, which are strict solutions of the 2D Helmholtz equation. Compared with that achieved by Airy beams, the bending angle of the particle trajectory attained here is much steeper (exceeding 90o). The large-angle bending transport of microparticles, which is robust to complex scattering environment, enables a wide range of applications from the colloidal to biological sciences. PMID:26279478

  7. Theoretical Study of Large-Angle Bending Transport of Microparticles by 2D Acoustic Half-Bessel Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yixiang; Qiu, Chunyin; Xu, Shengjun; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-08-01

    Conventional microparticle transports by light or sound are realized along a straight line. Recently, this limit has been overcome in optics as the growing up of the self-accelerating Airy beams, which are featured by many peculiar properties, e.g., bending propagation, diffraction-free and self-healing. However, the bending angles of Airy beams are rather small since they are only paraxial solutions of the two-dimensional (2D) Helmholtz equation. Here we propose a novel micromanipulation by using acoustic Half-Bessel beams, which are strict solutions of the 2D Helmholtz equation. Compared with that achieved by Airy beams, the bending angle of the particle trajectory attained here is much steeper (exceeding 90o). The large-angle bending transport of microparticles, which is robust to complex scattering environment, enables a wide range of applications from the colloidal to biological sciences.

  8. Reversal by [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin of the dopamine transporter loss caused by methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Tsao, L I; Cadet, J L; Su, T P

    1999-05-21

    A single administration of 40 mg/kg (i.p.) of methamphetamine caused a loss of dopamine transporter in the striatum of albino Swiss (CD-1) mouse for at least 3 weeks. The administration of a single dose of [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin (DADLE) (18 mg/kg, i.p.), given at day 14 after the administration of methamphetamine, caused a significant, transient restoration of dopamine transporter level in the striatum. These results suggest that delta-opioid peptide DADLE is able to reverse the neuronal damage caused by methamphetamine.

  9. Optimization of a neutron detector design using adjoint transport simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, C.; Manalo, K.; Huang, M.; Chin, M.; Edgar, C.; Applegate, S.; Sjoden, G.

    2012-07-01

    A synthetic aperture approach has been developed and investigated for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) detection in vehicles passing a checkpoint at highway speeds. SNM is postulated to be stored in a moving vehicle and detector assemblies are placed on the road-side or in chambers embedded below the road surface. Neutron and gamma spectral awareness is important for the detector assembly design besides high efficiencies, so that different SNMs can be detected and identified with various possible shielding settings. The detector assembly design is composed of a CsI gamma-ray detector block and five neutron detector blocks, with peak efficiencies targeting different energy ranges determined by adjoint simulations. In this study, formulations are derived using adjoint transport simulations to estimate detector efficiencies. The formulations is applied to investigate several neutron detector designs for Block IV, which has its peak efficiency in the thermal range, and Block V, designed to maximize the total neutron counts over the entire energy spectrum. Other Blocks detect different neutron energies. All five neutron detector blocks and the gamma-ray block are assembled in both MCNP and deterministic simulation models, with detector responses calculated to validate the fully assembled design using a 30-group library. The simulation results show that the 30-group library, collapsed from an 80-group library using an adjoint-weighting approach with the YGROUP code, significantly reduced the computational cost while maintaining accuracy. (authors)

  10. Crossover from 3D to 2D Quantum Transport in Bi2Se3/In2Se3 Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanfei, Zhao; Haiwen, Liu; Xin, Guo; Ying, Jiang; Yi, Sun; Huichao, Wang; Yong, Wang; Handong, Li; Maohai, Xie; Xincheng, Xie; Jian, Wang

    2015-03-01

    The topological insulator/normal insulator (TI/NI) superlattices (SLs) with multiple Dirac channels are predicted to offer great opportunity to design novel materials and investigate new quantum phenomena. Here, we report first transport studies on the SLs composed of TI Bi2Se3 layers sandwiched by NI In2Se3 layers artificially grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The transport properties of two kinds of SL samples show convincing evidence that the transport dimensionality changes from three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D) when decreasing the thickness of building block Bi2Se3 layers, corresponding to the crossover from coherent TI transport to separated TI channels. Our findings provide the possibility to realizing 3D surface states in TI/NI SLs.

  11. Crossover from 3D to 2D quantum transport in Bi2Se3/In2Se3 superlattices.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanfei; Liu, Haiwen; Guo, Xin; Jiang, Ying; Sun, Yi; Wang, Huichao; Wang, Yong; Li, Han-Dong; Xie, Mao-Hai; Xie, Xin-Cheng; Wang, Jian

    2014-09-10

    The topological insulator/normal insulator (TI/NI) superlattices (SLs) with multiple Dirac channels are predicted to offer great opportunity to design novel materials and investigate new quantum phenomena. Here, we report first transport studies on the SLs composed of TI Bi2Se3 layers sandwiched by NI In2Se3 layers artificially grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The transport properties of two kinds of SL samples show convincing evidence that the transport dimensionality changes from three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D) when decreasing the thickness of building block Bi2Se3 layers, corresponding to the crossover from coherent TI transport to separated TI channels. Our findings provide the possibility to realizing "3D surface states" in TI/NI SLs.

  12. Graphical User Interface for Simplified Neutron Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Randolph; Carter, Leland L

    2011-07-18

    A number of codes perform simple photon physics calculations. The nuclear industry is lacking in similar tools to perform simplified neutron physics shielding calculations. With the increased importance of performing neutron calculations for homeland security applications and defense nuclear nonproliferation tasks, having an efficient method for performing simple neutron transport calculations becomes increasingly important. Codes such as Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) can perform the transport calculations; however, the technical details in setting up, running, and interpreting the required simulations are quite complex and typically go beyond the abilities of most users who need a simple answer to a neutron transport calculation. The work documented in this report resulted in the development of the NucWiz program, which can create an MCNP input file for a set of simple geometries, source, and detector configurations. The user selects source, shield, and tally configurations from a set of pre-defined lists, and the software creates a complete MCNP input file that can be optionally run and the results viewed inside NucWiz.

  13. Rapid Measurement of Neutron Dose Rate for Transport Index

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.L.

    2000-02-27

    A newly available neutron dose equivalent remmeter with improved sensitivity and energy response has been put into service at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). This instrument is being used to expedite measurement of the Transport Index and as an ALARA tool to identify locations where slightly elevated neutron dose equivalent rates exist. The meter is capable of measuring dose rates as low as 0.2 {mu}Sv per hour (20 {mu}rem per hour). Tests of the angular response and energy response of the instrument are reported. Calculations of the theoretical instrument response made using MCNP{trademark} are reported for materials typical of those being shipped.

  14. In situ quantification and visualization of lithium transport with neutrons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Danny X; Wang, Jinghui; Pan, Ke; Qiu, Jie; Canova, Marcello; Cao, Lei R; Co, Anne C

    2014-09-01

    A real-time quantification of Li transport using a nondestructive neutron method to measure the Li distribution upon charge and discharge in a Li-ion cell is reported. By using in situ neutron depth profiling (NDP), we probed the onset of lithiation in a high-capacity Sn anode and visualized the enrichment of Li atoms on the surface followed by their propagation into the bulk. The delithiation process shows the removal of Li near the surface, which leads to a decreased coulombic efficiency, likely because of trapped Li within the intermetallic material. The developed in situ NDP provides exceptional sensitivity in the temporal and spatial measurement of Li transport within the battery material. This diagnostic tool opens up possibilities to understand rates of Li transport and their distribution to guide materials development for efficient storage mechanisms. Our observations provide important mechanistic insights for the design of advanced battery materials.

  15. CMFD acceleration of spatial domain-decomposed neutron transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, B. W.; Larsen, E. W.

    2012-07-01

    A significant limitation to parallelizing the solution of neutron transport problems is the need for sweeps across the entirety of the problem domain. Angular domain decomposition is common practice, as the equations for each direction are independent aside from their shared scattering/fission source. Accordingly, spatial domain decomposition does not naturally arise in the transport equations and is therefore less frequent in practice. In this paper, we show that a neutron transport domain can be straightforwardly divided into independent, parallelizable sweep regions, globally linked with the standard CMFD method, with an additional update equation. We verify, theoretically (via Fourier analysis) and computationally, that the convergence properties of this method are stable and nominally as rapid as standard CMFD. (authors)

  16. Flow and Transport of Radionuclides in the Rhizosphere: Imaging and Measurements in a 2D System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pales, Ashley; Darnault, Christophe; Li, Biting; Clifford, Heather; Montgomery, Dawn; Moysey, Stephen; Powell, Brian; DeVol, Tim; Erdmann, Bryan; Edayilam, Nimisha; Tharayil, Nishanth; Dogan, Mine; Martinez, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    This research aims to build upon past 2D tank light transmission methods to quantify real-time flow in unsaturated porous media, understand how exudates effect unstable flow patterns, and understand radionuclide mobility and dispersion in the subsurface. A 2D tank light transmission method was created using a transparent flow through tank coupled with a random rainfall simulator; a commercial LED light and a CMOS DSLR Nikon D5500 camera were used to capture the real-time flow images. The images were broken down from RGB into HVI and analyzed in Matlab to produce quantifiable data about finger formation and water saturation distribution. Radionuclide locations were determined via handheld gamma scanner. Water saturation along the vertical and horizontal profile (Matlab) was used to quantify the finger more objectively than by eye assessment alone. The changes in finger formation and speed of propagation between the control rain water (0.01M NaCl) and the solutions containing plant exudates illustrates that the plant exudates increased the wettability (mobility) of water moving through unsaturated porous media. This understanding of plant exudates effect on unsaturated flow is important for works studying how plants, their roots and exudates, may affect the mobility of radionuclides in unsaturated porous media. As there is an increase in exudate concentration, the mobility of the radionuclides due to changing flow pattern and available water content in porous media may be improved causing more dispersion in the porous media and intake into the plant. Changes in plant root exudation impact the distribution and density of radionuclides in the rhizosphere and vadose zone.

  17. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOEpatents

    Vujic, Jasmina L.

    1993-01-01

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values.

  18. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOEpatents

    Vujic, J.L.

    1993-11-30

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values. 28 figures.

  19. Pangolin v1.0, a conservative 2-D transport model for large scale parallel calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praga, A.; Cariolle, D.; Giraud, L.

    2014-07-01

    To exploit the possibilities of parallel computers, we designed a large-scale bidimensional atmospheric transport model named Pangolin. As the basis for a future chemistry-transport model, a finite-volume approach was chosen both for mass preservation and to ease parallelization. To overcome the pole restriction on time-steps for a regular latitude-longitude grid, Pangolin uses a quasi-area-preserving reduced latitude-longitude grid. The features of the regular grid are exploited to improve parallel performances and a custom domain decomposition algorithm is presented. To assess the validity of the transport scheme, its results are compared with state-of-the-art models on analytical test cases. Finally, parallel performances are shown in terms of strong scaling and confirm the efficient scalability up to a few hundred of cores.

  20. A 2-D numerical simulation study on longitudinal solute transport and longitudinal dispersion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-07-01

    The longitudinal dispersion coefficient, DL, is a fundamental parameter of longitudinal solute transport models: the advection-dispersion (AD) model and various deadzone models. Since DL cannot be measured directly, and since its calibration using tracer test data is quite expensive and not always available, researchers have developed various methods, theoretical or empirical, for estimating DL by easier available cross-sectional hydraulic measurements (i.e., the transverse velocity profile, etc.). However, for known and unknown reasons, DL cannot be satisfactorily predicted using these theoretical/empirical formulae. Either there is very large prediction error for theoretical methods, or there is a lack of generality for the empirical formulae. Here, numerical experiments using Mike21, a software package that implements one of the most rigorous two-dimensional hydrodynamic and solute transport equations, for longitudinal solute transport in hypothetical streams, are presented. An analysis of the evolution of simulated solute clouds indicates that the two fundamental assumptions in Fischer's longitudinal transport analysis may be not reasonable. The transverse solute concentration distribution, and hence the longitudinal transport appears to be controlled by a dimensionless number ?, where Q is the average volumetric flowrate, Dt is a cross-sectional average transverse dispersion coefficient, and W is channel flow width. A simple empirical ? relationship may be established. Analysis and a revision of Fischer's theoretical formula suggest that ɛ influences the efficiency of transverse mixing and hence has restraining effect on longitudinal spreading. The findings presented here would improve and expand our understanding of longitudinal solute transport in open channel flow.

  1. A quasi-2D flood modeling approach to simulate substance transport in polder systems for environment flood risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Lindenschmidt, Karl-Erich; Huang, Shaochun; Baborowski, Martina

    2008-07-01

    In flood modeling, many one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and water quality models are too restricted in capturing the spatial differentiation of processes within a polder or system of polders and two-dimensional (2D) models are too demanding in data requirements and computational resources, especially if Monte-Carlo techniques are to be used for model uncertainty analyses. The first goal of this paper is to show the successful development of a quasi-2D modeling approach which still calculates the dynamic wave in 1D but the discretisation of the computational units is in 2D, allowing a better spatial representation of the flow and substance transport processes in the polders without a large additional expenditure on data pre-processing and simulation processing. The models DYNHYD (1D hydrodynamics) and TOXI (sediment and micro-pollutant transport) were used as a basis for the hydrodynamic and water quality simulations. An extreme flood event on the Elbe River, Germany, with a proposed polder system variant was used as a test case. The results show a plausible differentiation of suspended sediment and zinc concentrations within the polders both spatially and temporally. This fulfills the second goal of this research. The third goal of this work is to provide an example methodology of carrying out an environmental risk assessment in inundated areas by flood waters, as required by the European Union floods directive. The deposition of zinc in polders was used for this example, due to its high contamination potential in the Elbe River. The extended quasi-2D modeling system incorporates a Monte-Carlo uncertainty analysis to assess the environmental impact of heavy metal deposition in the polders during extreme flooding. The environmental risk computed gives a 48% chance of exceeding the inspection value of 500 mg zinc/kg sediment for a flood such as the August 2002 event.

  2. Generalized Kubo formulas for the transport properties of incommensurate 2D atomic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancès, Eric; Cazeaux, Paul; Luskin, Mitchell

    2017-06-01

    We give an exact formulation for the transport coefficients of incommensurate two-dimensional atomic multilayer systems in the tight-binding approximation. This formulation is based upon the C* algebra framework introduced by Bellissard and collaborators [Coherent and Dissipative Transport in Aperiodic Solids, Lecture Notes in Physics (Springer, 2003), Vol. 597, pp. 413-486 and J. Math. Phys. 35(10), 5373-5451 (1994)] to study aperiodic solids (disordered crystals, quasicrystals, and amorphous materials), notably in the presence of magnetic fields (quantum Hall effect). We also present numerical approximations and test our methods on a one-dimensional incommensurate bilayer system.

  3. Exact-to-precision generalized perturbation for neutron transport calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S.

    2013-07-01

    This manuscript extends the exact-to-precision generalized perturbation theory (E{sub P}GPT), introduced previously, to neutron transport calculation whereby previous developments focused on neutron diffusion calculation only. The E{sub P}GPT collectively denotes new developments in generalized perturbation theory (GPT) that place premium on computational efficiency and defendable accuracy in order to render GPT a standard analysis tool in routine design and safety reactor calculations. EPGPT constructs a surrogate model with quantifiable accuracy which can replace the original neutron transport model for subsequent engineering analysis, e.g. functionalization of the homogenized few-group cross sections in terms of various core conditions, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification. This is achieved by reducing the effective dimensionality of the state variable (i.e. neutron angular flux) by projection onto an active subspace. Confining the state variations to the active subspace allows one to construct a small number of what is referred to as the 'active' responses which are solely dependent on the physics model rather than on the responses of interest, the number of input parameters, or the number of points in the state phase space. (authors)

  4. The AN neutron transport by nodal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barbarino, A.; Tomatis, D.

    2013-07-01

    The two group diffusion model combined to a nodal approach in space is the preferred scheme for the industrial simulation of nuclear water reactors. The main selling point is the speed of computation, allowing a large number of parametric studies. Anyway, the drawbacks of the underlying diffusion equation may arise with highly heterogeneous interfaces, often encountered in modern UO{sub 2} and MO{sub x} fuel loading patterns, and boron less controlled systems. This paper aims at showing how the simplified AN transport model, equivalent to the well known SPN, can be implemented in standard diffusion codes with minor modifications. Some numerical results are illustrated. (authors)

  5. Mathematical models for volume rendering and neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.

    1994-09-01

    This paper reviews several different models for light interaction with volume densities of absorbing, glowing, reflecting, or scattering material. They include absorption only, glow only, glow and absorption combined, single scattering of external illumination, and multiple scattering. The models are derived from differential equations, and illustrated on a data set representing a cloud. They are related to corresponding models in neutron transport. The multiple scattering model uses an efficient method to propagate the radiation which does not suffer from the ray effect.

  6. Transport Equations Resolution By N-BEE Anti-Dissipative Scheme In 2D Model Of Low Pressure Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kraloua, B.; Hennad, A.

    2008-09-23

    The aim of this paper is to determine electric and physical properties by 2D modelling of glow discharge low pressure in continuous regime maintained by term constant source. This electric discharge is confined in reactor plan-parallel geometry. This reactor is filled by Argon monatomic gas. Our continuum model the order two is composed the first three moments the Boltzmann's equations coupled with Poisson's equation by self consistent method. These transport equations are discretized by the finite volumes method. The equations system is resolved by a new technique, it is about the N-BEE explicit scheme using the time splitting method.

  7. 2D coherent charge transport in highly ordered conducting polymers doped by solid state diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Keehoon; Watanabe, Shun; Broch, Katharina; Sepe, Alessandro; Brown, Adam; Nasrallah, Iyad; Nikolka, Mark; Fei, Zhuping; Heeney, Martin; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-Ichi; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Doping is one of the most important methods to control charge carrier concentration in semiconductors. Ideally, the introduction of dopants should not perturb the ordered microstructure of the semiconducting host. In some systems, such as modulation-doped inorganic semiconductors or molecular charge transfer crystals, this can be achieved by spatially separating the dopants from the charge transport pathways. However, in conducting polymers, dopants tend to be randomly distributed within the conjugated polymer, and as a result the transport properties are strongly affected by the resulting structural and electronic disorder. Here, we show that in the highly ordered lamellar microstructure of a regioregular thiophene-based conjugated polymer, a small-molecule p-type dopant can be incorporated by solid state diffusion into the layers of solubilizing side chains without disrupting the conjugated layers. In contrast to more disordered systems, this allows us to observe coherent, free-electron-like charge transport properties, including a nearly ideal Hall effect in a wide temperature range, a positive magnetoconductance due to weak localization and the Pauli paramagnetic spin susceptibility.

  8. Shear-Reduction of Collisional Transport in a 2D Point Vortex Gas/Plasma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    2002-11-01

    The two dimensional point vortex gas is a simple but useful paradigm for more complex fluid and plasma flows.(D. Dubin and D. Jin, Phys. Lett. A 284), 112 (2001). This poster presents the theory of the collisional diffusion and viscosity coefficients for a point vortex gas, in an applied shear flow. We show that the transport coefficients are reduced in the presence of shear, just as for the shear reduction of transport observed in fusion plasmas. Here however, fluctuations are collisional rather than turbulent, allowing a rigorous calculation of the transport. When there are several species of point vortices, we find that Onsager relations require that the diffusive flux conserves the total vorticity density ρ (r) (proportional to charge density in the plasma analogue). Surprisingly, the diffusive flux concentrates vortices with large positive (or negative) circulations at maxima (or minima) of ρ (r). On a slower timescale, the momentum flux due to viscosity drives the system to a global thermal equilibrium state.

  9. Electron transport through nuclear pasta in magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a simple model for electron transport in a possible layer of exotic nuclear clusters (in the so-called nuclear pasta layer) between the crust and liquid core of a strongly magnetized neutron star. The electron transport there can be strongly anisotropic and gyrotropic. The anisotropy is produced by different electron effective collision frequencies along and across local symmetry axis in domains of exotic ordered nuclear clusters and by complicated effects of the magnetic field. We also calculate averaged kinetic coefficients in case local domains are freely oriented. Possible applications of the obtained results and open problems are outlined.

  10. Benchmarking of Neutron Production of Heavy-Ion Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

  11. Atmospheric Nitrogen Trifluoride: Optimized emission estimates using 2-D and 3-D Chemical Transport Models from 1973-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy, D. J.; Rigby, M. L.; Prinn, R. G.; Muhle, J.; Weiss, R. F.

    2009-12-01

    We present optimized annual global emissions from 1973-2008 of nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), a powerful greenhouse gas which is not currently regulated by the Kyoto Protocol. In the past few decades, NF3 production has dramatically increased due to its usage in the semiconductor industry. Emissions were estimated through the 'pulse-method' discrete Kalman filter using both a simple, flexible 2-D 12-box model used in the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) network and the Model for Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART v4.5), a full 3-D atmospheric chemistry model. No official audited reports of industrial NF3 emissions are available, and with limited information on production, a priori emissions were estimated using both a bottom-up and top-down approach with two different spatial patterns based on semiconductor perfluorocarbon (PFC) emissions from the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR v3.2) and Semiconductor Industry Association sales information. Both spatial patterns used in the models gave consistent results, showing the robustness of the estimated global emissions. Differences between estimates using the 2-D and 3-D models can be attributed to transport rates and resolution differences. Additionally, new NF3 industry production and market information is presented. Emission estimates from both the 2-D and 3-D models suggest that either the assumed industry release rate of NF3 or industry production information is still underestimated.

  12. Thermal Investigation of Common 2d FETs and New Generation of 3d FETs Using Boltzmann Transport Equation in Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samian, R. S.; Abbassi, A.; Ghazanfarian, J.

    2013-09-01

    The thermal performance of two-dimensional (2D) field-effect transistors (FET) is investigated frequently by solving the Fourier heat diffusion law and the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). With the introduction of the new generation of 3D FETs in which their thickness is less than the phonon mean-free-path it is necessary to carefully simulate the thermal performance of such devices. This paper numerically integrates the BTE in common 2D transistors including planar single layer and Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) transistor, and the new generation of 3D transistors including FinFET and Tri-Gate devices. In order to decrease the directional dependency of results in 3D simulations; the Legendre equal-weight (PN-EW) quadrature set has been employed. It is found that if similar switching time is assumed for 3D and 2D FETs while the new generation of 3D FETs has less net energy consumption, they have higher hot-spot temperature. The results show continuous heat flux distribution normal to the silicon/oxide interface while the temperature jump is seen at the interface in double layer transistors.

  13. Shock compression using flux-corrected transport in 2-D axisymmetric, nonsteady supersonic flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. B.; Plett, E. G.; Gladstone, D. H.

    1987-01-01

    The time and space splitting procedure of finite difference computations of supersonic, nonsteady, compressible flows was altered to implement the flux-corrected transport technique into the procedure. Computations of flows from the open end of a shock tube and from the breech nozzle of a recoilless rifle were carried out using flux-correction in the numerical procedure, and the results were compared with those obtained in computations performed without flux-correction. Flux-corrected computation results depicted the details and features of the flow characteristics in both test cases. In contrast, without flux-correction, only smeared solutions were obtained.

  14. Neutron transport in WIMS by the characteristics method

    SciTech Connect

    Halsall, M.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The common methods of solving the neutron transport equation in reactor assembly geometries involve some geometric approximation. The standard differential transport methods and diffusion methods rely on pin-cell smearing, and transmission probability methods make approximations to the boundary fluxes linking pin cells. Integral transport methods (collision probabilities) can cope with pin geometries by numerical integration but require excessive computing times that increase with the square of the number of regions. The characteristics method in WIMS, known as CACTUS, solves the differential transport equation by a numerical tracking technique whose accuracy is limited only by computing resources; in its WIMS implementation it can handle any pin-type geometry without the need for preliminary spatial smearing.

  15. Discontinuous diffusion synthetic acceleration for S{sub n} transport on 2D arbitrary polygonal meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Turcksin, Bruno Ragusa, Jean C.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) technique applied to the S{sub n} radiation transport equation is developed using Piece-Wise Linear Discontinuous (PWLD) finite elements on arbitrary polygonal grids. The discretization of the DSA equations employs an Interior Penalty technique, as is classically done for the stabilization of the diffusion equation using discontinuous finite element approximations. The penalty method yields a system of linear equations that is Symmetric Positive Definite (SPD). Thus, solution techniques such as Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) can be effectively employed. Algebraic MultiGrid (AMG) and Symmetric Gauss–Seidel (SGS) are employed as conjugate gradient preconditioners for the DSA system. AMG is shown to be significantly more efficient than SGS. Fourier analyses are carried out and we show that this discontinuous finite element DSA scheme is always stable and effective at reducing the spectral radius for iterative transport solves, even for grids with high-aspect ratio cells. Numerical results are presented for different grid types: quadrilateral, hexagonal, and polygonal grids as well as grids with local mesh adaptivity.

  16. Discontinuous diffusion synthetic acceleration for Sn transport on 2D arbitrary polygonal meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcksin, Bruno; Ragusa, Jean C.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) technique applied to the Sn radiation transport equation is developed using Piece-Wise Linear Discontinuous (PWLD) finite elements on arbitrary polygonal grids. The discretization of the DSA equations employs an Interior Penalty technique, as is classically done for the stabilization of the diffusion equation using discontinuous finite element approximations. The penalty method yields a system of linear equations that is Symmetric Positive Definite (SPD). Thus, solution techniques such as Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) can be effectively employed. Algebraic MultiGrid (AMG) and Symmetric Gauss-Seidel (SGS) are employed as conjugate gradient preconditioners for the DSA system. AMG is shown to be significantly more efficient than SGS. Fourier analyses are carried out and we show that this discontinuous finite element DSA scheme is always stable and effective at reducing the spectral radius for iterative transport solves, even for grids with high-aspect ratio cells. Numerical results are presented for different grid types: quadrilateral, hexagonal, and polygonal grids as well as grids with local mesh adaptivity.

  17. 2D and 3D crystallization of a bacterial homologue of human vitamin C membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Harder, Daniel; Ucurum, Zöhre; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2014-10-01

    Most organisms are able to synthesize vitamin C whereas humans are not. In order to contribute to the elucidation of the molecular working mechanism of vitamin C transport through biological membranes, we cloned, overexpressed, purified, functionally characterized, and 2D- and 3D-crystallized a bacterial protein (UraDp) with 29% of amino acid sequence identity to the human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 1 (SVCT1). Ligand-binding experiments by scintillation proximity assay revealed that uracil is a substrate preferably bound to UraDp. For structural analysis, we report on the production of tubular 2D crystals and present a first projection structure of UraDp from negatively stained tubes. On the other hand the successful growth of UraDp 3D crystals and their crystallographic analysis is described. These 3D crystals, which diffract X-rays to 4.2Å resolution, pave the way towards the high-resolution crystal structure of a bacterial homologue with high amino acid sequence identity to human SVCT1.

  18. Monte Carlo Simulations of Charge Transport in 2D Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Gagorik, Adam G; Mohin, Jacob W; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Hutchison, Geoffrey R

    2013-01-03

    The effect of morphology on charge transport in organic photovoltaics is assessed using Monte Carlo. In isotopic two-phase morphologies, increasing the domain size from 6.3 to 18.3 nm improves the fill factor by 11.6%, a result of decreased tortuosity and relaxation of Coulombic barriers. Additionally, when small aggregates of electron acceptors are interdispersed into the electron donor phase, charged defects form in the system, reducing fill factors by 23.3% on average, compared with systems without aggregates. In contrast, systems with idealized connectivity show a 3.31% decrease in fill factor when domain size was increased from 4 to 64 nm. We attribute this to a decreased rate of exciton separation at donor-acceptor interfaces. Finally, we notice that the presence of Coulomb interactions increases device performance as devices become smaller. The results suggest that for commonly found isotropic morphologies the Coulomb interactions between charge carriers dominates exciton separation effects.

  19. Transport of aurorally produced N/2D/ by winds in the high latitude thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerard, J.-C.; Roble, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    A time-dependent, two-dimensional model is developed for describing the meridional circulation of thermospheric odd nitrogen species produced in the auroral zone. The model is based on a previous model by Roble and Gary (1979) extended to upper altitude transport of the nitrogen species. Assumptions made include the existence of a steady neutral wind flowing from low to high latitudes, and an initial background due to scattered Lyman-beta and nightglow emissions. The aurora is also assumed as steady, along with a constant ion production. Predictions made using the model are compared with observations with the Atmosphere Explorer C spacecraft and rocket sounding measurements of the 5200 A distribution near the day-side polar cusp. The model requires thermospheric winds of 100-200 m/sec, flowing from day to nightside. Convective velocities near 1000 m/sec were detected by the Explorer spacecraft, as well as a day-to-nightside flow at the cusp.

  20. Interannual variability of carbon cycle implied by a 2-d atmospheric transport model.

    PubMed

    Can, Li; Xu, Li; Shao, Min; Zhang, Ren-Jian

    2004-01-01

    A 2-dimensional atmospheric transport model is deployed in a simplified CO2 inverse study. Calculated carbon flux distribution for the interval from 1981 to 1997 confirms the existence of a terrestrial carbon sink in mid-high latitude area of North Hemisphere. Strong interannual variability exists in carbon flux patterns, implying a possible link with ENSO and other natural episodes such as Pinatubo volcano eruption in 1991. Mechanism of this possible link was investigated with statistic method. Correlation analysis indicated that in North Hemisphere, climatic factors such as temperature and precipitation, to some extend, could influence the carbon cycle process of land and ocean, thus cause considerable change in carbon flux distribution. In addition, correlation study also demonstrated the possible, important role of Asian terrestrial ecosystems in carbon cycle.

  1. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  2. Quantum transport equation for systems with rough surfaces and its application to ultracold neutrons in a quantizing gravity field

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, M.; Meyerovich, A. E.

    2014-12-15

    We discuss transport of particles along random rough surfaces in quantum size effect conditions. As an intriguing application, we analyze gravitationally quantized ultracold neutrons in rough waveguides in conjunction with GRANIT experiments (ILL, Grenoble). We present a theoretical description of these experiments in the biased diffusion approximation for neutron mirrors with both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) roughness. All system parameters collapse into a single constant which determines the depletion times for the gravitational quantum states and the exit neutron count. This constant is determined by a complicated integral of the correlation function (CF) of surface roughness. The reliable identification of this CF is always hindered by the presence of long fluctuation-driven correlation tails in finite-size samples. We report numerical experiments relevant for the identification of roughness of a new GRANIT waveguide and make predictions for ongoing experiments. We also propose a radically new design for the rough waveguide.

  3. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.

    2000-01-01

    A low-energy neutron transport algorithm for use in space radiation protection is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multigroup analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. This analysis is accomplished by solving a realistic but simplified neutron transport test problem. The test problem is analyzed by using numerical and analytical procedures to obtain an accurate solution within specified error bounds. Results from the test problem are then used for determining mean values associated with rescattering terms that are associated with a multigroup solution of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through the evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for a water and an aluminum-water shield-target configuration is then compared with LAHET and MCNPX Monte Carlo code calculations for the same shield-target configuration. The algorithm developed showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a two-directional solution of the evaporation source showed even further improvement of the fluence near the front of the water target where diffusion from the front surface is important.

  4. Understanding Quantum Transport and the Kondo Effect in 2D Carbon Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Ross; Churochkin, Dmitry; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2013-03-01

    The rich physics surrounding correlations between conduction electrons and local spins in quantum dot systems is of significant interest towards the development of spintronic quantum information devices. In this study we establish the Kondo effect in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) films through a metal-insulator transition in resistance versus temperature interpreted within the Fermi liquid description of the Kondo effect and negative magnetoresistance which scales with a Kondo characteristic temperature. With a microstructure consisting of intact graphene nano-islands embedded within residual functionalized regions where local magnetic moments may form, RGO is effectively a disordered quantum dot system. This work is augmented with a theoretical study of transport through nano-scale multiple quantum dot devices. Solving within a Keldysh formalism we scrutinize quasi-bound state formation in a range of geometrical quantum dot configurations in order to interpret coherent quantum interference effects. We demonstrate negative differential conductance and control over device parameters such as the characteristic time. This tandem approach illustrates the promise of innovative low dimensional carbon spintronic devices.

  5. A transportable neutron radiography system based on a SbBe neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantidis, J. G.; Nicolaou, G. E.; Tsagas, N. F.

    2009-07-01

    A transportable neutron radiography system, incorporating a SbBe neutron source, has been simulated using the MCNPX code. Design provisions have allowed two radiography systems to be utilised using the same SbBe neutron source. In this respect, neutron radiographies can be carried out using the photoneutrons produced when the 124Sb is surrounded by the Be target. Alternatively, γ-radiography can be utilised with the photons from the 124Sb with the target removed. Appropriate collimators were simulated for each of the radiography modes. Apart from Be, the materials considered were compatible with the European Union Directive on 'Restriction of Hazardous Substances' (RoHS) 2002/95/EC, hence excluding the use of cadmium and lead. Bismuth was chosen as the material for γ-radiation shielding and the proposed system allowed a maximum activity of the 124Sb up to 1.85×1013 Bq. The system simulated allows different object sizes to be studied with a wide range of radiography parameters.

  6. Characterization of new materials for Ultracold Neutron transport and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Edgard; Christopher, Nicholas; Kawasaki, Shinsuke; Mammei, Russell; Marcellin, James; Matsumiya, Ryohei; Picker, Ruediger

    2016-09-01

    At TRIUMF, we are currently developing a super-thermal UltraCold Neutron (UCN) source using phonon exchange in super-fluid helium. To take full advantage of the high density of UCN from the TRIUMF source we are developing high UCN transmission guides and long storage time volumes for polarized UCN. These guides and storage volumes are important for experiments requiring a high density of polarized UCN, such as the neutron Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) measurement. The transportation efficiency depends on the capacity of the guide's walls to contain the UCN. The mean potential experienced by a UCN on wall collisions is called the Fermi potential and depends on the material. We have determined a set of potential candidates for our next generation UCN guides and EDM storage chamber. Their Fermi potential was measured using the SOFIA apparatus at MLF, J-PARC, Japan. Results of this measurement are presented in this talk.

  7. Stochastic analog neutron transport with TRIPOLI-4 and FREYA: Bayesian uncertainty quantification for neutron multiplicity counting

    DOE PAGES

    Verbeke, J. M.; Petit, O.

    2016-06-01

    From nuclear safeguards to homeland security applications, the need for the better modeling of nuclear interactions has grown over the past decades. Current Monte Carlo radiation transport codes compute average quantities with great accuracy and performance; however, performance and averaging come at the price of limited interaction-by-interaction modeling. These codes often lack the capability of modeling interactions exactly: for a given collision, energy is not conserved, energies of emitted particles are uncorrelated, and multiplicities of prompt fission neutrons and photons are uncorrelated. Many modern applications require more exclusive quantities than averages, such as the fluctuations in certain observables (e.g., themore » neutron multiplicity) and correlations between neutrons and photons. In an effort to meet this need, the radiation transport Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® was modified to provide a specific mode that models nuclear interactions in a full analog way, replicating as much as possible the underlying physical process. Furthermore, the computational model FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) was coupled with TRIPOLI-4 to model complete fission events. As a result, FREYA automatically includes fluctuations as well as correlations resulting from conservation of energy and momentum.« less

  8. Stochastic analog neutron transport with TRIPOLI-4 and FREYA: Bayesian uncertainty quantification for neutron multiplicity counting

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J. M.; Petit, O.

    2016-06-01

    From nuclear safeguards to homeland security applications, the need for the better modeling of nuclear interactions has grown over the past decades. Current Monte Carlo radiation transport codes compute average quantities with great accuracy and performance; however, performance and averaging come at the price of limited interaction-by-interaction modeling. These codes often lack the capability of modeling interactions exactly: for a given collision, energy is not conserved, energies of emitted particles are uncorrelated, and multiplicities of prompt fission neutrons and photons are uncorrelated. Many modern applications require more exclusive quantities than averages, such as the fluctuations in certain observables (e.g., the neutron multiplicity) and correlations between neutrons and photons. In an effort to meet this need, the radiation transport Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® was modified to provide a specific mode that models nuclear interactions in a full analog way, replicating as much as possible the underlying physical process. Furthermore, the computational model FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) was coupled with TRIPOLI-4 to model complete fission events. As a result, FREYA automatically includes fluctuations as well as correlations resulting from conservation of energy and momentum.

  9. Stochastic analog neutron transport with TRIPOLI-4 and FREYA: Bayesian uncertainty quantification for neutron multiplicity counting

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J. M.; Petit, O.

    2016-06-01

    From nuclear safeguards to homeland security applications, the need for the better modeling of nuclear interactions has grown over the past decades. Current Monte Carlo radiation transport codes compute average quantities with great accuracy and performance; however, performance and averaging come at the price of limited interaction-by-interaction modeling. These codes often lack the capability of modeling interactions exactly: for a given collision, energy is not conserved, energies of emitted particles are uncorrelated, and multiplicities of prompt fission neutrons and photons are uncorrelated. Many modern applications require more exclusive quantities than averages, such as the fluctuations in certain observables (e.g., the neutron multiplicity) and correlations between neutrons and photons. In an effort to meet this need, the radiation transport Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® was modified to provide a specific mode that models nuclear interactions in a full analog way, replicating as much as possible the underlying physical process. Furthermore, the computational model FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) was coupled with TRIPOLI-4 to model complete fission events. As a result, FREYA automatically includes fluctuations as well as correlations resulting from conservation of energy and momentum.

  10. Modelling of ELM-averaged power exhaust on JET using the EDGE2D code with variable transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirnev, G.; Fundamenski, W.; Corrigan, G.

    2007-06-01

    The scrape-off layer (SOL) of the JET tokamak has been modelled using a two-dimensional plasma/neutral code, EDGE2D/NIMBUS, with variable transport coefficients, chosen according to nine candidate theories for radial heat transport in the SOL. Comparison of the radial power width on the outer divertor plates, λq, predicted by modelling and measured experimentally in L-mode and ELM-averaged H-mode at JET is presented. Transport coefficients based on classical and neo-classical ion conduction are found to offer the best agreement with experimentally measured λq magnitude and scaling with target power, upstream density and toroidal field. These results reinforce the findings of an earlier study, based on a simplified model of the SOL (Chankin 1997 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 39 1059), and support the earlier estimate of the power width at the entrance of the outer divertor volume in ITER, λq ap 4 mm mapped to the outer mid-plane (Fundamenski et al 2004 Nucl. Fusion 44 20).

  11. Sensitivity study of neutron transport through standard and rebar concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiyan, S.I.; Roussin, R.W.; Lucius, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation is under way at ORNL to (1) develop a data base pertinent to the transport of neutrons through thick concrete shields, (2) use the data base in an energy group boundary selection and collapsing scheme, and (3) develop a simple methodology to access the data base to provide rapid solutions to practical shielding problems. This paper describes work carried out to fulfill objective (1), the work consisting of calculations of the transport of fission neutrons through 1- and 2-m-thick slabs of standard concrete and rebar (steel-reinforced) concrete, together with calculations of the sensitivities of the results to total, absorption, and elastic cross sections. The transport calculations were performed with the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN in both forward and adjoint modes. The DLC-41C/VITAMIN-C cross-section library (171 neutron, 36 gamma groups) was employed, with a P/sub 3/ cross-section expansion and an S/sub 16/ angular quadrature. In all cases the fission source was assumed to be distributed within the first 1-cm thickness of the slab and the detector was assumed to occupy the last 1-cm thickness of the slab. For the rebar concrete the slab constituents were homogenized, with the horizontal and vertical No. 11 reinforcing steel rods comprising 7.6 vol. % of the slab. The quantity calculated was the absorbed dose rate, and care was taken in the mesh interval selection and source description to ensure agreement between the forward and adjoint results to within 0.02%.

  12. Note: Reliable and non-contact 6D motion tracking system based on 2D laser scanners for cargo transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2014-10-15

    Maritime transportation demands an accurate measurement system to track the motion of oscillating container boxes in real time. However, it is a challenge to design a sensor system that can provide both reliable and non-contact methods of 6-DOF motion measurements of a remote object for outdoor applications. In the paper, a sensor system based on two 2D laser scanners is proposed for detecting the relative 6-DOF motion of a crane load in real time. Even without implementing a camera, the proposed system can detect the motion of a remote object using four laser beam points. Because it is a laser-based sensor, the system is expected to be highly robust to sea weather conditions.

  13. Structural, electronic transport and optical properties of functionalized quasi-2D TiC2 from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdiyorov, G. R.; Madjet, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Using the first-principles density functional theory, we study the effect of surface functionalization on the structural and optoelectronic properties of recently proposed quasi-two-dimensional material TiC2 [T. Zhao, S. Zhang, Y. Guo, Q. Wang, Nanoscale 8 (2016) 233]. Hydrogenated, fluorinated, oxidized and hydroxylated surfaces are considered. Significant changes in the lattice parameters and partial charge distributions are found due to the surface termination. Direct contribution of the adatoms to the system density of states near the Fermi level is obtained, which has a major impact on the optoelectronic properties of the material. For example, surface termination results in larger absorption in the visible range of the spectrum. The electronic transport is also affected by the surface functionalization: the current in the system can be reduced by an order of magnitude. These findings indicate the importance of the effects of surface passivation on optoelectronic properties of this quasi-2D material.

  14. A concurrent, multigroup, discrete ordinates model of neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M.R.; Still, C.H.

    1993-10-22

    The authors present an algorithm for the concurrent solution of the linear system arising from a multigroup, discrete ordinates model of neutron transport. The target architectures consist of distributed memory computers ranging from workstation clusters to massively parallel computers. Based on an analysis of the memory requirement and floating point complexity of matrix-vector multiplication in the iterative solution of the linear system, the authors propose a data layout and communication strategy designed to achieve scalability with respect to all phase space variables. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the algorithm on the nCUBE/2.

  15. A killer micro attack on 3D neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M.R.; Ferguson, J.M.

    1990-11-01

    We describe the deterministic solution of the neutron transport equation and the computation of the effective criticality of three-dimensional assemblies using the BBN TC2000 killer micros. We observe that the performance of our research code PTRAN running on 48 processors of the TC2000 is competitive with the partially vectorizable version running on a single Cray Y/MP processor. This performance scales well with the number of processors on real problems, including those that are not load balanced a priori. To obtain this performance, we explicitly specify and exploit data locality and data dependence using domain decomposition and dynamic job scheduling. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Current status of the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, J.

    2006-07-01

    PSG is a new Monte Carlo neutron transport code, developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The code is mainly intended for fuel assembly-level reactor physics calculations, such as group constant generation for deterministic reactor simulator codes. This paper presents the current status of the project and the essential capabilities of the code. Although the main application of PSG is in lattice calculations, the geometry is not restricted in two dimensions. This paper presents the validation of PSG against the experimental results of the three-dimensional MOX fuelled VENUS-2 reactor dosimetry benchmark. (authors)

  17. Structures of the fractional spaces generated by the difference neutron transport operator

    SciTech Connect

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Taskin, Abdulgafur

    2015-09-18

    The initial boundary value problem for the neutron transport equation is considered. The first, second and third order of accuracy difference schemes for the approximate solution of this problem are presented. Highly accurate difference schemes for neutron transport equation based on Padé approximation are constructed. In applications, stability estimates for solutions of difference schemes for the approximate solution of the neutron transport equation are obtained.The positivity of the neutron transport operator in Slobodeckij spaces is proved. Numerical techniques are developed and algorithms are tested on an example in MATLAB.

  18. Novel Parallel Numerical Methods for Radiation& Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P N

    2001-03-06

    In many of the multiphysics simulations performed at LLNL, transport calculations can take up 30 to 50% of the total run time. If Monte Carlo methods are used, the percentage can be as high as 80%. Thus, a significant core competence in the formulation, software implementation, and solution of the numerical problems arising in transport modeling is essential to Laboratory and DOE research. In this project, we worked on developing scalable solution methods for the equations that model the transport of photons and neutrons through materials. Our goal was to reduce the transport solve time in these simulations by means of more advanced numerical methods and their parallel implementations. These methods must be scalable, that is, the time to solution must remain constant as the problem size grows and additional computer resources are used. For iterative methods, scalability requires that (1) the number of iterations to reach convergence is independent of problem size, and (2) that the computational cost grows linearly with problem size. We focused on deterministic approaches to transport, building on our earlier work in which we performed a new, detailed analysis of some existing transport methods and developed new approaches. The Boltzmann equation (the underlying equation to be solved) and various solution methods have been developed over many years. Consequently, many laboratory codes are based on these methods, which are in some cases decades old. For the transport of x-rays through partially ionized plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium, the transport equation is coupled to nonlinear diffusion equations for the electron and ion temperatures via the highly nonlinear Planck function. We investigated the suitability of traditional-solution approaches to transport on terascale architectures and also designed new scalable algorithms; in some cases, we investigated hybrid approaches that combined both.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Cosmogenic Neutron Production and Transport in Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyeong J.; Drake, Darrell M.; Reedy, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    The numerical simulation code MCNPX was used to calculate the production and transport of cosmic-ray-produced neutrons in Mars and meteorites. These calculations help to understand the processes involved and the parameters that control the neutron fluxes. Results are presented here for neutrons in Mars and for the distribution of cosmic-ray neutrons and protons in a 50 cm-radius L-chondrite.

  20. Optimized Purification of a Heterodimeric ABC Transporter in a Highly Stable Form Amenable to 2-D Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Galián, Carmen; Manon, Florence; Dezi, Manuela; Torres, Cristina; Ebel, Christine; Lévy, Daniel; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Optimized protocols for achieving high-yield expression, purification and reconstitution of membrane proteins are required to study their structure and function. We previously reported high-level expression in Escherichia coli of active BmrC and BmrD proteins from Bacillus subtilis, previously named YheI and YheH. These proteins are half-transporters which belong to the ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) superfamily and associate in vivo to form a functional transporter able to efflux drugs. In this report, high-yield purification and functional reconstitution were achieved for the heterodimer BmrC/BmrD. In contrast to other detergents more efficient for solubilizing the transporter, dodecyl-ß-D-maltoside (DDM) maintained it in a drug-sensitive and vanadate-sensitive ATPase-competent state after purification by affinity chromatography. High amounts of pure proteins were obtained which were shown either by analytical ultracentrifugation or gel filtration to form a monodisperse heterodimer in solution, which was notably stable for more than one month at 4°C. Functional reconstitution using different lipid compositions induced an 8-fold increase of the ATPase activity (kcat∼5 s−1). We further validated that the quality of the purified BmrC/BmrD heterodimer is suitable for structural analyses, as its reconstitution at high protein densities led to the formation of 2-D crystals. Electron microscopy of negatively stained crystals allowed the calculation of a projection map at 20 Å resolution revealing that BmrC/BmrD might assemble into oligomers in a lipidic environment. PMID:21602923

  1. Quantification of tracer plume transport parameters in 2D saturated porous media by cross-borehole ERT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekmine, G.; Auradou, H.; Pessel, M.; Rayner, J. L.

    2017-04-01

    Cross-borehole ERT imaging was tested to quantify the average velocity and transport parameters of tracer plumes in saturated porous media. Seven tracer tests were performed at different flow rates and monitored by either a vertical or horizontal dipole-dipole ERT sequence. These sequences were tested to reconstruct the shape and temporally follow the spread of the tracer plumes through a background regularization procedure. Data sets were inverted with the same inversion parameters and 2D model sections of resistivity ratios were converted to tracer concentrations. Both array types provided an accurate estimation of the average pore velocity vz. The total mass Mtot recovered was always overestimated by the horizontal dipole-dipole and underestimated by the vertical dipole-dipole. The vertical dipole-dipole was however reliable to quantify the longitudinal dispersivity λz, while the horizontal dipole-dipole returned better estimation for the transverse component λx. λ and Mtot were mainly influenced by the 2D distribution of the cumulated electrical sensitivity and the Shadow Effects induced by the third dimension. The size reduction of the edge of the plume was also related to the inability of the inversion process to reconstruct sharp resistivity contrasts at the interface. Smoothing was counterbalanced by a non-realistic rise of the ERT concentrations around the centre of mass returning overpredicted total masses. A sensitivity analysis on the cementation factor m and the porosity ϕ demonstrated that a change in one of these parameters by 8% involved non negligible variations by 30 and 40% of the dispersion coefficients and mass recovery.

  2. Neutron Transport Models and Methods for HZETRN and Coupling to Low Energy Light Ion Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, S.R.; Slaba, T.C.; Heinbockel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircraft exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETCHEDS and FLUKA, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light ion (A<4) transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  3. Neutron Transport Models and Methods for HZETRN and Coupling to Low Energy Light Ion Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, S.R.; Slaba, T.C.; Heinbockel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircraft exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETCHEDS and FLUKA, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light ion (A<4) transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  4. Excessive fructose intake causes 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3)-dependent inhibition of intestinal and renal calcium transport in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Douard, Veronique; Sabbagh, Yves; Lee, Jacklyn; Patel, Chirag; Kemp, Francis W; Bogden, John D; Lin, Sheldon; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2013-06-15

    We recently discovered that chronic high fructose intake by lactating rats prevented adaptive increases in rates of active intestinal Ca(2+) transport and in levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3, the active form of vitamin D. Since sufficient Ca(2+) absorption is essential for skeletal growth, our discovery may explain findings that excessive consumption of sweeteners compromises bone integrity in children. We tested the hypothesis that 1,25-(OH)2D3 mediates the inhibitory effect of excessive fructose intake on active Ca(2+) transport. First, compared with those fed glucose or starch, growing rats fed fructose for 4 wk had a marked reduction in intestinal Ca(2+) transport rate as well as in expression of intestinal and renal Ca(2+) transporters that was tightly associated with decreases in circulating levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3, bone length, and total bone ash weight but not with serum parathyroid hormone (PTH). Dietary fructose increased the expression of 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) and decreased that of 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), suggesting that fructose might enhance the renal catabolism and impair the synthesis, respectively, of 1,25-(OH)2D3. Serum FGF23, which is secreted by osteocytes and inhibits CYP27B1 expression, was upregulated, suggesting a potential role of bone in mediating the fructose effects on 1,25-(OH)2D3 synthesis. Second, 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment rescued the fructose effect and normalized intestinal and renal Ca(2+) transporter expression. The mechanism underlying the deleterious effect of excessive fructose intake on intestinal and renal Ca(2+) transporters is a reduction in serum levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3. This finding is significant because of the large amounts of fructose now consumed by Americans increasingly vulnerable to Ca(2+) and vitamin D deficiency.

  5. Excessive fructose intake causes 1,25-(OH)2D3-dependent inhibition of intestinal and renal calcium transport in growing rats

    PubMed Central

    Douard, Veronique; Sabbagh, Yves; Lee, Jacklyn; Patel, Chirag; Kemp, Francis W.; Bogden, John D.; Lin, Sheldon

    2013-01-01

    We recently discovered that chronic high fructose intake by lactating rats prevented adaptive increases in rates of active intestinal Ca2+ transport and in levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3, the active form of vitamin D. Since sufficient Ca2+ absorption is essential for skeletal growth, our discovery may explain findings that excessive consumption of sweeteners compromises bone integrity in children. We tested the hypothesis that 1,25-(OH)2D3 mediates the inhibitory effect of excessive fructose intake on active Ca2+ transport. First, compared with those fed glucose or starch, growing rats fed fructose for 4 wk had a marked reduction in intestinal Ca2+ transport rate as well as in expression of intestinal and renal Ca2+ transporters that was tightly associated with decreases in circulating levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3, bone length, and total bone ash weight but not with serum parathyroid hormone (PTH). Dietary fructose increased the expression of 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) and decreased that of 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), suggesting that fructose might enhance the renal catabolism and impair the synthesis, respectively, of 1,25-(OH)2D3. Serum FGF23, which is secreted by osteocytes and inhibits CYP27B1 expression, was upregulated, suggesting a potential role of bone in mediating the fructose effects on 1,25-(OH)2D3 synthesis. Second, 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment rescued the fructose effect and normalized intestinal and renal Ca2+ transporter expression. The mechanism underlying the deleterious effect of excessive fructose intake on intestinal and renal Ca2+ transporters is a reduction in serum levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3. This finding is significant because of the large amounts of fructose now consumed by Americans increasingly vulnerable to Ca2+ and vitamin D deficiency. PMID:23571713

  6. Calculation of eigenvalues for neutron transport equation using Henyey-Greenstein phase function in slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bülbül, Ahmet

    2016-11-01

    Eigenvalues are obtained for one-dimensional steady-state neutron transport equation in slab geometry using Henyey-Greenstein (HG) phase function. Firstly, HG phase function is inserted into neutron transport equation then eigenvalues are calculated for different values of collision parameters c and t parameters. All results are calculated for P9 and U9 approximation and these results compared each other.

  7. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Adam J. Lee, John C.

    2016-02-15

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  8. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Adam J.; Lee, John C.

    2016-02-01

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  9. Capabilities of seismic and georadar 2D/3D imaging of shallow subsurface of transport route using the Seismobile system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilecki, Zenon; Isakow, Zbigniew; Czarny, Rafał; Pilecka, Elżbieta; Harba, Paulina; Barnaś, Maciej

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the capabilities of the Seismobile system for shallow subsurface imaging of transport routes, such as roads, railways, and airport runways, in different geological conditions were presented. The Seismobile system combines the advantages of seismic profiling using landstreamer and georadar (GPR) profiling. It consists of up to four seismic measuring lines and carriage with a suspended GPR antenna. Shallow subsurface recognition may be achieved to a maximum width of 10.5 m for a distance of 3.5 m between the measurement lines. GPR measurement is performed in the axis of the construction. Seismobile allows the measurement time, labour and costs to be reduced due to easy technique of its installation, remote data transmission from geophones to accompanying measuring modules, automated location of the system based on GPS and a highly automated method of seismic wave excitation. In this paper, the results of field tests carried out in different geological conditions were presented. The methodologies of acquisition, processing and interpretation of seismic and GPR measurements were broadly described. Seismograms and its spectrum registered by Seismobile system were compared to the ones registered by Geode seismograph of Geometrix. Seismic data processing and interpretation software allows for the obtaining of 2D/3D models of P- and S-wave velocities. Combined seismic and GPR results achieved sufficient imaging of shallow subsurface to a depth of over a dozen metres. The obtained geophysical information correlated with geological information from the boreholes with good quality. The results of performed tests proved the efficiency of the Seismobile system in seismic and GPR imaging of a shallow subsurface of transport routes under compound conditions.

  10. A killer micro attack on 3D neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M.R.; Ferguson, J.M.

    1990-11-16

    In this paper, we describe the deterministic solution of the neutron transport equation and the computation of the effective criticality of three-dimensional assemblies using the BBN TC2000 killer micros. We observe that the performance of our research code PTRAN running on 48 processors of the TC2000 is competitive with the partially vectorizable version running on a single Cray Y/MP processor. This performance scales well with the number of processors on real problems, including those that are not load balanced a priori. To obtain this performance, we explicitly specify and exploit data locality and data dependence using domain decomposition and dynamic job scheduling. From the results obtained here, it appears that, at least for this application, a production machine based on the TC2000 architecture with more powerful processors and a commensurate increase in switch speed could yield a significant gain in our design capability. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann solution of the transient Boltzmann transport equation in radiative and neutron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yahui; Yan, Liming; Ma, Yu

    2017-06-01

    Applications of the transient Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) have undergone much investigation, such as radiative heat transfer and neutron transport. This paper provides a lattice Boltzmann model to efficiently resolve the multidimensional transient BTE. For a higher angular resolution, enough transport directions are considered while the transient BTE in each direction is treated as a conservation law equation and solved independently. Both macroscopic equations recovered from a Chapman-Enskog expansion and simulated results of typical benchmark problems show not only the second-order accuracy but also the flexibility and applicability of the proposed lattice Boltzmann model. This approach may contribute a powerful technique for the parallel simulation of large-scale engineering and some alternative perspectives for solving the nonlinear transport problem further.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann solution of the transient Boltzmann transport equation in radiative and neutron transport.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yahui; Yan, Liming; Ma, Yu

    2017-06-01

    Applications of the transient Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) have undergone much investigation, such as radiative heat transfer and neutron transport. This paper provides a lattice Boltzmann model to efficiently resolve the multidimensional transient BTE. For a higher angular resolution, enough transport directions are considered while the transient BTE in each direction is treated as a conservation law equation and solved independently. Both macroscopic equations recovered from a Chapman-Enskog expansion and simulated results of typical benchmark problems show not only the second-order accuracy but also the flexibility and applicability of the proposed lattice Boltzmann model. This approach may contribute a powerful technique for the parallel simulation of large-scale engineering and some alternative perspectives for solving the nonlinear transport problem further.

  13. Experimental validation of a coupled neutron-photon inverse radiation transport solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, John; Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee T.

    2011-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed an inverse radiation transport solver that applies nonlinear regression to coupled neutron-photon deterministic transport models. The inverse solver uses nonlinear regression to fit a radiation transport model to gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity counting measurements. The subject of this paper is the experimental validation of that solver. This paper describes a series of experiments conducted with a 4.5 kg sphere of α-phase, weapons-grade plutonium. The source was measured bare and reflected by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spherical shells with total thicknesses between 1.27 and 15.24 cm. Neutron and photon emissions from the source were measured using three instruments: a gross neutron counter, a portable neutron multiplicity counter, and a high-resolution gamma spectrometer. These measurements were used as input to the inverse radiation transport solver to evaluate the solver's ability to correctly infer the configuration of the source from its measured radiation signatures.

  14. Experimental validation of GADRAS's coupled neutron-photon inverse radiation transport solver.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Harding, Lee T.

    2010-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed an inverse radiation transport solver that applies nonlinear regression to coupled neutron-photon deterministic transport models. The inverse solver uses nonlinear regression to fit a radiation transport model to gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity counting measurements. The subject of this paper is the experimental validation of that solver. This paper describes a series of experiments conducted with a 4.5 kg sphere of {alpha}-phase, weapons-grade plutonium. The source was measured bare and reflected by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spherical shells with total thicknesses between 1.27 and 15.24 cm. Neutron and photon emissions from the source were measured using three instruments: a gross neutron counter, a portable neutron multiplicity counter, and a high-resolution gamma spectrometer. These measurements were used as input to the inverse radiation transport solver to evaluate the solver's ability to correctly infer the configuration of the source from its measured radiation signatures.

  15. Role of positively charged amino acids in the M2D transmembrane helix of Ktr/Trk/HKT type cation transporters.

    PubMed

    Kato, Naoki; Akai, Masaro; Zulkifli, Lalu; Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Kato, Yasuhiro; Goshima, Shinobu; Hazama, Akihiro; Yamagami, Mutsumi; Guy, H Robert; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Studies suggest that Ktr/Trk/HKT-type transporters have evolved from multiple gene fusions of simple K(+) channels of the KcsA type into proteins that span the membrane at least eight times. Several positively charged residues are present in the eighth transmembrane segment, M2(D), in the transporters but not K(+) channels. Some models of ion transporters require a barrier to prevent free diffusion of ions down their electrochemical gradient, and it is possible that the positively charged residues within the transporter pore may prevent transporters from being channels. Here we studied the functional role of these positive residues in three Ktr/Trk/HKT-type transporters (Synechocystis KtrB-mediated K(+) uniporter, Arabidopsis AtHKT1-mediated Na(+) uniporter and wheat TaHKT1-mediated K(+)/Na(+) symporter) by examining K(+) uptake rates in E. coli, electrophysiological measurements in oocytes and growth rates of E. coli and yeast. The conserved Arg near the middle of the M2(D) segment was essential for the K(+) transport activity of KtrB and plant HKTs. Combined replacement of several positive residues in TaHKT1 showed that the positive residue at the beginning of the M2(D), which is conserved in many K(+) channels, also contributed to cation transport activity. This positive residue and the conserved Arg both face towards the ion conducting pore side. We introduced an atomic-scale homology model for predicting amino acid interactions. Based on the experimental results and the model, we propose that a salt bridge(s) exists between positive residues in the M2(D) and conserved negative residues in the pore region to reduce electrostatic repulsion against cation permeation caused by the positive residue(s). This salt bridge may help stabilize the transporter configuration, and may also prevent the conformational change that occurs in channels.

  16. Coupled full core neutron transport/CFD simulations of pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kochunas, B.; Stimpson, S.; Collins, B.; Downar, T.; Brewster, R.; Baglietto, E.; Yan, J.

    2012-07-01

    Recently as part of the CASL project, a capability to perform 3D whole-core coupled neutron transport and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations was demonstrated. This work uses the 2D/1D transport code DeCART and the commercial CFD code STAR-CCM+. It builds on previous CASL work demonstrating coupling for smaller spatial domains. The coupling methodology is described along with the problem simulated and results are presented for fresh hot full power conditions. An additional comparison is made to an equivalent model that uses lower order T/H feedback to assess the importance and cost of high fidelity feedback to the neutronics problem. A simulation of a quarter core Combustion Engineering (CE) PWR core was performed with the coupled codes using a Fixed Point Gauss-Seidel iteration technique. The total approximate calculation requirements are nearly 10,000 CPU hours and 1 TB of memory. The problem took 6 coupled iterations to converge. The CFD coupled model and low order T/H feedback model compared well for global solution parameters, with a difference in the critical boron concentration and average outlet temperature of 14 ppm B and 0.94 deg. C, respectively. Differences in the power distribution were more significant with maximum relative differences in the core-wide pin peaking factor (Fq) of 5.37% and average relative differences in flat flux region power of 11.54%. Future work will focus on analyzing problems more relevant to CASL using models with less approximations. (authors)

  17. A Static and Dynamic Investigation of Quantum Nonlinear Transport in Highly Dense and Mobile 2D Electron Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Scott

    Heterostructures made of semiconductor materials may be one of most versatile environments for the study of the physics of electron transport in two dimensions. These systems are highly customizable and demonstrate a wide range of interesting physical phenomena. In response to both microwave radiation and DC excitations, strongly nonlinear transport that gives rise to non-equilibrium electron states has been reported and investigated. We have studied GaAs quantum wells with a high density of high mobility two-dimensional electrons placed in a quantizing magnetic field. This study presents the observation of several nonlinear transport mechanisms produced by the quantum nature of these materials. The quantum scattering rate, 1tau/q, is an important parameter in these systems, defining the width of the quantized energy levels. Traditional methods of extracting 1tau/q involve studying the amplitude of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. We analyze the quantum positive magnetoresistance due to the cyclotron motion of electrons in a magnetic field. This method gives 1tau/q and has the additional benefit of providing access to the strength of electron-electron interactions, which is not possible by conventional techniques. The temperature dependence of the quantum scattering rate is found to be proportional to the square of the temperature and is in very good agreement with theory that considers electron-electron interactions in 2D systems. In quantum wells with a small scattering rate - which corresponds to well-defined Landau levels - quantum oscillations of nonlinear resistance that are independent of magnetic field strength have been observed. These oscillations are periodic in applied bias current and are connected to quantum oscillations of resistance at zero bias: either Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations for single subband systems or magnetointersubband oscillations for two subband systems. The bias-induced oscillations can be explained by a spatial variation of electron

  18. On-the-fly Neutron Tomography of Water Transport into Lupine Roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Carminati, Andrea; Kaestner, Anders; Mannes, David; Morgano, Manuel; Peetermans, Steven; Lehmann, Eberhard; Trtik, Pavel

    Measurement and visualization of water flow in soil and roots is essential for understanding of how roots take up water from soils. Such information would allow for the optimization of irrigation practices and for the identification of the optimal traits for the capture of water, in particular when water is scarce. However, measuring water flow in roots growing in soil is challenging. The previous 2D experiments (Zarebanadkouki et al., 2012) have not been sufficient for understanding the water transport across the root and therefore we employed an on-the-fly tomography technique with temporal resolution of three minutes. In this paper, we show that the series of on-the-fly neutron tomographic experiments performed on the same sample allow for monitoring the three-dimensional spatial distribution of D2O across the root tissue. The obtained data will allow us to calculate the convective and diffusive transport properties across root tissue and to estimate the relative importance of different pathways of water across the root tissue.

  19. A Study on Inhomogeneous Neutron Intensity Distribution Origin from Neutron Guide Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wei, Guohai; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Yuntao; He, Linfeng; Sun, Kai; Han, Songbai; Chen, Dongfeng

    The uniformity of the neutron intensity spatial distribution at the sample position will directly affect the neutron imaging quality. But the unexpected inhomogeneous spatial distribution phenomenon always appears in the neutron radiography facilities installed at the end of neutron guide. In this paper, the source of this phenomenon has been analyzed through geometrical optics and confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations, and several optimization solutions are also proposed.

  20. Experimental Transport Benchmarks for Physical Dosimetry to Support Development of Fast-Neutron Therapy with Neutron Capture Augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg; J. K. Hartwell; J. R. Venhuizen; C. A. Wemple; R. Risler; G. E. Laramore; W. Sauerwein; G. Hudepohl; A. Lennox

    2006-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Washington (UW) Neutron Therapy Center, the University of Essen (Germany) Neutron Therapy Clinic, and the Northern Illinois University(NIU) Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab have been collaborating in the development of fast-neutron therapy (FNT) with concurrent neutron capture (NCT) augmentation [1,2]. As part of this effort, we have conducted measurements to produce suitable benchmark data as an aid in validation of advanced three-dimensional treatment planning methodologies required for successful administration of FNT/NCT. Free-beam spectral measurements as well as phantom measurements with Lucite{trademark} cylinders using thermal, resonance, and threshold activation foil techniques have now been completed at all three clinical accelerator facilities. The same protocol was used for all measurements to facilitate intercomparison of data. The results will be useful for further detailed characterization of the neutron beams of interest as well as for validation of various charged particle and neutron transport codes and methodologies for FNT/NCT computational dosimetry, such as MCNP [3], LAHET [4], and MINERVA [5].

  1. Study of Transport Behavior and Conversion Efficiency in Pillar Structured Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R

    2007-04-26

    Room temperature, high efficiency and scalable radiation detectors can be realized by manipulating materials at the micro scale. With micro-semiconductor-pillars, we will advance the thermal neutron detection efficiency of semiconductor detectors to over 70% with 50 mm in detector thickness. New material science, new transport behavior, neutron to alpha conversion dynamics and their relationship with neutron detection will be discovered with the proposed structures.

  2. Development and testing of a deuterium gas target assembly for neutron production via the H-2(d,n)He-3 reaction at a low-energy accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Feautrier, D.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-03-01

    This report describes the development and testing of a deuterium gas target intended for use at a low-energy accelerator facility to produce neutrons for basic research and various nuclear applications. The principle source reaction is H-2(d,n)He-3. It produces a nearly mono-energetic group of neutrons. However, a lower-energy continuum neutron spectrum is produced by the H-2(d;n,p)H-2 reaction and also by deuterons which strike various components in the target assembly. The present target is designed to achieve the following objectives: (1) minimize unwanted background neutron production from the target assembly, (2) provide a relatively low level of residual long-term activity within the target components, (3) have the capacity to dissipate up to 150 watts of beam power with good target longevity, and (4) possess a relatively modest target mass in order to minimize neutron scattering from the target components. The basic physical principles that have to be considered in designing an accelerator target are discussed and the major engineering features of this particular target design are outlined. The results of initial performance tests on this target are documented and some conclusions concerning the viability of the target design are presented.

  3. Cooperative learning of neutron diffusion and transport theories

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Michael A.

    1999-04-30

    A cooperative group instructional strategy is being used to teach a unit on neutron transport and diffusion theory in a first-year-graduate level, Reactor Theory course that was formerly presented in the traditional lecture/discussion style. Students are divided into groups of two or three for the duration of the unit. Class meetings are divided into traditional lecture/discussion segments punctuated by cooperative group exercises. The group exercises were designed to require the students to elaborate, summarize, or practice the material presented in the lecture/discussion segments. Both positive interdependence and individual accountability are fostered by adjusting individual grades on the unit exam by a factor dependent upon group achievement. Group collaboration was also encouraged on homework assignments by assigning each group a single grade on each assignment. The results of the unit exam have been above average in the two classes in which the cooperative group method was employed. In particular, the problem solving ability of the students has shown particular improvement. Further,the students felt that the cooperative group format was both more educationally effective and more enjoyable than the lecture/discussion format.

  4. Rayleigh Quotient Iteration in 3D, Deterministic Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Slaybaugh, R; Evans, Thomas M; Davidson, Gregory G; Wilson, P.

    2012-01-01

    Today's "grand challenge" neutron transport problems require 3-D meshes with billions of cells, hundreds of energy groups, and accurate quadratures and scattering expansions. Leadership-class computers provide platforms on which high-fidelity fluxes can be calculated. However, appropriate methods are needed that can use these machines effectively. Such methods must be able to use hundreds of thousands of cores and have good convergence properties. Rayleigh quotient iteration (RQI) is an eigenvalue solver that has been added to the Sn code Denovo to address convergence. Rayleigh quotient iteration is an optimal shifted inverse iteration method that should converge in fewer iterations than the more common power method and other shifted inverse iteration methods for many problems of interest. Denovo's RQI uses a new multigroup Krylov solver for the fixed source solutions inside every iteration that allows parallelization in energy in addition to space and angle. This Krylov solver has been shown to scale successfully to 200,000 cores: for example one test problem scaled from 69,120 cores to 190,080 cores with 98% efficiency. This paper shows that RQI works for some small problems. However, the Krylov method upon which it relies does not always converge because RQI creates ill-conditioned systems. This result leads to the conclusion that preconditioning is needed to allow this method to be applicable to a wider variety of problems.

  5. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I. Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  6. Dopamine D1, D2, D3 Receptors, Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Type-2 (VMAT2) and Dopamine Transporter (DAT) Densities in Aged Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianjun; Xu, Jinbin; Cairns, Nigel J.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Mach, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine D1, D2, D3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2), and dopamine transporter (DAT) densities were measured in 11 aged human brains (aged 77–107.8, mean: 91 years) by quantitative autoradiography. The density of D1 receptors, VMAT2, and DAT was measured using [3H]SCH23390, [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [3H]WIN35428, respectively. The density of D2 and D3 receptors was calculated using the D3-preferring radioligand, [3H]WC-10 and the D2-preferring radioligand [3H]raclopride using a mathematical model developed previously by our group. Dopamine D1, D2, and D3 receptors are extensively distributed throughout striatum; the highest density of D3 receptors occurred in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). The density of the DAT is 10–20-fold lower than that of VMAT2 in striatal regions. Dopamine D3 receptor density exceeded D2 receptor densities in extrastriatal regions, and thalamus contained a high level of D3 receptors with negligible D2 receptors. The density of dopamine D1 linearly correlated with D3 receptor density in the thalamus. The density of the DAT was negligible in the extrastriatal regions whereas the VMAT2 was expressed in moderate density. D3 receptor and VMAT2 densities were in similar level between the aged human and aged rhesus brain samples, whereas aged human brain samples had lower range of densities of D1 and D2 receptors and DAT compared with the aged rhesus monkey brain. The differential density of D3 and D2 receptors in human brain will be useful in the interpretation of PET imaging studies in human subjects with existing radiotracers, and assist in the validation of newer PET radiotracers having a higher selectivity for dopamine D2 or D3 receptors. PMID:23185343

  7. Effects of in-plane magnetic field on the transport of 2D electron vortices in non-uniform plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Justin; Richardson, Andrew; Schumer, Joseph; Pulsed Power Team

    2015-11-01

    The formation of electron vortices in current-carrying plasmas is observed in 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the plasma-opening switch. In the presence of a background density gradient in Cartesian systems, vortices drift in the direction found by crossing the magnetic field with the background density gradient as a result of the Hall effect. However, most of the 2D simulations where electron vortices are seen and studied only allow for in-plane currents and thus only an out-of-plane magnetic field. Here we present results of numerical simulations of 2D, seeded electron vortices in an inhomogeneous background using the generalized 2D electron-magneto-hydrodynamic model that additionally allows for in-plane components of the magnetic field. By seeding vortices with a varying axial component of the velocity field, so that the vortex becomes a corkscrew, it is found that a pitch angle of around 20 degrees is sufficient to completely prevent the vortex from propagating due to the Hall effect for typical plasma parameters. This work is supported by the NRL Base Program.

  8. High-pressure melt growth and transport properties of SiP, SiAs, GeP, and GeAs 2D layered semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreteau, C.; Michon, B.; Besnard, C.; Giannini, E.

    2016-06-01

    Silicon and Germanium monopnictides SiP, SiAs, GeP and GeAs form a family of 2D layered semiconductors. We have succeeded in growing bulk single crystals of these compounds by melt-growth under high pressure (0.5-1 GPa) in a cubic anvil hot press. Large (mm-size), shiny, micaceous crystals of GeP, GeAs and SiAs were obtained, and could be exfoliated into 2D flakes. Small and brittle crystals of SiP were yielded by this method. High-pressure sintered polycrystalline SiP and GeAs have also been successfully used as a precursor in the Chemical Vapor Transport growth of these crystals in the presence of I2 as a transport agent. All compounds are found to crystallize in the expected layered structure and do not undergo any structural transition at low temperature, as shown by Raman spectroscopy down to T=5 K. All materials exhibit a semiconducting behavior. The electrical resistivity of GeP, GeAs and SiAs is found to depend on temperature following a 2D-Variable Range Hopping conduction mechanism. The availability of bulk crystals of these compounds opens new perspectives in the field of 2D semiconducting materials for device applications.

  9. Angular neutron transport investigation in the HZETRN free-space ion and nucleon transport and shielding computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleterry, R. C., Jr.; Wilson, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Extension of the high charge and energy (HZE) transport computer program HZETRN for angular transport of neutrons is considered. For this paper, only light ion transport, He4 and lighter, will be analyzed using a pure solar proton source. The angular transport calculator is the ANISN/PC program which is being controlled by the HZETRN program. The neutron flux values are compared for straight-ahead transport and angular transport in one dimension. The shield material is aluminum and the target material is water. The thickness of these materials is varied; however, only the largest model calculated is reported which is 50 gm/sq cm of aluminum and 100 gm/sq cm of water. The flux from the ANISN/PC calculation is about two orders of magnitude lower than the flux from HZETRN for very low energy neutrons. It is only a magnitude lower for the neutrons in the 10 to 20 MeV range in the aluminum and two orders lower in the water. The major reason for this difference is in the transport modes: straight-ahead versus angular. The angular treatment allows a longer path length than the straight-ahead approximation. Another reason is the different cross section sets used by the ANISN/PC-BUGLE-80 mode and the HZETRN mode. The next step is to investigate further the differences between the two codes and isolate the differences to just the angular versus straight-ahead transport mode. Then, create a better coupling between the angular neutron transport and the charged particle transport.

  10. Angular neutron transport investigation in the HZETRN free-space ion and nucleon transport and shielding computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; Wilson, J.W.

    1997-05-01

    Extension of the high charge and energy (HZE) transport computer program HZETRN for angular transport of neutrons is considered. For this paper, only light ion transport, He{sup 4} and lighter, will be analyzed using a pure solar proton source. The angular transport calculator is the ANISN/PC program which is being controlled by the HZETRN program. The neutron flux values are compared for straight-ahead transport and angular transport in one dimension. The shield material is aluminum and the target material is water. The thickness of these materials is varied; however, only the largest model calculated is reported which is 50 gm/cm{sup 2} of aluminum and 100 gm/cm{sup 2} of water. The flux from the ANISN/PC calculation is about two orders of magnitude lower than the flux from HZETRN for very low energy neutrons. It is only a magnitude lower for the neutrons in the 10 to 20 MeV range in the aluminum and two orders lower in the water. The major reason for this difference is in the transport modes: straight-ahead versus angular. The angular treatment allows a longer path length than the straight-ahead approximation. Another reason is the different cross section sets used by the ANISN/PC-BUGLE-80 mode and the HZETRN mode. The next step is to investigate further the differences between the two codes and isolate the differences to just the angular versus straight-ahead transport mode. Then, create a better coupling between the angular neutron transport and the charged particle transport.

  11. No association between schizophrenia and polymorphisms within the genes for debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) and the dopamine transporter (DAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.; Williams, J.; Asherson, P.; McGuffin, P.; Owen, M.

    1995-02-27

    It has been suggested that the cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase, debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase, is involved in the catabolism and processing of neurotransmitters subsequent to their reuptake into target cells. It is also thought to be related to the dopamine transporter that acts to take released dopamine back up into presynaptic terminals. The present study used the association approach to test the hypothesis that mutations in the genes for debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) and the dopamine transporter (DAT) confer susceptibility to schizophrenia. There were no differences in allele or genotype frequencies between patients and controls in the mutations causing the poor metaboliser phenotype in CYP2D6. In addition there was no association found between schizophrenia and a 48 bp repeat within the 3{prime} untranslated region of DAT. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Two-Dimensional Depth-Averaged Circulation Model CMS-M2D: Version 3.0, Report 2, Sediment Transport and Morphology Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Principal Investigator for CMS-M2D model development. Dr. Frank S. Buonaiuto, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Marine Sciences Research...of the JFK Causeway, Corpus Christi, Texas,” TAMU-CC-CBI-95-07, Conrad Blucher Institute for Surveying and Science , Texas A&M Univeristy-Corpus... Science 63, 249-260. Camenen, B., and Larson, M. (2006). “A suspended load sediment transport formula for the nearshore,” Journal of Coastal

  13. Neutron interaction and their transport with bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Esther Kalpana; Radhika, K.

    2015-05-15

    In the current paper an attempt was made to study and provide fundamental information about neutron interactions that are important to nuclear material measurements. The application of this study is explained about macroscopic interactions with bulk compound materials through a program in DEV C++ language which is done by enabling interaction of neutrons in nature. The output of the entire process depends upon the random number (i.e., incident neutron number), thickness of the material and mean free path as input parameters. Further the current study emphasizes on the usage of materials in shielding.

  14. Cosmic ray heliospheric transport study with neutron monitor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Ygbuhay, R. C.; Modzelewska, R.; Dorman, L. I.; Alania, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    Determining transport coefficients for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) propagation in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) poses a fundamental challenge in modeling cosmic ray modulation processes. GCR scattering in the solar wind involves wave-particle interaction, the waves being Alfven waves which propagate along the ambient field (B). Empirical values at 1 AU are determined for the components of the diffusion tensor for GCR propagation in the heliosphere using neutron monitor (NM) data. At high rigidities, particle density gradients and mean free paths at 1 AU in B can only be computed from the solar diurnal anisotropy (SDA) represented by a vector A (components Ar, Aϕ, and Aθ) in a heliospherical polar coordinate system. Long-term changes in SDA components of NMs (with long track record and the median rigidity of response Rm ~ 20 GV) are used to compute yearly values of the transport coefficients for 1963-2013. We confirm the previously reported result that the product of the parallel (to B) mean free path (λ||) and radial density gradient (Gr) computed from NM data exhibits a weak Schwabe cycle (11y) but strong Hale magnetic cycle (22y) dependence. Its value is most depressed in solar activity minima for positive (p) polarity intervals (solar magnetic field in the Northern Hemisphere points outward from the Sun) when GCRs drift from the polar regions toward the helioequatorial plane and out along the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), setting up a symmetric gradient Gθs pointing away from HCS. Gr drives all SDA components and λ|| Gr contributes to the diffusive component (Ad) of the ecliptic plane anisotropy (A). GCR transport is commonly discussed in terms of an isotropic hard sphere scattering (also known as billiard-ball scattering) in the solar wind plasma. We use it with a flat HCS model and the Ahluwalia-Dorman master equations to compute the coefficients α (=λ⊥/λ∥) and ωτ (a measure of turbulence in the solar wind) and transport

  15. MCNPX Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport in SiC semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, K.; Zat'ko, B.; Šagátová, A.; Pavlovič, M.; Nečas, V.; Stacho, M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate particle transport properties of a fast neutron detector based on silicon carbide. MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was used in our study because it allows seamless particle transport, thus not only interacting neutrons can be inspected but also secondary particles can be banked for subsequent transport. Modelling of the fast-neutron response of a SiC detector was carried out for fast neutrons produced by 239Pu-Be source with the mean energy of about 4.3 MeV. Using the MCNPX code, the following quantities have been calculated: secondary particle flux densities, reaction rates of elastic/inelastic scattering and other nuclear reactions, distribution of residual ions, deposited energy and energy distribution of pulses. The values of reaction rates calculated for different types of reactions and resulting energy deposition values showed that the incident neutrons transfer part of the carried energy predominantly via elastic scattering on silicon and carbon atoms. Other fast-neutron induced reactions include inelastic scattering and nuclear reactions followed by production of α-particles and protons. Silicon and carbon recoil atoms, α-particles and protons are charged particles which contribute to the detector response. It was demonstrated that although the bare SiC material can register fast neutrons directly, its detection efficiency can be enlarged if it is covered by an appropriate conversion layer. Comparison of the simulation results with experimental data was successfully accomplished.

  16. Deterministic and Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Calculations of the Dounreay Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ziver, A. Kemal; Shahdatullah, Sabu; Eaton, Matthew D.; Oliviera, Cassiano R.E. de; Ackroyd, Ron T.; Umpleby, Adrian P.; Pain, Christopher C.; Goddard, Antony J. H.; Fitzpatrick, James

    2004-12-15

    A homogenized whole-reactor cylindrical model of the Dounreay Fast Reactor has been constructed using both deterministic and Monte Carlo codes to determine neutron flux distributions inside the core and at various out-of-core components. The principal aim is to predict neutron-induced activation levels using both methods and make comparisons against the measured thermal reaction rates. Neutron transport calculations have been performed for a fixed source using a spatially lumped fission neutron distribution, which has been derived from measurements. The deterministic code used is based on the finite element approximation to the multigroup second-order even-parity neutron transport equation, which is implemented in the EVENT code. The Monte Carlo solutions were obtained using the MCNP4C code, in which neutron cross sections are represented in pointwise (or continuous) form. We have compared neutron spectra at various locations not only to show differences between using multigroup deterministic and continuous energy (point nuclear data) Monte Carlo methods but also to assess neutron-induced activation levels calculated using the spectra obtained from both methods. Results were also compared against experiments that were carried out to determine neutron-induced reaction rates. To determine activation levels, we employed the European Activation Code System FISPACT. We have found that the neutron spectra calculated at various in-core and out-of-core components show some differences, which mainly reflect the use of multigroup and point energy nuclear data libraries and methods employed, but these differences have not resulted in large errors on the calculated activation levels of materials that are important (such as steel components) for decommissioning studies of the reactor. The agreement of calculated reaction rates of thermal neutron detectors such as the {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}){sup 56}Mn against measurements was satisfactory.

  17. Influence of E{times}B and {nabla}{ital B} deift terms in 2-D edge/SOL transport simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T. D., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    Classical particle drifts across the magnetic field can play an important role in tokamak edge-plasma transport. The relative influence of these terms is studied for self-consistent simulations by including them, together with anomalous diffusion transport, in a 2-D fluid model of edge-plasma transport for the DIII-D tokamak geometry. The drifts cause asymmetries in the plasma equilibrium which depend on the direction of the magnetic field, B. The basic results can be understood by dividing the drifts into three categories: diamagnetic, E x B, and {nabla}B. The dominant effect near the divertor plates is from the E x B drifts, while the weaker {nabla}B drifts cause an increase in the magnitude of the radial electric field inside the magnetic separatrix. The diamagnetic terms, defined as divergence free, do not contribute to transport.

  18. Development of deterministic transport methods for low energy neutrons for shielding in space. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, B.

    1993-09-01

    Transport of low energy neutrons associated with the galactic cosmic ray cascade is analyzed in this dissertation. A benchmark quality analytical algorithm is demonstrated for use with BRYNTRN, a computer program written by the High Energy Physics Division of NASA Langley Research Center, which is used to design and analyze shielding against the radiation created by the cascade. BRYNTRN uses numerical methods to solve the integral transport equations for baryons with the straight-ahead approximation, and numerical and empirical methods to generate the interaction probabilities. The straight-ahead approximation is adequate for charged particles, but not for neutrons. As NASA Langley improves BRYNTRN to include low energy neutrons, a benchmark quality solution is needed for comparison. The neutron transport algorithm demonstrated in this dissertation uses the closed-form Green's function solution to the galactic cosmic ray cascade transport equations to generate a source of neutrons. A basis function expansion for finite heterogeneous and semi-infinite homogeneous slabs with multiple energy groups and isotropic scattering is used to generate neutron fluxes resulting from the cascade. This method, called the FN method, is used to solve the neutral particle linear Boltzmann transport equation. As a demonstration of the algorithm coded in the programs MGSLAB and MGSEMI, neutron and ion fluxes are shown for a beam of fluorine ions at 1000 MeV per nucleon incident on semi-infinite and finite aluminum slabs. Also, to demonstrate that the shielding effectiveness against the radiation from the galactic cosmic ray cascade is not directly proportional to shield thickness, a graph of transmitted total neutron scalar flux versus slab thickness is shown. A simple model based on the nuclear liquid drop assumption is used to generate cross sections for the galactic cosmic ray cascade.

  19. Determination of the absolute configuration of (-)-(2R)-succinic-2-d acid by neutron diffraction study: Unambiguous proof of the absolute stereochemistry of the NAD/sup +//NADH interconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, H.S.H.; Stevens, R.C.; Fujita, S.; Watkins, M.I.; Koetzle, T.F.; Bau, R.

    1988-05-01

    The absolute configuration of the CHD group (D = deuterium) in (-)-(2R)-succinic-2-d acid, as prepared from (-)-(2S,3R)-malic-3-d acid, has been shown unambiguously to be R by the technique of single-crystal neutron diffraction. The optically active cation (+)-phenylethylammonium was used as the chiral reference. The structure of (C/sub 6/H/sub 5/CH/sub 3/CHNH/sub 3/)/sup +/(HOOCCH/sub 2/CHDCOOO)/sup -/ has been studied with x-ray diffraction at room temperature and neutron diffraction at room temperature and neutron diffraction at 100 K. Crystal data from the neutron diffraction analysis of the phenylethylammonium slat of the title compound at 100 K: space group P2/sub 1/; a = 8.407 /angstrom/, b = 8.300 /angstrom/, c = 8.614 /angstrom/, ..beta.. = 91.20/degrees/; unit cell volume = 600.9 /angstrom//sup 3/, Z = 2. The result confirms the stereochemistry of the malate/succinate transformation, as well as the NAD/sup +//NADH interconversion, and demonstrates the usefulness of the single-crystal neutron diffraction method for determining the absolute configuration of molecules having a chiral monodeuteriomethylene group.

  20. How to polarise all neutrons in one beam: a high performance polariser and neutron transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, D. Martin; Bentley, P. M.; Pappas, C.

    2016-09-01

    Polarised neutron beams are used in disciplines as diverse as magnetism,soft matter or biology. However, most of these applications often suffer from low flux also because the existing neutron polarising methods imply the filtering of one of the spin states, with a transmission of 50% at maximum. With the purpose of using all neutrons that are usually discarded, we propose a system that splits them according to their polarisation, flips them to match the spin direction, and then focuses them at the sample. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations show that this is achievable over a wide wavelength range and with an outstanding performance at the price of a more divergent neutron beam at the sample position.

  1. Conceptual design and optimization of a plastic scintillator array for 2D tomography using a compact D-D fast neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert; Zboray, Robert; Cortesi, Marco; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2014-04-01

    A conceptual design optimization of a fast neutron tomography system was performed. The system is based on a compact deuterium-deuterium fast neutron generator and an arc-shaped array of individual neutron detectors. The array functions as a position sensitive one-dimensional detector allowing tomographic reconstruction of a two-dimensional cross section of an object up to 10 cm across. Each individual detector is to be optically isolated and consists of a plastic scintillator and a Silicon Photomultiplier for measuring light produced by recoil protons. A deterministic geometry-based model and a series of Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the design geometry parameters affecting the reconstructed image resolution. From this, it is expected that with an array of 100 detectors a reconstructed image resolution of ~1.5mm can be obtained. Other simulations were performed in order to optimize the scintillator depth (length along the neutron path) such that the best ratio of direct to scattered neutron counts is achieved. This resulted in a depth of 6-8 cm and an expected detection efficiency of 33-37%. Based on current operational capabilities of a prototype neutron generator being developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, planned implementation of this detector array design should allow reconstructed tomograms to be obtained with exposure times on the order of a few hours. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In situ studies of mass transport in liquid alloys by means of neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Kargl, F; Engelhardt, M; Yang, F; Weis, H; Schmakat, P; Schillinger, B; Griesche, A; Meyer, A

    2011-06-29

    When in situ techniques became available in recent years this led to a breakthrough in accurately determining diffusion coefficients for liquid alloys. Here we discuss how neutron radiography can be used to measure chemical diffusion in a ternary AlCuAg alloy. Neutron radiography hereby gives complementary information to x-ray radiography used for measuring chemical diffusion and to quasielastic neutron scattering used mainly for determining self-diffusion. A novel Al(2)O(3) based furnace that enables one to study diffusion processes by means of neutron radiography is discussed. A chemical diffusion coefficient of Ag against Al around the eutectic composition Al(68.6)Cu(13.8)Ag(17.6) at.% was obtained. It is demonstrated that the in situ technique of neutron radiography is a powerful means to study mass transport properties in situ in binary and ternary alloys that show poor x-ray contrast.

  3. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all <1%. The results validate the accuracy of the new code, which is a useful tool in scintillation detector optimization. PMID:24600168

  4. Status of the solar and infrared radiation submodels in the LLNL 1-D and 2-D chemical-transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Ellis, J.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have implemented a series of state of the art radiation transport submodels in previously developed one dimensional and two dimensional chemical transport models of the troposphere and stratosphere. These submodels provide the capability of calculating accurate solar and infrared heating rates. They are a firm basis for further radiation submodel development as well as for studying interactions between radiation and model dynamics under varying conditions of clear sky, clouds, and aerosols. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Neutron cross-section probability tables in TRIPOLI-3 Monte Carlo transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, S.H.; Vergnaud, T.; Nimal, J.C.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron transport calculations need an accurate treatment of cross sections. Two methods (multi-group and pointwise) are usually used. A third one, the probability table (PT) method, has been developed to produce a set of cross-section libraries, well adapted to describe the neutron interaction in the unresolved resonance energy range. Its advantage is to present properly the neutron cross-section fluctuation within a given energy group, allowing correct calculation of the self-shielding effect. Also, this PT cross-section representation is suitable for simulation of neutron propagation by the Monte Carlo method. The implementation of PTs in the TRIPOLI-3 three-dimensional general Monte Carlo transport code, developed at Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, and several validation calculations are presented. The PT method is proved to be valid not only in the unresolved resonance range but also in all the other energy ranges.

  6. Functionalized 2D-MoS2-Incorporated Polymer Ternary Solar Cells: Role of Nanosheet-Induced Long-Range Ordering of Polymer Chains on Charge Transport.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Razi; Srivastava, Ritu; Yadav, Sushma; Chand, Suresh; Sapra, Sameer

    2017-09-19

    In this paper, we demonstrated the enhancement in power conversion efficiency (PCE) of solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) by incorporation of functionalized 2D-MoS2 nanosheets (NSs) as an additional charge-transporting material. The enhancement in PCE of ternary solar cells arises due to the synergic enhancement in exciton dissociation and the improvement in mobility of both electrons and holes through the active layer of the solar cells. The improved hole mobility is attributed to the formation of the long-range ordered nanofibrillar structure of polymer phases and improved crystallinity in the presence of 2D-MoS2 NSs. The improved electron mobility arises due to the highly conducting 2D network of MoS2 NSs which provides additional electron transport channels within the active layer. The nanosheet-incorporated ternary blend solar cells exhibit 32% enhancement in PCE relative to the binary blend P3HT/PC71BM.

  7. Experimental validation of a coupled neutron-photon inverse radiation transport solver.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John K.; Harding, Lee; Mitchell, Dean James

    2010-03-01

    Forward radiation transport is the problem of calculating the radiation field given a description of the radiation source and transport medium. In contrast, inverse transport is the problem of inferring the configuration of the radiation source and transport medium from measurements of the radiation field. As such, the identification and characterization of special nuclear materials (SNM) is a problem of inverse radiation transport, and numerous techniques to solve this problem have been previously developed. The authors have developed a solver based on nonlinear regression applied to deterministic coupled neutron-photon transport calculations. The subject of this paper is the experimental validation of that solver. This paper describes a series of experiments conducted with a 4.5-kg sphere of alpha-phase, weapons-grade plutonium. The source was measured in six different configurations: bare, and reflected by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spherical shells with total thicknesses of 1.27, 2.54, 3.81, 7.62, and 15.24 cm. Neutron and photon emissions from the source were measured using three instruments: a gross neutron counter, a portable neutron multiplicity counter, and a high-resolution gamma spectrometer. These measurements were used as input to the inverse radiation transport solver to characterize the solver's ability to correctly infer the configuration of the source from its measured signatures.

  8. De-Li-DAQ-2D - a new data acquisition system for position-sensitive neutron detectors with delay-line readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchanovskiy, F. V.; Murashkevich, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    Software for a data acquisition system of modern one- and two-dimensional position-sensitive detectors with delay-line readout, which includes a software interface to a new electronic module De-Li-DAQ-2D with a USB interface, is presented. The new system after successful tests on the stand and on several spectrometers of the IBR-2 reactor has been integrated into the software complex SONIX+ [1]. The De-Li- DAQ-2D module [2] contains an 8-channel time-code converter (TDC-GPX) with a time resolution of 80 ps, field programmable gate array (FPGA), 1 Gbyte histogram memory and high-speed interface with a fiber-optic communication line. A real count rate is no less than 106 events/s. The De-Li-DAQ-2D module is implemented in the NIM standard. The De-Li-DAQ-2D module can operate in two modes: histogram mode and list mode.

  9. Neutron transport calculation for Activation Evaluation for Decommissioning of PET cyclotron Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobuhara, Fumiyoshi; Kuroyanagi, Makoto; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Hajime; Toyoda, Akihiro; Takahashi, Katsuhiko

    2017-09-01

    In order to evaluate the state of activation in a cyclotron facility used for the radioisotope production of PET diagnostics, we measured the neutron flux by using gold foils and TLDs. Then, the spatial distribution of neutrons and induced activity inside the cyclotron vault were simulated with the Monte Calro calculation code for neutron transport and DCHAIN-SP for activation calculation. The calculated results are in good agreement with measured values within factor 3. Therefore, the adaption of the advanced evaluation procedure for activation level is proved to be important for the planning of decommissioning of these facilities.

  10. Computational Transport Modeling of High-Energy Neutrons Found in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brad; Theriot, Corey A.; Rohde, Larry H.; Wu, Honglu

    2012-01-01

    The high charge and high energy (HZE) particle radiation environment in space interacts with spacecraft materials and the human body to create a population of neutrons encompassing a broad kinetic energy spectrum. As an HZE ion penetrates matter, there is an increasing chance of fragmentation as penetration depth increases. When an ion fragments, secondary neutrons are released with velocities up to that of the primary ion, giving some neutrons very long penetration ranges. These secondary neutrons have a high relative biological effectiveness, are difficult to effectively shield, and can cause more biological damage than the primary ions in some scenarios. Ground-based irradiation experiments that simulate the space radiation environment must account for this spectrum of neutrons. Using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHITS), it is possible to simulate a neutron environment that is characteristic of that found in spaceflight. Considering neutron dosimetry, the focus lies on the broad spectrum of recoil protons that are produced in biological targets. In a biological target, dose at a certain penetration depth is primarily dependent upon recoil proton tracks. The PHITS code can be used to simulate a broad-energy neutron spectrum traversing biological targets, and it account for the recoil particle population. This project focuses on modeling a neutron beamline irradiation scenario for determining dose at increasing depth in water targets. Energy-deposition events and particle fluence can be simulated by establishing cross-sectional scoring routines at different depths in a target. This type of model is useful for correlating theoretical data with actual beamline radiobiology experiments. Other work exposed human fibroblast cells to a high-energy neutron source to study micronuclei induction in cells at increasing depth behind water shielding. Those findings provide supporting data describing dose vs. depth across a water-equivalent medium. This

  11. Neutron spectra and dose-rate measurements around a transport cask for spent reactor fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimpler, Arndt

    1997-02-01

    A storage facility with a capacity of 420 containers is available for the interim storage of spent fuel from power reactors at the village of Gorleben in Germany. During transportation and storage of spent fuel casks radiation exposure of the personnel is dominated by neutrons. The routine control of the dose rate limits according to the transport regulations and the licence of the storage facility is performed with conventional neutron survey meters. These monitors, calibrated for fast neutrons at radionuclide neutron sources, usually overestimate the real dose rate in unknown neutron fields. In this paper, a series of measurements with several monitoring instruments near a transport cask of the CASTOR type is presented. The results are compared with reference data for the does equivalents calculated from the measured fluence spectra using a Bonner multisphere spectrometer. Besides reliable information about neutron spectra and dose rates at the container, it was found that some of the rem counters overestimate the true dose rate by a factor of 2 or more.

  12. Neutron and photon transport in seagoing cargo containers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J.; Descalle, M.-A.; Hall, J.; Pohl, B.; Prussin, S.G.

    2005-05-01

    Factors affecting sensing of small quantities of fissionable material in large seagoing cargo containers by neutron interrogation and detection of {beta}-delayed photons are explored. The propagation of variable-energy neutrons in cargos, subsequent fission of hidden nuclear material and production of the {beta}-delayed photons, and the propagation of these photons to an external detector are considered explicitly. Detailed results of Monte Carlo simulations of these stages in representative cargos are presented. Analytical models are developed both as a basis for a quantitative understanding of the interrogation process and as a tool to allow ready extrapolation of our results to cases not specifically considered here.

  13. Development of deterministic transport methods for low energy neutrons for shielding in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, Barry

    1993-01-01

    Transport of low energy neutrons associated with the galactic cosmic ray cascade is analyzed in this dissertation. A benchmark quality analytical algorithm is demonstrated for use with BRYNTRN, a computer program written by the High Energy Physics Division of NASA Langley Research Center, which is used to design and analyze shielding against the radiation created by the cascade. BRYNTRN uses numerical methods to solve the integral transport equations for baryons with the straight-ahead approximation, and numerical and empirical methods to generate the interaction probabilities. The straight-ahead approximation is adequate for charged particles, but not for neutrons. As NASA Langley improves BRYNTRN to include low energy neutrons, a benchmark quality solution is needed for comparison. The neutron transport algorithm demonstrated in this dissertation uses the closed-form Green's function solution to the galactic cosmic ray cascade transport equations to generate a source of neutrons. A basis function expansion for finite heterogeneous and semi-infinite homogeneous slabs with multiple energy groups and isotropic scattering is used to generate neutron fluxes resulting from the cascade. This method, called the FN method, is used to solve the neutral particle linear Boltzmann transport equation. As a demonstration of the algorithm coded in the programs MGSLAB and MGSEMI, neutron and ion fluxes are shown for a beam of fluorine ions at 1000 MeV per nucleon incident on semi-infinite and finite aluminum slabs. Also, to demonstrate that the shielding effectiveness against the radiation from the galactic cosmic ray cascade is not directly proportional to shield thickness, a graph of transmitted total neutron scalar flux versus slab thickness is shown. A simple model based on the nuclear liquid drop assumption is used to generate cross sections for the galactic cosmic ray cascade. The ENDF/B V database is used to generate the total and scattering cross sections for neutrons in

  14. Development of deterministic transport methods for low energy neutrons for shielding in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapol, Barry

    1993-09-01

    Transport of low energy neutrons associated with the galactic cosmic ray cascade is analyzed in this dissertation. A benchmark quality analytical algorithm is demonstrated for use with BRYNTRN, a computer program written by the High Energy Physics Division of NASA Langley Research Center, which is used to design and analyze shielding against the radiation created by the cascade. BRYNTRN uses numerical methods to solve the integral transport equations for baryons with the straight-ahead approximation, and numerical and empirical methods to generate the interaction probabilities. The straight-ahead approximation is adequate for charged particles, but not for neutrons. As NASA Langley improves BRYNTRN to include low energy neutrons, a benchmark quality solution is needed for comparison. The neutron transport algorithm demonstrated in this dissertation uses the closed-form Green's function solution to the galactic cosmic ray cascade transport equations to generate a source of neutrons. A basis function expansion for finite heterogeneous and semi-infinite homogeneous slabs with multiple energy groups and isotropic scattering is used to generate neutron fluxes resulting from the cascade. This method, called the FN method, is used to solve the neutral particle linear Boltzmann transport equation. As a demonstration of the algorithm coded in the programs MGSLAB and MGSEMI, neutron and ion fluxes are shown for a beam of fluorine ions at 1000 MeV per nucleon incident on semi-infinite and finite aluminum slabs. Also, to demonstrate that the shielding effectiveness against the radiation from the galactic cosmic ray cascade is not directly proportional to shield thickness, a graph of transmitted total neutron scalar flux versus slab thickness is shown. A simple model based on the nuclear liquid drop assumption is used to generate cross sections for the galactic cosmic ray cascade. The ENDF/B V database is used to generate the total and scattering cross sections for neutrons in

  15. Water-Soluble 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides as the Hole-Transport Layer for Highly Efficient and Stable p-i-n Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Wang, Zhaowei; Liu, Yanfeng; Zhang, Kaicheng; Yuan, Ligang; Zhou, Yi; Song, Bo; Li, Yongfang

    2017-08-02

    As a hole-transport layer (HTL) material, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene-sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) was often criticized for its intrinsic acidity and hygroscopic effect that would in the long run affect the stability of perovskite solar cells (Pero-SCs). As alternatives, herein water-soluble two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), such as MoS2 and WS2 were used as HTLs in p-i-n Pero-SCs. It was found that the content of 1T phase in 2D TMDs HTLs is centrally important to the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of Pero-SCs, and the 1T-rich TMDs (as achieved from exfoliation and without postheating) lead to much higher PCEs. More importantly, as PEDOT:PSS was replaced by 2D TMDs, both the PCEs and stability of Pero-SCs were significantly improved. The highest PCEs of 14.35 and 15.00% were obtained for the Pero-SCs with MoS2 and WS2, respectively, whereas the Pero-SCs with PEDOT:PSS showed a highest PCE of only 12.44%. These are up to date the highest PCEs using 2D TMDs as HTLs. After being stored in a glovebox for 56 days, PCEs of the Pero-SCs using MoS2 and WS2 HTLs remained 78 and 72%, respectively, whereas the PCEs of Pero-SCs with PEDOT:PSS almost dropped to 0 over 35 days. This study demonstrates that water-soluble 2D TMDs have great potential for application as new generation of HTLs aiming at high performance and long-term stable Pero-SCs.

  16. HSCT Assessment Calculations with the AER 2-D Model: Sensitivities to Transport Formulation, PSC Formulation, Interannual Temperature Variation. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Shia, Run-Lie; Jackman, Charles; Fleming, Eric; Considine, David; Kinnison, Douglas; Connell, Peter; Rotman, Douglas

    1998-01-01

    The summary are: (1) Some chemical differences in background atmosphere are surprisingly large (NOY). (2) Differences in model transport explain a majority of the intertnodel differences in the absence of PSCs. (3) With PSCS, large differences exist in predicted O3 depletion between models with the same transport. (4) AER/LLNL model calculates more O3 depletion in NH than LLNL. (5) AER/GSFC model cannot match calculated O3 depletion of GSFC model in SH. and (6) Results sensitive to interannual temperature variations (at least in NH).

  17. Complex quantum transport in a modulation doped strained Ge quantum well heterostructure with a high mobility 2D hole gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, C.; Casteleiro, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.

    2016-09-01

    The complex quantum transport of a strained Ge quantum well (QW) modulation doped heterostructure with two types of mobile carriers has been observed. The two dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in the Ge QW exhibits an exceptionally high mobility of 780 000 cm2/Vs at temperatures below 10 K. Through analysis of Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance of this 2DHG below 2 K, the hole effective mass is found to be 0.065 m0. Anomalous conductance peaks are observed at higher fields which deviate from standard Shubnikov de-Haas and quantum Hall effect behaviour due to conduction via multiple carrier types. Despite this complex behaviour, analysis using a transport model with two conductive channels explains this behaviour and allows key physical parameters such as the carrier effective mass, transport, and quantum lifetimes and conductivity of the electrically active layers to be extracted. This finding is important for electronic device applications, since inclusion of highly doped interlayers which are electrically active, for enhancement of, for example, room temperature carrier mobility, does not prevent analysis of quantum transport in a QW.

  18. Complex quantum transport in a modulation doped strained Ge quantum well heterostructure with a high mobility 2D hole gas

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, C. Casteleiro, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.

    2016-09-05

    The complex quantum transport of a strained Ge quantum well (QW) modulation doped heterostructure with two types of mobile carriers has been observed. The two dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in the Ge QW exhibits an exceptionally high mobility of 780 000 cm{sup 2}/Vs at temperatures below 10 K. Through analysis of Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance of this 2DHG below 2 K, the hole effective mass is found to be 0.065 m{sub 0}. Anomalous conductance peaks are observed at higher fields which deviate from standard Shubnikov de-Haas and quantum Hall effect behaviour due to conduction via multiple carrier types. Despite this complex behaviour, analysis using a transport model with two conductive channels explains this behaviour and allows key physical parameters such as the carrier effective mass, transport, and quantum lifetimes and conductivity of the electrically active layers to be extracted. This finding is important for electronic device applications, since inclusion of highly doped interlayers which are electrically active, for enhancement of, for example, room temperature carrier mobility, does not prevent analysis of quantum transport in a QW.

  19. Least-squares finite element discretizations of neutron transport equations in 3 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Manteuffel, T.A; Ressel, K.J.; Starkes, G.

    1996-12-31

    The least-squares finite element framework to the neutron transport equation introduced in is based on the minimization of a least-squares functional applied to the properly scaled neutron transport equation. Here we report on some practical aspects of this approach for neutron transport calculations in three space dimensions. The systems of partial differential equations resulting from a P{sub 1} and P{sub 2} approximation of the angular dependence are derived. In the diffusive limit, the system is essentially a Poisson equation for zeroth moment and has a divergence structure for the set of moments of order 1. One of the key features of the least-squares approach is that it produces a posteriori error bounds. We report on the numerical results obtained for the minimum of the least-squares functional augmented by an additional boundary term using trilinear finite elements on a uniform tesselation into cubes.

  20. The Effect of Anisotropic Scatter on Atmospheric Neutron Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    and Training Command In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering Nicholas J. McIntee...Anisotropy is present in the angular distributions of neutrons departing from a nuclear scattering event. This anisotropy cannot be defined in a closed...distribution PDF is apparent, with a significant forward bias

  1. The effect of electron-hole scattering on transport properties of a 2D semimetal in the HgTe quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Entin, M. V.; Magarill, L. I.; Olshanetsky, E. B. Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2013-11-15

    The influence of e-h scattering on the conductivity and magnetotransport of 2D semimetallic HgTe is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The presence of e-h scattering leads to the friction between electrons and holes resulting in a large temperature-dependent contribution to the transport coefficients. The coefficient of friction between electrons and holes is determined. The comparison of experimental data with the theory shows that the interaction between electrons and holes based on the long-range Coulomb potential strongly underestimates the e-h friction. The experimental results are in agreement with the model of strong short-range e-h interaction.

  2. Solution-processed 2D niobium diselenide nanosheets as efficient hole-transport layers in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xing; Cui, Wei; Song, Tao; Liu, Changhai; Shi, Xiaoze; Wang, Suidong; Sun, Baoquan

    2014-02-01

    Thin-layer, two-dimensional NbSe2 nanosheets with lower trap density have been obtained and act as an alternative hole-transporting layer to replace MoO3 in organic solar cells. If poly({4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl}{3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl}):[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester acts as an active layer, a power conversion efficiency of 8.10 % has been achieved without any further thermal treatment. The properties of this hole-transporting layer were investigated and the improvements in the devices are discussed.

  3. Section 1. Simulation of surface-water integrated flow and transport in two-dimensions: SWIFT2D user's manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical model for simulation of surface-water integrated flow and transport in two (horizontal-space) dimensions is documented. The model solves vertically integrated forms of the equations of mass and momentum conservation and solute transport equations for heat, salt, and constituent fluxes. An equation of state for salt balance directly couples solution of the hydrodynamic and transport equations to account for the horizontal density gradient effects of salt concentrations on flow. The model can be used to simulate the hydrodynamics, transport, and water quality of well-mixed bodies of water, such as estuaries, coastal seas, harbors, lakes, rivers, and inland waterways. The finite-difference model can be applied to geographical areas bounded by any combination of closed land or open water boundaries. The simulation program accounts for sources of internal discharges (such as tributary rivers or hydraulic outfalls), tidal flats, islands, dams, and movable flow barriers or sluices. Water-quality computations can treat reactive and (or) conservative constituents simultaneously. Input requirements include bathymetric and topographic data defining land-surface elevations, time-varying water level or flow conditions at open boundaries, and hydraulic coefficients. Optional input includes the geometry of hydraulic barriers and constituent concentrations at open boundaries. Time-dependent water level, flow, and constituent-concentration data are required for model calibration and verification. Model output consists of printed reports and digital files of numerical results in forms suitable for postprocessing by graphical software programs and (or) scientific visualization packages. The model is compatible with most mainframe, workstation, mini- and micro-computer operating systems and FORTRAN compilers. This report defines the mathematical formulation and computational features of the model, explains the solution technique and related model constraints, describes the

  4. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: Quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling.

  6. 2D coherent charge transport in highly ordered conducting polymers doped by solid state diffusion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Keehoon; Watanabe, Shun; Broch, Katharina; Sepe, Alessandro; Brown, Adam; Nasrallah, Iyad; Nikolka, Mark; Fei, Zhuping; Heeney, Martin; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-Ichi; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Doping is one of the most important methods to control charge carrier concentration in semiconductors. Ideally, the introduction of dopants should not perturb the ordered microstructure of the semiconducting host. In some systems, such as modulation-doped inorganic semiconductors or molecular charge transfer crystals, this can be achieved by spatially separating the dopants from the charge transport pathways. However, in conducting polymers, dopants tend to be randomly distributed within the conjugated polymer, and as a result the transport properties are strongly affected by the resulting structural and electronic disorder. Here, we show that in the highly ordered lamellar microstructure of a regioregular thiophene-based conjugated polymer, a small-molecule p-type dopant can be incorporated by solid state diffusion into the layers of solubilizing side chains without disrupting the conjugated layers. In contrast to more disordered systems, this allows us to observe coherent, free-electron-like charge transport properties, including a nearly ideal Hall effect in a wide temperature range, a positive magnetoconductance due to weak localization and the Pauli paramagnetic spin susceptibility.

  7. Engineered bone culture in a perfusion bioreactor: a 2D computational study of stationary mass and momentum transport.

    PubMed

    Pierre, J; Oddou, C

    2007-12-01

    Successful bone cell culture in large implants still is a challenge to biologists and requires a strict control of the physicochemical and mechanical environments. This study analyses from the transport phenomena viewpoint the limiting factors of a perfusion bioreactor for bone cell culture within fibrous and porous large implants (2.5 cm in length, a few cubic centimetres in volume, 250 microm in fibre diameter with approximately 60% porosity). A two-dimensional mathematical model, based upon stationary mass and momentum transport in these implants is proposed and numerically solved. Cell oxygen consumption, in accordance theoretically with the Michaelis-Menten law, generates non linearity in the boundary conditions of the convection diffusion equation. Numerical solutions are obtained with a commercial code (Femlab 3.1; Comsol AB, Stockholm, Sweden). Moreover, based on the simplification of transport equations, a simple formula is given for estimating the length of the oxygen penetration within the implant. Results show that within a few hours of culture process and for a perfusion velocity of the order of 10(-4) m s(-1), the local oxygen concentration is everywhere sufficiently high to ensure a suitable cell metabolism. But shear stresses induced by the fluid flow with such a perfusion velocity are found to be locally too large (higher than 10(-3) Pa). Suitable shear stresses are obtained by decreasing the velocity at the inlet to around 2 x 10(-5) m s(-1). But consequently hypoxic regions (low oxygen concentrations) appear at the downstream part of the implant. Thus, it is suggested here that in the determination of the perfusion flow rate within a large implant, a compromise between oxygen supply and shear stress effects must be found in order to obtain a successful cell culture.

  8. A Piecewise Linear Discontinuous Finite Element Spatial Discretization of the Transport Equation in 2D Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Adams, M L; Chang, J H

    2008-10-01

    We present a new spatial discretization of the discrete-ordinates transport equation in two-dimensional cylindrical (RZ) geometry for arbitrary polygonal meshes. This discretization is a discontinuous finite element method that utilizes the piecewise linear basis functions developed by Stone and Adams. We describe an asymptotic analysis that shows this method to be accurate for many problems in the thick diffusion limit on arbitrary polygons, allowing this method to be applied to radiative transfer problems with these types of meshes. We also present numerical results for multiple problems on quadrilateral grids and compare these results to the well-known bi-linear discontinuous finite element method.

  9. Increased particle transport due to resonant magnetic perturbations modelled with a vacuum field line tracing code and a 2D fluid code

    SciTech Connect

    Mordijck, S.; Owen, L. W.; Moyer, R. A.

    2010-02-23

    In this paper we compare the pedestal density changes in resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) H-modes at low collisionality with enhanced free streaming due to the creation of open field lines. First, we derive the effective radial transport coefficients by matching an ELMing (edge localized mode) H-mode using SOLPS5. Next, a vacuum field line tracing code, TRIP3D, is employed to calculate free streaming of particles along open field lines inside the traditional 2D axisymmetric separatrix. These coefficients are added to the effective radial transport coefficients from the ELMing H-mode and inserted in SOLPS5 to compute midplane profiles. Finally, we compare the SOLPS5 results with the experimental data from RMP H-modes and find good agreement. This good agreement was achieved not only for one single case, but also for two different experiments, with different triangularities, where the high triangularity case contains two RMP H-modes that give good agreement.

  10. Evidence of robust 2D transport and Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping in disordered topological insulator (Bi2Se3) nanowires.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Biplab; Sharma, Alka; Sinha, Bhavesh; Shah, Kunjal; Jejurikar, Suhas; Senguttuvan, T D; Husale, Sudhir

    2017-08-10

    We report the experimental observation of variable range hopping conduction in focused-ion-beam (FIB) fabricated ultra-narrow nanowires of topological insulator (Bi2Se3). The value of the exponent (d + 1)(-1) in the hopping equation was extracted as [Formula: see text]for different widths of nanowires, which is the proof of the presence of Efros-Shklovskii hopping transport mechanism in a strongly disordered system. High localization lengths (0.5 nm, 20 nm) were calculated for the devices. A careful analysis of the temperature dependent fluctuations present in the magnetoresistance curves, using the standard Universal Conductance Fluctuation theory, indicates the presence of 2D topological surface states. Also, the surface state contribution to the conductance was found very close to one conductance quantum. We believe that our experimental findings shed light on the understanding of quantum transport in disordered topological insulator based nanostructures.

  11. Time-reversal breaking and spin transport induced by magnetic impurities in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshan, V.; Ketabi, S. A.; Moghaddam, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    We employed the formalism of bond currents, expressed in terms of non-equilibrium Green’s function to obtain the local currents and transport features of zigzag silicene ribbon in the presence of magnetic impurity. When only intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit interactions are present, silicene behaves as a two-dimensional topological insulator with gapless edge states. But in the presence of finite intrinsic spin-orbit interaction, the edge states start to penetrate into the bulk of the sample by increasing Rashba interaction strength. The exchange interaction induced by local impurities breaks the time-reversal symmetry of the gapless edge states and influences the topological properties strongly. Subsequently, the singularity of partial Berry curvature disappears and the silicene nanoribbon becomes a trivial insulator. On the other hand, when the concentration of the magnetic impurities is low, the edge currents are not affected significantly. In this case, when the exchange field lies in the x-y plane, the spin mixing around magnetic impurity is more profound rather than the case in which the exchange field is directed along the z-axis. Nevertheless, when the exchange field of magnetic impurities is placed in the x-y plane, a spin-polarized conductance is observed. The resulting conductance polarization can be tuned by the concentration of the impurities and even completely polarized spin transport is achievable.

  12. Quantifying moisture transport in cementitious materials using neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Catherine L.

    A portion of the concrete pavements in the US have recently been observed to have premature joint deterioration. This damage is caused in part by the ingress of fluids, like water, salt water, or deicing salts. The ingress of these fluids can damage concrete when they freeze and expand or can react with the cementitious matrix causing damage. To determine the quality of concrete for assessing potential service life it is often necessary to measure the rate of fluid ingress, or sorptivity. Neutron imaging is a powerful method for quantifying fluid penetration since it can describe where water has penetrated, how quickly it has penetrated and the volume of water in the concrete or mortar. Neutrons are sensitive to light atoms such as hydrogen and thus clearly detect water at high spatial and temporal resolution. It can be used to detect small changes in moisture content and is ideal for monitoring wetting and drying in mortar exposed to various fluids. This study aimed at developing a method to accurately estimate moisture content in mortar. The common practice is to image the material dry as a reference before exposing to fluid and normalizing subsequent images to the reference. The volume of water can then be computed using the Beer-Lambert law. This method can be limiting because it requires exact image alignment between the reference image and all subsequent images. A model of neutron attenuation in a multi-phase cementitious composite was developed to be used in cases where a reference image is not available. The attenuation coefficients for water, un-hydrated cement, and sand were directly calculated from the neutron images. The attenuation coefficient for the hydration products was then back-calculated. The model can estimate the degree of saturation in a mortar with known mixture proportions without using a reference image for calculation. Absorption in mortars exposed to various fluids (i.e., deionized water and calcium chloride solutions) were investigated

  13. Modelling river bank erosion using a 2D depth-averaged numerical model of flow and non-cohesive, non-uniform sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kadi Abderrezzak, Kamal; Die Moran, Andrés; Tassi, Pablo; Ata, Riadh; Hervouet, Jean-Michel

    2016-07-01

    Bank erosion can be an important form of morphological adjustment in rivers. With the advances made in computational techniques, two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical models have become valuable tools for resolving many engineering problems dealing with sediment transport. The objective of this research work is to present a simple, new, bank-erosion operator that is integrated into a 2D Saint-Venant-Exner morphodynamic model. The numerical code is based on an unstructured grid of triangular elements and finite-element algorithms. The slope of each element in the grid is compared to the angle of repose of the bank material. Elements for which the slope is too steep are tilted to bring them to the angle of repose along a horizontal axis defined such that the volume loss above the axis is equal to the volume gain below, thus ensuring mass balance. The model performance is assessed using data from laboratory flume experiments and a scale model of the Old Rhine. For the flume experiment case with uniform bank material, relevant results are obtained for bank geometry changes. For the more challenging case (i.e. scale model of the Old Rhine with non-uniform bank material), the numerical model is capable of reproducing the main features of the bank failure, induced by the newly designed groynes, as well as the transport of the mobilized sediment material downstream. Some deviations between the computed results and measured data are, however, observed. They are ascribed to the effects of three-dimensional (3D) flow structures, pore pressure and cohesion, which are not considered in the present 2D model.

  14. 2D Particle-In-Cell simulations of the electron-cyclotron instability and associated anomalous transport in Hall-Effect Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdenek; Péchereau, François; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    This work studies the electron-cyclotron instability in Hall-Effect Thrusters (HETs) using a 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system where a magnetic field, B0, is aligned along the X-axis (radial direction, including absorbing walls), a constant electric field, E0, along the Z-axis (axial direction, perpendicular to simulation plane), and the E0xB0 direction along the Y-axis (O direction, with periodic boundaries). Although for low plasma densities classical electron-neutral collisions theory describes well electron transport, at sufficiently high densities (as measured in HETs) a strong instability can be observed that enhances the electron mobility, even in the absence of collisions. The instability generates high frequency ( MHz) and short wavelength ( mm) fluctuations in both the electric field and charged particle densities. We investigate the correlation between these fluctuations and their role with anomalous electron transport; complementing previous 1D simulations. Plasma is self-consistently heated by the instability, but since the latter does not reach saturation in an infinitely long 2D system, saturation is achieved through implementation of a finite axial length that models convection in E0 direction. With support of Safran Aircraft Engines.

  15. Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability method with quadratic flux approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shafii, Mohammad Ali Meidianti, Rahma Wildian, Fitriyani, Dian; Tongkukut, Seni H. J.; Arkundato, Artoto

    2014-09-30

    Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method with quadratic flux approach has been carried out. In general, the solution of the neutron transport using the CP method is performed with the flat flux approach. In this research, the CP method is implemented in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh being conducted into non flat flux approach. It means that the neutron flux at any point in the nuclear fuel cell are considered different each other followed the distribution pattern of quadratic flux. The result is presented here in the form of quadratic flux that is better understanding of the real condition in the cell calculation and as a starting point to be applied in computational calculation.

  16. Numerical solution of the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    This study presents three numerical algorithms to solve the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics. The algorithms have been developed taking into account delayed neutrons and they have been implemented into the novel MCART code, which solves the neutron transport equation for two-dimensional geometry and an arbitrary number of energy groups. The MCART code uses regular mesh for the representation of the spatial domain, it models up-scattering, and takes advantage of OPENMP and OPENGL algorithms for parallel computing and plotting, respectively. The code has been benchmarked with the multiplication factor results of a Boiling Water Reactor, with the analytical results for a prompt jump transient in an infinite medium, and with PARTISN and TDTORT results for cross section and source transients. The numerical simulations have shown that only two numerical algorithms are stable for small time steps.

  17. Sensitive and transportable gadolinium-core plastic scintillator sphere for neutron detection and counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Carrel, Frédérick; Corre, Gwenolé; Normand, Stéphane; Méchin, Laurence; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    Neutron detection forms a critical branch of nuclear-related issues, currently driven by the search for competitive alternative technologies to neutron counters based on the helium-3 isotope. The deployment of plastic scintillators shows a high potential for efficient detectors, safer and more reliable than liquids, more easily scalable and cost-effective than inorganic. In the meantime, natural gadolinium, through its 155 and mostly 157 isotopes, presents an exceptionally high interaction probability with thermal neutrons. This paper introduces a dual system including a metal gadolinium core inserted at the center of a high-scale plastic scintillator sphere. Incident fast neutrons are thermalized by the scintillator shell and then may be captured with a significant probability by gadolinium 155 and 157 nuclei in the core. The deposition of a sufficient fraction of the capture high-energy prompt gamma signature inside the scintillator shell will then allow discrimination from background radiations by energy threshold, and therefore neutron detection. The scaling of the system with the Monte Carlo MCNPX2.7 code was carried out according to a tradeoff between the moderation of incident fast neutrons and the probability of slow neutron capture by a moderate-cost metal gadolinium core. Based on the parameters extracted from simulation, a first laboratory prototype for the assessment of the detection method principle has been synthetized. The robustness and sensitivity of the neutron detection principle are then assessed by counting measurement experiments. Experimental results confirm the potential for a stable, highly sensitive, transportable and cost-efficient neutron detector and orientate future investigation toward promising axes.

  18. The adjoint neutron transport equation and the statistical approach for its solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracco, P.; Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.

    2016-11-01

    The adjoint equation was introduced in the early days of neutron transport and its solution, the neutron importance, has been used for several applications in neutronics. The work presents at first a critical review of the adjoint neutron transport equation. Afterwards, the adjont model is constructed for a reference physical situation, for which an analytical approach is viable, i.e. an infinite homogeneous scattering medium. This problem leads to an equation that is the adjoint of the slowing-down equation, which is well known in nuclear reactor physics. A general closed-form analytical solution to such adjoint equation is obtained by a procedure that can be used also to derive the classical Placzek functions. This solution constitutes a benchmark for any statistical or numerical approach to the adjoint equation. A sampling technique to evaluate the adjoint flux for the transport equation is then proposed and physically interpreted as a transport model for pseudo-particles. This can be done by introducing appropriate kernels describing the transfer of the pseudo-particles in the phase space. This technique allows estimating the importance function by a standard Monte Carlo approach. The sampling scheme is validated by comparison with the analytical results previously obtained.

  19. Existence Result for the Kinetic Neutron Transport Problem with a General Albedo Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Richard; Bourhrara, Lahbib

    2011-09-01

    We present an existence result for the kinetic neutron transport equation with a general albedo boundary condition. The proof is constructive in the sense that we build a sequence that converges to the solution of the problem by iterating on the albedo term. Both nonhomogeneous and albedo boundary conditions are studied.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport in semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, Katarína; Zaťko, Bohumír; Šagátová, Andrea; Nečas, Vladimír

    2013-05-01

    Several Monte Carlo all-particle transport codes are under active development around the world. In this paper we focused on the capabilities of the MCNPX code (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) to follow the particle transport in semiconductor detector of fast neutrons. Semiconductor detector based on semi-insulating GaAs was the object of our investigation. As converter material capable to produce charged particles from the (n, p) interaction, a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was employed. As the source of fast neutrons, the 239Pu-Be neutron source was used in the model. The simulations were performed using the MCNPX code which makes possible to track not only neutrons but also recoiled protons at all interesting energies. Hence, the MCNPX code enables seamless particle transport and no other computer program is needed to process the particle transport. The determination of the optimal thickness of the conversion layer and the minimum thickness of the active region of semiconductor detector as well as the energy spectra simulation were the principal goals of the computer modeling. Theoretical detector responses showed that the best detection efficiency can be achieved for 500 μm thick HDPE converter layer. The minimum detector active region thickness has been estimated to be about 400 μm.

  1. Time-independent one-speed neutron transport equation with anisotropic scattering in absorbing media

    SciTech Connect

    Hangelbroek, R. J.

    1980-06-01

    This report treats the time-independent, one-speed neutron transport equation with anisotropic scattering in absorbing media. For nuclear gain operators existence and uniqueness of solutions to the half-space and finite-slab problems are proved in L/sub 2/-space. The formulas needed for explicit calculations are derived by the use of perturbation theory techniques.

  2. Comparative 2D Radiation MHD Simulations of Argon Gas Puff Z-pinch Plasma Experiments on the Sandia Z Machine Using the Radiative Diffusion and CRE Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. K.; Thornhill Giuliani, J. W., Jr.; Apruzese, J. P.; Terry, R. E.; Davis, J.

    2001-10-01

    The recent development of the computationally efficient tabulated collisional radiative equilibrium (TCRE) radiation transport model(J.W. Thornhill, J.P. Apruzese, J. Davis, R.W. Clark, A.L. Velikovich, J.L. Giuliani, Jr., Y.K. Chong, K.G. Whitney, C. Deeney, C.A. Coverdale and F.L. Cochran, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3480 (2001).) has made possible full multidimensional radiation MHD simulations of hot dense Z-pinch plasmas with a realistic description of the non-LTE ionization dynamics and radiation transport physics. In this study, we focus on the implementation of the TCRE radiation transport model in the Mach2 2D radiation MHD code. An application of the model is made through a full dynamical simulation of an argon gas puff pinch driven by a circuit model of the Z generator. An analysis of the simulation, in particular, the K- and L-shell radiation yields, as well as the spectral and spatial characteristics of the radiation will be presented. In addition, a comparison of this multidimensional transport method will be made with the existing radiative diffusion model.

  3. Standard and goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement applied to radiation transport on 2D unstructured triangular meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yaqi; Ragusa, Jean C.

    2011-02-01

    Standard and goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) techniques are presented for the linear Boltzmann transport equation. A posteriori error estimates are employed to drive the AMR process and are based on angular-moment information rather than on directional information, leading to direction-independent adapted meshes. An error estimate based on a two-mesh approach and a jump-based error indicator are compared for various test problems. In addition to the standard AMR approach, where the global error in the solution is diminished, a goal-oriented AMR procedure is devised and aims at reducing the error in user-specified quantities of interest. The quantities of interest are functionals of the solution and may include, for instance, point-wise flux values or average reaction rates in a subdomain. A high-order (up to order 4) Discontinuous Galerkin technique with standard upwinding is employed for the spatial discretization; the discrete ordinates method is used to treat the angular variable.

  4. Nonlinear Acceleration Methods for Even-Parity Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. Martin; C. R. E. De Oliveira; H. Park

    2010-05-01

    Convergence acceleration methods for even-parity transport were developed that have the potential to speed up transport calculations and provide a natural avenue for an implicitly coupled multiphysics code. An investigation was performed into the acceleration properties of the introduction of a nonlinear quasi-diffusion-like tensor in linear and nonlinear solution schemes. Using the tensor reduced matrix as a preconditioner for the conjugate gradients method proves highly efficient and effective. The results for the linear and nonlinear case serve as the basis for further research into the application in a full three-dimensional spherical-harmonics even-parity transport code. Once moved into the nonlinear solution scheme, the implicit coupling of the convergence accelerated transport method into codes for other physics can be done seamlessly, providing an efficient, fully implicitly coupled multiphysics code with high order transport.

  5. A 109 neutrons/pulse transportable pulsed D-D neutron source based on flexible head plasma focus unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2016-03-01

    A 17 kJ transportable plasma focus (PF) device with flexible transmission lines is developed and is characterized. Six custom made capacitors are used for the capacitor bank (CB). The common high voltage plate of the CB is fixed to a centrally triggered spark gap switch. The output of the switch is coupled to the PF head through forty-eight 5 m long RG213 cables. The CB has a quarter time-period of 4 μs and an estimated current of 506 kA is delivered to the PF device at 17 kJ (60 μF, 24 kV) energy. The average neutron yield measured using silver activation detector in the radial direction is (7.1 ± 1.4) × 108 neutrons/shot over 4π sr at 5 mbar optimum D2 pressure. The average neutron yield is more in the axial direction with an anisotropy factor of 1.33 ± 0.18. The average neutron energies estimated in the axial as well as in the radial directions are (2.90 ± 0.20) MeV and (2.58 ± 0.20) MeV, respectively. The flexibility of the PF head makes it useful for many applications where the source orientation and the location are important factors. The influence of electromagnetic interferences from the CB as well as from the spark gap on applications area can be avoided by putting a suitable barrier between the bank and the PF head.

  6. Deterministic methods for time-dependent stochastic neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Randal S

    2009-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for solving the time-dependent survival probability equation in general (lD/2D/3D) geometries using the multi group SNmethod. Although this equation was first formulated by Bell in the early 1960's, it has only been applied to stationary systems (for other than idealized point models) until recently, and detailed descriptions of numerical solution techniques are lacking in the literature. This paper presents such a description and applies it to a dynamic system representative of a figurative criticality accident scenario.

  7. Analytical three-dimensional neutron transport benchmarks for verification of nuclear engineering codes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, B.D.; Kornreich, D.E.

    1997-07-01

    Because of the requirement of accountability and quality control in the scientific world, a demand for high-quality analytical benchmark calculations has arisen in the neutron transport community. The intent of these benchmarks is to provide a numerical standard to which production neutron transport codes may be compared in order to verify proper operation. The overall investigation as modified in the second year renewal application includes the following three primary tasks. Task 1 on two dimensional neutron transport is divided into (a) single medium searchlight problem (SLP) and (b) two-adjacent half-space SLP. Task 2 on three-dimensional neutron transport covers (a) point source in arbitrary geometry, (b) single medium SLP, and (c) two-adjacent half-space SLP. Task 3 on code verification, includes deterministic and probabilistic codes. The primary aim of the proposed investigation was to provide a suite of comprehensive two- and three-dimensional analytical benchmarks for neutron transport theory applications. This objective has been achieved. The suite of benchmarks in infinite media and the three-dimensional SLP are a relatively comprehensive set of one-group benchmarks for isotropically scattering media. Because of time and resource limitations, the extensions of the benchmarks to include multi-group and anisotropic scattering are not included here. Presently, however, enormous advances in the solution for the planar Green`s function in an anisotropically scattering medium have been made and will eventually be implemented in the two- and three-dimensional solutions considered under this grant. Of particular note in this work are the numerical results for the three-dimensional SLP, which have never before been presented. The results presented were made possible only because of the tremendous advances in computing power that have occurred during the past decade.

  8. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Sagalovsky, Leonid

    1995-09-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutron is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy (FNTS) and pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ration is greater than about 0.01. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projections angles and modest (2 cm) reolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and the reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA technqiues are presented.

  9. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) and Pulsed Fast-Neutron Analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ratio is greater than about 0.01. The Monte-Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projection angles and modest (2 cm) resolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and these reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte-Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA techniques are presented.

  10. Anisotropic Elastic Resonance Scattering model for the Neutron Transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed Ouisloumen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Shadi Z. Ghrayeb

    2014-11-24

    The resonance scattering transfer cross-section has been reformulated to account for anisotropic scattering in the center-of-mass of the neutron-nucleus system. The main innovation over previous implementations is the relaxation of the ubiquitous assumption of isotropic scattering in the center-of-mass and the actual effective use of scattering angle distributions from evaluated nuclear data files in the computation of the angular moments of the resonant scattering kernels. The formulas for the high order anisotropic moments in the laboratory system are also derived. A multi-group numerical formulation is derived and implemented into a module incorporated within the NJOY nuclear data processing code. An ultra-fine energy mesh cross section library was generated using these new theoretical models and then was used for fuel assembly calculations with the PARAGON lattice physics code. The results obtained indicate a strong effect of this new model on reactivity, multi-group fluxes and isotopic inventory during depletion.

  11. Ageing of a neutron shielding used in transport/storage casks

    SciTech Connect

    Nizeyiman, Fidele; Alami, Aatif; Issard, Herve; Bellenger, Veronique

    2012-07-11

    In radioactive materials transport/storage casks, a mineral-filled vinylester composite is used for neutron shielding which relies on its hydrogen and boron atoms content. During cask service life, this composite is mainly subjected to three types of ageing: hydrothermal ageing, thermal oxidation and neutron irradiation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of hydrothermal ageing on the properties and chemical composition of this polymer composite. At high temperature (120 Degree-Sign C and 140 Degree-Sign C), the main consequence is the strong decrease of mechanical properties induced by the filler/matrix debonding.

  12. Radiative or neutron transport modeling using a lattice Boltzmann equation framework.

    PubMed

    Bindra, H; Patil, D V

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE)-based framework is used to obtain the solution for the linear radiative or neutron transport equation. The LBE framework is devised for the integrodifferential forms of these equations which arise due to the inclusion of the scattering terms. The interparticle collisions are neglected, hence omitting the nonlinear collision term. Furthermore, typical representative examples for one-dimensional or two-dimensional geometries and inclusion or exclusion of the scattering term (isotropic and anisotropic) in the Boltzmann transport equation are illustrated to prove the validity of the method. It has been shown that the solution from the LBE methodology is equivalent to the well-known P(n) and S(n) methods. This suggests that the LBE can potentially provide a more convenient and easy approach to solve the physical problems of neutron and radiation transport.

  13. Transport and deposition of polymer-modified Fe0 nanoparticles in 2-D heterogeneous porous media: effects of particle concentration, Fe0 content, and coatings.

    PubMed

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Cihan, Abdullah; Kim, Hye-Jin; Mital, Menka; Illangasekare, Tissa; Lowry, Gregory V

    2010-12-01

    Concentrated suspensions of polymer-modified Fe(0) nanoparticles (NZVI) are injected into heterogeneous porous media for groundwater remediation. This study evaluated the effect of porous media heterogeneity and the dispersion properties including particle concentration, Fe(0) content, and adsorbed polymer mass and layer thickness which are expected to affect the delivery and emplacement of NZVI in heterogeneous porous media in a two-dimensional (2-D) cell. Heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity had a significant impact on the deposition of NZVI. Polymer modified NZVI followed preferential flow paths and deposited in the regions where fluid shear is insufficient to prevent NZVI agglomeration and deposition. NZVI transported in heterogeneous porous media better at low particle concentration (0.3 g/L) than at high particle concentrations (3 and 6 g/L) due to greater particle agglomeration at high concentration. High Fe(0) content decreased transport during injection due to agglomeration promoted by magnetic attraction. NZVI with a flat adsorbed polymeric layer (thickness ∼30 nm) could not be transported effectively due to pore clogging and deposition near the inlet, while NZVI with a more extended adsorbed layer thickness (i.e., ∼70 nm) were mobile in porous media. This study indicates the importance of characterizing porous media heterogeneity and NZVI dispersion properties as part of the design of a robust delivery strategy for NZVI in the subsurface.

  14. 2D particle-in-cell simulations of the electron drift instability and associated anomalous electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    In this work we study the electron drift instability in Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) using a 2D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system modeling the radial-azimuthal (r{--}θ ) plane for large radius thrusters. A magnetic field, {{B}}0, is aligned along the Oy axis (r direction), a constant applied electric field, {{E}}0, along the Oz axis (perpendicular to the simulation plane), and the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction is along the Ox axis (θ direction). Although electron transport can be well described by electron–neutral collisions for low plasma densities, at high densities (similar to those in typical HETs), a strong instability is observed that enhances the electron cross-field mobility; even in the absence of electron–neutral collisions. The instability generates high frequency (of the order of MHz) and short wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the azimuthal electric field and charged particle densities, and propagates in the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction with a velocity close to the ion sound speed. The correlation between the electric field and density fluctuations (which leads to an enhanced electron–ion friction force) is investigated and shown to be directly responsible for the increased electron transport. Results are compared with a recent kinetic theory, showing good agreement with the instability properties and electron transport.

  15. SUTRA: A model for 2D or 3D saturated-unsaturated, variable-density ground-water flow with solute or energy transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, Clifford I.; Provost, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    SUTRA (Saturated-Unsaturated Transport) is a computer program that simulates fluid movement and the transport of either energy or dissolved substances in a subsurface environment. This upgraded version of SUTRA adds the capability for three-dimensional simulation to the former code (Voss, 1984), which allowed only two-dimensional simulation. The code employs a two- or three-dimensional finite-element and finite-difference method to approximate the governing equations that describe the two interdependent processes that are simulated: 1) fluid density-dependent saturated or unsaturated ground-water flow; and 2) either (a) transport of a solute in the ground water, in which the solute may be subject to: equilibrium adsorption on the porous matrix, and both first-order and zero-order production or decay; or (b) transport of thermal energy in the ground water and solid matrix of the aquifer. SUTRA may also be used to simulate simpler subsets of the above processes. A flow-direction-dependent dispersion process for anisotropic media is also provided by the code and is introduced in this report. As the primary calculated result, SUTRA provides fluid pressures and either solute concentrations or temperatures, as they vary with time, everywhere in the simulated subsurface system. SUTRA flow simulation may be employed for two-dimensional (2D) areal, cross sectional and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of saturated ground-water flow systems, and for cross sectional and 3D modeling of unsaturated zone flow. Solute-transport simulation using SUTRA may be employed to model natural or man-induced chemical-species transport including processes of solute sorption, production, and decay. For example, it may be applied to analyze ground-water contaminant transport problems and aquifer restoration designs. In addition, solute-transport simulation with SUTRA may be used for modeling of variable-density leachate movement, and for cross sectional modeling of saltwater intrusion in

  16. The coupling between idealized 2D eddies and 3D small-scale turbulence in the upper ocean and its implications for oil transport simulations using ENDLESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Yang, D.; Meneveau, C. V.; Chamecki, M.

    2016-12-01

    As oil plumes from deep-water blowouts reach the ocean mixed layer (OML), they experience considerable horizontal and vertical dilution due to the action of Langmuir turbulence, submesoscale eddies and Ekman transport. Previous studies using large-eddy simulation (LES) have shown that Langmuir turbulence can impact the transport direction, lateral diffusion and geometry of surface oil plume, depending on the size of oil droplets. However, the large range of relevant length scales, from submesoscale eddies down to small-scale 3D Langmuir turbulence, makes it challenging to accurately reproduce the long-term evolution of oil plumes in the upper ocean using conventional large-eddy simulation strategies. The extended nonperiodic domain large-eddy simulation for scalars (ENDLESS) is a new technique developed as a multi-scale approach to simulate long-term oil plume dispersion at a reasonable computational cost. The basic idea is to simulate Langmuir turbulence on a LES domain with a small but sufficient horizontal domain size to capture the essential physics of the flow field, while simulating the oil plume evolution over an effectively horizontally extended large domain. Moreover, this ENDLESS method permits the superposition of large-scale quasi-2D ocean eddies on the oil advection, allowing for coupling with regional ocean circulation models. Using this new numerical tool, the effects of the interactions between 3D turbulence and 2D eddies on the flow field and on oil dispersion are elucidated by comparing the results from ENDLESS with those from conventional LES. This research was made possible by a grant from The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative.

  17. Noninvasive Neutron Scattering Measurements Reveal Slower Cholesterol Transport in Model Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Garg, S.; Porcar, L.; Woodka, A.C.; Butler, P.D.; Perez-Salas, U.

    2011-01-01

    Proper cholesterol transport is essential to healthy cellular activity and any abnormality can lead to several fatal diseases. However, complete understandings of cholesterol homeostasis in the cell remains elusive, partly due to the wide variability in reported values for intra- and intermembrane cholesterol transport rates. Here, we used time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering to measure cholesterol intermembrane exchange and intramembrane flipping rates, in situ, without recourse to any external fields or compounds. We found significantly slower transport kinetics than reported by previous studies, particularly for intramembrane flipping where our measured rates are several orders of magnitude slower. We unambiguously demonstrate that the presence of chemical tags and extraneous compounds employed in traditional kinetic measurements dramatically affect the system thermodynamics, accelerating cholesterol transport rates by an order of magnitude. To our knowledge, this work provides new insights into cholesterol transport process disorders, and challenges many of the underlying assumptions used in most cholesterol transport studies to date. PMID:21767489

  18. Noninvasive neutron scattering measurements reveal slower cholesterol transport in model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Garg, S; Porcar, L; Woodka, A C; Butler, P D; Perez-Salas, U

    2011-07-20

    Proper cholesterol transport is essential to healthy cellular activity and any abnormality can lead to several fatal diseases. However, complete understandings of cholesterol homeostasis in the cell remains elusive, partly due to the wide variability in reported values for intra- and intermembrane cholesterol transport rates. Here, we used time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering to measure cholesterol intermembrane exchange and intramembrane flipping rates, in situ, without recourse to any external fields or compounds. We found significantly slower transport kinetics than reported by previous studies, particularly for intramembrane flipping where our measured rates are several orders of magnitude slower. We unambiguously demonstrate that the presence of chemical tags and extraneous compounds employed in traditional kinetic measurements dramatically affect the system thermodynamics, accelerating cholesterol transport rates by an order of magnitude. To our knowledge, this work provides new insights into cholesterol transport process disorders, and challenges many of the underlying assumptions used in most cholesterol transport studies to date.

  19. Marine transportation and burial of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel/neutron shield tank package

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) project for dismantling the Shippingport atomic power station. One of the more significant and challenging technical aspects of the project, which is being managed for DOE by General Electric-Nuclear Energy, is the marine transport of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its associated neutron shield tank (NST) to the government-owned Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. Planning of the transport activity, barge transportation operations, and Hanford transportation operations, are discussed. This work will be the first use of barge transportation in the United States of a radioactive RPV package from a decommissioned land-based nuclear power plant. This extensive transportation operation has been accomplished in a timely, safe, and cost-effective manner.

  20. Secondary fusion coupled deuteron/triton transport simulation and thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. B.; Wang, K.; Liu, H. G.; Li, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    A Monte Carlo tool RSMC (Reaction Sequence Monte Carlo) was developed to simulate deuteron/triton transportation and reaction coupled problem. The 'Forced particle production' variance reduction technique was used to improve the simulation speed, which made the secondary product play a major role. The mono-energy 14 MeV fusion neutron source was employed as a validation. Then the thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor was studied with our tool. Moreover, an in-core conversion efficiency measurement experiment was performed with {sup 6}LiD and {sup 6}LiH converters. Threshold activation foils was used to indicate the fast and fusion neutron flux. Besides, two other pivotal parameters were calculated theoretically. Finally, the conversion efficiency of {sup 6}LiD is obtained as 1.97x10{sup -4}, which matches well with the theoretical result. (authors)

  1. Atmospheric transport of neutrons and gamma rays from a high-altitude nuclear detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Although radiation outputs from nuclear detonations in free space are well established, few studies exist of effect of atmospheric transport on the resulting intensity, energy, and time signatures. This report presents calculations for generic sources at high altitudes, 20-50 km above the Earth`s surface, in an atmosphere whose density decreases almost exponentially with height. The sources are instantaneous time bursts with simple energy dependences: gamma rays use an evaporation spectrum; neutrons use either a Gaussian fusion or a Maxwell fission spectrum. The observation angles vary from vertical to 5{degrees} below the horizon, and detectors are placed in either geosynchronous or low Earth orbits (100 km). All calculations use the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code in either its photon, neutron, or coupled neutron-photon modes, with the coupled mode being applied to the production of gamma rays by neutron inelastic scattering. The standard MCNP outputs are analyzed to extract the intensity, energy, and time dependences of the fluence as functions of either source altitude or observation angle. In general, the intensities drop rapidly below about 30-km source altitude or +5` slant angle. Above these limits, the gamma-ray signal loses substantial intensity but still contains most of the original source information. In contrast, neutron scattering produces little or no decrease in intensity, but it rapidly degrades much of the information about the original source spectrum. Finally, although there is abundant gamma-ray production from neutron inelastic scattering, the resulting signatures appear to provide little additional information.

  2. Interfacing MCNPX and McStas for simulation of neutron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkby, Esben; Lauritzen, Bent; Nonbøl, Erik; Kjær Willendrup, Peter; Filges, Uwe; Wohlmuther, Michael; Gallmeier, Franz X.

    2013-02-01

    Simulations of target-moderator-reflector system at spallation sources are conventionally carried out using Monte Carlo codes such as MCNPX (Waters et al., 2007 [1]) or FLUKA (Battistoni et al., 2007; Ferrari et al., 2005 [2,3]) whereas simulations of neutron transport from the moderator and the instrument response are performed by neutron ray tracing codes such as McStas (Lefmann and Nielsen, 1999; Willendrup et al., 2004, 2011a,b [4-7]). The coupling between the two simulation suites typically consists of providing analytical fits of MCNPX neutron spectra to McStas. This method is generally successful but has limitations, as it e.g. does not allow for re-entry of neutrons into the MCNPX regime. Previous work to resolve such shortcomings includes the introduction of McStas inspired supermirrors in MCNPX. In the present paper different approaches to interface MCNPX and McStas are presented and applied to a simple test case. The direct coupling between MCNPX and McStas allows for more accurate simulations of e.g. complex moderator geometries, backgrounds, interference between beam-lines as well as shielding requirements along the neutron guides.

  3. An integral equation arising in two group neutron transport theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassell, J. S.; Williams, M. M. R.

    2003-07-01

    An integral equation describing the fuel distribution necessary to maintain a flat flux in a nuclear reactor in two group transport theory is reduced to the solution of a singular integral equation. The formalism developed enables the physical aspects of the problem to be better understood and its relationship with the corresponding diffusion theory model is highlighted. The integral equation is solved by reducing it to a non-singular Fredholm equation which is then evaluated numerically.

  4. The Interplay between Proto--Neutron Star Convection and Neutrino Transport in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, A.; Calder, A. C.; Bruenn, S. W.; Blondin, J. M.; Guidry, M. W.; Strayer, M. R.; Umar, A. S.

    1998-01-01

    We couple two-dimensional hydrodynamics to realistic one-dimensional multigroup flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport to investigate proto-neutron star convection in core-collapse supernovae, and more specifically, the interplay between its development and neutrino transport. Our initial conditions, time-dependent boundary conditions, and neutrino distributions for computing neutrino heating, cooling, and deleptonization rates are obtained from one-dimensional simulations that implement multigroup flux-limited diffusion and one-dimensional hydrodynamics. The development and evolution of proto-neutron star convection are investigated for both 15 and 25 M⊙ models, representative of the two classes of stars with compact and extended iron cores, respectively. For both models, in the absence of neutrino transport, the angle-averaged radial and angular convection velocities in the initial Ledoux unstable region below the shock after bounce achieve their peak values in ~20 ms, after which they decrease as the convection in this region dissipates. The dissipation occurs as the gradients are smoothed out by convection. This initial proto-neutron star convection episode seeds additional convectively unstable regions farther out beneath the shock. The additional proto-neutron star convection is driven by successive negative entropy gradients that develop as the shock, in propagating out after core bounce, is successively strengthened and weakened by the oscillating inner core. The convection beneath the shock distorts its sphericity, but on the average the shock radius is not boosted significantly relative to its radius in our corresponding one-dimensional models. In the presence of neutrino transport, proto-neutron star convection velocities are too small relative to bulk inflow velocities to result in any significant convective transport of entropy and leptons. This is evident in our two-dimensional entropy snapshots, which in this case appear spherically symmetric

  5. Benchmark test of transport calculations of gold and nickel activation with implications for neutron kerma at Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, M; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Sawada, S; Munaka, M; Kuramoto, A; Oka, T; Iwatani, K; Shizuma, K; Hasai, H

    1992-11-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a 252Cf fission neutron source to validate the use of the code for the energy spectrum analyses of Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons. Nuclear data libraries used in the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code calculation were ENDF/B-III, ENDF/B-IV, LASL-SUB, and ENDL-73. The neutron moderators used were granite (the main component of which is SiO2, with a small fraction of hydrogen), Newlight [polyethylene with 3.7% boron (natural)], ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), and water (H2O). Each moderator was 65 cm thick. The neutron detectors were gold and nickel foils, which were used to detect thermal and epithermal neutrons (4.9 eV) and fast neutrons (> 0.5 MeV), respectively. Measured activity data from neutron-irradiated gold and nickel foils in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which correspond to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For both gold and nickel detectors, the measured activities and the calculated values agreed within 10%. The slopes of the depth-yield relations in each moderator, except granite, were similar for neutrons detected by the gold and nickel foils. From the results of these studies, the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code was verified to be accurate enough for use with the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, chlorine, and cadmium, and for the incident 252Cf fission spectrum neutrons.

  6. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method applied to the 1-D spherical neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Machorro, Eric . E-mail: machorro@amath.washington.edu

    2007-04-10

    Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods are used to estimate solutions to the non-scattering 1-D spherical neutron transport equation. Various trial and test spaces are compared in the context of a few sample problems whose exact solution is known. Certain trial spaces avoid unphysical behaviors that seem to plague other methods. Comparisons with diamond differencing and simple corner-balancing are presented to highlight these improvements.

  7. Domain Decomposition and Load Balancing in the Amtran Neutron Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, J; Clouse, C

    2003-07-07

    Effective spatial domain decomposition for discrete ordinate (Sn) neutron transport calculations has been critical for exploiting massively parallel architectures typified by the ASCI White computer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A combination of geometrical and computational constraints has posed a unique challenge as problems have been scaled up to several thousand processors. Carefully scripted decomposition and corresponding execution algorithms have been developed to handle a range of geometrical and hardware configurations.

  8. Systems guide to MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, B.L.; West, J.T.

    1984-06-01

    The subject of this report is the implementation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code - Version 3 (MCNP) on the different types of computer systems, especially the IBM MVS system. The report supplements the documentation of the RSIC computer code package CCC-200/MCNP. Details of the procedure to follow in executing MCNP on the IBM computers, either in batch mode or interactive mode, are provided.

  9. Apparatus, Method and Program Storage Device for Determining High-Energy Neutron/Ion Transport to a Target of Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W. (Inventor); Tripathi, Ram K. (Inventor); Badavi, Francis F. (Inventor); Cucinotta, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus, method and program storage device for determining high-energy neutron/ion transport to a target of interest. Boundaries are defined for calculation of a high-energy neutron/ion transport to a target of interest; the high-energy neutron/ion transport to the target of interest is calculated using numerical procedures selected to reduce local truncation error by including higher order terms and to allow absolute control of propagated error by ensuring truncation error is third order in step size, and using scaling procedures for flux coupling terms modified to improve computed results by adding a scaling factor to terms describing production of j-particles from collisions of k-particles; and the calculated high-energy neutron/ion transport is provided to modeling modules to control an effective radiation dose at the target of interest.

  10. Neutrino Transport in Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries: Dynamical Mass Ejection and Neutrino-Driven Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutoku, K.; Kiuchi, K.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present our recent results of numerical-relativity simulations of black hole-neutron star binary mergers incorporating approximate neutrino transport. We in particular discuss dynamical mass ejection and neutrino-driven wind.

  11. The potential of detecting intermediate-scale biomass and canopy interception in a coniferous forest using cosmic-ray neutron intensity measurements and neutron transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasen, M.; Looms, M. C.; Bogena, H. R.; Desilets, D.; Zreda, M. G.; Sonnenborg, T. O.; Jensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The water stored in the various compartments of the terrestrial ecosystem (in snow, canopy interception, soil and litter) controls the exchange of the water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere. Therefore, measurements of the water stored within these pools are critical for the prediction of e.g. evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge. The detection of cosmic-ray neutron intensity is a novel non-invasive method for the quantification of continuous intermediate-scale soil moisture. The footprint of the cosmic-ray neutron probe is a hemisphere of a few hectometers and subsurface depths of 10-70 cm depending on wetness. The cosmic-ray neutron method offers measurements at a scale between the point-scale measurements and large-scale satellite retrievals. The cosmic-ray neutron intensity is inversely correlated to the hydrogen stored within the footprint. Overall soil moisture represents the largest pool of hydrogen and changes in the soil moisture clearly affect the cosmic-ray neutron signal. However, the neutron intensity is also sensitive to variations of hydrogen in snow, canopy interception and biomass offering the potential to determine water content in such pools from the signal. In this study we tested the potential of determining canopy interception and biomass using cosmic-ray neutron intensity measurements within the framework of the Danish Hydrologic Observatory (HOBE) and the Terrestrial Environmental Observatories (TERENO). Continuous measurements at the ground and the canopy level, along with profile measurements were conducted at towers at forest field sites. Field experiments, including shielding the cosmic-ray neutron probes with cadmium foil (to remove lower-energy neutrons) and measuring reference intensity rates at complete water saturated conditions (on the sea close to the HOBE site), were further conducted to obtain an increased understanding of the physics controlling the cosmic-ray neutron transport and the equipment used

  12. Synergism of the method of characteristics and CAD technology for neutron transport calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Wang, D.; He, T.; Wang, G.; Zheng, H.

    2013-07-01

    The method of characteristics (MOC) is a very popular methodology in neutron transport calculation and numerical simulation in recent decades for its unique advantages. One of the key problems determining whether the MOC can be applied in complicated and highly heterogeneous geometry is how to combine an effective geometry processing method with MOC. Most of the existing MOC codes describe the geometry by lines and arcs with extensive input data, such as circles, ellipses, regular polygons and combination of them. Thus they have difficulty in geometry modeling, background meshing and ray tracing for complicated geometry domains. In this study, a new idea making use of a CAD solid modeler MCAM which is a CAD/Image-based Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics and Radiation Transport developed by FDS Team in China was introduced for geometry modeling and ray tracing of particle transport to remove these geometrical limitations mentioned above. The diamond-difference scheme was applied to MOC to reduce the spatial discretization error of the flat flux approximation in theory. Based on MCAM and MOC, a new MOC code was developed and integrated into SuperMC system, which is a Super Multi-function Computational system for neutronics and radiation simulation. The numerical testing results demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the new idea for geometry treatment in SuperMC. (authors)

  13. An Algorithm for the Transport of Anisotropic Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.

    2005-01-01

    One major obstacle to human space exploration is the possible limitations imposed by the adverse effect of long-term exposure to the space environment. Even before human spaceflight began, the potentially brief exposure of astronauts to the very intense random solar particle events (SPE) were of great concern. A new challenge appears in deep space exploration from exposure to the low-intensity heavy-ion flux of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since the missions are of long duration and the accumulated GCR exposures can be high. Because cancer induction rates increase behind low to rather large thicknesses of aluminum shielding, according to available biological data on mammalian exposures to GCR like ions, the shield requirements for a Mars mission are prohibitively expensive in terms of mission launch costs. Therefore, a critical issue in the Human Exploration and Development of Space enterprise is cost effective mitigation of risk associated with ionizing radiation exposure. In order to estimate astronaut risk to GCR exposure and associated cancer risks and health hazards, it is necessary to do shield material studies. To determine an optimum radiation shield material it is necessary to understand nuclear interaction processes such as fragmentation and secondary particle production which is a function of energy dependent cross sections. This requires knowledge of material transmission characteristics either through laboratory testing or improved theoretical modeling. Here ion beam transport theory is of importance in that testing of materials in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are a major emphasis of the present work.

  14. The FN method for anisotropic scattering in neutron transport theory: the critical slab problem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülecyüz, M. C.; Tezcan, C.

    1996-08-01

    The FN method which has been applied to many physical problems for isotropic and anisotropic scattering in neutron transport theory is extended for problems for extremely anisotropic scattering. This method depends on the Placzek lemma and the use of the infinite medium Green's function. Here the Green's function for extremely anisotropic scattering which was expressed as a combination of the Green's functions for isotropic scattering is used to solve the critical slab problem. It is shown that the criticality condition is in agreement with the one obtained previously by reducing the transport equation for anisotropic scattering to isotropic scattering and solving using the FN method.

  15. A portable, parallel, object-oriented Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Cummings, J.C.; Nolen, S.D. |

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code using C++ and the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. This transport code, called MC++, currently computes k and {alpha}-eigenvalues and is portable to and runs parallel on a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, clustered SMPs, and individual workstations. It contains appropriate classes and abstractions for particle transport and, through the use of POOMA, for portable parallelism. Current capabilities of MC++ are discussed, along with physics and performance results on a variety of hardware, including all Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) hardware. Current parallel performance indicates the ability to compute {alpha}-eigenvalues in seconds to minutes rather than hours to days. Future plans and the implementation of a general transport physics framework are also discussed.

  16. Improved algorithms and coupled neutron-photon transport for auto-importance sampling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Jun-Li; Wu, Zhen; Qiu, Rui; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Man-Chun; Zhang, Hui; Gang, Zhi; Xu, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The Auto-Importance Sampling (AIS) method is a Monte Carlo variance reduction technique proposed for deep penetration problems, which can significantly improve computational efficiency without pre-calculations for importance distribution. However, the AIS method is only validated with several simple examples, and cannot be used for coupled neutron-photon transport. This paper presents improved algorithms for the AIS method, including particle transport, fictitious particle creation and adjustment, fictitious surface geometry, random number allocation and calculation of the estimated relative error. These improvements allow the AIS method to be applied to complicated deep penetration problems with complex geometry and multiple materials. A Completely coupled Neutron-Photon Auto-Importance Sampling (CNP-AIS) method is proposed to solve the deep penetration problems of coupled neutron-photon transport using the improved algorithms. The NUREG/CR-6115 PWR benchmark was calculated by using the methods of CNP-AIS, geometry splitting with Russian roulette and analog Monte Carlo, respectively. The calculation results of CNP-AIS are in good agreement with those of geometry splitting with Russian roulette and the benchmark solutions. The computational efficiency of CNP-AIS for both neutron and photon is much better than that of geometry splitting with Russian roulette in most cases, and increased by several orders of magnitude compared with that of the analog Monte Carlo. Supported by the subject of National Science and Technology Major Project of China (2013ZX06002001-007, 2011ZX06004-007) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275110, 11375103)

  17. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, K; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Oka, T; Hasai, H

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate 152Eu and 60Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen.

  18. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: Indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazuo; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hiraoka, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Oka, Takamitsu

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate {sup 152}Eu and {sup 60}Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. An Improved Elastic and Nonelastic Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tripathi, R. K.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Shinn, Judy L.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron transport algorithm including both elastic and nonelastic particle interaction processes for use in space radiation protection for arbitrary shield material is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multiple energy grouping and analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through a bidirectional neutron evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for an aluminum water shield-target configuration is then compared with MCNPX and LAHET Monte Carlo calculations for the same shield-target configuration. With the Monte Carlo calculation as a benchmark, the algorithm developed in this paper showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a high-energy bidirectional neutron source based on a formula by Ranft showed even further improvement of the fluence results over previous results near the front of the water target where diffusion out the front surface is important. Effects of improved interaction cross sections are modest compared with the addition of the high-energy bidirectional source terms.

  20. A versatile UHV transport and measurement chamber for neutron reflectometry under UHV conditions.

    PubMed

    Syed Mohd, A; Pütter, S; Mattauch, S; Koutsioubas, A; Schneider, H; Weber, A; Brückel, T

    2016-12-01

    We report on a versatile mini ultra-high vacuum (UHV) chamber which is designed to be used on the MAgnetic Reflectometer with high Incident Angle of the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum in Garching, Germany. Samples are prepared in the adjacent thin film laboratory by molecular beam epitaxy and moved into the compact chamber for transfer without exposure to ambient air. The chamber is based on DN 40 CF flanges and equipped with sapphire view ports, a small getter pump, and a wobble stick, which serves also as sample holder. Here, we present polarized neutron reflectivity measurements which have been performed on Co thin films at room temperature in UHV and in ambient air in a magnetic field of 200 mT and in the Q-range of 0.18 Å(-1). The results confirm that the Co film is not contaminated during the polarized neutron reflectivity measurement. Herewith it is demonstrated that the mini UHV transport chamber also works as a measurement chamber which opens new possibilities for polarized neutron measurements under UHV conditions.

  1. An Improved Elastic and Nonelastic Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tripathi, R. K.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Shinn, Judy L.

    2000-07-01

    A neutron transport algorithm including both elastic and nonelastic particle interaction processes for use in space radiation protection for arbitrary shield material is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multiple energy grouping and analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through a bidirectional neutron evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for an aluminum water shield-target configuration is then compared with MCNPX and LAHET Monte Carlo calculations for the same shield-target configuration. With the Monte Carlo calculation as a benchmark, the algorithm developed in this paper showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a high-energy bidirectional neutron source based on a formula by Ranft showed even further improvement of the fluence results over previous results near the front of the water target where diffusion out the front surface is important. Effects of improved interaction cross sections are modest compared with the addition of the high-energy bidirectional source terms.

  2. A versatile UHV transport and measurement chamber for neutron reflectometry under UHV conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed Mohd, A.; Pütter, S.; Mattauch, S.; Koutsioubas, A.; Schneider, H.; Weber, A.; Brückel, T.

    2016-12-01

    We report on a versatile mini ultra-high vacuum (UHV) chamber which is designed to be used on the MAgnetic Reflectometer with high Incident Angle of the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum in Garching, Germany. Samples are prepared in the adjacent thin film laboratory by molecular beam epitaxy and moved into the compact chamber for transfer without exposure to ambient air. The chamber is based on DN 40 CF flanges and equipped with sapphire view ports, a small getter pump, and a wobble stick, which serves also as sample holder. Here, we present polarized neutron reflectivity measurements which have been performed on Co thin films at room temperature in UHV and in ambient air in a magnetic field of 200 mT and in the Q-range of 0.18 Å-1. The results confirm that the Co film is not contaminated during the polarized neutron reflectivity measurement. Herewith it is demonstrated that the mini UHV transport chamber also works as a measurement chamber which opens new possibilities for polarized neutron measurements under UHV conditions.

  3. Synthesis, electronic and opto-electronic transport properties of atomically thin 2D layers of MoS2, WSe2 and CuIn 7Se11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sujoy

    The recent emergence of a new class of two dimensional layered materials (2DLMs) have not only opened up the potential for exciting new technological opportunities but also established a new platform to explore exciting new fundamental physics and chemistry at the limit of atomic thickness. Among several of these newly rediscovered 2DLMs, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) as well as other elemental combinations of Group III and Group VI represent a large family of 2D layered materials, which can be isolated into few atomic layers. These materials show remarkable promise for future electronic and opto-electronics applications. The scope of this dissertation, thus, broadly covers the electronic and opto-electronic properties of such few layered 2D materials. Extensive investigation of electronic and opto-electronic transport phenomena of charge carriers in few layer MoS2 synthesized using a variety of methods such as Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), liquid phase exfoliation and mechanical exfoliation as well as CVT grown mechanically exfoliated WSe2 and ternary alloy of CuIn7Se11 is reported. Specifically, it is shown that in case of MoS2, the ac conductance (sigma(o); measured in the range of 10mHz < o < 0.1 MHz) of atomically thin 2D layers of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) Molybdenum Disulphide (MoS2) as well as thin films of exfoliated flakes of MoS2, show "universal" power law behavior (with sigma(o) os). The temperature dependence of 's' indicate that the mechanism of ac transport in CVD MoS2 is due to electron hopping by quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) process whereas the ac transport in exfoliated MoS2 films is due to correlated barrier hoping (CBH) mechanism. The ac conductivity also show scaling behavior, manifested by collapse of the ac conductivity data for both the samples at various temperatures to one single master curve. The T-gamma dependence of the d.c conductance suggests that in case of the CVD - grown and mechanically exfoliated MoS2

  4. CAD-Based Monte Carlo Neutron Transport KSTAR Analysis for KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Geon Ho; Choi, Sung Hoon; Shim, Hyung Jin

    2017-09-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport analysis for a complex nuclear system such as fusion facility may require accurate modeling of its complicated geometry. In order to take advantage of modeling capability of the computer aided design (CAD) system for the MC neutronics analysis, the Seoul National University MC code, McCARD, has been augmented with a CAD-based geometry processing module by imbedding the OpenCASCADE CAD kernel. In the developed module, the CAD geometry data are internally converted to the constructive solid geometry model with help of the CAD kernel. An efficient cell-searching algorithm is devised for the void space treatment. The performance of the CAD-based McCARD calculations are tested for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research device by comparing with results of the conventional MC calculations using a text-based geometry input.

  5. Geant4 simulations of the neutron production and transport in the n_TOF spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Guerrero, C.; Quesada, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    The neutron production and transport in the spallation target of the n_TOF facility at CERN has been simulated with Geant4. The results obtained with the different hadronic Physics Lists provided by Geant4 have been compared with the experimental neutron flux in n_TOF-EAR1. The best overall agreement in both the absolute value and the energy dependence of the flux from thermal to 1GeV, is obtained with the INCL++ model coupled with the Fritiof Model(FTFP). This Physics List has been thus used to simulate and study the main features of the new n_TOF-EAR2 beam line, currently in its commissioning phase.

  6. Radiation Transport Analysis in Chalcogenide-Based Devices and a Neutron Howitzer Using MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Herbert

    As photons, electrons, and neutrons traverse a medium, they impart their energy in ways that are analytically difficult to describe. Monte Carlo methods provide valuable insight into understanding this behavior, especially when the radiation source or environment is too complex to simplify. This research investigates simulating various radiation sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, characterizing their impact on various materials, and comparing the simulation results to general theory and measurements. A total of five sources were of interest: two photon sources of different incident particle energies (3.83 eV and 1.25 MeV), two electron sources also of different energies (30 keV and 100 keV), and a californium-252 (Cf-252) spontaneous fission neutron source. Lateral and vertical programmable metallization cells (PMCs) were developed by other researchers for exposure to these photon and electron sources, so simplified PMC models were implemented in MCNP to estimate the doses and fluences. Dose rates measured around the neutron source and the predicted maximum activity of activation foils exposed to the neutrons were determined using MCNP and compared to experimental results obtained from gamma-ray spectroscopy. The analytical fluence calculations for the photon and electron cases agreed with MCNP results, and differences are due to MCNP considering particle movements that hand calculations do not. Doses for the photon cases agreed between the analytical and simulated results, while the electron cases differed by a factor of up to 4.8. Physical dose rate measurements taken from the neutron source agreed with MCNP within the 10% tolerance of the measurement device. The activity results had a percent error of up to 50%, which suggests a need to further evaluate the spectroscopy setup.

  7. Application of three-dimensional transport code to the analysis of the neutron streaming experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatani, K.; Slater, C.O.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarized the calculational results of neutron streaming through a Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Prototype coolant pipe chaseway. Particular emphasis is placed on results at bends in the chaseway. Calculations were performed with three three-dimensional codes: the discrete ordinates radiation transport code TORT and Monte Carlo radiation transport code MORSE, which were developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the discrete ordinates code ENSEMBLE, which was developed in Japan. The purpose of the calculations is not only to compare the calculational results with the experimental results, but also to compare the results of TORT and MORSE with those of ENSEMBLE. In the TORT calculations, two types of difference methods, weighted-difference method was applied in ENSEMBLE calculation. Both TORT and ENSEMBLE produced nearly the same calculational results, but differed in the number of iterations required for converging each neutron group. Also, the two types of difference methods in the TORT calculations showed no appreciable variance in the number of iterations required. However, a noticeable disparity in the computer times and some variation in the calculational results did occur. The comparisons of the calculational results with the experimental results, showed for the epithermal neutron flux generally good agreement in the first and second legs and at the first bend where the two-dimensional modeling might be difficult. Results were fair to poor along the centerline of the first leg near the opening to the second leg because of discrete ordinates ray effects. Additionally, the agreement was good throughout the first and second legs for the thermal neutron region. Calculations with MORSE were made. These calculational results and comparisons are described also. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  8. 2-D numerical simulations of groundwater flow, heat transfer and 4He transport — implications for the He terrestrial budget and the mantle helium heat imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Maria Clara; Patriarche, Delphine; Goblet, Patrick

    2005-09-01

    Because helium and heat production results from a common source, a continental 4He crustal flux of 4.65 * 10 - 14 mol m - 2 s - 1 has been estimated based on heat flow considerations. In addition, because the observed mantle He / heat flux ratio at the proximity of mid-ocean ridges (6.6 * 10 - 14 mol J - 1 ) is significantly lower than the radiogenic production ratio (1.5 * 10 - 12 mol J - 1 ), the presence of a terrestrial helium-heat imbalance was suggested. The latter could be explained by the presence of a layered mantle in which removal of He is impeded from the lower mantle [R.K. O'Nions, E.R. Oxburgh, Heat and helium in the Earth, Nature 306 (1983) 429-431; E.R. Oxburgh, R.K. O'Nions, Helium loss, tectonics, and the terrestrial heat budget, Science 237 (1987) 1583-1588]. van Keken et al. [P.E. van Keken, C.J. Ballentine, D. Porcelli, A dynamical investigation of the heat and helium imbalance, Earth Planet, Sci. Lett. 188 (2001) 421-434] have recently claimed that the helium-heat imbalance remains a robust observation. Such conclusions, however, were reached under the assumption that a steady-state regime was in place for both tracers and that their transport properties are similar at least in the upper portion of the crust. Here, through 2-D simulations of groundwater flow, heat transfer and 4He transport carried out simultaneously in the Carrizo aquifer and surrounding formations in southwest Texas, we assess the legitimacy of earlier assumptions. Specifically, we show that the driving transport mechanisms for He and heat are of a fundamentally different nature for a high range of permeabilities ( k ≤ 10 - 16 m 2) found in metamorphic and volcanic rocks at all depths in the crust. The assumption that transport properties for these two tracers are similar in the crust is thus unsound. We also show that total 4He / heat flux ratios lower than radiogenic production ratios do not reflect a He deficit in the crust or mantle original reservoir. Instead, they

  9. Thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor and Monte Carlo coupled simulation of deuteron/triton transport and secondary products generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guan-bo; Liu, Han-gang; Wang, Kan; Yang, Xin; Feng, Qi-jie

    2012-09-01

    Thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor has being studied in China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP). Current Monte Carlo codes, such as MCNP and GEANT, are inadequate when applied in this multi-step reactions problems. A Monte Carlo tool RSMC (Reaction Sequence Monte Carlo) has been developed to simulate such coupled problem, from neutron absorption, to charged particle ionization and secondary neutron generation. "Forced particle production" variance reduction technique has been implemented to improve the calculation speed distinctly by making deuteron/triton induced secondary product plays a major role. Nuclear data is handled from ENDF or TENDL, and stopping power from SRIM, which described better for low energy deuteron/triton interactions. As a validation, accelerator driven mono-energy 14 MeV fusion neutron source is employed, which has been deeply studied and includes deuteron transport and secondary neutron generation. Various parameters, including fusion neutron angle distribution, average neutron energy at different emission directions, differential and integral energy distributions, are calculated with our tool and traditional deterministic method as references. As a result, we present the calculation results of convertor with RSMC, including conversion ratio of 1 mm 6LiD with a typical thermal neutron (Maxwell spectrum) incidence, and fusion neutron spectrum, which will be used for our experiment.

  10. Interaction between serotonin transporter and dopamine D2/D3 receptor radioligand measures is associated with harm avoidant symptoms in anorexia and bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Bailer, Ursula F.; Frank, Guido K.; Price, Julie C.; Meltzer, Carolyn C.; Becker, Carl; Mathis, Chester A.; Wagner, Angela; Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Putnam, Karen; Schork, Nicholas J.; Gamst, Anthony; Kaye, Walter H.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) have alterations of measures of serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) function, which persist after long-term recovery and are associated with elevated harm avoidance (HA), a measure of anxiety and behavioral inhibition. Objective Based on theories that 5-HT is an aversive motivational system that may oppose a DA-related appetitive system, we explored interactions of positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand measures that reflect portions of these systems. Methods Twenty-seven individuals recovered (REC) from eating disorders (EDs) (7 AN-BN, 11 AN, 9 BN) and 9 control women (CW) were analyzed for correlations between [11C]McN5652 and [11C]raclopride binding. Results There was a positive correlation between [11C]McN5652 binding potential BPnon displaceable(ND)) and [11C]raclopride BPND for the dorsal caudate (r(27) = .62; p < .001), antero-ventral striatum (r(27) = .55, p = .003), middle caudate (r(27) = .68; p < .001), ventral (r(27) = .64; p < .001) and dorsal putamen (r(27) = .42; p = .03). No significant correlations were found in CW. [11C]raclopride BPND, but not [11C]McN5652 BPND, was significantly related to HA in REC EDs. A linear regression analysis showed that the interaction between [11C]McN5652 BPND and [11C]raclopride BPND in the dorsal putamen significantly (b = 140.04; t (22) = 2.21; p = .04) predicted HA. Conclusions This is the first study using PET and the radioligands [11C]McN5652 and [11C]raclopride to show a direct relationship between 5-HT transporter and striatal DA D2/D3 receptor binding in humans, supporting the possibility that 5-HT and DA interactions contribute to HA behaviors in EDs. PMID:23154100

  11. WHIST transport analysis of high neutron production, ICRH heated, pellet fueled jet plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Tolliver, J.S.; Phillips, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    The WHIST 1-1/2-D predictive transport code is used to model the particle and energy transport of JET pellet-fueled, ICRH-heated plasmas. Pellet injection during the current rise phase was used to produce strong central peaking of the particle density followed by central ICRH heating and led to transient period of enhanced confinement. The evolution of the density profile as well as the electron and ion temperature profiles and strong ICRH heating conditions are examined during this period of enhanced confinement in the context of models for particle and energy transport. Because WHIST is a predictive transport code, it requires models for particle and energy sources and transport coefficients. The analysis procedure thus consists of modeling the particle source terms (pellets, gas, and recycled neutrals), energy source terms (ohmic and ICRH heating), and energy loss terms (primarily radiation), and varying the transport models until the best qualitative and quantitative agreement is obtained between calculated and observed quantities. We find that plasma behavior is well described during the first second of ICRH heating following pellet injection by the same transport coefficients that describe the ohmic plasma. The distinction between electron and ion thermal losses depends on the relative heating rates of electrons and ions as determined by the ICRH model, as well as the radiation losses. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Evaluation of Hylife-II and Sombrero using 175- and 566- group neutron transport and activation cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D; Latkowski, J; Sanz, J

    1999-06-18

    Recent modifications to the TART Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code enable calculation of 566-group neutron spectra. This expanded group structure represents a significant improvement over the 50- and 175-group structures that have been previously available. To support use of this new capability, neutron activation cross section libraries have been created in the 175- and 566-group structures starting from the FENDL/A-2.0 pointwise data. Neutron spectra have been calculated for the first walls of the HYLIFE-II and SOMBRERO inertial fusion energy power plant designs and have been used in subsequent neutron activation calculations. The results obtained using the two different group structures are compared to each other as well as to those obtained using a 175-group version of the EAF3.1 activation cross section library.

  13. Applying nonlinear diffusion acceleration to the neutron transport k-Eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Taitano, William

    2015-11-01

    High-order/low-order (or moment-based acceleration) algorithms have been used to significantly accelerate the solution to the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem over the past several years. Recently, the nonlinear diffusion acceleration algorithm has been extended to solve fixed-source problems with anisotropic scattering sources. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can extend this algorithm to k-eigenvalue problems in which the scattering source is anisotropic and a significant acceleration can be achieved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the low-order, diffusion-like eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently using a technique known as nonlinear elimination.

  14. Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  15. Effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on transport properties of thermoelectrics

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, H.; Leonard, K. J.

    2017-07-25

    Thermoelectric materials were subjected to high fluence neutron irradiation in order to understand the effect of radiation damage on transport properties. This paper is relevant to the NASA Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program in which thermoelectric elements are exposed to radiation over a long period of time in space missions. Selected n-type and p-type bismuth telluride materials were irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a neutron fluence of 1.3 × 1018 n/cm2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The increase in the Seebeck coefficient in the n-type material was partially off-set by an increase in electrical resistivity, making the powermore » factor higher at lower temperatures. For the p-type materials, although the Seebeck coefficient was not affected by irradiation, electrical resistivity decreased slightly. The figure of merit, zT, showed a clear drop in the 300–400 K range for the p-type material and an increase for the n-type material. Considering that the p-type and n-type materials are connected in series in a module, the overall irradiation damages at the device level were limited. Finally, these results, at neutron fluences exceeding a typical space mission, are significant to ensure that the radiation damage to thermoelectrics does not affect the performance of RTGs.« less

  16. Effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on transport properties of thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Leonard, K. J.

    2017-07-01

    Thermoelectric materials were subjected to high fluence neutron irradiation in order to understand the effect of radiation damage on transport properties. This study is relevant to the NASA Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program in which thermoelectric elements are exposed to radiation over a long period of time in space missions. Selected n-type and p-type bismuth telluride materials were irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a neutron fluence of 1.3 × 1018 n/cm2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The increase in the Seebeck coefficient in the n-type material was partially off-set by an increase in electrical resistivity, making the power factor higher at lower temperatures. For the p-type materials, although the Seebeck coefficient was not affected by irradiation, electrical resistivity decreased slightly. The figure of merit, zT, showed a clear drop in the 300-400 K range for the p-type material and an increase for the n-type material. Considering that the p-type and n-type materials are connected in series in a module, the overall irradiation damages at the device level were limited. These results, at neutron fluences exceeding a typical space mission, are significant to ensure that the radiation damage to thermoelectrics does not affect the performance of RTGs.

  17. Transmutation approximations for the application of hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic neutron transport to shutdown dose rate analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Biondo, Elliott D.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2017-05-08

    In fusion energy systems (FES) neutrons born from burning plasma activate system components. The photon dose rate after shutdown from resulting radionuclides must be quantified. This shutdown dose rate (SDR) is calculated by coupling neutron transport, activation analysis, and photon transport. The size, complexity, and attenuating configuration of FES motivate the use of hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic neutron transport. The Multi-Step Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (MS-CADIS) method can be used to optimize MC neutron transport for coupled multiphysics problems, including SDR analysis, using deterministic estimates of adjoint flux distributions. When used for SDR analysis, MS-CADIS requires the formulation ofmore » an adjoint neutron source that approximates the transmutation process. In this work, transmutation approximations are used to derive a solution for this adjoint neutron source. It is shown that these approximations are reasonably met for typical FES neutron spectra and materials over a range of irradiation scenarios. When these approximations are met, the Groupwise Transmutation (GT)-CADIS method, proposed here, can be used effectively. GT-CADIS is an implementation of the MS-CADIS method for SDR analysis that uses a series of single-energy-group irradiations to calculate the adjoint neutron source. For a simple SDR problem, GT-CADIS provides speedups of 200 100 relative to global variance reduction with the Forward-Weighted (FW)-CADIS method and 9 ± 5 • 104 relative to analog. As a result, this work shows that GT-CADIS is broadly applicable to FES problems and will significantly reduce the computational resources necessary for SDR analysis.« less

  18. Monte Carlo Simulation of Atmospheric Neutron Transport at High Altitudes Using MCNP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    interaction data, (2) discrete reaction neutron interaction data, (3) multigroup neutron interaction data, (4) continuous photon interaction data and (5... multigroup photon interaction data. In neutron - only and coupled neutron /photon problems, one continuous-energy, multigroup or discrete reaction...as histograms rather than as continuous curves. The multigroup tables have been derived from the same sources as the other neutron interaction tables

  19. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B. X.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.

    2012-02-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with ˜38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ˜1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  20. Equations of the surface harmonics method for solving time-dependent neutron transport problems and their verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Time-dependent equations of the surface harmonics method (SHM) are obtained for planar one-dimensional geometry. The equations are verified by calculations of test problems from Benchmark Problem Book ANL-7416, and the capabilities and efficiency of applying the SHM for solving the time-dependent neutron transport equation in the diffusion approximation are demonstrated. The results of the work show that the implementation of the SHG for full-scale computations will make possible substantial progress in the efficient solution of time-dependent problems of neutron transport in nuclear reactors.

  1. MONTE CARLO NEUTRINO TRANSPORT THROUGH REMNANT DISKS FROM NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Richers, Sherwood; Ott, Christian D.; Kasen, Daniel; Fernández, Rodrigo; O’Connor, Evan

    2015-11-01

    We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two-dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the cases of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45° from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentially leading to a stronger neutrino-driven wind. Neutrino cooling in the dense midplane of the disk is stronger when using MC transport, leading to a globally higher cooling rate by a factor of a few and a larger leptonization rate by an order of magnitude. We calculate neutrino pair annihilation rates and estimate that an energy of 2.8 × 10{sup 46} erg is deposited within 45° of the symmetry axis over 300 ms when a central BH is present. Similarly, 1.9 × 10{sup 48} erg is deposited over 3 s when an HMNS sits at the center, but neither estimate is likely to be sufficient to drive a gamma-ray burst jet.

  2. Monte Carlo Neutrino Transport through Remnant Disks from Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richers, Sherwood; Kasen, Daniel; O'Connor, Evan; Fernández, Rodrigo; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-11-01

    We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two-dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the cases of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45° from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentially leading to a stronger neutrino-driven wind. Neutrino cooling in the dense midplane of the disk is stronger when using MC transport, leading to a globally higher cooling rate by a factor of a few and a larger leptonization rate by an order of magnitude. We calculate neutrino pair annihilation rates and estimate that an energy of 2.8 × 1046 erg is deposited within 45° of the symmetry axis over 300 ms when a central BH is present. Similarly, 1.9 × 1048 erg is deposited over 3 s when an HMNS sits at the center, but neither estimate is likely to be sufficient to drive a gamma-ray burst jet.

  3. A study of the quantum classical crossover in the spin dynamics of the 2D S = 5/2 antiferromagnet Rb2MnF4: neutron scattering, computer simulations and analytic theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huberman, T.; Tennant, D. A.; Cowley, R. A.; Coldea, R.; Frost, C. D.

    2008-05-01

    We report comprehensive inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the magnetic excitations in the 2D spin-5/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet Rb2MnF4 as a function of temperature from deep in the Néel ordered phase up to paramagnetic, 0.13

  4. Probing multiscale transport and inhomogeneity in a lithium-ion cells using in-situ neutron methods

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Hui; An, Ke; Allu, Srikanth; ...

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate for the first time the lithiation process in graphitic anodes using insitu neutron radiography in a pouch cell format. The neutron absorption contrast shows a direct correlation between degree of lithiation and the discharge voltage plateau. Furthermore, we provide a semi-quantitative comparison between the observed spatial variations of neutron attenuation line profile across the graphite electrode and the calculated lithium concentration profiles computed under similar electrochemical discharge conditions. In conjunction, in situ neutron diffraction of a similar pouch cell under identical test protocol was carried to obtain information about the local phase changes upon lithiation. Combined in-situmore » radiography and diffraction opens up a powerful nondestructive method to understand the multi-scale nature of lithium transport and degradation in practical lithium-ion cells.« less

  5. Probing multiscale transport and inhomogeneity in a lithium-ion cells using in-situ neutron methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hui; An, Ke; Allu, Srikanth; Pannala, Sreekanth; Li, Jianlin; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Martha, Surendra; Nanda, Jagjit

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate for the first time the lithiation process in graphitic anodes using insitu neutron radiography in a pouch cell format. The neutron absorption contrast shows a direct correlation between degree of lithiation and the discharge voltage plateau. Furthermore, we provide a semi-quantitative comparison between the observed spatial variations of neutron attenuation line profile across the graphite electrode and the calculated lithium concentration profiles computed under similar electrochemical discharge conditions. In conjunction, in situ neutron diffraction of a similar pouch cell under identical test protocol was carried to obtain information about the local phase changes upon lithiation. Combined in-situ radiography and diffraction opens up a powerful nondestructive method to understand the multi-scale nature of lithium transport and degradation in practical lithium-ion cells.

  6. Global Error Bounds for the Petrov-Galerkin Discretization of the Neutron Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B; Brown, P; Greenbaum, A; Machorro, E

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we prove that the numerical solution of the mono-directional neutron transport equation by the Petrov-Galerkin method converges to the true solution in the L{sup 2} norm at the rate of h{sup 2}. Since consistency has been shown elsewhere, the focus here is on stability. We prove that the system of Petrov-Galerkin equations is stable by showing that the 2-norm of the inverse of the matrix for the system of equations is bounded by a number that is independent of the order of the matrix. This bound is equal to the length of the longest path that it takes a neutron to cross the domain in a straight line. A consequence of this bound is that the global error of the Petrov-Galerkin approximation is of the same order of h as the local truncation error. We use this result to explain the widely held observation that the solution of the Petrov-Galerkin method is second accurate for one class of problems, but is only first order accurate for another class of problems.

  7. Using the transportable, computer-operated, liquid-scintillator fast-neutron spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1988-11-01

    When a detailed energy spectrum is needed for radiation-protection measurements from approximately 1 MeV up to several tens of MeV, organic-liquid scintillators make good neutron spectrometers. However, such a spectrometer requires a sophisticated electronics system and a computer to reduce the spectrum from the recorded data. Recently, we added a Nuclear Instrument Module (NIM) multichannel analyzer and a lap-top computer to the NIM electronics we have used for several years. The result is a transportable fast-neutron spectrometer system. The computer was programmed to guide the user through setting up the system, calibrating the spectrometer, measuring the spectrum, and reducing the data. Measurements can be made over three energy ranges, 0.6--2 MeV, 1.1--8 MeV, or 1.6--16 MeV, with the spectrum presented in 0.1-MeV increments. Results can be stored on a disk, presented in a table, and shown in graphical form. 5 refs., 51 figs.

  8. Effects of polymorphisms in CYP2D6 and ABC transporters and side effects induced by gefitinib on the pharmacokinetics of the gefitinib metabolite, O-desmethyl gefitinib.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Sato, Kazuhiro; Niioka, Takenori; Takeda, Masahide; Okuda, Yuji; Asano, Mariko; Ito, Hiroshi; Miura, Masatomo

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effects of polymorphisms in CYP2D6, ABCB1, and ABCG2 and the side effects induced by gefitinib on the pharmacokinetics of O-desmethyl gefitinib, the active metabolite of gefitinib. On day 14 after beginning therapy with gefitinib, plasma concentrations of gefitinib and O-desmethyl gefitinib were measured. Patients were grouped into three groups according to their combination of CYP2D6 alleles: homozygous extensive metabolisers (EMs; *1/*1, *1/*2, and *2/*2; n = 13), heterozygous EMs (*1/*5, *2/*5, *1/*10, and *2/*10; n = 18), and intermediate metabolisers (IMs; *5/*10 and *10/*10; n = 5). The median AUC0-24 of O-desmethyl gefitinib in CYP2D6 IMs was 1460 ng h/mL, whereas that in homozygous EMs was 12,523 ng h/mL (P = 0.021 in univariate analysis). The median AUC ratio of O-desmethyl gefitinib to gefitinib differed among homozygous EMs, heterozygous EMs, and IMs at a ratio of 1.41:0.86:0.24 (P = 0.030). On the other hand, there were no significant differences in the AUC0-24 of O-desmethyl gefitinib between ABCB1 and ABCG2 genotypes. In a multivariate analysis, CYP2D6 homozygous EMs (P = 0.012) were predictive for a higher AUC0-24 of O-desmethyl gefitinib. The side effects of diarrhoea, skin rash, and hepatotoxicity induced by gefitinib were unrelated to the AUC0-24 of O-desmethyl gefitinib. CYP2D6 polymorphisms were associated with the formation of O-desmethyl gefitinib from gefitinib. In CYP2D6 homozygous EMs, the plasma concentrations of O-desmethyl gefitinib were higher over 24 h after taking gefitinib than those of the parent compound; however, side effects induced by gefitinib were unrelated to O-desmethyl gefitinib exposure.

  9. A POD reduced order model for resolving angular direction in neutron/photon transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Buchan, A.G.; Calloo, A.A.; Goffin, M.G.; Dargaville, S.; Fang, F.; Pain, C.C.; Navon, I.M.

    2015-09-01

    This article presents the first Reduced Order Model (ROM) that efficiently resolves the angular dimension of the time independent, mono-energetic Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). It is based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and uses the method of snapshots to form optimal basis functions for resolving the direction of particle travel in neutron/photon transport problems. A unique element of this work is that the snapshots are formed from the vector of angular coefficients relating to a high resolution expansion of the BTE's angular dimension. In addition, the individual snapshots are not recorded through time, as in standard POD, but instead they are recorded through space. In essence this work swaps the roles of the dimensions space and time in standard POD methods, with angle and space respectively. It is shown here how the POD model can be formed from the POD basis functions in a highly efficient manner. The model is then applied to two radiation problems; one involving the transport of radiation through a shield and the other through an infinite array of pins. Both problems are selected for their complex angular flux solutions in order to provide an appropriate demonstration of the model's capabilities. It is shown that the POD model can resolve these fluxes efficiently and accurately. In comparison to high resolution models this POD model can reduce the size of a problem by up to two orders of magnitude without compromising accuracy. Solving times are also reduced by similar factors.

  10. A comparison of acceleration methods for solving the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Knoll, D.A.

    2014-10-01

    Over the past several years a number of papers have been written describing modern techniques for numerically computing the dominant eigenvalue of the neutron transport criticality problem. These methods fall into two distinct categories. The first category of methods rewrite the multi-group k-eigenvalue problem as a nonlinear system of equations and solve the resulting system using either a Jacobian-Free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method or Nonlinear Krylov Acceleration (NKA), a variant of Anderson Acceleration. These methods are generally successful in significantly reducing the number of transport sweeps required to compute the dominant eigenvalue. The second category of methods utilize Moment-Based Acceleration (or High-Order/Low-Order (HOLO) Acceleration). These methods solve a sequence of modified diffusion eigenvalue problems whose solutions converge to the solution of the original transport eigenvalue problem. This second class of methods is, in our experience, always superior to the first, as most of the computational work is eliminated by the acceleration from the LO diffusion system. In this paper, we review each of these methods. Our computational results support our claim that the choice of which nonlinear solver to use, JFNK or NKA, should be secondary. The primary computational savings result from the implementation of a HOLO algorithm. We display computational results for a series of challenging multi-dimensional test problems.

  11. Lithium Transport in an Amorphous LixSi Anode Investigated by Quasi-elastic Neutron Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Sacci, Robert L.; Lehmann, Michelle L.; Diallo, Souleymane O.; ...

    2017-04-27

    Here, we demonstrate the room temperature mechanochemical synthesis of highly defective LixSi anode materials and characterization of the Li transport. We probed the Li+ self-diffusion using quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) to measure the Li self-diffusion in the alloy. Li diffusion was found to be significantly greater (3.0 × 10–6 cm2 s–1) than previously measured crystalline and electrochemically made Li–Si alloys; the energy of activation was determined to be 0.20 eV (19 kJ mol–1). Amorphous Li–Si structures are known to have superior Li diffusion to their crystalline counterparts; therefore, the isolation and stabilization of defective Li–Si structures may improve the utilitymore » of Si anodes for Li-ion batteries.« less

  12. Analysis of EBR-II neutron and photon physics by multidimensional transport-theory techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jacqmin, R.P.; Finck, P.J.; Palmiotti, G.

    1994-03-01

    This paper contains a review of the challenges specific to the EBR-II core physics, a description of the methods and techniques which have been developed for addressing these challenges, and the results of some validation studies relative to power-distribution calculations. Numerical tests have shown that the VARIANT nodal code yields eigenvalue and power predictions as accurate as finite difference and discrete ordinates transport codes, at a small fraction of the cost. Comparisons with continuous-energy Monte Carlo results have proven that the errors introduced by the use of the diffusion-theory approximation in the collapsing procedure to obtain broad-group cross sections, kerma factors, and photon-production matrices, have a small impact on the EBR-II neutron/photon power distribution.

  13. A demonstration of a whole core neutron transport method in a gas cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, K. J.; Rahnema, F.

    2013-07-01

    This paper illustrates a capability of the whole core transport method COMET. Building on previous works which demonstrated the accuracy of the method, this work serves to emphasize the robust capability of the method while also accentuating its efficiency. A set of core configurations is presented based on an operating gas-cooled thermal reactor, Japan's HTTR, and COMET determines the eigenvalue and fission density profile throughout each core configuration. Results for core multiplication factors are compared to MCNP for accuracy and also to compare runtimes. In all cases, the values given by COMET differ by those given by MCNP by less than the uncertainty inherent in the stochastic solution procedure, however, COMET requires runtimes shorter on the order of a few hundred. Figures are provided illustrating the whole core fission density profile, with segments of pins explicitly modeled individually, so that pin-level neutron flux behavior can be seen without any approximation due to simplification strategies such as homogenization. (authors)

  14. Magnetometry and transport data complement polarized neutron reflectometry in magnetic depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; He, Xi; Mukherjee, T.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Sahoo, S.; Binek, Ch.

    2011-11-01

    Exchange coupled magnetic hard layer/soft layer thin films show a variety of complex magnetization reversal mechanisms depending on the hierarchy of interaction strengths within and between the films. Magnetization reversal can include uniform rotation, soft layer biasing, as well as exchange spring behavior. We investigate the magnetization reversal of a CoPt/Permalloy/Ta/Permalloy heterostructure. Here, Stoner-Wohlfarth-type uniform magnetization rotation of the virtually free Permalloy layer and exchange spring behavior of the strongly pinned Permalloy layer are found in the same sample. We investigate the complex magnetization reversal by polarized neutron reflectometry, magnetometry, and magneto-transport. The synergy of combining these experimental methods together with theoretical modeling is key to obtain the complete quantitative depth resolved information of the magnetization reversal processes for a multilayer of mesoscopic thickness.

  15. TART97 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1997-11-22

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on- line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and its data riles.

  16. Radiation transport codes for potential applications related to radiobiology and radiotherapy using protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Several Monte Carlo radiation transport computer codes are used to predict quantities of interest in the fields of radiotherapy and radiobiology. The calculational methods are described and comparisions of calculated and experimental results are presented for dose distributions produced by protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions. Comparisons of calculated and experimental cell survival probabilities are also presented.

  17. Radiation transport analyses in support of the SNS Target Station Neutron Beam Line Shutters Title I Design

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.M.; Pevey, R.E.; Lillie, R.A.; Johnson, J.O.

    2000-12-01

    A detailed radiation transport analysis of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) shutters is important for the construction of the SNS because of its impact on conventional facility design, normal operation of the facility, and maintenance operations. Thus far the analysis of the SNS shutter travel gaps has been completed. This analysis was performed using coupled Monte Carlo and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations.

  18. 2D and 3D crystallization of the wild-type IIC domain of the glucose PTS transporter from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kalbermatter, David; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Chiu, Po-Lin; Ucurum, Zöhre; Walz, Thomas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system serves the combined uptake and phosphorylation of carbohydrates. This structurally and functionally complex system is composed of several conserved functional units that, through a cascade of phosphorylated intermediates, catalyze the transfer of the phosphate moiety from phosphoenolpyruvate to the substrate, which is bound to the integral membrane domain IIC. The wild-type glucose-specific IIC domain (wt-IIC(glc)) of Escherichia coli was cloned, overexpressed and purified for biochemical and functional characterization. Size-exclusion chromatography and scintillation-proximity binding assays showed that purified wt-IIC(glc) was homogenous and able to bind glucose. Crystallization was pursued following two different approaches: (i) reconstitution of wt-IIC(glc) into a lipid bilayer by detergent removal through dialysis, which yielded tubular 2D crystals, and (ii) vapor-diffusion crystallization of detergent-solubilized wt-IIC(glc), which yielded rhombohedral 3D crystals. Analysis of the 2D crystals by cryo-electron microscopy and the 3D crystals by X-ray diffraction indicated resolutions of better than 6Å and 4Å, respectively. Furthermore, a complete X-ray diffraction data set could be collected and processed to 3.93Å resolution. These 2D and 3D crystals of wt-IIC(glc) lay the foundation for the determination of the first structure of a bacterial glucose-specific IIC domain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-01-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image. PMID:27271330

  20. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-06-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image.

  1. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-06-08

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image.

  2. Summary report for ITER task - D10: Update and implementation of neutron transport and activation codes and processed libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Attaya, H.

    1995-01-01

    The primary goal of this task is to provide the capabilities in the activation code RACC, to treat pulsed operation modes. In addition, it is required that the code utilizes the same spatial mesh and geometrical models as employed in the one or multidimensional neutron transport codes used in ITER design. This would ensure the use of the same neutron flux generated by those codes to calculate the different activation parameters. It is also required to have the capabilities for generating graphical outputs for the calculated activation parameters.

  3. U{sub N} Method For The Critical Slab Problem In One-Speed Neutron Transport Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Oeztuerk, Hakan; Guengoer, Sueleyman

    2008-11-11

    The Chebyshev polynomial approximation (U{sub N} method) is used to solve the critical slab problem in one-speed neutron transport theory using Marshak boundary condition. The isotropic scattering kernel with the combination of forward and backward scattering is chosen for the neutrons in a uniform finite slab. Numerical results obtained by the U{sub N} method are presented in the tables together with the results obtained by the well-known P{sub N} method for comparison. It is shown that the method converges rapidly with its easily executable equations.

  4. Surface harmonics method for two-dimensional time-dependent neutron transport problems of square-lattice nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    Time-dependent equations of the Surface Harmonics Method (SHM) have been derived from the time-dependent neutron transport equation with explicit representation of delayed neutrons for solving the two-dimensional time-dependent problems. These equations have been realized in the SUHAM-TD code. The TWIGL benchmark problem has been used for verification of the SUHAM-TD code. The results of the study showed that computational costs required to achieve necessary accuracy of the solution can be an order of magnitude less than with the use of the conventional finite difference method (FDM). (authors)

  5. The TORT three-dimensional discrete ordinates neutron/photon transport code (TORT version 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, W.A.; Simpson, D.B.

    1997-10-01

    TORT calculates the flux or fluence of neutrons and/or photons throughout three-dimensional systems due to particles incident upon the system`s external boundaries, due to fixed internal sources, or due to sources generated by interaction with the system materials. The transport process is represented by the Boltzman transport equation. The method of discrete ordinates is used to treat the directional variable, and a multigroup formulation treats the energy dependence. Anisotropic scattering is treated using a Legendre expansion. Various methods are used to treat spatial dependence, including nodal and characteristic procedures that have been especially adapted to resist numerical distortion. A method of body overlay assists in material zone specification, or the specification can be generated by an external code supplied by the user. Several special features are designed to concentrate machine resources where they are most needed. The directional quadrature and Legendre expansion can vary with energy group. A discontinuous mesh capability has been shown to reduce the size of large problems by a factor of roughly three in some cases. The emphasis in this code is a robust, adaptable application of time-tested methods, together with a few well-tested extensions.

  6. A Systematic Solution Approach for Neutron Transport Problems in Diffuse Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manteuffel, T. A.; Ressel, K. J.

    1996-01-01

    A systematic solution approach for the neutron transport equation, based on a least-squares finite-element discretization, is presented. This approach includes the theory for the existence and uniqueness of the analytical as well as of the discrete solution, bounds for the discretization error, and guidance for the development of an efficient multigrid solver for the resulting discrete problem. To guarantee the accuracy of the discrete solution for diffusive regimes, a scaling transformation is applied to the transport operator prior to the discretization. The key result is the proof of the V-ellipticity and continuity of the scaled least-squares bilinear form with constants that are independent of the total cross section and the absorption cross section. For a variety of least-squares finite-element discretizations this leads to error bounds that remain valid in diffusive regimes. Moreover, for problems in slab geometry a full multigrid solver is presented with V(1, 1)-cycle convergence rates approximately equal to 0.1, independent of the size of the total cross section and the absorption cross section.

  7. Subplane-based Control Rod Decusping Techniques for the 2D/1D Method in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Aaron M; Collins, Benjamin S; Downar, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The MPACT transport code is being jointly developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Michigan to serve as the primary neutron transport code for the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator. MPACT uses the 2D/1D method to solve the transport equation by decomposing the reactor model into a stack of 2D planes. A fine mesh flux distribution is calculated in each 2D plane using the Method of Characteristics (MOC), then the planes are coupled axially through a 1D NEM-P$_3$ calculation. This iterative calculation is then accelerated using the Coarse Mesh Finite Difference method. One problem that arises frequently when using the 2D/1D method is that of control rod cusping. This occurs when the tip of a control rod falls between the boundaries of an MOC plane, requiring that the rodded and unrodded regions be axially homogenized for the 2D MOC calculations. Performing a volume homogenization does not properly preserve the reaction rates, causing an error known as cusping. The most straightforward way of resolving this problem is by refining the axial mesh, but this can significantly increase the computational expense of the calculation. The other way of resolving the partially inserted rod is through the use of a decusping method. This paper presents new decusping methods implemented in MPACT that can dynamically correct the rod cusping behavior for a variety of problems.

  8. A Complex-Geometry Validation Experiment for Advanced Neutron Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Anthony W. LaPorta; Joseph W. Nielsen; James Parry; Mark D. DeHart; Samuel E. Bays; William F. Skerjanc

    2013-11-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a focused effort to upgrade legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols used for support of core fuel management and experiment management in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its companion critical facility (ATRC) at the INL.. This will be accomplished through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate new Verification and Validation (V&V) protocols, over the next 12-18 months. Stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and nuclear data packages that support this effort include MCNP5[1], SCALE/KENO6[2], HELIOS[3], SCALE/NEWT[2], and ATTILA[4]. Furthermore, a capability for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI[5] system has also been implemented. Finally, we are also evaluating the Serpent[6] and MC21[7] codes, as additional verification tools in the near term as well as for possible applications to full three-dimensional Monte Carlo based fuel management modeling in the longer term. On the experimental side, several new benchmark-quality code validation measurements based on neutron activation spectrometry have been conducted using the ATRC. Results for the first four experiments, focused on neutron spectrum measurements within the Northwest Large In-Pile Tube (NW LIPT) and in the core fuel elements surrounding the NW LIPT and the diametrically opposite Southeast IPT have been reported [8,9]. A fifth, very recent, experiment focused on detailed measurements of the element-to-element core power distribution is summarized here and examples of the use of the measured data for validation of corresponding MCNP5, HELIOS, NEWT, and Serpent computational models using modern least-square adjustment methods are provided.

  9. Combined transport, magnetization and neutron scattering study of correlated iridates and iron pnictide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhital, Chetan

    The work performed within this thesis is divided into two parts, each focusing primarily on the study of magnetic phase behavior using neutron scattering techniques. In first part, I present transport, magnetization, and neutron scattering studies of materials within the iridium oxide-based Ruddelsden-Popper series [Srn+1IrnO3n+1] compounds Sr 3Ir2O7 (n=2) and Sr2IrO4 (n=1). This includes a comprehensive study of the doped bilayer system Sr 3(Ir1-xRux )2O7. In second part, I present my studies of the effect of uniaxial pressure on magnetic and structural phase behavior of the iron-based high temperature superconductor Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2. Iridium-based 5d transition metal oxides host rather unusual electronic/magnetic ground states due to strong interplay between electronic correlation, lattice structure and spin-orbit effects. Out of the many oxides containing iridium, the Ruddelsden-Popper series [Srn+1IrnO 3n+1] oxides are some of the most interesting systems to study both from the point of view of physics as well as from potential applications. My work is focused on two members of this series Sr3Ir2O 7 (n=2) and Sr2IrO4 (n=1). In particular, our combined transport, magnetization and neutron scattering studies of Sr 3Ir2O7 (n=2) showed that this system exhibits a complex coupling between charge transport and magnetism. The spin magnetic moments form a G-type antiferromagnetic structure with moments oriented along the c-axis, with an ordered moment of 0.35+/-0.06 muB/Ir. I also performed experiments doping holes in this bilayer Sr3(Ir1-xRu x)2O7 system in order to study the role of electronic correlation in these materials. Our results show that the ruthenium-doped holes remain localized within the Jeff=1/2 Mott insulating background of Sr3Ir2O7, suggestive of 'Mott blocking' and the presence of strong electronic correlation in these materials. Antiferromagnetic order however survives deep into the metallic regime with the same ordering q-vector, suggesting an

  10. Study of the response of a lithium yttrium borate scintillator based neutron rem counter by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, C.; Tyagi, Mohit; Biju, K.; Shanbhag, A. A.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2015-12-01

    The scarcity and the high cost of 3He has spurred the use of various detectors for neutron monitoring. A new lithium yttrium borate scintillator developed in BARC has been studied for its use in a neutron rem counter. The scintillator is made of natural lithium and boron, and the yield of reaction products that will generate a signal in a real time detector has been studied by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. A 2 cm lead introduced to enhance the gamma rejection shows no appreciable change in the shape of the fluence response or in the yield of reaction products. The fluence response when normalized at the average energy of an Am-Be neutron source shows promise of being used as rem counter.

  11. Radiation transport requirements for clinical applications of neutron capture therapy: The rtt-MC Monte Carlo module

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, F.J.; Wessol, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    The rtt-MC dose calculation module of the BNCT-Rtpe treatment planning system has been developed specifically for boron neutron cancer therapy. Due to the complicated nature of combined gamma, fast-, epithermal- and thermal-energy neutron transport in tissue, all approaches to treatment planning to date for this treatment modality rely on Monte Carlo or three-dimensional discrete ordinates methods. Simple, fast and accurate methods for this modality have simply not been developed. In this paper the authors discuss some of the unique attributes of this therapy and the approaches they have used to begin to merge into clinical applications. As this paper is under draft, the modern implementation of boron neutron cancer therapy in the US is being realized. Research of skin and tumor effect for superficial melanoma of the extremities has been initiated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and brain cancer therapy (using this planning system) has begun at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  12. A Novel Algorithm for Solving the Multidimensional Neutron Transport Equation on Massively Parallel Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Yousry

    2014-06-10

    We employ the Integral Transport Matrix Method (ITMM) as the kernel of new parallel solution methods for the discrete ordinates approximation of the within-group neutron transport equation. The ITMM abandons the repetitive mesh sweeps of the traditional source iterations (SI) scheme in favor of constructing stored operators that account for the direct coupling factors among all the cells' fluxes and between the cells' and boundary surfaces' fluxes. The main goals of this work are to develop the algorithms that construct these operators and employ them in the solution process, determine the most suitable way to parallelize the entire procedure, and evaluate the behavior and parallel performance of the developed methods with increasing number of processes, P. The fastest observed parallel solution method, Parallel Gauss-Seidel (PGS), was used in a weak scaling comparison with the PARTISN transport code, which uses the source iteration (SI) scheme parallelized with the Koch-baker-Alcouffe (KBA) method. Compared to the state-of-the-art SI-KBA with diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA), this new method- even without acceleration/preconditioning-is completitive for optically thick problems as P is increased to the tens of thousands range. For the most optically thick cells tested, PGS reduced execution time by an approximate factor of three for problems with more than 130 million computational cells on P = 32,768. Moreover, the SI-DSA execution times's trend rises generally more steeply with increasing P than the PGS trend. Furthermore, the PGS method outperforms SI for the periodic heterogeneous layers (PHL) configuration problems. The PGS method outperforms SI and SI-DSA on as few as P = 16 for PHL problems and reduces execution time by a factor of ten or more for all problems considered with more than 2 million computational cells on P = 4.096.

  13. Neutronics calculation of RTP core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie B.; Zin, Muhammad Rawi B. Mohamed; Karim, Julia Bt. Abdul; Bayar, Abi Muttaqin B. Jalal; Usang, Mark Dennis Anak; Mustafa, Muhammad Khairul Ariff B.; Hamzah, Na'im Syauqi B.; Said, Norfarizan Bt. Mohd; Jalil, Muhammad Husamuddin B.

    2017-01-01

    Reactor calculation and simulation are significantly important to ensure safety and better utilization of a research reactor. The Malaysian's PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) achieved initial criticality on June 28, 1982. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes. Since early 90s, neutronics modelling were used as part of its routine in-core fuel management activities. The are several computer codes have been used in RTP since then, based on 1D neutron diffusion, 2D neutron diffusion and 3D Monte Carlo neutron transport method. This paper describes current progress and overview on neutronics modelling development in RTP. Several important parameters were analysed such as keff, reactivity, neutron flux, power distribution and fission product build-up for the latest core configuration. The developed core neutronics model was validated by means of comparison with experimental and measurement data. Along with the RTP core model, the calculation procedure also developed to establish better prediction capability of RTP's behaviour.

  14. Development of a transportable neutron activation analysis system to quantify manganese in bone in vivo: feasibility and methodology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingzi; Koltick, David; Byrne, Patrick; Wang, Haoyu; Zheng, Wei; Nie, Linda H

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the methodology and feasibility of developing a transportable neutron activation analysis (NAA) system to quantify manganese (Mn) in bone using a portable deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator as the neutron source. Since a DD neutron generator was not available in our laboratory, a deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator was used to obtain experimental data and validate the results from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. After validation, MC simulations using a DD generator as the neutron source were then conducted. Different types of moderators and reflectors were simulated, and the optimal thicknesses for the moderator and reflector were determined. To estimate the detection limit (DL) of the system, and to observe the interference of the magnesium (Mg) γ line at 844 keV to the Mn γ line at 847 keV, three hand phantoms with Mn concentrations of 30 parts per million (ppm), 150 ppm, and 500 ppm were made and irradiated by the DT generator system. The Mn signals in these phantoms were then measured using a 50% high-efficiency high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The DL was calculated to be about 4.4 ppm for the chosen irradiation, decay, and measurement time. This was calculated to be equivalent to a DL of about 3.3 ppm for the DD generator system. To achieve this DL with one 50% high-efficiency HPGe detector, the dose to the hand was simulated to be about 37 mSv, with the total body equivalent dose being about 23µSv. In conclusion, it is feasible to develop a transportable NAA system to quantify Mn in bone in vivo with an acceptable radiation exposure to the subject.

  15. Development of a transportable neutron activation analysis system to quantify manganese in bone in vivo: feasibility and methodology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingzi; Koltick, David; Byrne, Patrick; Wang, Haoyu; Zheng, Wei; Nie, Linda H

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the methodology and feasibility of developing a transportable neutron activation analysis (NAA) system to quantify manganese (Mn) in bone using a portable deuterium–deuterium (DD) neutron generator as the neutron source. Since a DD neutron generator was not available in our laboratory, a deuterium–tritium (DT) neutron generator was used to obtain experimental data and validate the results from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. After validation, MC simulations using a DD generator as the neutron source were then conducted. Different types of moderators and reflectors were simulated, and the optimal thicknesses for the moderator and reflector were determined. To estimate the detection limit (DL) of the system, and to observe the interference of the magnesium (Mg) γ line at 844 keV to the Mn γ line at 847 keV, three hand phantoms with Mn concentrations of 30 parts per million (ppm), 150 ppm, and 500 ppm were made and irradiated by the DT generator system. The Mn signals in these phantoms were then measured using a 50% high-efficiency high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The DL was calculated to be about 4.4 ppm for the chosen irradiation, decay, and measurement time. This was calculated to be equivalent to a DL of about 3.3 ppm for the DD generator system. To achieve this DL with one 50% high-efficiency HPGe detector, the dose to the hand was simulated to be about 37 mSv, with the total body equivalent dose being about 23μSv. In conclusion, it is feasible to develop a transportable NAA system to quantify Mn in bone in vivo with an acceptable radiation exposure to the subject. PMID:24165395

  16. Neutron radiography and modelling of water flow and D2O transport in soil and plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Mohsen; Carminati, Andrea; Kröner, Eva

    2014-05-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is currently limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure the water fluxes in soil and plants. Our study aimed to develop a new non-destructive method to measure the local fluxes of water into roots of plants growing in soil. We injected deuterated water (D2O) near the roots of lupines growing in sandy soils, and we used neutron radiography to image the transport of D2O through the root system. The experiments were performed during day, when plants were transpiring, and at night, when transpiration was reduced. The radiographs showed that: 1) the radial transport of D2O from soil and roots depended similarly from diffusion and convection; and 2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To determine the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we simulated the D2O transport in soils and roots. A dual porosity model was used to describe the apoplastic and symplastic pathways of water across the root tissue. Other features as the endodermis and the xylem were also included in the model. The D2O transport was modelled solving a convection-diffusion numerical model in soil and plants. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that at night the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modelling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots, as well as the ration between the apoplastic and symplastic flow. For 24 day-old lupine grown in a sandy soil with uniform water content, our modelling results showed that root water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the roots near soil surface and it decreased toward the distal parts. The results indicated the water crossed the root cortex mainly through the apoplastic pathway. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along root systems growing in

  17. A 10(9) neutrons/pulse transportable pulsed D-D neutron source based on flexible head plasma focus unit.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R K; Srivastava, R; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2016-03-01

    A 17 kJ transportable plasma focus (PF) device with flexible transmission lines is developed and is characterized. Six custom made capacitors are used for the capacitor bank (CB). The common high voltage plate of the CB is fixed to a centrally triggered spark gap switch. The output of the switch is coupled to the PF head through forty-eight 5 m long RG213 cables. The CB has a quarter time-period of 4 μs and an estimated current of 506 kA is delivered to the PF device at 17 kJ (60 μF, 24 kV) energy. The average neutron yield measured using silver activation detector in the radial direction is (7.1 ± 1.4) × 10(8) neutrons/shot over 4π sr at 5 mbar optimum D2 pressure. The average neutron yield is more in the axial direction with an anisotropy factor of 1.33 ± 0.18. The average neutron energies estimated in the axial as well as in the radial directions are (2.90 ± 0.20) MeV and (2.58 ± 0.20) MeV, respectively. The flexibility of the PF head makes it useful for many applications where the source orientation and the location are important factors. The influence of electromagnetic interferences from the CB as well as from the spark gap on applications area can be avoided by putting a suitable barrier between the bank and the PF head.

  18. 3D Neutron Transport PWR Full-core Calculation with RMC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yishu; She, Ding; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Kan; Li, Zeguang; Liang, Jingang; Leroyer, Hadrien

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, there are more and more interests in the use of Monte Carlo codes to calculate the detailed power density distributions in full-core reactors. With the Inspur TS1000 HPC Server of Tsinghua University, several calculations have been done based on the EDF 3D Neutron Transport PWR Full-core benchmark through large-scale parallelism. To investigate and compare the results of the deterministic method and Monte Carlo method, EDF R&D and Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University are having a collaboration to make code to code verification. So in this paper, two codes are used. One is the code COCAGNE developed by the EDF R&D, a deterministic core code, and the other is the Monte Carlo code RMC developed by Department of Engineering Physics in Tsinghua University. First, the full-core model is described and a 26-group calculation was performed by these two codes using the same 26-group cross-section library provided by EDF R&D. Then the parallel and tally performance of RMC is discussed. RMC employs a novel algorithm which can cut down most of the communications. It can be seen clearly that the speedup ratio almost linearly increases with the nodes. Furthermore the cell-mapping method applied by RMC consumes little time to tally even millions of cells. The results of the codes COCAGNE and RMC are compared in three ways. The results of these two codes agree well with each other. It can be concluded that both COCAGNE and RMC are able to provide 3D-transport solutions associated with detailed power density distributions calculation in PWR full-core reactors. Finally, to investigate how many histories are needed to obtain a given standard deviation for a full 3D solution, the non-symmetrized condensed 2-group fluxes of RMC are discussed.

  19. A fully coupled Monte Carlo/discrete ordinates solution to the neutron transport equation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Filippone, W.L.; Baker, R.S.

    1990-12-31

    The neutron transport equation is solved by a hybrid method that iteratively couples regions where deterministic (S{sub N}) and stochastic (Monte Carlo) methods are applied. Unlike previous hybrid methods, the Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are fully coupled in the sense that no assumption is made about geometrical separation or decoupling. The hybrid method provides a new means of solving problems involving both optically thick and optically thin regions that neither Monte Carlo nor S{sub N} is well suited for by themselves. The fully coupled Monte Carlo/S{sub N} technique consists of defining spatial and/or energy regions of a problem in which either a Monte Carlo calculation or an S{sub N} calculation is to be performed. The Monte Carlo region may comprise the entire spatial region for selected energy groups, or may consist of a rectangular area that is either completely or partially embedded in an arbitrary S{sub N} region. The Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are then connected through the common angular boundary fluxes, which are determined iteratively using the response matrix technique, and volumetric sources. The hybrid method has been implemented in the S{sub N} code TWODANT by adding special-purpose Monte Carlo subroutines to calculate the response matrices and volumetric sources, and linkage subrountines to carry out the interface flux iterations. The common angular boundary fluxes are included in the S{sub N} code as interior boundary sources, leaving the logic for the solution of the transport flux unchanged, while, with minor modifications, the diffusion synthetic accelerator remains effective in accelerating S{sub N} calculations. The special-purpose Monte Carlo routines used are essentially analog, with few variance reduction techniques employed. However, the routines have been successfully vectorized, with approximately a factor of five increase in speed over the non-vectorized version.

  20. Oxygen transport pathways in Ruddlesden–Popper structured oxides revealed via in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin; Huq, Ashfia; ...

    2015-09-21

    Ruddlesden-Popper structured oxides, general form An+1BnO3n+1, consist of n-layers of the perovskite structure stacked in between rock-salt layers, and have potential application in solid oxide electrochemical cells and ion transport membrane reactors. Three materials with constant Co/Fe ratio, LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2), and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3) were synthesized and studied via in situ neutron powder diffraction between 765 K and 1070 K at a pO2 of 10-1 atm. Then, the structures were fit to a tetragonal I4/mmm space group, and were found to have increased total oxygen vacancy concentration in the order La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ > LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δmore » > LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ, following the trend predicted for charge compensation upon increasing Sr2+/La3+ ratio. The oxygen vacancies within the material were almost exclusively located within the perovskite layers for all of the crystal structures with only minimal vacancy formation in the rock-salt layer. Finally, analysis of the concentration of these vacancies at each distinct crystallographic site and the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters for the oxygen sites reveals potential preferred oxygen transport pathways through the perovskite layers.« less

  1. Documentation and verification of VST2D; a model for simulating transient, Variably Saturated, coupled water-heat-solute Transport in heterogeneous, anisotropic 2-Dimensional, ground-water systems with variable fluid density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a model for simulating transient, Variably Saturated, coupled water-heatsolute Transport in heterogeneous, anisotropic, 2-Dimensional, ground-water systems with variable fluid density (VST2D). VST2D was developed to help understand the effects of natural and anthropogenic factors on quantity and quality of variably saturated ground-water systems. The model solves simultaneously for one or more dependent variables (pressure, temperature, and concentration) at nodes in a horizontal or vertical mesh using a quasi-linearized general minimum residual method. This approach enhances computational speed beyond the speed of a sequential approach. Heterogeneous and anisotropic conditions are implemented locally using individual element property descriptions. This implementation allows local principal directions to differ among elements and from the global solution domain coordinates. Boundary conditions can include time-varying pressure head (or moisture content), heat, and/or concentration; fluxes distributed along domain boundaries and/or at internal node points; and/or convective moisture, heat, and solute fluxes along the domain boundaries; and/or unit hydraulic gradient along domain boundaries. Other model features include temperature and concentration dependent density (liquid and vapor) and viscosity, sorption and/or decay of a solute, and capability to determine moisture content beyond residual to zero. These features are described in the documentation together with development of the governing equations, application of the finite-element formulation (using the Galerkin approach), solution procedure, mass and energy balance considerations, input requirements, and output options. The VST2D model was verified, and results included solutions for problems of water transport under isohaline and isothermal conditions, heat transport under isobaric and isohaline conditions, solute transport under isobaric and isothermal conditions, and coupled water

  2. New Frontier in Probing Fluid Transport in Low-Permeability Geomedia: Applications of Elastic and Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hjelm, R.; Sussman, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Low-permeability geomedia are prevalent in subsurface environments. They have become increasingly important in a wide range of applications such as CO2-sequestration, hydrocarbon recovery, enhanced geothermal systems, legacy waste stewardship, high-level radioactive waste disposal, and global security. The flow and transport characteristics of low-permeability geomedia are dictated by their exceedingly low permeability values ranging from 10-6 to 10-12 darcy with porosities dominated by nanoscale pores. Developing new characterization methods and robust computational models that allow estimation of transport properties of low-permeability geomedia has been identified as a critical basic research and technology development need for controlling subsurface and fluids flow. Due to its sensibility to hydrogen and flexible sample environment, neutron based elastic and inelastic scattering can, through various techniques, interrogate all the nanoscale pores in the sample whether they are fluid accessible or not, and readily characterize interfacial waters. In this presentation, we will present two studies revealing the effects of nanoscale pore confinement on fluid dynamics in geomedia. In one study, we use combined (ultra-small)/small-angle elastic neutron scatterings to probe nanoporous features responses in geological materials to transport processes. In the other study, incoherent inelastic neutron scattering was used to distingwish between intergranular pore water and fluid inclusion moisture in bedded rock salt, and to explore their thermal stablibility. Our work demonstrates that neutron based elastic and inelastic scatterings are techniques of choice for in situ probing hydrocarbon and water behavior in nanoporous materials, providing new insights into water-rock interaction and fluids transport in low-permeability geomaterials.

  3. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS On control of kinematic parameters of ultracold neutrons in waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivlin, Lev A.

    2010-10-01

    The possibility of controlling the kinematic parameters of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is analysed by the example of a waveguide transfer and transformation of 2D images in ultracold neutrons and by the example of an increase in the concentration and deceleration/acceleration of ultracold neutrons during their transport in the waveguide with a variable cross section. The critical parameters of the problem are estimated, which indicates both consistency of the proposed approach and the emerging experimental limitations.

  4. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  5. Modeling the uniform transport in thin film SOI MOSFETs with a Monte-Carlo simulator for the 2D electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, Luca; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Esseni, David; Selmi, Luca

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we present simulations of some of the most relevant transport properties of the inversion layer of ultra-thin film SOI devices with a self-consistent Monte-Carlo transport code for a confined electron gas. We show that size induced quantization not only decreases the low-field mobility (as experimentally found in [Uchida K, Koga J, Ohba R, Numata T, Takagi S. Experimental eidences of quantum-mechanical effects on low-field mobility, gate-channel capacitance and threshold voltage of ultrathin body SOI MOSFETs, IEEE IEDM Tech Dig 2001;633-6; Esseni D, Mastrapasqua M, Celler GK, Fiegna C, Selmi L, Sangiorgi E. Low field electron and hole mobility of SOI transistors fabricated on ultra-thin silicon films for deep sub-micron technology application. IEEE Trans Electron Dev 2001;48(12):2842-50; Esseni D, Mastrapasqua M, Celler GK, Fiegna C, Selmi L, Sangiorgi E, An experimental study of mobility enhancement in ultra-thin SOI transistors operated in double-gate mode, IEEE Trans Electron Dev 2003;50(3):802-8. [1-3

  6. Modelling neutron transport in planetary media via analytical multigroup diffusion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfili, P.; Luciani, A.; Furfaro, R.; Ganapol, B. D.; Mostacci, D.

    A novel analytical solution to the 1D, steady-state, multi-slab, multi-group diffusion equation is proposed as a mean to compute the energy-dependent galactic cosmic ray-induced neutron fluxes established in planetary media. More specifically, the proposed algorithm is implemented to allow fast and highly accurate determination of low-energy cosmic ray neutrons inside the Earth's surface and atmosphere. Two sets of experimental measurements have been considered to validate our model. In both cases, a good agreement between the calculated and observed neutron fluxes is achieved. Subsequently, neutron diffusion calculations have been performed for various Earth-based scenarios comprising (a) two-slab (air-soil) configuration and (b) three-slab (air-soil-ice) configuration to investigate the functional relationship between soil composition and neutron spatial distribution.

  7. Transport calculation of neutrons leaked to the surroundings of the facilities by the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura.

    PubMed

    Imanaka, T

    2001-09-01

    A transport calculation of the neutrons leaked to the environment by the JCO criticality accident was carried out based on three-dimensional geometrical models of the buildings within the JCO territory. Our work started from an initial step to simulate the leakage process of neutrons from the precipitation tank, and proceeded to a step to calculate the neutron propagation throughout the JCO facilities. The total fission number during the accident in the precipitation tank was evaluated to be 2.5 x 10(18) by comparing the calculated neutron-induced activities per 235U fission with the measured values in a stainless-steel net sample taken 2 m from the precipitation tank. Shield effects by various structures within the JCO facilities were evaluated by comparing the present results with a previous calculation using two-dimensional models which suppose a point source of the fission spectrum in the air above the ground without any shield structures. The shield effect by the precipitation tank, itself, was obtained to be a factor of 3. The shield factor by the conversion building varied between 1.1 and 2, depending on the direction from the building. The shield effect by the surrounding buildings within the JCO territory was between I and 5, also depending on the direction.

  8. Transport in fuel cells: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and neutron imaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Douglas Scott

    This dissertation focuses on two powerful methods of performing in-situ studies of transport limitations in fuel cells. The first is electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) while the second is neutron imaging. Three fuel cell systems are studied in this work: polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and enzyme fuel cells (EFCs). The first experimental section of this dissertation focuses on application of EIS and neutron imaging to an operating PEMFC. The effects of cathode-side humidity and flow rate, as well as cell temperature and a transient response to cathode-side humidity, were studied for a PEMFC via EIS. It was found that increased air humidity in the cathode resulted in greatly reduced cathode resistance as well as a significant reduction in membrane resistance. The anode resistance was only slightly reduced in this case. Increased air flow rate was observed to have little effect on any resistance in the PEMFC, though slight reductions in both the anode and the cathode were observed. Increased cell temperature resulted in decreased cathode and anode resistances. Finally, the transient response to increased humidity exhibited unstable behavior for both the anode and the cathode resistances and the PEMFC power output. Neutron imaging allowed the calculation of water content throughout the PEMFC, showing a maximum in water content at the cathode gas diffusion layer - membrane interface. The second experimental section of this dissertation delves into the world of microbial fuel cells. Multiple long-term observations of changes in internal resistances were performed and illustrated the reduction in anode resistance as the bacterial community was established. Over this same time period, the cathode resistance was observed to have increased; these two phenomena suggest that the anode improved over time while the cathode suffered from degradation. Increased anode fluid ionic strength and flow rate both led to significant

  9. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  10. Cosmic-ray neutron transport at a forest field site: the sensitivity to various environmental conditions with focus on biomass and canopy interception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasen, Mie; Jensen, Karsten H.; Desilets, Darin; Zreda, Marek; Bogena, Heye R.; Looms, Majken C.

    2017-04-01

    Cosmic-ray neutron intensity is inversely correlated to all hydrogen present in the upper decimeters of the subsurface and the first few hectometers of the atmosphere above the ground surface. This correlation forms the base of the cosmic-ray neutron soil moisture estimation method. The method is, however, complicated by the fact that several hydrogen pools other than soil moisture affect the neutron intensity. In order to improve the cosmic-ray neutron soil moisture estimation method and explore the potential for additional applications, knowledge about the environmental effect on cosmic-ray neutron intensity is essential (e.g., the effect of vegetation, litter layer and soil type). In this study the environmental effect is examined by performing a sensitivity analysis using neutron transport modeling. We use a neutron transport model with various representations of the forest and different parameters describing the subsurface to match measured height profiles and time series of thermal and epithermal neutron intensities at a field site in Denmark. Overall, modeled thermal and epithermal neutron intensities are in satisfactory agreement with measurements; however, the choice of forest canopy conceptualization is found to be significant. Modeling results show that the effect of canopy interception, soil chemistry and dry bulk density of litter and mineral soil on neutron intensity is small. On the other hand, the neutron intensity decreases significantly with added litter-layer thickness, especially for epithermal neutron energies. Forest biomass also has a significant influence on the neutron intensity height profiles at the examined field site, altering both the shape of the profiles and the ground-level thermal-to-epithermal neutron ratio. This ratio increases with increasing amounts of biomass, and was confirmed by measurements from three sites representing agricultural, heathland and forest land cover. A much smaller effect of canopy interception on the ground

  11. 2-d chemical sampling of a tropopause fold over the Mediterranean: Observations by the IR limb-imager GLORIA and calculations by chemistry-transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sören; Friedl-Vallon, Felix; Höpfner, Michael; Ungermann, Jörn; Vogel, Bärbel; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Müller, Rolf; Diekmann, Christopher; Schröter, Jennifer; Ruhnke, Roland; Orphal, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    We will present results from measurements obtained by the GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere) instrument that has been operated on the Geophysica research aircraft during a field campaign within the European StratoClim project in the Mediterranean area with basis in Kalamata, Greece, in September 2016. The flight at an altitude of 18 km (400 K) reached the eastern Mediterranean south of Cyprus, where air influence by the Asian Monsoon was sampled. We will show retrievals of two-dimensional trace-gas distributions derived from GLORIA observations performed with high spectral resolution. Targeted gases are, amongst others, O3 and HNO3 as stratospheric tracers and PAN and C2H6 as pollution indicators. We will present an analysis of retrieval performance including diagnostics of spatial resolution and an estimated error budget. For a first scientific analysis, comparisons to atmospheric model simulations from two atmospheric chemistry-transport models, ICON-ART (ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic model - Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) and CLaMS (Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere) will be discussed. Focus will be on comparisons of the distribution of the trace gases measured by GLORIA to the model tracers indicating the chemical composition as well as well as the air mass origin. Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 603557

  12. Oxygen transport pathways in Ruddlesden–Popper structured oxides revealed via in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-09-21

    Ruddlesden-Popper structured oxides, general form An+1BnO3n+1, consist of n-layers of the perovskite structure stacked in between rock-salt layers, and have potential application in solid oxide electrochemical cells and ion transport membrane reactors. Three materials with constant Co/Fe ratio, LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2), and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3) were synthesized and studied via in situ neutron powder diffraction between 765 K and 1070 K at a pO2 of 10-1 atm. Then, the structures were fit to a tetragonal I4/mmm space group, and were found to have increased total oxygen vacancy concentration in the order La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ > LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ > LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ, following the trend predicted for charge compensation upon increasing Sr2+/La3+ ratio. The oxygen vacancies within the material were almost exclusively located within the perovskite layers for all of the crystal structures with only minimal vacancy formation in the rock-salt layer. Finally, analysis of the concentration of these vacancies at each distinct crystallographic site and the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters for the oxygen sites reveals potential preferred oxygen transport pathways through the perovskite layers.

  13. Effect of dietary calcium and 1,25-(OH)2D3 on the expression of calcium transport genes in calbindin-D9k and -D28k double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Oh, Goo Taeg; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2009-02-06

    The phenotypes of calbindin-D9k (CaBP-9k) and -28k (CaBP-28k) single knockout (KO) mice are similar to wild-type (WT) mice due to the compensatory action of other calcium transport proteins. In this study, we generated CaBP-9k/CaBP-28k double knockout (DKO) mice in order to investigate the importance of CaBP-9k and CaBP-28k in active calcium processing. Under normal dietary conditions, DKO mice did not exhibit any changes in phenotype or the expression of active calcium transport genes as compared to WT or CaBP-28k KO mice. Under calcium-deficient dietary conditions, the phenotype and expression of calcium transport genes in CaBP-28k KO mice were similar to WT, whereas in DKO mice, serum calcium levels and bone length were decreased. The intestinal and renal expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid member 6 (TRPV6) mRNA was significantly decreased in DKO mice fed a calcium-deficient diet as compared to CaBP-28k KO or WT mice, and DKO mice died after 4 weeks on a calcium-deficient diet. Body weight, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone length were significantly reduced in all mice fed a calcium and 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3)-deficient diet, as compared to a normal diet, and none of the mice survived more than 4 weeks. These results indicate that deletion of CaBP-28k alone does not affect body calcium homeostasis, but that deletion of CaBP-9k and CaBP-28k has a significant effect on calcium processing under calcium-deficient conditions, confirming the importance of dietary calcium and 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) during growth and development.

  14. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sarah A; Uhoya, Walter O; Tsoi, Georgiy M; Wenger, Lowell E; Vohra, Yogesh K; Chesnut, Gary N; Weir, Samuel T; Tulk, Christopher A; dos Santos, Antonio M

    2012-05-30

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Néel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa(-1) up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  15. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah; Uhoya, Walter; Tsoi, Georgiy; Wenger, Lowell E; Vohra, Yogesh; Chesnut, Gary Neal; Weir, S. T.; Tulk, Christopher A; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2012-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Neel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa(-1) up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  16. Determination of the end state of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident using neutron transport analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bandini, B.R.; Baratta, A.J. ); Fricke, V.R. )

    1988-06-01

    Since the March 1979 accident, the source range monitors (SRMs) at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) have been reading several orders of magnitude higher than would be expected in a normal shutdown core. A study in which these anomalous SRM readings are analyzed and the cause determined is reported. Here, the DOT 4.3 two-dimensional transport code was used to simulate the SRM response and the response of an axial string of solid-state track recorders by modeling the neutronics of the damaged TMI-2 core. This modeling has indicated the presence of -- 10 tonnes of fuel material in the lower vessel plenum, a condition that was subsequently verified by direct observation. The computational model, the method of cross-section preparation, and an analysis of the various core neutron sources are described, as well as the results obtained from this effort.

  17. Nodal collocation approximation for the multidimensional PL equations applied to transport source problems

    SciTech Connect

    Verdu, G.; Capilla, M.; Talavera, C. F.; Ginestar, D.

    2012-07-01

    PL equations are classical high order approximations to the transport equations which are based on the expansion of the angular dependence of the angular neutron flux and the nuclear cross sections in terms of spherical harmonics. A nodal collocation method is used to discretize the PL equations associated with a neutron source transport problem. The performance of the method is tested solving two 1D problems with analytical solution for the transport equation and a classical 2D problem. (authors)

  18. Visualization of Root Water Uptake: Quantification of Deuterated Water Transport in Roots Using Neutron Radiography and Numerical Modeling[C

    PubMed Central

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kroener, Eva; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure water fluxes in soil and plants. Here, we describe a new method to noninvasively quantify water fluxes in roots. To this end, neutron radiography was used to trace the transport of deuterated water (D2O) into roots. The results showed that (1) the radial transport of D2O from soil to the roots depended similarly on diffusive and convective transport and (2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To quantify the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we introduced a convection-diffusion model to simulate the D2O transport in roots. The model takes into account different pathways of water across the root tissue, the endodermis as a layer with distinct transport properties, and the axial transport of D2O in the xylem. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modeling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots. For a 24-d-old lupine (Lupinus albus) grown in a soil with uniform water content, root water uptake was higher in the proximal parts of lateral roots and decreased toward the distal parts. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along the root systems. PMID:25189533

  19. Improvement of the 2D/1D Method in MPACT Using the Sub-Plane Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Aaron M; Collins, Benjamin S; Downar, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Michigan are jointly developing the MPACTcode to be the primary neutron transport code for the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA). To solve the transport equation, MPACT uses the 2D/1D method, which decomposes the problem into a stack of 2D planes that are then coupled with a 1D axial calculation. MPACT uses the Method of Characteristics for the 2D transport calculations and P3 for the 1D axial calculations, then accelerates the solution using the 3D Coarse mesh Finite Dierence (CMFD) method. Increasing the number of 2D MOC planes will increase the accuracy of the alculation, but will increase the computational burden of the calculations and can cause slow convergence or instability. To prevent these problems while maintaining accuracy, the sub-plane scheme has been implemented in MPACT. This method sub-divides the MOC planes into sub-planes, refining the 1D P3 and 3D CMFD calculations without increasing the number of 2D MOC planes. To test the sub-plane scheme, three of the VERA Progression Problems were selected: Problem 3, a single assembly problem; Problem 4, a 3x3 assembly problem with control rods and pyrex burnable poisons; and Problem 5, a quarter core problem. These three problems demonstrated that the sub-plane scheme can accurately produce intra-plane axial flux profiles that preserve the accuracy of the fine mesh solution. The eigenvalue dierences are negligibly small, and dierences in 3D power distributions are less than 0.1% for realistic axial meshes. Furthermore, the convergence behavior with the sub-plane scheme compares favorably with the conventional 2D/1D method, and the computational expense is decreased for all calculations due to the reduction in expensive MOC calculations.

  20. An analytical discrete ordinates solution for a nodal model of a two-dimensional neutron transport problem

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, J. F. P.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, an analytical discrete ordinates method is used to solve a nodal formulation of a neutron transport problem in x, y-geometry. The proposed approach leads to an important reduction in the order of the associated eigenvalue systems, when combined with the classical level symmetric quadrature scheme. Auxiliary equations are proposed, as usually required for nodal methods, to express the unknown fluxes at the boundary introduced as additional unknowns in the integrated equations. Numerical results, for the problem defined by a two-dimensional region with a spatially constant and isotropically emitting source, are presented and compared with those available in the literature. (authors)

  1. Transport analysis of measured neutron leakage spectra from spheres as tests of evaluated high energy cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, D. D.; Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.

    1973-01-01

    Integral tests of evaluated ENDF/B high-energy cross sections have been made by comparing measured and calculated neutron leakage flux spectra from spheres of various materials. An Am-Be (alpha,n) source was used to provide fast neutrons at the center of the test spheres of Be, CH2, Pb, Nb, Mo, Ta, and W. The absolute leakage flux spectra were measured in the energy range 0.5 to 12 MeV using a calibrated NE213 liquid scintillator neutron spectrometer. Absolute calculations of the spectra were made using version 3 ENDF/B cross sections and an S sub n discrete ordinates multigroup transport code. Generally excellent agreement was obtained for Be, CH2, Pb, and Mo, and good agreement was observed for Nb although discrepancies were observed for some energy ranges. Poor comparative results, obtained for Ta and W, are attributed to unsatisfactory nonelastic cross sections. The experimental sphere leakage flux spectra are tabulated and serve as possible benchmarks for these elements against which reevaluated cross sections may be tested.

  2. The effect of biological shielding on fast neutron and photon transport in the VVER-1000 mock-up model placed in the LR-0 reactor.

    PubMed

    Košťál, Michal; Cvachovec, František; Milčák, Ján; Mravec, Filip

    2013-05-01

    The paper is intended to show the effect of a biological shielding simulator on fast neutron and photon transport in its vicinity. The fast neutron and photon fluxes were measured by means of scintillation spectroscopy using a 45×45 mm(2) and a 10×10 mm(2) cylindrical stilbene detector. The neutron spectrum was measured in the range of 0.6-10 MeV and the photon spectrum in 0.2-9 MeV. The results of the experiment are compared with calculations. The calculations were performed with various nuclear data libraries.

  3. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    White, Morgan C.

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second, the ability to

  4. Boronophenylalanine, a boron delivery agent for boron neutron capture therapy, is transported by ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2.

    PubMed

    Wongthai, Printip; Hagiwara, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Wei, Ling; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kato, Itsuro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2015-03-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy relies on the selective delivery of boron carriers to malignant cells. p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA), a boron delivery agent, has been proposed to be localized to cells through transporter-mediated mechanisms. In this study, we screened aromatic amino acid transporters to identify BPA transporters. Human aromatic amino acid transporters were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined for BPA uptake and kinetic parameters. The roles of the transporters in BPA uptake were characterized in cancer cell lines. For the quantitative assessment of BPA uptake, HPLC was used throughout the study. Among aromatic amino acid transporters, ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 were found to transport BPA with Km values of 137.4 ± 11.7, 20.3 ± 0.8 and 88.3 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Uptake experiments in cancer cell lines revealed that the LAT1 protein amount was the major determinant of BPA uptake at 100 μM, whereas the contribution of ATB(0,+) became significant at 1000 μM, accounting for 20-25% of the total BPA uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 transport BPA at affinities comparable with their endogenous substrates, suggesting that they could mediate effective BPA uptake in vivo. The high and low affinities of LAT1 and ATB(0,+), respectively, differentiate their roles in BPA uptake. ATB(0,+), as well as LAT1, could contribute significantly to the tumor accumulation of BPA at clinical dose.

  5. 2D- and 3D-QSAR studies of a series of benzopyranes and benzopyrano[3,4b][1,4]-oxazines as inhibitors of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabeen, Ishrat; Wetwitayaklung, Penpun; Chiba, Peter; Pastor, Manuel; Ecker, Gerhard F.

    2013-02-01

    The ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is notorious for contributing to multidrug resistance in antitumor therapy. Due to its expression in many blood-organ barriers, it also influences the pharmacokinetics of drugs and drug candidates and is involved in drug/drug- and drug/nutrient interactions. However, due to lack of structural information the molecular basis of ligand/transporter interaction still needs to be elucidated. Towards this goal, a series of Benzopyranes and Benzopyrano[3,4b][1,4]oxazines have been synthesized and pharmacologically tested for their ability to inhibit P-gp mediated daunomycin efflux. Both quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models using simple physicochemical and novel GRID-independent molecular descriptors (GRIND) were established to shed light on the structural requirements for high P-gp inhibitory activity. The results from 2D-QSAR showed a linear correlation of vdW surface area (Å2) of hydrophobic atoms with the pharmacological activity. GRIND (3D-QSAR) studies allowed to identify important mutual distances between pharmacophoric features, which include one H-bond donor, two H-bond acceptors and two hydrophobic groups as well as their distances from different steric hot spots of the molecules. Activity of the compounds particularly increases with increase of the distance of an H-bond donor or a hydrophobic feature from a particular steric hot spot of the benzopyrane analogs.

  6. Numerical solution of the equation of neutrons transport on plane geometry by analytical schemes using acceleration by synthetic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Vargas, G.

    A computer program has been developed which uses a technique of synthetic acceleration by diffusion by analytical schemes. Both in the diffusion equation as in that of transport, analytical schemes were used which allowed a substantial time saving in the number of iterations required by source iteration method to obtain the K(sub e)ff. The program developed ASD (Synthetic Diffusion Acceleration) by diffusion was written in FORTRAN and can be executed on a personal computer with a hard disc and mathematical O-processor. The program is unlimited as to the number of regions and energy groups. The results obtained by the ASD program for K(sub e)ff is nearly completely concordant with those obtained by utilizing the ANISN-PC code for different analytical type problems in this work. The ASD program allowed obtention of an approximate solution of the neutron transport equation with a relatively low number of internal reiterations with good precision. One of its applications would be in the direct determinations of axial distribution neutronic flow in a fuel assembly as well as in the obtention of the effective multiplication factor.

  7. The coupling of the neutron transport application RATTLESNAKE to the nuclear fuels performance application BISON under the MOOSE framework

    SciTech Connect

    Gleicher, Frederick N.; Williamson, Richard L.; Ortensi, Javier; Wang, Yaqi; Spencer, Benjamin W.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Hales, Jason D.; Martineau, Richard C.

    2014-10-01

    The MOOSE neutron transport application RATTLESNAKE was coupled to the fuels performance application BISON to provide a higher fidelity tool for fuel performance simulation. This project is motivated by the desire to couple a high fidelity core analysis program (based on the self-adjoint angular flux equations) to a high fidelity fuel performance program, both of which can simulate on unstructured meshes. RATTLESNAKE solves self-adjoint angular flux transport equation and provides a sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux with resonance treatment during burnup or a fast transient. BISON solves the coupled thermomechanical equations for the fuel on a sub-millimeter scale. Both applications are able to solve their respective systems on aligned and unaligned unstructured finite element meshes. The power density and local burnup was transferred from RATTLESNAKE to BISON with the MOOSE Multiapp transfer system. Multiple depletion cases were run with one-way data transfer from RATTLESNAKE to BISON. The eigenvalues are shown to agree well with values obtained from the lattice physics code DRAGON. The one-way data transfer of power density is shown to agree with the power density obtained from an internal Lassman-style model in BISON.

  8. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  9. 3-D Deep Penetration Neutron Imaging of Thick Absorgin and Diffusive Objects Using Transport Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ragusa, Jean; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    here explores the inverse problem of optical tomography applied to heterogeneous domains. The neutral particle transport equation was used as the forward model for how neutral particles stream through and interact within these heterogeneous domains. A constrained optimization technique that uses Newtons method served as the basis of the inverse problem. Optical tomography aims at reconstructing the material properties using (a) illuminating sources and (b) detector readings. However, accurate simulations for radiation transport require that the particle (gamma and/or neutron) energy be appropriate discretize in the multigroup approximation. This, in turns, yields optical tomography problems where the number of unknowns grows (1) about quadratically with respect to the number of energy groups, G, (notably to reconstruct the scattering matrix) and (2) linearly with respect to the number of unknown material regions. As pointed out, a promising approach could rely on algorithms to appropriately select a material type per material zone rather than G2 values. This approach, though promising, still requires further investigation: (a) when switching from cross-section values unknowns to material type indices (discrete integer unknowns), integer programming techniques are needed since derivative information is no longer available; and (b) the issue of selecting the initial material zoning remains. The work reported here proposes an approach to solve the latter item, whereby a material zoning is proposed using one-group or few-groups transport approximations. The capabilities and limitations of the presented method were explored; they are briefly summarized next and later described in fuller details in the Appendices. The major factors that influenced the ability of the optimization method to reconstruct the cross sections of these domains included the locations of the sources used to illuminate the domains, the number of separate experiments used in the reconstruction, the

  10. Visualization of root water uptake: quantification of deuterated water transport in roots using neutron radiography and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kroener, Eva; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure water fluxes in soil and plants. Here, we describe a new method to noninvasively quantify water fluxes in roots. To this end, neutron radiography was used to trace the transport of deuterated water (D2O) into roots. The results showed that (1) the radial transport of D2O from soil to the roots depended similarly on diffusive and convective transport and (2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To quantify the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we introduced a convection-diffusion model to simulate the D2O transport in roots. The model takes into account different pathways of water across the root tissue, the endodermis as a layer with distinct transport properties, and the axial transport of D2O in the xylem. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modeling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots. For a 24-d-old lupine (Lupinus albus) grown in a soil with uniform water content, root water uptake was higher in the proximal parts of lateral roots and decreased toward the distal parts. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along the root systems. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. FASTER 3: A generalized-geometry Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    The theory used in FASTER-III, a Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in complex geometries, is outlined. The program includes the treatment of geometric regions bounded by quadratic and quadric surfaces with multiple radiation sources which have specified space, angle, and energy dependence. The program calculates, using importance sampling, the resulting number and energy fluxes at specified point, surface, and volume detectors. It can also calculate minimum weight shield configuration meeting a specified dose rate constraint. Results are presented for sample problems involving primary neutron, and primary and secondary photon, transport in a spherical reactor shield configuration.

  12. A 2-D/1-D transverse leakage approximation based on azimuthal, Fourier moments

    DOE PAGES

    Stimpson, Shane G.; Collins, Benjamin S.; Downar, Thomas

    2017-01-12

    Here, the MPACT code being developed collaboratively by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Michigan is the primary deterministic neutron transport solver within the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator (VERA-CS). In MPACT, the two-dimensional (2-D)/one-dimensional (1-D) scheme is the most commonly used method for solving neutron transport-based three-dimensional nuclear reactor core physics problems. Several axial solvers in this scheme assume isotropic transverse leakages, but work with the axial SN solver has extended these leakages to include both polar and azimuthal dependence. However, explicit angular representation can be burdensome for run-time and memory requirements. The work heremore » alleviates this burden by assuming that the azimuthal dependence of the angular flux and transverse leakages are represented by a Fourier series expansion. At the heart of this is a new axial SN solver that takes in a Fourier expanded radial transverse leakage and generates the angular fluxes used to construct the axial transverse leakages used in the 2-D-Method of Characteristics calculations.« less

  13. Li+ transport in poly(ethylene oxide) based electrolytes: neutron scattering, dielectric spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Do, Changwoo; Lunkenheimer, Peter; Diddens, Diddo; Götz, Marion; Weiss, Matthias; Loidl, Alois; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Allgaier, Jürgen; Ohl, Michael

    2013-07-05

    The dynamics of Li(+) transport in polyethylene oxide (PEO) and lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imde mixtures are investigated by combining neutron spin-echo (NSE) and dielectric spectroscopy with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results are summarized in a relaxation time map covering wide ranges of temperature and time. The temperature dependence of the dc conductivity and the dielectric α relaxation time is found to be identical, indicating a strong coupling between both. The relaxation times obtained from the NSE measurements at 0.05 Å(-1)transportation process is shown in which the PEO chain forms EO cages over several monomer units and the Li ion "jump" from cage to cage. The role of the backbone of the polymer is discussed and contributes signifcantly to the Li ion transportation process. Moreover, detailed characteristic length and time scales of the Li(+) transport process in this polymer electrolyte are identified and interpreted.

  14. Modelling of the non-stationary thermal neutron transport in hydrogenous media using the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, Urszula

    2006-06-01

    The work is aimed to compare results of the Monte Carlo simulations of pulsed neutron experiments with results of real experiments. The simulations have been performed for homogenous and two-zone system. In the first case the cylinder of Plexiglas has been used. In two-zone systems, Plexiglas has been used as an outer moderator and aqueous solutions of H 3BO 3 or KCl of known concentrations have been used as the inner samples. The simulations have been performed (1) using for neutron scattering in Plexiglas a standard library for H in polyethylene (a commonly suggested way) and (2) using a modification of this library. The modification gives very good agreement between simulations and experimental results.

  15. Innovative and Advanced Coupled Neutron Transport and Thermal Hydraulic Method (Tool) for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of VHTR/NGNP Prismatic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rahnema, Farzad; Garimeela, Srinivas; Ougouag, Abderrafi; Zhang, Dingkang

    2013-11-29

    This project will develop a 3D, advanced coarse mesh transport method (COMET-Hex) for steady- state and transient analyses in advanced very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). The project will lead to a coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulic (T/H) core simulation tool with fuel depletion capability. The computational tool will be developed in hexagonal geometry, based solely on transport theory without (spatial) homogenization in complicated 3D geometries. In addition to the hexagonal geometry extension, collaborators will concurrently develop three additional capabilities to increase the code’s versatility as an advanced and robust core simulator for VHTRs. First, the project team will develop and implement a depletion method within the core simulator. Second, the team will develop an elementary (proof-of-concept) 1D time-dependent transport method for efficient transient analyses. The third capability will be a thermal hydraulic method coupled to the neutronics transport module for VHTRs. Current advancements in reactor core design are pushing VHTRs toward greater core and fuel heterogeneity to pursue higher burn-ups, efficiently transmute used fuel, maximize energy production, and improve plant economics and safety. As a result, an accurate and efficient neutron transport, with capabilities to treat heterogeneous burnable poison effects, is highly desirable for predicting VHTR neutronics performance. This research project’s primary objective is to advance the state of the art for reactor analysis.

  16. Determination of neutron flux distribution by using ANISN, a one-dimensional discrete S sub n ordinates transport code with anisotropic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghorai, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use a one-dimensional discrete coordinates transport code called ANISN in order to determine the energy-angle-spatial distribution of neutrons in a 6-feet cube rock box which houses a D-T neutron generator at its center. The project was two-fold. The first phase of the project involved adaptation of the ANISN code written for an IBM 360/75/91 computer to the UNIVAC system at JSC. The second phase of the project was to use the code with proper geometry, source function and rock material composition in order to determine the neutron flux distribution around the rock box when a 14.1 MeV neutron generator placed at its center is activated.

  17. Fast Neutron Transport in the Biological Shielding Model and Other Regions of the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košťál, Michal; Milčák, Ján; Cvachovec, František; Jánský, Bohumil; Rypar, Vojtěch; Juříček, Vlastimil; Novák, Evžen; Egorov, Alexander; Zaritskiy, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    A set of benchmark experiments was carried out in the full scale VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0 in order to validate neutron transport calculation methodologies and to perform the optimization of the shape and locations of neutron flux operation monitors channels inside the shielding of the new VVER-1000 type reactors. Compared with previous experiments on the VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0, the fast neutron spectra were measured in the extended neutron energy interval (0.1-10 MeV) and new calculations were carried out with the MCNPX code using various nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B VII.0, JEFF 3.1, JENDL 3.3, JENDL 4, ROSFOND 2009, and CENDL 3.1). Measurements and calculations were carried out at different points in the mock-up. The calculation and experimental data are compared.

  18. Neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of neutron detection and measurement are discussed. Topics include sources of neutrons, neutrons in medicine, interactions of neutrons with matter, neutron shielding, neutron measurement units, measurement methods, and neutron spectroscopy. (ACR)

  19. Application of 3-dimensional radiation transport codes to the analysis of the CRBR prototypic coolant pipe chaseway neutron streaming experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatani, K. )

    1992-08-01

    This report summarizes the calculational results from analyses of a Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) prototypic coolant pipe chaseway neutron streaming experiment Comparisons of calculated and measured results are presented, major emphasis being placed on results at bends in the chaseway. Calculations were performed with three three-dimensional radiation transport codes: the discrete ordinates code TORT and the Monte Carlo code MORSE, both developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the discrete ordinates code ENSEMBLE, developed by Japan. The calculated results from the three codes are compared (1) with previously-calculated DOT3.5 two-dimensional results, (2) among themselves, and (3) with measured results. Calculations with TORT used both the weighted-difference and nodal methods. Only the weighted-difference method was used in ENSEMBLE. When the calculated results were compared to measured results, it was found that calculation-to-experiment (C/E) ratios were good in the regions of the chaseway where two-dimensional modeling might be difficult and where there were no significant discrete ordinates ray effects. Excellent agreement was observed for responses dominated by thermal neutron contributions. MORSE-calculated results and comparisons are described also, and detailed results are presented in an appendix.

  20. General Purpose Monte Carlo Codes for Neutron and Photon Transport Calculations based on Continuous Energy and Multigroup Methods.

    SciTech Connect

    NAGAYA, YASANOBU

    2008-02-29

    Version 00 (1) Problems to be solved: MVP/GMVP II can solve eigenvalue and fixed-source problems. The multigroup code GMVP can solve forward and adjoint problems for neutron, photon and neutron-photon coupled transport. The continuous-energy code MVP can solve only the forward problems. Both codes can also perform time-dependent calculations. (2) Geometry description: MVP/GMVP employs combinatorial geometry to describe the calculation geometry. It describes spatial regions by the combination of the 3-dimensional objects (BODIes). Currently, the following objects (BODIes) can be used. - BODIes with linear surfaces : half space, parallelepiped, right parallelepiped, wedge, right hexagonal prism - BODIes with quadratic surface and linear surfaces : cylinder, sphere, truncated right cone, truncated elliptic cone, ellipsoid by rotation, general ellipsoid - Arbitrary quadratic surface and torus The rectangular and hexagonal lattice geometry can be used to describe the repeated geometry. Furthermore, the statistical geometry model is available to treat coated fuel particles or pebbles for high temperature reactors. (3) Particle sources: The various forms of energy-, angle-, space- and time-dependent distribution functions can be specified. See Abstract for more detail.

  1. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; ...

    2013-06-11

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The temperature of this ferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 240 K at ambient pressure at a rate of –16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of ferromagnetic order is suppressed. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function ofmore » pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 K to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the ferromagnetic ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. Furthermore, a change in ferromagnetic ordering as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure to an α-Sm type structure at high pressures.« less

  2. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah; Montgomery, Jeffrey M; Tsoi, Georgiy; Vohra, Yogesh; Chesnut, Gary Neal; Weir, S. T.; Tulk, Christopher A; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2013-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare-earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic (FM) order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the FM Curie temperature. The temperature of this FM transition decreases at a rate of-16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of FM order is suppressed. The neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the FM ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. A disappearance of FM ordering was observed as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa and is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed structure to an -Sm-type structure at high pressures.

  3. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Chesnut, Gary N.; Weir, Samuel T.; Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.

    2013-06-11

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The temperature of this ferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 240 K at ambient pressure at a rate of –16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of ferromagnetic order is suppressed. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 K to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the ferromagnetic ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. Furthermore, a change in ferromagnetic ordering as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure to an α-Sm type structure at high pressures.

  4. Neutron-neutron and neutron-photon correlations with FREYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R.; Randrup, J.

    2017-09-01

    For many years, the state of the art for modeling fission in radiation transport codes has involved sampling from average distributions. However, in a true fission event, the energies, momenta and multiplicities of emitted particles are correlated. The FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) code generates complete fission events. Event-by-event techniques such as those of FREYA are particularly useful because it is possible to obtain complete kinematic information on the prompt neutrons and photons emitted during the fission process. It is therefore possible to extract any desired correlation observables. We describe FREYA and compare our results with neutron-neutron, neutron-light fragment and neutron-photon correlation data.

  5. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, Elliott D; Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Mosher, Scott W; Grove, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).

  6. A posteriori error estimators for the discrete ordinates approximation of the one-speed neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, S.; Azmy, Y. Y.

    2013-07-01

    When calculating numerical solutions of the neutron transport equation it is important to have a measure of the accuracy of the solution. As the true solution is generally not known, a suitable estimation of the error must be made. The steady state transport equation possesses discretization errors in all its independent variables: angle, energy and space. In this work only spatial discretization errors are considered. An exact transport solution, in which the degree of regularity of the exact flux across the singular characteristic is controlled, is manufactured to determine the numerical solutions true discretization error. This solution is then projected onto a Legendre polynomial space in order to form an exact solution on the same basis space as the numerical solution, Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method (DGFEM), to enable computation of the true error. Over a series of test problems the true error is compared to the error estimated by: Ragusa and Wang (RW), residual source (LER) and cell discontinuity estimators (JD). The validity and accuracy of the considered estimators are primarily assessed by considering the effectivity index and global L2 norm of the error. In general RW excels at approximating the true error distribution but usually under-estimates its magnitude; the LER estimator emulates the true error distribution but frequently over-estimates the magnitude of the true error; the JD estimator poorly captures the true error distribution and generally under-estimates the error about singular characteristics but over-estimates it elsewhere. (authors)

  7. TART 2000: A Coupled Neutron-Photon, 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry, Time Dependent, Monte Carlo Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E

    2000-11-22

    TART2000 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input Preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART2000 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART2000 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART2000 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART2000 and its data files.

  8. TART98 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry time dependent Monte Carlo Transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D E

    1998-11-22

    TART98 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART98 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART98 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART98 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART98 and its data files.

  9. Performance tests on PNL`s transportable neutron/gamma waste assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, D.L.; Davidson, D.; Lemons, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, in conjunction with Canberra Industries, has implemented a 55-gallon drum waste assay system. The single system unit consists of a combined segmented gamma assay system and a neutron assay system. The unit is designed to function either in the laboratory or in a mobile trailer. The system is on wheels and can be moved through standard double doors. The gamma system uses an HPGe detector with a Se-75 source for transmission corrections. The neutron detector uses 40 He-3 detectors connected to a JSR-12 neutron coincidence counter. The system`s software is unique and is interactive with the user; it features a menu driven operator screen from which all functions regarding operations and calibrations can be selected. Single or combined assays with various setups, including containers smaller than 55 gallons, may be performed. The software and analysis is designed for unknown waste contents, but allows input of waste stream information prior to assay. The system was originally designed for safeguards` MC&A requirements and has enough sensitivity to determine whether a drum is TRU or LLW in one assay pass. Typical counting times are approximately 1800 seconds for a dual pass. Preliminary testing of the system with the available Pu standards has shown the system will perform to the required levels stated in the Data Quality Objectives of the WIPP Performance Demonstration program. An overall study of the system is underway to determine the lower limit of detection (LLD) for different isotopes, to best utilize the combined assay results, and to apply the appropriate data corrections for more complete answers, such as corrections for the end effects. Results from these developments will be presented at the conference.

  10. Neutron/gamma coupled library generation and gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, S. G.; Kim, K. S.; Cho, J. Y.; Lee, K. H.

    2012-07-01

    KAERI has developed a lattice transport calculation code KARMA and its multi-group cross section library generation system. Recently, the multi-group cross section library generation system has included a gamma cross section generation capability and KARMA also has been improved to include a gamma transport calculation module. This paper addresses the multi-group gamma cross section generation capability for the KARMA 1.2 code and the preliminary test results of the KARMA 1.2 gamma transport calculations. The gamma transport calculation with KARMA 1.2 gives the gamma flux, gamma smeared power, and gamma energy deposition distributions. The results of the KARMA gamma calculations were compared with those of HELIOS and they showed that KARMA 1.2 gives reasonable gamma transport calculation results. (authors)

  11. Analytical Tests for Ray Effect Errors in Discrete Ordinate Methods for Solving the Neutron Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B

    2004-03-22

    This paper contains three analytical solutions of transport problems which can be used to test ray-effect errors in the numerical solutions of the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). We derived the first two solutions and the third was shown to us by M. Prasad. Since this paper is intended to be an internal LLNL report, no attempt was made to find the original derivations of the solutions in the literature in order to cite the authors for their work.

  12. Developing Sediment Transport and Dredging Prediction Model of Ohio River at Olmsted Locks and Dams Area using HEC-RAS (1D/2D)By Ganesh Raj Ghimire1 and Bruce A. Devantier 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment deposition is a serious issue in the construction and operation of large reservoir and inland navigation projects in the United States and around the world. Olmsted Locks and Dams in the Ohio River navigation system is facing similar challenges of huge sediment deposition during the ongoing in-wet construction methodology since 1993. HEC-RAS 5.0 integrated with ArcGIS, will be used to yield unsteady 2D hydrodynamic model of Ohio River at Olmsted area. Velocity, suspended sediment, bed sediment and hydrographic survey data acquired from public archives of USGS and USACE Louisville District will be input into the model. Calibration and validation of model will be performed against the measured stage, flow and velocity data. It will be subjected to completely unsteady 1D sediment transport modeling new to HEC-RAS 5.0 which incorporates sediment load and bed gradation via a DSS file, commercial dredging and BSTEM model. Sediment model will be calibrated to replicate the historical bed volume changes. Excavated cross-sections at Olmsted area will also be used to predict the sediment volume trapped inside the ditch over the period between excavations and placement of dam shells at site. Model will attempt to replicate historical dredging volume data and compare with the deposition volume from simulation model to formulate the dredging prediction model. Hence, the results of this research will generate a model that can form a basis for scheduling the dredging event prior to the placement of off-shore cast shells replacing the current as and when required approach of dredging plan. 1 Graduate Student, Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois, 62901-6603 2 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois, 62901-6603

  13. Multi-core performance studies of a Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, A. R.; Smith, K.; Romano, P. K.; Forget, B.; Felker, K. G.

    2013-07-14

    Performance results are presented for a multi-threaded version of the OpenMC Monte Carlo neutronics code using OpenMP in the context of nuclear reactor criticality calculations. Our main interest is production computing, and thus we limit our approach to threading strategies that both require reasonable levels of development effort and preserve the code features necessary for robust application to real-world reactor problems. Several approaches are developed and the results compared on several multi-core platforms using a popular reactor physics benchmark. A broad range of performance studies are distilled into a simple, consistent picture of the empirical performance characteristics of reactor Monte Carlo algorithms on current multi-core architectures.

  14. Neutron transport-burnup code MCORGS and its application in fusion fission hybrid blanket conceptual research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xue-Ming; Peng, Xian-Jue

    2016-09-01

    Fusion science and technology has made progress in the last decades. However, commercialization of fusion reactors still faces challenges relating to higher fusion energy gain, irradiation-resistant material, and tritium self-sufficiency. Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactors (FFHR) can be introduced to accelerate the early application of fusion energy. Traditionally, FFHRs have been classified as either breeders or transmuters. Both need partition of plutonium from spent fuel, which will pose nuclear proliferation risks. A conceptual design of a Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactor for Energy (FFHR-E), which can make full use of natural uranium with lower nuclear proliferation risk, is presented. The fusion core parameters are similar to those of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. An alloy of natural uranium and zirconium is adopted in the fission blanket, which is cooled by light water. In order to model blanket burnup problems, a linkage code MCORGS, which couples MCNP4B and ORIGEN-S, is developed and validated through several typical benchmarks. The average blanket energy Multiplication and Tritium Breeding Ratio can be maintained at 10 and 1.15 respectively over tens of years of continuous irradiation. If simple reprocessing without separation of plutonium from uranium is adopted every few years, FFHR-E can achieve better neutronic performance. MCORGS has also been used to analyze the ultra-deep burnup model of Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) from LLNL, and a new blanket design that uses Pb instead of Be as the neutron multiplier is proposed. In addition, MCORGS has been used to simulate the fluid transmuter model of the In-Zinerater from Sandia. A brief comparison of LIFE, In-Zinerater, and FFHR-E will be given.

  15. Performance and accuracy of criticality calculations performed using WARP – A framework for continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport in general 3D geometries on GPUs

    DOE PAGES

    Bergmann, Ryan M.; Rowland, Kelly L.; Radnović, Nikola; ...

    2017-05-01

    In this companion paper to "Algorithmic Choices in WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs" (doi:10.1016/j.anucene.2014.10.039), the WARP Monte Carlo neutron transport framework for graphics processing units (GPUs) is benchmarked against production-level central processing unit (CPU) Monte Carlo neutron transport codes for both performance and accuracy. We compare neutron flux spectra, multiplication factors, runtimes, speedup factors, and costs of various GPU and CPU platforms running either WARP, Serpent 2.1.24, or MCNP 6.1. WARP compares well with the results of the production-level codes, and it is shown that on the newestmore » hardware considered, GPU platforms running WARP are between 0.8 to 7.6 times as fast as CPU platforms running production codes. Also, the GPU platforms running WARP were between 15% and 50% as expensive to purchase and between 80% to 90% as expensive to operate as equivalent CPU platforms performing at an equal simulation rate.« less

  16. Design of a high-current low-energy beam transport line for an intense D-T/D-D neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaolong; Wang, Junrun; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jianyi; Xia, Li; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Yanyan; Jiang, Bing; Huang, Zhiwu; Ma, Zhanwen; Wei, Zheng; Qian, Xiangping; Xu, Dapeng; Lan, Changlin; Yao, Zeen

    2016-03-01

    An intense D-T/D-D neutron generator is currently being developed at the Lanzhou University. The Cockcroft-Walton accelerator, as a part of the neutron generator, will be used to accelerate and transport the high-current low-energy beam from the duoplasmatron ion source to the rotating target. The design of a high-current low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line and the dynamics simulations of the mixed beam were carried out using the TRACK code. The results illustrate that the designed beam line facilitates smooth transportation of a deuteron beam of 40 mA, and the number of undesired ions can be reduced effectively using two apertures.

  17. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  18. Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

  19. Quantitative imaging of water transport in soil and roots using neutron radiography, D2O and a new numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, M.; Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is currently limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure the water fluxes in soil and plants. Our study aimed to develop a new non-destructive method to measure the local fluxes of water into roots of plants growing in soils. We injected deuterated water (D2O) near the roots of lupines growing in sandy soils, and we used neutron radiography to image the transport of D2O through the root system. The experiments were performed during day, when plants were transpiring, and at night, when transpiration was reduced. The radiographs showed that: 1) the radial transport of D2O from soil and roots depended similarly to diffusion and convection; and 2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To determine the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we simulated the D2O transport in soils and roots. A dual porosity model was used to describe the apoplastic and symplastic pathways of water across the root tissue. Other features such as the endodermis and the xylem were also included in the model. The D2O transport was modelled solving a convection-diffusion numerical model in soil and plants. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that at night the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modelling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots. For 24 day-old lupine grown in a sandy soil with uniform water content, our modelling results showed that root water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the roots near soil surface and it decreased toward the distal parts. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along root systems growing in soils. Future applications of this method include the characterization of varying root systems, the radial and axial hydraulic conductivity of different root

  20. Improving Low Order, Linear, Positive Spatial Quadratures for the Partial Current Neutron Transport Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    an integro - differential equation that is not directly solvable except in the simplest cases; therefore it requires a numerical approximation...AFIT researchers have developed a new approach to solving Discrete Ordinates equations , which approximate the linear Boltzmann Transport Equation ...linear equation . Positive, linear methods are available, but are only first-order accurate. The latter can achieve needed accuracy by using optically

  1. The use of symbolic computation in radiative, energy, and neutron transport calculations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, J.I.

    1997-09-01

    This investigation used sysmbolic manipulation in developing analytical methods and general computational strategies for solving both linear and nonlinear, regular and singular integral and integro-differential equations which appear in radiative and mixed-mode energy transport. Contained in this report are seven papers which present the technical results as individual modules.

  2. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  3. Interpolation method for the transport theory and its application in fusion-neutronics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents an interpolation method for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The method is based on a flux synthesis technique using two reference-point solutions. The equation for the interpolated solution results in a Volterra integral equation which is proved to have a unique solution. As an application of the present method, tritium breeding ratio is calculated for a typical D-T fusion reactor system. The result is compared to that of a variational technique.

  4. Updated version of the DOT 4 one- and two-dimensional neutron/photon transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, W.A.; Childs, R.L.

    1982-07-01

    DOT 4 is designed to allow very large transport problems to be solved on a wide range of computers and memory arrangements. Unusual flexibilty in both space-mesh and directional-quadrature specification is allowed. For example, the radial mesh in an R-Z problem can vary with axial position. The directional quadrature can vary with both space and energy group. Several features improve performance on both deep penetration and criticality problems. The program has been checked and used extensively.

  5. Preliminary time-of-flight neutron diffraction studies of Escherichia coli ABC transport receptor phosphate-binding protein at the Protein Crystallography Station.

    PubMed

    Sippel, K H; Bacik, J; Quiocho, F A; Fisher, S Z

    2014-06-01

    Inorganic phosphate is an essential molecule for all known life. Organisms have developed many mechanisms to ensure an adequate supply, even in low-phosphate conditions. In prokaryotes phosphate transport is instigated by the phosphate-binding protein (PBP), the initial receptor for the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) phosphate transporter. In the crystal structure of the PBP-phosphate complex, the phosphate is completely desolvated and sequestered in a deep cleft and is bound by 13 hydrogen bonds: 12 to protein NH and OH donor groups and one to a carboxylate acceptor group. The carboxylate plays a key recognition role by accepting a phosphate hydrogen. PBP phosphate affinity is relatively consistent across a broad pH range, indicating the capacity to bind monobasic (H2PO4-) and dibasic (HPO4(2-)) phosphate; however, the mechanism by which it might accommodate the second hydrogen of monobasic phosphate is unclear. To answer this question, neutron diffraction studies were initiated. Large single crystals with a volume of 8 mm3 were grown and subjected to hydrogen/deuterium exchange. A 2.5 Å resolution data set was collected on the Protein Crystallography Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Initial refinement of the neutron data shows significant nuclear density, and refinement is ongoing. This is the first report of a neutron study from this superfamily.

  6. Preliminary time-of-flight neutron diffraction studies of Escherichia coli ABC transport receptor phosphate-binding protein at the Protein Crystallography Station

    PubMed Central

    Sippel, K. H.; Bacik, J.; Quiocho, F. A.; Fisher, S. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate is an essential molecule for all known life. Organisms have developed many mechanisms to ensure an adequate supply, even in low-phosphate conditions. In prokaryotes phosphate transport is instigated by the phosphate-binding protein (PBP), the initial receptor for the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) phosphate transporter. In the crystal structure of the PBP–phosphate complex, the phosphate is completely desolvated and sequestered in a deep cleft and is bound by 13 hydrogen bonds: 12 to protein NH and OH donor groups and one to a carboxylate acceptor group. The carboxylate plays a key recognition role by accepting a phosphate hydrogen. PBP phosphate affinity is relatively consistent across a broad pH range, indicating the capacity to bind monobasic (H2PO4 −) and dibasic (HPO4 2−) phosphate; however, the mechanism by which it might accommodate the second hydrogen of monobasic phosphate is unclear. To answer this question, neutron diffraction studies were initiated. Large single crystals with a volume of 8 mm3 were grown and subjected to hydrogen/deuterium exchange. A 2.5 Å resolution data set was collected on the Protein Crystallography Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Initial refinement of the neutron data shows significant nuclear density, and refinement is ongoing. This is the first report of a neutron study from this superfamily. PMID:24915101

  7. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-07

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  8. Phonon thermal conduction in novel 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2016-12-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in phonon thermal transport in low-dimensional materials, due to the crucial importance of dissipating and managing heat in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Significant progress has been achieved for one-dimensional (1D) systems, both theoretically and experimentally. However, the study of heat conduction in two-dimensional (2D) systems is still in its infancy due to the limited availability of 2D materials and the technical challenges of fabricating suspended samples that are suitable for thermal measurements. In this review, we outline different experimental techniques and theoretical approaches for phonon thermal transport in 2D materials, discuss the problems and challenges of phonon thermal transport measurements and provide a comparison between existing experimental data. Special attention will be given to the effects of size, dimensionality, anisotropy and mode contributions in novel 2D systems, including graphene, boron nitride, MoS2, black phosphorous and silicene.

  9. Time dependent discrete ordinates neutron transport using distribution iteration in XYZ geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dishaw, James R.

    The distribution iteration (DI) algorithm, developed by Wager [32] and Prins [28], for solving the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) has proven, with further development, to be a robust alternative to von Neumann iteration on the scattering source, aka source iteration (SI). Previous work with DI was based on the time-independent form of the transport equation. In this research, the DI algorithm was (1) Improved to provide faster, more efficient, robust convergence; (2) Extended to XYZ geometry; (3) Extended to Multigroup Energy treatment; (4) Extended to solve the time-dependent form of the Boltzmann Transport Equation. The discrete ordinates equations for approximating the BTE have been solved using SI since the discrete ordinates method was developed at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory by 1953. However, SI is often inefficient by itself and requires an accelerator in order to produce results efficiently and reliably. The acceleration schemes that are in use in production codes are Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) and Transport Synthetic Acceleration (TSA). DSA is ineffective for some problems, and cannot be extended to high-performance spatial quadratures. TSA is less effective than DSA and fails for some problems. Krylov acceleration has been explored in recent years, but has many parameters that require problem-dependent tuning for efficiency and effectiveness. The DI algorithm is an alternative to source iteration that, in our testing, does not require an accelerator. I developed a formal verification plan and executed it to verify the results produced by my code that implemented DI with the above features. A new, matrix albedo, boundary condition treatment was developed and implemented so that infinite-medium benchmarks could be included in the verification test suite. The DI algorithm was modified for parallel efficiency and the prior instability of the refinement sweep was corrected. The testing revealed that DI performed as well or faster than

  10. Comparison of the 3-D Deterministic Neutron Transport Code Attila® To Measure Data, MCNP And MCNPX For The Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    D. Scott Lucas; D. S. Lucas

    2005-09-01

    An LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project is underway at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to apply the three-dimensional multi-group deterministic neutron transport code (Attila®) to criticality, flux and depletion calculations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper discusses the development of Attila models for ATR, capabilities of Attila, the generation and use of different cross-section libraries, and comparisons to ATR data, MCNP, MCNPX and future applications.

  11. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  12. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2017-02-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  13. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  14. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    and Homeland Defense. As a part of the E-2D AHE radar modernization effort, the Navy also invested in integrating a full glass cockpit and full...Communication Navigation Surveillance/Air Traffic Management capability. The glass cockpit will also provide the capability for the pilot or co-pilot to...hours at a station distance of 200nm Flat Turn Service Ceiling =>25,000 feet above MSL at mission profile =>25,000 feet above MSL at mission

  15. Flux extrapolation models used in the DOT IV discrete ordinates neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, E.T.; Rhoades, W.A.; Engle, W.W. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    The DOT IV code solves the Boltzmann transport equation in two dimensions using the method of discrete ordinates. Special techniques have been incorporated in this code to mitigate the effects of flux extrapolation error in space meshes of practical size. This report presents the flux extrapolation models as they appear in DOT IV. A sample problem is also presented to illustrate the effects of the various models on the resultant flux. Convergence of the various models to a single result as the mesh is refined is also examined. A detailed comparison with the widely used TWOTRAN II code is reported. The features which cause DOT and TWOTRAN to differ in the converged results are completely observed and explained.

  16. Whole-core neutron transport calculations without fuel-coolant homogenization

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. A.; Tsoulfanidis, N.; Lewis, E. E.; Palmiotti, G.; Taiwo, T. A.

    2000-02-10

    The variational nodal method implemented in the VARIANT code is generalized to perform full core transport calculations without spatial homogenization of cross sections at either the fuel-pin cell or fuel assembly level. The node size is chosen to correspond to one fuel-pin cell in the radial plane. Each node is divided into triangular finite subelements, with the interior spatial flux distribution represented by piecewise linear trial functions. The step change in the cross sections at the fuel-coolant interface can thus be represented explicitly in global calculations while retaining the fill spherical harmonics capability of VARIANT. The resulting method is applied to a two-dimensional seven-group representation of a LWR containing MOX fuel assemblies. Comparisons are made of the accuracy of various space-angle approximations and of the corresponding CPU times.

  17. Semiconductor neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Littlewood, Peter B.; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Smith, James L.; Sullivan, Clair J.; Alexandrov, Boian S.; Lashley, Jason Charles

    2011-03-08

    A neutron detector has a compound of lithium in a single crystal form as a neutron sensor element. The lithium compound, containing improved charge transport properties, is either lithium niobate or lithium tantalate. The sensor element is in direct contact with a monitor that detects an electric current. A signal proportional to the electric current is produced and is calibrated to indicate the neutrons sensed. The neutron detector is particularly useful for detecting neutrons in a radiation environment. Such radiation environment may, e.g. include gamma radiation and noise.

  18. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  19. Coupled multi-group neutron photon transport for the simulation of high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.

    2009-08-01

    The accurate and efficient simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems is necessary for several important radiation detection applications. Examples include the detection of nuclear threats concealed in cargo containers and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for nondestructive determination of elemental composition of unknown samples.

  20. Characterization of the high-energy neutron beam of the PRISMA beamline using a diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Frost, C. D.; Minniti, T.; Schooneveld, E.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-07-01

    The high-energy neutron component (En > 10 MeV) of the neutron spectrum of PRISMA, a beam-line at the ISIS spallation source, has been characterized for the first time. Neutron measurements using a Single-crystal Diamond Detector at a short-pulse source are obtained by a combination of pulse height and time of flight analysis. An XY scan provides a 2D map of the high-energy neutron beam which has a diameter of about 40 mm. The high neutron flux, that has been found to be (3.8 ± 0.7) · 105 cm-2s-1 for En > 10 MeV in the centre, opens up for a possible application of the beam-line as a high-energy neutron irradiation position. Results are of interest for the development of the ChipIR beam-line, which will feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for chip irradiation experiment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that diamond detectors can be used at spallation sources to investigate the transport of high-energy neutrons down instruments which is of interest in general to designers as high-energy neutrons are a source of background in thermal beamlines.

  1. Development and characterization of a high yield transportable pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rishi; Mishra, Ekansh; Dhang, Prosenjit; Sagar, Karuna; Meena, Manraj; Shyam, Anurag

    2016-09-01

    The results of characterization experiments carried out on a newly developed dense plasma focus device based intense pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system are reported. Its high current sealed pseudospark switch based low inductance capacitor bank with maximum stored energy of ˜10 kJ is segregated into four modules of ˜2.5 kJ each and it cumulatively delivers peak current in the range of 400 kA-600 kA (corresponding to charging voltage range of 14 kV-18 kV) in a quarter time period of ˜2 μs. The neutron yield performance of this device has been optimized by discretely varying deuterium filling gas pressure in the range of 6 mbar-11 mbar at ˜17 kV/550 kA discharge. At ˜7 kJ/8.5 mbar operation, the average neutron yield has been measured to be in the order of ˜4 × 109 neutrons/pulse which is the highest ever reported neutron yield from a plasma focus device with the same stored energy. The average forward to radial anisotropy in neutron yield is found to be ˜2. The entire system is contained on a moveable trolley having dimensions 1.5 m × 1 m × 0.7 m and its operation and control (up to the distance of 25 m) are facilitated through optically isolated handheld remote console. The overall compactness of this system provides minimum proximity to small as well as large samples for irradiation. The major intended application objective of this high neutron yield dense plasma focus device development is to explore the feasibility of active neutron interrogation experiments by utilization of intense pulsed neutron sources.

  2. Development and characterization of a high yield transportable pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rishi; Mishra, Ekansh; Dhang, Prosenjit; Sagar, Karuna; Meena, Manraj; Shyam, Anurag

    2016-09-01

    The results of characterization experiments carried out on a newly developed dense plasma focus device based intense pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system are reported. Its high current sealed pseudospark switch based low inductance capacitor bank with maximum stored energy of ∼10 kJ is segregated into four modules of ∼2.5 kJ each and it cumulatively delivers peak current in the range of 400 kA-600 kA (corresponding to charging voltage range of 14 kV-18 kV) in a quarter time period of ∼2 μs. The neutron yield performance of this device has been optimized by discretely varying deuterium filling gas pressure in the range of 6 mbar-11 mbar at ∼17 kV/550 kA discharge. At ∼7 kJ/8.5 mbar operation, the average neutron yield has been measured to be in the order of ∼4 × 10(9) neutrons/pulse which is the highest ever reported neutron yield from a plasma focus device with the same stored energy. The average forward to radial anisotropy in neutron yield is found to be ∼2. The entire system is contained on a moveable trolley having dimensions 1.5 m × 1 m × 0.7 m and its operation and control (up to the distance of 25 m) are facilitated through optically isolated handheld remote console. The overall compactness of this system provides minimum proximity to small as well as large samples for irradiation. The major intended application objective of this high neutron yield dense plasma focus device development is to explore the feasibility of active neutron interrogation experiments by utilization of intense pulsed neutron sources.

  3. Development and characterization of a high yield transportable pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Rishi E-mail: rishiv@barc.gov.in; Mishra, Ekansh; Dhang, Prosenjit; Sagar, Karuna; Meena, Manraj; Shyam, Anurag

    2016-09-15

    The results of characterization experiments carried out on a newly developed dense plasma focus device based intense pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system are reported. Its high current sealed pseudospark switch based low inductance capacitor bank with maximum stored energy of ∼10 kJ is segregated into four modules of ∼2.5 kJ each and it cumulatively delivers peak current in the range of 400 kA–600 kA (corresponding to charging voltage range of 14 kV–18 kV) in a quarter time period of ∼2 μs. The neutron yield performance of this device has been optimized by discretely varying deuterium filling gas pressure in the range of 6 mbar–11 mbar at ∼17 kV/550 kA discharge. At ∼7 kJ/8.5 mbar operation, the average neutron yield has been measured to be in the order of ∼4 × 10{sup 9} neutrons/pulse which is the highest ever reported neutron yield from a plasma focus device with the same stored energy. The average forward to radial anisotropy in neutron yield is found to be ∼2. The entire system is contained on a moveable trolley having dimensions 1.5 m × 1 m × 0.7 m and its operation and control (up to the distance of 25 m) are facilitated through optically isolated handheld remote console. The overall compactness of this system provides minimum proximity to small as well as large samples for irradiation. The major intended application objective of this high neutron yield dense plasma focus device development is to explore the feasibility of active neutron interrogation experiments by utilization of intense pulsed neutron sources.

  4. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  5. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  6. Pointwise Energy Solution of the Boltzmann Transport Equation for Thermal Neutrons - Final Report - 07/01/1999 - 06/30/2001

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark L.

    2001-06-30

    In July of 1999 Louisiana State University (LSU) was awarded a two year research grant by the D.O.E. NEER program to develop a methodology for neutron transport calculations using pointwise (PW) nuclear data in the thermal energy range, and to implement the method into the CENTRM transport code being developed at LSU for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This work has extended CENTRM's current epithermal PW calculation to encompass the thermal range, providing a continuous-energy deterministic transport code that can address problems that may not be adequately treated using multigroup methods. The new version of the CENTRM code was completed, and provided to ORNL for inclusion in the next release of the SCALE code system. The new thermal calculation developed by the NEER project is a significant improvement in the CENTRM capability, and should have an impact on criticality and shipping cask analysis done by numerous organizations who use this code system.

  7. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  8. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  9. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  10. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model.

  11. FASTER 3: A generalized-geometry Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    A description of the FASTER-III program for Monte Carlo Carlo calculation of photon and neutron transport in complex geometries is presented. Major revisions include the capability of calculating minimum weight shield configurations for primary and secondary radiation and optimal importance sampling parameters. The program description includes a users manual describing the preparation of input data cards, the printout from a sample problem including the data card images, definitions of Fortran variables, the program logic, and the control cards required to run on the IBM 7094, IBM 360, UNIVAC 1108 and CDC 6600 computers.

  12. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  13. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  14. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  15. The relative diffusive transport rate of SrI2 in water changes over the nanometer length scale as measured by coherent quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Faraone, Antonio

    2016-05-14

    X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to provide insight into the structures of ionic solutions for over a century, but the probes have covered distances shorter than 8 Å. For the non-hydrolyzing salt SrI2 in aqueous solution, a locally ordered lattice of ions exists that scatters slow neutrons coherently down to at least 0.1 mol L(-1) concentration, where the measured average distance between scatterers is over 18 Å. To investigate the motions of these scatterers, coherent quasielastic neutron scattering (CQENS) data on D2O solutions with SrI2 at 1, 0.8, 0.6, and 0.4 mol L(-1) concentrations was obtained to provide an experimental measure of the diffusive transport rate for the motion between pairs of ions relative to each other. Because CQENS measures the motion of one ion relative to another, the frame of reference is centered on an ion, which is unique among all diffusion measurement methods. We call the measured quantity the pairwise diffusive transport rate Dp. In addition to this ion centered frame of reference, the diffusive transport rate can be measured as a function of the momentum transfer q, where q = (4π/λ)sin θ with a scattering angle of 2θ. Since q is related to the interion distance (d = 2π/q), for the experimental range 0.2 Å(-1)≤q≤ 1.0 Å(-1), Dp is, then, measured over interion distances from 40 Å to ≈6 Å. We find the measured diffusional transport rates increase with increasing distance between scatterers over the entire range covered and interpret this behavior to be caused by dynamic coupling among the ions. Within the model of Fickian diffusion, at the longer interionic distances Dp is greater than the Nernst-Hartley value for an infinitely dilute solution. For these nm-distance diffusional transport rates to conform with the lower, macroscopically measured diffusion coefficients, we propose that local, coordinated counter motion of at least pairs of ions is part of the transport process.

  16. An Intercomparison of 2-D Models Within a Common Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Scott, Courtney J.; Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.; Considine, David B.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A model intercomparison among the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) 2-D model, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D model, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D model allows us to separate differences due to model transport from those due to the model's chemical formulation. This is accomplished by constructing two hybrid models incorporating the transport parameters of the GSFC and LLNL models within the AER model framework. By comparing the results from the native models (AER and e.g. GSFC) with those from the hybrid model (e.g. AER chemistry with GSFC transport), differences due to chemistry and transport can be identified. For the analysis, we examined an inert tracer whose emission pattern is based on emission from a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) fleet; distributions of trace species in the 2015 atmosphere; and the response of stratospheric ozone to an HSCT fleet. Differences in NO(y) in the upper stratosphere are found between models with identical transport, implying different model representations of atmospheric chemical processes. The response of O3 concentration to HSCT aircraft emissions differs in the models from both transport-dominated differences in the HSCT-induced perturbations of H2O and NO(y) as well as from differences in the model represent at ions of O3 chemical processes. The model formulations of cold polar processes are found to be the most significant factor in creating large differences in the calculated ozone perturbations

  17. Neutron fluence determination for VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel aging surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Ilieva, K.D.; Apostolov, T.G.; Belousov, S.I.; Antonov, S.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The neutron flux and fluence determination on Bulgarian VVER-440/230 (Units No. 1--4 of Kozloduy NPP) Reactor Pressure Vessels is discussed. In these reactors weld 4 of RPV undergoes the most severe irradiation embrittlement. The choice of the neutron transport calculational parameters is substantiated. The inconsistency of 3D neutron flux values obtained by the 3D code TORT and by the synthesis method of DOT 2D results in the point of most severe irradiation embrittlement is within 3% limits range. Radiochemical analysis of the templets sampled out from the Unit No. 2 vessel after 16 cycles of exploitation, before and after the annealing, was carried out. The calculated and experimental values of the neutron fluence on the Unit 2 RPV are compared.

  18. Intercomparison of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes to model TEPC response in low-energy neutron and gamma-ray fields.

    PubMed

    Ali, F; Waker, A J; Waller, E J

    2014-10-01

    Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) can potentially be used as a portable and personal dosemeter in mixed neutron and gamma-ray fields, but what hinders this use is their typically large physical size. To formulate compact TEPC designs, the use of a Monte Carlo transport code is necessary to predict the performance of compact designs in these fields. To perform this modelling, three candidate codes were assessed: MCNPX 2.7.E, FLUKA 2011.2 and PHITS 2.24. In each code, benchmark simulations were performed involving the irradiation of a 5-in. TEPC with monoenergetic neutron fields and a 4-in. wall-less TEPC with monoenergetic gamma-ray fields. The frequency and dose mean lineal energies and dose distributions calculated from each code were compared with experimentally determined data. For the neutron benchmark simulations, PHITS produces data closest to the experimental values and for the gamma-ray benchmark simulations, FLUKA yields data closest to the experimentally determined quantities.

  19. 2D transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzeli, Sajedeh; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Pasquier, Diego; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2017-08-01

    Graphene is very popular because of its many fascinating properties, but its lack of an electronic bandgap has stimulated the search for 2D materials with semiconducting character. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), which are semiconductors of the type MX2, where M is a transition metal atom (such as Mo or W) and X is a chalcogen atom (such as S, Se or Te), provide a promising alternative. Because of its robustness, MoS2 is the most studied material in this family. TMDCs exhibit a unique combination of atomic-scale thickness, direct bandgap, strong spin-orbit coupling and favourable electronic and mechanical properties, which make them interesting for fundamental studies and for applications in high-end electronics, spintronics, optoelectronics, energy harvesting, flexible electronics, DNA sequencing and personalized medicine. In this Review, the methods used to synthesize TMDCs are examined and their properties are discussed, with particular attention to their charge density wave, superconductive and topological phases. The use of TMCDs in nanoelectronic devices is also explored, along with strategies to improve charge carrier mobility, high frequency operation and the use of strain engineering to tailor their properties.

  20. Information on the Interstate Transport Good Neighbor Provision for the 2012 Fine Particulate Matter (PM) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) under Clean Air Act (CAA) Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(I)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this March 2016 memorandum is to provide information to EPA regional offices and states as they develop and review SIPs that address the interstate transport Good Neighbor provision as it pertains to the PM2.5 NAAQS

  1. Sodium ion transport mechanisms in antiperovskite electrolytes Na3OBr and Na4OI2: An in Situ neutron diffraction study

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Yonggang; Li, Shuai; ...

    2016-06-02

    Na-rich antiperovskites are recently developed solid electrolytes with enhanced sodium ionic conductivity and show promising functionality as a novel solid electrolyte in an all solid-stat battery. In this work, the sodium ionic transport pathways of the parent compound Na3OBr, as well as the modified layered antiperovskite Na4OI2, were studied and compared through temperature dependent neutron diffraction combined with the maximum entropy method. In the cubic Na3OBr antiperovskite, the nuclear density distribution maps at 500 K indicate that sodium ions ho within and among oxygen octahedra, and Br- ions are not involved in the tetragonal Na4OI2 antiperovskite, Na ions, which connectmore » octahedra in the ab plane, have the lowest activation energy barrier. In conclusion, the transport of sodium ions along the c axis is assisted by I- ions.« less

  2. Sodium Ion Transport Mechanisms in Antiperovskite Electrolytes Na3OBr and Na4OI2: An in-situ Neutron Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Yonggang; Li, Shuai; Howard, John W.; Neuefeind, Jörg; Ren, Yang; Wang, Hui; Liang, Chengdu; Yang, Wenge; Zou, Ruqiang; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    Na-rich antiperovskites are recently developed solid electrolytes with enhanced sodium ionic conductivity and show promising functionality as a novel solid electrolyte in an all solid-state battery. In this work, the sodium ionic transport pathways of the parent compound Na3OBr, as well as the modified layered antiperovskite Na4OI2, were studied and compared through temperature dependent neutron diffraction combined with the maximum entropy method. In the cubic Na3OBr antiperovskite, the nuclear density distribution maps at 500 K indicate that sodium ions hop within and among oxygen octahedra, and Br- ions are not involved. In the tetragonal Na4OI2 antiperovskite, Na ions, which connect octahedra in the ab plane, have the lowest activation energy barrier. The transport of sodium ions along the c axis is assisted by I- ions.

  3. Sodium Ion Transport Mechanisms in Antiperovskite Electrolytes Na3OBr and Na4OI2: An in Situ Neutron Diffraction Study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Yonggang; Li, Shuai; Howard, John W; Neuefeind, Jörg; Ren, Yang; Wang, Hui; Liang, Chengdu; Yang, Wenge; Zou, Ruqiang; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-06-20

    Na-rich antiperovskites are recently developed solid electrolytes with enhanced sodium ionic conductivity and show promising functionality as a novel solid electrolyte in an all solid-state battery. In this work, the sodium ionic transport pathways of the parent compound Na3OBr, as well as the modified layered antiperovskite Na4OI2, were studied and compared through temperature-dependent neutron diffraction combined with the maximum entropy method. In the cubic Na3OBr antiperovskite, the nuclear density distribution maps at 500 K indicate that sodium ions hop within and among oxygen octahedra, and Br(-) ions are not involved. In the tetragonal Na4OI2 antiperovskite, Na ions, which connect octahedra in the ab plane, have the lowest activation energy barrier. The transport of sodium ions along the c axis is assisted by I(-) ions.

  4. Boronophenylalanine, a boron delivery agent for boron neutron capture therapy, is transported by ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2

    PubMed Central

    Wongthai, Printip; Hagiwara, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Wei, Ling; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kato, Itsuro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy relies on the selective delivery of boron carriers to malignant cells. p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA), a boron delivery agent, has been proposed to be localized to cells through transporter-mediated mechanisms. In this study, we screened aromatic amino acid transporters to identify BPA transporters. Human aromatic amino acid transporters were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined for BPA uptake and kinetic parameters. The roles of the transporters in BPA uptake were characterized in cancer cell lines. For the quantitative assessment of BPA uptake, HPLC was used throughout the study. Among aromatic amino acid transporters, ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2 were found to transport BPA with Km values of 137.4 ± 11.7, 20.3 ± 0.8 and 88.3 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Uptake experiments in cancer cell lines revealed that the LAT1 protein amount was the major determinant of BPA uptake at 100 μM, whereas the contribution of ATB0,+ became significant at 1000 μM, accounting for 20–25% of the total BPA uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2 transport BPA at affinities comparable with their endogenous substrates, suggesting that they could mediate effective BPA uptake in vivo. The high and low affinities of LAT1 and ATB0,+, respectively, differentiate their roles in BPA uptake. ATB0,+, as well as LAT1, could contribute significantly to the tumor accumulation of BPA at clinical dose. PMID:25580517

  5. MHD instabilities in accretion mounds - I. 2D axisymmetric simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Mignone, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    We have performed stability analysis of axisymmetric accretion mounds on neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries by 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with the PLUTO MHD code. We find that the mounds are stable with respect to interchange instabilities, but the addition of excess mass destabilizes the equilibria. Our simulations confirm that accretion mounds are unstable with respect to MHD instabilities beyond a threshold mass. We investigate both filled and hollow mounds and for the latter also compute the expected profile of cyclotron resonance scattering features (CRSF). In comparison to the CRSF from filled mounds reported in our earlier work, hollow mounds display wider and more complex line profiles.

  6. Demonstration of three-dimensional deterministic radiation transport theory dose distribution analysis for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nigg, D W; Randolph, P D; Wheeler, F J

    1991-01-01

    The Monte Carlo stochastic simulation technique has traditionally been the only well-recognized method for computing three-dimensional radiation dose distributions in connection with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) research. A deterministic approach to this problem would offer some advantages over the Monte Carlo method. This paper describes an application of a deterministic method to analytically simulate BNCT treatment of a canine head phantom using the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven medical research reactor (BMRR). Calculations were performed with the TORT code from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an implementation of the discrete ordinates, or Sn method. Calculations were from first principles and used no empirical correction factors. The phantom surface was modeled by flat facets of approximately 1 cm2. The phantom interior was homogeneous. Energy-dependent neutron and photon scalar fluxes were calculated on a 32 x 16 x 22 mesh structure with 96 discrete directions in angular phase space. The calculation took 670 min on an Apollo DN10000 workstation. The results were subsequently integrated over energy to obtain full three-dimensional dose distributions. Isodose contours and depth-dose curves were plotted for several separate dose components of interest. Phantom measurements were made by measuring neutron activation (and therefore neutron flux) as a function of depth in copper-gold alloy wires that were inserted through catheters placed in holes drilled in the phantom. Measurements agreed with calculations to within about 15%. The calculations took about an order of magnitude longer than comparable Monte Carlo calculations but provided various conveniences, as well as a useful check.

  7. Structure of the novel ternary hydrides Li4Tt2D (Tt=Si and Ge).

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Hartman, Michael R; Udovic, Terrence J; Rush, John J; Zhou, Wei; Bowman, Robert C; Vajo, John J

    2007-02-01

    The crystal structures of newly discovered Li4Ge2D and Li4Si2D ternary phases were solved by direct methods using neutron powder diffraction data. Both structures can be described using a Cmmm orthorhombic cell with all hydrogen atoms occupying Li6-octahedral interstices. The overall crystal structure and the geometry of these interstices are compared with those of other related phases, and the stabilization of this novel class of ternary hydrides is discussed.

  8. Substrate effects and dielectric integration in 2D electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamlagain, Bhim Prasad

    The ultra-thin body of monolayer (and few-layer) two dimensional (2D) semiconducting materials such as transitional metal dichalconiges (TMDs), black phosphorous (BP) has demonstrated tremendous beneficial physical, transport, and optical properties for a wide range of applications. Because of their ultrathin bodies, the properties of 2D materials are highly sensitive to environmental effects. Particularly, the performance of 2D semiconductor electronic devices is strongly dependent on the substrate/dielectric properties, extrinsic impurities and absorbates. In this work, we systematically studied the transport properties of mechanically exfoliated few layer TMD field-effect transistors (FETs) consistently fabricated on various substrates including SiO2,Parylene -C, Al2O3, SiO2 modified by octadecyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS) self-assembled monolayer (SAMs), and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). We performed variable temperature transport measurements to understand the effects of various scattering mechanisms such as remote surface phonon scattering, coulomb scattering, surface roughness scattering on the mobility of these devices. To reveal the intrinsic channel properties, we also investigated TMD devices encapsulated by h-BN. To further optimize the dielectric interface and electrostatic control of the TMD channels, we developed a novel thermal-oxidation method to turn few-layer 2D metals into ultrathin and atomically flat high -kappa dielectrics. In order to optimize the performance of TMD electronic devices, it is also critical to fabricate low resistance ohmic contacts required for effectively injecting charge carriers into the TMD channel. Along this direction, we developed a new contact strategy to minimize the contact resistance for a variety of TMDs by van der Waals assembly of doped TMDs as contacts and undoped TMDs as channel materials. The developed unique method for low-resistance ohmic contacts achieved using the 2D/2D contact strategy and novel technique

  9. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  10. Promising Thermoelectric Bulk Materials with 2D Structures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiming; Zhao, Li-Dong

    2017-07-24

    Given that more than two thirds of all energy is lost, mostly as waste heat, in utilization processes worldwide, thermoelectric materials, which can directly convert waste heat to electricity, provide an alternative option for optimizing energy utilization processes. After the prediction that superlattices may show high thermoelectric performance, various methods based on quantum effects and superlattice theory have been adopted to analyze bulk materials, leading to the rapid development of thermoelectric materials. Bulk materials with two-dimensional (2D) structures show outstanding properties, and their high performance originates from both their low thermal conductivity and high Seebeck coefficient due to their strong anisotropic features. Here, the advantages of superlattices for enhancing the thermoelectric performance, the transport mechanism in bulk materials with 2D structures, and optimization methods are discussed. The phenomenological transport mechanism in these materials indicates that thermal conductivities are reduced in 2D materials with intrinsically short mean free paths. Recent progress in the transport mechanisms of Bi2 Te3 -, SnSe-, and BiCuSeO-based systems is summarized. Finally, possible research directions to enhance the thermoelectric performance of bulk materials with 2D structures are briefly considered. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Pore characteristics and their emergent effect on water adsorption and transport in clays using small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hartl, M.; Wang, Y.; Hjelm, R.

    2013-12-01

    In nuclear waste management, clays are canonical materials in the construction of engineered barriers. They are also naturally occurring reactive minerals which play an important role in retention and colloidal facilitated reactive transport in subsurface systems. Knowledge of total and accessible porosity in clays is crucial in determining fluids transport behavior in clays. It will provide fundamental insight on the performance efficiency of specific clays as a barrier material and their role in regulating radionuclide transport in subsurface environments. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the change in pore characteristics of clays as function of moisture content, and to determine their pore character in relation to their water retention capacity. Recent developments in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques allow quantitative measurement of pore morphology and size distribution of various materials in their pristine state under various sample environments (exposure to solution, high temperature, and so on). Furthermore, due to dramatic different neutron scattering properties of hydrogen and deuterium, one can readily use contrast variation, which is the isotopic labeling with various ratios of H and D (e.g. mixture of H2O/D2O) to highlight or suppress features of the sample. This is particularly useful in the study of complex pore system such as clays. In this study, we have characterized the pore structures for a number of clays including clay minerals and field samples which are relevant to high-level waste systems under various sample environments (e.g., humidity, temperature and pressure) using SANS. Our results suggest that different clays show unique pore features under various sample environments. To distinguish between accessible/non-accessible pores and the nature of pore filling (e.g. the quantity of H2O adsorbed by clays, and the distribution of H2O in relation to pore character) to water, clays were exposed for

  12. Distribution of transport current in a type-II superconductor studied by small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Pautrat, A; Goupil, C; Simon, Ch; Charalambous, D; Forgan, E M; Lazard, G; Mathieu, P; Brûlet, A

    2003-02-28

    We report small-angle neutron scattering measurements on the vortex lattice in a PbIn polycrystal in the presence of an applied current. Using the rocking curves as a probe of the distribution of current in the sample, we observe that vortex pinning is due to the surface roughness. This leads to a surface current that persists in the flux-flow region. We show the influence of surface treatments on the distribution of this current.

  13. Ray Next-Event Estimator Transport of Primary and Secondary Gamma Rays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    66  Run #1 - Neutron Transport, Monoenergetic Source ........................ 67  Run #2 - Neutron Transport, Fission Source...Transport, Fission Neutron Source ...................... 81  Run #6 - Coupled Transport, Monoenergetic Neutron Source...68  24. Ray-Estimated Neutron Flux Per Source Neutron at the Flux-Point from a Monoenergetic Point Source in Time and Energy Computed by

  14. Californium-252: A New Isotopic Source for Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Reinig, W.C.

    2001-08-29

    This report discusses a new isotopic source for neutron radiography, Californium-252. Nuclear reactors are the usual source of neutrons for radiography, primarily because of their intense neutron beams. If neutron radiography is to have widespread use, intense transportable neutron sources are required that can be used in plants, in laboratories and in the field.

  15. Neutron Imaging of Archaeological Bronzes

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzewski, Krysta; Herringer, Susan; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Walker, Lakeisha MH; Sheldon, Brian; Voisin, Sophie; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Finocchiaro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the initial results of 2-D and 3-D neutron imaging of bronze artifacts using the CG-1D prototype beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Neutron imaging is a non-destructive technique capable of producing unprecedented three-dimensional information on archaeomaterials, including qualitative, quantitative, and visual data on impurities, composition change, voids, and c

  16. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  17. Neutron flux mapping inside a cubic and a head PMMA phantom using indirect neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pi-En; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Huang, Chun-Kai; Liu, Hong-Ming; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2009-07-01

    This study aims to measure the two-dimensional (2D) neutron spatial distribution inside a cubic and a head PMMA phantom for the purpose of further comparison with the treatment planning. The measurements were made by using the indirect neutron radiography (INR), which utilized a thin copper foil and the imaging plate. The developed image provides satisfactory spatial resolution and very low statistical error (< 1%). As to the time cost, the whole procedure normally takes less than 3 h. The result shows that the indirect neutron radiography can be a quick and reliable method to provide a 2D neutron spatial distribution inside a phantom.

  18. Validation and testing of the VAM2D computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. )

    1991-10-01

    This document describes two modeling studies conducted by HydroGeoLogic, Inc. for the US NRC under contract no. NRC-04089-090, entitled, Validation and Testing of the VAM2D Computer Code.'' VAM2D is a two-dimensional, variably saturated flow and transport code, with applications for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal. The computer code itself is documented in a separate NUREG document (NUREG/CR-5352, 1989). The studies presented in this report involve application of the VAM2D code to two diverse subsurface modeling problems. The first one involves modeling of infiltration and redistribution of water and solutes in an initially dry, heterogeneous field soil. This application involves detailed modeling over a relatively short, 9-month time period. The second problem pertains to the application of VAM2D to the modeling of a waste disposal facility in a fractured clay, over much larger space and time scales and with particular emphasis on the applicability and reliability of using equivalent porous medium approach for simulating flow and transport in fractured geologic media. Reflecting the separate and distinct nature of the two problems studied, this report is organized in two separate parts. 61 refs., 31 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Magnetic Correlations in the Quasi-2D Semiconducting Ferromagnet CrSiTe3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Travis; Aczel, Adam; Lumsden, Mark; Nagler, Steve; Stone, Matt; Yan, Jianqiang; Mandrus, David

    2015-03-01

    The quasi-two-dimensional, semiconducting ferromagnet CrSiTe3 is a particularly attractive candidate for spintronics applications due its relatively accessible transition temperature and large magnetic moment. In this study, we use neutron scattering to measure the static and dynamic magnetic properties. Neutron diffraction shows 3D ordering below TC=33K, but two dimensional static correlations persist up to at least 300K. The inelastic neutron scattering data shows two distinct spin wave bands, which are nearly dispersionless along the c-axis. The exchange constants extracted from the data suggest that the spins are very nearly Heisenberg, but only weakly coupled perpendicular to the 2D planes. Above the Curie temperature, the spin wave intensity decreases drastically but, like the static correlations, these dynamic magnetic correlations persist within the 2D planes up to room temperature.

  20. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  1. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  2. Neutron beam characterization measurements at the Manuel Lujan Jr. neutron scattering center

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal; Muhrer, Guenter; Daemen, Luke L; Kelsey, Charles T; Duran, Michael A; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the neutron beam characteristics of neutron moderators at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE. The absolute thermal neutron flux, energy spectra and time emission spectra were measured for the high resolution and high intensity decoupled water, partially coupled liquid hydrogen and partially coupled water moderators. The results of our experimental study will provide an insight into aging of different target-moderator-reflector-shield components as well as new experimental data for benchmarking of neutron transport codes.

  3. Comparison of Analysis Results Between 2D/1D Synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G in the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung Lim, Mi; Maeng, Young Jae; Fero, Arnold H.; Anderson, Stanwood L.

    2016-02-01

    The 2D/1D synthesis methodology has been used to calculate the fast neutron (E > 1.0 MeV) exposure to the beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel. This method uses the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinates code and the BUGLE-96 cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VI. RAPTOR-M3G (RApid Parallel Transport Of Radiation-Multiple 3D Geometries) which performs full 3D calculations was developed and is based on domain decomposition algorithms, where the spatial and angular domains are allocated and processed on multi-processor computer architecture. As compared to traditional single-processor applications, this approach reduces the computational load as well as the memory requirement per processor. Both methods are applied to surveillance test results for the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP)-OPR (Optimized Power Reactor) 1000 MW. The objective of this paper is to compare the results of the KSNP surveillance program between 2D/1D synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G. Each operating KSNP has a reactor vessel surveillance program consisting of six surveillance capsules located between the core and the reactor vessel in the downcomer region near the reactor vessel wall. In addition to the In-Vessel surveillance program, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry (EVND) program has been implemented. In order to estimate surveillance test results, cycle-specific forward transport calculations were performed by 2D/1D synthesis and by RAPTOR-M3G. The ratio between measured and calculated (M/C) reaction rates will be discussed. The current plan is to install an EVND system in all of the Korea PWRs including the new reactor type, APR (Advanced Power Reactor) 1400 MW. This work will play an important role in establishing a KSNP-specific database of surveillance test results and will employ RAPTOR-M3G for surveillance dosimetry location as well as positions in the KSNP reactor vessel.

  4. Comparative study of Monte Carlo particle transport code PHITS and nuclear data processing code NJOY for recoil cross section spectra under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Because primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) create point defects and clusters in materials that are irradiated with neutrons, it is important to validate the calculations of recoil cross section spectra that are used to estimate radiation damage in materials. Here, the recoil cross section spectra of fission- and fusion-relevant materials were calculated using the Event Generator Mode (EGM) of the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) and also using the data processing code NJOY2012 with the nuclear data libraries TENDL2015, ENDF/BVII.1, and JEFF3.2. The heating number, which is the integral of the recoil cross section spectra, was also calculated using PHITS-EGM and compared with data extracted from the ACE files of TENDL2015, ENDF/BVII.1, and JENDL4.0. In general, only a small difference was found between the PKA spectra of PHITS + TENDL2015 and NJOY + TENDL2015. From analyzing the recoil cross section spectra extracted from the nuclear data libraries using NJOY2012, we found that the recoil cross section spectra were incorrect for 72Ge, 75As, 89Y, and 109Ag in the ENDF/B-VII.1 library, and for 90Zr and 55Mn in the JEFF3.2 library. From analyzing the heating number, we found that the data extracted from the ACE file of TENDL2015 for all nuclides were problematic in the neutron capture region because of incorrect data regarding the emitted gamma energy. However, PHITS + TENDL2015 can calculate PKA spectra and heating numbers correctly.

  5. MRI-guided neutron capture therapy by use of a dual gadolinium/boron agent targeted at tumour cells through upregulated low-density lipoprotein transporters.

    PubMed

    Geninatti-Crich, Simonetta; Alberti, Diego; Szabo, Ibolya; Deagostino, Annamaria; Toppino, Antonio; Barge, Alessandro; Ballarini, Francesca; Bortolussi, Silva; Bruschi, Piero; Protti, Nicoletta; Stella, Sabrina; Altieri, Saverio; Venturello, Paolo; Aime, Silvio

    2011-07-18

    The upregulation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) transporters in tumour cells has been exploited to deliver a sufficient amount of gadolinium/boron/ligand (Gd/B/L) probes for neutron capture therapy, a binary chemio-radiotherapy for cancer treatment. The Gd/B/L probe consists of a carborane unit (ten B atoms) bearing an aliphatic chain on one side (to bind LDL particles), and a Gd(III)/1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane monoamide complex on the other (for detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)). Up to 190 Gd/B/L probes were loaded per LDL particle. The uptake from tumour cells was initially assessed on cell cultures of human hepatoma (HepG2), murine melanoma (B16), and human glioblastoma (U87). The MRI assessment of the amount of Gd/B/L taken up by tumour cells was validated by inductively coupled plasma-mass-spectrometric measurements of the Gd and B content. Measurements were undertaken in vivo on mice bearing tumours in which B16 tumour cells were inoculated at the base of the neck. From the acquisition of magnetic resonance images, it was established that after 4-6 hours from the administration of the Gd/B/L-LDL particles (0.1 and 1 mmol kg(-1) of Gd and (10)B, respectively) the amount of boron taken up in the tumour region is above the threshold required for successful NCT treatment. After neutron irradiation, tumour growth was followed for 20 days by MRI. The group of treated mice showed markedly lower tumour growth with respect to the control group.

  6. Advancing the agent methodology to include the higher order of neutron anisotropy with accelerated solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satvat, Nader

    With the development of new core designs for generation IV reactors with their complexity and newer fuel designs, the need for consideration of neutron anisotropic scattering is becoming important for enchasing the economy and reliability of these designs. The theory and accurate modeling of neutron anisotropy is one of the most important problems of the transport solution to neutron Boltzmann equation. A number of methods based on careful theoretical developments, were established to numerically determine the effect of anisotropy; some of these methods are: the spherical harmonics method, the so-called function method (FN), the discrete ordinate method, and the Monte Carlo method. The AGENT methodology, based on the method of characteristics, currently the most accurate neutron transport method, represents the state-of-the-art advanced neutronics simulation tool available for 2D, 3D, and full core modeling. The higher order of anisotropic scattering (with no limitation of the number of expansion) is introduced into the AGENT code. An extensive analysis is performed to verify and validate this new model. It is shown that anisotropic scattering is important to be considered for complex geometries due to high angular dependence of neutron flux. The first principle in physics were used to explain the effects of anisotropic scattering (at the level on particle interactions), importance in including the higher moments in flux development for the core designs of high heterogonous structure promoting biased scattering (at the level of heterogeneous reactor assemblies in 2D and 3D). This inclusion of higher order of anisotropic scattering as expected increased the complexity of the mathematical model which in turn increased the computational time. An analysis of the computational time dependence on anisotropic scattering and the method of characteristics resolution parameters are analyzed with accurate predictions of scaling to larger geometries. Finally, an accelerated

  7. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  8. Discontinuous Finite Elements for a Hyperbolic Problem with Singular Coefficient: a Convergence Theory for 1-D Spherical Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Machorro, E. A.

    2010-09-07

    A theory of convergence is presented for the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method of solving the non-scattering spherically symmetric Boltzmann transport equation using piecewise constant test and trial functions. Results are then extended to higher order polynomial spaces. Comparisons of numerical properties were presented in earlier work.

  9. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  10. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  11. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  12. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  13. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  14. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  15. Neutron skins and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2013-11-07

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

  16. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  17. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  18. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  19. Neutron logging tool readings and neutron parameters of formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czubek, Jan A.

    1995-03-01

    A case history of the calibration of neutron porosity tools is given in the paper. The calibration of neutron porosity tools is one of the most difficult, complicated, and time consuming tasks in the well logging operations in geophysics. A semi empirical approach to this problem is given in the paper. It is based on the correlation of the tool readings observed in known environments with the apparent neutron parameters sensed by the tools. The apparent neutron parameters are functions of the true neutron parameters of geological formations and of the borehole material, borehole diameter, and the tool position inside the borehole. The true integral neutron transport parameters are obtained by the multigroup diffusion approximation for slowing down of neutrons and by one thermal neutron group for the diffusion. In the latter, the effective neutron temperature is taken into account. The problem of the thermal neutron absorption cross section of rocks is discussed in detail from the point of view of its importance for the well logging results and for the experimental techniques being used.

  20. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule—CN—noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  1. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  2. Discontinuous isogeometric analysis methods for the first-order form of the neutron transport equation with discrete ordinate (SN) angular discretisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, A. R.; Welch, J. A.; Kópházi, J.; Eaton, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper two discontinuous Galerkin isogeometric analysis methods are developed and applied to the first-order form of the neutron transport equation with a discrete ordinate (SN) angular discretisation. The discontinuous Galerkin projection approach was taken on both an element level and the patch level for a given Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) patch. This paper describes the detailed dispersion analysis that has been used to analyse the numerical stability of both of these schemes. The convergence of the schemes for both smooth and non-smooth solutions was also investigated using the method of manufactured solutions (MMS) for multidimensional problems and a 1D semi-analytical benchmark whose solution contains a strongly discontinuous first derivative. This paper also investigates the challenges posed by strongly curved boundaries at both the NURBS element and patch level with several algorithms developed to deal with such cases. Finally numerical results are presented both for a simple pincell test problem as well as the C5G7 quarter core MOX/UOX small Light Water Reactor (LWR) benchmark problem. These numerical results produced by the isogeometric analysis (IGA) methods are compared and contrasted against linear and quadratic discontinuous Galerkin finite element (DGFEM) SN based methods.

  3. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  4. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  5. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  6. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  7. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  8. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  9. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. 2D Distributed Sensing Via TDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    plate VEGF CompositeSensor Experimental Setup Air 279 mm 61 78 VARTM profile: slope RTM profile: rectangle 22 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware...2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Vision: Non-contact 2D sensing ü VARTM setup constructed within TL can be sensed by its EM field: 2D...300.0 mm/ns. 1 2 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Model Validation “ RTM Flow” TDR Response to 139 mm VEGC

  11. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  12. TART calculations of neutron attenuation and neutron-induced photons on 5% and 20% borated polyethylene slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.

    1993-04-20

    The coupled neutron/photon transport code TART has been used to calculate the attenuation of neutrons and the production of induced photons for neutrons incidents on 5% and 20% borated polyethylene slabs. The neutron attenuation lengths are found to be 2.4 cm and 2.9 cm for 5% and 20% borated polyethylene, respectively.

  13. Simulation of the full-core pin-model by JMCT Monte Carlo neutron-photon transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Li, G.; Zhang, B.; Shu, L.; Shangguan, D.; Ma, Y.; Hu, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Since the large numbers of cells over a million, the tallies over a hundred million and the particle histories over ten billion, the simulation of the full-core pin-by-pin model has become a real challenge for the computers and the computational methods. On the other hand, the basic memory of the model has exceeded the limit of a single CPU, so the spatial domain and data decomposition must be considered. JMCT (J Monte Carlo Transport code) has successful fulfilled the simulation of the full-core pin-by-pin model by the domain decomposition and the nested parallel computation. The k{sub eff} and flux of each cell are obtained. (authors)

  14. A distribution pattern of cadmium, gadolinium and samarium in Phaseolus vulgaris (L) plants as assessed by dynamic neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kőrösi, Ferenc; Balaskó, Márton; Sváb, Erzsébet

    1999-11-01

    The qualitative and semi-quantitative distributions, presumably apoplast transport patterns for the Gd, Sm and Cd were investigated in the primordial leaf tissues of the bean using dynamic neutron radiography. According to the applied 3D, 2D images and the pixel count distribution histograms of the considered gray levels, peculiar distribution patterns were postulated for the elements. Main and lateral vascular systems for Gd, the cell walls as well as intercellular spaces for Sm and the main leaf vein for Cd assumed to be the apoplast transport spaces and volumes.

  15. Neutron structural characterization, inversion degree and transport properties of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel prepared by the hydroxide route

    SciTech Connect

    Sagua, A.; Lescano, Gabriela M.; Alonso, J.A.; Martínez-Coronado, R.; Fernández-Díaz, M.T.; Morán, E.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A pure specimen has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. This spinel, studied by NPD, shows an important inversion degree, λ = 0.80. A bond-valence study shows that the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected 3+ and 2+ values, respectively. The mixed valence Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} accounts for a hopping mechanism between adjacent octahedral sites, leading to a significant conductivity. Highlights: ► A low-temperature hydroxide route allowed preparing almost pure specimens of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. ► NPD essential to determine inversion degree; contrasting Ni and Mn for neutrons. ► Bond valence establishes valence state of octahedral and tetrahedral Ni and Mn ions. ► Thermal analysis, transport measurements complement characterization of this oxide. ► A structure–properties relationship is established. -- Abstract: The title compound has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. The crystal structure has been investigated at room temperature from high-resolution neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data. It crystallizes in a cubic spinel structure, space group Fd3{sup ¯}m, Z = 8, with a = 8.3940(2) Å at 295 K. The crystallographic formula is (Ni{sub 0.202(1)}Mn{sub 0.798(1)}){sub 8a}(Ni{sub 0.790(1)}Mn{sub 1.210(1)}){sub 16d}O{sub 4} where 8a and 16d stand for the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure, respectively. There is a significant inversion degree of the spinel structure, λ = 0.80. In fact, the variable parameter for the oxygen position, u = 0.2636(4), is far from that expected (u = 0.25) for normal spinels. From a bond-valence study, it seems that the valence distribution in NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is not as trivial as expected (Ni{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+}), but clearly the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected +3 and +2 values, respectively. The mixed valence observed at

  16. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  17. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  18. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L.; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi -Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomas; Kong, Jing

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  19. The basics of 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The technique of two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for separating complex mixtures of proteins, but s