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Sample records for 2-d numerical experiments

  1. 2D and 3D Numerical Experiments Assessing the Necessary Conditions for a Plume-fed Asthenosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, C.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Hasenclever, J.

    2008-12-01

    In past years we have presented observation evidence which suggests to us that in Earth's mantle there exists a buoyant asthenosphere layer fed by upwelling in mantle plumes, and consumed by accretion and transformation into overlying lithosphere by ridge upwelling and melt-extraction (which creates a ~60km-thick layer of compositional lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges), by plate cooling (which accretes a further ~40km of asthenosphere after 100 Ma of near-surface cooling), and by dragdown by subducting slabs (which drags a further ~20km sheet of buoyant asthenosphere on either side of the subducting slab). This scenario has been recently reviewed in Yamamoto et al (GSA Vol. 431). We believe that the reason this mode of mantle convection has not yet been seen in numerical models of mantle convection is due to the inability of current models to model the correct upwelling rates in focused lower-viscosity plumes (i.e. that, due to numerical resolution problems they currently underpredict plume upwelling) and to correctly model the magnitude of downdragging of a more buoyant but lower viscosity asthenosphere layer by subducting slabs (which they currently overpredict, cf. Phipps Morgan et al., Terra Nova, 2007). Here we present results from a suite of 2D and 3D calculations that include the effects of ridge accretion, plate cooling and well-resolved asthenosphere dragdown by subducting slabs. In the 2D experiments we do not let mantle plumes spontaneously form at the hot base of the mantle. Instead we extract mantle at a prescribed rate from a single region near the bottom of the mantle (the base of the 'plume stem') and inject this hot material into the uppermost mantle using a local dilation element 'source'. The point is to bypass an incorrect 2D treatment of plume upwelling (plumes should be pipes that only slightly disrupt surrounding flow instead of sheets that break 2D mantle flow), in order to explore what upwelling flux is needed to form a persistent plume

  2. Investigation of capillary nanosecond discharges in air at moderate pressure: comparison of experiments and 2D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, Andrei V.; Starikovskaia, Svetlana M.; Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-01

    Nanosecond electrical discharges in the form of ionization waves are of interest for rapidly ionizing and exciting complex gas mixtures to initiate chemical reactions. Operating with a small discharge tube diameter can significantly increase the specific energy deposition and so enable optimization of the initiation process. Analysis of the uniformity of energy release in small diameter capillary tubes will aid in this optimization. In this paper, results for the experimentally derived characteristics of nanosecond capillary discharges in air at moderate pressure are presented and compared with results from a two-dimensional model. The quartz capillary tube, having inner and outer diameters of 1.5 and 3.4 mm, is about 80 mm long and filled with synthetic dry air at 27 mbar. The capillary tube with two electrodes at the ends is inserted into a break of the central wire of a long coaxial cable. A metal screen around the tube is connected to the cable ground shield. The discharge is driven by a 19 kV 35 ns voltage pulse applied to the powered electrode. The experimental measurements are conducted primarily by using a calibrated capacitive probe and back current shunts. The numerical modelling focuses on the fast ionization wave (FIW) and the plasma properties in the immediate afterglow after the conductive plasma channel has been established between the two electrodes. The FIW produces a highly focused region of electric field on the tube axis that sustains the ionization wave that eventually bridges the electrode gap. Results from the model predict FIW propagation speed and current rise time that agree with the experiment.

  3. Laboratory Experiments On Continually Forced 2d Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, M. G.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Van Heijst, G. J. F.

    There has been much recent interest in the advection of tracers by 2D turbulence in geophysical flows. While there is a large body of literature on decaying 2D turbulence or forced 2D turbulence in unbounded domains, there have been very few studies of forced turbulence in bounded domains. In this study we present new experimental results from a continuously forced quasi 2D turbulent field. The experiments are performed in a square Perspex tank filled with water. The flow is made quasi 2D by a steady background rotation. The rotation rate of the tank has a small (<8 %) sinusoidal perturbation which leads to the periodic formation of eddies in the corners of the tank. When the oscillation period of the perturbation is greater than an eddy roll-up time-scale, dipole structures are observed to form. The dipoles can migrate away from the walls, and the interior of the tank is continually filled with vortexs. From experimental visualizations the length scale of the vortexs appears to be largely controlled by the initial formation mechanism and large scale structures are not observed to form at large times. Thus the experiments provide a simple way of cre- ating a continuously forced 2D turbulent field. The resulting structures are in contrast with most previous laboratory experiments on 2D turbulence which have investigated decaying turbulence and have observed the formations of large scale structure. In these experiments, decaying turbulence had been produced by a variety of methods such as the decaying turbulence in the wake of a comb of rods (Massen et al 1999), organiza- tion of vortices in thin conducting liquids (Cardoso et al 1994) or in rotating systems where there are sudden changes in angular rotation rate (Konijnenberg et al 1998). Results of dye visualizations, particle tracking experiments and a direct numerical simulation will be presented and discussed in terms of their oceanographic application. Bibliography Cardoso,O. Marteau, D. &Tabeling, P

  4. 2D numerical modelling of meandering channel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    XIAO, Y.; ZHOU, G.; YANG, F. S.

    2016-03-01

    A 2D depth-averaged model for hydrodynamic sediment transport and river morphological adjustment was established. The sediment transport submodel takes into account the influence of non-uniform sediment with bed surface armoring and considers the impact of secondary flow in the direction of bed-load transport and transverse slope of the river bed. The bank erosion submodel incorporates a simple simulation method for updating bank geometry during either degradational or aggradational bed evolution. Comparison of the results obtained by the extended model with experimental and field data, and numerical predictions validate that the proposed model can simulate grain sorting in river bends and duplicate the characteristics of meandering river and its development. The results illustrate that by using its control factors, the improved numerical model can be applied to simulate channel evolution under different scenarios and improve understanding of patterning processes.

  5. 2D and 3D Numerical Simulations of Flux Cancellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Linton, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Cancellation of magnetic flux in the solar photosphere and chromosphere has been linked observationally and theoretically to a broad range of solar activity, from filament channel formation to CME initiation. Because this phenomenon is typically measured at only a single layer in the atmosphere, in the radial (line of sight) component of the magnetic field, the actual processes behind this observational signature are ambiguous. It is clear that reconnection is involved in some way, but the location of the reconnection sites and associated connectivity changes remain uncertain in most cases. We are using numerical modeling to demystify flux cancellation, beginning with the simplest possible configuration: a subphotospheric Lundquist flux tube surrounded by a potential field, immersed in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere, spanning many orders of magnitude in plasma beta. In this system, cancellation is driven slowly by a 2-cell circulation pattern imposed in the convection zone, such that the tops of the cells are located around the beta=1 level (i.e., the photosphere) and the flows converge and form a downdraft at the polarity inversion line; note however that no flow is imposed along the neutral line. We will present the results of 2D and 3D MHD-AMR simulations of flux cancellation, in which the flux at the photosphere begins in either an unsheared or sheared state. In all cases, a low-lying flux rope is formed by reconnection at the polarity inversion line within a few thousand seconds. The flux rope remains stable and does not rise, however, in contrast to models which do not include the presence of significant mass loading.

  6. 2-D and 3-D numerical simulation of a supersonic inlet flowfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Shunji; Arakawa, Chuichi

    The 2-D and 3-D steady, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were numerically solved for the flowfields in an experimentally tested inlet model with bleed through a cavity. In the 2-D analysis, a normal shock was located at diffuser inlet instead of the position below the cavity. The normal shock in the middle of the diffuser caused a massive separation of the boundary layer and a large total pressure loss. In the 3-D analysis, the shock wave was distorted by the side wall boundary layer separation, and the complex flow structure was established. The result of the 3-D analysis agreed well with the experiment.

  7. Numerical simulation of rock cutting using 2D AUTODYN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldemichael, D. E.; Rani, A. M. Abdul; Lemma, T. A.; Altaf, K.

    2015-12-01

    In a drilling process for oil and gas exploration, understanding of the interaction between the cutting tool and the rock is important for optimization of the drilling process using polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutters. In this study the finite element method in ANSYS AUTODYN-2D is used to simulate the dynamics of cutter rock interaction, rock failure, and fragmentation. A two-dimensional single PDC cutter and rock model were used to simulate the orthogonal cutting process and to investigate the effect of different parameters such as depth of cut, and back rake angle on two types of rocks (sandstone and limestone). In the simulation, the cutting tool was dragged against stationary rock at predetermined linear velocity and the depth of cut (1,2, and 3 mm) and the back rake angles(-10°, 0°, and +10°) were varied. The simulation result shows that the +10° back rake angle results in higher rate of penetration (ROP). Increasing depth of cut leads to higher ROP at the cost of higher cutting force.

  8. Dynamic unfolding of multilayers: 2D numerical approach and application to turbidites in SW Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechmann, S. M.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Burg, J.-P.; Marques, F. O.

    2010-10-01

    Numerical algorithms for two-dimensional (2D) ductile multilayer folding are used (1) to unfold synthetically generated multilayer folds and natural multilayer folds in turbidites on the SW coast of Portugal and (2) to test how 2D ductile multilayer folding may generate collapsed hinges. A series of dynamic retro-deformation experiments with different viscosity ratios, rheological flow laws, boundary conditions and initial geometries were able to restore digitized, natural multilayer folds to flat layers, except one particular collapsed hinge with closed limbs (i.e. no matrix material left between limbs). Consistently, 2D forward simulations of ductile multilayer folding produced always omega-shaped hinges with matrix material remaining stuffed between limbs. These numerical results suggested that 2D reverse ductile unfolding cannot retro-deform the fully closed, collapsed hinge. Having observed that one limb of this collapsed fold is ruptured, with a measured gap of about 4.9 m, additional calculations were made with implementation of this amount of stretching. Results were not more satisfactory. Since omega-shaped folds exist in other places in the field area, we concluded that in this specific case shales were likely squeezed out from the hinge in the third dimension, parallel to the fold axis. Dynamic retro-deformations indicate that the effective viscosity ratio between inter-layered quartzwackes and shales was between 25 and 100 during folding. They further point out where 3D flow and possibly fracturing were effective during folding. This work demonstrates the constructive feedback between numerical tests and field data and that dynamic retro-deformation offers rheological constraints that geometric retro-deformation of geological sections cannot provide.

  9. Improvement of a 2D numerical model of lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimine, Y.

    2013-12-01

    I propose an improved procedure that reduces an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in two-dimensional simulations based on Ishihara et al. (in Lava Flows and Domes, Fink, JH eds., 1990). The numerical model for lava flow simulations proposed by Ishihara et al. (1990) is based on two-dimensional shallow water model combined with a constitutive equation for a Bingham fluid. It is simple but useful because it properly reproduces distributions of actual lava flows. Thus, it has been regarded as one of pioneer work of numerical simulations of lava flows and it is still now widely used in practical hazard prediction map for civil defense officials in Japan. However, the model include an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of DEM because the model separately assigns the condition for the lava flow to stop due to yield stress for each of two orthogonal axes of rectangular calculating grid based on DEM. This procedure brings a diamond-shaped distribution as shown in Fig. 1 when calculating a lava flow supplied from a point source on a virtual flat plane although the distribution should be circle-shaped. To improve the drawback, I proposed a modified procedure that uses the absolute value of yield stress derived from both components of two orthogonal directions of the slope steepness to assign the condition for lava flows to stop. This brings a better result as shown in Fig. 2. Fig. 1. (a) Contour plots calculated with the original model of Ishihara et al. (1990). (b) Contour plots calculated with a proposed model.

  10. Accelerating numerical modeling of wave propagation through 2-D anisotropic materials using OpenCL.

    PubMed

    Molero, Miguel; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula

    2013-03-01

    We present an implementation of the numerical modeling of elastic waves propagation, in 2D anisotropic materials, using the new parallel computing devices (PCDs). Our study is aimed both to model laboratory experiments and explore the capabilities of the emerging PCDs by discussing performance issues. In the experiments a sample plate of an anisotropic material placed inside a water tank is rotated and, for every angle of rotation it is subjected to an ultrasonic wave (produced by a large source transducer) that propagates in the water and through the material producing some reflection and transmission signals that are recording by a "point-like" receiver. This experiment is numerically modeled by running a finite difference code covering a set of angles θ∈[-50°, 50°], and recorded the signals for the transmission and reflection results. Transversely anisotropic and weakly orthorhombic materials are considered. We accelerated the computation using an open-source toolkit called PyOpenCL, which lets one to easily access the OpenCL parallel computation API's from the high-level programming environment of Python. A speedup factor over 19 using the GPU is obtained when compared with the execution of the same program in parallel using a CPU multi-core (in this case we use the 4-cores that has the CPU). The performance for different graphic cards and operating systems is included together with the full 2-D finite difference code with PyOpenCL. PMID:23290584

  11. A Better 2-D Mechanical Energy Conservation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paesler, Michael

    2012-02-01

    A variety of simple classical mechanics energy conservation experiments are used in teaching laboratories. Typical one-dimensional (1-D) setups may involve falling balls or oscillating springs. Many of these can be quite satisfying in that students can confirm—within a few percent—that mechanical energy is conserved. Students generally have little trouble identifying discrepancies such as the loss of a few percent of the gravitational potential energy due to air friction encountered by a falling ball. Two-dimensional (2-D) systems can require more sophisticated analysis for higher level laboratories, but such systems often incorporate complicating components that can make the exercise academically incomplete and experimentally less accurate. The following describes a simple 2-D energy conservation experiment based on the popular "Newton's Cradle" toy that allows students to account for nearly all of the mechanical energy in the system in an academically complete analysis.

  12. Transport Experiments on 2D Correlated Electron Physics in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Daniel

    2014-03-24

    This research project was designed to investigate experimentally the transport properties of the 2D electrons in Si and GaAs, two prototype semiconductors, in several new physical regimes that were previously inaccessible to experiments. The research focused on the strongly correlated electron physics in the dilute density limit, where the electron potential energy to kinetic energy ratio rs>>1, and on the fractional quantum Hall effect related physics in nuclear demagnetization refrigerator temperature range on samples with new levels of purity and controlled random disorder.

  13. In-Cell Protein Structures from 2D NMR Experiments.

    PubMed

    Müntener, Thomas; Häussinger, Daniel; Selenko, Philipp; Theillet, Francois-Xavier

    2016-07-21

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy provides atomic resolution insights into the structural properties of proteins in cells, but it is rarely used to solve entire protein structures de novo. Here, we introduce a paramagnetic lanthanide-tag to simultaneously measure protein pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) to be used as input for structure calculation routines within the Rosetta program. We employ this approach to determine the structure of the protein G B1 domain (GB1) in intact Xenopus laevis oocytes from a single set of 2D in-cell NMR experiments. Specifically, we derive well-defined GB1 ensembles from low concentration in-cell NMR samples (∼50 μM) measured at moderate magnetic field strengths (600 MHz), thus offering an easily accessible alternative for determining intracellular protein structures. PMID:27379949

  14. 2D numerical simulation of passive autocatalytic recombiner for hydrogen mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gera, B.; Sharma, P. K.; Singh, R. K.

    2012-04-01

    Resolving hydrogen related safety issues, pertaining to nuclear reactor safety has been an important area of research world over for the past decade. The studies on hydrogen transport behavior and development of hydrogen mitigation systems are still being pursued actively in various research labs, including Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), in India. The passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR) is one of such hydrogen mitigating device consisting of catalyst surfaces arranged in an open-ended enclosure. In the plate type recombiner design sheets made of stainless steel and coated with platinum catalyst material are arranged in parallel inside a flow channel. The catalyst elements are exposed to a constant flow of a mixture of air, hydrogen and steam, a catalytic reaction occurs spontaneously at the catalyst surfaces and the heat of reaction produces natural convection flow through the enclosure. Numerical simulation and experiments are required for an in-depth knowledge of such plate type PAR. Specific finite volume based in-house 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code has been developed to model and analyse the working of these recombiners and has been used to simulate one literature quoted experiment. The validation results were in good agreement against literature quoted German REKO experiments. Parametric study has been performed for particular recombiner geometry for various inlet conditions. Salient features of the simplified CFD model developed at BARC and results of the present model calculations are presented in this paper.

  15. Generalized Diffuse Field Within a 2d Alluvial Basin: a Numerical Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina Villegas, J.; Baena, M.; Piña, J.; Perton, M.; Suarez, M.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2013-05-01

    Since the pioneering work of Aki (1957), the seismic noise has been used to infer the wave velocity distribution of soil formations. Later, diffuse-field concepts from room acoustics began to be used in elastodynamics by Weaver (1982) and flourished in many applications thanks to the contributions of Campillo and coworkers. It was established that diffusion like regimes are obtained when the field is produced by equipartitioned, uniform illumination. Within an elastodynamic diffuse-field the average correlation of the displacement field between two stations is proportional to the Green function of the system for those points. Usually, the surface waves can be interpreted by means of the retrieved Green function, from which very important information about the properties in depth can be obtained. Seismic noise and coda are frequently considered as diffuse-fields. This assumption is well supported by ideas of multiple scattering of waves and the resultant energy equipartition. There are few examples of numerically generated diffuse-fields. Some are based on random distributed forces (e.g. Sánchez-Sesma et al., 2006), while others used a set of plane waves with varying incidence angles and polarization (e.g. Sánchez-Sesma and Campillo 2006; Kawase et al. 2011). In this work we generate numerically a diffuse field within the Kawase and Aki (1989) 2D model using a random set of independent and uncorrelated incident plane P, SV and Rayleigh waves. For the simulations we use the indirect boundary element method (IBEM). Thus, we obtained the Green function for pairs of receivers by averaging correlations between different stations on the surface. In order to validate our results we compute the model's Green function as the response for a unit point load using the IBEM. Our numerical experiment provides guidelines for actual calculations of earthquakes in real alluvial basins.

  16. 2D numerical simulation of the MEP energy-transport model with a finite difference scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, V. . E-mail: romano@dmi.unict.it

    2007-02-10

    A finite difference scheme of Scharfetter-Gummel type is used to simulate a consistent energy-transport model for electron transport in semiconductors devices, free of any fitting parameters, formulated on the basis of the maximum entropy principle. Simulations of silicon n{sup +}-n-n{sup +} diodes, 2D-MESFET and 2D-MOSFET and comparisons with the results obtained by a direct simulation of the Boltzmann transport equation and with other energy-transport models, known in the literature, show the validity of the model and the robustness of the numerical scheme.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Compression Corners and Hypersonic Inlet Flows Using the RPLUS2D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational code, PRLUS2D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for two-dimensional shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions. The problem of compression corners at supersonic speeds was solved using the RPLUS2D code. To validate the RPLUS2D code for hypersonic speeds, it was applied to a realistic hypersonic inlet geometry. Both the Baldwin-Lomax and the Chien two-equation turbulence models were used. Computational results showed that the RPLUS2D code compared very well with experimentally obtained data for supersonic compression corner flows, except in the case of large separated flows resulting from the interactions between the shock wave and turbulent boundary layer. The computational results compared well with the experiment results in a hypersonic NASA P8 inlet case, with the Chien two-equation turbulence model performing better than the Baldwin-Lomax model.

  18. FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled numerical simulation of wavefields near excavation boundaries in underground mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Cai, M.

    2016-11-01

    A nonlinear velocity model that considers the influence of confinement and rock mass failure on wave velocity is developed. A numerical method, which couples FLAC and SPECFEM2D, is developed for ground motion modeling near excavation boundaries in underground mines. The motivation of developing the FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled approach is to take merits of each code, such as the stress analysis capability in FLAC and the powerful wave propagation analysis capability in SPECFEM2D. Because stress redistribution and failure of the rock mass around an excavation are considered, realistic non-uniform velocity fields for the SPECFEM2D model can be obtained, and this is a notable feature of this study. Very large differences in wavefields and ground motion are observed between the results from the non-uniform and the uniform velocity models. If the non-uniform velocity model is used, the ground motion around a stope can be amplified up to five times larger than that given by the design scaling law. If a uniform velocity model is used, the amplification factor is only about three. Using the FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled modeling approach, accurate velocity models can be constructed and this in turn will assist in predicting ground motions accurately around underground excavations.

  19. Numerical simulation of ( T 2, T 1) 2D NMR and fluid responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Mao-Jin; Zou, You-Long; Zhang, Jin-Yan; Zhao, Xin

    2012-12-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology is limited for fluid typing, while two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) logging can provide more parameters including longitudinal relaxation time ( T 1) and transverse relaxation time ( T 2) relative to fluid types in porous media. Based on the 2D NMR relaxation mechanism in a gradient magnetic field, echo train simulation and 2D NMR inversion are discussed in detail. For 2D NMR inversion, a hybrid inversion method is proposed based on the damping least squares method (LSQR) and an improved truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) algorithm. A series of spin echoes are first simulated with multiple waiting times ( T W s) in a gradient magnetic field for given fluid models and these synthesized echo trains are inverted by the hybrid method. The inversion results are consistent with given models. Moreover, the numerical simulation of various fluid models such as the gas-water, light oil-water, and vicious oil-water models were carried out with different echo spacings ( T E s) and T W s by this hybrid method. Finally, the influences of different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) on inversion results in various fluid models are studied. The numerical simulations show that the hybrid method and optimized observation parameters are applicable to fluid typing of gas-water and oil-water models.

  20. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods.

    PubMed

    Maximov, Ivan I; Vinding, Mads S; Tse, Desmond H Y; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Shah, N Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community.

  1. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximov, Ivan I.; Vinding, Mads S.; Tse, Desmond H. Y.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Shah, N. Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community.

  2. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods.

    PubMed

    Maximov, Ivan I; Vinding, Mads S; Tse, Desmond H Y; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Shah, N Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community. PMID:25863895

  3. Penetration of tungsten-alloy rods into composite ceramic targets: Experiments and 2-D simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Z.; Dekel, E.; Hohler, V.; Stilp, A. J.; Weber, K.

    1998-07-10

    A series of terminal ballistics experiments, with scaled tungsten-alloy penetrators, was performed on composite targets consisting of ceramic tiles glued to thick steel backing plates. Tiles of silicon-carbide, aluminum nitride, titanium-dibroide and boron-carbide were 20-80 mm thick, and impact velocity was 1.7 km/s. 2-D numerical simulations, using the PISCES code, were performed in order to simulate these shots. It is shown that a simplified version of the Johnson-Holmquist failure model can account for the penetration depths of the rods but is not enough to capture the effect of lateral release waves on these penetrations.

  4. Absorption and scattering 2-D volcano images from numerically calculated space-weighting functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Ibañez, Jesus; Prudencio, Janire; Bianco, Francesca; De Siena, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Short-period small magnitude seismograms mainly comprise scattered waves in the form of coda waves (the tail part of the seismogram, starting after S waves and ending when the noise prevails), spanning more than 70 per cent of the whole seismogram duration. Corresponding coda envelopes provide important information about the earth inhomogeneity, which can be stochastically modeled in terms of distribution of scatterers in a random medium. In suitable experimental conditions (i.e. high earth heterogeneity), either the two parameters describing heterogeneity (scattering coefficient), intrinsic energy dissipation (coefficient of intrinsic attenuation) or a combination of them (extinction length and seismic albedo) can be used to image Earth structures. Once a set of such parameter couples has been measured in a given area and for a number of sources and receivers, imaging their space distribution with standard methods is straightforward. However, as for finite-frequency and full-waveform tomography, the essential problem for a correct imaging is the determination of the weighting function describing the spatial sensitivity of observable data to scattering and absorption anomalies. Due to the nature of coda waves, the measured parameter couple can be seen as a weighted space average of the real parameters characterizing the rock volumes illuminated by the scattered waves. This paper uses the Monte Carlo numerical solution of the Energy Transport Equation to find approximate but realistic 2-D space-weighting functions for coda waves. Separate images for scattering and absorption based on these sensitivity functions are then compared with those obtained with commonly used sensitivity functions in an application to data from an active seismic experiment carried out at Deception Island (Antarctica). Results show that these novel functions are based on a reliable and physically grounded method to image magnitude and shape of scattering and absorption anomalies. Their

  5. Numerical Simulations of 2-D Phase-Field Model with Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; McDonough, J. M.; Tagavi, K. A.

    2003-11-01

    We present a 2-D isotropic phase-field model with convection induced by a flow field applied to freezing into a supercooled melt of pure substance, nickle. Numerical procedures and details of numerical parameters employed are provided, and the convergence of the numerical method is demonstrated by conducting grid-function convergence tests. Dendrite structures, temperature fields, pressure fields, streamlines and velocity vector fields are presented at several different times during the dendrite growth process. Comparisons of dendrites and temperature fields with and without convection indicate that the flow field has a significant effect on the growth rate of the dendrites; in particular, it inhibits the growth. In addition, the flow field influences the dendritic structural morphologies and thickness of the interface. Moreover, the dendrites behave as a solid body in the flow leading to stagnation points and other interesting flow features.

  6. Comparison between 2D and 3D Numerical Modelling of a hot forging simulative test

    SciTech Connect

    Croin, M.; Ghiotti, A.; Bruschi, S.

    2007-04-07

    The paper presents the comparative analysis between 2D and 3D modelling of a simulative experiment, performed in laboratory environment, in which operating conditions approximate hot forging of a turbine aerofoil section. The plane strain deformation was chosen as an ideal case to analyze the process because of the thickness variations in the final section and the consequent distributions of contact pressure and sliding velocity at the interface that are closed to the conditions of the real industrial process. In order to compare the performances of 2D and 3D approaches, two different analyses were performed and compared with the experiments in terms of loads and temperatures peaks at the interface between the dies and the workpiece.

  7. Data catalog of satellite experiments. Supplement no. 2D: Planetology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Spacecraft, experiment, and data sets are presented of lunar explorations. Apollo lunar surface experiments are listed and brief discriptions are included. Areas of data include: astronomy, meteorology, planetology, and solar physics.

  8. A Better 2-D Mechanical Energy Conservation Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paesler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A variety of simple classical mechanics energy conservation experiments are used in teaching laboratories. Typical one-dimensional (1-D) setups may involve falling balls or oscillating springs. Many of these can be quite satisfying in that students can confirm--within a few percent--that mechanical energy is conserved. Students generally have…

  9. A numerical study on the thermal initiation of a confined explosive in 2-D geometry.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Erdoğan; Ulas, Abdullah

    2011-02-15

    Insensitive munitions design against thermal stimuli like slow or fast cook-off has become a significant requirement for today's munitions. In order to achieve insensitive munitions characteristics, the response of the energetic material needs to be predicted against heating stimuli. In this study, a 2D numerical code was developed to simulate the slow and fast cook-off heating conditions of confined munitions and to obtain the response of the energetic materials. Computations were performed in order to predict the transient temperature distribution, the ignition time, and the location of ignition in the munitions. These predictions enable the designers to have an idea of when and at which location the energetic material ignites under certain adverse surrounding conditions. In the paper, the development of the code is explained and the numerical results are compared with available experimental and numerical data in the literature. Additionally, a parametric study was performed showing the effect of dimensional scaling of munitions and the heating rate on the ignition characteristics.

  10. Optical fiber poling by induction: analysis by 2D numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, F; Huang, D; Corbari, C; Healy, N; Sazio, P J A

    2016-04-15

    Since their first demonstration some 25 years ago, thermally poled silica fibers have been used to realize device functions such as electro-optic modulation, switching, polarization-entangled photons, and optical frequency conversion with a number of advantages over bulk free-space components. We have recently developed an innovative induction poling technique that could allow for the development of complex microstructured fiber geometries for highly efficient χ(2)-based device applications. To systematically implement these more advanced poled fiber designs, we report here the development of comprehensive numerical models of the induction poling mechanism itself via two-dimensional (2D) simulations of ion migration and space-charge region formation using finite element analysis. PMID:27082323

  11. Comparison of numerical methods for 2D crystals under anisotropic surface free energy and through evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolla, Madhuri Udayanjani

    In this dissertation first, we compute the equilibrium shapes of 2D crystals under anisotropic surface free energies. An equilibrium shape minimizes the total surface free energy. The governing equation in polar coordinates is a nonlinear ordinary differential equation. Two numerical methods, finite difference and the finite element are used and compared. We investigate the accuracy, order of convergence and efficiency of the two methods in computing the equilibrium shapes. Secondly, we consider the surface of the crystal evolving under surface diffusion and compute the final shape in the evolution which is the equilibrium shape. The surface diffusion equation in polar coordinates is a time-dependent nonlinear 4th order partial differential equation. Again we apply the two methods finite difference and finite element. The results are observed at different stages of evolution of the crystal for the isotropy case. Then we compare the accuracy, order of convergence and efficiency of the two methods.

  12. Numerical Study of Microwave Reflectometry in Plasmas with 2D Turbulent Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    E. Mazzucato

    1998-02-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of the role played by 2D turbulent fluctuations in microwave reflectometry -- a radar technique for density measurements using the reflection of electromagnetic waves from a plasma cutoff. The results indicate that, if the amplitude of fluctuations is below a threshold which is set by the spectrum of poloidal wavenumbers, the measured backward field appears to originate from a virtual location behind the reflecting layer, and to arise from the phase modulation of the probing wave, with an amplitude given by 1D geometric optics. These results suggest a possible scheme for turbulence measurements in tokamaks, where the backward field is collected with a wide aperture antenna, and the virtual reflecting layer is imaged onto the plane of an array of detectors. Such a scheme should be capable of providing additional information on the nature of the short-scale turbulence observed in tokamaks, which still remains one of the unresolved issues in fusion research.

  13. 1-D and 2-D modeling of U-Ti alloy response in impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, B.; Favorsky, V.; Landau, A.; Shvarts, D.; Zaretsky, E. B.

    2003-09-01

    Dynamie response of a U-0.75wt%Ti alloy bas been studied in planar (disk-on-disk), reverse (disk-on-rod) and symmetric (rod-on-rod) ballistic impact experiments performed with a 25 mm light-gas gun. The impact velocities ranged between 100 and 500 m/see and the samples were softly recovered for further examination, revealing different degrees of spall fracture (planar impact) and of adiabatic shear bands (ballistic experiments). The back (planar experiments) and the lateral (ballistic experiments) surface velocities were continuously monitored by VISAR. The velocity profiles and the damage maps were simulated using a 2-D AUTODYN^TM Lagrangian finite differences code. Simulations of the planar experiments were performed with special attention to the compressive path of the loading cycle in order to calibrate a modified Steinberg-Cochran-Guinan (SCG) constitutive model. The Bauschinger effect and a single-parameter spall model were added to describe the unloading and tensile paths. The calibrated SCG model was then employed to simulate the ballistic experiments. An erosion AUTODYN built-in subroutine with a threshold value of plastic strain was chosen to describe the failure in the ballistic impact experiments. The results of the suggested experimental-numerical technique can be taken into account in estimating the different contributions to the shock-induced plastic deformation and failure.

  14. 2-D Airbreathing Lightcraft Engine Experiments in Quiescent Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Israel I.; Myrabo, Leik N.; Minucci, Marco A. S.; de Oliveira, Antonio C.; Toro, Paulo G. P.; Chanes, José B.; Rego, Israel S.

    2011-11-01

    Ground-breaking laser propulsion (LP) experiments were performed under quiescent conditions with a 25 cm wide, two-dimensional Lightcraft model using a Lumonics TEA-622 CO2 laser emitting ˜ 1 μs pulses. In preparation for subsequent hypersonic experiments, this static test campaign was conducted at ambient pressures of 0.06, 0.15, 0.30 and 1 bar with laser pulse energies of 150 to 230 J. Time-variant pressure distributions, generated over engine "absorption chamber" walls, were integrated to obtain total impulse and momentum coupling coefficients (Cm) representative of a single propulsion cycle. Schlieren visualization of laser-induced air breakdown and expanding blast waves was also accomplished. Surprisingly, the Cm results of 600-3000 Ns/MJ were 2.5x to 5x greater than previous results from smaller Lightcraft models; this suggests that higher static Cm performance can likely be achieved in larger scale LP engines. This research collaboration, forged between the USAF and Brazilian Air Force, was carried out at the Henry T. Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics in Brazil.

  15. Numerical analysis using 2D modeling of optical fiber poled by induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; De Lucia, F.; Corbari, C.; Healy, N.; Sazio, P. J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal poling, a technique to introduce effective second-order nonlinearities in silica optical fibers, has found widespread applications in frequency conversion, electro-optic modulation, switching and polarization-entangled photon pair generation. Since its first demonstration around 25 years ago, studies into thermal poling were primarily based on anode-cathode electrode configurations. However, more recently, superior electrode configurations have been investigated that allow for robust and reliable thermally poled fibers with excellent second order nonlinear properties [1, 2]. Very recently, we experimentally demonstrated an electrostatic induction poling technique that creates a stable second-order nonlinearity in a twin-hole fiber without any direct physical contact to internal fiber electrodes whatsoever [3]. This innovative technique lifts a number of restrictions on the use of complex microstructured optical fibers (MOF) for poling, as it is no longer necessary to individually contact internal electrodes and presents a general methodology for selective liquid electrode filling of complex MOF geometries. In order to systematically implement these more advanced device embodiments, it is first necessary to develop comprehensive numerical models of the induction poling mechanism itself. To this end, we have developed two-dimensional (2D) simulations of space-charge region formation using COMSOL finite element analysis, by building on current numerical models [4].

  16. Continental rifting to seafloor spreading: 2D and 3D numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie; Gerya, Taras

    2014-05-01

    Two topics related with continental extension is studied by using numerical modeling methods: (1) Lithospheric mantle stratification changes dynamics of craton extension (2D modeling) and (2) Initial lithospheric rheological structure influences the incipient geometry of the seafloor spreading (3D modeling). (Topic 1) Lithospheric mantle stratification is a common feature in cratonic areas which has been demonstrated by geophysical and geochemical studies. The influence of lithospheric mantle stratification during craton evolution remains poorly understood. We use a 2D thermo-mechanical coupled numerical model to study the influence of stratified lithospheric mantle on craton extension. A rheologically weak layer representing hydrated and/or metasomatized composition is implemented in the lithospheric mantle. Our results show that the weak mantle layer changes the dynamics of lithospheric extension by enhancing the deformation of the overlying mantle and crust and inhibiting deformation of the underlying mantle. Modeling results are compared with North China and North Atlantic cratons. Our work indicates that although the presence of a weak layer may not be sufficient to initiate craton deformation, it enhances deformation by lowering the required extensional plate boundary force. (Topic 2) The process from continental rifting to seafloor spreading is an important step in the Wilson Cycle. Since the rifting to spreading is a continuous process, understanding the inheritance of continental rifting in seafloor spreading is crucial to study the incipient geometry (on a map view) of the oceanic ridge and remains a big challenge. Large extension strain is required to simulate the rifting and spreading processes. Oceanic ridge has a 3D geometry on a map view in nature, which requires 3D studies. Therefore, we employ the three-dimensional numerical modeling method to study this problem. The initial lithospheric rheological structure and the perturbation geometry are two

  17. A new model for two-dimensional numerical simulation of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Zhang, Yongmin

    2013-10-11

    Pseudo-two dimensional (pseudo-2D) fluidized beds, for which the thickness of the system is much smaller than the other two dimensions, is widely used to perform fundamental studies on bubble behavior, solids mixing, or clustering phenomenon in different gas-solids fluidization systems. The abundant data from such experimental systems are very useful for numerical model development and validation. However, it has been reported that two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds usually predict poor quantitative agreement with the experimental data, especially for the solids velocity field. In this paper, a new model is proposed to improve the 2D numerical simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds by properly accounting for the frictional effect of the front and back walls. Two previously reported pseudo-2D experimental systems were simulated with this model. Compared to the traditional 2D simulations, significant improvements in the numerical predictions have been observed and the predicted results are in better agreement with the available experimental data.

  18. Improved treatment of asthenosphere flow and melting in 2D numerical solutions for continental rifting: embedded vs nested modeling approaches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Monserrat, Albert; Morgan, Jason P.; Taramón, Jorge M.; Hall, Robert

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on improving current 2D numerical approaches to modeling the boundary conditions associated with computing accurate deformation and melting associated with continental rifting. Recent models primarily use far-field boundary conditions that have been used for decades with little assessment of their effects on asthenospheric flow beneath the rifting region. All are extremely oversimplified. All are likely to significantly shape the pattern of asthenospheric flow beneath the stretching lithosphere which is associated with pressure-release melting and rift volcanism. The choice of boundary conditions may lead to different predictions of asthenospheric flow and melting associated with lithospheric stretching and breakup. We also find that they may affect the mode of crustal stretching. Here we discuss a suite of numerical experiments using a Lagrangian formulation, that compare these choices to likely more realistic boundary condition choices like the analytical solution for flow associated with two diverging plates stretching over a finite-width region. We also compare embedded and nested meshes with a high-resolution 2-D region within a cartesian 'whole mantle cross-section' box. Our initial results imply that the choice of far-field boundary conditions does indeed significantly influence predicted melting distributions and melt volumes associated with continental breakup. For calculations including asthenospheric melting, the 'finite width plate spreading' and embedded rifting boundary condition treatments lead to significantly smaller BC-influenced signals when using high-resolution calculation regions of order ~1000 km wide and 600 km deep within a lower resolution box of the order of >5000 km wide and 2800 km. We recommend their use when models are attempting to resolve the effects of asthenosphere flow and melting. We also discuss several examples of typical numerical 'artifacts' related to 'edge convection' at the sides of the stretching region

  19. Numerical Optimization Using Computer Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosset, Michael W.; Torczon, Virginia

    1997-01-01

    Engineering design optimization often gives rise to problems in which expensive objective functions are minimized by derivative-free methods. We propose a method for solving such problems that synthesizes ideas from the numerical optimization and computer experiment literatures. Our approach relies on kriging known function values to construct a sequence of surrogate models of the objective function that are used to guide a grid search for a minimizer. Results from numerical experiments on a standard test problem are presented.

  20. Numerical simulation of 2D buoyant jets in ice-covered and temperature-stratified water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ruochuan

    A two-dimensional (2D) unsteady simulation model is applied to the problem of a submerged warm water discharge into a stratified lake or reservoir with an ice cover. Numerical simulations and analyses are conducted to gain insight into large-scale convective recirculation and flow processes in a cold waterbody induced by a buoyant jet. Jet behaviors under various discharge temperatures are captured by directly modeling flow and thermal fields. Flow structures and processes are described by the simulated spatial and temporal distributions of velocity and temperature in various regions: deflection, recirculation, attachment, and impingement. Some peculiar hydrothermal and dynamic features, e.g. reversal of buoyancy due to the dilution of a warm jet by entraining cold ambient water, are identified and examined. Simulation results show that buoyancy is the most important factor controlling jet behavior and mixing processes. The inflow boundary is treated as a liquid wall from which the jet is offset. Similarity and difference in effects of boundaries perpendicular and parallel to flow, and of buoyancy on jet attachment and impingement, are discussed. Symmetric flow configuration is used to de-emphasize the Coanda effect caused by offset.

  1. Modelling 2001 lahars at Popocatépetl volcano using FLO2D numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2013-12-01

    Popocatépetl volcano is located on the central part of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt. It is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico and endanger more than 25 million people that lives in its surroundings. In the last months, the renewal of its volcanic activity put into alert scientific community. One of the possible scenarios is the 2001 explosive activity, which was characterized by a 8 km eruptive column and the subsequent formation of pumice flows up to 4 km from the crater. Lahars were generated few hours after, remobilizing the new deposits towards NE flank of the volcano, along Huiloac Gorge, almost reaching Santiago Xalitzintla town (Capra et al., 2004). The occurrence of a similar scenario makes very important to reproduce this event to delimitate accurately lahar hazard zones. In this work, 2001 lahar deposit is modeled using FLO2D numerical code. Geophone data is used to reconstruct initial hydrograph and sediment concentration. Sensitivity study of most important parameters used by this code like Manning, and α and β coefficients was conducted in order to achieve a good simulation. Results obtained were compared with field data and demonstrated a good agreement in thickness and flow distribution. A comparison with previously published data with laharZ program (Muñoz-Salinas, 2009) is also made. Additionally, lahars with fluctuating sediment concentrations but with similar volume are simulated to observe the influence of the rheological behavior on lahar distribution.

  2. Water cycling beneath subduction zones in 2D and 3D numerical models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupke, L.; Iyer, K. H.; Hasenclever, J.; Morgan, J.

    2013-12-01

    Tracing the cycling of fluids and volatiles through subduction zones continues to be a challenging task with budgets still having large error bars attached to them. In this contribution we show how numerical models can help to integrate various geological, geophysical, and geochemical datasets and how they can be used to put better bounds on the likely amounts of water being subducted, released into the arc and back-arc melting regions, and recycled to the deeper mantle. To achieve this task we use a suite of numerical models. Bending related faulting and hydration of the incoming lithosphere is resolved using a reactive flow model that solves for crustal scale fluid flow and mantle serpentinization using reaction kinetics. Seismic tomography studies from offshore Chile and Central America are used to evaluate and constrain the effective reaction rate. These rates are then used to assess the contribution of serpentinization to the water budget at subduction zones. The pattern of hydration is controlled by the reaction kinetics and serpentinization is most intense around the 270°C isotherm. The depth of this isotherm correlates well with the dominant spacing of double seismic zones observed globally. Comparison of the results with heat flow data suggests that observed seafloor temperature gradients in the bend-fault region are too low to be caused by ';one-pass' downward water flow into the serpentinizing lithosphere, but rather suggest that bend-faults are areas of active hydrothermal circulation. This implies that serpentine-sourced vents and chemosynthetic vent communities should be found in this deep-sea environment as well. Dehydration reactions are resolved with a 2D kinematic subduction zone model that computes the temperature field and the likely locations and volumes of slab fluid release due to metamorphic dehydration reactions. Here we find that up to 1/3 of the subducted water may be transported into the deeper mantle for the coldest subduction zones

  3. On craton thinning/destruction: Insight from 2D thermal-mechanical numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Although most cratons maintain stable, some exceptions are present, such as the North China craton, North Atlantic craton, and Wyoming craton, which have experienced dramatic lithospheric deformation/thinning. Mechanisms triggering cratonic thinning remains enigmatic [Lee et al., 2011]. Using a 2D thermo-mechanical coupled numerical model [Gerya and Yuen, 2007], we investigate two possible mechanisms: (1) stratification of cratonic lithospheric mantle, and (2) rheological weakening due to hydration.Lithospheric mantle stratification is a common feature in cratonic areas which has been demonstrated by geophysical and geochemical studies [Thybo and Perchuc, 1997; Griffin et al., 2004; Romanowicz, 2009; Rychert and Shearer, 2009; Yuan and Romanowicz, 2010]. The influence of lithospheric mantle stratification during craton evolution remains poorly understood. A rheologically weak layer representing hydrated and/or metasomatized composition is implemented in the lithospheric mantle. Our results show that the weak mantle layer changes the dynamics of lithospheric extension by enhancing the deformation of the overlying mantle and crust and inhibiting deformation of the underlying mantle [Liao et al., 2013; Liao and Gerya, 2014]. Modeling results are compared with North China and North Atlantic cratons. Our work indicates that although the presence of a weak layer may not be sufficient to initiate craton deformation, it enhances deformation by lowering the required extensional plate boundary force. Rheological weakening due to hydration is a possible mechanism triggering/enhancing craton deformation, especially for cratons jaxtaposing with a subduction, since water can release from a subducting slab. We investigate the influence of wet mantle flow laws [Hirth and Kohlstedt, 2003], in which a water parameter (i.e. constant water content) is involved. Our results show that wet dislocation alone does not accelerate cratonic deformation significantly. However, if wet diffusion

  4. Approaches to Modeling Coupled Flow and Reaction in a 2-D Cementation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl; Cochepin, B.; Trotignon, L.; Bildstein, O.; Steefel, C.; Lagneau, V.; van der Lee, J.

    2008-04-01

    Porosity evolution at reactive interfaces is a key process that governs the evolution and performances of many engineered systems that have important applications in earth and environmental sciences. This is the case, for example, at the interface between cement structures and clays in deep geological nuclear waste disposals. Although in a different transport regime, similar questions arise for permeable reactive barriers used for biogeochemical remediation in surface environments. The COMEDIE project aims at investigating the coupling between transport, hydrodynamics and chemistry when significant variations of porosity occur. The present work focuses on a numerical benchmark used as a design exercise for the future COMEDIE-2D experiment. The use of reactive transport simulation tools like Hytec and Crunch provides predictions of the physico-chemical evolutions that are expected during the future experiments in laboratory. Focus is given in this paper on the evolution during the simulated experiment of precipitate, permeability and porosity fields. A first case is considered in which the porosity is constant. Results obtained with Crunch and Hytec are in relatively good agreement. Differences are attributable to the models of reactive surface area taken into account for dissolution/precipitation processes. Crunch and Hytec simulations taking into account porosity variations are then presented and compared. Results given by the two codes are in qualitative agreement, with differences attributable in part to the models of reactive surface area for dissolution/precipitation processes. As a consequence, the localization of secondary precipitates predicted by Crunch leads to lower local porosities than for predictions obtained by Hytec and thus to a stronger coupling between flow and chemistry. This benchmark highlights the importance of the surface area model employed to describe systems in which strong porosity variations occur as a result of dissolution

  5. Numerical Real Space Renormalization of a 2D Random Boson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Shankar; Refael, Gil

    2011-03-01

    Interest in the random boson problem originated in experiments on Helium adsorbed in Vycor, but the problem arises in many contexts, including Josephson junction arrays and disordered cold atom systems. Recently, Altman, Kafri, Polkovnikov, and Refael have studied a rotor model description of interacting bosons subjected to quenched disorder in one dimension. Using a real space renormalization approach, they have identified a random fixed point that marks the transition between superfluid and Mott-glass phases. Here, we describe work that numerically extends their approach to the random boson problem in two dimensions. We first test the validity of the real space renormalization by comparison to exact diagonalization of small systems. Then, we move to larger systems and explore what the renormalization scheme can tell us about the nature of the insulating and superfluid phases.

  6. 2-D Numerical Simulation of Eruption Clouds : Effects of Turbulent Mixing between Eruption Cloud and Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; KOYAGUCHI, T.; OGAWA, M.; Hachisu, I.

    2001-05-01

    Mixing of eruption cloud and air is one of the most important processes for eruption cloud dynamics. The critical condition of eruption types (eruption column or pyroclastic flow) depends on efficiency of mixing of eruption cloud and the ambient air. However, in most of the previous models (e.g., Sparks,1986; Woods, 1988), the rate of mixing between cloud and air is taken into account by introducing empirical parameters such as entrainment coefficient or turbulent diffusion coefficient. We developed a numerical model of 2-D (axisymmetrical) eruption columns in order to simulate the turbulent mixing between eruption column and air. We calculated the motion of an eruption column from a circular vent on the flat surface of the earth. Supposing that relative velocity of gas and ash particles is sufficiently small, we can treat eruption cloud as a single gas. Equation of state (EOS) for the mixture of the magmatic component (i.e. volcanic gas plus pyroclasts) and air can be expressed by EOS for an ideal gas, because volume fraction of the gas phase is very large. The density change as a function of mixing ratio between air and the magmatic component has a strong non-linear feature, because the density of the mixture drastically decreases as entrained air expands by heating. This non-linear feature can be reproduced by changing the gas constant and the ratio of specific heat in EOS for ideal gases; the molecular weight increases and the ratio of specific heat approaches 1 as the magmatic component increases. It is assumed that the dynamics of eruption column follows the Euler equation, so that no viscous effect except for the numerical viscosity is taken into account. Roe scheme (a general TVD scheme for compressible flow) is used in order to simulate the generation of shock waves inside and around the eruption column. The results show that many vortexes are generated around the boundary between eruption cloud and air, which results in violent mixing. When the size of

  7. 2D transient granular flows over obstacles: experimental and numerical work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juez, Carmelo; Caviedes-Voullième, Daniel; Murillo, Javier; García-Navarro, Pilar

    2016-04-01

    Landslides are an ubiquitous natural hazard, and therefore human infrastructure and settlements are often at risk in mountainous regions. In order to better understand and predict landslides, systematic studies of the phenomena need to be undertaken. In particular, computational tools which allow for analysis of field problems require to be thoroughly tested, calibrated and validated under controlled conditions. And to do so, it is necessary for such controlled experiments to be fully characterized in the same terms as the numerical model requires. This work presents an experimental study of dry granular flow over a rough bed with topography which resembles a mountain valley. It has an upper region with a very high slope. The geometry of the bed describes a fourth order polynomial curve, with a low point with zero slope, and afterwards a short region with adverse slope. Obstacles are present in the lower regions which are used as model geometries of human structures. The experiments consisted of a sudden release a mass of sand on the upper region, and allowing it to flow downslope. Furthermore, it has been frequent in previous studies to measure final states of the granular mass at rest, but seldom has transient data being provided, and never for the entire field. In this work we present transient measurements of the moving granular surfaces, obtained with a consumer-grade RGB-D sensor. The sensor, developed for the videogame industry, allows to measure the moving surface of the sand, thus obtaining elevation fields. The experimental results are very consistent and repeatable. The measured surfaces clearly show the distinctive features of the granular flow around the obstacles and allow to qualitatively describe the different flow patterns. More importantly, the quantitative description of the granular surface allows for benchmarking and calibration of predictive numerical models, key in scaling the small-scale experimental knowledge into the field. In addition, as

  8. EDGE2D Simulations of JET{sup 13}C Migration Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan; J.P. Coad; G. Corrigan; G.F. Matthews; J. Spence

    2004-06-16

    Material migration has received renewed interest due to tritium retention associated with carbon transport to remote vessel locations. Those results influence the desirability of carbon usage on ITER. Subsequently, additional experiments have been performed, including tracer experiments attempting to identify material migration from specific locations. In this paper, EDGE2D models a well-diagnosed JET{sup 13}C tracer migration experiment. The role of SOL flows upon the migration patterns is identified.

  9. 2-D MHD numerical simulations of EML plasma armatures with ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, G. C.; Huerta, M. A.; Thio, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    We use a 2-D) resistive MHD code to simulate an EML plasma armature. The energy equation includes Ohmic heating, radiation heat transport and the ideal gas equation of state, allowing for variable ionization using the Saha equations. We calculate rail ablation taking into account the flow of heat into the interior of the rails. Our simulations show the development of internal convective flows and secondary arcs. We use an explicit Flux Corrected Transport algorithm to advance all quantities in time.

  10. BEST-HNN and 2D-(HN) NH experiments for rapid backbone assignment in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Paul, Subhradip; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2010-05-01

    HNN has proven to be an extremely valuable experiment for rapid and unambiguous backbone (H N, 15N) assignment in ( 13C, 15N) labeled proteins. However, low sensitivity of the experiment is often a limiting factor, especially when the transverse relaxation times ( T2) are short. We show here that BEST modification Schanda et al. (2006) [2] increases the sensitivity per unit time by more than a factor of 2.0 and thus substantially increases the speed of data collection; good 3D data can be collected in 8-10 h. Next, we present a simple method for amino-acid type identification based on simple 2D versions of the HNN experiment, labeled here as 2D-(HN) NH. Each of these experiments which produce anchor points for Gly, Ala, Ser/Thr residues, can be recorded in less than an hour. These enable rapid data acquisition, rapid analysis, and consequently rapid assignment of backbone (H N, 15N) resonances. The 2D-(HN) NH experiment does not involve aliphatic/aromatic protons and hence can be applied to deuterated protein samples as well, which is an additional advantage. The experiments have been demonstrated with human ubiquitin (76 aa) and acetic-acid denatured HIV-1 protease (99 aa), as representatives of folded and unfolded protein systems, respectively.

  11. Numerical solution of 2D-vector tomography problem using the method of approximate inverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetov, Ivan; Maltseva, Svetlana; Polyakova, Anna

    2016-08-01

    We propose a numerical solution of reconstruction problem of a two-dimensional vector field in a unit disk from the known values of the longitudinal and transverse ray transforms. The algorithm is based on the method of approximate inverse. Numerical simulations confirm that the proposed method yields good results of reconstruction of vector fields.

  12. The strategy for numerical solving of PIES without explicit calculation of singular integrals in 2D potential problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szerszeń, Krzysztof; Zieniuk, Eugeniusz

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a strategy for numerical solving of parametric integral equation system (PIES) for 2D potential problems without explicit calculation of singular integrals. The values of these integrals will be expressed indirectly in terms of easy to compute non-singular integrals. The effectiveness of the proposed strategy is investigated with the example of potential problem modeled by the Laplace equation. The strategy simplifies the structure of the program with good the accuracy of the obtained solutions.

  13. Numerical Modeling of LCROSS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanov, V. G.; Kim, V. V.; Matveichev, A. V.; Zhukov, B. G.; Lomonosov, I. V.

    2009-06-01

    The mission objectives of the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) include confirming the presence or absence of water ice in a permanently shadowed crater in the Moon's polar regions. In this research we present results of numerical modeling of forthcoming LCROSS experiment. The parallel FPIC3D gas dynamic code with implemented realistic equations of state (EOS) and constitutive relations [1] was used. New wide--range EOS for lunar ground was developed. We carried out calculations of impact of model body on the lunar surface at different angels. Situations of impact on dry and water ice--contained lunar ground were also taken into account. Modeling results are given for crater's shape and size along with amount of ejecta. [4pt] [1] V.E. Fortov, V.V. Kim, I.V. Lomonosov, A.V. Matveichev, A.V. Ostrik. Numerical modeling of hypervelocity impacts, Intern J Impact Engeneering, 33, 244-253 (2006)

  14. Numerical studies of the melting transition in 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, P.; Donko, Z.; Kalman, G. J.

    2008-09-07

    We present the latest results of our systematic studies of the solid--liquid phase transition in 2D classical many-particle systems interacting with the Yukawa potential. Our previous work is extended by applying the molecular dynamic simulations to systems with up to 1.6 million particles in the computational box (for {kappa} = 2 case). Equilibrium simulations are performed for different coupling parameters in the vicinity of the expected melting transition ({gamma}{sub m}{sup {kappa}}{sup ={sup 2}}{approx_equal}415) and a wide range of observables are averaged over uncorrelated samples of the micro-canonical ensemble generated by the simulations.

  15. A Numerical Analysis of Sloshing Fluid in 2D Tanks with Baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. H.; Chen, B. F.

    2011-09-01

    A tuned liquid damper (TLD) is one possible damping device of tall buildings under wind and earthquake excitations. A 2D tank with a vertically tank bottom-mounted baffle under horizontal excitation is studied in this work. The combination of time-independent finite difference method [1-3] and one-dimensional ghost cell approach was implemented to solve liquid sloshing in the baffled tank. The correlation between the movement of baffles and flow field due to liquid sloshing might to the clue to investigate the evolution of vortices around the baffle tip. We categorize the interaction process of vortices evolution into three phases: (1) Formation of separated shear layer and generation of vortices; (2) Formation of a vertical jet and shedding of vortices; (3) Interaction between shedding vortices and sloshing flow: the generation of snaky flow.

  16. Numerical method of crack analysis in 2D finite magnetoelectroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minghao; Xu, Guangtao; Fan, Cuiying

    2010-04-01

    The present paper extends the hybrid extended displacement discontinuity fundamental solution method (HEDD-FSM) (Eng Anal Bound Elem 33:592-600, 2009) to analysis of cracks in 2D finite magnetoelectroelastic media. The solution of the crack is expressed approximately by a linear combination of fundamental solutions of the governing equations, which includes the extended point force fundamental solutions with sources placed at chosen points outside the domain of the problem under consideration, and the extended Crouch fundamental solutions with extended displacement discontinuities placed on the crack. The coefficients of the fundamental solutions are determined by letting the approximated solution satisfy the prescribed boundary conditions on the boundary of the domain and on the crack face. The Crouch fundamental solution for a parabolic element at the crack tip is derived to model the square root variations of near tip fields. The extended stress intensity factors are calculated under different electric and magnetic boundary conditions.

  17. Some features of auroral electric fields as seen in 2D numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemann, H.; Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Results of 2D plasma simulations are presented and related to auroral observations. The formation of V-shaped potentials is studied with a 2 1/2 dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell code for a magnetized plasma. It is shown that amplitudes for perpendicular electric fields are larger than for parallel electric fields, and for Te less than 100 eV, the amplitudes are comparable to the electric fields associated with the electrostatic shocks observed from the S3-3 satellite. The excitation of electrostatic ion-cyclotron EIC waves which occurs in the region below the parallel potential drop is discussed. In auroral plasmas EIC waves are observed above the V-shaped double layers in association with ion beams and field-aligned currents. The results also show that oppositely directed electric fields in the center and at the edges of the simulation region produce oppositely directed currents. Precipitating auroral ions in association with electron inverted-V events are seen by the DMSP-F6 satellite.

  18. A Beam-Fourier Technique for the Numerical Investigation of 2D Nonlinear Convective Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, N. C.

    2011-11-01

    In the current work, we develop a numerical method suitable for treating the problem of nonlinear two-dimensional flows in rectangular domains. For the spatial approximation we employ the Fourier-Galerkin approach. More specifically, our basis functions are products of trigonometric and Beam functions. This choice means that the solutions automatically satisfy the boundary and periodic conditions in the x and y directions respectively. The accuracy of the method is assessed by applying it to model problems which admit exact analytical solutions. The numerical and analytic solutions are found to be in good agreement. The convergence rate of the spectral coefficients is found to be fifth-order algebraic in the x-direction and y-direction, confirming the efficiency and speed of our technique.

  19. Numerical solution of 2D and 3D turbulent internal flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Naixing; Xu, Yanji

    1991-08-01

    The paper describes a method for solving numerically two-dimensional or axisymmetric, and three-dimensional turbulent internal flow problems. The method is based on an implicit upwinding relaxation scheme with an arbitrarily shaped conservative control volume. The compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a two-equation turbulence model. All these equations are expressed by using a nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. The method is applied to study the compressible internal flow in modern power installations. It has been observed that predictions for two-dimensional and three-dimensional channels show very good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Numerical and experimental studies of the elastic enhancement factor of 2D open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirko, Leszek; Białous, Małgorzata; Yunko, Vitalii; Bauch, Szymon; Ławniczak, Michał

    We present the results of numerical and experimental studies of the elastic enhancement factor W for microwave rough and rectangular cavities simulating two-dimensional chaotic and partially chaotic quantum billiards in the presence of moderate absorption strength. We show that for the frequency range ν = 15 . 0 - 18 . 5 GHz, in which the coupling between antennas and the system is strong enough, the values of W for the microwave rough cavity lie below the predictions of random matrix theory and on average they are above the theoretical results of V. Sokolov and O. Zhirov, Phys. Rev. E, 91, 052917 (2015). We also show that the enhancement factor W of a microwave rectangular cavity coupled to the external channels via microwave antennas, simulating a partially chaotic quantum billiard, calculated by applying the Potter-Rosenzweig model with κ = 2 . 8 +/- 0 . 5 is close to the experimental one. Our numerical and experimental results suggest that the enhancement factor can be used as a measure of internal chaos which can be especially useful for systems with significant openness or absorption. This work was partially supported by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education Grants N N202 130239 and UMO-2013/09/D/ST2/03727.

  1. Comparison between a 1D and a 2D numerical model of an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Thomas Frank; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Bahl, Christian R. H.; Elmegaard, Brian; Pryds, Nini; Smith, Anders

    2008-05-01

    The active magnetic regenerator (AMR) refrigeration system represents an environmentally attractive alternative to vapour-compression refrigeration. This paper compares the results of two numerical AMR models: (1) a 1D finite difference model and (2) a 2D finite element model. Both models simulate a reciprocating AMR and can determine the cyclical steady-state temperature profile of the system as well as performance parameters such as the refrigeration capacity, the work input and the coefficient of performance (COP). The models are used to analyse an AMR with a regenerator made of flat parallel plates of gadolinium operating in the presence of a 1 T magnetic field. The results are used to discuss under which circumstances a 1D model is insufficient and a 2D model is necessary. The results indicate that when the temperature gradients in the AMR perpendicular to the flow are small a 1D model obtains accurate results of overall results such as the refrigeration capacity but that a 2D model is required for a detailed analysis of the phenomena occurring inside the AMR.

  2. Modelling river bank erosion using a 2D depth-averaged numerical model of flow and non-cohesive, non-uniform sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kadi Abderrezzak, Kamal; Die Moran, Andrés; Tassi, Pablo; Ata, Riadh; Hervouet, Jean-Michel

    2016-07-01

    Bank erosion can be an important form of morphological adjustment in rivers. With the advances made in computational techniques, two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical models have become valuable tools for resolving many engineering problems dealing with sediment transport. The objective of this research work is to present a simple, new, bank-erosion operator that is integrated into a 2D Saint-Venant-Exner morphodynamic model. The numerical code is based on an unstructured grid of triangular elements and finite-element algorithms. The slope of each element in the grid is compared to the angle of repose of the bank material. Elements for which the slope is too steep are tilted to bring them to the angle of repose along a horizontal axis defined such that the volume loss above the axis is equal to the volume gain below, thus ensuring mass balance. The model performance is assessed using data from laboratory flume experiments and a scale model of the Old Rhine. For the flume experiment case with uniform bank material, relevant results are obtained for bank geometry changes. For the more challenging case (i.e. scale model of the Old Rhine with non-uniform bank material), the numerical model is capable of reproducing the main features of the bank failure, induced by the newly designed groynes, as well as the transport of the mobilized sediment material downstream. Some deviations between the computed results and measured data are, however, observed. They are ascribed to the effects of three-dimensional (3D) flow structures, pore pressure and cohesion, which are not considered in the present 2D model.

  3. A hybrid experimental-numerical technique for determining 3D velocity fields from planar 2D PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, A.; Sigurdson, M.; Mezić, I.; Meinhart, C. D.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of 3D, three component velocity fields is central to the understanding and development of effective microfluidic devices for lab-on-chip mixing applications. In this paper we present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for the generation of 3D flow information from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data and finite element simulations of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer. A numerical least-squares optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based 3D multiphysics simulation in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved estimation of the steady state velocity field. This 3D velocity field can be used to assess mixing phenomena more accurately than would be possible through simulation alone. Our technique can also be used to estimate uncertain quantities in experimental situations by fitting the gathered field data to a simulated physical model. The optimization algorithm reduced the root-mean-squared difference between the experimental and simulated velocity fields in the target region by more than a factor of 4, resulting in an average error less than 12% of the average velocity magnitude.

  4. Numerical Study of Sound Emission by 2D Regular and Chaotic Vortex Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knio, Omar M.; Collorec, Luc; Juvé, Daniel

    1995-02-01

    The far-field noise generated by a system of three Gaussian vortices lying over a flat boundary is numerically investigated using a two-dimensional vortex element method. The method is based on the discretization of the vorticity field into a finite number of smoothed vortex elements of spherical overlapping cores. The elements are convected in a Lagrangian reference along particle trajectories using the local velocity vector, given in terms of a desingularized Biot-Savart law. The initial structure of the vortex system is triangular; a one-dimensional family of initial configurations is constructed by keeping one side of the triangle fixed and vertical, and varying the abscissa of the centroid of the remaining vortex. The inviscid dynamics of this vortex configuration are first investigated using non-deformable vortices. Depending on the aspect ratio of the initial system, regular or chaotic motion occurs. Due to wall-related symmetries, the far-field sound always exhibits a time-independent quadrupolar directivity with maxima parallel end perpendicular to the wall. When regular motion prevails, the noise spectrum is dominated by discrete frequencies which correspond to the fundamental system frequency and its superharmonics. For chaotic motion, a broadband spectrum is obtained; computed soundlevels are substantially higher than in non-chaotic systems. A more sophisticated analysis is then performed which accounts for vortex core dynamics. Results show that the vortex cores are susceptible to inviscid instability which leads to violent vorticity reorganization within the core. This phenomenon has little effect on the large-scale features of the motion of the system or on low frequency sound emission. However, it leads to the generation of a high-frequency noise band in the acoustic pressure spectrum. The latter is observed in both regular and chaotic system simulations.

  5. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction calculations simulating the SIMQUAKE experiment using STEALTH 2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, H. T.; Hofmann, R.; Yee, G.; Vaughan, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Transient, nonlinear soil-structure interaction simulations of an Electric Power Research Institute, SIMQUAKE experiment were performed using the large strain, time domain STEALTH 2D code and a cyclic, kinematically hardening cap soil model. Results from the STEALTH simulations were compared to identical simulations performed with the TRANAL code and indicate relatively good agreement between all the STEALTH and TRANAL calculations. The differences that are seen can probably be attributed to: (1) large (STEALTH) vs. small (TRANAL) strain formulation and/or (2) grid discretization differences.

  6. Application of 2D numerical model to unsteady performance evaluation of vertical-axis tidal current turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Qu, Hengliang; Shi, Hongda; Hu, Gexing; Hyun, Beom-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Tidal current energy is renewable and sustainable, which is a promising alternative energy resource for the future electricity supply. The straight-bladed vertical-axis turbine is regarded as a useful tool to capture the tidal current energy especially under low-speed conditions. A 2D unsteady numerical model based on Ansys-Fluent 12.0 is established to conduct the numerical simulation, which is validated by the corresponding experimental data. For the unsteady calculations, the SST model, 2×105 and 0.01 s are selected as the proper turbulence model, mesh number, and time step, respectively. Detailed contours of the velocity distributions around the rotor blade foils have been provided for a flow field analysis. The tip speed ratio (TSR) determines the azimuth angle of the appearance of the torque peak, which occurs once for a blade in a single revolution. It is also found that simply increasing the incident flow velocity could not improve the turbine performance accordingly. The peaks of the averaged power and torque coefficients appear at TSRs of 2.1 and 1.8, respectively. Furthermore, several shapes of the duct augmentation are proposed to improve the turbine performance by contracting the flow path gradually from the open mouth of the duct to the rotor. The duct augmentation can significantly enhance the power and torque output. Furthermore, the elliptic shape enables the best performance of the turbine. The numerical results prove the capability of the present 2D model for the unsteady hydrodynamics and an operating performance analysis of the vertical tidal stream turbine.

  7. THE 2D HEISENBERG ANTIFERROMAGNET IN HIGH-Tc SUPERCONDUCTIVITY:. A Review of Numerical Techniques and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, T.

    In this article we review numerical studies of the quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a square lattice, which is a model of the magnetic properties of the undoped “precursor insulators” of the high temperature superconductors. We begin with a brief pedagogical introduction and then discuss zero and nonzero temperature properties and compare the numerical results to analytical calculations and to experiment where appropriate. We also review the various algorithms used to obtain these results, and discuss algorithm developments and improvements in computer technology which would be most useful for future numerical work in this area. Finally we list several outstanding problems which may merit further investigation.

  8. Numerical experiments on unstructured PIC stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Day, David Minot

    2011-04-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) is a method for plasmas simulation. Particles are pushed with Verlet time integration. Fields are modeled using finite differences on a tensor product mesh (cells). The Unstructured PIC methods studied here use instead finite element discretizations on unstructured (simplicial) meshes. PIC is constrained by stability limits (upper bounds) on mesh and time step sizes. Numerical evidence (2D) and analysis will be presented showing that similar bounds constrain unstructured PIC.

  9. Impact of Surface Roughness on Capillary Trapping Using 2D-Micromodel Visualization Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Attaei-Dadavi, Iman; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-04-01

    According to experimental observations, capillary trapping is strongly dependent on the roughness of the pore-solid interface. We performed imbibition experiments in the range of capillary numbers (Ca) from 10^-6 to 5x10^-5 using 2D-micromodels, which exhibit a rough surface. The microstructure comprises a double-porosity structure with pronounced macropores. The dynamics of precursor thin-film flow and its importance for capillary trapping is studied. For the first time Thin-Film Dynamics and the Complex Interplay of Thin Film- and Corner Flow for Snap-off Trapping is visualized using fluorescence microscopy. The experimental data for thin-film flow advancement show a square-root time dependence. Contrary to smooth surfaces, we prove by strict thermodynamical arguments that complete wetting is possible in a broad range of contact angles (0 - 90°). We develop a pore-scale model, which describes the front dynamics of thin-film flow on rough surfaces. Furthermore, contact angle hysteresis is considered for rough surfaces. We conduct a comprehensive cluster analysis, studying the influence of viscous forces (capillary number) and buoyancy forces (bond number) on cluster size distribution and comparing the results with predictions from percolation theory. We found that our experimental results agree with theoretical results of percolation theory for Ca = 10^-6: (i) a universal power-like cluster size distribution, (ii) the linear surface-volume relationship of trapped clusters, and (iii) the existence of the cut-off correlation length for the maximal cluster height. The good agreement is a strong argument that the experimental cluster size distribution is caused by a percolation-like trapping process (Ordinary Percolation). [1] H. Geistlinger, I. Ataei-Dadavi, S. Mohammadian, and H.-J. Vogel (2015) The Impact of Pore structure and Surface Roughness on Capillary Trapping for 2D- and 3D-porous media: Comparison with Percolation theory. Special issue: Applications of

  10. A 2D transient numerical model combining heat/mass transport effects in a tubular solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollayi Barzi, Y.; Ghassemi, M.; Hamedi, M. H.

    The purpose of this study is to present a 2D transient numerical model to predict the dynamic behavior of a tubular SOFC. In this model, the transient conservation equations (momentum, species and energy equations) are solved numerically and electrical and electrochemical outputs are calculated with an equivalent electrical circuit for the cell. The developed model determines the cell electrical and thermal responses to the variation of load current. Also it predicts the local EMF, state variables (pressure, temperature and species concentration) and cell performance for different cell load currents. Using this comprehensive model the dynamic behavior of Tubular SOFC is studied. First an initial steady state operating condition is set for the SOFC model and then the time response of the fuel cell to changes of some interested input parameters (like electrical load) is analyzed. The simulation starts when the cell is at the steady state in a specific output load. When the load step change takes place, the solution continues to reach to the new steady state condition. Then the cell transient behavior is analyzed. The results show that when the load current is stepped up, the output voltage decreases to a new steady state voltage in about 67 min.

  11. Ultrasonic field profile evaluation in acoustically inhomogeneous anisotropic materials using 2D ray tracing model: Numerical and experimental comparison.

    PubMed

    Kolkoori, S R; Rahman, M-U; Chinta, P K; Ktreutzbruck, M; Rethmeier, M; Prager, J

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound propagation in inhomogeneous anisotropic materials is difficult to examine because of the directional dependency of elastic properties. Simulation tools play an important role in developing advanced reliable ultrasonic non destructive testing techniques for the inspection of anisotropic materials particularly austenitic cladded materials, austenitic welds and dissimilar welds. In this contribution we present an adapted 2D ray tracing model for evaluating ultrasonic wave fields quantitatively in inhomogeneous anisotropic materials. Inhomogeneity in the anisotropic material is represented by discretizing into several homogeneous layers. According to ray tracing model, ultrasonic ray paths are traced during its energy propagation through various discretized layers of the material and at each interface the problem of reflection and transmission is solved. The presented algorithm evaluates the transducer excited ultrasonic fields accurately by taking into account the directivity of the transducer, divergence of the ray bundle, density of rays and phase relations as well as transmission coefficients. The ray tracing model is able to calculate the ultrasonic wave fields generated by a point source as well as a finite dimension transducer. The ray tracing model results are validated quantitatively with the results obtained from 2D Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique (EFIT) on several configurations generally occurring in the ultrasonic non destructive testing of anisotropic materials. Finally, the quantitative comparison of ray tracing model results with experiments on 32mm thick austenitic weld material and 62mm thick austenitic cladded material is discussed.

  12. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulation of a 2D Circulation Control Wind Tunnel Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Jones, Greg; Lin, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver for a circulation control airfoil. 2D and 3D simulation results are compared to a circulation control wind tunnel test conducted at the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART). The RANS simulations are compared to a low blowing case with a jet momentum coefficient, C(sub u), of 0:047 and a higher blowing case of 0.115. Three dimensional simulations of the model and tunnel walls show wall effects on the lift and airfoil surface pressures. These wall effects include a 4% decrease of the midspan sectional lift for the C(sub u) 0.115 blowing condition. Simulations comparing the performance of the Spalart Allmaras (SA) and Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence models are also made, showing the SST model compares best to the experimental data. A Rotational/Curvature Correction (RCC) to the turbulence model is also evaluated demonstrating an improvement in the CFD predictions.

  13. Quantum information experiments with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Kevin; Bohnet, Justin; Sawyer, Brian; Britton, Joseph; Wall, Michael; Foss-Feig, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria; Bollinger, John

    2016-05-01

    We summarize recent experimental work with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped 9 Be+ ions stored in a Penning trap. Penning traps utilize static magnetic and electric fields to confine ions, and enable the trapping and laser cooling of ion crystals larger than typically possible in RF ion traps. We work with single-plane ion crystals where the ions form a triangular lattice through minimization of their Coulomb potential energy. The crystals rotate, and we present numerical studies that determine optimal operating parameters for producing low temperature, stable 2-dimensional crystals with Doppler laser cooling and a rotating wall potential. Our qubit is the electron spin-flip transition in the ground state of 9 Be+ and is sensitive to magnetic field fluctuations. Through mitigation of part-per-billion, vibration-induced magnetic field fluctuations we demonstrate T2 coherence times longer than 50 ms. We engineer long-range Ising interactions with spin-dependent optical dipole forces, and summarize recent measurements that characterize the entanglement generated through single-axis twisting. Supported by: JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PHY-1521080, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  14. Wind-tunnel experiments of thermally-stratified turbulent boundary layer flow over a wall-mounted 2-D block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent boundary-layer flows over complex topography have been extensively studied in the atmospheric sciences and wind engineering communities. The upwind turbulence level, the atmospheric thermal stability and the shape of the topography as well as surface characteristics play important roles in turbulent transport of momentum and scalar fluxes. However, to the best of our knowledge, atmospheric thermal stability has rarely been taken into account in laboratory simulations, particularly in wind-tunnel experiments. Extension of such studies in thermally-stratified wind tunnels will substantially advance our understanding of thermal stability effects on the physics of flow over complex topography. Additionally, high-resolution experimental data can be used for development of new parameterization of surface fluxes and validation of numerical models such as Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). A series of experiments of neutral and thermally-stratified boundary-layer flows over a wall-mounted 2-D block were conducted at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory boundary-layer wind tunnel. The 2-D block, with a width to height ratio of 2:1, occupied the lowest 25% of the turbulent boundary layer. Stable and convective boundary layers were simulated by independently controlling the temperature of air flow, the test section floor, and the wall-mounted block surfaces. Measurements using high-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), x-wire/cold-wire anemometry, thermal-couples and surface heat flux sensors were made to quantify the turbulent properties and surface fluxes in distinct macroscopic flow regions, including the separation/recirculation zones, evolving shear layer and the asymptotic far wake. Emphasis will be put on addressing thermal stability effects on the spatial distribution of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and turbulent fluxes of momentum and scalar from the near to far wake region. Terms of the TKE budget equation are also inferred from measurements and

  15. Seafloor weathering buffering climate: numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.; Abbot, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Continental silicate weathering is widely held to consume atmospheric CO2 at a rate controlled in part by temperature, resulting in a climate-weathering feedback [Walker et al., 1981]. It has been suggested that weathering of oceanic crust of warm mid-ocean ridge flanks also has a CO2 uptake rate that is controlled by climate [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001; Brady and Gislason, 1997]. Although this effect might not be significant on present-day Earth [Caldeira, 1995], seafloor weathering may be more pronounced during snowball states [Le Hir et al., 2008], during the Archean when seafloor spreading rates were faster [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001], and on waterworld planets [Abbot et al., 2012]. Previous studies of seafloor weathering have made significant contributions using qualitative, generally one-box, models, and the logical next step is to extend this work using a spatially resolved model. For example, experiments demonstrate that seafloor weathering reactions are temperature dependent, but it is not clear whether the deep ocean temperature affects the temperature at which the reactions occur, or if instead this temperature is set only by geothermal processes. Our goal is to develop a 2-D numerical model that can simulate hydrothermal circulation and resulting alteration of oceanic basalts, and can therefore address such questions. A model of diffusive and convective heat transfer in fluid-saturated porous media simulates hydrothermal circulation through porous oceanic basalt. Unsteady natural convection is solved for using a Darcy model of porous media flow that has been extensively benchmarked. Background hydrothermal circulation is coupled to mineral reaction kinetics of basaltic alteration and hydrothermal mineral precipitation. In order to quantify seafloor weathering as a climate-weathering feedback process, this model focuses on hydrothermal reactions that influence carbon uptake as well as ocean alkalinity: silicate rock dissolution, calcium and magnesium leaching

  16. Numerical experiments in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The direct simulation methods developed by Orszag and Patternson (1972) for isotropic turbulence were extended to homogeneous turbulence in an incompressible fluid subjected to uniform deformation or rotation. The results of simulations for irrotational strain (plane and axisymmetric), shear, rotation, and relaxation toward isotropy following axisymmetric strain are compared with linear theory and experimental data. Emphasis is placed on the shear flow because of its importance and because of the availability of accurate and detailed experimental data. The computed results are used to assess the accuracy of two popular models used in the closure of the Reynolds-stress equations. Data from a variety of the computed fields and the details of the numerical methods used in the simulation are also presented.

  17. Experiment evaluation of speckle suppression efficiency of 2D quasi-spiral M-sequence-based diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Lapchuk, A; Pashkevich, G A; Prygun, O V; Yurlov, V; Borodin, Y; Kryuchyn, A; Korchovyi, A A; Shylo, S

    2015-10-01

    The quasi-spiral 2D diffractive optical element (DOE) based on M-sequence of length N=15 is designed and manufactured. The speckle suppression efficiency by the DOE rotation is measured. The speckle suppression coefficients of 10.5, 6, and 4 are obtained for green, violet, and red laser beams, respectively. The results of numerical simulation and experimental data show that the quasi-spiral binary DOE structure can be as effective in speckle reduction as a periodic 2D DOE structure. The numerical simulation and experimental results show that the speckle suppression efficiency of the 2D DOE structure decreases approximately twice at the boundaries of the visible range. It is shown that a replacement of this structure with the bilateral 1D DOE allows obtaining the maximum speckle suppression efficiency in the entire visible range of light. PMID:26479664

  18. Acid/base front propagation in saturated porous media: 2D laboratory experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyaux-Lawniczak, Stéphanie; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    We perform laboratory scale reactive transport experiments involving acid-basic reactions between nitric acid and sodium hydroxide. A two-dimensional experimental setup is designed to provide continuous on-line measurements of physico-chemical parameters such as pH, redox potential (Eh) and electrical conductivity (EC) inside the system under saturated flow through conditions. The electrodes provide reliable values of pH and EC, while sharp fronts associated with redox potential dynamics could not be captured. Care should be taken to properly incorporate within a numerical model the mixing processes occurring inside the electrodes. The available observations are modeled through a numerical code based on the advection-dispersion equation. In this framework, EC is considered as a variable behaving as a conservative tracer and pH and Eh require solving the advection dispersion equation only once. The agreement between the computed and measured pH and EC is good even without recurring to parameters calibration on the basis of the experiments. Our findings suggest that the classical advection-dispersion equation can be used to interpret these kinds of experiments if mixing inside the electrodes is adequately considered.

  19. Acid/base front propagation in saturated porous media: 2D laboratory experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Loyaux-Lawniczak, Stéphanie; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    We perform laboratory scale reactive transport experiments involving acid-basic reactions between nitric acid and sodium hydroxide. A two-dimensional experimental setup is designed to provide continuous on-line measurements of physico-chemical parameters such as pH, redox potential (Eh) and electrical conductivity (EC) inside the system under saturated flow through conditions. The electrodes provide reliable values of pH and EC, while sharp fronts associated with redox potential dynamics could not be captured. Care should be taken to properly incorporate within a numerical model the mixing processes occurring inside the electrodes. The available observations are modeled through a numerical code based on the advection-dispersion equation. In this framework, EC is considered as a variable behaving as a conservative tracer and pH and Eh require solving the advection dispersion equation only once. The agreement between the computed and measured pH and EC is good even without recurring to parameters calibration on the basis of the experiments. Our findings suggest that the classical advection-dispersion equation can be used to interpret these kinds of experiments if mixing inside the electrodes is adequately considered.

  20. Numerical study on spatially varying bottom friction coefficient of a 2D tidal model with adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xianqing; Zhang, Jicai

    2006-10-01

    Based on the simulation of M2 tide in the Bohai Sea, the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea, TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data are assimilated into a 2D tidal model to study the spatially varying bottom friction coefficient (BFC) by using the adjoint method. In this study, the BFC at some grid points are selected as the independent BFC, while the BFC at other grid points can be obtained through linear interpolation with the independent BFC. Two strategies for selecting the independent BFC are discussed. In the first strategy, one independent BFC is uniformly selected from each 1°×1° area. In the second one, the independent BFC are selected based on the spatial distribution of water depth. Twin and practical experiments are carried out to compare the two strategies. In the twin experiments, the adjoint method has a strong ability of inverting the prescribed BFC distributions combined with the spatially varying BFC. In the practical experiments, reasonable simulation results can be obtained by optimizing the spatially varying independent BFC. In both twin and practical experiments, the simulation results with the second strategy are better than those with the first one. The BFC distribution obtained from the practical experiment indicates that the BFC in shallow water are larger than those in deep water in the Bohai Sea, the North Yellow Sea, the South Yellow Sea and the East China Sea individually. However, the BFC in the East China Sea are larger than those in the other areas perhaps because of the large difference of water depth or bottom roughness. The sensitivity analysis indicates that the model results are more sensitive to the independent BFC near the land.

  1. 2-D Circulation Control Airfoil Benchmark Experiments Intended for CFD Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Allan, Brian G.; Lin, Johb C.

    2009-01-01

    A current NASA Research Announcement (NRA) project being conducted by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) personnel and NASA collaborators includes the development of Circulation Control (CC) blown airfoils to improve subsonic aircraft high-lift and cruise performance. The emphasis of this program is the development of CC active flow control concepts for both high-lift augmentation, drag control, and cruise efficiency. A collaboration in this project includes work by NASA research engineers, whereas CFD validation and flow physics experimental research are part of NASA s systematic approach to developing design and optimization tools for CC applications to fixed-wing aircraft. The design space for CESTOL type aircraft is focusing on geometries that depend on advanced flow control technologies that include Circulation Control aerodynamics. The ability to consistently predict advanced aircraft performance requires improvements in design tools to include these advanced concepts. Validation of these tools will be based on experimental methods applied to complex flows that go beyond conventional aircraft modeling techniques. This paper focuses on recent/ongoing benchmark high-lift experiments and CFD efforts intended to provide 2-D CFD validation data sets related to NASA s Cruise Efficient Short Take Off and Landing (CESTOL) study. Both the experimental data and related CFD predictions are discussed.

  2. Rise characteristics of gas bubbles in a 2D rectangular column: VOF simulations vs experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, R.; Baten, J.M. van

    1999-10-01

    About five centuries ago, Leonardo da Vinci described the sinuous motion of gas bubbles rising in water. The authors have attempted to simulate the rise trajectories of bubbles of 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, and 20 mm in diameter rising in a 2D rectangular column filled with water. The simulations were carried out using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique developed by Hirt and Nichols (J. Computational Physics, 39, 201--225 (1981)). To solve the Navier-Stokes equations of motion the authors used a commercial solver, CFX 4.1c of AEA Technology, UK. They developed their own bubble-tracking algorithm to capture sinuous bubble motions. The 4 and 5 mm bubbles show large lateral motions observed by Da Vinci. The 7, 8 and 9 mm bubble behave like jellyfish. The 12 mm bubble flaps its wings like a bird. The extent of lateral motion of the bubbles decreases with increasing bubble size. Bubbles larger than 20 mm in size assume a spherical cap form and simulations of the rise characteristics match experiments exactly. VOF simulations are powerful tools for a priori determination of the morphology and rise characteristics of bubbles rising in a liquid. Bubble-bubble interactions are also properly modeled by the VOF technique.

  3. Numerical model of water flow and solute accumulation in vertisols using HYDRUS 2D/3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Tomáš; Dahan, Ofer; Turkeltub, Tuvia

    2015-04-01

    Keywords: dessication-crack-induced-salinization, preferential flow, conceptual model, numerical model, vadose zone, vertisols, soil water retention function, HYDRUS 2D/3D Vertisols cover a hydrologically very significant area of semi-arid regions often through which water infiltrates to groundwater aquifers. Understanding of water flow and solute accumulation is thus very relevant to agricultural activity and water resources management. Previous works suggest a conceptual model of dessication-crack-induced-salinization where salinization of sediment in the deep section of the vadose zone (up to 4 m) is induced by subsurface evaporation due to convective air flow in the dessication cracks. It suggests that the salinization is induced by the hydraulic gradient between the dry sediment in the vicinity of cracks (low potential) and the relatively wet sediment further from the main cracks (high potential). This paper presents a modified previously suggested conceptual model and a numerical model. The model uses a simple uniform flow approach but unconventionally prescribes the boundary conditions and the hydraulic parameters of soil. The numerical model is bound to one location close to a dairy farm waste lagoon, but the application of the suggested conceptual model could be possibly extended to all semi-arid regions with vertisols. Simulations were conducted using several modeling approaches with an ultimate goal of fitting the simulation results to the controlling variables measured in the field: temporal variation in water content across thick layer of unsaturated clay sediment (>10 m), sediment salinity and salinity the water draining down the vadose zone to the water table. The development of the model was engineered in several steps; all computed as forward solutions by try-and-error approach. The model suggests very deep instant infiltration of fresh water up to 12 m, which is also supported by the field data. The paper suggests prescribing a special atmospheric

  4. Numerical experiments on the theta pinch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volosevich, P. P.; Zukakishyili, G. G.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical calculation of theta pinch problems are presented. Physical processes in theta pinch systems are considered in a one dimensional, two temperature magnetohydrodynamic, approximation with allowance for end losses by longitudinal heat conductivity. The numerical calculations are compared with results of earlier experiments.

  5. Raman 2D-band splitting in graphene: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Frank, Otakar; Mohr, Marcel; Maultzsch, Janina; Thomsen, Christian; Riaz, Ibtsam; Jalil, Rashid; Novoselov, Kostya S; Tsoukleri, Georgia; Parthenios, John; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Kavan, Ladislav; Galiotis, Costas

    2011-03-22

    We present a systematic experimental and theoretical study of the two-phonon (2D) Raman scattering in graphene under uniaxial tension. The external perturbation unveils that the 2D mode excited with 785 nm has a complex line-shape mainly due to the contribution of two distinct double resonance scattering processes (inner and outer) in the Raman signal. The splitting depends on the direction of the applied strain and the polarization of the incident light. The results give new insight into the nature of the 2D band and have significant implications for the use of graphene as reinforcement in composites since the 2D mode is crucial to assess how effectively graphene uptakes an applied stress or strain.

  6. 2-D magnetotelluric experiment to investigate the Nassugtoqidian orogeny in South-East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heincke, Björn; Chen, Jin; Riisager, Peter; Kolb, Jochen; Jørgensen, Asta F.

    2015-04-01

    The northwest-trending Palaeoproterozoic Nagssugtoqidian orogen extends over 250 km along the east coast of Greenland in the area around the village Tasiilaq. The geological evolution of this area closely compares with the ones of the Lewisian complex of Scotland and the Nagssugtoqidian orogen in western Greenland and, hence, leads to the suggestion that they belong to the same continental-scale orogenic belt. However, an accurate correlation across the inland ice is challenging and still ambiguous and therefore more detailed knowledge about the individual orogens might help to understand their relationship. Details about the large-scale tectonic evolution during the Nagssugtoqidian orogeny in this remote Arctic region are not known due to complex geology, relatively coarse geological mapping and the lack of extensive geophysical investigations. E.g. the vergence of the orogen, subduction-related magmatism and accretion history are matters of ongoing discussion (Kalsbeek et al., 1993; Nutman et al., 2008 and Kolb, 2013). We performed a 2-D magnetotelluric (MT) experiment across the southern part of the orogen along the Sermilik Fjord in order to improve our understanding of the orogenic process in general and to better constrain the location and vergence of the suture zone. However, because of the rough climate and the lack of infrastructure, this study is considered as a first test to investigate how MT surveys can be most efficiently performed in this remote part of the world. The NE-SW trending profile consists of eight MT stations and has a total length of ~70 km using long period LEMI-420 systems. The quality of the data is severely affected by polar electrojets that do not satisfy the plane wave assumptions, which is typical for regions close to the magnetic poles. In order to reduce the distortion from these signals onto the impedance estimates, we tested different advanced processing schemes. In addition to the more conventional robust response function

  7. Experimental and numerical investigation of DNAPL infiltration and spreading in a 2-D sandbox by means of light transmission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, F.; Shi, X.; Wu, J.; Gao, Y. W.

    2013-12-01

    Chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE) are widespread groundwater contaminants often referred to as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Accuracy description of the spreading behavior and configuration for subsurface DNAPL migration is important, especially favourable for design effective remediation strategies. In this study, a 2-D experiment was conducted to investigate the infiltration behavior and spatial distribution of PCE in saturated porous media. Accusand 20/30 mesh sand (Unimin, Le Sueur, MN) was used as the background medium with two 70/80 and 60/70 mesh lenses embedded to simulate heterogeneous conditions. Dyed PCE of 100 ml was released into the flow cell at a constant rate of 2ml/min using a Harvard Apparatus syringe pump with a 50 ml glass syringe for two times, and 5 ml/min water was continuously injected through the inlet at the left side of the sandbox, while kept the same effluent rate at right side to create hydrodynamic condition. A light transmission (LT) system was used to record the migration of PCE and determine the saturation distribution of PCE in the sandbox experiment with a thermoelectrically air-cooled charged-coupled device (CCD) camera. All images were processed using MATLAB to calculate thickness-averaged PCE saturation for each pixel. Mass balance was checked through comparing injected known mounts of PCE with that calculated from LT analysis. Results showed that LT method is effective to delineate PCE migration pathways and quantify the saturation distribution. The relative errors of total PCE volumes calculated by LT analysis at different times were within 15% of the injected PCE volumes. The simulation are conducted using the multiphase modeling software T2VOC, which calibrated by the LT analysis results of three recorded time steps to fit with the complete spatial-temporal distribution of the PCE saturation. Model verification was then performed using the other eight recorded time

  8. 2D numerical modeling of gravity-driven giant-scale deformation processes in the offshore Barreirinhas Basin (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Francesco; Manconi, Andrea; Rinaldo Barchi, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    this particular place and also elsewhere. We set up a 2D fluid dynamic model by considering a Finite Element Method (FEM) environment, which allows us to well represent the geometries, densities and viscosities of the geological materials, as derived from geophysical investigations. Our study aims at understanding whether the long-term mechanical behavior of the Barreirinhas Basin DW-FTB can be reproduced by considering a simplified Newtonian fluid dynamics environment or it is controlled by a more complex rheology, which might include the effect of additional parameters such as internal friction, cohesive strength and pore-fluid pressure at the basal detachment.

  9. Detailed Fission Power 2D-Mapping of AFIP-2 Experiment in ATR CFT Position

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; M. A. Lillo

    2008-05-01

    The NNSA (National Nuclear Security Administration) RERTR (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) program assigned INL (Idaho National Laboratory) the responsibility of developing and demonstrating high uranium density research reactor fuel forms to enable the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) in the research reactors around the world. A series of full-size fuel plate irradiation tests are proposed for the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor). Labeled the AFIP (ATR Full-size-plates In center flux trap Position) experiments, these tests will be conducted in the ATR center flux trap. The AFIP-2 experiment will contain two full size fuel plates fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory-Y-12 (ORNL). The nominal fuel zone is rectangular in shape having a designed length of 21.5-in (54.6l-cm), width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), and uniform thickness of 0.014-in (0.03556-cm). This gives a nominal fuel zone volume of 0.482 in3 (7.89 cm3) in each fuel plate. The test holder accommodates two independent test trains. Each test train is designed to hold 2 plates, for a total of 4 plates per test holder. AFIP-2 test plates will be irradiated at a peak surface heat flux of about 350 W/cm2 and discharged at a peak U-235 burn-up of about 70 at.%. Based on limited irradiation testing of the monolithic (U10Mo) fuel form, it is desirable to keep the peak fuel temperature below 250°C; to achieve this, it will be necessary to keep plate heat fluxes below 500 W/cm2. Due to the heavy U-235 loading and width of 1.6-in (4.064 cm), the neutron self-shielding will increase the local-to-average-ratio fission power near the sides of the fuel plates. To assure the AFIP-2 experiment will comply with the ATR safety requirements, a very detailed 2 dimensional (2D) Y-Z fission power profile was evaluated to best predict the fuel plate temperature distribution. The ability to accurately predict fuel plate power and burnup are essential in the AFIP-2 fuel test train design and the irradiated fuel

  10. Experiments on 2D Vortex Patterns with a Photoinjected Pure Electron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, Daniel; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    The equations governing the evolution of a strongly magnetized pure electron plasma are analogous to those of an ideal 2D fluid; plasma density is analogous to fluid vorticity. Therefore, we can study vortex dynamics with pure electron plasmas. We generate our electron plasma with a photocathode electron source. The photocathode provides greater control over the initial profile than previous thermionic sources and allows us to create complicated initial density distributions, corresponding to complicated vorticity distributions in a fluid. Results on the stability of 2D vortex patterns will be presented: 1) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring; 2) The stability of N vortices arranged in a ring with a central vortex; 3) The stability of more complicated vortex patterns.(http://socrates.berkeley.edu/ )fajans/

  11. MONTE GENEROSO ROCKFALL FIELD TEST (SWITZERLAND): Real size experiment to constraint 2D and 3D rockfall simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humair, F.; Matasci, B.; Carrea, D.; Pedrazzini, A.; Loye, A.; Pedrozzi, G.; Nicolet, P.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    account the results of the experimental testing are performed and compared with the a-priori simulations. 3D simulations were performed using a software that takes into account the effect of the forest cover in the blocky trajectory (RockyFor 3D) and an other that neglects this aspect (Rotomap; geo&soft international). 2D simulation (RocFall; Rocscience) profiles were located in the blocks paths deduced from 3D simulations. The preliminary results show that: (1) high speed movies are promising and allow us to track the blocks using video software, (2) the a-priori simulations tend to overestimate the runout distance which is certainly due to an underestimation of the obstacles as well as the breaking of the failing rocks which is not taken into account in the models, (3) the trajectories deduced from both a-priori simulation and real size experiment highlights the major influence of the channelized slope morphology on rock paths as it tends to follow the flow direction. This indicates that the 2D simulation have to be performed along the line of flow direction.

  12. Small post-perovskite patches at the base of lower mantle primordial reservoirs: Insights from 2-D numerical modeling and implications for ULVZs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Deschamps, Frédéric; Tackley, Paul J.

    2016-04-01

    We perform numerical experiments of thermochemical mantle convection in 2-D spherical annulus geometry to investigate the distribution of post-perovskite (pPv) with respect to the location of primordial reservoirs of dense material in the lowermost mantle. High core-mantle boundary temperatures lead to strong anticorrelation between the locations of pPv and large primordial reservoirs, while low values lead to a pPv layer fully covering the outer core. Intermediate values avoid a full pPv layer but allow pPv phase change to occur within the primordial reservoirs. Through interactions between cold downwellings and primordial reservoirs, low viscosity (weak) pPv leads to the formation of long-lived, thin tails of primordial materials extending laterally at the edges of these reservoirs. Small patches of pPv also form within the primordial reservoir but are short-lived. If primordial reservoirs are enriched in iron, these patches may provide an explanation for the ultralow-velocity zones.

  13. A New Cell-Centered Implicit Numerical Scheme for Ions in the 2-D Axisymmetric Code Hall2de

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez Ortega, Alejandro; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new algorithm in the Hall2De code to simulate the ion hydrodynamics in the acceleration channel and near plume regions of Hall-effect thrusters. This implementation constitutes an upgrade of the capabilities built in the Hall2De code. The equations of mass conservation and momentum for unmagnetized ions are solved using a conservative, finite-volume, cell-centered scheme on a magnetic-field-aligned grid. Major computational savings are achieved by making use of an implicit predictor/multi-corrector algorithm for time evolution. Inaccuracies in the prediction of the motion of low-energy ions in the near plume in hydrodynamics approaches are addressed by implementing a multi-fluid algorithm that tracks ions of different energies separately. A wide range of comparisons with measurements are performed to validate the new ion algorithms. Several numerical experiments with the location and value of the anomalous collision frequency are also presented. Differences in the plasma properties in the near-plume between the single fluid and multi-fluid approaches are discussed. We complete our validation by comparing predicted erosion rates at the channel walls of the thruster with measurements. Erosion rates predicted by the plasma properties obtained from simulations replicate accurately measured rates of erosion within the uncertainty range of the sputtering models employed.

  14. Optoacoustic temperature monitoring during HIFU impact on biological tissues: ex vivo study and numerical simulations of 2D temperature reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Sergey; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Pelivanov, Ivan

    2012-02-01

    Dependencies of the optoacoustic (OA) transformation efficiency on tissue temperature were obtained for the application in OA temperature monitoring during thermal therapies. Accurate measurement of the OA signal amplitude versus temperature was performed in different ex-vivo tissues in the temperature range 25°C - 80°C. The investigated tissues were selected to represent different structural components: chicken breast (skeletal muscle), porcine lard (fatty tissue) and porcine liver (richly perfused tissue). Backward mode of the OA signal detection and a narrow probe laser beam were used in the experiments to avoid the influence of changes in light scattering with tissue coagulation on the OA signal amplitude. Measurements were performed in heating and cooling regimes. Characteristic behavior of the OA signal amplitude temperature dependences in different temperature ranges were described in terms of changes in different structural components of the tissue samples. Finally, numerical simulation of the OA temperature monitoring with a linear transducers array was performed to demonstrate the possibility of real-time temperature mapping.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Oxidized 2D C/SiC Composites in Air Environments Below 900 °C: Microstructure and Elastic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhigang; Chen, Xihui; Shao, Hongyan; Song, Yingdong

    2016-08-01

    A numerical model is presented for simulation of the oxidation-affected behaviors of two dimensional carbon fiber-reinforced silcon carbide matrix composite (2D C/SiC) exposed to air oxidizing environments below 900 °C, which incorporates the modeling of oxidized microstructure and computing of degraded elastic properties. This model is based upon the analysis of the representative volume cell (RVC) of the composite. The multi-scale model of 2D C/SiC composites is concerned in the present study. Analysis results of such a composite can provide a guideline for the real 2D C/SiC composite. The micro-structure during oxidation process is firstly modeled in the RVC. The elastic moduli of oxidized composite under non-stress oxidation environment is computed by finite element analysis. The elastic properties of 2D-C/SiC composites in air oxidizing environment are evaluated and validated in comparison to experimental data. The oxidation time, temperature and fiber volume fractions of C/SiC composite are investigated to show their influences upon the elastic properties of 2D C/SiC composites.

  16. Numerical Study of Turbulence Model Predictions for the MD 30P/30N and NHLP-2D Three-Element Highlift Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Joseph H.

    1998-01-01

    This report details calculations for the McDonnell-Douglas 30P/30N and the NHLP-2D three-element highlift configurations. Calculations were performed with the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes code ISAAC to study the effects of various numerical issues on high lift predictions. These issues include the effect of numerical accuracy on the advection terms of the turbulence equations, Navier-Stokes versus the thin-layer Navier-Stokes approximation, an alternative formulation of the production term, and the performance of several turbulence models. The effect of the transition location on the NHLP-2D flow solution was investigated. Two empirical transition models were used to estimate the transition location.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Detachment Folding: a 2D Approach with Application to Incremental Coseismic Fold Growth in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Luther; Suppe, John; Graveleau, Fabien

    2010-05-01

    -Chi-like earthquakes with 8 m slip terminating in the fold and about 45 non-Chi-Chi events with 8 m slip passing through the fold. In order to understand the incremental, but not necessarily dynamical, development of the Tungshih and other similar anticlines we are developing 2D numerical models similar to this structure using both idealized initial states (flat layers, level ground surface, etc.) and deformed states derived from the natural prototype (seismic profiles, surface data, etc.). We are taking this two-pronged approach because while our main goal is to re-create the last 12 m increment of growth on the Cholan structure, having knowledge of the nature and extent of the strains (damage to the rockmass) required to get to this initial pre-Chi-Chi state will likely be important with regard to setting up the 'natural' example model. In other words-knowing where the rockmass is weakened or anisotropic due to prior deformation will aid in defining the character and distribution of material properties in our incremental model. We are using both continuum and discrete modeling methods and are examining the feasibility of developing a coupled continuous/discrete model in which deeper the levels of the structure is modeled as a continuum and the near surface is simulated using a bonded particle-based method. The particle nature of the discrete formulation lends itself particularly well to addressing the inherently discontinuous nature of shallow-level deformation. Both techniques rely on finite-difference formulations, which we believe have significant advantages over traditional finite-element modeling approaches. Results expected from this modeling work include, among others: 1) better understanding of the mechanical controls of the evolution of detachment folds in general; 2) knowledge of the slip-transfer mechanisms at core of the Tungshih anticline and mechanical conditions that allow us to re-create the surface deformation documented at Cholan; 3) an understanding of the

  18. Radioactive Sediment Transport on Ogaki Dam Reservoir in Fukushima Evacuated Zone: Numerical Simulation Studies by 2-D River Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Susumu; Kitamura, Akihiro; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Machida, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on March 2011 released significant quantities of radionuclides to atmosphere. The most significant nuclide is radioactive cesium isotopes. Therefore, the movement of the cesium is one of the critical issues for the environmental assessment. Since the cesium is strongly sorbed by soil particles, the cesium transport can be regarded as the sediment transport which is mainly brought about by the aquatic system such as a river and a lake. In this research, our target is the sediment transport on Ogaki dam reservoir which is located in about 16 km northwest from FDNPP. The reservoir is one of the principal irrigation dam reservoirs in Fukushima Prefecture and its upstream river basin was heavily contaminated by radioactivity. We simulate the sediment transport on the reservoir using 2-D river simulation code named Nays2D originally developed by Shimizu et al. (The latest version of Nays2D is available as a code included in iRIC (http://i-ric.org/en/), which is a river flow and riverbed variation analysis software package). In general, a 2-D simulation code requires a huge amount of calculation time. Therefore, we parallelize the code and execute it on a parallel computer. We examine the relationship between the behavior of the sediment transport and the height of the reservoir exit. The simulation result shows that almost all the sand that enter into the reservoir deposit close to the entrance of the reservoir for any height of the exit. The amounts of silt depositing within the reservoir slightly increase by raising the height of the exit. However, that of the clay dramatically increases. Especially, more than half of the clay deposits, if the exit is sufficiently high. These results demonstrate that the water level of the reservoir has a strong influence on the amount of the clay discharged from the reservoir. As a result, we conclude that the tuning of the water level has a possibility for controlling the

  19. Numerical simulations of heavily polluted fine-grained sediment remobilization using 1D, 1D+, and 2D channel schematization.

    PubMed

    Kaiglová, Jana; Langhammer, Jakub; Jiřinec, Petr; Janský, Bohumír; Chalupová, Dagmar

    2015-03-01

    This article used various hydrodynamic and sediment transport models to analyze the potential and the limits of different channel schematizations. The main aim was to select and evaluate the most suitable simulation method for fine-grained sediment remobilization assessment. Three types of channel schematization were selected to study the flow potential for remobilizing fine-grained sediment in artificially modified channels. Schematization with a 1D cross-sectional horizontal plan, a 1D+ approach, splitting the riverbed into different functional zones, and full 2D mesh, adopted in MIKE by the DHI modeling suite, was applied to the study. For the case study, a 55-km stretch of the Bílina River, in the Czech Republic, Central Europe, which has been heavily polluted by the chemical and coal mining industry since the mid-twentieth century, was selected. Long-term exposure to direct emissions of toxic pollutants including heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) resulted in deposits of pollutants in fine-grained sediments in the riverbed. Simulations, based on three hydrodynamic model schematizations, proved that for events not exceeding the extent of the riverbed profile, the 1D schematization can provide comparable results to a 2D model. The 1D+ schematization can improve accuracy while keeping the benefits of high-speed simulation and low requirements of input DEM data, but the method's suitability is limited by the channel properties. PMID:25687259

  20. 3D numerical simulation of laser-generated Lamb waves propagation in 2D acoustic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shiling; Lomonosov, Alexey M.; Shen, Zhonghua; Han, Bing

    2015-05-01

    Acoustic black holes have been widely used in damping structural vibration. In this work, the Lamb waves are utilized to evaluate the specified structure. The three-dimensional numerical model of acoustic black holes with parabolic profile was established. The propagation of laser-generated Lamb wave in two-dimensional acoustic black holes was numerically simulated using the finite element method. The results indicated that the incident wave was trapped by the structure obviously.

  1. Upgrade of PARC2D to include real gas effects. [computer program for flowfield surrounding aeroassist flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saladino, Anthony; Praharaj, Sarat C.; Collins, Frank G.; Seaford, C. Mark

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the changes and additions to the perfect gas PARC2D code to include chemical equilibrium effects, resulting in a code called PARCEQ2D. The work developed out of a need to have the capability of more accurately representing the flowfield surrounding the aeroassist flight experiment (AFE) vehicle. Use is made of the partition function of statistical mechanics in the evaluation of the thermochemical properties. This approach will allow the PARC code to be extended to thermal nonequilibrium when this task is undertaken in the future. The transport properties follow from formulae from the kinetic theory of gases. Results are presented for a two-dimensional AFE that compare perfect gas and real gas solutions at flight conditions, showing vast differences between the two cases.

  2. On the effects of assembly compression on the performance of liquid-feed DMFCs under methanol-limiting conditions: A 2D numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Salaberri, P. A.; Vera, M.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of assembly compression on the performance of liquid-feed DMFCs under methanol-limiting conditions is explored by means of a 2D/1D multiphysics across-the-channel model. The numerical formulation incorporates a comprehensive 2D description of the anode GDL, including two-phase phenomena, non-uniform anisotropic transport properties, and electrical contact resistances at the GDL/BPP interface. GDL effective properties are evaluated using empirical data corresponding to Toray® carbon paper. A simplified but physically sound 1D description, locally coupled to the 2D anode GDL model, is adopted to describe transport processes in the MPLs, membrane and cathode GDL, whereas the catalyst layers are treated as infinitely thin surfaces. Good agreement is found between the numerical results and previous experimental data. The interplay between assembly compression, bipolar plate material, and channel configuration is also investigated. The results show that there is an optimum GDL compression ratio in terms of overall power density, the optimal compression level being strongly dependent on bipolar plate material. Beyond the optimum, the detrimental effect of compression is larger in non-parallel flow fields due to the additional reduction of methanol transported by under-rib convection. The results suggest that, under certain conditions, this transport mechanism could be more important than diffusion in the anode of liquid-feed DMFCs.

  3. 2D Radiation MHD K-shell Modeling of Single Wire Array Stainless Steel Experiments on the Z Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Apruzese, J. P.; Chong, Y. K.; Davis, J.; Dasgupta, A.; Whitney, K. G.; Clark, R. W.; Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    Many physical effects can produce unstable plasma behavior that affect K-shell emission from arrays. Such effects include: asymmetry in the initial density profile, asymmetry in power flow, thermal conduction at the boundaries, and non-uniform wire ablation. Here we consider how asymmetry in the radiation field also contributes to the generation of multidimensional plasma behavior that affects K-shell power and yield. To model this radiation asymmetry, we have incorporated into the MACH2 r-z MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE population kinetics based on radiation transport using multi-dimensional ray tracing. Such methodology is necessary for modeling the enhanced radiative cooling that occurs at the anode and cathode ends of the pinch during the run-in phase of the implosion. This enhanced radiative cooling is due to reduced optical depth at these locations producing an asymmetric flow of radiative energy that leads to substantial disruption of large initial diameter (>5 cm) pinches and drives 1D into 2D fluid (i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor like) flows. The impact of this 2D behavior on K-shell power and yield is investigated by comparing 1D and 2D model results with data obtained from a series of single wire array stainless steel experiments performed on the Z generator.

  4. Floodplain mapping via 1D and quasi-2D numerical models in the valley of Thessaly, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, Athanasios; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Koukouvinos, Antonis; Tegos, Aristoteles; Pagana, Vasiliki; Panagopoulos, Panayiotis-Dionisios; Mamassis, Nikolaos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2013-04-01

    The European Union Floods Directive defines a flood as 'a covering by water of land not normally covered by water'. Human activities, such as agriculture, urban development, industry and tourism, contribute to an increase in the likelihood and adverse impacts of flood events. The study of the hydraulic behaviour of a river is important in flood risk management. Here, we investigate the behaviour of three hydraulic models, with different theoretical frameworks, in a real case scenario. The area is located in the Penios river basin, in the plain of Thessaly (Greece). The three models used are the one-dimensional HEC-RAS and the quasi two-dimensional LISFLOOD-FP and FLO-2D which are compared to each other, in terms of simulated maximum water depth as well as maximum flow velocity, and to a real flood event. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is performed to determine how each simulation is affected by the river and floodplain roughness coefficient, in terms of flood inundation.

  5. Towards the Identification of the Keeper Erosion Cause(s): Numerical Simulations of the Plasma and Neutral Gas Using the Global Cathode Model OrCa2D-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations with the time-dependent Orificed Cathode (OrCa2D-II) computer code show that classical enhancements of the plasma resistivity can not account for the elevated electron temperatures and steep plasma potential gradients measured in the plume of a 25-27.5 A discharge hollow cathode. The cathode, which employs a 0.11-in diameter orifice, was operated at 5.5 sccm without an applied magnetic field using two different anode geometries. It is found that anomalous resistivity based on electron-driven instabilities improves the comparison between theory and experiment. It is also estimated that other effects such as the Hall-effect from the self-induced magnetic field, not presently included in OrCa2D-II, may contribute to the constriction of the current density streamlines thus explaining the higher plasma densities observed along the centerline.

  6. Emergent Power-Law Phase in the 2D Heisenberg Windmill Antiferromagnet: A Computational Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeevanesan, Bhilahari; Chandra, Premala; Coleman, Piers; Orth, Peter P.

    2015-10-01

    In an extensive computational experiment, we test Polyakov's conjecture that under certain circumstances an isotropic Heisenberg model can develop algebraic spin correlations. We demonstrate the emergence of a multispin U(1) order parameter in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet on interpenetrating honeycomb and triangular lattices. The correlations of this relative phase angle are observed to decay algebraically at intermediate temperatures in an extended critical phase. Using finite-size scaling we show that both phase transitions are of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless type, and at lower temperatures we find long-range Z6 order.

  7. Emergent Power-Law Phase in the 2D Heisenberg Windmill Antiferromagnet: A Computational Experiment.

    PubMed

    Jeevanesan, Bhilahari; Chandra, Premala; Coleman, Piers; Orth, Peter P

    2015-10-23

    In an extensive computational experiment, we test Polyakov's conjecture that under certain circumstances an isotropic Heisenberg model can develop algebraic spin correlations. We demonstrate the emergence of a multispin U(1) order parameter in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet on interpenetrating honeycomb and triangular lattices. The correlations of this relative phase angle are observed to decay algebraically at intermediate temperatures in an extended critical phase. Using finite-size scaling we show that both phase transitions are of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless type, and at lower temperatures we find long-range Z(6) order.

  8. Numerical investigation of the flat band Bloch modes in a 2D photonic crystal with Dirac cones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Fietz, Chris; Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2015-04-20

    A numerical method combining complex-k band calculations and absorbing boundary conditions for Bloch waves is presented. We use this method to study photonic crystals with Dirac cones. We demonstrate that the photonic crystal behaves as a zero-index medium when excited at normal incidence, but that the zero-index behavior is lost at oblique incidence due to excitation of modes on the flat band. We also investigate the formation of monomodal and multimodal cavity resonances inside the photonic crystals, and the physical origins of their different line-shape features.

  9. Unsteady separation experiments on 2-D airfoils, 3-D wings, and model helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorber, Peter F.; Carta, Franklin O.

    1992-01-01

    Information on unsteady separation and dynamic stall is being obtained from two experimental programs that have been underway at United Technologies Research Center since 1984. The first program is designed to obtain detailed surface pressure and boundary layer condition information during high amplitude pitching oscillations of a large (17.3 in. chord) model wing in a wind tunnel. The second program involves the construction and testing of a pressure-instrumented model helicopter rotor. This presentation describes some of the results of these experiments, and in particular compares the detailed dynamic stall inception information obtained from the oscillating wing with the unsteady separation and reverse flow results measured on the retreating blade side of the model rotor during wind tunnel testing.

  10. 2D Numeric Modeling of Cenozoic Lithospheric deformation in the Himalaya-Tibet-Pamir-Tien Shan Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tympel, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2011-12-01

    The Pamir-Hindu Kush region located in the western syntaxis of the Himalaya is the locus of a large number of intermediate-depth earthquakes and an almost vertical high velocity zone, seen in seismic tomography. The seismicity is not clearly related to oceanic subduction and forms an S-shaped zone between north-western Afghanistan and the eastern Pamir. In depth, the earthquake hypocenters are forming what some authors interpret as a V-shaped pattern which supports the model of two converging subduction zones to explain the observations. However, other models propose a single but highly contorted Indian slab or even a Rayleigh-Taylor instability due to a higher density in the lithosphere compared to the asthenosphere. As part of the TIPAGE project (TIen Shan - PAmir GEodynamic program) our aim is to find lithospheric scale models consistent with all major observations as well as to find controlling factors for the extreme Cenozoic shortening in the Pamir-Tien Shan orogen. For our current modeling approach we use the finite-element code SLIM3D which allows coupled thermo-mechanical treatment of deformation processes. The code is capable of highly nonlinear elasto-visco-plastic rheology including diffusion, dislocation and Peierls creep mechanism and allowing self-consistent generation of faults. It incorporates free surface boundary conditions and is equiped with petrological routines for gabbro-eclogite, coesite-stishovite phase transitions. We run several 2D cross-section models in order to explain the high velocity zone below the Pamir-Hindu Kush and the seismicity which distingushes the region from the rest of the Himalaya. In a typical model setup India has two parts: the 'inner part' which comprises 35-45 km thick continental crust and relatively thick cratonic mantle lithosphere; the 'outer part' has 25-30 km thick crust and a less depleted, more ocean-like lithosphere. Inside of Asia we place an "inclusion" of thicker cratonic lithosphere, like that of the

  11. The Role of Parameters Controlling Tectonically Erosive and Accretive Forearcs - Results of 2D Sandbox Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohrmann, J.; Kukowski, N.; Adam, J.; Oncken, O.

    2001-12-01

    In this study, we attempt to identify and quantify the influence of the mechanical parameters controlling the mass transfer modes in the brittle part of tectonically erosive and accretive forearc settings. With scaled analogue sandbox experiments we studied the influence of the amount of sediment supply, the presence of mechanically weak layers as potential detachment, the properties of the subduction interface as well as the distribution of the vertical load in the wedge on both systems, the tectonically erosive and accretive. The results of the experiments without any backward material loss lead to a hierarchical control of the investigated parameters. Sediment supply is the main parameter: As soon as sediments enter the trench on top of the oceanic plate, accretive mass transfer will occur under any mechanical constraints. A non-accretive mass transfer occurs in the case of no sediment supply. Basal properties, i.e. friction and roughness of the basal subduction interface, exert a major influence on both, the accretive and the erosive systems: They determine the capability to underthrust material beneath the wedge. In non-accretive systems, significant roughness of the basal interface and therewith a high basal friction leads to tectonic erosion, whereas a smooth basal interface produces stagnant mass transfer. The presence of a weak layer has a different influence on the accretive and non-accretive mode: In an accretive system, a weak layer in the incoming sediment pile changes the mass transfer pattern from a purely frontally or dominantly basally accretive mode to contemporaneous frontal and basal accretion. In the case of tectonic erosion, the presence of a weak layer leads to higher rates of basal erosion and arcward material transport, but it does not change the general mass transfer pattern. The distribution of vertical load only influences secondary features of the forearc architecture: Topographic highs and lows in the forearc wedge, i.e. a deviation of

  12. Numerical simulations - Some results for the 2- and 3-D Hubbard models and a 2-D electron phonon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalapino, D. J.; Sugar, R. L.; White, S. R.; Bickers, N. E.; Scalettar, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations on the half-filled three-dimensional Hubbard model clearly show the onset of Neel order. Simulations of the two-dimensional electron-phonon Holstein model show the competition between the formation of a Peierls-CDW state and a superconducting state. However, the behavior of the partly filled two-dimensional Hubbard model is more difficult to determine. At half-filling, the antiferromagnetic correlations grow as T is reduced. Doping away from half-filling suppresses these correlations, and it is found that there is a weak attractive pairing interaction in the d-wave channel. However, the strength of the pair field susceptibility is weak at the temperatures and lattice sizes that have been simulated, and the nature of the low-temperature state of the nearly half-filled Hubbard model remains open.

  13. Numerical Experiments with Shock-Turbulence Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lele, S. K.; Larsson, J.; Bhagatwala, A.; Moin, P.

    2009-04-01

    Many applications in engineering and physical sciences involve turbulent flows interacting with shock waves. High-speed flows around aerodynamic bodies and through propulsion systems for high-speed flight abound with interactions of shear driven turbulence with complex shock waves. Supernova explosions and implosion of a cryogenic fuel pellet for inertial confinement fusion also involve the interaction of shockwaves with turbulence and strong density variations. Numerical simulations of such physical phenomena impose conflicting demands on the numerical algorithms. Capturing broadband spatial and temporal variations in a turbulent flow suggests the use of high-bandwidth schemes with minimal dissipation and dispersion, while capturing the flow discontinuity at a shock wave requires numerical dissipation. We summarize results from a series of benchmark test problems for assessing the ability of three different approaches to shock capturing: high order WENO, nonlinear artificial diffusivity with compact finite differences, and a hybrid approach combining high-order central differencing with WENO near the shocks. These test problems allow an assessment of the tradeoff needed between preserving non-dissipation of small-scale flow fluctuations and avoiding significant Gibbs' oscillation near a shock. Numerical experiments on Taylor-Green problem and compressible isotropic turbulence are used to evaluate the performance of these schemes on flows with broadband fluctuations. The compressible turbulence test case also contains local eddy-shocklets. The performance of each scheme is characterized in terms of an effective bandwidth. Finally some results on a canonical shock-turbulence interaction problem, i.e. the interaction of isotropic turbulence with a (nominally) normal shock, are discussed. These results achieve a turbulence Reynolds number which is significantly larger than previous DNS studies of this problem. It is observed that when the turbulence interacting with

  14. Critical Heat Flux Experiments on the Reactor Vessel Wall Using 2-D Slice Test Section

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung; Baek, Won-Pil

    2005-11-15

    The critical heat flux (CHF) on the reactor vessel outer wall was measured using the two-dimensional slice test section. The radius and the channel area of the test section were 2.5 m and 10 cm x 15 cm, respectively. The flow channel area and the heater width were smaller than those of the ULPU experiments, but the radius was greater than that of the ULPU. The CHF data under the inlet subcooling of 2 to 25 deg. C and the mass flux 0 to 300 kg/m{sup 2}.s had been acquired. The measured CHF value was generally slightly lower than that of the ULPU. The difference possibly comes from the difference of the test section material and the thickness. However, the general trend of CHF according to the mass flux was similar with that of the ULPU. The experimental CHF data were compared with the predicted values by SULTAN correlation. The SULTAN correlation predicted well this study's data only for the mass flux higher than 200 kg/m{sup 2}.s, and for the exit quality lower than 0.05. The local condition-based correlation was developed, and it showed good prediction capability for broad quality (-0.01 to 0.5) and mass flux (<300 kg/m{sup 2}.s) conditions with a root-mean-square error of 2.4%. There were increases in the CHF with trisodium phosphate-added water.

  15. Constraining Polarized Foregrounds for EoR Experiments I: 2D Power Spectra from the PAPER-32 Imaging Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, S. A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Nunhokee, C. D.; Bernardi, G.; Pober, J. C.; Ali, Z. S.; Bradley, R. F.; Carilli, C. L.; DeBoer, D. R.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Jacobs, D. C.; Klima, P.; MacMahon, D. H. E.; Manley, J. R.; Moore, D. F.; Parsons, A. R.; Stefan, I. I.; Walbrugh, W. P.

    2016-06-01

    Current generation low-frequency interferometers constructed with the objective of detecting the high-redshift 21 cm background aim to generate power spectra of the brightness temperature contrast of neutral hydrogen in primordial intergalactic medium. Two-dimensional (2D) power spectra (power in Fourier modes parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight) that formed from interferometric visibilities have been shown to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth foregrounds (known as the wedge) and spectrally structured 21 cm background emission (the EoR window). However, polarized foregrounds are known to possess spectral structure due to Faraday rotation, which can leak into the EoR window. In this work we create and analyze 2D power spectra from the PAPER-32 imaging array in Stokes I, Q, U, and V. These allow us to observe and diagnose systematic effects in our calibration at high signal-to-noise within the Fourier space most relevant to EoR experiments. We observe well-defined windows in the Stokes visibilities, with Stokes Q, U, and V power spectra sharing a similar wedge shape to that seen in Stokes I. With modest polarization calibration, we see no evidence that polarization calibration errors move power outside the wedge in any Stokes visibility to the noise levels attained. Deeper integrations will be required to confirm that this behavior persists to the depth required for EoR detection.

  16. High Rayleigh number convection numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verzicco, Roberto

    2002-03-01

    Numerical experiments on the flow developing in a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio Γ = 1/2 heated from below and cooled from above, are conducted for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) ranging from 2 x 10^6 up to 2 x 10^11. The aim of the present study is to numerically replicate the experiments by Roche et al. (2001) and Niemela et al. (2000) performed using gaseous helium close to the critical point as working fluid (Pr = 0.7). The numerical simulation permitted us to generate a large data base which was validated by the experimental results and, on the other hand, provided physical insights which are missed by the experimental approaches usually limited to pointwise temperature and global heat exchange measurements. Attention is focussed on the presence of large-scale structures whose characterization is important owing to the introduction of constant `winds' sweeping the plates and generating viscous and thermal boundary layers. The analysis of instantaneous snapshots clearly indicates that the topology of the recirculating large scale structures is quite different with respect to what is commonly observed in Γ = 1 cells where a unique large scale recirculation structure completely fills the fluid volume (e.g. Verzicco & Camussi, 1999). It is shown that a transition occurs at about Ra = 10^9; at lower Ra the flow is characterized by the presence of two counter-rotating toroidal rings attached to the horizontal plates. At larger Ra, in contrast, the most intense structure consists of two counter-rotating rolls of unitary aspect ratio. The two types of flow, which co-exists in the range 10^9 < Ra < 10^10, determine different properties of both the thermal and the viscous boundary layers. Indeed, even if the limited range of Ra analyzed in the present simulation does not allow the presence of a transition to be clearly observed in the Nu vs Ra diagram, the proposed scenario is confirmed by the direct analysis of the boundary layer thicknesses and of the kinetic energy and

  17. Momentum density and 2D-ACAR experiments in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, A. . Dept. of Physics); Smedskjaer, L.C. )

    1991-12-01

    We compare measured c-projected 2D-ACAR spectrum from an untwinned single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} with the corresponding band theory predictions. Many different one-dimensional sections through the spectrum are considered, together with the characteristic amplitudes and shapes of the spectral anisotropies, with a focus on identifying and delineating Fermi surface signatures in the spectra. The positron data clearly show several distinct features of the ridge Fermi surface predicted by the band theory, and give an indication of the pillbox Fermi sheet. The good agreement between theory and experiment suggests that the band theory framework based on the local density approximation (LDA) is capable of providing a substantially correct description of the momentum density and Fermiology of the normal ground state electronic structure of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}.

  18. Advanced Tsunami Numerical Simulations and Energy Considerations by use of 3D-2D Coupled Models: The October 11, 1918, Mona Passage Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Venegas, Alberto M.; Horrillo, Juan; Pampell-Manis, Alyssa; Huérfano, Victor; Mercado, Aurelio

    2015-06-01

    The most recent tsunami observed along the coast of the island of Puerto Rico occurred on October 11, 1918, after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake in the Mona Passage. The earthquake was responsible for initiating a tsunami that mostly affected the northwestern coast of the island. Runup values from a post-tsunami survey indicated the waves reached up to 6 m. A controversy regarding the source of the tsunami has resulted in several numerical simulations involving either fault rupture or a submarine landslide as the most probable cause of the tsunami. Here we follow up on previous simulations of the tsunami from a submarine landslide source off the western coast of Puerto Rico as initiated by the earthquake. Improvements on our previous study include: (1) higher-resolution bathymetry; (2) a 3D-2D coupled numerical model specifically developed for the tsunami; (3) use of the non-hydrostatic numerical model NEOWAVE (non-hydrostatic evolution of ocean WAVE) featuring two-way nesting capabilities; and (4) comprehensive energy analysis to determine the time of full tsunami wave development. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes model tsunami solution using the Navier-Stokes algorithm with multiple interfaces for two fluids (water and landslide) was used to determine the initial wave characteristic generated by the submarine landslide. Use of NEOWAVE enabled us to solve for coastal inundation, wave propagation, and detailed runup. Our results were in agreement with previous work in which a submarine landslide is favored as the most probable source of the tsunami, and improvement in the resolution of the bathymetry yielded inundation of the coastal areas that compare well with values from a post-tsunami survey. Our unique energy analysis indicates that most of the wave energy is isolated in the wave generation region, particularly at depths near the landslide, and once the initial wave propagates from the generation region its energy begins to stabilize.

  19. Digit ratio (2D:4D) predicts sporting success among female fencers independent from physical, experience, and personality factors.

    PubMed

    Voracek, M; Reimer, B; Dressler, S G

    2010-12-01

    Research particularly focusing on male athletes and popular sports (running and soccer) suggests associations of lower (masculinized) second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action, with better sports performance. Studies focusing on women, non-mainstream sports, or controlling for covariates relevant for sporting success are still sparse. This study examined associations between 2D:4D and performance of both male and female athletes active in fencing (a non-mainstream sport dominated by male participants), while controlling for covariates. National fencing rankings and 2D:4D of 58 male and 41 female Austrian tournament fencers (mean age 24 years) were correlated. Among female, but not male, fencers, lower 2D:4D was related to better national fencing rankings. 2D:4D still accounted for incremental variance (12%) in fencing success, when the effects of salient performance factors (age, body mass index, years of fencing, training intensity, and the personality variables achievement, control, harm avoidance, and social potency) were controlled for (totaling 35% attributable variance). Athletes active in the most aggressive form (the sabre) had lower 2D:4D than those active in the other forms (épée and foil fencing). Sporting success in adult life might be partly prenatally programmed via long-lasting extragenital effects of testosterone. PMID:19843265

  20. Melt-rock reaction in the asthenospheric mantle: Perspectives from high-order accurate numerical simulations in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirupathi, S.; Schiemenz, A. R.; Liang, Y.; Parmentier, E.; Hesthaven, J.

    2013-12-01

    The style and mode of melt migration in the mantle are important to the interpretation of basalts erupted on the surface. Both grain-scale diffuse porous flow and channelized melt migration have been proposed. To better understand the mechanisms and consequences of melt migration in a heterogeneous mantle, we have undertaken a numerical study of reactive dissolution in an upwelling and viscously deformable mantle where solubility of pyroxene increases upwards. Our setup is similar to that described in [1], except we use a larger domain size in 2D and 3D and a new numerical method. To enable efficient simulations in 3D through parallel computing, we developed a high-order accurate numerical method for the magma dynamics problem using discontinuous Galerkin methods and constructed the problem using the numerical library deal.II [2]. Linear stability analyses of the reactive dissolution problem reveal three dynamically distinct regimes [3] and the simulations reported in this study were run in the stable regime and the unstable wave regime where small perturbations in porosity grows periodically. The wave regime is more relevant to melt migration beneath the mid-ocean ridges but computationally more challenging. Extending the 2D simulations in the stable regime in [1] to 3D using various combinations of sustained perturbations in porosity at the base of the upwelling column (which may result from a viened mantle), we show the geometry and distribution of dunite channel and high-porosity melt channels are highly correlated with inflow perturbation through superposition. Strong nonlinear interactions among compaction, dissolution, and upwelling give rise to porosity waves and high-porosity melt channels in the wave regime. These compaction-dissolution waves have well organized but time-dependent structures in the lower part of the simulation domain. High-porosity melt channels nucleate along nodal lines of the porosity waves, growing downwards. The wavelength scales

  1. Parameterization of a numerical 2-D debris flow model with entrainment: a case study of the Faucon catchment, Southern French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussin, H. Y.; Luna, B. Quan; van Westen, C. J.; Christen, M.; Malet, J.-P.; van Asch, Th. W. J.

    2012-10-01

    The occurrence of debris flows has been recorded for more than a century in the European Alps, accounting for the risk to settlements and other human infrastructure that have led to death, building damage and traffic disruptions. One of the difficulties in the quantitative hazard assessment of debris flows is estimating the run-out behavior, which includes the run-out distance and the related hazard intensities like the height and velocity of a debris flow. In addition, as observed in the French Alps, the process of entrainment of material during the run-out can be 10-50 times in volume with respect to the initially mobilized mass triggered at the source area. The entrainment process is evidently an important factor that can further determine the magnitude and intensity of debris flows. Research on numerical modeling of debris flow entrainment is still ongoing and involves some difficulties. This is partly due to our lack of knowledge of the actual process of the uptake and incorporation of material and due the effect of entrainment on the final behavior of a debris flow. Therefore, it is important to model the effects of this key erosional process on the formation of run-outs and related intensities. In this study we analyzed a debris flow with high entrainment rates that occurred in 2003 at the Faucon catchment in the Barcelonnette Basin (Southern French Alps). The historic event was back-analyzed using the Voellmy rheology and an entrainment model imbedded in the RAMMS 2-D numerical modeling software. A sensitivity analysis of the rheological and entrainment parameters was carried out and the effects of modeling with entrainment on the debris flow run-out, height and velocity were assessed.

  2. 2D sandbox experiments of surfactant foams for mobility control and enhanced LNAPL recovery in layered soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longpré-Girard, Mélanie; Martel, Richard; Robert, Thomas; Lefebvre, René; Lauzon, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    The ability of surfactant foam to enhance mobility control and LNAPL recovery in a heterogeneous porous media was investigated through sandbox experiments with p-xylene used as LNAPL. A layered heterogeneous porous media was represented in a 2D sandbox filled with two layers of coarse and medium silica sand. Based on previous tests, the surfactant solution used was Ammonyx Lo at a concentration of 0.1% (w/w). The sandbox experimental program included tracer tests done under both uncontaminated and contaminated conditions, foam injection under uncontaminated conditions and surfactant solution and foam injection under contaminated conditions. Tracer tests indicated that the permeability contrast between sand layers was increased by LNAPL contamination. Foam injection under uncontaminated conditions presented a S-shaped front that indicated a better mobility control than the piston-shaped front obtained during tracer tests. During foam injection, complete sweep of the sandbox was achieved with 1.8 pore volume (PV) compared to 2.8 PV during tracer injection, thus indicating better mobility control with foam. Pre-flush of the contaminated sandbox with surfactant solution initiated p-xylene mobilization but no free phase was recovered at the effluent. A negligible p-xylene residual saturation was reached following foam injection in the contaminated sandbox. However, mass balance indicated a total recovery of only 48% of the initial p-xylene, thus indicating an underestimation of the recovery by volatilization. Recovery by volatilization was corrected, which gave the following proportions of LNAPL recovery mechanisms: 19% by mobilization, 16% by dissolution and 65% by volatilization. Results show the potential efficiency of foam remediation of LNAPL source zones in heterogeneous porous media. Still, further developments are needed prior to field scale application, which could benefit from in situ foam production that would simplify on-site operations.

  3. Numerical simulation on the thermal radiative properties of a 2D SiO2/W/SiO2/W layered grating for thermophotovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi; Fu, Ceji

    2016-10-01

    Tailoring the spectrum of thermal emission from the emitter is important for improving the performance of a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. In this work, a two-dimensional (2D) layered grating structure made of SiO2 and tungsten (W), which can realize wavelength-selective control of thermal emission, was proposed for a potential emitter in TPV applications. Numerical simulations of the spectral emissivity of the structure from the ultraviolet (UV) to the mid-infrared region reveals that the spectral-normal emissivity of the structure is enhanced to above 0.95 in the wavelength region from 0.55 μm to 1.9 μm for both TE and TM waves, but drops sharply at wavelength larger than 2 μm. Physical mechanisms responsible for the wavelength-selective emissivity were elucidated as due to resonance of magnetic polaritons (MPs) in the SiO2 spacer and in the grooves of the tungsten grating, Wood's anomaly (WA), excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and wave interference. Furthermore, the structure was found to exhibit quasi-diffuse and polarization-insensitive features of thermal emission, suggesting that the proposed structure can serve as the emitter in the design of high performance TPV systems.

  4. Probabilistic hazard analysis of dense Pyroclastic Density Currents at Vesuvius (Italy) via parametric uncertainty characterization of TITAN2D numerical simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierz, Pablo; Ramona Stefanescu, Elena; Sandri, Laura; Patra, Abani; Marzocchi, Warner; Sulpizio, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    Probabilistic hazard assessments of Pyroclastic Density Currents (PDCs) are of great interest for decision-making purposes. However, there is a limited number of published works available on this topic. Recent advances in computation and statistical methods are offering new opportunities beyond the classical Monte Carlo (MC) sampling which is known as a simple and robust method but it usually turns out to be slow and computationally intractable. In this work, Titan2D numerical simulator has been coupled to Polynomial Chaos Quadrature (PCQ) to propagate the simulator parametric uncertainty and compute VEI-based probabilistic hazard maps of dense PDCs formed as a result of column collapse at Vesuvius volcano, Italy. Due to the lack of knowledge about the exact conditions under which these PDCs will form, Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs) are assigned to the simulator input parameters (Bed Friction Angle and Volume) according to three VEI sizes. Uniform distributions were used for both parameters since there is insufficient information to assume that any value in the range is more likely that any other value. Reasonable (and compatible) ranges for both variables were constrained according to past eruptions at Vesuvius volcanic system. On the basis of reasoning above a number of quadrature points were taken within those ranges, which resulted in one execution of the TITAN2D code at each quadrature point. With a computational cost several orders of magnitude smaller than MC, exceedance probabilities for a given threshold of flow depth (and conditional to the occurrence of VEI3, VEI4 and VEI5 eruptions) were calculated using PCQ. Moreover, PCQ can be run at different threshold values of the same output variable (flow depth, speed, kinetic energy, …) and, therefore, it can serve to compute Exceedance Probability curves (aka hazard curves) at singular points inside the hazard domain, representing the most important and useful scientific input to quantitative risk

  5. The evolution of lithosphere deformation due to infiltration of asthenosphere melt into a lithosphere with inherited weakness: insight from 2D numerical models of continental rifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, C.; Parmentier, E.; Hirth, G.

    2013-12-01

    Melt formed in the asthenosphere affects lithosphere evolution through its accumulation and subsequent infiltration and heating of the lithosphere. Magmatic weakening of the lithosphere has received particular attention in the context of continental rifting because homogeneous continental lithosphere is too strong to rift under available tectonic forces without a weakening mechanism. But the observation that rifting generally initiates in heterogeneous continental mobile belts suggests that rift zones develop in lithosphere with some inherited compositional weakness, obscuring the importance of magmatic weakening. To test the relative roles of magmatic and compositional weakening, we construct a 2D numerical model that includes both effects. We treat the lithosphere and asthenosphere as separate, but coupled, domains. The lithosphere deforms via a composite brittle-ductile rheology with a strain rate that varies horizontally but is independent of depth. We apply an extensional force that is constant throughout the lithosphere, causing thinned or weakened regions of the lithosphere to extend at higher strain rate. We treat the asthenosphere as a viscous and partially molten and solve the 2D conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy for both the solid and melt phases. Melting and freezing are treated using a hydrated peridotite solidus. Solid velocities in the asthenosphere are calculated using the solid velocities from the lithosphere base as boundary conditions. The asthenosphere and lithosphere are coupled through magma infiltration and subsequent lithosphere heating. Melt fractions accumulating above an imposed critical melt fraction are extracted and emplaced within a few kms of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, where it freezes, releasing latent heat. We test scenarios with a fixed critical melt fraction as well as a variable critical melt fraction determined by our previously published parametrization of dike propagation [Havlin et al., EPSL

  6. Numerical experiments with flows of elongated granules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, Harold G.; Brewe, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Theory and numerical results are given for a program simulating two dimensional granular flow (1) between two infinite, counter-moving, parallel, roughened walls, and (2) for an infinitely wide slider. Each granule is simulated by a central repulsive force field ratcheted with force restitution factor to introduce dissipation. Transmission of angular momentum between particles occurs via Coulomb friction. The effect of granular hardness is explored. Gaps from 7 to 28 particle diameters are investigated, with solid fractions ranging from 0.2 to 0.9. Among features observed are: slip flow at boundaries, coagulation at high densities, and gross fluctuation in surface stress. A videotape has been prepared to demonstrate the foregoing effects.

  7. BET_VH probabilistic assessment of pyroclastic flows hazard at El Misti volcano, South Peru, based on geological record and numerical simulations with TITAN2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, R.; Thouret, J. C.; Sandri, L.; Irimus, I. A.; Stefanescu, R.

    2012-04-01

    Pyroclastic density currents, which include pyroclastic surges and pyroclastic flows (PFs), are among the most dangerous volcanic phenomena. We present a probabilistic hazard assessment of the PFs generated from eruptive column collapse at El Misti volcano (5822 m) in South Peru. The high relief of the cone, the location of the city of Arequipa (~1,000,000 people) on two large volcanoclastic fans and the H (3.5 km)/L (17 km) ratio (0.2) between the summit and the city center, make PFs a direct threat. We consider three eruption scenario sizes: small Vulcanian/Phreatomagmatic (VEI 2), medium Sub-Plinian (VEI 3-4), and large Plinian (VEI 4+). We use the Event-Tree approach in a Bayesian scheme with BET_VH (Bayesian Event Tree for Volcanic Hazard) software. Quantitative data that stem from numerical simulations from TITAN2D (termed prior models) and from stratigraphic record (termed past data) are input to BET_VH, which enables us to compute the probabilities (in a 1-year time window) of (i) having an eruption (ii) in a selected location/vent (iii) of a specific size, (iv) and that this eruption will produce PFs (v) that will reach a location of interest around El Misti. TITAN2D simulation runs, expressed as color-coded thicknesses of PDC deposits, fit well the extent of past PFs deposits, including thick confined deposits (0.5-7 m) in the Rio Chili canyon and its tributary ravines (Quebradas San Lazaro, Huarangal and Agua Salada).The unconfined, thinner (≤10cm) deposits, as displayed by simulation runs on the interfluves, is attributed to ash-cloud surges. Such thin, fine ash deposits have not been emphasized in geological maps either because they have been removed away or remain yet unrecognized. The simulated Vulcanian flows, restricted to the upper part of the cone, become confined (0.1-1m thick) in the ravines which converge towards each of the three Quebradas. The simulated Subplinian PF deposits reach 0.1 to 1 m thick in the Quebradas and 1-4 m WNW of El

  8. Plume Electrification: Laboratory and Numerical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, J. S.; Dufek, J.

    2012-12-01

    The spectacular lightning strokes observed during eruptions testify to the enormous potentials that can be generated within plumes. Related to the charging of individual ash particles, large electric fields and volcanic lightning have been observed at Eyjafjallajokull, Redoubt, and Chaiten, among other volcanoes. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for plume electrification, including triboelectric charging, charging from the brittle failure of rock, and charging due to phase change as material is carried aloft. While the overall electrification of the plume likely results from a combination of these processes, in the following work we focus on triboelectric charging—how a plume charges as particles collide with each other. To explore the role of triboelectric effects in plume charging we have conducted a number of small scale laboratory experiments similar to those designed by Forward et al (2009). Succinctly, the experiments consist of fluidizing an ash bed with nitrogen and monitoring the resulting currents induced by the moving particles. It is important to note that the reaction chamber only allows particle-particle interactions. The entire experimental setup is enclosed in a vacuum chamber, allowing us to carefully control the environment during experiments. Runs were carried out for different ash compositions, and driving pressures. We particularly focused on natural grain size distributions of ash and on quantifying not only the net charge but also the charging rate. Furthermore, we report on our progress to incorporate the collected data, namely charging rates, into a large eularian-eularian-lagrangian multiphase eruption dynamic model. Finally, to validate these results, we present our plans to deploy a large wireless sensor network of electrometers and magnetometers around active volcanoes to directly map the overhead E- and M-fields as an eruption occurs.

  9. Results of an attempt to measure increased rates of the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n in a nonelectrochemical cold fusion experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Decker, Arthur J.; Blue, James W.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was performed to look for evidence of deuterium fusion in palladium. The experiment, which involved introducing deuterium into the palladium filter of a hydrogen purifier, was designed to detect neutrons produced in the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n as well as heat production. The neutron counts for deuterium did not differ significantly from background or from the counts for a hydrogen control. Heat production was detected when deuterium, but not hydrogen, was pumped from the purifier.

  10. Spray combustion experiments and numerical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, Edward J.; Bulzan, Daniel L.; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of commercial aircraft will include turbofan engines with performance significantly better than those in the current fleet. Control of particulate and gaseous emissions will also be an integral part of the engine design criteria. These performance and emission requirements present a technical challenge for the combustor: control of the fuel and air mixing and control of the local stoichiometry will have to be maintained much more rigorously than with combustors in current production. A better understanding of the flow physics of liquid fuel spray combustion is necessary. This paper describes recent experiments on spray combustion where detailed measurements of the spray characteristics were made, including local drop-size distributions and velocities. Also, an advanced combustor CFD code has been under development and predictions from this code are compared with experimental results. Studies such as these will provide information to the advanced combustor designer on fuel spray quality and mixing effectiveness. Validation of new fast, robust, and efficient CFD codes will also enable the combustor designer to use them as additional design tools for optimization of combustor concepts for the next generation of aircraft engines.

  11. Numerical Experiments on Sediment Pulse Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. A.; Nelson, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Local channel morphology is highly dependent on sediment supply from upstream reaches. Sediment pulses are introduced to channels during natural and anthropogenic disturbances such as landslides, dam removal, or gravel augmentation. Flume studies have shown that sediment pulses tend to evolve through some combination of translation and dispersion, but the relative importance of the sediment pulse size, the grain size of the pulse material, flow unsteadiness, and channel nonuniformity is poorly understood. Here we use a one-dimensional morphodynamic model to simulate the evolution of various sediment pulses in a straight, rectangular channel. The model is capable of determining transcritical flows, using the energy equation for subcritical nodes and a reduced momentum equation for supercritical nodes. Bed evolution and grain size sorting are handled with the mixed-grain-size Exner equation for sediment continuity. A stratigraphy submodel allows the vertical grain size distribution created during deposition to provide feedbacks on morphodynamic processes encountered during degradation. We explore how pulse characteristics such as total mass, feed timing, and grain size distribution affect pulse translation and dispersion. We also consider the influence of steady versus unsteady water discharge and the existence of background sediment feed. Finally, we examine the effect of variations in channel width by varying the amplitude and wavelength of downstream sinusoidal width undulations. Preliminary results suggest that smaller sediment pulses experience a greater degree of translation than larger pulses. Width variations, particularly those of larger amplitudes, were found to result in increased pulse dispersion. Our results suggest that morphodynamic models can facilitate understanding of what controls sediment pulse dynamics, and they may improve predictions and the potential effectiveness of river restoration techniques such as dam removal and gravel augmentation.

  12. Non-robust numerical simulations of analogue extension experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naliboff, John; Buiter, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Numerical and analogue models of lithospheric deformation provide significant insight into the tectonic processes that lead to specific structural and geophysical observations. As these two types of models contain distinct assumptions and tradeoffs, investigations drawing conclusions from both can reveal robust links between first-order processes and observations. Recent studies have focused on detailed comparisons between numerical and analogue experiments in both compressional and extensional tectonics, sometimes involving multiple lithospheric deformation codes and analogue setups. While such comparisons often show good agreement on first-order deformation styles, results frequently diverge on second-order structures, such as shear zone dip angles or spacing, and in certain cases even on first-order structures. Here, we present finite-element experiments that are designed to directly reproduce analogue "sandbox" extension experiments at the cm-scale. We use material properties and boundary conditions that are directly taken from analogue experiments and use a Drucker-Prager failure model to simulate shear zone formation in sand. We find that our numerical experiments are highly sensitive to numerous numerical parameters. For example, changes to the numerical resolution, velocity convergence parameters and elemental viscosity averaging commonly produce significant changes in first- and second-order structures accommodating deformation. The sensitivity of the numerical simulations to small parameter changes likely reflects a number of factors, including, but not limited to, high angles of internal friction assigned to sand, complex, unknown interactions between the brittle sand (used as an upper crust equivalent) and viscous silicone (lower crust), highly non-linear strain weakening processes and poor constraints on the cohesion of sand. Our numerical-analogue comparison is hampered by (a) an incomplete knowledge of the fine details of sand failure and sand

  13. Development of fast patient position verification software using 2D-3D image registration and its clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kumagai, Motoki; Miki, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Riki; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-09-01

    To improve treatment workflow, we developed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-based patient positional verification software application and integrated it into carbon-ion scanning beam treatment. Here, we evaluated the basic performance of the software. The algorithm provides 2D/3D registration matching using CT and orthogonal X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) images. The participants were 53 patients with tumors of the head and neck, prostate or lung receiving carbon-ion beam treatment. 2D/3D-ITchi-Gime (ITG) calculation accuracy was evaluated in terms of computation time and registration accuracy. Registration calculation was determined using the similarity measurement metrics gradient difference (GD), normalized mutual information (NMI), zero-mean normalized cross-correlation (ZNCC), and their combination. Registration accuracy was dependent on the particular metric used. Representative examples were determined to have target registration error (TRE) = 0.45 ± 0.23 mm and angular error (AE) = 0.35 ± 0.18° with ZNCC + GD for a head and neck tumor; TRE = 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and AE = 0.16 ± 0.07° with ZNCC for a pelvic tumor; and TRE = 1.19 ± 0.78 mm and AE = 0.83 ± 0.61° with ZNCC for lung tumor. Calculation time was less than 7.26 s.The new registration software has been successfully installed and implemented in our treatment process. We expect that it will improve both treatment workflow and treatment accuracy. PMID:26081313

  14. Development of fast patient position verification software using 2D-3D image registration and its clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kumagai, Motoki; Miki, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Riki; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    To improve treatment workflow, we developed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-based patient positional verification software application and integrated it into carbon-ion scanning beam treatment. Here, we evaluated the basic performance of the software. The algorithm provides 2D/3D registration matching using CT and orthogonal X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) images. The participants were 53 patients with tumors of the head and neck, prostate or lung receiving carbon-ion beam treatment. 2D/3D-ITchi-Gime (ITG) calculation accuracy was evaluated in terms of computation time and registration accuracy. Registration calculation was determined using the similarity measurement metrics gradient difference (GD), normalized mutual information (NMI), zero-mean normalized cross-correlation (ZNCC), and their combination. Registration accuracy was dependent on the particular metric used. Representative examples were determined to have target registration error (TRE) = 0.45 ± 0.23 mm and angular error (AE) = 0.35 ± 0.18° with ZNCC + GD for a head and neck tumor; TRE = 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and AE = 0.16 ± 0.07° with ZNCC for a pelvic tumor; and TRE = 1.19 ± 0.78 mm and AE = 0.83 ± 0.61° with ZNCC for lung tumor. Calculation time was less than 7.26 s.The new registration software has been successfully installed and implemented in our treatment process. We expect that it will improve both treatment workflow and treatment accuracy. PMID:26081313

  15. Convective melting in a magma chamber: theory and numerical experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakin, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present results of the numerical modeling of convective melting in a magma chamber in 2D. Model was pointed on the silicic system approximated with Qz-Fsp binary undersaturated with water. Viscosity was calculated as a function of the melt composition, temperature and crystal content and comprises for the pure melt 104.5-105.5 Pas. Lower boundary was taken thermally insulated in majority of the runs. Size of FEM (bilinear elements) grid for velocity is 25x25 cm and for the integration of the density term 8x8 cm. Melting of the chamber roof proceeds with the heat supply due to the chaotic thermo-compositional convection and conductive heat loose into melted substrate. We compare our numerical data with existing semi-analytical models. Theoretical studies of the assimilation rates in the magma chambers usually use theoretical semi-analytical model by Huppert and Sparks (1988) (e.g., Snyder, 2000). We find that this model has strong points: 1) Independence of the melting rate on the sill thickness (Ra>>Rac) 2) Independence of the convective heat transfer on the roof temperature 3) Determination of the exponential thermal boundary layer ahead of the melting front and weak points: 1) Ignoring the possibility of the crystallization without melting regime for narrow sills and dykes. 2)Neglecting of two-phase character of convection. 3)Ignoring of the strong viscosity variation near the melting front. Independence of convective flux from the sill size (at Ra>>Rac) allows reducing of computational domain to the geologically small size (10-15 m). Concept of exponential thermal boundary layer is also rather important. Length scale (L0) of this layer is related to the melting rate and thermal diffusivity coefficient kT as L0=kT/um and at the melting rate 10 m/yr becomes about 2 m. Such small scale implies that convective melting is very effective (small conductive heat loss) and part of the numerical domain filled with roof rocks can be taken small. In the H&S model

  16. Numerical Modeling of a Magnetic Flux Compression Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhin, Volodymyr; Bauer, Bruno S.; Awe, Thomas J.; Fuelling, Stephan; Goodrich, Tasha; Lindemuth, Irvin R.; Siemon, Richard E.; Garanin, Sergei F.

    2007-06-01

    A possible plasma target for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a stable diffuse z-pinch in a toroidal cavity, like that in MAGO experiments. To examine key phenomena of such MTF systems, a magnetic flux compression experiment with this geometry is under design. The experiment is modeled with 3 codes: a slug model, the 1D Lagrangian RAVEN code, and the 1D or 2D Eulerian Magneto-Hydro-Radiative-Dynamics-Research (MHRDR) MHD simulation. Even without injection of plasma, high- Z wall plasma is generated by eddy-current Ohmic heating from MG fields. A significant fraction of the available liner kinetic energy goes into Ohmic heating and compression of liner and central-core material. Despite these losses, efficiency of liner compression, expressed as compressed magnetic energy relative to liner kinetic energy, can be close to 50%. With initial fluctuations (1%) imposed on the liner and central conductor density, 2D modeling manifests liner intrusions, caused by the m = 0 Rayleigh-Taylor instability during liner deceleration, and central conductor distortions, caused by the m = 0 curvature-driven MHD instability. At many locations, these modes reduce the gap between the liner and the central core by about a factor of two, to of order 1 mm, at the time of peak magnetic field.

  17. The use of FLO2D numerical code in lahar hazard evaluation at Popocatépetl volcano: a 2001-lahar scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2014-07-01

    Lahar modelling represents an excellent tool to design hazard maps. It allows the definition of potential inundation zones for different lahar magnitude scenarios and sediment concentrations. Here we present the results obtained for the 2001 syneruptive lahar at Popocatépetl volcano, based on simulations performed with FLO2D software. An accurate delineation of this event is needed since it is one of the possible scenarios considered during a volcanic crisis. One of the main issues for lahar simulation using FLO2D is the calibration of the input hydrograph and rheologic flow properties. Here we verified that geophone data can be properly calibrated by means of peak discharge calculations obtained by superelevation method. Simulation results clearly show the influence of concentration and rheologic properties on lahar depth and distribution. Modifying rheologic properties during lahar simulation strongly affect lahar distribution. More viscous lahars have a more restricted aerial distribution, thicker depths, and resulting velocities are noticeable smaller. FLO2D proved to be a very successful tool to delimitate lahar inundation zones as well as to generate different lahar scenarios not only related to lahar volume or magnitude but also to take into account different sediment concentrations and rheologies widely documented to influence lahar prone areas.

  18. The use of FLO2D numerical code in lahar hazard evaluation at Popocatépetl volcano: a 2001 lahar scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2014-12-01

    Lahar modeling represents an excellent tool for designing hazard maps. It allows the definition of potential inundation zones for different lahar magnitude scenarios and sediment concentrations. Here, we present the results obtained for the 2001 syneruptive lahar at Popocatépetl volcano, based on simulations performed with FLO2D software. An accurate delineation of this event is needed, since it is one of the possible scenarios considered if magmatic activity increases its magnitude. One of the main issues for lahar simulation using FLO2D is the calibration of the input hydrograph and rheological flow properties. Here, we verified that geophone data can be properly calibrated by means of peak discharge calculations obtained by the superelevation method. Digital elevation model resolution also resulted as an important factor in defining the reliability of the simulated flows. Simulation results clearly show the influence of sediment concentrations and rheological properties on lahar depth and distribution. Modifying rheological properties during lahar simulation strongly affects lahar distribution. More viscous lahars have a more restricted aerial distribution and thicker depths, and resulting velocities are noticeably smaller. FLO2D proved to be a very successful tool for delimitating lahar inundation zones as well as generating different lahar scenarios not only related to lahar volume or magnitude, but also taking into account different sediment concentrations and rheologies widely documented as influencing lahar-prone areas.

  19. Ionic Liquid Dynamics Measured with 2D IR and IR Pump-Probe Experiments on a Linear Anion and the Influence of Potassium Cations.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    The room-temperature ionic liquid EmimNTf2 (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) was studied with two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) experiments using low-concentration selenocyanate (SeCN(-)) as the vibrational probe. SeCN(-) was added as EmimSeCN, which keeps the cation the same. KSeCN was also used, so K(+) was added. Two 2D IR polarization configurations were employed: ⟨XXXX⟩ (all pulses have the same polarization) and ⟨XXYY⟩ (the first two pulse polarizations are perpendicular to that of the third pulse and the echo). The spectral diffusion differs for the two configurations, demonstrating that reorientation-induced spectral diffusion, in addition to structural spectral diffusion (SSD), plays a role in the observed dynamics. The SSD was extracted from the 2D IR time-dependent data. The samples with EmimSeCN have dynamics on several fast time scales; however, when KSeCN is used, both the PPSP anisotropy decay and the 2D IR decays have low amplitude offsets (nondecaying values at long times). The size of the offsets increased with increased K(+) concentration. These results are explained in terms of a two-ensemble model. A small fraction of the SeCN(-) is located in the regions modified by the presence of K(+), causing a substantial slowing of the SeCN(-) orientational relaxation and spectral diffusion. Having a small ensemble of SeCN(-) that undergoes very slow dynamics is sufficient to explain the offsets. For the major ensemble, the dynamics with and without K(+) are the same. PMID:26872207

  20. A Comparison of Metamodeling Techniques via Numerical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of a few metamodeling techniques using numerical experiments for the single input-single output case. These experiments enable comparing the models' predictions with the phenomenon they are aiming to describe as more data is made available. These techniques include (i) prediction intervals associated with a least squares parameter estimate, (ii) Bayesian credible intervals, (iii) Gaussian process models, and (iv) interval predictor models. Aspects being compared are computational complexity, accuracy (i.e., the degree to which the resulting prediction conforms to the actual Data Generating Mechanism), reliability (i.e., the probability that new observations will fall inside the predicted interval), sensitivity to outliers, extrapolation properties, ease of use, and asymptotic behavior. The numerical experiments describe typical application scenarios that challenge the underlying assumptions supporting most metamodeling techniques.

  1. Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction with Aqueous Glyoxylic Acid: An Experiment in Organic Synthesis and 2-D NMR Analysis for Advanced Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augé, Jacques; Lubin-Germain, Nadège

    1998-10-01

    As an application of the use of water as solvent in organic synthesis, a convenient synthesis of a-hydroxy-g-lactones from an aqueous solution of glyoxylic acid is described. The mechanism of the reaction leading to the lactones goes through cycloadducts which rearrange in situ. The NMR analysis of the diastereomeric lactones is particularly interesting; such an analysis illustrates the importance of modern techniques including 2-D NMR spectroscopy. Complete assignments of the signals are mentioned and NOESY spectra are enclosed. The full experiment is addressed to advanced undergraduate students who are trained in organic synthesis and NMR spectroscopy.

  2. Investigations on mobility of carbon colloid supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in a column experiment and a laboratory 2D-aquifer test system.

    PubMed

    Busch, Jan; Meißner, Tobias; Potthoff, Annegret; Oswald, Sascha E

    2014-09-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has recently gained great interest in the scientific community as in situ reagent for installation of permeable reactive barriers in aquifer systems, since nZVI is highly reactive with chlorinated compounds and may render them to harmless substances. However, nZVI has a high tendency to agglomerate and sediment; therefore it shows very limited transport ranges. One new approach to overcome the limited transport of nZVI in porous media is using a suited carrier colloid. In this study we tested mobility of a carbon colloid supported nZVI particle "Carbo-Iron Colloids" (CIC) with a mean size of 0.63 μm in a column experiment of 40 cm length and an experiment in a two-dimensional (2D) aquifer test system with dimensions of 110 × 40 × 5 cm. Results show a breakthrough maximum of 82 % of the input concentration in the column experiment and 58 % in the 2D-aquifer test system. Detected residuals in porous media suggest a strong particle deposition in the first centimeters and few depositions in the porous media in the further travel path. Overall, this suggests a high mobility in porous media which might be a significant enhancement compared to bare or polyanionic stabilized nZVI.

  3. Numerical simulations of the QUELL experiment in SULTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Marinucci, C.

    1995-03-01

    The QUench Experiment on Long Length (QUELL) in the SULTAN Facility is planned to investigate the quench propagation and detection of a conductor with ITER relevant geometry and scaled performance. The objective of this study is to show the ability of QUELL to provide quench conditions relevant for ITER and to simulate the system performance, dealing in particular with the design aspects of the power supply, cryogenic system and heaters. The numerical analysis was performed with GANDALF - a 1-D code to analyze Dual Channel Cable-in-Conduit Conductors. A numerical convergence test and a comparison with another code and with analytical results have confirmed the validity of the simulations.

  4. Numerical simulatin of supernova-relevant laser-driven hydro experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Leibrandt, D; Robey, H F; Edwards, M J; Braun, D G; Miles, A R; Drake, R P

    2004-02-10

    In ongoing experiments performed on the OMEGA laser [J. M. Soures et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2108 (1996)] at the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), nanosecond laser pulses are used to drive strong blast waves into two-layer targets. Perturbations on the interface between the two materials are unstable to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability as a result of shock transit and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability during the deceleration-phase behind the shock front. These experiments are designed to produce a strongly shocked interface whose evolution is a scaled version of the unstable hydrogen-helium interface in core-collapse supernovae such as SN 1987A. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities and the resulting transition to turbulence on supernovae observables that remain as yet unexplained. The authors are, at present, particularly interested in the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability through the late nonlinear stage, the transition to turbulence, and the subsequent transport of material within the turbulent region. In this paper, the results of numerical simulations of 2D single and multimode experiments are presented. These simulations are run using the 2D Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) radiation hydrodynamics code CALE [R. T. Barton, Numerical Astrophysics (Jones and Bartlett, Boston, 1985)]. The simulation results are shown to compare well with experimental radiography. A buoyancy-drag model captures the behavior of the single-mode interface, but gives only partial agreement in the multi-mode cases. The Richtmyer-Meshkov and target decompression contributions to the perturbation growth are both estimated and shown to be significant. Significant dependence of the simulation results on the material equation of state (EOS) is demonstrated, and the prospect of continuing the experiments to conclusively demonstrate the transition to turbulence is discussed.

  5. Processing biobased polymers using plasticizers: Numerical simulations versus experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desplentere, Frederik; Cardon, Ludwig; Six, Wim; Erkoç, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In polymer processing, the use of biobased products shows lots of possibilities. Considering biobased materials, biodegradability is in most cases the most important issue. Next to this, bio based materials aimed at durable applications, are gaining interest. Within this research, the influence of plasticizers on the processing of the bio based material is investigated. This work is done for an extrusion grade of PLA, Natureworks PLA 2003D. Extrusion through a slit die equipped with pressure sensors is used to compare the experimental pressure values to numerical simulation results. Additional experimental data (temperature and pressure data along the extrusion screw and die are recorded) is generated on a dr. Collin Lab extruder producing a 25mm diameter tube. All these experimental data is used to indicate the appropriate functioning of the numerical simulation tool Virtual Extrusion Laboratory 6.7 for the simulation of both the industrial available extrusion grade PLA and the compound in which 15% of plasticizer is added. Adding the applied plasticizer, resulted in a 40% lower pressure drop over the extrusion die. The combination of different experiments allowed to fit the numerical simulation results closely to the experimental values. Based on this experience, it is shown that numerical simulations also can be used for modified bio based materials if appropriate material and process data are taken into account.

  6. A direct sensitivity comparison between flow-modulated comprehensive 2D and 1D GC in untargeted and targeted MS-based experiments.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Franchina, Flavio A; Zoccali, Mariosimone; Bonaccorsi, Ivana; Cacciola, Francesco; Mondello, Luigi

    2013-09-01

    The present contribution is focused on the measurement of the analytical sensitivity attained in untargeted/targeted MS/MS experiments, performed using flow-modulator comprehensive 2D and 1D GC. The comprehensive 2D experiment was performed by diverting part of the high flow (circa 80%) to flush the accumulation loop (about 28 mL/min) to waste, to reduce the gas flow entering the ion source. 1D analyses were performed through: (i) unmodulated and (ii) single column applications. An equivalent temperature program was applied in the modulated and unmodulated analyses, while a faster one was employed in the single column one. In all application types, the (same) triple quadrupole instrument was operated in the full-scan and multiple reaction monitoring modes. A genuine sweet orange oil and the same sample spiked with 20 phytosanitary compounds were employed to reach the research objective. The results highlight the problems related to the flow modulation-MS combination. Specifically, it was found that sensitivity was on average three to four times higher in unmodulated and optimized single-column applications. PMID:23868497

  7. Fringe-controlled biodegradation under dynamic conditions: Quasi 2-D flow-through experiments and reactive-transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominik; Kürzinger, Petra; Bauer, Robert; Griebler, Christian; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has been shown to be most pronounced at the fringe of contaminant plumes, where mixing of contaminated water and ambient groundwater, containing dissolved electron acceptors, stimulates microbial activity. While physical mixing of contaminant and electron acceptor by transverse dispersion has been shown to be the major bottleneck for biodegradation in steady-state plumes, so far little is known on the effect of flow and transport dynamics (caused, e.g., by a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table) on biodegradation in these systems. Towards this end we performed experiments in quasi-two-dimensional flow-through microcosms on aerobic toluene degradation by Pseudomonas putida F1. Plume dynamics were simulated by vertical alteration of the toluene plume position and experimental results were analyzed by reactive-transport modeling. We found that, even after disappearance of the toluene plume for two weeks, the majority of microorganisms stayed attached to the sediment and regained their full biodegradation potential within two days after reappearance of the toluene plume. Our results underline that besides microbial growth, also maintenance and dormancy are important processes that affect biodegradation performance under transient environmental conditions and therefore deserve increased consideration in future reactive-transport modeling.

  8. Numerical modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Enedy, S.

    1993-01-01

    Data from injection experiments in the southeast Geysers are presented that show strong interference (both negative and positive) with a neighboring production well. Conceptual and numerical models are developed that explain the negative interference (decline of production rate) in terms of heat transfer limitations and water-vapor relative permeability effects. Recovery and over-recovery following injection shut-in are attributed to boiling of injected fluid, with heat of vaporization provided by the reservoir rocks.

  9. Numerical modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; Enedy, Steve

    1993-01-28

    Data from injection experiments in the southeast Geysers are presented that show strong interference (both negative and positive) with a neighboring production well. Conceptual and numerical models are developed that explain the negative interference (decline of production rate) in terms of heat transfer limitations and water-vapor relative permeability effects. Recovery and overrecovery following injection shut-in are attributed to boiling of injected fluid, with heat of vaporization provided by the reservoir rocks.

  10. Cryogenic Fracturing: Laboratory Visualization Experiments and Numerical Simulations Using Peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Short, R.; Edmiston, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Typical hydraulic fracturing operations involve the use of a large quantity of water, which can be problematic for several reasons including possible formation (permeability) damage, disposal of waste water, and the use of precious local water resource. An alternate reservoir permeability enhancing technology not requiring water is cryogenic fracturing. This method induces controlled fracturing of rock formations by thermal shock and has potentially important applications in the geothermal and hydrocarbon industries. In this process, cryogenic fluid—such as liquid nitrogen—is injected into the subsurface, causing fracturing due to thermal gradients. These fractures may improve the formation permeability relative to that achievable by hydraulic fracturing alone. We conducted combined laboratory visualization and numerical simulations studies of thermal-shock-induced fracture initiation and propagation resulting from liquid nitrogen injection in rock and analog materials. The experiment used transparent soda-lime glass cubes to facilitate real-time visualization of fracture growth and the fracture network geometry. In this contribution, we report the effect of overall temperature difference between cryogenic fluid and solid material on the produced fracture network, by pre-heating the glass cubes to several temperatures and injecting liquid nitrogen. Temperatures are monitored at several points by thermocouple and the fracture evolution is captured visually by camera. The experiment was modeled using a customized, thermoelastic, fracture-capable numerical simulation code based on peridynamics. The performance of the numerical code was validated by the results of the laboratory experiments, and then the code was used to study the different factors affecting a cryogenic fracturing operation, including the evolution of residual stresses and constitutive relationships for material failure. In complex rock such as shale, understanding the process of cryogenic

  11. Short-term groundwater fluxes in the hyporheic zone as a consequence of changing river stages; numerical simulation by HYDRUS 2D/3D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyseure, Guido; Chou, Po-Yi

    2010-05-01

    All hydrological handbooks contain methods for direct runoff and base-flow separation. The semi-log separation method is the most classical one. One can, however, question the physical base for such method. In addition, the water fluxes in the riverbed are important for ecology and water quality. In our study an 2-D cross-section including the river and the surrounding aquifer was set-up in HYDRUS 2D/3D. Initial conditions were a steady-state subsurface flow feeding the river with a recharge from the soil surface. A surface runoff event was simulated by a rise and recession of the water level in the river. Differences between summer and winter situation were explored by given representative temperatures to the different components of the river-aquifer system. The simulations show that the fluxes are very different along the riverbed. Even during steady state baseflow we see that the fluxes through the bottom were 2 to 3 times smaller as compared to the side banks. During the hydrographs the proportion can become up to 5 times. Another interesting result is that within the time frame of the hydrograph and its immediate recession relatively little water, which pentetrated in the aquifer, returns to the river. Most of the water replenishes the aquifer and there is only a very small rise of baseflow. In our simulation we returned to the original level as before the hydrograph, so in reality even less or no rise in baseflow may occur immediately after a hydrograph. Of course, in a longer time-frame the recharge of the aquifer will give a rise to the actual subsurface drainage. The change in seasonal temperatures within the river-aquifer system has a substantial effect. For identical river stage hydrograph changes the hyporheic exchange fluxes are more intense in summer than in winter. If we define the hyporheic zone as the extedn to which the water fluxes from the river can penetrate, then we see that this zone is wider on the sides as compared to the bottom of the

  12. Contact line instability: Comparison between experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, J.; González, A. G.; Gomba, J.; Gratton, R.; Kondic, Lou

    2003-11-01

    We report results of experiments and numerical simulations of the spreading of fixed volumes of silicon oil on vertical substrates. The initial condition is generated from a filament of diameter 0.4 mm and cross section of 10-4 cm^2. By means of two optical techniques, the Schlieren method and the use of an anamorphic lens, we performed a systematic study for a range of cross sections. In particular, we measure the thickness during the early stable stage of the spreading, and analyze the spatial Fourier spectra of the shape of the contact line in the unstable stage, which leads to a finger shaped pattern. The experimental results are compared with numerical simulations within the framework of lubrication approximation. The good agreement found between experiments and simulations strongly supports the hypotheses of the theory and the methods employed in the numerical calculations. This comparison is essential to determine the realistic thickness of the precursor film that must be used in the simulations. Its value (≈ 40 nm) is consistent with measurements in the literature.

  13. Numerical simulation of experiments in the Giant Planet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Davy, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Utilizing a series of existing computer codes, ablation experiments in the Giant Planet Facility are numerically simulated. Of primary importance is the simulation of the low Mach number shock layer that envelops the test model. The RASLE shock-layer code, used in the Jupiter entry probe heat-shield design, is adapted to the experimental conditions. RASLE predictions for radiative and convective heat fluxes are in good agreement with calorimeter measurements. In simulating carbonaceous ablation experiments, the RASLE code is coupled directly with the CMA material response code. For the graphite models, predicted and measured recessions agree very well. Predicted recession for the carbon phenolic models is 50% higher than that measured. This is the first time codes used for the Jupiter probe design have been compared with experiments.

  14. Isentropic Compression up to 200 KBars for LX 04, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Hare, D.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on LX-04 (HMX / Viton 85/15) were performed respectively at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope and associated Hugoniot of this HE. 2D and 3D configurations have been calculated here to test the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shot 1067 on LX 04. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.

  15. Multiple scattering in the high-frequency limit with second-order shadowing function from 2D anisotropic rough dielectric surfaces: II. Comparison with numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourlier, C.; Berginc, G.

    2004-07-01

    This second part presents illustrative examples of the model developed in the companion paper, which is based on the first- and second-order optics approximation. The surface is assumed to be Gaussian and the correlation height is chosen as anisotropic Gaussian. The incoherent scattering coefficient is computed for a height rms range from 0.5lgr to 1lgr (where lgr is the electromagnetic wavelength), for a slope rms range from 0.5 to 1 and for an incidence angle range from 0 to 70°. In addition, simulations are presented for an anisotropic Gaussian surface and when the receiver is not located in the plane of incidence. For a metallic and dielectric isotropic Gaussian surfaces, the cross- and co-polarizations are also compared with a numerical approach obtained from the forward-backward method with a novel spectral acceleration algorithm developed by Torrungrueng and Johnson (2001, JOSA A 18).

  16. Momentum density and 2D-ACAR experiments in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, A.; Smedskjaer, L.C.

    1991-12-01

    We compare measured c-projected 2D-ACAR spectrum from an untwinned single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} with the corresponding band theory predictions. Many different one-dimensional sections through the spectrum are considered, together with the characteristic amplitudes and shapes of the spectral anisotropies, with a focus on identifying and delineating Fermi surface signatures in the spectra. The positron data clearly show several distinct features of the ridge Fermi surface predicted by the band theory, and give an indication of the pillbox Fermi sheet. The good agreement between theory and experiment suggests that the band theory framework based on the local density approximation (LDA) is capable of providing a substantially correct description of the momentum density and Fermiology of the normal ground state electronic structure of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}.

  17. Morphotectonic evolution of passive margins undergoing active surface processes: large-scale experiments using numerical models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucher, Romain; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Extension of the continental lithosphere can lead to the formation of a wide range of rifted margins styles with contrasting tectonic and geomorphological characteristics. It is now understood that many of these characteristics depend on the manner extension is distributed depending on (among others factors) rheology, structural inheritance, thermal structure and surface processes. The relative importance and the possible interactions of these controlling factors is still largely unknown. Here we investigate the feedbacks between tectonics and the transfers of material at the surface resulting from erosion, transport, and sedimentation. We use large-scale (1200 x 600 km) and high-resolution (~1km) numerical experiments coupling a 2D upper-mantle-scale thermo-mechanical model with a plan-form 2D surface processes model (SPM). We test the sensitivity of the coupled models to varying crust-lithosphere rheology and erosional efficiency ranging from no-erosion to very efficient erosion. We discuss how fast, when and how the topography of the continents evolves and how it can be compared to actual passive margins escarpment morphologies. We show that although tectonics is the main factor controlling the rift geometry, transfers of masses at the surface affect the timing of faulting and the initiation of sea-floor spreading. We discuss how such models may help to understand the evolution of high-elevated passive margins around the world.

  18. 2-D numerical simulations of groundwater flow, heat transfer and 4He transport — implications for the He terrestrial budget and the mantle helium heat imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Maria Clara; Patriarche, Delphine; Goblet, Patrick

    2005-09-01

    Because helium and heat production results from a common source, a continental 4He crustal flux of 4.65 * 10 - 14 mol m - 2 s - 1 has been estimated based on heat flow considerations. In addition, because the observed mantle He / heat flux ratio at the proximity of mid-ocean ridges (6.6 * 10 - 14 mol J - 1 ) is significantly lower than the radiogenic production ratio (1.5 * 10 - 12 mol J - 1 ), the presence of a terrestrial helium-heat imbalance was suggested. The latter could be explained by the presence of a layered mantle in which removal of He is impeded from the lower mantle [R.K. O'Nions, E.R. Oxburgh, Heat and helium in the Earth, Nature 306 (1983) 429-431; E.R. Oxburgh, R.K. O'Nions, Helium loss, tectonics, and the terrestrial heat budget, Science 237 (1987) 1583-1588]. van Keken et al. [P.E. van Keken, C.J. Ballentine, D. Porcelli, A dynamical investigation of the heat and helium imbalance, Earth Planet, Sci. Lett. 188 (2001) 421-434] have recently claimed that the helium-heat imbalance remains a robust observation. Such conclusions, however, were reached under the assumption that a steady-state regime was in place for both tracers and that their transport properties are similar at least in the upper portion of the crust. Here, through 2-D simulations of groundwater flow, heat transfer and 4He transport carried out simultaneously in the Carrizo aquifer and surrounding formations in southwest Texas, we assess the legitimacy of earlier assumptions. Specifically, we show that the driving transport mechanisms for He and heat are of a fundamentally different nature for a high range of permeabilities ( k ≤ 10 - 16 m 2) found in metamorphic and volcanic rocks at all depths in the crust. The assumption that transport properties for these two tracers are similar in the crust is thus unsound. We also show that total 4He / heat flux ratios lower than radiogenic production ratios do not reflect a He deficit in the crust or mantle original reservoir. Instead, they

  19. Wind-tunnel experiments of turbulent flow over a surface-mounted 2-D block in a thermally-stratified boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent flows over complex surface topography have been of great interest in the atmospheric science and wind engineering communities. The geometry of the topography, surface roughness and temperature characteristics as well as the atmospheric thermal stability play important roles in determining momentum and scalar flux distribution. Studies of turbulent flow over simplified topography models, under neutrally stratified boundary-layer conditions, have provided insights into fluid dynamics. However, atmospheric thermal stability has rarely been considered in laboratory experiments, e.g., wind-tunnel experiments. Series of wind-tunnel experiments of thermally-stratified boundary-layer flow over a surface-mounted 2-D block, in a well-controlled boundary-layer wind tunnel, will be presented. Measurements using high-resolution PIV, x-wire/cold-wire anemometry and surface heat flux sensors were conducted to quantify the turbulent flow properties, including the size of the recirculation zone, coherent vortex structures and the subsequent boundary layer recovery. Results will be shown to address thermal stability effects on momentum and scalar flux distribution in the wake, as well as dominant mechanism of turbulent kinetic energy generation and consumption. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from the Swiss National Foundation (Grant 200021-132122), the National Science Foundation (Grant ATM-0854766) and NASA (Grant NNG06GE256).

  20. Basin evaluation in deltaic series using 2-D numerical modeling a comparison of Mahakam delta and south Louisiana/Gulf of Mexico case histories

    SciTech Connect

    Burrus, J. ); De Choppin, J.G.; Grosjean, J.L.; Oudin, J.L. ); Schwarzer, T. ); Schroeder, F.; Lander, R. )

    1993-09-01

    Integrated numerical modeling of petroleum, generation and migration is difficult to apply in deltaic series. Using Institut Francais du Petrole's two-dimensional model TEMISPACK, we tried to simulate the petroleum history along a 70 km long east-west regional section in the Mahakam delta (Indonesia) and a 800 km long north-south section in south Louisiana/Gulf of Mexico. The two basins contain thick (>10 km) accumulations of the post middle miocene. The principal results are as follows (1) Both basins have similar overpressure profiles caused by thick shales with nano-darcy permeabilities. Compaction, not oil or gas generation, controls the overpressure histories. (2) In both basins, the thermal history is dominated by burial rate, thermal blanketing, and undercompaction. Basinward increases in thermal gradients are probably due to basinward increases in shale content and undercompaction, rather than geodynamic processes. (3) We used an upscaling procedure to define sedimentary facies and properties for each cell in the models. In both cases, we found a huge permeability anisotropy of interbedded facies was necessary to match observed pressure profiles and hydrocarbon distributions. This anisotropy results in a dominant [open quotes]parallel-to-bedding[close quotes] migration pattern, with only a moderate (<0.5 km) vertical migration component. (4) A fundamental difference between the Mahakam and the Gulf coast petroleum systems is the hole of growth faults. In the Gulf Coast, huge growth faults connect deep overpressured, overmature Tertiary source facies with shallow, interbedded sandy reservoirs. Enhanced vertical permeability in the vicinity of these fault zones allows for several kilometers of vertical migration. In the Mahakam delta, where growth faults are less prevalent, deep overpressured shales have very poor expulsion efficiency; gas and oil in shallow reservoirs are shown to be fed mostly by coals located above, and not within, the overpressured zone.

  1. Droplet impact on highly viscous liquid: from experiments to numerics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Zhen; Michon, Guy-Jean; Josserand, Christophe; Zaleski, Stephane; Ray, Pascal; Li, Zengyao; Tao, Wenquan

    2014-11-01

    A numerical model is proposed to deal with the triple-phase impacting dynamics, of which a droplet of normal liquid impacts on a highly viscous liquid basin. Viscous effect is dominant during the dynamics as compared to the inertia and the surface tension. A liquid viscosity ratio ml is introduced to measure the viscosity deviation from a normal liquid as ml =μbasin /μdrople normal . Direct numerical simulations were executed with a code called Gerris. By increasing the liquid viscosity ratio ml, a continuous transition from L / L impact to L / S impact can be achieved. Two regimes are identified: wave-like regime and solidification regime. Experiments of droplet impacting on highly viscous liquid were also executed. Droplets of ethanol impact on a liquid basin of honey in a vacuum chamber where the gas pressure could be varied. A similarity to the impact on solid was observed, liquid basin performed as a solid and the complete suppression of splash was also observed by decreasing the gas pressure as reported for impacts on solid. Droplet shapes predicted by our simulations agree well with those observed in experiments.

  2. Use of 2D-video disdrometer to derive mean density-size and Ze-SR relations: Four snow cases from the light precipitation validation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Gwo-Jong; Bringi, V. N.; Moisseev, Dmitri; Petersen, W. A.; Bliven, L.; Hudak, David

    2015-02-01

    The application of the 2D-video disdrometer to measure fall speed and snow size distribution and to derive liquid equivalent snow rate, mean density-size and reflectivity-snow rate power law is described. Inversion of the methodology proposed by Böhm provides the pathway to use measured fall speed, area ratio and '3D' size measurement to estimate the mass of each particle. Four snow cases from the Light Precipitation Validation Experiment are analyzed with supporting data from other instruments such as the Precipitation Occurrence Sensor System (POSS), Snow Video Imager (SVI), a network of seven snow gauges and three scanning C-band radars. The radar-based snow accumulations using the 2DVD-derived Ze-SR relation are in good agreement with a network of seven snow gauges and outperform the accumulations derived from a climatological Ze-SR relation used by the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The normalized bias between radar-derived and gauge accumulation is reduced from 96% when using the fixed FMI relation to 28% when using the Ze-SR relations based on 2DVD data. The normalized standard error is also reduced significantly from 66% to 31%. For two of the days with widely different coefficients of the Ze-SR power law, the reflectivity structure showed significant differences in spatial variability. Liquid water path estimates from radiometric data also showed significant differences between the two cases. Examination of SVI particle images at the measurement site corroborated these differences in terms of unrimed versus rimed snow particles. The findings reported herein support the application of Böhm's methodology for deriving the mean density-size and Ze-SR power laws using data from 2D-video disdrometer.

  3. Use of 2d-video Disdrometer to Derive Mean Density-size and Ze-SR Relations: Four Snow Cases from the Light Precipitation Validation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Gwo-Jong; Bringi, V. N.; Moisseev, Dmitri; Petersen, Walter A.; Bliven, Francis L.; Hudak, David

    2014-01-01

    The application of the 2D-video disdrometer to measure fall speed and snow size distribution and to derive liquid equivalent snow rate, mean density-size and reflectivity-snow rate power law is described. Inversion of the methodology proposed by Böhm provides the pathway to use measured fall speed, area ratio and '3D' size measurement to estimate the mass of each particle. Four snow cases from the Light Precipitation Validation Experiment are analyzed with supporting data from other instruments such as Precipitation Occurrence Sensor System (POSS), Snow Video Imager (SVI), a network of seven snow gauges and three scanning C9 band radars. The radar-based snow accumulations using the 2DVD-derived Ze-SR relation are in good agreement with a network of seven snow gauges and outperform the accumulations derived from a climatological Ze-SR relation used by the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The normalized bias between radar-derived and gauge accumulation is reduced from 96% when using the fixed FMI relation to 28% when using the Ze-SR relations based on 2DVD data. The normalized standard error is also reduced significantly from 66% to 31%. For two of the days with widely different coefficients of the Ze-SR power law, the reflectivity structure showed significant differences in spatial variability. Liquid water path estimates from radiometric data also showed significant differences between the two cases. Examination of SVI particle images at the measurement site corroborated these differences in terms of unrimed versus rimed snow particles. The findings reported herein support the application of Böhm's methodology for deriving the mean density-size and Ze-SR power laws using data from 2D-video disdrometer.

  4. Machine discovery based on numerical data generated in computer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Tsuyoshi; Shimura, Masamichi

    1996-12-31

    In the discovery of useful theorems or formulas, experimental data acquisition plays a fundamental role. Most of the previous discovery systems which have the abilities for experimentation, however, require much knowledge for evaluating experimental results, or require plans of common experiments which are given to the systems in advance. Only few systems have been attempted to make experiments which enable the discovery based on acquired experimental data without depending on given initial knowledge. This paper proposes a new approach for discovering useful theorems in the domain of plane geometry by employing experimentation. In this domain, drawing a figure and observing it correspond to making experimentation since these two processes are preparations for acquiring geometrical data. EXPEDITION, a discovery system based on experimental data acquisition, generates figures by itself and acquires expressions describing relations among line segments and angles in the figures. Such expressions can be extracted from the numerical data obtained in the computer experiments. By using simple heuristics for drawing and observing figures, the system succeeds in discovering many new useful theorems and formulas as well as rediscovering well-known theorems, such as power theorems and Thales` theorem.

  5. Numerical modeling of oxygen exclusion experiments of anaerobic bioventing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihopoulos, Philip G.; Suidan, Makram T.; Sayles, Gregory D.; Kaskassian, Sebastien

    2002-10-01

    A numerical and experimental study of transport phenomena underlying anaerobic bioventing (ABV) is presented. Understanding oxygen exclusion patterns in vadose zone environments is important in designing an ABV process for bioremediation of soil contaminated with chlorinated solvents. In particular, the establishment of an anaerobic zone of influence by nitrogen injection in the vadose zone is investigated. Oxygen exclusion experiments are performed in a pilot scale flow cell (2×1.1×0.1 m) using different venting flows and two different outflow boundary conditions (open and partially covered). Injection gas velocities are varied from 0.25×10 -3 to 1.0×10 -3 cm/s and are correlated with the ABV radius of influence. Numerical simulations are used to predict the collected experimental data. In general, reasonable agreement is found between observed and predicted oxygen concentrations. Use of impervious covers can significantly reduce the volume of forcing gas used, where an increase in oxygen exclusion efficiency is consistent with a decrease in the outflow area above the injection well.

  6. Numerical modeling of oxygen exclusion experiments of anaerobic bioventing.

    PubMed

    Mihopoulos, Philip G; Suidan, Makram T; Sayles, Gregory D; Kaskassian, Sebastien

    2002-10-01

    A numerical and experimental study of transport phenomena underlying anaerobic bioventing (ABV) is presented. Understanding oxygen exclusion patterns in vadose zone environments is important in designing an ABV process for bioremediation of soil contaminated with chlorinated solvents. In particular, the establishment of an anaerobic zone of influence by nitrogen injection in the vadose zone is investigated. Oxygen exclusion experiments are performed in a pilot scale flow cell (2 x 1.1 x 0.1 m) using different venting flows and two different outflow boundary conditions (open and partially covered). Injection gas velocities are varied from 0.25 x 10(-3) to 1.0 x 10(-3) cm/s and are correlated with the ABV radius of influence. Numerical simulations are used to predict the collected experimental data. In general, reasonable agreement is found between observed and predicted oxygen concentrations. Use of impervious covers can significantly reduce the volume of forcing gas used, where an increase in oxygen exclusion efficiency is consistent with a decrease in the outflow area above the injection well.

  7. Numerical experiments of variable property turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ashish; Peeters, Jurriaan; Boersma, Bendiks; Pecnik, Rene

    2014-11-01

    We perform numerical experiments of turbulent channel flows with varying density and viscosity to investigate the validity of semi-local scaling as proposed by Huang, Coleman and Bradshaw (1995, J. Fluid Mech). Direct numerical simulations of the low Mach number approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations are used, whereby the fluid is internally heated and the temperature at the walls is set to constant. A pseudo-spectral discretization in the periodic directions and a 6th order compact finite difference in wall normal direction is used. The friction Reynolds number based on half channel height and wall friction velocity is Reτ = 395 . Different relations for density and viscosity as a function of temperature are studied. A variable property case has been identified with turbulent statistics that are quasi-similar to constant property turbulence. This case corresponds to the condition when the semi-local scaling is equal to the classical scaling. For cases wherein the semi-local scaling differs from classical scaling in the channel core, we show that the near-wall turbulence deviates towards a state of increased/decreased anisotropy as compared to constant property turbulence. The above results show not only the validity but also the usefulness of the semi-local scaling.

  8. Numerical modeling of oxygen exclusion experiments of anaerobic bioventing.

    PubMed

    Mihopoulos, Philip G; Suidan, Makram T; Sayles, Gregory D; Kaskassian, Sebastien

    2002-10-01

    A numerical and experimental study of transport phenomena underlying anaerobic bioventing (ABV) is presented. Understanding oxygen exclusion patterns in vadose zone environments is important in designing an ABV process for bioremediation of soil contaminated with chlorinated solvents. In particular, the establishment of an anaerobic zone of influence by nitrogen injection in the vadose zone is investigated. Oxygen exclusion experiments are performed in a pilot scale flow cell (2 x 1.1 x 0.1 m) using different venting flows and two different outflow boundary conditions (open and partially covered). Injection gas velocities are varied from 0.25 x 10(-3) to 1.0 x 10(-3) cm/s and are correlated with the ABV radius of influence. Numerical simulations are used to predict the collected experimental data. In general, reasonable agreement is found between observed and predicted oxygen concentrations. Use of impervious covers can significantly reduce the volume of forcing gas used, where an increase in oxygen exclusion efficiency is consistent with a decrease in the outflow area above the injection well. PMID:12400833

  9. Spreading dynamics of 2D dipolar Langmuir monolayer phases.

    PubMed

    Heinig, P; Wurlitzer, S; Fischer, Th M

    2004-07-01

    We study the spreading of a liquid 2D dipolar droplet in a Langmuir monolayer. Interfacial tensions (line tensions) and microscopic contact angles depend on the scale on which they are probed and obey a scaling law. Assuming rapid equilibration of the microscopic contact angle and ideal slippage of the 2D solid/liquid and solid/gas boundary, the driving force of spreading is merely expressed by the shape-dependent long-range interaction integrals. We obtain good agreement between experiment and numerical simulations using this theory. PMID:15278693

  10. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  11. Numerical experiments with the Lamellae Upscaling Concept with Approximate Handling of Coalescence of the Reaction Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, M.; Ginn, T. R.; Le Borgne, T.; Schreyer, L. G.; Dentz, M.

    2015-12-01

    The challenge in characterizing mixing-limited reaction rates between displacing and displaced groundwater solutions (Figure 1, left panel) is the in quantifying mixing extent that is controlled by small scale heterogeneity. We describe limited numerical 2D testing of the lamella approach that focuses on the deformation of the moving front, treated as a set of linearized patches termed lamellae. We simulate flow and reactive transport in a recently characterized sample of Massillon sandstone to provide Eulerian test data for comparison with the new Lagrangian lamella-based solution. In our numerical experiments particle tracking is used to approximate the lamellar positions and deformations at any given time, and reactions are calculated on each lamella in proportion to the local scalar dissipation rate. The simulated data show the effect of small scale heterogeneity including strong shearing and local collapse or coalescence (Figure 1, right panel) of the reaction front on the global reaction rate. We propose a simple approximation to handle coalescence in the lamella-based upscaling and we test it against the simulated data.

  12. Numerical Modelling of the Deep Impact Mission Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuennemann, K.; Collins, G. S.; Melosh, H. J.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s Deep Impact Mission (launched January 2005) will provide, for the first time ever, insights into the interior of a comet (Tempel 1) by shooting a approx.370 kg projectile onto the surface of a comets nucleus. Although it is usually assumed that comets consist of a very porous mixture of water ice and rock, little is known about the internal structure and in particular the constitutive material properties of a comet. It is therefore difficult to predict the dimensions of the excavated crater. Estimates of the crater size are based on laboratory experiments of impacts into various target compositions of different densities and porosities using appropriate scaling laws; they range between 10 s of meters up to 250 m in diameter [1]. The size of the crater depends mainly on the physical process(es) that govern formation: Smaller sizes are expected if (1) strength, rather than gravity, limits crater growth; and, perhaps even more crucially, if (2) internal energy losses by pore-space collapse reduce the coupling efficiency (compaction craters). To investigate the effect of pore space collapse and strength of the target we conducted a suite of numerical experiments and implemented a novel approach for modeling porosity and the compaction of pores in hydrocode calculations.

  13. Cascade processes in stratified media: experiment and direct numerical simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibgatullin, Ilias; Brouzet, Christophe; Joubaud, Sylvain; Ermanyuk, Evgeny; Dauxois, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves may transfer substantial part of energy in oceans and astrophysical objects, influence the background stratification, and angular momentum. Internal waves can be generated by convection in astrophysical objects, by tidal motion and interaction with orography in oceans. Internal and inertial waves obey similar system of equations. Due to very particular type of dispersive relation and the way internal waves are reflected from surfaces, in confined domains the monochromatic internal waves after sequence of reflections may form closed paths, the "wave attractors" [1]. Presently, linear theory of wave attractors is quite elaborated and a principal interest of research is focused on nonlinear regimes and unstable configurations, overturning events and mixing. We have performed direct numerical simulation of wave attractors which closely reproduces experiments [2] being carried out in Ecole Normal Superior de Lyon (ENS de Lyon). Direct numerical simulation is realized with the help of spectral element approach and code nek5000. Triadic resonance is confirmed as the first instability which appears on the most energetic ray of the attractor at sufficiently large forcing. With further increase of the forcing amplitude the daughter waves also become unstable resulting in a sophisticated cascade process which was first observed experimentally. For very high forcing amplitude interaction of focused waves with the walls results in appearance of small-scale folded structures. Their interaction with principal flow is the subject of further research. 1. Maas, L. R. M. & Lam, F.-P. A., Geometric focusing of internal waves. J. Fluid Mech, 1995,. 300, 1-41 2. Scolan, H., Ermanyuk, E., Dauxois, T., 2013, Physical Review Letters, 110, 234501

  14. Numerical experiments with rubble piles: equilibrium shapes and spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Elankumaran, Pradeep; Sanderson, Robyn E.

    2005-02-01

    We present numerical experiments investigating the shape and spin limits of self-gravitating "perfect" rubble piles that consist of identical, smooth, rigid, spherical particles with configurable normal coefficient of restitution and no sliding friction. Such constructs are currently employed in a variety of investigations, ranging from the formation of asteroid satellites to the dynamical properties of Saturn's densest rings. We find that, owing to cannonball stacking behavior, rubble piles can maintain non-spherical shapes without bulk spin, unlike a fluid, and can spin faster than a perfect fluid before shedding mass, consistent with the theory for the more general continuum rubble pile model (Holsapple, 2004, Icarus 172, 272-303). Rubble piles that reassemble following a catastrophic disruption reconfigure themselves to lie within stability limits predicted by the continuum theory. We also find that coarse configurations consisting of a small number of particles are more resistant to tidal disruption than fine configurations with many particles. Overall this study shows that idealized rubble piles behave qualitatively in a manner similar to certain granular materials, at least in the limit where global shape readjustments and/or mass shedding begins. The limits obtained here may provide constraints on the possible internal structure of some small Solar System bodies that have extreme shapes or are under high stress. Amalthea is presented as a case study.

  15. Analyses of internal tides generation and propagation over a Gaussian ridge in laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossmann, Yvan; Paci, Alexandre; Auclair, Francis; Floor, Jochem

    2010-05-01

    Internal tides are suggested to play a major role in the sustaining of the global oceanic circulation [1][5]. Although the exact origin of the energy conversions occurring in stratified fluids is questioned [2], it is clear that the diapycnal energy transfers provided by the energy cascade of internal gravity waves generated at tidal frequencies in regions of steep bathymetry is strongly linked to the general circulation energy balance. Therefore a precise quantification of the energy supply by internal waves is a crucial step in forecasting climate, since it improves our understanding of the underlying physical processes. We focus on an academic case of internal waves generated over an oceanic ridge in a linearly stratified fluid. In order to accurately quantify the diapycnal energy transfers caused by internal waves dynamics, we adopt a complementary approach involving both laboratory and numerical experiments. The laboratory experiments are conducted in a 4m long tank of the CNRM-GAME fluid mechanics laboratory, well known for its large stratified water flume (e.g. Knigge et al [3]). The horizontal oscillation at precisely controlled frequency of a Gaussian ridge immersed in a linearly stratified fluid generates internal gravity waves. The ridge of e-folding width 3.6 cm is 10 cm high and spans 50 cm. We use PIV and Synthetic Schlieren measurement techniques, to retrieve the high resolution velocity and stratification anomaly fields in the 2D vertical plane across the ridge. These experiments allow us to get access to real and exhaustive measurements of a wide range of internal waves regimes by varying the precisely controlled experimental parameters. To complete this work, we carry out some direct numerical simulations with the same parameters (forcing amplitude and frequency, initial stratification, boundary conditions) as the laboratory experiments. The model used is a non-hydrostatic version of the numerical model Symphonie [4]. Our purpose is not only to

  16. Measuring (13)C-(2)D dipolar couplings with a universal REDOR dephasing curve

    PubMed

    Gullion

    2000-09-01

    A (13)C-observe REDOR experiment is described which allows (13)C-(2)D dipolar couplings to be obtained by a universal dipolar dephasing curve. Previous (13)C-observe REDOR experiments on (13)C-(2)D spin pairs generally relied on numerical simulations to obtain the dipolar coupling. The REDOR experiment described in this article is based on a deuterium composite pulse, and the data analysis eliminates the need for numerical simulations and is the same as the traditional REDOR analysis performed on pairs of spin-12 nuclei. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10968975

  17. Evaluation of transverse dispersion effects in tank experiments by numerical modeling: parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis and revision of experimental design.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, E; Bauer, S; Eberhardt, C; Beyer, C

    2012-06-01

    Transverse dispersion represents an important mixing process for transport of contaminants in groundwater and constitutes an essential prerequisite for geochemical and biodegradation reactions. Within this context, this work describes the detailed numerical simulation of highly controlled laboratory experiments using uranine, bromide and oxygen depleted water as conservative tracers for the quantification of transverse mixing in porous media. Synthetic numerical experiments reproducing an existing laboratory experimental set-up of quasi two-dimensional flow through tank were performed to assess the applicability of an analytical solution of the 2D advection-dispersion equation for the estimation of transverse dispersivity as fitting parameter. The fitted dispersivities were compared to the "true" values introduced in the numerical simulations and the associated error could be precisely estimated. A sensitivity analysis was performed on the experimental set-up in order to evaluate the sensitivities of the measurements taken at the tank experiment on the individual hydraulic and transport parameters. From the results, an improved experimental set-up as well as a numerical evaluation procedure could be developed, which allow for a precise and reliable determination of dispersivities. The improved tank set-up was used for new laboratory experiments, performed at advective velocities of 4.9 m d(-1) and 10.5 m d(-1). Numerical evaluation of these experiments yielded a unique and reliable parameter set, which closely fits the measured tracer concentration data. For the porous medium with a grain size of 0.25-0.30 mm, the fitted longitudinal and transverse dispersivities were 3.49×10(-4) m and 1.48×10(-5) m, respectively. The procedures developed in this paper for the synthetic and rigorous design and evaluation of the experiments can be generalized and transferred to comparable applications. PMID:22575873

  18. Evaluation of transverse dispersion effects in tank experiments by numerical modeling: parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis and revision of experimental design.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, E; Bauer, S; Eberhardt, C; Beyer, C

    2012-06-01

    Transverse dispersion represents an important mixing process for transport of contaminants in groundwater and constitutes an essential prerequisite for geochemical and biodegradation reactions. Within this context, this work describes the detailed numerical simulation of highly controlled laboratory experiments using uranine, bromide and oxygen depleted water as conservative tracers for the quantification of transverse mixing in porous media. Synthetic numerical experiments reproducing an existing laboratory experimental set-up of quasi two-dimensional flow through tank were performed to assess the applicability of an analytical solution of the 2D advection-dispersion equation for the estimation of transverse dispersivity as fitting parameter. The fitted dispersivities were compared to the "true" values introduced in the numerical simulations and the associated error could be precisely estimated. A sensitivity analysis was performed on the experimental set-up in order to evaluate the sensitivities of the measurements taken at the tank experiment on the individual hydraulic and transport parameters. From the results, an improved experimental set-up as well as a numerical evaluation procedure could be developed, which allow for a precise and reliable determination of dispersivities. The improved tank set-up was used for new laboratory experiments, performed at advective velocities of 4.9 m d(-1) and 10.5 m d(-1). Numerical evaluation of these experiments yielded a unique and reliable parameter set, which closely fits the measured tracer concentration data. For the porous medium with a grain size of 0.25-0.30 mm, the fitted longitudinal and transverse dispersivities were 3.49×10(-4) m and 1.48×10(-5) m, respectively. The procedures developed in this paper for the synthetic and rigorous design and evaluation of the experiments can be generalized and transferred to comparable applications.

  19. Model based evaluation of a contaminant plume development under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in 2D bench-scale tank experiments.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, E; Beyer, C; Bauer, R D; Griebler, C; Bauer, S

    2014-06-01

    The influence of transverse mixing on competitive aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume was investigated using a two-dimensional, bench-scale flow-through laboratory tank experiment. In the first part of the experiment aerobic degradation of increasing toluene concentrations was carried out by the aerobic strain Pseudomonas putida F1. Successively, ethylbenzene (injected as a mixture of unlabeled and fully deuterium-labeled isotopologues) substituted toluene; nitrate was added as additional electron acceptor and the anaerobic denitrifying strain Aromatoleum aromaticum EbN1 was inoculated to study competitive degradation under aerobic /anaerobic conditions. The spatial distribution of anaerobic degradation was resolved by measurements of compound-specific stable isotope fractionation induced by the anaerobic strain as well as compound concentrations. A fully transient numerical reactive transport model was employed and calibrated using measurements of electron donors, acceptors and isotope fractionation. The aerobic phases of the experiment were successfully reproduced using a double Monod kinetic growth model and assuming an initial homogeneous distribution of P. putida F1. Investigation of the competitive degradation phase shows that the observed isotopic pattern cannot be explained by transverse mixing driven biodegradation only, but also depends on the inoculation process of the anaerobic strain. Transient concentrations of electron acceptors and donors are well reproduced by the model, showing its ability to simulate transient competitive biodegradation. PMID:24122285

  20. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R.; Mäder, Urs

    2015-06-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time.

  1. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R; Mäder, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time.

  2. Predicting the Evolution of Faulting in Accretionary Prisms with Work Optimization: Insights from Numerical Simulations of Analog Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeck, J.; Cooke, M. L.; Herbert, J. W.; Souloumiac, P.; Maillot, B.

    2015-12-01

    Accretionary wedges develop through the episodic, discrete propagation of imbricate thrust faults at the deformation front and advancement of the decollement surface. In this process, diffuse compaction, propagation of new fractures, and slip and opening along preexisting fractures accommodate cumulative deformation to differing degrees throughout the evolution of the wedge. Previous analyses suggest that the energy budget reveals how strain is partitioned within this episodic system near the onset of thrust faulting. In this contribution, we perform a work optimization analysis with 2D, boundary element method, Fric2D numerical models of accretionary wedges. We use the displacement field captured through particle image velocimetry analysis of scaled physical experiments in dry sand to inform the loading applied to the numerical models. We introduce planar faults of various dips and locations within the wedge, and calculate the gain in efficiency (ΔWext) produced by adding each fault to the wedge. We consider the faults that produce the largest ΔWext to be most energetically favorable, and thus likely to develop at the onset of discrete failure in the wedge. We compare the predictions of this parametric work optimization approach to the geometry of through-going faults observed in the physical analog experiment. We find that the numerical work analysis closely predicts the dip and location of the first forethrust observed in the experiment, as well as the dip of the first backthrust in the experiment. A similar parametric study with planar faults of differing lengths in the modeled wedge shows that the dip of the fault that optimizes work can vary with fault length, and that forethrusts consistently produce a greater gain in efficiency than backthrusts of equal lengths.

  3. A numerical experiment on light pollution from distant sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, M.

    2011-08-01

    To predict the light pollution of the night-time sky realistically over any location or measuring point on the ground presents quite a difficult calculation task. Light pollution of the local atmosphere is caused by stray light, light loss or reflection of artificially illuminated ground objects or surfaces such as streets, advertisement boards or building interiors. Thus it depends on the size, shape, spatial distribution, radiative pattern and spectral characteristics of many neighbouring light sources. The actual state of the atmospheric environment and the orography of the surrounding terrain are also relevant. All of these factors together influence the spectral sky radiance/luminance in a complex manner. Knowledge of the directional behaviour of light pollution is especially important for the correct interpretation of astronomical observations. From a mathematical point of view, the light noise or veil luminance of a specific sky element is given by a superposition of scattered light beams. Theoretical models that simulate light pollution typically take into account all ground-based light sources, thus imposing great requirements on CPU and MEM. As shown in this paper, a contribution of distant sources to the light pollution might be essential under specific conditions of low turbidity and/or Garstang-like radiative patterns. To evaluate the convergence of the theoretical model, numerical experiments are made for different light sources, spectral bands and atmospheric conditions. It is shown that in the worst case the integration limit is approximately 100 km, but it can be significantly shortened for light sources with cosine-like radiative patterns.

  4. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  5. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  6. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  7. Floret Test, Numerical Simulations of the Dent, Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Cutting, J.; Gagliardi, F.; Tarver, C.; Tran, T.

    2006-02-14

    The Floret test has been developed as a screening test to study the performance of a small amount of HE. Numerical simulations have been performed recently using CTH. The objective of this study is to perform numerical simulations in order to better understand the shock waves interactions, involved in the dent formation. Different 3D wedge configurations have been tested using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the HE receptor with Ls-Dyna.

  8. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  9. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  10. Impacts into quartz sand: Crater formation, shock metamorphism, and ejecta distribution in laboratory experiments and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünnemann, Kai; Zhu, Meng-Hua; StöFfler, Dieter

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the ejection mechanics by a complementary approach of cratering experiments, including the microscopic analysis of material sampled from these experiments, and 2-D numerical modeling of vertical impacts. The study is based on cratering experiments in quartz sand targets performed at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range. In these experiments, the preimpact location in the target and the final position of ejecta was determined by using color-coded sand and a catcher system for the ejecta. The results were compared with numerical simulations of the cratering and ejection process to validate the iSALE shock physics code. In turn the models provide further details on the ejection velocities and angles. We quantify the general assumption that ejecta thickness decreases with distance according to a power-law and that the relative proportion of shocked material in the ejecta increase with distance. We distinguish three types of shock metamorphic particles (1) melt particles, (2) shock lithified aggregates, and (3) shock-comminuted grains. The agreement between experiment and model was excellent, which provides confidence that the models can predict ejection angles, velocities, and the degree of shock loading of material expelled from a crater accurately if impact parameters such as impact velocity, impactor size, and gravity are varied beyond the experimental limitations. This study is relevant for a quantitative assessment of impact gardening on planetary surfaces and the evolution of regolith layers on atmosphereless bodies.

  11. Recirculation System for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary Formations: Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Detwiler, R. L.; Serajian, V.; Bruno, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    the remarkable match between our observations and numerical results, we extended our model to explore a wider range of thermal and hydrological parameters beyond the experimental conditions. Our results prove the capability of heat transfer in sedimentary formations for geothermal energy production.) Sandstone sample with two thermally insulating Teflon caps (white discs). In and out arrows indicate the flow direction while the sample is heated along its circumference (heater not shown). B) Example of a 2D temperature distribution during injection. White x shows the location of the flow ports, inlet (left) and outlet (right). Red is the set boundary temperature and blue is the fluid temperature at the inlet.

  12. Flow and Transport in Highly Heterogeneous Porous Formations: Numerical Experiments Performed Using the Analytic Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, I.

    2002-05-01

    Flow and transport in porous formations are analyzed using numerical simulations. Hydraulic conductivity is treated as a spatial random function characterized by a probability density function and a two-point covariance function. Simulations are performed for a multi-indicator conductivity structure developed by Gedeon Dagan (personal communication). This conductivity structure contains inhomogeneities (inclusions) of elliptical and ellipsoidal geometry that are embedded in a homogeneous background. By varying the distribution of sizes and conductivities of inclusions, any probability density function and two-point covariance may be reproduced. The multi-indicator structure is selected since it yields simple approximate transport solutions (Aldo Fiori, personal communication) and accurate numerical solutions (based on the Analytic Element Method). The dispersion is examined for two conceptual models. Both models are based on the multi-indicator conductivity structure. The first model is designed to examine dispersion in aquifers with continuously varying conductivity. The inclusions in this model cover as much area/volume of the porous formation as possible. The second model is designed for aquifers that contain clay/sand/gravel lenses embedded in otherwise homogeneous background. The dispersion in both aquifer types is simulated numerically. Simulation results are compared to those obtained using simple approximate solutions. In order to infer transport statistics that are representative of an infinite domain using the numerical experiments, the inclusions are placed in a domain that was shaped as a large ellipse (2D) and a large spheroid (3D) that were submerged in an unbounded homogeneous medium. On a large scale, the large body of inclusions behaves like a single large inhomogeneity. The analytic solution for a uniform flow past the single inhomogeneity of such geometry yields uniform velocity inside the domain. The velocity differs from that at infinity and

  13. Numerical Simulation of the Perrin-Like Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, Zygmunt; Grech, Dariusz

    2008-01-01

    A simple model of the random Brownian walk of a spherical mesoscopic particle in viscous liquids is proposed. The model can be solved analytically and simulated numerically. The analytic solution gives the known Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion law r[superscript 2] = 2Dt, where the diffusion constant D is expressed by the mass and geometry of a…

  14. Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery through Fluid Viscosity Modifications: Experiments and numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.

    2008-07-29

    Abstract Heterogeneity is often encountered in subsurface contamination characterization and remediation. Low-permeability zones are typically bypassed when remedial fluids are injected into subsurface heterogeneous aquifer systems. Therefore, contaminants in the bypassed areas may not be contacted by the amendments in the remedial fluid, which may significantly prolong the remediation operations. Laboratory experiments and numerical studies have been conducted to develop the Mobility-Controlled Flood (MCF) technology for subsurface remediation and to demonstrate the capability of this technology in enhancing the remedial amendments delivery to the lower permeability zones in heterogeneous systems. Xanthan gum, a bio-polymer, was used to modify the viscosity of the amendment-containing remedial solutions. Sodium mono-phosphate and surfactant were the remedial amendment used in this work. The enhanced delivery of the amendments was demonstrated in two-dimensional (2-D) flow cell experiments, packed with heterogeneous systems. The impact of polymer concentration, fluid injection rate, and permeability contract in the heterogeneous systems has been studied. The Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator was modified to include polymer-induced shear thinning effects. Shear rates of polymer solutions were computed from pore-water velocities using a relationship proposed in the literature. Viscosity data were subsequently obtained from empirical viscosity-shear rate relationships derived from laboratory data. The experimental and simulation results clearly show that the MCF technology is capable of enhancing the delivery of remedial amendments to subsurface lower permeability zones. The enhanced delivery significantly improved the NAPL removal from these zones and the sweeping efficiency on a heterogeneous system was remarkably increased when a polymer fluid was applied. MCF technology is also able to stabilize the fluid displacing front when there is a

  15. Mechanical characterisation of Dacron graft: Experiments and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Claudio A; García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and numerical analyses focused on the mechanical characterisation of a woven Dacron vascular graft are presented. To that end, uniaxial tensile tests under different orientations have been performed to study the anisotropic behaviour of the material. These tests have been used to adjust the parameters of a hyperelastic anisotropic constitutive model which is applied to predict through numerical simulation the mechanical response of this material in the ring tensile test. The obtained results show that the model used is capable of representing adequately the nonlinear elastic region and, in particular, it captures the progressive increase of the rigidity and the anisotropy due to the stretching of the Dacron. The importance of this research lies in the possibility of predicting the graft׳s mechanical response under generalized loading such as those that occur under physiological conditions after surgical procedures. PMID:26627367

  16. Mechanical characterisation of Dacron graft: Experiments and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Claudio A; García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and numerical analyses focused on the mechanical characterisation of a woven Dacron vascular graft are presented. To that end, uniaxial tensile tests under different orientations have been performed to study the anisotropic behaviour of the material. These tests have been used to adjust the parameters of a hyperelastic anisotropic constitutive model which is applied to predict through numerical simulation the mechanical response of this material in the ring tensile test. The obtained results show that the model used is capable of representing adequately the nonlinear elastic region and, in particular, it captures the progressive increase of the rigidity and the anisotropy due to the stretching of the Dacron. The importance of this research lies in the possibility of predicting the graft׳s mechanical response under generalized loading such as those that occur under physiological conditions after surgical procedures.

  17. Critical Dynamics in Quenched 2D Atomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larcher, F.; Dalfovo, F.; Proukakis, N. P.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium dynamics across phase transitions is a subject of intense investigations in diverse physical systems. One of the key issues concerns the validity of the Kibble-Zurek (KZ) scaling law for spontaneous defect creation. The KZ mechanism has been recently studied in cold atoms experiments. Interesting open questions arise in the case of 2D systems, due to the distinct nature of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition. Our studies rely on the stochastic Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We perform systematic numerical simulations of the spontaneous emergence and subsequent dynamics of vortices in a uniform 2D Bose gas, which is quenched across the BKT phase transition in a controlled manner, focusing on dynamical scaling and KZ-type effects. By varying the transverse confinement, we also look at the extent to which such features can be seen in current experiments. Financial support from EPSRC and Provincia Autonoma di Trento.

  18. Taylor bubbles at high viscosity ratios: experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewakandamby, Buddhika; Hasan, Abbas; Azzopardi, Barry; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The Taylor bubble is a single long bubble which nearly fills the entire cross section of a liquid-filled circular tube, often occurring in gas-liquid slug flows in many industrial applications, particularly oil and gas production. The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of three-dimensional Taylor bubble rising in highly viscous silicone oil in a vertical pipe. An adaptive unstructured mesh modelling framework is adopted here which can modify and adapt anisotropic unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of bubble rising and reduce computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control volume and finite element formulation, a `volume of fluid'-type method for the interface-capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation. Experimental results for the Taylor bubble shape and rise velocity are presented, together with numerical results for the dynamics of the bubbles. A comparison of the simulation predictions with experimental data available in the literature is also presented to demonstrate the capabilities of our numerical method. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  19. Study of Positronium in Low-k Dielectric Films by means of 2D-Angular Correlation Experiments at a High-Intensity Slow-Positron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gessmann, T; Petkov, M P; Weber, M H; Lynn, K G; Rodbell, K P; Asoka-Kumar, P; Stoeffl, W; Howell, R H

    2001-06-20

    Depth-resolved measurements of the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) were performed at the high-intensity slow-positron beam of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We studied the formation of positronium in thin films of methyl-silsesquioxane (MSSQ) spin-on glass containing open-volume defects in the size of voids. Samples with different average void sizes were investigated and positronium formation could be found in all cases. The width of the angular correlation related to the annihilation of parapositronium increased with the void size indicating the annihilation of non-thermalized parapositronium.

  20. Design and analysis of numerical experiments. [applicable to fully nonlinear, global, equivalent-barotropic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Sacks, Jerome; Chang, Yue-Fang

    1993-01-01

    Methods for the design and analysis of numerical experiments that are especially useful and efficient in multidimensional parameter spaces are presented. The analysis method, which is similar to kriging in the spatial analysis literature, fits a statistical model to the output of the numerical model. The method is applied to a fully nonlinear, global, equivalent-barotropic dynamical model. The statistical model also provides estimates for the uncertainty of predicted numerical model output, which can provide guidance on where in the parameter space to conduct further experiments, if necessary. The method can provide significant improvements in the efficiency with which numerical sensitivity experiments are conducted.

  1. Numerical experiment of thermal conductivity in two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzad, Aamir; He, Mao-Gang

    2015-12-15

    A newly improved homogenous nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (HNEMDS) method, proposed by the Evans, has been used to compute the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma liquids (SCCDPLs), for the first time. The effects of equilibrium external field strength along with different system sizes and plasma states (Γ, κ) on the thermal conductivity of SCCDPLs have been calculated using an enhanced HNEMDS method. A simple analytical temperature representation of Yukawa 2D thermal conductivity with appropriate normalized frequencies (plasma and Einstein) has also been calculated. The new HNEMDS algorithm shows that the present method provides more accurate results with fast convergence and small size effects over a wide range of plasma states. The presented thermal conductivity obtained from HNEMDS method is found to be in very good agreement with that obtained through the previously known numerical simulations and experimental results for 2D Yukawa liquids (SCCDPLs) and with the three-dimensional nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and equilibrium MDS calculations. It is shown that the HNEMDS algorithm is a powerful tool, making the calculations very efficient and can be used to predict the thermal conductivity in 2D Yukawa liquid systems.

  2. Numerical Experiments for Storm Surge Inundation in Korean Coastal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Shim, J.; Jun, K.

    2012-12-01

    Sea-level rising due to climate change following the global warming and the increased intensity of typhoon are magnifying inundation hazards up to the unpredictable level, resulting from the typhoon surge in Korea and other coastal states around the world. Typhoon is the most serious natural disaster in Korean coastal area. Many people died by storm surge inundation every year. And typhoon caused a lot of damage to property. Climate changes due to global warming are producing a stronger natural disaster. Coastal zones have been damaged by typhoons and accompanying storm surge. Especially, the most serious loss of life and terrible property damage caused by typhoon Maemi in 2003. The typhoon Maemi invaded Korean Peninsula leaving property loss of $ 4 Billion and killing 131 people. After then, there has been an increased interest in these coastal zone problems. If storm surges coincide with high tides, the loss of life and property damage due to high waters arc even worse. Therefore it is desirable to accurately forecast the amount water level increase. In this study, using a numerical model FVCOM(finite volume coastal circulation model, Chen et al.,2004), storm surge was simulated to examine its fluctuation characteristics for the coastal area behind Masan, Yeosu and Busan city in Korea. In the numerical model, a moving boundary condition(wet-dry treatment) was incorporated to explain wave inundation. To simulate the inundation scenario, the model grids were extended up to the area inside the lowland in application of the digital elevation data(DEM) made by precisely combining the aero-LiDAR survey data and bathymetry data for the 3 demonstration regions of Busan, Masan and Yeosu. Minimum grid of 300 m unstructured triangular mesh applied to calculate the storm surge was adopted as a grid system. And the minimum grid size of 30 m was built near Busan, Masan and Yeosu area which are the fine coastal regions and where the inundation is simulated. Numerically

  3. Drop by drop scattering properties of a radar bin : a numerical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the development and initial results of a numerical simulation of pseudo-radar observations computed as the sum of the electric field backscattered by each drop. Simulations are carried out for three successive radar bins with a gate length of 30 m and beam width of 1°. The first step is the simulation of a 100 m x 100 m x 100 m volume with all its drops. The 3D raindrop generator relies on the findings on the rainfall field very small scales (mm to few tens of m) spatio-temporal structure, of the HYDROP experiment and a recent analysis of 2D video disdrometer data in a Multifractal framework. More precisely: (i) The Liquid Water Content (LWC) distribution is represented with the help a multiplicative cascade down to 0.5 m, below which it is considered as homogeneous. (ii) Within each 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 m3 patch, liquid water is distributed into drops according to a pre-defined Drop Size Distribution (DSD) and located randomly uniformly. (iii) Such configuration is compared with the one consisting of the same drops uniformly distributed over the 50 x 50 x 50 m3 volume. Then the backscattered field by the drops located within a radar bin are computed as the sum a individual contribution. Antenna beam weighing is taken into account Due to the fact that the radar wave length is much smaller than the "patches" size for rainfall, it appears that as theoretically expected we retrieved an exponential distribution for potential measure horizontal reflectivity. A much lower dispersion is noticed for differential reflectivity. We show that a simple ballistic assumption for drop velocities does not enable to reproduce radar observations, and turbulence must be taken into account. Finally the sensitivity of these outputs to the various model parameters is quantified.

  4. Linking Physical and Numerical Modelling in Hydrogeology using Sand Tank Experiments and COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Kamini; Loheide, Steven P., II

    2011-03-01

    Visualising subsurface processes in hydrogeology and building intuition for how these processes are controlled by changes in forcing is hard for many undergraduate students. While numerical modelling is one way to help undergraduate students explore outcomes of multiple scenarios, many codes are not user-friendly with respect to defining domains, boundary conditions, and coupling processes, and numerical modelling exercises are also often disconnected from systems that the students understand, limiting their ability to extrapolate what they have learned for other situations. Here, we test the hypothesis that hydrogeology students will better estimate rates of groundwater flow and contaminant transport and the magnitudes of the parameters that control flow and transport by linking physical and numerical models. We present an exercise that links physical and numerical modelling of fluid flow and solute transport using 2-D 'ant farm' sand tanks with parallel models in COMSOL Multiphysics. The sand tank exercises provide students with a way to visualise subsurface flow and transport processes, while COMSOL allows them to explicitly pull apart the mathematics associated with these systems and build intuition for their solutions. Given coupled experimentation and numerical exercises, we find that students will connect processes that they see in the laboratory with the outcomes of numerical models, and the post-exercise tests indicate that they have an improved understanding of: (1) the magnitude and importance of properties and parameters that control flow and transport and (2) the simplifications made in numerical models of physical systems.

  5. Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several years, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has engaged in the design and development of an experimental research facility to investigate the use of diagonalized crossed-field magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerators as a possible thrust augmentation device for thermal propulsion systems. In support of this effort, a three-dimensional numerical MHD model has been developed for the purpose of analyzing and optimizing accelerator performance and to aid in understanding critical underlying physical processes and nonideal effects. This Technical Memorandum fully summarizes model development efforts and presents the results of pretest performance optimization analyses. These results indicate that the MHD accelerator should utilize a 45deg diagonalization angle with the applied current evenly distributed over the first five inlet electrode pairs. When powered at 100 A, this configuration is expected to yield a 50% global efficiency with an 80% increase in axial velocity and a 50% increase in centerline total pressure.

  6. Numerical experiments in ringing of offshore systems under viscous loads

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, K.R.; Kareem, A.

    1996-12-31

    A phenomenon which has recently received much attention in offshore engineering is the ringing response of structures. This high frequency transient type response has been observed in nature, particularly in tension leg platforms (TLPs). Given the implications of this behavior on the fatigue life of tendons, it is important that it be considered for response analysis. Significant progress has been made in recent years in identifying the nonlinear mechanisms that induce ringing in complex offshore structural systems. This introductory study-uses a simple model to numerically demonstrates several of the more salient features that are commonly cited in current literature, and shows that viscous loads may result in inducing ringing type response of members under certain conditions. Ringing response in pitch due to viscous loading is simulated on a column piercing the surface, and the significant contributing force mechanisms are identified. System characteristics are altered to ameliorate the performance of these systems.

  7. Tsunami intrusion in wide meandering channels: a Lagrangian numerical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, L. A.; Alam, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Among the many difficulties of tsunami forecast, wave runup on sloped beaches remains a major obstacle in numerical simulations. Traditional Eulerian models must adjust the fluid flow domain continuously due to the moving shorelines, which can significantly affect the computational cost and results accuracy. An efficient though uncommon alternative for accurate runup predictions still exists, consisting in using a Lagrangian model as recently shown by e.g. Couston et al. (2015) who studied the runup of landslide tsunamis in lakes with a non-dispersive Lagrangian model. Here we introduce a fully-nonlinear Boussinesq-type model derived in the Lagrangian framework to investigate various cases of long-wave runup on curved beaches and meandering channels. The governing equations are expressed in terms of curvilinear Lagrangian coordinates, making the model suitable for accurate runup computations at shorelines of arbitrary geometry while retaining the inherent simplicity of a physical model discretized on a fixed and structured grid. We implement an elliptic grid generation algorithm to map the physical space to the computational space, and a high-order finite-difference scheme for time integration. The numerical model has a linear complexity in the number of unknowns when neglecting dispersive effects. We show that the formation of edge waves due to the sloped banks of a wide channel has a significant influence on the capability of a meander or constriction in reflecting the intruding tsunami, and we investigate the effect of dispersion. Reference: Couston, L.-A., Mei, C. C., & Alam, M.-R. (2015). Landslide tsunamis in lakes. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 772, 784-804.

  8. Combination of transient 2D-IR experiments and ab initio computations sheds light on the formation of the charge-transfer state in photoexcited carbonyl carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Segado Centellas, Mireia; Lapini, Andrea; Lima, Manuela; Avila, Francisco; Santoro, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Chiara; Righini, Roberto

    2014-08-14

    The excited state dynamics of carbonyl carotenoids is very complex because of the coupling of single- and doubly excited states and the possible involvement of intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) states. In this contribution we employ ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and theoretical computations to investigate the relaxation dynamics of trans-8'-apo-β-carotenal occurring on the picosecond time scale, after excitation in the S2 state. In a (slightly) polar solvent like chloroform, one-dimensional (T1D-IR) and two-dimensional (T2D-IR) transient infrared spectroscopy reveal spectral components with characteristic frequencies and lifetimes that are not observed in nonpolar solvents (cyclohexane). Combining experimental evidence with an analysis of CASPT2//CASSCF ground and excited state minima and energy profiles, complemented with TDDFT calculations in gas phase and in solvent, we propose a photochemical decay mechanism for this system where only the bright single-excited 1Bu(+) and the dark double-excited 2Ag(-) states are involved. Specifically, the initially populated 1Bu(+) relaxes toward 2Ag(-) in 200 fs. In a nonpolar solvent 2Ag(-) decays to the ground state (GS) in 25 ps. In polar solvents, distortions along twisting modes of the chain promote a repopulation of the 1Bu(+) state which then quickly relaxes to the GS (18 ps in chloroform). The 1Bu(+) state has a high electric dipole and is the main contributor to the charge-transfer state involved in the dynamics in polar solvents. The 2Ag(-) → 1Bu(+) population transfer is evidenced by a cross peak on the T2D-IR map revealing that the motions along the same stretching of the conjugated chain on the 2Ag(-) and 1Bu(+) states are coupled.

  9. Exploring the dynamics of reaction N((2)D)+C2H4 with crossed molecular-beam experiments and quantum-chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shih-Huang; Chin, Chih-Hao; Chen, Wei-Kan; Huang, Wen-Jian; Hsieh, Chu-Chun

    2011-05-14

    We conducted the title reaction using a crossed molecular-beam apparatus, quantum-chemical calculations, and RRKM calculations. Synchrotron radiation from an undulator served to ionize selectively reaction products by advantage of negligibly small dissociative ionization. We observed two products with gross formula C(2)H(3)N and C(2)H(2)N associated with loss of one and two hydrogen atoms, respectively. Measurements of kinetic-energy distributions, angular distributions, low-resolution photoionization spectra, and branching ratios of the two products were carried out. Furthermore, we evaluated total branching ratios of various exit channels using RRKM calculations based on the potential-energy surface of reaction N((2)D)+C(2)H(4) established with the method CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)+ZPE[B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)]. The combination of experimental and computational results allows us to reveal the reaction dynamics. The N((2)D) atom adds to the C=C π-bond of ethene (C(2)H(4)) to form a cyclic complex c-CH(2)(N)CH(2) that directly ejects a hydrogen atom or rearranges to other intermediates followed by elimination of a hydrogen atom to produce C(2)H(3)N; c-CH(2)(N)CH+H is the dominant product channel. Subsequently, most C(2)H(3)N radicals, notably c-CH(2)(N)CH, further decompose to CH(2)CN+H. This work provides results and explanations different from the previous work of Balucani et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A, 2000, 104, 5655], indicating that selective photoionization with synchrotron radiation as an ionization source is a good choice in chemical dynamics research.

  10. Numerical experiments on the influence of melt and serpentinization on passive margin structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault, Joya; Buiter, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    Passive margins are often classified as magma-rich or magma-poor, with distinctly different crustal architectures. For example, end-member magma-rich margins have thick sequences of seaward-dipping reflectors, short necking zones, and thick oceanic crusts, whereas many magma-poor margins have wide necking zones, hyper-extended crust, and exhumed serpentinized mantle. Melt and magmatic processes can strongly affect the mantle and crust during various stages of extension. At late stages of extension, serpentinization of upper mantle rocks will also affect crustal strength. We aim to study the influence of melt and serpentinization on structures developed during passive margin formation. Melt and serpentinization are two processes that can alter crust and mantle rheologic properties during different stages of extension. Introducing melt into a rift system will alter the thermal field, rheology, and density of crust and lithosphere. The presence of large amounts of melt (7-8%) in upper mantle rocks will significantly lower the viscosity. In addition, depleted mantle rocks can have significant loss of water that would result in raising the viscosity by about a factor of 100. Intrusion and underplating of magma to the lower crust can cause metamorphism and thus density and rheological changes of the surrounding crust. Furthermore, analogue experiments have shown that magmatic underplating will induce strain localization in the crust during extension. In regions such as the magma-poor margins of the North Atlantic, the serpentinization of mantle peridotites after sufficient thinning of continental crust can lead to strain localization that will subsequently affect the margin architecture. Upper mantle rocks become serpentinized at temperatures lower than 400 degrees when seawater infiltrates. The lower frictional properties that serpentinized peridotites have at these temperatures work to localize strain and allow detachment faults to form. We use 2D numerical experiments

  11. Parallel algorithms for 2-D cylindrical transport equations of Eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Yang, S.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, aimed at the neutron transport equations of eigenvalue problem under 2-D cylindrical geometry on unstructured grid, the discrete scheme of Sn discrete ordinate and discontinuous finite is built, and the parallel computation for the scheme is realized on MPI systems. Numerical experiments indicate that the designed parallel algorithm can reach perfect speedup, it has good practicality and scalability. (authors)

  12. The Numerical Studies Program for the Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment (AGCE) for Spacelab Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, W. W. (Editor); Davis, M. H. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric general circulation experiment (AGCE) numerical design for Spacelab flights was studied. A spherical baroclinic flow experiment which models the large scale circulations of the Earth's atmosphere was proposed. Gravity is simulated by a radial dielectric body force. The major objective of the AGCE is to study nonlinear baroclinic wave flows in spherical geometry. Numerical models must be developed which accurately predict the basic axisymmetric states and the stability of nonlinear baroclinic wave flows. A three dimensional, fully nonlinear, numerical model and the AGCE based on the complete set of equations is required. Progress in the AGCE numerical design studies program is reported.

  13. Numerical experiments on dynamo action in sheared and rotating turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, T. A.; Heinemann, T.; Rincon, F.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.; Cowley, S. C.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2008-09-01

    Numerical simulations of forced turbulence in elongated shearing boxes are carried out to demonstrate that a nonhelical turbulence in conjunction with a linear shear can give rise to a mean-field dynamo. Exponential growth of magnetic field at scales larger than the outer (forcing) scale of the turbulence is found. Over a range of values of the shearing rate S spanning approximately two orders of magnitude, the growth rate of the magnetic field is proportional to the imposed shear, γ∝ S, while the characteristic spatial scale of the field is ∝ S^{-1/2}. The effect is quite general: earlier results for the nonrotating case by \\cite{}Yousef et al. (2008) are extended to shearing boxes with Keplerian rotation; it is also shown that the shear dynamo mechanism operates both below and above the threshold for the fluctuation dynamo. The apparently generic nature of the shear dynamo effect makes it an attractive object of study for the purpose of understanding the generation of magnetic fields in astrophysical systems.

  14. Beaconless stochastic parallel gradient descent laser beam control: numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Piatrou, Piotr; Roggemann, Michael

    2007-09-20

    We apply a target-in-the-loop strategy to the case of adaptive optics beam control in the presence of strong atmospheric turbulence for air-to-ground directed energy laser applications. Using numerical simulations we show that in the absence of a cooperative beacon to probe the atmosphere it is possible to extract information suitable for effective beam control from images of the speckled and strongly turbulence degraded intensity distribution of the laser energy at the target. We use a closed-loop, single-deformable-mirror adaptive optics system driven by a target-in-the-loop stochastic parallel gradient descent optimization algorithm minimizing a mean-radius performance metric defined on the image of the laser beam intensity distribution formed at the receiver. We show that a relatively low order 25-channel zonal adaptive optical beam control system controlled in this way is capable of achieving a high degree of turbulence compensation with respect to energy concentration if the tilt can be corrected separately.

  15. Analysis of Numerical Simulation Results of LIPS-200 Lifetime Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juanjuan; Zhang, Tianping; Geng, Hai; Jia, Yanhui; Meng, Wei; Wu, Xianming; Sun, Anbang

    2016-06-01

    Accelerator grid structural and electron backstreaming failures are the most important factors affecting the ion thruster's lifetime. During the thruster's operation, Charge Exchange Xenon (CEX) ions are generated from collisions between plasma and neutral atoms. Those CEX ions grid's barrel and wall frequently, which cause the failures of the grid system. In order to validate whether the 20 cm Lanzhou Ion Propulsion System (LIPS-200) satisfies China's communication satellite platform's application requirement for North-South Station Keeping (NSSK), this study analyzed the measured depth of the pit/groove on the accelerator grid's wall and aperture diameter's variation and estimated the operating lifetime of the ion thruster. Different from the previous method, in this paper, the experimental results after the 5500 h of accumulated operation of the LIPS-200 ion thruster are presented firstly. Then, based on these results, theoretical analysis and numerical calculations were firstly performed to predict the on-orbit lifetime of LIPS-200. The results obtained were more accurate to calculate the reliability and analyze the failure modes of the ion thruster. The results indicated that the predicted lifetime of LIPS-200's was about 13218.1 h which could satisfy the required lifetime requirement of 11000 h very well.

  16. Experiments and numerical simulation of mixing under supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, T.; Rodriguez, J.; Leyva, I. A.; Candel, S.

    2012-05-01

    Supercritical pressure conditions designate a situation where the working fluid pressure is above the critical point. Among these conditions, it is interesting to identify a transcritical range which corresponds to cases where the pressure is above the critical point, but the injection temperature is below the critical value. This situation is of special interest because it raises fundamental issues which have technological relevance in the analysis of flows in liquid rocket engines. This situation is here envisaged by analyzing the behavior of a nitrogen shear coaxial jet comprising an inner stream injected at temperatures close to the critical temperature and a coaxial flow at a higher temperature. Experiments are carried out both in the absence of external modulation and by imposing a large amplitude transverse acoustic field. Real gas large eddy simulations are performed for selected experiments. The combination of experiments and calculations is used to evaluate effects of injector geometry and operating parameters. Calculations retrieve what is observed experimentally when the momentum flux ratio of the outer to the inner stream J= (ρ _eu_e^2)/(ρ _iu_i^2) is varied. Results exhibit the change in flow structure and the development of a recirculation region when this parameter exceeds a critical value. The instantaneous flow patterns for different momentum flux ratios are used in a second stage to characterize the dynamical behavior of the flow in terms of power spectral density of velocity and density fluctuations. Results obtained under acoustic modulation provide insight into mixing enhancement of coaxial streams with a view of its possible consequences in high frequency combustion instabilities. It is shown in particular that the presence of strong acoustic modulations notably reduces the high density jet core length, indicating an increased mixing efficiency. This behavior is more pronounced when the jet is placed at the location of maximum transverse

  17. Numerical controlled polishing, continued force wear and part correction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hannah, P.R.; Day, R.D.; Hatch, D.J.; McClure, E.R.

    1994-09-01

    This abstract reports the near completion of the first phase of this program. It is the aim of this program to provide the operator of a N/C diamond turning machine or N/C grinding machine (jig grinder) with the wear characteristics necessary to achieve uniform material removal. The second phase of this program addresses a different problem, although solving this problem is highly dependent on the results of the first phase. Diamond turned, or any lathe turned surface, exhibits regular tool marks due to the tool passing over the surface being cut. Changes in depth of cut, feed rate and work rpm will change the character of these groves, but will not eliminate them. Optical surfaces produced by this process exhibit increased scattering as the light wavelength decreases limiting their use; at least for optical purposes, to IR and some visible applications. Utilizing wear information gathered in the first part of this program we will attempt to reduce these residual tool marks by polishing. The polishing of diamond turned surfaces is not new. Diamond turned metal surfaces, especially in electroless nickel and high phosphorus nickel electroplate have been polished to improve their scatter characteristics. What we believe is unique is the use of a spherical wheel, rotating on axis and being moved over the part in a prescribed manner by numerical control. Over the past year we have made some major changes in our polishing methods and procedures. We have listed below these changes, as a refresher for the reader as to our previous procedures. These changes will be addressed in the body of the text.

  18. Numerically Modeling Pulsed-Current, Kinked Wire Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filbey, Gordon; Kingman, Pat

    1999-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has embarked on a program to provide far-term land fighting vehicles with electromagnetic armor protection. Part of this work seeks to establish robust simulations of magneto-solid-mechanics phenomena. Whether describing violent rupture of a fuse link resulting from a large current pulse or the complete disruption of a copper shaped-charge jet subjected to high current densities, the simulations must include effects of intense Lorentz body forces and rapid Ohmic heating. Material models are required that describe plasticity, flow and fracture, conductivity, and equation of state (EOS) parameters for media in solid, liquid, and vapor phases. An extended version of the Eulerian wave code CTH has been used to predict the apex motion of a V-shaped (``kinked'') copper wire 3mm in diameter during a 400 kilo-amp pulse. These predictions, utilizing available material, EOS, and conductivity data for copper and the known characteristics of an existing capacitor-bank pulsed power supply, were then used to configure an experiment. The experiments were in excellent agreement with the prior simulations. Both computational and experimental results (including electrical data and flash X-rays) will be presented.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Receptivity for a Transition Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collis, S. Scott; Joslin, R. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The cost of fuel to overcome turbulence induced viscous drag on a commercial airplane constitutes a significant fraction of the operating cost of an airline. Achieving laminar flow and maintaining it over a large portion of the wing can significantly reduce the viscous drag, and hence the cost. Design of such laminar-flow-control wings and their practical operation requires the ability to accurately and reliably predict the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The transition process begins with the conversion of environmental and surface disturbances into the instability waves of the flow by a process called receptivity. The goal of the current research project has been to improve the prediction of transition through a better understanding of the physics of receptivity. The initial objective of this work was to investigate the specific stability and receptivity characteristics of a particular experimental investigation of boundary layer receptivity at NASA Langley. Some simulation results using direct solutions of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations which modeled this experiment where presented in the 1999 APS DFD meeting. However, based on these initial investigations, it became clear that to cover the vast receptivity parameter space required for a practical transition prediction tool, more efficient methods would be required. Thus, the focus of this research was shifted from modeling this particular experiment to formulating and developing new techniques that could efficiently yet accurately predict receptivity for a wide range of disturbance conditions.

  20. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CONVERGING SHOCKS IN PULSED POWER DRIVEN EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    R. KANZLEITER; W. ATCHISON; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The final shot of the current Near Term Liner Experiment (NTLX) series occurred on September 29, 2000. Utilization of a pulsed power source with a standardized liner/target ''cartridge'' produced a uniform implosion to drive hydrodynamic experiments. Diagnostics showed that high quality data of shock propagation can be obtained from pulsed power liner drivers as in the current NTLX series. Very good agreement in calculating shock locations was obtained between the codes used to model the NTLX series, RAGE and RAVEN. RAVEN also accurately predicts liner/target impact as measured by B-Dot probes. Large differences are observed between the calculated and measured positions of converging shock waves even in simple geometrical configurations. Liner/target impact is accurately calculated and similar results are produced for shock velocities in Lucite. RAGE and RAVEN use different hydrodynamic algorithms, yet agree, this focuses current efforts on EOS issues within the outer tin target to resolve discrepancies. Further diagnostics covering shock breakout from the outer tin target and shock propagation shortly thereafter would be highly beneficial.

  1. iPad-based primary 2D reading of CT angiography examinations of patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding: preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Neri, E; Bargellini, I; Scalise, P; Calcagni, F; Mantarro, A; D'Ippolito, G; Bartolozzi, C

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the iPad (Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) for two-dimensional (2D) reading of CT angiography (CTA) studies performed for suspected acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. Methods: 24 CTA examinations of patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding confirmed (19/24, 79.2%) or ruled out (5/24, 20.8%) by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were retrospectively reviewed by three independent readers on a commercial picture archiving communication system (PACS) workstation and on an iPad with Retina Display® 64 GB (Apple Inc.). The time needed to complete reading of every CTA examination was recorded, as well as the rate of detection of arterial bleeding and identification of suspected bleeding arteries on both devices. Results: Overall, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values for bleeding detection were not significantly different while using the iPad and workstation (0.774 vs 0.847, 0.947 vs 0.895, 0.6 vs 0.8, 0.9 vs 0.944 and 0.750 vs 0.667, respectively; p > 0.05). In DSA-positive cases, the iPad and workstation allowed correct identification of the bleeding source in 17/19 cases (89.5%) and 15/19 cases (78.9%), respectively (p > 0.05). Finally, the time needed to complete reading of every CTA study was significantly shorter using the iPad (169 ± 74 vs 222 ± 70 s, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Compared with a conventional PACS workstation, iPad-based preliminary 2D reading of CTA studies has comparable diagnostic accuracy for detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and can be significantly faster. Advances in knowledge: The iPad could be used by on-call interventional radiologists for immediate decision on percutaneous embolization in patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25652643

  2. Numerical Simulations of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Chun Y.; Trumble, Kerry A.; Campbell, Charles H.; Lessard, Victor R.; Wood, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were used to study the possible effects that the Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Flight Experiments may have on the heating environment of the Space Shuttle during its entry to Earth. To investigate this issue, hypersonic calculations using the Data-Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) and Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation (LAURA) CFD codes were computed for a 0.75 tall protuberance at flight conditions of Mach 15 and 18. These initial results showed high surface heating on the BLT trip and the areas surrounding the protuberance. Since the predicted peak heating rates would exceed the thermal limits of the materials selected to construct the BLT trip, many changes to the geometry were attempted in order to reduce the surface heat flux. The following paper describes the various geometry revisions and the resulting heating environments predicted by the CFD codes.

  3. Quasiclassical Trajectory Calculations of the N((2)D) + H2O Reaction Elucidating the Formation Mechanism of HNO and HON Seen in Molecular Beam Experiments.

    PubMed

    Homayoon, Zahra; Bowman, Joel M; Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2014-10-16

    The N((2)D) + H2O is a reaction with competitive product channels, passing through several intermediates. Dynamics of this reaction had been investigated by two of the present authors at two collision energies, Ec, using the crossed molecular beams mass spectrometric method ( Faraday Discuss. 2001 , 119 , 27 - 49 ). The complicated mechanism of this reaction and puzzling results encouraged us to investigate the reaction in a joint experimental/theoretical study. Quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations on an ab initio potential energy surface describing all channels of the title reaction are done with a focus on the N/H exchange channels. Interesting results of QCT calculations, in very good agreement with experimental data, reveal subtle details of the reaction dynamics of the title reaction to HNO/HON + H exit channels by disentangling the different routes to formation of the two possible HNO/HON isomers and therefore assisting in a critical manner the derivation of the reaction mechanism. Results of the present study show that the nonstatistical HNOH intermediate governs exit channels; therefore, the HON channel is as important as that of HNO. The study also confirms that the H2 + NO molecular channel is negligible even though the barrier to its formation is calculated to be well below the reactant asymptote.

  4. Synthesis and Resolution of the Atropisomeric 1,1'-Bi-2-Naphthol: An Experiment in Organic Synthesis and 2-D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.

    2004-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is presented. It is seen that the experiment regarding the synthesis and resolution of 1,1'-Bi-2-naphtol presents a good experiment for teaching organic synthesis and NMR spectroscopy and provides a strategy for obtaining enantiopure compounds from achiral starting materials.

  5. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  6. Tracing Shock Wave Attenuation in Porous, Particulate Targets: Insights from Impact Experiments and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, C.; Zhu, M.-H.; Wünnemann, K.; Hecht, L.; Stöffler, D.

    2016-08-01

    We directly compare shock zoning (representing shock pressures from ~59 to ~5 GPa) preserved in layered melt particles recovered from impact experiments with quartz sand targets with numerical models of crater formation and shock wave attenuation.

  7. Numerical simulation of the experiment of electrical explosion of aluminum foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulation of the experiment of Korobenko et al (2007 Phys. Rev. B 75 064208) in strongly coupled plasma of aluminum have been fulfilled. The results of numerical simulation and the experiment are compared. It is established that the hydrodynamic flows in the experiment can be assumed one-dimensional. The elastic-plastic effects in the dynamics of aluminum foil are also insignificant. The focus in the modeling is devoted to the study of the dynamics of the thermodynamic states of aluminum and their spatial homogeneity. It is emphasized the strong influence of the thermal conductivity for such experiments.

  8. Product operator descriptions of the 2D DEPT J-resolved NMR experiment for weakly coupled ISn (I=\\frac{1}{2}, S=\\frac{3}{2}; n=1, 2, 3) spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokatlı, Ahmet; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2010-02-01

    There are a variety of multi-pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments for spectral assignment of complex molecules in a solution. The two-dimensional (2D) distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT) J-resolved NMR experiment is a 13C-detected, spectral editing polarization transfer technique. The product operator theory is widely used for an analytical description of the multi-pulse NMR experiment for weakly coupled spin systems. In this study, analytical descriptions of the 2D DEPT J-resolved NMR experiment for weakly coupled ISn (I=\\textstyle{\\frac{1}{2}}, S=\\textstyle{\\frac{3}{2}} ; n=1, 2, 3) spin systems using the product operator theory have been introduced for the first time. The calculated intensities and positions of the observable signals are simulated for molecules containing [13C (I=\\textstyle{\\frac{1}{2}}) , 81Br (S=\\textstyle{\\frac{3}{2}})] nuclei by using a MAPLE program on a computer. Finally, we present a theoretical discussion and experimental suggestions.

  9. Determination of the Rotational Barrier for Kinetically Stable Conformational Isomers via NMR and 2D TLC: An Introductory Organic Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Burns, William G.; Lavin, Judi M.; Chong, Yong S.; Pellechia, Perry; Shimizu, Ken D.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment to determine the rotational barrier about a C[subscript aryl]-N[subscript imide] single bond that is suitable for first-semester organic chemistry students is presented. The investigation begins with the one-step synthesis of a N,N'-diaryl naphthalene diimide, which exists as two room temperature-stable atropisomers (syn and anti).…

  10. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  11. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  12. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  13. The water-bearing numerical model and its operational forecasting experiments part I: the water-bearing numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Daqing; Xu, Youping

    1998-06-01

    In first paper of articles, the physical and calculating schemes of the water-bearing numerical model are described. The model is developed by bearing all species of hydrometeors in a conventional numerical model in which the dynamic framework of hydrostatic equilibrium is taken. The main contributions are: the mixing ratios of all species of hydrometeors are added as the prognostic variables of model, the prognostic equations of these hydrometeors are introduced, the cloud physical framework is specially designed, some technical measures are used to resolve a series of physical, mathematical and computational problems arising from water-bearing; and so on. The various problems (in such aspects as the designs of physical and calculating schemes and the composition of computational programme) which are exposed in feasibility test, in sensibility test, and especially in operational forecasting experiments are successfully resolved using a lot of technical measures having been developed from researches and tests. Finally, the operational forecasting running of the water-bearing numerical model and its forecasting system is realized stably and reliably, and the fine forecasts are obtained. All of these mentioned above will be described in second paper.

  14. 2D photonic-crystal optomechanical nanoresonator.

    PubMed

    Makles, K; Antoni, T; Kuhn, A G; Deléglise, S; Briant, T; Cohadon, P-F; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Pinard, L; Michel, C; Dolique, V; Flaminio, R; Cagnoli, G; Robert-Philip, I; Heidmann, A

    2015-01-15

    We present the optical optimization of an optomechanical device based on a suspended InP membrane patterned with a 2D near-wavelength grating (NWG) based on a 2D photonic-crystal geometry. We first identify by numerical simulation a set of geometrical parameters providing a reflectivity higher than 99.8% over a 50-nm span. We then study the limitations induced by the finite value of the optical waist and lateral size of the NWG pattern using different numerical approaches. The NWG grating, pierced in a suspended InP 265-nm thick membrane, is used to form a compact microcavity involving the suspended nanomembrane as an end mirror. The resulting cavity has a waist size smaller than 10 μm and a finesse in the 200 range. It is used to probe the Brownian motion of the mechanical modes of the nanomembrane. PMID:25679837

  15. Numerical analysis corresponding with experiment in compact beam simulator for heavy ion inertial fusion driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Sakai, Y.; Komori, T.; Sato, T.; Hasegawa, J.; Horioka, K.; Takahashi, K.; Sasaki, T.; Harada, Nob

    2016-05-01

    Tune depression in a compact beam equipment is estimated, and numerical simulation results are compared with an experimental one for the compact beam simulator in a driver of heavy ion inertial fusion. The numerical simulation with multi-particle tracking is carried out, corresponding to the experimental condition, and the result is discussed with the experimental one. It is expected that the numerical simulation developed in this paper is useful tool to investigate the beam dynamics in the experiment with the compact beam simulator.

  16. Hydrodynamics of long-duration urban floods: experiments and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrault, Anaïs; Finaud-Guyot, Pascal; Archambeau, Pierre; Bruwier, Martin; Erpicum, Sébastien; Pirotton, Michel; Dewals, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Flood risk in urbanized areas raises increasing concerns as a result of demographic and climate changes. Hydraulic modelling is a key component of urban flood risk analysis; yet, detailed validation data are still lacking for comprehensively validating hydraulic modelling of inundation flow in urbanized floodplains. In this study, we present an experimental model of inundation flow in a typical European urban district and we compare the experimental observations with predictions by a 2-D shallow-water numerical model. The experimental set-up is 5 m × 5 m and involves seven streets in each direction, leading to 49 intersections. For a wide range of inflow discharges, the partition of the measured outflow discharges at the different street outlets was found to remain virtually constant. The observations also suggest that the street widths have a significant influence on the discharge partition between the different streets' outlets. The profiles of water depths along the streets are mainly influenced by the complex flow processes at the intersections, while bottom roughness plays a small part. The numerical model reproduces most of the observed flow features satisfactorily. Using a turbulence model was shown to modify the length of the recirculations in the streets, but not to alter significantly the discharge partition. The main limitation of the numerical model results from the Cartesian grid used, which can be overcome by using a porosity-based formulation of the shallow-water equations. The upscaling of the experimental observations to the field is also discussed.

  17. Numerical simulation studies of the LBNL heavy-ion beam combiner experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Seidl, P.; Haber, I.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Transverse beam combining is a cost-saving option employed in many designs for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy drivers. A major area of interest, both theoretically and experimentally, is the resultant transverse phase space dilution during the beam merging process. Currently, a prototype combining experiment is underway at LBNL and we have employed a variety of numerical descriptions to aid in both the initial design of the experiment data. These range from simple envelope codes to detailed 2- and 3-D PIC simulations. We compare the predictions of the different numerical models to each other and to experimental data at different longitudinal positions.

  18. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  19. Fluorine detected 2D NMR experiments for the practical determination of size and sign of homonuclear F-F and heteronuclear C-F multiple bond J-coupling constants in multiple fluorinated compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspers, Ruud L. E. G.; Ampt, Kirsten A. M.; Dvortsak, Peter; Jaeger, Martin; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-06-01

    The use of fluorine in molecules obtained from chemical synthesis has become increasingly important within the pharmaceutical and agricultural industry. NMR characterization of these compounds is of great value with respect to their structure elucidation, their screening in metabolomics investigations and binding studies. The favorable NMR properties of the fluorine nucleus make NMR with fluorine detection of great value in this respect. A suite of NMR 2D F-F- and F-C-correlation experiments with fluorine detection was applied to the assignment of resonances, nJCF- and nJFF-couplings as well as the determination of their size and sign. The utilization of this experiment suite was exemplarily demonstrated for a highly fluorinated vinyl alkyl ether. Especially F-C HSQC and J-scaled F-C HMBC experiments allowed determining the size of the J-couplings of this compound. The relative sign of its homo- and heteronuclear couplings was achieved by different combinations of 2D NMR experiments, including non-selective and F2-selective F-C XLOC, F2-selective F-C HMQC, and F-F COSY. The F2-one/two-site selective F-C XLOC versions were found highly useful, as they led to simplifications of the common E.COSY patterns and resulted in a higher confidence level of the assignment by using selective excitation. The combination of F2-one/two-site selective F-C XLOC experiments with a F2-one-site selective F-C HMQC experiment provided the signs of all nJCF- and nJFF-couplings in the vinyl moiety of the test compound. Other combinations of experiments were found useful as well for special purposes when focusing for example on homonuclear couplings a combination of F-F COSY-10 with a F2-one-site selective F-C HMQC could be used. The E.COSY patterns in the spectra demonstrated were analyzed by use of the spin-selective displacement vectors, and in case of the XLOC also by use of the DQ- and ZQ-displacement vectors. The variety of experiments presented shall contribute to facilitate the

  20. Long-term memory in experiments and numerical simulations of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Mininni, P; Dmitruk, P; Odier, P; Pinton, J-F; Plihon, N; Verhille, G; Volk, R; Bourgoin, M

    2014-05-01

    We analyze time series stemming from experiments and direct numerical simulations of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Simulations are done in periodic boxes, but with a volumetric forcing chosen to mimic the geometry of the flow in the experiments, the von Kármán swirling flow between two counterrotating impellers. Parameters in the simulations are chosen to (within computational limitations) allow comparisons between the experiments and the numerical results. Conducting fluids are considered in all cases. Two different configurations are considered: a case with a weak externally imposed magnetic field and a case with self-sustained magnetic fields. Evidence of long-term memory and 1/f noise is observed in experiments and simulations, in the case with weak magnetic field associated with the hydrodynamic behavior of the shear layer in the von Kármán flow, and in the dynamo case associated with slow magnetohydrodynamic behavior of the large-scale magnetic field.

  1. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  2. Test particle acceleration in a numerical MHD experiment of an anemone jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosdahl, K. J.; Galsgaard, K.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: To use a 3D numerical MHD experiment representing magnetic flux emerging into an open field region as a background field for tracing charged particles. The interaction between the two flux systems generates a localised current sheet where MHD reconnection takes place. We investigate how efficiently the reconnection region accelerates charged particles and what kind of energy distribution they acquire. Methods: The particle tracing is done numerically using the Guiding Center Approximation on individual data sets from the numerical MHD experiment. Results: We derive particle and implied photon distribution functions having power law forms, and look at the impact patterns of particles hitting the photosphere. We find that particles reach energies far in excess of those seen in observations of solar flares. However the structure of the impact region in the photosphere gives a good representation of the topological structure of the magnetic field. Three movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  4. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  5. Physical barriers formed from gelling liquids: 1. numerical design of laboratory and field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

    1994-01-01

    The emplacement of liquids under controlled viscosity conditions is investigated by means of numerical simulations. Design calculations are performed for a laboratory experiment on a decimeter scale, and a field experiment on a meter scale. The purpose of the laboratory experiment is to study the behavior of multiple gout plumes when injected in a porous medium. The calculations for the field trial aim at designing a grout injection test from a vertical well in order to create a grout plume of a significant extent in the subsurface.

  6. Numerical simulations of the flow with the prescribed displacement of the airfoil and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řidký, V.; Šidlof, P.; Vlček, V.

    2013-04-01

    The work is devoted to comparing measured data with the results of numerical simulations. As mathematical model was used mathematical model whitout turbulence for incompressible flow In the experiment was observed the behavior of designed NACA0015 airfoil in airflow. For the numerical solution was used OpenFOAM computational package, this is open-source software based on finite volume method. In the numerical solution is prescribed displacement of the airfoil, which corresponds to the experiment. The velocity at a point close to the airfoil surface is compared with the experimental data obtained from interferographic measurements of the velocity field. Numerical solution is computed on a 3D mesh composed of about 1 million ortogonal hexahedron elements. The time step is limited by the Courant number. Parallel computations are run on supercomputers of the CIV at Technical University in Prague (HAL and FOX) and on a computer cluster of the Faculty of Mechatronics of Liberec (HYDRA). Run time is fixed at five periods, the results from the fifth periods and average value for all periods are then be compared with experiment.

  7. Numerical simulations of a nonequilibrium argon plasma in a shock-tube experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1991-01-01

    A code developed for the numerical modeling of nonequilibrium radiative plasmas is applied to the simulation of the propagation of strong ionizing shock waves in argon gas. The simulations attempt to reproduce a series of shock-tube experiments which will be used to validate the numerical models and procedures. The ability to perform unsteady simulations makes it possible to observe some fluctuations in the shock propagation, coupled to the kinetic processes. A coupling mechanism by pressure waves, reminiscent of oscillation mechanisms observed in detonation waves, is described. The effect of upper atomic levels is also briefly discussed.

  8. A TVD-type method for 2D scalar Hamilton-Jacobi equations on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lingyan; Song, Songhe

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, a TVD-type difference scheme which satisfies maximum principle is developed for 2D scalar Hamilton-Jacobi equations on unstructured triangular meshes. The main ideas are node-based approximations and derivative-limited reconstruction with quadratic interpolation polynomial. The solution's slope satisfies maximum principle. Numerical experiments are performed to demonstrate high-order accuracy in smooth fields and good resolution of derivative singularities. The new method is simpler than WENO.

  9. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  10. Numerical simulation of stratified flows from laboratory experiments to coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraunie, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Numeric modeling of a flow past vertical strip uniformly towing with permanent velocity in horizontal direction in a linearly stratified talk which was based on a finite differences solver adapted to the low Reynolds Navier-Stokes equation with transport equation for salinity (LES simulation [6]) has demonstrated reasonable agreement with data of schlieren visualization, density marker and probe measurements of internal wave fields. Another approach based on two different numerical methods for one specific case of stably stratified incompressible flow was developed, using the compact finite-difference discretizations. The numerical scheme itself follows the principle of semi-discretisation, with high order compact discretisation in space, while the time integration is carried out by the Strong Stability Preserving Runge-Kutta scheme. Results were compared against the reference solution obtained by the AUSM finite volume method [7]. The test case allowed demonstrating the ability of selected numerical methods to represent stably stratified flows over horizontal strip [4] and hill type 2D obstacles [1, 3] with generation of internal waves. From previous LES [4] and RANS [8] realistic simulations code, the ability of research codes to reproduce field observations is discussed. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research work was supported by Region Provence Alpes Côte d'Azur - Modtercom project, the Research Plan MSM 6840770010 of the Ministry of education of Czech Republic and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 12-01-00128). REFERENCES 1. Chashechkin Yu.D., Mitkin V.V. Experimental study of a fine structure of 2D wakes and mixing past an obstacle in a continuously stratified fluid // Dynamics of Atmosphere and Oceans. 2001. V. 34. P. 165-187. 2. Chashechkin, Yu. D. Hydrodynamics of a sphere in a stratified fluid // Fluid Dyn. 1989. V.24(1) P. 1-7. 3. Mitkin V. V., Chashechkin Yu. D. Transformation of hanging discontinuities into vortex systems in a stratified flow

  11. Statistical comparison between experiments and numerical simulations of shock-accelerated gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Zoldi, C. A.; Tomkins, C. D.

    2002-01-01

    We present detailed spatial analysis comparing experimental data and numerical simulation results for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments of Prestridge et al. and Tomkins et al. These experiments consist, respectively, of one and two diffuse cylinders of sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) impulsively accelerated by a Mach 1.2 shockwave in air. The subsequent fluid evolution and mixing is driven by the deposition of baroclinic vorticity at the interface between the two fluids. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods, including a new weighted adaptive Runge-Kutta (WARK) scheme. We quantify the nature of the mixing using using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. Our investigation of the gas cylinder configurations follows the path of our earlier studies of the geometrically and dynamically more complex gas 'curtain' experiment. In those studies, we found significant discrepancies in the details of the experimentally measured mixing and the details of the numerical simulations. Here we evaluate the effects of these hydrodynamic integration techniques on the diffuse gas cylinder simulations, which we quantitatively compare with experimental data.

  12. Scaling of material properties for Yucca Mountain: literature review and numerical experiments on saturated hydraulic conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, S.A.; Rautman, C.A.

    1996-08-01

    A review of pertinent literature reveals techniques which may be practical for upscaling saturated hydraulic conductivity at Yucca Mountain: geometric mean, spatial averaging, inverse numerical modeling, renormalization, and a perturbation technique. Isotropic realizations of log hydraulic conductivity exhibiting various spatial correlation lengths are scaled from the point values to five discrete scales through these techniques. For the variances in log{sub 10} saturated hydraulic conductivity examined here, geometric mean, numerical inverse and renormalization adequately reproduce point scale fluxes across the modeled domains. Fastest particle velocities and dispersion measured on the point scale are not reproduced by the upscaled fields. Additional numerical experiments examine the utility of power law averaging on a geostatistical realization of a cross-section similar to the cross-sections that will be used in the 1995 groundwater travel time calculations. A literature review on scaling techniques for thermal and mechanical properties is included. 153 refs., 29 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Oscillating viscous boundary layer at high Reynolds number: Experiments and numerical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyt, I.; Bailliet, H.; Foucault, E.; Valière, J.-Ch.

    2015-10-01

    Transition to turbulence for an acoustically oscillating flow (without any mean motion) in a resonant wave guide is considered. Departure from the laminar behaviour of the Stokes boundary layer formed in the near wall region is studied both experimentally and numerically for increasing acoustic levels. Laser Doppler Velocimetry is used to measure velocity profiles at different phases along the acoustic period and the experimental profile distortion is interpreted as the consequence of the development of a turbulent boundary layer. On the other hand, the oscillating flow is investigated numerically with a high order resolution one dimensional scheme for comparison with experimental results. The effective viscosity that models transition to turbulence is included and the velocity profile is integrated along the radial coordinate. Results from experiments and from numerical calculation are in very good agreement.

  14. Numerical simulations of biaxial experiments on damage and fracture in sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Steffen; Schmidt, Marco; Brünig, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The damage and failure process of ductile metals is characterized by different mechanisms acting on the micro-scale as well as on the macro-level. These deterioration processes essentially depend on the material type and on the loading conditions. To describe these phenomena in an appropriate way a phenomenological continuum damage and fracture model has been proposed. To detect the effects of stress-state-dependent damage mechanisms, numerical simulations of tests with new biaxial specimen geometries for sheet metals have been performed. The experimental results including digital image correlation (DIC) show good agreement with the corresponding numerical analysis. The presented approach based on both experiments and numerical simulation provides several new aspects in the simulation of sheet metal forming processes.

  15. Coherent structures in a turbulent mixing layer - A comparison between direct numerical simulations and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalfe, R. W.; Menon, S.; Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1985-01-01

    An eduction scheme has been developed in an attempt to determine the characteristics of large-scale vortical structures in a turbulent mixing layer. This analysis scheme has been applied to a set of experimental data taken in a new, larger mixing layer facility designed to minimize boundary and resonance effects. A similar scheme has been developed to apply to the results of a direct numerical simulation of a temporally growing mixing layer. A comparison of the two approaches shows important similarities in the coherent structures. The numerical simulations indicate that low levels of coherent forcing can dramatically change the evolution of the mixing layer. In the absence of such forcing, the numerical simulations and experiments show a lack of regularity in the transverse position, spacing, amplitude, shape and spanwise coherence of the large-scale vortical structures.

  16. Numerical investigation of two interacting parallel thruster-plumes and comparison to experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabe, Martin; Holz, André; Ziegenhagen, Stefan; Hannemann, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    Clusters of orbital thrusters are an attractive option to achieve graduated thrust levels and increased redundancy with available hardware, but the heavily under-expanded plumes of chemical attitude control thrusters placed in close proximity will interact, leading to a local amplification of downstream fluxes and of back-flow onto the spacecraft. The interaction of two similar, parallel, axi-symmetric cold-gas model thrusters has recently been studied in the DLR High-Vacuum Plume Test Facility STG under space-like vacuum conditions, employing a Patterson-type impact pressure probe with slot orifice. We reproduce a selection of these experiments numerically, and emphasise that a comparison of numerical results to the measured data is not straight-forward. The signal of the probe used in the experiments must be interpreted according to the degree of rarefaction and local flow Mach number, and both vary dramatically thoughout the flow-field. We present a procedure to reconstruct the probe signal by post-processing the numerically obtained flow-field data and show that agreement to the experimental results is then improved. Features of the investigated cold-gas thruster plume interaction are discussed on the basis of the numerical results.

  17. Scale selection in columnar jointing: Insights from experiments on cooling stearic acid and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Amalie; Raufaste, Christophe; Misztal, Marek; Celestini, Franck; Guidi, Maria; Ellegaard, Clive; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Many natural fracture systems are characterized by a single length scale, which is the distance between neighboring fractures. Examples are mud cracks and columnar jointing. In columnar jointing the origin of this scale has been a long-standing issue. Here we present a comprehensive study of columnar jointing based on experiments on cooling stearic acids, numerical simulations using both discrete and finite element methods and basic analytical calculations. We show that the diameter of columnar joints is a nontrivial function of the material properties and the cooling conditions of the system. We determine the shape of this function analytically and show that it is in agreement with the experiments and the numerical simulations.

  18. Effects of numerical methods on comparisons between experiments and simulations of shock-accelerated mixing.

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Tomkins, C. D.; Zoldi, C. A.; Prestridge, K. P.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Rightley, P. M.; Benjamin, R. F.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the detailed structures of mixing flows for Richtmyer-Meshkov experiments of Prestridge et al. [PRE 00] and Tomkins et al. [TOM 01] and examine the most recent measurements from the experimental apparatus. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods. We compare experimental data with simulations for configurations of one and two diffuse cylinders of SF{sub 6} in air using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. The details of the initial conditions have a significant effect on the computed results, especially in the case of the double cylinder. Additionally, these comparisons reveal sensitive dependence of the computed solution on the numerical method.

  19. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. DYNA2D96. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    DYNA2D is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  1. Isentropic Compression for TATB Based HE Samples, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A; Vandersall, K; L'Eplattenier, P; Burger, M

    2006-02-06

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on TATB based HE were performed respectively at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope and associated Hugoniot of this HE [1]. 3D configurations have been calculated here to test the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shot 1967.

  2. Optimization of Capacitive Acoustic Resonant Sensor Using Numerical Simulation and Design of Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Loussert, Christophe; Sergent, Michelle; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of the acoustic resonant sensor requires a clear understanding of how the output responses of the sensor are affected by the variation of different factors. During this work, output responses of a capacitive acoustic transducer, such as membrane displacement, quality factor, and capacitance variation, are considered to evaluate the sensor design. The six device parameters taken into consideration are membrane radius, backplate radius, cavity height, air gap, membrane tension, and membrane thickness. The effects of factors on the output responses of the transducer are investigated using an integrated methodology that combines numerical simulation and design of experiments (DOE). A series of numerical experiments are conducted to obtain output responses for different combinations of device parameters using finite element methods (FEM). Response surface method is used to identify the significant factors and to develop the empirical models for the output responses. Finally, these results are utilized to calculate the optimum device parameters using multi-criteria optimization with desirability function. Thereafter, the validating experiments are designed and deployed using the numerical simulation to crosscheck the responses. PMID:25894937

  3. Ground-based PIV and numerical flow visualization results from the surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.; Wernet, Mark P.; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) Spacelab mission planned for June, 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electric, two dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique called Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT), which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. Results using the ground based STDCE hardware, with a radiant flux heating mode, and the PDT system are compared to numerical solutions obtained by solving the axisymmetric Navier Stokes equations with a deformable free surface. The PDT technique is successful in producing a velocity vector field and corresponding stream function from the raw video data which satisfactorily represents the physical flow. A numerical program is used to compute the velocity field and corresponding stream function under identical conditions. Both the PDT system and numerical results were compared to a streak photograph, used as a benchmark, with good correlation.

  4. Ground-based PIV and numerical flow visualization results from the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.; Werner, Mark P.; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) Spacelab mission planned for June, 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electric, two dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique called Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT), which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. Results using the ground based STDCE hardware, with a radiant flux heating mode, and the PDT system are compared to numerical solutions obtained by solving the axisymmetric Navier Stokes equations with a deformable free surface. The PDT technique is successful in producing a velocity vector field and corresponding stream function from the raw video data which satisfactorily represents the physical flow. A numerical program is used to compute the velocity field and corresponding stream function under identical conditions. Both the PDT system and numerical results were compared to a streak photograph, used as a benchmark, with good correlation.

  5. Numerical experiments on the modulation theory for the nonlinear atomic chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, W.; Herrmann, M.

    2008-02-01

    Modulation theory with periodic travelling waves is a powerful, but not rigorous tool to derive a thermodynamic description for atomic chains with nearest neighbour interactions (FPU chains). This theory is sufficiently complex to deal with strong oscillations on the microscopic scale, and therefore it is capable to describe the creation of temperature and the transport of heat on a macroscopic scale. In this paper we investigate the validity of modulation theory by means of several numerical experiments. We start with a survey on the foundations of modulation theory. In particular, we discuss the hyperbolic scaling, the notion of cold data, microscopic oscillations and Young measures, periodic and modulated travelling waves, and, finally, the resulting macroscopic conservation laws. Afterwards we discuss how the validity of a macroscopic theory may be tested within numerical simulations of the microscopic dynamics. To this end we describe an approach to thermodynamic data exploration which is motivated by the theory of Young measures, and relies on mesoscopic windows in space and time. The last part is devoted to several numerical experiments including examples with periodic boundary conditions and smooth initial data, and macroscopic Riemann problems. We interpret the outcome of these experiments in the framework of thermodynamics, and end up with two conclusions. (1) There are many examples for which modulation theory provides in fact the right thermodynamic description because it can predict both the structure of the microscopic oscillations and their macroscopic evolution correctly. (2) Modulation theory will fail if the oscillations exhibit a more complicate structure.

  6. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  7. Laboratory Experiments, Numerical Simulations, and Astronomical Observations of Deflected Supersonic Jets: Application to HH 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J. M.; Wilde, B. H.; Coker, R. F.; Rosen, P. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Blue, B. E.; Williams, R. J. R.; Carver, R.; Frank, A.

    2009-11-01

    Collimated supersonic flows in laboratory experiments behave in a similar manner to astrophysical jets provided that radiation, viscosity, and thermal conductivity are unimportant in the laboratory jets and that the experimental and astrophysical jets share similar dimensionless parameters such as the Mach number and the ratio of the density between the jet and the ambient medium. When these conditions apply, laboratory jets provide a means to study their astrophysical counterparts for a variety of initial conditions, arbitrary viewing angles, and different times, attributes especially helpful for interpreting astronomical images where the viewing angle and initial conditions are fixed and the time domain is limited. Experiments are also a powerful way to test numerical fluid codes in a parameter range in which the codes must perform well. In this paper, we combine images from a series of laboratory experiments of deflected supersonic jets with numerical simulations and new spectral observations of an astrophysical example, the young stellar jet HH 110. The experiments provide key insights into how deflected jets evolve in three dimensions, particularly within working surfaces where multiple subsonic shells and filaments form, and along the interface where shocked jet material penetrates into and destroys the obstacle along its path. The experiments also underscore the importance of the viewing angle in determining what an observer will see. The simulations match the experiments so well that we can use the simulated velocity maps to compare the dynamics in the experiment with those implied by the astronomical spectra. The experiments support a model where the observed shock structures in HH 110 form as a result of a pulsed driving source rather than from weak shocks that may arise in the supersonic shear layer between the Mach disk and bow shock of the jet's working surface.

  8. LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS, NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS, AND ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATIONS OF DEFLECTED SUPERSONIC JETS: APPLICATION TO HH 110

    SciTech Connect

    Hartigan, P.; Carver, R.; Foster, J. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Williams, R. J. R.; Wilde, B. H.; Coker, R. F.; Hansen, J. F.; Blue, B. E.; Frank, A.

    2009-11-01

    Collimated supersonic flows in laboratory experiments behave in a similar manner to astrophysical jets provided that radiation, viscosity, and thermal conductivity are unimportant in the laboratory jets and that the experimental and astrophysical jets share similar dimensionless parameters such as the Mach number and the ratio of the density between the jet and the ambient medium. When these conditions apply, laboratory jets provide a means to study their astrophysical counterparts for a variety of initial conditions, arbitrary viewing angles, and different times, attributes especially helpful for interpreting astronomical images where the viewing angle and initial conditions are fixed and the time domain is limited. Experiments are also a powerful way to test numerical fluid codes in a parameter range in which the codes must perform well. In this paper, we combine images from a series of laboratory experiments of deflected supersonic jets with numerical simulations and new spectral observations of an astrophysical example, the young stellar jet HH 110. The experiments provide key insights into how deflected jets evolve in three dimensions, particularly within working surfaces where multiple subsonic shells and filaments form, and along the interface where shocked jet material penetrates into and destroys the obstacle along its path. The experiments also underscore the importance of the viewing angle in determining what an observer will see. The simulations match the experiments so well that we can use the simulated velocity maps to compare the dynamics in the experiment with those implied by the astronomical spectra. The experiments support a model where the observed shock structures in HH 110 form as a result of a pulsed driving source rather than from weak shocks that may arise in the supersonic shear layer between the Mach disk and bow shock of the jet's working surface.

  9. Numerical experiments on the role of buoyancy and rheology during the formation of extension-driven gneiss domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchinski, Megan; Rey, Patrice; Teyssier, Christian; Whitney, Donna; Mondy, Luke

    2016-04-01

    Domal structures that are cored with crystallized partially melted crustal rocks are ubiquitous features in active and exhumed orogens. The exposure of these gneiss/migmatite domes at the Earth's surface represents an opportunity to study the mechanisms of flow within the deep crust, and the mode of emplacement of high-pressure rocks into the shallow crust. End-member gneiss dome types include (1) extension-driven domes that core metamorphic core complexes, and (2) buoyancy-driven domes that are exhumed by diapiric flow. Numerical models are ideally suited to test the relative roles of buoyancy and extension-driven mechanisms in dome dynamics, and therefore to explore the interaction of physical parameters involved in doming. To that end, this research utilizes a 2D visco-plastic thermomechanical modeling framework to undertake a parametric numerical experiment where the density (range of 2700-3100 kg.m3) and viscosity (range of 1E19-1E21 Pa.s) of the lower crust are systematically varied. The style and timing of "intrusion" of partially molten lower crust into non-molten lower crust is similar for densities of 2700-3100 kg.m3 across two lower crustal viscosities tested here (1E19 Pa.s, 1E21 Pa.s). However, dome development and upwards flow of lower crust material for a relatively high-density, middle-viscosity lower crust (2900-3100 kg.m^3; 1E20 Pa.s) involves a significant upward translation of the Moho, relative to the low-density, middle-viscosity model results. In addition, the high-density, middle-viscosity model shows a decrease in the volume of partial melt in the lower crust, and distributed brittle faulting in the upper crust. Thus, this experiment suite illustrates that variations in density and viscosity of the lower crust influence (1) faults distribution in the upper crust, (2) flow patterns within the lower crust, (3) upward translation of the solidus into the lower crust, and (4) upward displacement of the Moho. The style of extension within the

  10. Two-Dimensional Numerical Evaluation of 1-D Multi-FM SSD Experiments on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvydky, A.; Hohenberger, M.; Marozas, J. A.; Bonino, M. J.; Canning, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Kessler, T. J.; Kruschwitz, B. E.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    Adequate single-beam smoothing is crucial for successful direct-drive target implosions. One-dimensional, multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) has been proposed to provide the required level of smoothing. A prototype multi-FM SSD system has been integrated into one beamline of the OMEGA EP Laser System and has been used in laser-driven planar-foil experiments to study the effectiveness of multi-FM SSD in reducing laser imprint. Recent experiments have achieved significantly improved signal-to-noise by employing a newly-qualified soft x-ray imaging diagnostic. Results of 2-D DRACO simulations will be compared with the available experimental data. The simulations include realistic time-dependent far-field spot intensity calculations that emulate the effect of the SSD and have a sufficiently fine computational mesh to resolve speckles. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  12. Science Support for Space-Based Droplet Combustion: Drop Tower Experiments and Detailed Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchese, Anthony J.; Dryer, Frederick L.

    1997-01-01

    This program supports the engineering design, data analysis, and data interpretation requirements for the study of initially single component, spherically symmetric, isolated droplet combustion studies. Experimental emphasis is on the study of simple alcohols (methanol, ethanol) and alkanes (n-heptane, n-decane) as fuels with time dependent measurements of drop size, flame-stand-off, liquid-phase composition, and finally, extinction. Experiments have included bench-scale studies at Princeton, studies in the 2.2 and 5.18 drop towers at NASA-LeRC, and both the Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC-1, FSDC-2) and the free Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) studies aboard the shuttle. Test matrix and data interpretation are performed through spherically-symmetric, time-dependent numerical computations which embody detailed sub-models for physical and chemical processes. The computed burning rate, flame stand-off, and extinction diameter are compared with the respective measurements for each individual experiment. In particular, the data from FSDC-1 and subsequent space-based experiments provide the opportunity to compare all three types of data simultaneously with the computed parameters. Recent numerical efforts are extending the computational tools to consider time dependent, axisymmetric 2-dimensional reactive flow situations.

  13. 2D/3D image (facial) comparison using camera matching.

    PubMed

    Goos, Mirelle I M; Alberink, Ivo B; Ruifrok, Arnout C C

    2006-11-10

    A problem in forensic facial comparison of images of perpetrators and suspects is that distances between fixed anatomical points in the face, which form a good starting point for objective, anthropometric comparison, vary strongly according to the position and orientation of the camera. In case of a cooperating suspect, a 3D image may be taken using e.g. a laser scanning device. By projecting the 3D image onto a 2D image with the suspect's head in the same pose as that of the perpetrator, using the same focal length and pixel aspect ratio, numerical comparison of (ratios of) distances between fixed points becomes feasible. An experiment was performed in which, starting from two 3D scans and one 2D image of two colleagues, male and female, and using seven fixed anatomical locations in the face, comparisons were made for the matching and non-matching case. Using this method, the non-matching pair cannot be distinguished from the matching pair of faces. Facial expression and resolution of images were all more or less optimal, and the results of the study are not encouraging for the use of anthropometric arguments in the identification process. More research needs to be done though on larger sets of facial comparisons. PMID:16337353

  14. Shock experiments and numerical simulations on low energy portable electrically exploding foil accelerators.

    PubMed

    Saxena, A K; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2010-03-01

    Two low energy (1.6 and 8 kJ) portable electrically exploding foil accelerators are developed for moderately high pressure shock studies at small laboratory scale. Projectile velocities up to 4.0 km/s have been measured on Kapton flyers of thickness 125 microm and diameter 8 mm, using an in-house developed Fabry-Perot velocimeter. An asymmetric tilt of typically few milliradians has been measured in flyers using fiber optic technique. High pressure impact experiments have been carried out on tantalum, and aluminum targets up to pressures of 27 and 18 GPa, respectively. Peak particle velocities at the target-glass interface as measured by Fabry-Perot velocimeter have been found in good agreement with the reported equation of state data. A one-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on realistic models of equation of state and electrical resistivity has been developed to numerically simulate the flyer velocity profiles. The developed numerical scheme is validated against experimental and simulation data reported in literature on such systems. Numerically computed flyer velocity profiles and final flyer velocities have been found in close agreement with the previously reported experimental results with a significant improvement over reported magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Numerical modeling of low energy systems reported here predicts flyer velocity profiles higher than experimental values, indicating possibility of further improvement to achieve higher shock pressures.

  15. Shock experiments and numerical simulations on low energy portable electrically exploding foil accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A. K.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2010-03-15

    Two low energy (1.6 and 8 kJ) portable electrically exploding foil accelerators are developed for moderately high pressure shock studies at small laboratory scale. Projectile velocities up to 4.0 km/s have been measured on Kapton flyers of thickness 125 {mu}m and diameter 8 mm, using an in-house developed Fabry-Perot velocimeter. An asymmetric tilt of typically few milliradians has been measured in flyers using fiber optic technique. High pressure impact experiments have been carried out on tantalum, and aluminum targets up to pressures of 27 and 18 GPa, respectively. Peak particle velocities at the target-glass interface as measured by Fabry-Perot velocimeter have been found in good agreement with the reported equation of state data. A one-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on realistic models of equation of state and electrical resistivity has been developed to numerically simulate the flyer velocity profiles. The developed numerical scheme is validated against experimental and simulation data reported in literature on such systems. Numerically computed flyer velocity profiles and final flyer velocities have been found in close agreement with the previously reported experimental results with a significant improvement over reported magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Numerical modeling of low energy systems reported here predicts flyer velocity profiles higher than experimental values, indicating possibility of further improvement to achieve higher shock pressures.

  16. Finite difference model for aquifer simulation in two dimensions with results of numerical experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trescott, Peter C.; Pinder, George Francis; Larson, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The model will simulate ground-water flow in an artesian aquifer, a water-table aquifer, or a combined artesian and water-table aquifer. The aquifer may be heterogeneous and anisotropic and have irregular boundaries. The source term in the flow equation may include well discharge, constant recharge, leakage from confining beds in which the effects of storage are considered, and evapotranspiration as a linear function of depth to water. The theoretical development includes presentation of the appropriate flow equations and derivation of the finite-difference approximations (written for a variable grid). The documentation emphasizes the numerical techniques that can be used for solving the simultaneous equations and describes the results of numerical experiments using these techniques. Of the three numerical techniques available in the model, the strongly implicit procedure, in general, requires less computer time and has fewer numerical difficulties than do the iterative alternating direction implicit procedure and line successive overrelaxation (which includes a two-dimensional correction procedure to accelerate convergence). The documentation includes a flow chart, program listing, an example simulation, and sections on designing an aquifer model and requirements for data input. It illustrates how model results can be presented on the line printer and pen plotters with a program that utilizes the graphical display software available from the Geological Survey Computer Center Division. In addition the model includes options for reading input data from a disk and writing intermediate results on a disk.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Tuff Dissolution and Precipitation Experiments: Validation of Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Coupled-Process Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, P. F.; Kneafsey, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to evaluate THC effects on flow in fractured media, we performed a laboratory experiment and numerical simulations to investigate mineral dissolution and precipitation. To replicate mineral dissolution by condensate in fractured tuff, deionized water equilibrated with carbon dioxide was flowed for 1,500 hours through crushed Yucca Mountain tuff at 94° C. The reacted water was collected and sampled for major dissolved species, total alkalinity, electrical conductivity, and pH. The resulting steady-state fluid composition had a total dissolved solids content of about 140 mg/L; silica was the dominant dissolved constituent. A portion of the steady-state reacted water was flowed at 10.8 mL/hr into a 31.7-cm tall, 16.2-cm wide vertically oriented planar fracture with a hydraulic aperture of 31 microns in a block of welded Topopah Spring tuff that was maintained at 80° C at the top and 130° C at the bottom. The fracture began to seal within five days. A 1-D plug-flow model using the TOUGHREACT code developed at Berkeley Lab was used to simulate mineral dissolution, and a 2-D model was developed to simulate the flow of mineralized water through a planar fracture, where boiling conditions led to mineral precipitation. Predicted concentrations of the major dissolved constituents for the tuff dissolution were within a factor of 2 of the measured average steady-state compositions. The fracture-plugging simulations result in the precipitation of amorphous silica at the base of the boiling front, leading to a hundred-fold decrease in fracture permeability in less than 6 days, consistent with the laboratory experiment. These results help validate the use of the TOUGHREACT code for THC modeling of the Yucca Mountain system. The experiment and simulations indicate that boiling and concomitant precipitation of amorphous silica could cause significant reductions in fracture porosity and permeability on a local scale. The TOUGHREACT code will be used

  18. Chaotic advection at large Péclet number: Electromagnetically driven experiments, numerical simulations, and theoretical predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Aldo; Meunier, Patrice; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Cuevas, Sergio; Ramos, Eduardo

    2014-01-15

    We present a combination of experiment, theory, and modelling on laminar mixing at large Péclet number. The flow is produced by oscillating electromagnetic forces in a thin electrolytic fluid layer, leading to oscillating dipoles, quadrupoles, octopoles, and disordered flows. The numerical simulations are based on the Diffusive Strip Method (DSM) which was recently introduced (P. Meunier and E. Villermaux, “The diffusive strip method for scalar mixing in two-dimensions,” J. Fluid Mech. 662, 134–172 (2010)) to solve the advection-diffusion problem by combining Lagrangian techniques and theoretical modelling of the diffusion. Numerical simulations obtained with the DSM are in reasonable agreement with quantitative dye visualization experiments of the scalar fields. A theoretical model based on log-normal Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of stretching factors, characteristic of homogeneous turbulence in the Batchelor regime, allows to predict the PDFs of scalar in agreement with numerical and experimental results. This model also indicates that the PDFs of scalar are asymptotically close to log-normal at late stages, except for the large concentration levels which correspond to low stretching factors.

  19. Two-dimensional atmospheric transport and chemistry model - Numerical experiments with a new advection algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, Run-Lie; Ha, Yuk Lung; Wen, Jun-Shan; Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive testing of the advective scheme proposed by Prather (1986) has been carried out in support of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory two-dimensional model of the middle atmosphere. The original scheme is generalized to include higher-order moments. In addition, it is shown how well the scheme works in the presence of chemistry as well as eddy diffusion. Six types of numerical experiments including simple clock motion and pure advection in two dimensions have been investigated in detail. By comparison with analytic solutions, it is shown that the new algorithm can faithfully preserve concentration profiles, has essentially no numerical diffusion, and is superior to a typical fourth-order finite difference scheme.

  20. Temperature data assimilation for hyporheic exchange: numerical studies and sandbox experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, L.; Zeng, L.; Wu, L.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the temperature difference between groundwater and surface water (GW-SW), heat can be used as an ideal tracer in hyporheic zone. To quantify GW-SW interactions, existing methods are mainly based on the analytical solution of one-dimensional heat transport equation. However, the assumptions therein are usually violated in practical applications. Furthermore, there are relatively limited experimental sandbox studies regarding heat tracer for complicated GW-SW interactions. In this study, we developed a data assimilation method to quantify the GW-SW interaction in the presence of heterogeneous river bed. A numerical simulator was used to solve the groundwater and heat transport equation. Then the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) was employed to assimilate the temperature data to quantify the unknown interactions (velocity field) between GW-SW and heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field. The validity of this method was verified by both numerical simulation and sandbox experiment for different scenarios.

  1. Two-dimensional atmospheric transport and chemistry model: numerical experiments with a new advection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Shia, R L; Ha, Y L; Wen, J S; Yung, Y L

    1990-05-20

    Extensive testing of the advective scheme, proposed by Prather (1986), has been carried out in support of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory two-dimensional model of the middle atmosphere. We generalize the original scheme to include higher-order moments. In addition, we show how well the scheme works in the presence of chemistry as well as eddy diffusion. Six types of numerical experiments including simple clock motion and pure advection in two dimensions have been investigated in detail. By comparison with analytic solutions it is shown that the new algorithm can faithfully preserve concentration profiles, has essentially no numerical diffusion, and is superior to a typical fourth-order finite difference scheme.

  2. A nearly analytic symplectically partitioned Runge-Kutta method for 2-D seismic wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiao; Yang, Dinghui; Liu, Faqi

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we develop a new nearly analytic symplectically partitioned Runge-Kutta (NSPRK) method for numerically solving elastic wave equations. In this method, we first transform the elastic wave equations into a Hamiltonian system, and use the nearly analytic discrete operator to approximate the high-order spatial differential operators, and then we employ the partitioned second-order symplectic Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the resulted semi-discrete Hamiltonian ordinary differential equations (ODEs). We investigate in great detail on the properties of the NSPRK method that includes the stability condition for the P-SV wave in a 2-D homogeneous isotropic medium, the computational efficiency, and the numerical dispersion relation for the 2-D acoustic case. Meanwhile, we apply the NSPRK to simulate the elastic wave propagating in several multilayer models with both strong velocity contrasts and fluctuating interfaces. Both theoretical analysis and numerical results show that the NSPRK can effectively suppress the numerical dispersion resulted from the discretization of the wave equations, and more importantly, it preserves the symplecticity structure for long-time computation. In addition, numerical experiments demonstrate that the NSPRK is effective to combine the split perfectly matched layer boundary conditions to take care of the reflections from the artificial boundaries.

  3. "Physically-based" numerical experiment to determine the dominant hillslope processes during floods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaume, Eric; Esclaffer, Thomas; Dangla, Patrick; Payrastre, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    To study the dynamics of hillslope responses during flood event, a fully coupled "physically-based" model for the combined numerical simulation of surface runoff and underground flows has been developed. A particular attention has been given to the selection of appropriate numerical schemes for the modelling of both processes and of their coupling. Surprisingly, the most difficult question to solve, from a numerical point of view, was not related to the coupling of two processes with contrasted kinetics such as surface and underground flows, but to the high gradient infiltration fronts appearing in soils, source of numerical diffusion, instabilities and sometimes divergence. The model being elaborated, it has been successfully tested against results of high quality experiments conducted on a laboratory sandy slope in the early eighties, which is still considered as a reference hillslope experimental setting (Abdul & Guilham). The model appeared able to accurately simulate the pore pressure distributions observed in this 1.5 meter deep and wide laboratory hillslope, as well as its outflow hydrograph shapes and the measured respective contributions of direct runoff and groundwater to these outflow hydrographs. Based on this great success, the same model has been used to simulate the response of a theoretical 100-meter wide and 10% sloped hillslope, with a 2 meter deep pervious soil and impervious bedrock. Three rain events have been tested: a 100 millimeter rainfall event over 10 days, over 1 day or over one hour. The simulated responses are hydrologically not realistic and especially the fast component of the response, that is generally observed in the real-world and explains flood events, is almost absent of the simulated response. Thinking a little about the whole problem, the simulation results appears totally logical according to the proposed model. The simulated response, in fact a recession hydrograph, corresponds to a piston flow of a relatively uniformly

  4. 2D bifurcations and Newtonian properties of memristive Chua's circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marszalek, W.; Podhaisky, H.

    2016-01-01

    Two interesting properties of Chua's circuits are presented. First, two-parameter bifurcation diagrams of Chua's oscillatory circuits with memristors are presented. To obtain various 2D bifurcation images a substantial numerical effort, possibly with parallel computations, is needed. The numerical algorithm is described first and its numerical code for 2D bifurcation image creation is available for free downloading. Several color 2D images and the corresponding 1D greyscale bifurcation diagrams are included. Secondly, Chua's circuits are linked to Newton's law φ ''= F(t,φ,φ')/m with φ=\\text{flux} , constant m > 0, and the force term F(t,φ,φ') containing memory terms. Finally, the jounce scalar equations for Chua's circuits are also discussed.

  5. Numerous Numerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henle, James M.

    This pamphlet consists of 17 brief chapters, each containing a discussion of a numeration system and a set of problems on the use of that system. The numeration systems used include Egyptian fractions, ordinary continued fractions and variants of that method, and systems using positive and negative bases. The book is informal and addressed to…

  6. Phase transitions and dynamic entropy in small two-dimensional systems: Experiment and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, K. G.; Petrov, O. F.; Myasnikov, M. I.; Statsenko, K. B.; Vasiliev, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    The results of experimental and numerical analysis are presented for phase transitions in strongly nonequilibrium small systems of strongly interacting Brownian particles. The dynamic entropy method is applied to analysis of the state of these systems. Experiments are carried out with kinetic heating of the structures of micron-size particles in a laboratory rf discharge plasma. Three phase states of these small systems are observed: crystalline, liquid, and transient. The mechanism of phase transitions in cluster structures of strongly interacting particles is described.

  7. Numerical experiments on short-term meteorological effects on solar variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.; Hansen, J. E.; Stone, P. H.; Quirk, W. J.; Lacis, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    A set of numerical experiments was conducted to test the short-range sensitivity of a large atmospheric general circulation model to changes in solar constant and ozone amount. On the basis of the results of 12-day sets of integrations with very large variations in these parameters, it is concluded that realistic variations would produce insignificant meteorological effects. Any causal relationships between solar variability and weather, for time scales of two weeks or less, rely upon changes in parameters other than solar constant or ozone amounts, or upon mechanisms not yet incorporated in the model.

  8. Preliminary Results from Numerical Experiments on the Summer 1980 Heat Wave and Drought

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, N.; Atlas, R.; Sud, Y. C.

    1985-01-01

    During the summer of 1980, a prolonged heat wave and drought affected the United States. A preliminary set of experiments has been conducted to study the effect of varying boundary conditions on the GLA model simulation of the heat wave. Five 10-day numerical integrations with three different specifications of boundary conditions were carried out: a control experiment which utilized climatological boundary conditions, an SST experiment which utilized summer 1980 sea-surface temperatures in the North Pacific, but climatological values elsewhere, and a Soil Moisture experiment which utilized the values of Mintz-Serafini for the summer, 1980. The starting dates for the five forecasts were 11 June, 7 July, 21 July, 22 August, and 6 September of 1980. These dates were specifically chosen as days when a heat wave was already established in order to investigate the effect of soil moistures or North Pacific sea-surface temperatures on the model's ability to maintain the heat wave pattern. The experiments were evaluated in terms of the heat wave index for the South Plains, North Plains, Great Plains and the entire U.S. In addition a subjective comparison of map patterns has been performed.

  9. Numerical modeling of exhaust smoke dispersion for a generic frigate and comparisons with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergin, Selma; Dobrucalı, Erinç

    2014-06-01

    The exhaust smoke dispersion for a generic frigate is investigated numerically through the numerical solution of the governing fluid flow, energy, species and turbulence equations. The main objective of this work is to obtain the effects of the yaw angle, velocity ratio and buoyancy on the dispersion of the exhaust smoke. The numerical method is based on the fully conserved control-volume representation of the fully elliptic Navier-Stokes equations. Turbulence is modeled using a two-equation ( k- ɛ) model. The flow visualization tests using a 1/100 scale model of the frigate in the wind tunnel were also carried out to determine the exhaust plume path and to validate the computational results. The results show that down wash phenomena occurs for the yaw angles between ψ =10° and 20°. The results with different exhaust gas temperatures show that the buoyancy effect increases with the increasing of the exhaust gas temperature. However, its effect on the plume rise is less significant in comparison with its momentum. A good agreement between the predictions and experiment results is obtained.

  10. Mixing of a point-source indoor pollutant: Numerical predictions and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lobscheid, C.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    In most practical estimates of indoor pollutant exposures, it is common to assume that the pollutant is uniformly and instantaneously mixed in the indoor space. It is also commonly known that this assumption is simplistic, particularly for point sources, and for short-term or localized indoor exposures. We report computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of mixing time of a point-pulse release of a pollutant in an unventilated mechanically mixed isothermal room. We aimed to determine the adequacy of the standard RANS two-equation ({kappa}-{var_epsilon}) turbulence model to predict the mixing times under these conditions. The predictions were made for the twelve mixing time experiments performed by Drescher et al. (1995). We paid attention to adequate grid resolution, suppression of numerical diffusion, and careful simulation of the mechanical blowers used in the experiments. We found that the predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  11. The sensitivity of the general circulation to Arctic Sea ice boundaries - A numerical experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, G. F.; Johnson, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for a set of numerical experiments conducted with the Goddard (formerly GISS) general circulation model. The experiments were designed to test the model atmospheric response to a single fixed and specified parameter, the total ice cover in the Davis Strait, Barents Sea, East Greenland Sea, Sea of Okhotsk and Bering Sea. Margin variations are considered that are substantially smaller than those involved in ice age or ice-free Arctic simulations. Anomaly is defined as the mean of two runs corresponding to climatological maximum sea ice conditions. Model results indicate that the ice margin anomalies are capable of altering local climates in certain regions of high and middle latitudes. Possible interactions between high latitudes and subtropical regions are suggested.

  12. Flocculation processes and sedimentation of fine sediments in the open annular flume - experiment and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, I.; Hillebrand, G.; Olsen, N. R. B.; Vollmer, S.; Lehmann, B.; Nestmann, F.

    2013-10-01

    The prediction of cohesive sediment transport requires numerical models which include the dominant physico-chemical processes of fine sediments. Mainly in terms of simulating small scale processes, flocculation of fine particles plays an important role since aggregation processes affect the transport and settling of fine-grained particles. Flocculation algorithms used in numerical models are based on and calibrated using experimental data. A good agreement between the results of the simulation and the measurements is a prerequisite for further applications of the transport functions. In this work, the sediment transport model (SSIIM) was extended by implementing a physics-based aggregation process model based on McAnally (1999). SSIIM solves the Navier-Stokes-Equations in a three-dimensional, non-orthogonal grid using the k-ɛ turbulence model. The program calculates the suspended load with the convection-diffusion equation for the sediment concentration. Experimental data from studies in annular flumes (Hillebrand, 2008; Klassen, 2009) is used to test the flocculation algorithm. Annular flumes are commonly used as a test rig for laboratory studies on cohesive sediments since the flocculation processes are not interfered with by pumps etc. We use the experiments to model measured floc sizes, affected by aggregation processes, as well as the sediment concentration of the experiment. Within the simulation of the settling behavior, we use different formulas for calculating the settling velocity (Stokes, 1850 vs. Winterwerp, 1998) and include the fractal dimension to take into account the structure of flocs. The aim of the numerical calculations is to evaluate the flocculation algorithm by comparison with the experimental data. The results from these studies have shown, that the flocculation process and the settling behaviour are very sensitive to variations in the fractal dimension. We get the best agreement with measured data by adopting a characteristic fractal

  13. Utilizing microstructural characteristics to derive insights into deformation and annealing behaviour: Numerical simulations, experiments and nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazolo, Sandra; Montagnat, Maurine; Prakash, Abhishek; Borthwick, Verity; Evans, Lynn; Griera, Albert; Bons, Paul D.; Svahnberg, Henrik; Prior, David J.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the influence of the pre-existing microstructure on subsequent microstructural development is pivotal for the correct interpretation of rocks and ice that stayed at high homologous temperatures over a significant period of time. The microstructural behaviour of these materials through time has an important bearing on the interpretation of characteristics such as grain size, for example, using grain size statistics to detect former high strain zones that remain at high temperatures but low stress. We present a coupled experimental and modelling approach to better understand the evolution of recrystallization characteristics as a function of deformation-annealing time paths in a material with a high viscoplastic anisotropy e.g. polycrystalline ice and magnesium alloys. Deformation microstructures such as crystal bending, subgrain boundaries, grain size variation significantly influence the deformation and annealing behaviour of crystalline material. For numerical simulations we utilize the microdynamic modelling platform, Elle (www.elle.ws), taking local microstructural evolution into account to simulate the following processes: recovery within grains, rotational recrystallization, grain boundary migration and nucleation. We first test the validity of the numerical simulations against experiments, and then use the model to interpret microstructural features in natural examples. In-situ experiments are performed on laboratory grown and deformed ice and magnesium alloy. Our natural example is a deformed then recrystallized anorthosite from SW Greenland. The presented approach can be applied to many other minerals and crystalline materials.

  14. Comparison of chemical and nuclear explosions: Numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, J.R.; Bos, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper the authors discuss numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), which was an underground explosion conducted in September 1993 in the volcanic tuff of the Nevada Test Site. The NPE source consisted of 1.29 {times} 10{sup 6} kg of ANFO-emulsion blasting agent, with the approximate energy of 1.1 kt, emplaced 389 m beneath the surface of Rainier Mesa. The authors compare detailed numerical simulations of the NPE with data collected from that experiment, and with calculations of an equally energetic nuclear explosion in identical geology. Calculated waveforms, at ranges out to approximately 1 km, agree moderately well in the time domain with free-field data, and are in qualitative agreement with free-surface records. Comparison of computed waveforms for equally energetic chemical and nuclear sources reveals relatively minor differences beyond the immediate near-source region, with the chemical source having an {approximately}25% greater seismic moment but otherwise indistinguishable (close-in) seismic source properties. 41 refs., 67 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Pressurized groundwater outflow experiments and numerical modeling for outflow channels on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Wouter A.; Hauber, Ernst; McLelland, Stuart J.; Murphy, Brendan J.; Parsons, Daniel R.; Conway, Susan J.; Roda, Manuel; Govers, Rob; Kleinhans, Maarten G.

    2014-12-01

    The landscape of Mars shows incised channels that often appear abruptly in the landscape, suggesting a groundwater source. However, groundwater outflow processes are unable to explain the reconstructed peak discharges of the largest outflow channels based on their morphology. Therefore, there is a disconnect between groundwater outflow processes and the resulting morphology. Using a combined approach with experiments and numerical modeling, we examine outflow processes that result from pressurized groundwater. We use a large sandbox flume, where we apply a range of groundwater pressures at the base of a layer of sediment. Our experiments show that different pressures result in distinct outflow processes and resulting morphologies. Low groundwater pressure results in seepage, forming a shallow surface lake and a channel when the lake overflows. At intermediate groundwater pressures, fissures form and groundwater flows out more rapidly. At even higher pressures, the groundwater initially collects in a subsurface reservoir that grows due to flexural deformation of the surface. When this reservoir collapses, a large volume of water is released to the surface. We numerically model the ability of these processes to produce floods on Mars and compare the results to discharge estimates based on previous morphological studies. We show that groundwater seepage and fissure outflow are insufficient to explain the formation of large outflow channels from a single event. Instead, formation of a flexure-induced subsurface reservoir and subsequent collapse generates large floods that can explain the observed morphologies of the largest outflow channels on Mars and their source areas.

  16. The Zombie Instability: Using Numerical Simulation to Design a Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Pei, Suyang; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Marcus, Philip

    2014-11-01

    A new type of finite amplitude-instability has been found in numerical simulations of stratified, rotating, shear flows. The instability occurs via baroclinic critical layers that create linearly unstable vortex layers, which roll-up into vortices. Under the right conditions, those vortices can form a new generation of vortices, resulting in ``vortex self-replication'' that fills the fluid with vortices. Creating this instability in a laboratory would provide further evidence for the existence of the instability, which we first found in numerical simulations of protoplanetary disks. To design a laboratory experiment we need to know how the flow parameters-- shear, rotation and stratification, etc. affect the instability. To build an experiment economically, we also need to know how the finite-amplitude trigger of the instability scales with viscosity and the size of the domain. In this talk, we summarize our findings. We present a map, in terms of the experimentally controllable parameters, that shows where the instability occurs and whether the instability creates a few isolated transient vortices, a few long-lived vortices, or long-lived, self-replicating vortices that fill the entire flow.

  17. Numerical Simulation With Data Assimilation of Laboratory Experiments In A Rotating, Stratified Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galmiche, M.; Sommeria, J.; Verron, J.; Thivolle-Cazat, E.

    Due to the difficulty in measuring the ocean properties with accuracy and high reso- lution in space and time, the validation of the data assimilation schemes developped for the use of operational oceanography is not straightforward. We present here an experimental alternative to test the accuracy of data assimilation schemes at the labo- ratory scale. The same method is used as in real-scale operational oceanography, but the oceanic reality is replaced by the velocity field measured in laboratory experiments of simple, oceanic-like flows. Laboratory experiments of vortex instability in a rotating, two-layer fluid are per- formed in the large Coriolis turntable (LEGI, France). The velocity field of the flow is measured using the PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) technique. The numerical sim- ulation of these flows is performed using the MICOM (Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Model, Bleck and Boudra 1986) numerical code, the experimental data being assimi- lated using the SEEK (Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman Filter, Pham et al. 1998) version of the Kalman Filter. Order reduction is operated thanks to an EOF (Empirical Orthogonal Functions) analysis. We can then analyze how data assimilation drives the numerical simulation closer to the reality, as a function of a certain number of param- eters (assimilation frequency, space resolution, choice of EOF basis, parameterization of model errors,...) References Bleck, R. and Boudra, D. 1986. Wind driven spin-up in eddy-resolving ocean models formulated in isopycnic ans isobaric coordinates. JGR 91, 7611-7621. Pham, D., Verron, J. and Roubaud, M. 1998. A Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman Filter for data assimilation in oceanography. JMS 16 (3-4), 323-340.

  18. Integrating Laboratory and Numerical Decompression Experiments to Investigate Fluid Dynamics into the Conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, Laura; Colucci, Simone; De'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2015-04-01

    The study of the fluid dynamics of magmatic melts into the conduit, where direct observations are unattainable, was proven to be strongly enhanced by multiparametric approaches. Among them, the coupling of numerical modeling with laboratory experiments represents a fundamental tool of investigation. Indeed, the experimental approach provide invaluable data to validate complex multiphase codes. We performed decompression experiments in a shock tube system, using pure silicon oil as a proxy for the basaltic melt. A range of viscosity comprised between 1 and 1000 Pa s was investigated. The samples were saturated with Argon for 72h at 10MPa, before being slowly decompressed to atmospheric pressure. The evolution of the analogue magmatic system was monitored through a high speed camera and pressure sensors, located into the analogue conduit. The experimental decompressions have then been reproduced numerically using a multiphase solver based on OpenFOAM framework. The original compressible multiphase Openfoam solver twoPhaseEulerFoam was extended to take into account the multicomponent nature of the fluid mixtures (liquid and gas) and the phase transition. According to the experimental conditions, the simulations were run with values of fluid viscosity ranging from 1 to 1000 Pa s. The sensitivity of the model has been tested for different values of the parameters t and D, representing respectively the relaxation time for gas exsolution and the average bubble diameter, required by the Gidaspow drag model. Valuable range of values for both parameters are provided from experimental observations, i.e. bubble nucleation time and bubble size distribution at a given pressure. The comparison of video images with the outcomes of the numerical models was performed by tracking the evolution of the gas volume fraction through time. Therefore, we were able to calibrate the parameter of the model by laboratory results, and to track the fluid dynamics of experimental decompression.

  19. Optimization of CFETR CSMC cabling based on numerical modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jinggang; Dai, Chao; Liu, Bo; Wu, Yu; Liu, Fang; Liao, Guojun; Xue, Tianjun; Wei, Zhourong; Nijhuis, Arend; Zhou, Chao; Devred, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    The China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a new tokamak device, whose magnet system includes toroidal field (TF), central solenoid (CS) and poloidal field (PF) coils. The main goal is to build a fusion engineering tokamak reactor with 50-200 MW fusion power and self-sufficiency by blanket, which means that the deuterium-tritium reaction in the plasma produces neutrons and alpha particles, and the neutrons react with the lithium-containing blanket surrounding the plasma, breeding the tritium by lithium-neutron reaction. To develop the manufacturing technique for the full-size CS coil, the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) project for CFETR was launched first. A Nb3Sn conductor is to be used in the CFETR CSMC, whose design refers to the ITER CS conductor with the same short-twist-pitch cable pattern. Due to the short twist pitch and relatively low void fraction, a high compaction ratio is required during cabling and the risk of strand damage is increased significantly. Although it is impossible to avoid strand deformation for this design, it is crucial to find a way to reduce strand damage as much as possible. A numerical model was used to analyze the causes of strand damage, including variation in twist pitch length as well as different mechanical properties for copper and Nb3Sn strands. Several experiments have been performed to verify the numerical results, including cabling trials for different conditions and critical current (I c) tests on strands with/without deformation. The results show that the numerical analysis is consistent with the experiments and provides the optimal cabling conditions for the CFETR CSMC.

  20. Numerical modeling of Large Plasma Device Alfvén wave experiments using AstroGK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Kevin D.; Howes, Gregory G.; Tatsuno, Tomoya; Numata, Ryusuke; Dorland, William

    2010-02-01

    Collisions between counterpropagating Alfvén waves represent the fundamental building block of plasma turbulence, a phenomenon of great importance to a wide variety of fields, from space physics and astrophysics to controlled magnetic fusion. Proposed experiments to study Alfvén wave collisions on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman, H. Pfister, Z. Lucky, J. Bamber, D. Leneman, and J. Maggs, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the University of California, Los Angeles, will benefit significantly from numerical modeling capable of reproducing not only the linear dispersive effects of kinetic and inertial Alfvén waves, but also the nonlinear evolution of the Alfvénic turbulence. This paper presents a comparison of linear simulation results using the astrophysical gyrokinetics code, AstroGK, to the measured linear properties of kinetic and inertial Alfvén waves in the LAPD plasma. Results demonstrate that: (1) finite frequency effects due to the ion cyclotron resonance do not prevent satisfactory modeling of the LAPD plasma using gyrokinetic theory; and (2) an advanced collision operator, recently implemented in AstroGK, enables the code to successfully reproduce the collisionally enhanced damping rates of linear waves measured in recent LAPD experiments. These tests justify the use of AstroGK in the modeling of LAPD Alfvén wave experiments and suggest that AstroGK will be a valuable tool in modeling the nonlinear evolution of proposed Alfvén wave collision experiments.

  1. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  2. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  3. Thermal stability of Ag, Al, Sn, Pb, and Hg films reinforced by 2D (C, Si) crystals and the formation of interfacial fluid states in them upon heating. MD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polukhin, V. A.; Kurbanova, E. D.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to study the thermal stability of the interfacial states of metallic Al, Ag, Sn, Pb, and Hg films (i.e., the structural elements of superconductor composites and conducting electrodes) reinforced by 2D graphene and silicene crystals upon heating up to disordering and to analyze the formation of nonautonomous fluid pseudophases in interfaces. The effect of perforation defects in reinforcing 2D-C and 2D-Si planes with passivated edge covalent bonds on the atomic dynamics is investigated. As compared to Al and Ag, the diffusion coefficients in Pd and Hg films increase monotonically with temperature during thermally activated disordering processes, the interatomic distances decrease, the sizes decrease, drops form, and their density profile grows along the normal. The coagulation of Pb and Hg drops is accompanied by a decrease in the contact angle, the reduction of the interface contact with graphene, and the enhancement of its corrugation (waviness).

  4. Infragravity wave generation and dynamics over a mild slope beach : Experiments and numerical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cienfuegos, R.; Duarte, L.; Hernandez, E.

    2008-12-01

    Charasteristic frequencies of gravity waves generated by wind and propagating towards the coast are usually comprised between 0.05Hz and 1Hz. Nevertheless, lower frequecy waves, in the range of 0.001Hz and 0.05Hz, have been observed in the nearshore zone. Those long waves, termed as infragravity waves, are generated by complex nonlinear mechanisms affecting the propagation of irregular waves up to the coast. The groupiness of an incident random wave field may be responsible for producing a slow modulation of the mean water surface thus generating bound long waves travelling at the group speed. Similarly, a quasi- periodic oscillation of the break-point location, will be accompained by a slow modulation of set-up/set-down in the surf zone and generation and release of long waves. If the primary structure of the carrying incident gravity waves is destroyed (e.g. by breaking), forced long waves can be freely released and even reflected at the coast. Infragravity waves can affect port operation through resonating conditions, or strongly affect sediment transport and beach morphodynamics. In the present study we investigate infragravity wave generation mechanisms both, from experiments and numerical computations. Measurements were conducted at the 70-meter long wave tank, located at the Instituto Nacional de Hidraulica (Chile), prepared with a beach of very mild slope of 1/80 in order to produce large surf zone extensions. A random JONSWAP type wave field (h0=0.52m, fp=0.25Hz, Hmo=0.17m) was generated by a piston wave-maker and measurements of the free surface displacements were performed all over its length at high spatial resolution (0.2m to 1m). Velocity profiles were also measured at four verticals inside the surf zone using an ADV. Correlation maps of wave group envelopes and infragravity waves are computed in order to identify long wave generation and dynamics in the experimental set-up. It appears that both mechanisms (groupiness and break-point oscillation) are

  5. Tsunami-induced boulder transport - combining physical experiments and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetjen, Jan; Engel, Max; May, Simon Matthias; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Brueckner, Helmut; Prasad Pudasaini, Shiva

    2016-04-01

    Coasts are crucial areas for living, economy, recreation, transportation, and various sectors of industry. Many of them are exposed to high-energy wave events. With regard to the ongoing population growth in low-elevation coastal areas, the urgent need for developing suitable management measures, especially for hazards like tsunamis, becomes obvious. These measures require supporting tools which allow an exact estimation of impact parameters like inundation height, inundation area, and wave energy. Focussing on tsunamis, geological archives can provide essential information on frequency and magnitude on a longer time scale in order to support coastal hazard management. While fine-grained deposits may quickly be altered after deposition, multi-ton coarse clasts (boulders) may represent an information source on past tsunami events with a much higher preservation potential. Applying numerical hydrodynamic coupled boulder transport models (BTM) is a commonly used approach to analyse characteristics (e.g. wave height, flow velocity) of the corresponding tsunami. Correct computations of tsunamis and the induced boulder transport can provide essential event-specific information, including wave heights, runup and direction. Although several valuable numerical models for tsunami-induced boulder transport exist (e. g. Goto et al., 2007; Imamura et al., 2008), some important basic aspects of both tsunami hydrodynamics and corresponding boulder transport have not yet been entirely understood. Therefore, our project aims at these questions in four crucial aspects of boulder transport by a tsunami: (i) influence of sediment load, (ii) influence of complex boulder shapes other than idealized rectangular shapes, (iii) momentum transfers between multiple boulders, and (iv) influence of non-uniform bathymetries and topographies both on tsunami and boulder. The investigation of these aspects in physical experiments and the correct implementation of an advanced model is an urgent need

  6. Numerical analysis and experiment research on fluid orbital performance of vane type propellant management device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Li, Y.; Pan, H. L.; Liu, J. T.; Zhuang, B. T.

    2015-01-01

    Vane type propellant management device (PMD) is one of the key components of the vane-type surface tension tank (STT), and its fluid orbital performance directly determines the STT's success or failure. In present paper, numerical analysis and microgravity experiment study on fluid orbital performance of a vane type PMD were carried out. By using two-phase flow model of volume of fluid (VOF), fluid flow characteristics in the tank with the vane type PMD were numerically calculated, and the rules of fluid transfer and distribution were gotten. A abbreviate model test system of the vane type PMD is established and microgravity drop tower tests were performed, then fluid management and transmission rules of the vane type PMD were obtained under microgravity environment. The analysis and tests results show that the vane type PMD has good and initiative fluid orbital management ability and meets the demands of fluid orbital extrusion in the vane type STT. The results offer valuable guidance for the design and optimization of the new generation of vane type PMD, and also provide a new approach for fluid management and control in space environment.

  7. Instability of surface lenticular vortices: results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaye, Noé; Paci, Alexandre; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2016-04-01

    We examine the instability of lenticular vortices -- or lenses -- in a stratified rotating fluid. The simplest configuration is one in which the lenses overlay a deep layer and have a free surface, and this can be studied using a two-layer rotating shallow water model. We report results from laboratory experiments and high-resolution direct numerical simulations of the destabilization of vortices with constant potential vorticity, and compare these to a linear stability analysis. The stability properties of the system are governed by two parameters: the typical upper-layer potential vorticity and the size (depth) of the vortex. Good agreement is found between analytical, numerical and experimental results for the growth rate and wavenumber of the instability. The nonlinear saturation of the instability is associated with conversion from potential to kinetic energy and weak emission of gravity waves, giving rise to the formation of coherent vortex multipoles with trapped waves. The impact of flow in the lower layer is examined. In particular, it is shown that the growth rate can be strongly affected and the instability can be suppressed for certain types of weak co-rotating flow.

  8. Numerical Design Of Experiments to Analyse the Contact Conditions in Microforming

    SciTech Connect

    Barbier, C.; Thibaud, S.; Picart, P.; Chambert, J.

    2007-05-17

    In microforming, the so-called size effects can be observed in the material flow behaviour as well as in the frictional behaviour. In order to study the frictional behaviour a preliminary numerical characterization of the surface tribology has been carried out. A numerical design of experiments (DOE) is based on cylinder upsetting tests to define the influence of surface geometric properties on the resultant force. The simulations have been performed with the finite element software LS-Dyna by using an axisymmetric model. The mechanical behaviour of the cylinder specimen was described by an elastic-plastic material law, whereas the upsetting plates were assumed to be rigid. The workpiece is considered to be a copper alloy (CuZn10). The average roughness Ra and the average mean spacing Sm have been chosen to describe surface roughness properties. The tool and workpiece surfaces have been modelled using a sinusoidal profile. The five input parameters of the DOE are the amplitude and the period of the two sinusoidal profiles and the phase displacement between them. The analysis of variance shows the statistically significant parameters or interactions.

  9. Fractal aggregates in reduced gravity experiments and numerical simulations to characterize cometary material properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasue, Jeremie; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Hadamcik, Edith; Botet, Robert; Renard, Jean-Baptiste

    In situ missions have shown that cometary dust particles have low densities and are easily fragmenting aggregates [1]. The linear polarization of the solar light scattered by cometary dust corresponds to bell-shaped (with a small negative branch and a maximum below 30%) phase curves with a quasi-linear increase with the wavelength between 30° and 50° phase angle [2]. Such physical properties of the cometary material are reconciled by a fractal model of cometary dust and comet nuclei as formed by aggregation in reduced gravity as studied by laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. Reduced gravity light scattering experiments: The CODAG-LSU experiment (1999) gave the first indication of the light scattering properties transition between single particles and low dimensions fractal aggregates (D 1.3) [3, 4]. Such studies will be pursued on board the ISS with the ICAPS precursor experiment. The PROGRA2 experiment is designed to study the light scattering properties of particles levitated during dedicated microgravity flights or with ground-based configurations [5]. The material properties are chosen so as to be relevant in the context of cosmic dust from cometary and asteroidal origins. It is especially useful to disentangle the effects of varying albedos of constitutive materials [6], shape and size of constitutive grains [7]. Some of the results are interpreted in terms of fractal aggregates growth. Light scattering numerical simulations Based on numerical simulations and in coherence with the experimental results, a model of cometary coma by a mixture of fractal aggregates of up to 256 sub-micron sized spheroidal grains and compact spheroidal particles is shown to reproduce the polarimetric observations of comets such as 1P/Halley or C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp [8]. Physical parameters of the size distribution of particles (minimum and maximum size, shape of the size distribution and quantity and location of absorbing and non-absorbing particles) can be retrieved

  10. A numerical tool for reproducing driver behaviour: experiments and predictive simulations.

    PubMed

    Casucci, M; Marchitto, M; Cacciabue, P C

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the simulation tool called SDDRIVE (Simple Simulation of Driver performance), which is the numerical computerised implementation of the theoretical architecture describing Driver-Vehicle-Environment (DVE) interactions, contained in Cacciabue and Carsten [Cacciabue, P.C., Carsten, O. A simple model of driver behaviour to sustain design and safety assessment of automated systems in automotive environments, 2010]. Following a brief description of the basic algorithms that simulate the performance of drivers, the paper presents and discusses a set of experiments carried out in a Virtual Reality full scale simulator for validating the simulation. Then the predictive potentiality of the tool is shown by discussing two case studies of DVE interactions, performed in the presence of different driver attitudes in similar traffic conditions. PMID:19249745

  11. Review of nonlinear ultrasonic guided wave nondestructive evaluation: theory, numerics, and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chillara, Vamshi Krishna; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in using the higher harmonic generation of ultrasonic guided wave modes for nondestructive evaluation continues to grow tremendously as the understanding of nonlinear guided wave propagation has enabled further analysis. The combination of the attractive properties of guided waves with the attractive properties of higher harmonic generation provides a very unique potential for characterization of incipient damage, particularly in plate and shell structures. Guided waves can propagate relatively long distances, provide access to hidden structural components, have various displacement polarizations, and provide many opportunities for mode conversions due to their multimode character. Moreover, higher harmonic generation is sensitive to changing aspects of the microstructures such as to the dislocation density, precipitates, inclusions, and voids. We review the recent advances in the theory of nonlinear guided waves, as well as the numerical simulations and experiments that demonstrate their utility.

  12. Numerical modeling experiments of coastal upwelling at the field of Arctic fjords.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosecki, Szymon; Dzierzbicka-Głowacka, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    Coastal upwelling is a well described, known phenomenon in theory. Nowadays there is more and more both environmental and modeling studies about it. Upwelling especially in the Arctic fjords is a process that strongly affects hydrodynamics and even more ecosystems. It is so important, that it brings detailed question about effects and needed wind driven forcing parameters. My modeling experiment studies were strongly different than the studies that are typically carried out using numerical models. Instead of searching for this phenomenon in modeled analysis or environmental data, I did several case scenarios simulations. For those I used statistically selected wind data measured in-stiu. The hi-resolution coastal mapping, the flexible mesh discretization method and the sigma-layered three dimensional model MIKE 3 by DHI allowed me to explore this phenomenon with very good accuracy. This studies have been done in Institute of Oceanology PAS in Sopot, as a part of Centre for Polar Studies.

  13. Impact of Modified Conductivity Models on Numerical Simulation of Strongly Coupled Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, Carter P.; Benage, John F.; Tierney, Thomas E.; Workman, Jonathan

    2000-10-01

    1-D MHD codes have routinely been employed in the preliminary design of pulsed power hydrodynamics and strongly coupled plasma experiments at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Recent experimental work by Benage, et. al.(Benage, J.F., Shanahan, W.R., and Murillo, M.S., Physical Review Letters), 83, no. 15, pg. 2953, (1999) however, has shown that the established theories used to generate the resistivity tables previously employed in these numerical codes are inadequate in relevant portions of the density and temperature parameter regimes. The best theoretical match to the resistivity data of Benage is provided by a density functional model of Perrot and Dharma-Wardana. Newly available conductivity tables for Aluminum(provided by Mike Desjarlais and Steve Rosenthal of Sandia National Laboratory) are being used to re-evaluate previously modeled experimental configurations. Details of the impact of the various resistivity models on prediction of experimental configurations will be presented.

  14. Sediment Transport and Flow Dynamics in a Fish-Habitat Restoration Project: Field and Numerical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biron, P.; Carver, R. B.; Carré, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    Few studies have examined sediment transport patterns around instream structures used to enhance fish habitat despite the importance of this variable in the successful design of stream restoration schemes. This paper presents results from a field experiment on particle movement around flow deflectors during a series of floods in a restored reach of the Nicolet River (Quebec). Bedload transport is investigated using passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags with particles ranging from 0.05 m to 0.16 m. These were followed from positions upstream of a pair of current deflectors which were designed to maintain a deep downstream pool. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the flow field at various flow stages (when deflectors are either emerged or submerged) are also used to relate near-bed velocity and bed shear stress to transport patterns. A key question is whether particles are capable of leaving the restored pool afterwards, since it determines whether the pool will be maintained in the long term. Results indicate that from 2005 to 2008, of the 117 pit-tagged particles that fell in the pool only 27 are known to have exited. None of the 30 largest rocks entering the pool escaped. To explain bedload transport, the three-dimensionality of the flow field when structures are submerged must be taken into account. The interaction between submerged deflectors and the dug pool gives rise to large streamwise, lateral and vertical velocity gradients, resulting in several interconnected mixing layers which likely affect sediment transport. To further understand the interactions between the morphology of the dug pool and flow dynamics, various pool geometries are tested in numerical experiments.

  15. The development of slabs in the upper mantle: Insights from numerical and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Thorsten W.; Faccenna, Caludio; O'Connell, Richard J.; Giardini, Domenico

    1999-07-01

    We have performed numerical and laboratory experiments to model subduction of oceanic lithosphere in the upper mantle from its beginnings as a gravitational instability to the fully developed slab. A two-dimensional finite element code is applied to model Newtonian creep in the numerical experiments. Scaled analog media are used in the laboratory, a sand mixture models the brittle crust, silicone putty simulates creep in the lower crust and mantle lithosphere, and glucose syrup is the asthenosphere analog. Both model approaches show similar results and reproduce first-order observations of the subduction process in nature based on density and viscosity heterogeneities in a Stokes flow model. Subduction nucleates slowly and a pronounced slab forms only when the viscosity contrast between oceanic plate and mantle is below a threshold. We find that the subduction velocity and angle are time-dependent and increase roughly exponentially over tens of millions of years before the slab reaches the 670-km discontinuity. The style of subduction is controlled by the prescribed velocity of convergence, the density contrast between the plates, and the viscosity contrast between the oceanic plate and the mantle. These factors can be combined in the buoyancy number F which expresses the ratio between driving slab pull and resisting viscous dissipation in the oceanic plate. Variations in F control the stress in the plates, the speed and the dip of subduction, and the rate of trench retreat, reproducing the contrasting styles of subduction observed in nature. The subduction rate is strongly influenced by the work of bending the lithosphere as it subducts.

  16. The agreement between 3D, standard 2D and triplane 2D speckle tracking: effects of image quality and 3D volume rate

    PubMed Central

    Stöbe, Stephan; Tarr, Adrienn; Pfeiffer, Dietrich; Hagendorff, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of 3D and 2D speckle tracking performed on standard 2D and triplane 2D datasets of normal and pathological left ventricular (LV) wall-motion patterns with a focus on the effect that 3D volume rate (3DVR), image quality and tracking artifacts have on the agreement between 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 37 patients with normal LV function and 18 patients with ischaemic wall-motion abnormalities underwent 2D and 3D echocardiography, followed by offline speckle tracking measurements. The values of 3D global, regional and segmental strain were compared with the standard 2D and triplane 2D strain values. Correlation analysis with the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was also performed. The 3D and 2D global strain values correlated good in both normally and abnormally contracting hearts, though systematic differences between the two methods were observed. Of the 3D strain parameters, the area strain showed the best correlation with the LVEF. The numerical agreement of 3D and 2D analyses varied significantly with the volume rate and image quality of the 3D datasets. The highest correlation between 2D and 3D peak systolic strain values was found between 3D area and standard 2D longitudinal strain. Regional wall-motion abnormalities were similarly detected by 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 2DST of triplane datasets showed similar results to those of conventional 2D datasets. 2D and 3D speckle tracking similarly detect normal and pathological wall-motion patterns. Limited image quality has a significant impact on the agreement between 3D and 2D numerical strain values. PMID:26693303

  17. Super-thermal particles in hot plasmas—Kinetic models, numerical solution strategies, and comparison to tokamak experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauber, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    The excitation of collective instabilities by super-thermal particles in hot plasmas and the related transport processes attract increasing interest due to their fundamental challenges for theoretical models and their practical importance for burning fusion plasmas. In fact, the physics of a self-heated thermonuclear plasma due to fusion-born 3.5 MeV α-particles is one of the most important outstanding fundamental research topics on the way to a fusion power plant with magnetic confinement. Within the last 10 years significant advances on both the theoretical and the experimental sides have been made leading to a more detailed and quantitative understanding of fast-particle-driven instabilities. On the theoretical side, the crucial step was to move from fluid models for the plasma background with a hybrid kinetic expression for the energetic particles to a fully kinetic model for all the plasma species, i.e. background ions, background electrons, and fast ions. This improvement allows one to describe consistently the resonant interaction between global plasma waves such as shear Alfvén and Alfvén-acoustic waves, and the particles via Landau damping, i.e. the dynamics parallel to the magnetic background field. Also, mode conversion mechanisms require the inclusion of background ion scales in a kinetic, non-perturbative way. This accurate treatment of the plasma background leads not only to changes in the linear mode properties such as frequency, growth/damping rate, and mode structure but also influences the non-linear dynamics. Due to major advances, innovations and installation of diagnostics in present day experiments, this comparison can be carried out in a more detailed and comprehensive way than a few years ago. For example, the measurement of damping rates via active external antennas, the imaging of 2D mode structures via electron-cyclotron-emission spectroscopy, and the direct detection of escaping fast ions allow to diagnose various kinetic features of

  18. Non-linear effects in a spherical convection experiments with temperature dependent fluid properties: Microgravity experiment and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaussinger, F.; Futterer, B.; Egbers, C.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal convection is one important driving mechanism of flow in the earth mantle. Setting up a self-gravitating buoyancy in a spherical shell geometry is the limiting factor for laboratory experiments to analyze velocity flow structures and heat transport. The geophysical flow model 'GeoFlow II', which is located at the Columbus module on the ISS, realizes such a central gravity. Under microgravity conditions a central dielectrophoretic force field is applied to a fluid filled spherical annulus. In contrast to the first mission 'GeoFlow I' the electro-hydrodynamical volume expansion coefficient of the working fluid has a strong dependence on the temperature and leads to pattern, which are related to a strong temperature dependent viscosity of the fluid. Even though the oil's viscosity itself is temperature-dependent, too, the maximum of viscosity contrast is only up to 1.5. The optical measurement of the fluid flow is based on the Wollaston shearing interferometry, since the on orbit setup avoids the use of measurement particles. This technique leads to fringe patterns. Simulations with RESPECT and GAIAA tend to verify the experimentally observed patterns by different numerical models.

  19. Higher-Order Neural Networks Applied to 2D and 3D Object Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly; Reid, Max B.

    1994-01-01

    A Higher-Order Neural Network (HONN) can be designed to be invariant to geometric transformations such as scale, translation, and in-plane rotation. Invariances are built directly into the architecture of a HONN and do not need to be learned. Thus, for 2D object recognition, the network needs to be trained on just one view of each object class, not numerous scaled, translated, and rotated views. Because the 2D object recognition task is a component of the 3D object recognition task, built-in 2D invariance also decreases the size of the training set required for 3D object recognition. We present results for 2D object recognition both in simulation and within a robotic vision experiment and for 3D object recognition in simulation. We also compare our method to other approaches and show that HONNs have distinct advantages for position, scale, and rotation-invariant object recognition. The major drawback of HONNs is that the size of the input field is limited due to the memory required for the large number of interconnections in a fully connected network. We present partial connectivity strategies and a coarse-coding technique for overcoming this limitation and increasing the input field to that required by practical object recognition problems.

  20. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments of colliding jets: Turbulent amplification of seed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    In this study we present high-resolution numerical simulations of laboratory experiments that study the turbulent amplification of magnetic fields generated by laser-driven colliding jets. The radiative magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations discussed here were performed with the FLASH code and have assisted in the analysis of the experimental results obtained from the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a pair of thin Carbon foils is placed in an Argon-filled chamber and is illuminated to create counter-propagating jets. The jets carry magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery mechanism and collide to form a highly turbulent region. The interaction is probed using a wealth of diagnostics, including induction coils that are capable of providing the field strength and directionality at a specific point in space. The latter have revealed a significant increase in the field's strength due to turbulent amplification. Our FLASH simulations have allowed us to reproduce the experimental findings and to disentangle the complex processes and dynamics involved in the colliding flows. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC.

  1. Numerical simulation of hole-closure experiments on a large centrifuge. [Subseabed Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect

    McTigue, D.F.; Sutherland, H.J.; Dawson, P.R.

    1987-04-01

    The creep closure of a slot in water-saturated clay has been simulated numerically with the finite-element computer code NEPTUNE. The calculations model scaled experiments performed on the Sandia 25-foot centrifuge at 90 g. The material model used represents the clay matrix as a linearly viscous fluid, the volumetric deformation rate of which depends upon the ''effective'' mean normal stress. Simulations have been run for a range of material properties and a variety of possible boundary conditions. The calculations indicate that the deformation is dominated by shearing, while volumetric creep is relatively unimportant, i.e., the characteristic time for the deformation is short in comparison to that for the flow of interstitial fluid. Velocities of the order observed in the centrifuge experiments (approx.1 m/s) are calculated for a shear viscosity of 10/sup 3/ Pa . s, which is of a magnitude consistent with values reported in the literature. The overall kinematics of the experimental flow field is reproduced satisfactorily for reasonable boundary conditions on the material in the neighborhood of the hole. The calculations demonstrate that the formulation implemented in the NEPTUNE computer code is able to predict certain observable aspects of the creep deformation of water-saturated clay. Thus, the comparison between experimental observations and computational results provides partial validation of the code.

  2. Numerical simulation of mud erosion rate in sand-mud alternate layer and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Oyama, H.; Sato, T.

    2015-12-01

    For gas production from methane hydrates in sand-mud alternate layers, depressurization method is expected as feasible. After methane hydrate is dissociated, gas and water flow in pore space. There is a concern about the erosion of mud surface and it may result in flow blockage that disturbs the gas production. As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we developed a numerical simulation of water-induced mud erosion in pore-scale sand-mud domains to model such mud erosion. The size of which is of the order of 100 micro meter. Water flow is simulated using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and mud surface is treated as solid boundary with arbitrary shape, which changes with time. Periodic boundary condition is adopted at the domain boundaries, except for the surface of mud layers and the upper side. Shear stress acting on the mud surface is calculated using a momentum-exchange method. Mud layer is eroded when the shear stress exceeds a threshold coined a critical shear stress. In this study, we compared the simulated mud erosion rate with experimental data acquired from an experiment using artificial sand-mud core. As a result, the simulated erosion rate agrees well with that of the experiment.

  3. Numerical Calculations of 3-D High-Lift Flows and Comparison with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, William B, III

    2015-01-01

    Solutions were obtained with the Navier-Stokes CFD code TLNS3D to predict the flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing, a high-lift wing composed of three elements: the main-wing element, a deployed leading-edge slat, and a deployed trailing-edge flap. Turbulence was modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. One case with massive separation was repeated using Menter's two-equation SST (Menter's Shear Stress Transport) k-omega turbulence model in an attempt to improve the agreement with experiment. The investigation was conducted at a free stream Mach number of 0.2, and at angles of attack ranging from 10.004 degrees to 34.858 degrees. The Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the wing was 4.3 x 10 (sup 6). Compared to experiment, the numerical procedure predicted the surface pressures very well at angles of attack in the linear range of the lift. However, computed maximum lift was 5% low. Drag was mainly under predicted. The procedure correctly predicted several well-known trends and features of high-lift flows, such as off-body separation. The two turbulence models yielded significantly different solutions for the repeated case.

  4. Enhanced remedial amendment delivery through fluid viscosity modifications: experiments and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L; Oostrom, M; Wietsma, T W; Covert, M A

    2008-10-23

    Low-permeability zones are typically bypassed when remedial fluids are injected into subsurface heterogeneous aquifer systems. Therefore, contaminants in the bypassed areas may not be contacted by the amendments in the remedial fluid, which may significantly prolong remediation operations. Laboratory experiments and numerical studies have been conducted to investigate the use of a shear-thinning polymer (Xanthan gum) to improve access to low-permeability zones in heterogeneous systems. The chemicals sodium mono-phosphate and the surfactant MA-80 were used as the remedial amendments. The impact of polymer concentration, fluid injection rate, and permeability contrast in the heterogeneous systems has been studied in a series of eleven two-dimensional flow cell experiments. The Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator was modified to include polymer-induced shear-thinning effects. The experimental and simulation results clearly show that using the polymer leads to an enhanced delivery of remedial amendments to lower-permeability zones and an increased sweeping efficiency. An added benefit of using the polymer is the stabilization of the displacing front when density differences exist between displaced and displacing fluids. The modified STOMP simulator was able to predict the experimental observed fluid displacing behavior well and might be used to predict subsurface remediation performance when a shear-thinning fluid is used to remediate a heterogeneous system at larger scales.

  5. Numerical experiment of cyclic layering in a solidified binary eutectic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toramaru, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Mitsuo

    2012-02-01

    In shallow magmatic intrusions, a characteristic layering structure (hereafter referred to as cyclic layering) can sometimes be observed. This cyclic layering is caused by double diffusion and crystallization kinetics, and different from what is observed as rhythmic layering caused by gravity. The cyclic layering is visualized as differential weathering in response to the differential stiffness caused by textural variations such as those in the volume fraction, number density, and size of vesicles or crystals. The spacing of layers seems to increase according to a geometric progression, like as in Liesegang bands of a diffusion-precipitation system. In order to understand the development condition for cyclic layering and the characteristics of textural variations, such as the spacing of layering in crystallized multi-component melts by conductive cooling, we carried out a numerical experiment on the 1D crystallization process of a binary eutectic melt. This simulation took into account the cooling from contact with country rock as well as the compositional and thermal diffusion and the kinetics of diffusion-limited crystallization. The governing equations include dimensionless control parameters describing the relative importance of thermal diffusion or compositional diffusion (Lewis number, Le) and the effective latent heat release (Stefan number, St). From the results of the numerical experiments, it was found that the layering develops through eutectic oscillation (compositional and thermal oscillation below the eutectic point), suggesting that the bi-activating condition, whereby both phases cooperatively activate their crystallization rates, is essential for the development of layering. No layering is observed at the margin, and the length of the region with no layering increases exponentially with decreasing St. The amplitude of textural oscillation decreases with decreasing St. Thus, practically no layering develops at small latent heat release. Three types

  6. Understanding magnetic remanence acquisition through combined synthetic sediment deposition experiments and numerical simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, D.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding depositional remanent magnetizations (DRMs) bears implications on interpreting paleomagnetic and paleointensity records extracted from sedimentary rocks. Laboratory deposition experiments have yielded DRMs with shallow remanent inclinations and revealed a field dependence of the magnetization (M), which is orders of magnitude lower than the saturation remanence. To investigate these observations further, experiments involving differently shaped particles were performed. Spherical particles confirmed the field dependence of both the inclination error and M and the fact that the DRM acquired experimentally is lower than saturation. A sediment concentration dependence of the inclination error was observed, indicating a dependance of the inclination error on the sediment load/burial depth or the sedimentation rate. Other outcome was the certainty that spherical particles alone can lead to substantial inclination shallowing. Numerical simulations of settling spherical particles indicated that DRM should be ~10 times lower than the saturation remanence and predicted that rolling of the grains on the sediment surface and particle interactions during settling can produce a substantial shallowing of the inclination and lowering of the remanence, bringing the simulations in close agreement to the experimental results. Experiments involving platy particles, instead allowed interesting comparisons and gave insight into the behavior of differently shaped particles, for instance yielding smaller amounts of shallowing than spheres, in contrast to general belief. Viewing DRM as an anisotropic process allows fitting the experimental results with tensors (kDRM). The ratios of kvertical over khorizontal are in good agreement to the ratios of M obtained in vertical over horizontal experimental fields, which should be equivalent to the widely used inclination shallowing factor f. Experimental results were highly repeatabile, however not always as repeatable for both M and

  7. Characterization of stony soils' hydraulic conductivity using laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Eléonore; Pichault, Mathieu; Pansak, Wanwisa; Degré, Aurore; Garré, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Determining soil hydraulic properties is of major concern in various fields of study. Although stony soils are widespread across the globe, most studies deal with gravel-free soils, so that the literature describing the impact of stones on the hydraulic conductivity of a soil is still rather scarce. Most frequently, models characterizing the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils assume that the only effect of rock fragments is to reduce the volume available for water flow, and therefore they predict a decrease in hydraulic conductivity with an increasing stoniness. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of rock fragments on the saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This was done by means of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations involving different amounts and types of coarse fragments. We compared our results with values predicted by the aforementioned predictive models. Our study suggests that it might be ill-founded to consider that stones only reduce the volume available for water flow. We pointed out several factors of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils that are not considered by these models. On the one hand, the shape and the size of inclusions may substantially affect the hydraulic conductivity. On the other hand, laboratory experiments show that an increasing stone content can counteract and even overcome the effect of a reduced volume in some cases: we observed an increase in saturated hydraulic conductivity with volume of inclusions. These differences are mainly important near to saturation. However, comparison of results from predictive models and our experiments in unsaturated conditions shows that models and data agree on a decrease in hydraulic conductivity with stone content, even though the experimental conditions did not allow testing for stone contents higher than 20 %.

  8. Single Droplet Combustion of Decane in Microgravity: Experiments and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Struk, P. M.; Ikegam, M.; Xu, G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data on single droplet combustion of decane in microgravity and compares the results to a numerical model. The primary independent experiment variables are the ambient pressure and oxygen mole fraction, pressure, droplet size (over a relatively small range) and ignition energy. The droplet history (D(sup 2) history) is non-linear with the burning rate constant increasing throughout the test. The average burning rate constant, consistent with classical theory, increased with increasing ambient oxygen mole fraction and was nearly independent of pressure, initial droplet size and ignition energy. The flame typically increased in size initially, and then decreased in size, in response to the shrinking droplet. The flame standoff increased linearly for the majority of the droplet lifetime. The flame surrounding the droplet extinguished at a finite droplet size at lower ambient pressures and an oxygen mole fraction of 0.15. The extinction droplet size increased with decreasing pressure. The model is transient and assumes spherical symmetry, constant thermo-physical properties (specific heat, thermal conductivity and species Lewis number) and single step chemistry. The model includes gas-phase radiative loss and a spherically symmetric, transient liquid phase. The model accurately predicts the droplet and flame histories of the experiments. Good agreement requires that the ignition in the experiment be reasonably approximated in the model and that the model accurately predict the pre-ignition vaporization of the droplet. The model does not accurately predict the dependence of extinction droplet diameter on pressure, a result of the simplified chemistry in the model. The transient flame behavior suggests the potential importance of fuel vapor accumulation. The model results, however, show that the fractional mass consumption rate of fuel in the flame relative to fuel vaporized is close to 1.0 for all but the lowest ambient oxygen mole

  9. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  10. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  11. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang-Kong; Dalvit, Diego A R

    2015-06-01

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. Finally, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials. PMID:25965703

  12. On 2D bisection method for double eigenvalue problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, X.

    1996-06-01

    The two-dimensional bisection method presented in (SIAM J. Matrix Anal. Appl. 13(4), 1085 (1992)) is efficient for solving a class of double eigenvalue problems. This paper further extends the 2D bisection method of full matrix cases and analyses its stability. As in a single parameter case, the 2D bisection method is very stable for the tridiagonal matrix triples satisfying the symmetric-definite condition. Since the double eigenvalue problems arise from two-parameter boundary value problems, an estimate of the discretization error in eigenpairs is also given. Some numerical examples are included. 42 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Design of the LRP airfoil series using 2D CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.; Vronsky, Tomas; Gaudern, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the design and wind tunnel testing of a high-Reynolds number, high lift airfoil series designed for wind turbines. The airfoils were designed using direct gradient- based numerical multi-point optimization based on a Bezier parameterization of the shape, coupled to the 2D Navier-Stokes flow solver EllipSys2D. The resulting airfoils, the LRP2-30 and LRP2-36, achieve both higher operational lift coefficients and higher lift to drag ratios compared to the equivalent FFA-W3 airfoils.

  14. Finite temperature corrections in 2d integrable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselle, M.; Hasenbusch, M.

    2002-09-01

    We study the finite size corrections for the magnetization and the internal energy of the 2d Ising model in a magnetic field by using transfer matrix techniques. We compare these corrections with the functional form recently proposed by Delfino and LeClair-Mussardo for the finite temperature behaviour of one-point functions in integrable 2d quantum field theories. We find a perfect agreement between theoretical expectations and numerical results. Assuming the proposed functional form as an input in our analysis we obtain a relevant improvement in the precision of the continuum limit estimates of both quantities.

  15. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang -Kong; Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    2015-05-12

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. In conclusion, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  16. Nomenclature for human CYP2D6 alleles.

    PubMed

    Daly, A K; Brockmöller, J; Broly, F; Eichelbaum, M; Evans, W E; Gonzalez, F J; Huang, J D; Idle, J R; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Ishizaki, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Meyer, U A; Nebert, D W; Steen, V M; Wolf, C R; Zanger, U M

    1996-06-01

    To standardize CYP2D6 allele nomenclature, and to conform with international human gene nomenclature guidelines, an alternative to the current arbitrary system is described. Based on recommendations for human genome nomenclature, we propose that alleles be designated by CYP2D6 followed by an asterisk and a combination of roman letters and arabic numerals distinct for each allele with the number specifying the key mutation and, where appropriate, a letter specifying additional mutations. Criteria for classification as a separate allele and protein nomenclature are also presented. PMID:8807658

  17. Numerical Experiments on Oxygen Plasma Focus: Scaling Laws of Soft X-Ray Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akel, M.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical experiments have been investigated on UNU/ICTP PFF low energy plasma focus device with oxygen filling gas. In these numerical experiments, the temperature window of 119-260 eV has been used as a suitable temperature range for generating oxygen soft X-rays. The Lee model was applied to characterize the UNU/ICTP PFF plasma focus. The optimum soft X-ray yield (Ysxr) was found to be 0.75 J, with the corresponding efficiency of about 0.03 % at pressure of 2.36 Torr and the end axial speed was va = 5 cm/μs. The practical optimum combination of p0, z0 and `a' for oxygen Ysxr was found to be 0.69 Torr, 4.8 cm and 2.366 cm respectively, with the outer radius b = 3.2 cm. This combination gives Ysxr ~ 5 J, with the corresponding efficiency of about 0.16 %. Thus we expect to increase the oxygen Ysxr of UNU/ICTP PFF, without changing the capacitor bank, merely by changing the electrode configuration and operating pressure. Scaling laws on oxygen soft X-ray yield, in terms of storage energies E0, peak discharge current Ipeak and focus pinch current Ipinch were found over the range from 1 kJ to 1 MJ. It was found that the oxygen soft X-ray yields scale well with and for the low inductance (L0 = 30 nH) (where yields are in J and currents in kA). While the soft X-ray yield scaling laws in terms of storage energies were found to be as (E0 in kJ and Ysxr in J) with the scaling showing gradual deterioration as E0 rises over the range. The oxygen soft X-ray yield emitted from plasma focus is found to be about 8.7 kJ for storage energy of 1 MJ. The optimum efficiency for soft X-ray yield (1.1 %) is with capacitor bank energy of 120 kJ. This indicates that oxygen plasma focus is a good soft X-ray source when properly designed.

  18. Numerical experiments in semiclassical laser-cooling theory of multistate atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanainen, Juha

    1992-11-01

    We describe a numerical implementation of our semiclassical laser-cooling theory [J. Javanainen, Phys. Rev. A 44, 5857 (1991)] for an arbitrary multilevel atom and light field. There is satisfactory agreement between experiments and temperatures obtained from Langevin-equation simulations of the motion of an atom subject to light-pressure force and the accompanying diffusion in three-dimensional (3D) optical molasses in which there are three orthogonal pairs of counterpropagating waves with a common linear polarization for the two beams in a pair, but orthogonal polarizations between the pairs. However, the velocity distribution of the atoms is anisotropic and may deviate strongly from a Gaussian, heterodyne spectra may have a sideband, and the atomic density may be a maximum at the maximum of the potential of the dipole forces of the molasses beams. Subsequent velocity-linearized analysis of atomic damping and diffusion shows that the damping tensor may have a negative eigenvalue corresponding to heating in large regions of space, even though the light is red tuned for cooling. It is also found that the position-averaged damping and diffusion tensors make a poor predictor of the temperature obtained in Langevin-equation simulations and real experiments. Based on additional simulations of a simple 1D model, we formulate a hypothesis that connects our findings. The key idea is that an atom trapped in a minimum of the potential of the dipole forces is subject to a weaker-than-average damping, and therefore tends to boil out of the trap.

  19. Numerical Experiments on the Two-step Emergence of Twisted Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T.

    2011-07-01

    We present the new results of the two-dimensional numerical experiments on the cross-sectional evolution of a twisted magnetic flux tube rising from the deeper solar convection zone (-20,000 km) to the corona through the surface. The initial depth is 10 times deeper than most of the previous calculations focusing on the flux emergence from the uppermost convection zone. We find that the evolution is illustrated by the following two-step process. The initial tube rises due to its buoyancy, subject to aerodynamic drag due to the external flow. Because of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field, the tube maintains its coherency and does not deform to become a vortex roll pair. When the flux tube approaches the photosphere and expands sufficiently, the plasma on the rising tube accumulates to suppress the tube's emergence. Therefore, the flux decelerates and extends horizontally beneath the surface. This new finding owes to our large-scale simulation, which simultaneously calculates the dynamics within the interior as well as above the surface. As the magnetic pressure gradient increases around the surface, magnetic buoyancy instability is triggered locally and, as a result, the flux rises further into the solar corona. We also find that the deceleration occurs at a higher altitude than assumed in our previous experiment using magnetic flux sheets. By conducting parametric studies, we investigate the conditions for the two-step emergence of the rising flux tube: field strength >~ 1.5 × 104 G and the twist >~ 5.0 × 10-4 km-1 at -20,000 km depth.

  20. NUMERICAL EXPERIMENTS ON THE TWO-STEP EMERGENCE OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T.

    2011-07-10

    We present the new results of the two-dimensional numerical experiments on the cross-sectional evolution of a twisted magnetic flux tube rising from the deeper solar convection zone (-20,000 km) to the corona through the surface. The initial depth is 10 times deeper than most of the previous calculations focusing on the flux emergence from the uppermost convection zone. We find that the evolution is illustrated by the following two-step process. The initial tube rises due to its buoyancy, subject to aerodynamic drag due to the external flow. Because of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field, the tube maintains its coherency and does not deform to become a vortex roll pair. When the flux tube approaches the photosphere and expands sufficiently, the plasma on the rising tube accumulates to suppress the tube's emergence. Therefore, the flux decelerates and extends horizontally beneath the surface. This new finding owes to our large-scale simulation, which simultaneously calculates the dynamics within the interior as well as above the surface. As the magnetic pressure gradient increases around the surface, magnetic buoyancy instability is triggered locally and, as a result, the flux rises further into the solar corona. We also find that the deceleration occurs at a higher altitude than assumed in our previous experiment using magnetic flux sheets. By conducting parametric studies, we investigate the conditions for the two-step emergence of the rising flux tube: field strength {approx}> 1.5 x 10{sup 4} G and the twist {approx}> 5.0 x 10{sup -4} km{sup -1} at -20,000 km depth.

  1. Analysis of the Source Physics Experiment SPE4 Prime Using State-Of Parallel Numerical Tools.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, O.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.; Glenn, L.

    2015-12-01

    This work describes a methodology used for large scale modeling of wave propagation from underground chemical explosions conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) fractured granitic rock. We show that the discrete natures of rock masses as well as the spatial variability of the fabric of rock properties are very important to understand ground motions induced by underground explosions. In order to build a credible conceptual model of the subsurface we integrated the geological, geomechanical and geophysical characterizations conducted during recent test at the NNSS as well as historical data from the characterization during the underground nuclear test conducted at the NNSS. Because detailed site characterization is limited, expensive and, in some instances, impossible we have numerically investigated the effects of the characterization gaps on the overall response of the system. We performed several computational studies to identify the key important geologic features specific to fractured media mainly the joints characterized at the NNSS. We have also explored common key features to both geological environments such as saturation and topography and assess which characteristics affect the most the ground motion in the near-field and in the far-field. Stochastic representation of these features based on the field characterizations has been implemented into LLNL's Geodyn-L hydrocode. Simulations were used to guide site characterization efforts in order to provide the essential data to the modeling community. We validate our computational results by comparing the measured and computed ground motion at various ranges for the recently executed SPE4 prime experiment. We have also conducted a comparative study between SPE4 prime and previous experiments SPE1 and SPE3 to assess similarities and differences and draw conclusions on designing SPE5.

  2. Numerical experiments on consistent horizontal and vertical resolution for atmospheric models and observing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.; Lindzen, Richard S.

    1992-01-01

    Simple numerical experiments are performed in order to determine the effects of inconsistent combinations of horizontal and vertical resolution in both atmospheric models and observing systems. In both cases, we find that inconsistent spatial resolution is associated with enhanced noise generation. A rather fine horizontal resolution in a satellite data observing system seems to be excessive when combined with the usually available relatively coarse vertical resolution. Using different strength horizontal filters, adjusted in such a way as to render the effective horizontal resolution more consistent with vertical resolution for the observing system, may result in improvement of the analysis accuracy. However, the increase of vertical resolution for a satellite data observing system is desirable. For the conventional data observing system with better vertically resolved data, the results are different in that little or no horizontal filtering is needed to make spatial resolution more consistent for the system. The obtained experimental estimates of consistent vertical and effective horizontal resolution are in a general agreement with consistent resolution estimates previously derived theoretically by the authors.

  3. Numerical experiments on consistent horizontal and vertical resolution for atmospheric models and observing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.; Lindzen, Richard S.

    1993-01-01

    Simple numerical experiments are performed in order to determine the effects of inconsistent combinations of horizontal and vertical resolution in both atmospheric models and observing systems. In both cases, we find that inconsistent spatial resolution is associated with enhanced noise generation. A rather fine horizontal resolution in a satellite-data observing system seems to be excessive when combined with the usually available relatively coarse vertical resolution. Using horizontal filters of different strengths, adjusted in such a way as to render the effective horizontal resolution more consistent with vertical resolution for the observing system, may result in improvement of the analysis accuracy. The increase of vertical resolution for a satellite data observing system with better vertically resolved data, the results are different in that little or no horizontal filtering is needed to make spatial resolution more consistent for the system. The obtained experimental estimates of consistent vertical and effective horizontal resolution are in a general agreement with consistent resolution estimates previously derived theoretically by the authors.

  4. On the generation of sound by turbulent convection. I - A numerical experiment. [in solar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Thomas J.; Cattaneo, Fausto; Malagoli, Andrea

    1993-01-01

    Motivated by the problem of the origin of the solar p-modes, we study the generation of acoustic waves by turbulent convection. Our approach uses the results of high-resolution 3D simulations as the experimental basis for our investigation. The numerical experiment describes the evolution of a horizontally periodic layer of vigorously convecting fluid. The sound is measured by a procedure, based on a suitable linearization of the equations of compressible convection that allows the amplitude of the acoustic field to be determined. Through this procedure we identify unambiguously some 400 acoustic modes. The total energy of the acoustic field is found to be a fraction of a percent of the kinetic energy of the convection. The amplitudes of the observed modes depend weakly on (horizontal) wavenumber but strongly on frequency. The line widths of the observed modes typically exceed the natural linewidths of the modes as inferred from linear theory. This broadening appears to be related to the (stochastic) interaction between the modes and the underlying turbulence which causes abrupt, episodic events during which the phase coherence of the modes is lost.

  5. Impacts of land-use change on catchment sediment connectivity: a numerical experiment using CAESAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Wiel, Marco; Coulthard, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sediment connectivity is not implemented explicitly in most process-based landscape evolution models. Instead it is an emergent dynamic resulting from the iterated interactions between local sediment transport processes which are explicitly formalized in the models. This study investigates sediment connectivity as an emergent dynamic, using the CAESAR landscape evolution model. The numerical experiment focuses on the upper catchment of the River Swale, UK. Three hypothetical land-use scenarios are simulated, each with a slightly different land-use configuration: one where the whole catchment is assumed to be fully forested and two where the catchment is partially deforested to grassland. Analysing and contrasting differences in simulated erosion and deposition patterns between these scenarios illustrates how land-use changes in one part of the landscape can affect sediment processes in another part. Results indicate that this type of sediment connectivity, driven by land-use change, indeed emerges in the simulations and that it operates in both downstream and upstream directions.

  6. Dynamics of soil water evaporation during soil drying: laboratory experiment and numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3. PMID:24489492

  7. Numerical studies and metric development for validation of magnetohydrodynamic models on the HIT-SI experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.; Victor, B.; Morgan, K.; Hossack, A.; Sutherland, D.; Jarboe, T.; Nelson, B. A.; Marklin, G.

    2015-05-15

    We present application of three scalar metrics derived from the Biorthogonal Decomposition (BD) technique to evaluate the level of agreement between macroscopic plasma dynamics in different data sets. BD decomposes large data sets, as produced by distributed diagnostic arrays, into principal mode structures without assumptions on spatial or temporal structure. These metrics have been applied to validation of the Hall-MHD model using experimental data from the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive helicity injection experiment. Each metric provides a measure of correlation between mode structures extracted from experimental data and simulations for an array of 192 surface-mounted magnetic probes. Numerical validation studies have been performed using the NIMROD code, where the injectors are modeled as boundary conditions on the flux conserver, and the PSI-TET code, where the entire plasma volume is treated. Initial results from a comprehensive validation study of high performance operation with different injector frequencies are presented, illustrating application of the BD method. Using a simplified (constant, uniform density and temperature) Hall-MHD model, simulation results agree with experimental observation for two of the three defined metrics when the injectors are driven with a frequency of 14.5 kHz.

  8. Numerical Hindcast Experiments for Study Tropical Convections and MJO Events during Year of Tropical Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, J.; Tao, W.; Shen, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is the dominant component of intraseasonal variability in the tropic. It interacts and influences a wide range of weather and climate phenomena across different temporal and spatial scales. Despite the important role the MJO plays in the weather and climate system, past multi-model MJO intercomparison studies have shown that current global general circulation models (GCMs) still have considerable shortcomings in representing and forecasting this phenomenon. To improve representation of MJO and tropical convective cloud systems in global model, an Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) in which a cloud-resolving model takes the place of the sing-column cumulus parameterization used in convectional GCMs has been successfully developed at NAAS Goddard (Tao et al. 2009). To evaluate and improve the ability of this modeling system in representation and prediction of the MJO, several numerical hindcast experiments of a few selected MJO events during YOTC have been carried out. The ability of the model to simulate the MJO events is examined using diagnostic and skill metrics developed by the CLIVAR MJO Working Group Project as well as comparisons with a high-resolution global mesoscale model simulations, satellite observations, and analysis dataset. Several key variables associated with the MJO are investigated, including precipitation, outgoing longwave radiation, large-scale circulation, surface latent heat flux, low-level moisture convergence, vertical structure of moisture and hydrometers, and vertical diabatic heating profiles to gain insight of cloud processes associated with the MJO events.

  9. Numerical Experiments in Complex Hæmodynamic Flows. Non-Newtonian Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basombrío, Fernando G.; Dari, Enzo A.; Buscaglia, Gustavo C.; Feijóo, Raúl A.

    Numerical experiments for non-trivial flows, close to realistic situations in hæmodynamics, are described and interpreted. Two geometries have been selected: an axisymmetric corrugated tube (with periodic boundary conditions) and a 3D bifurcation with an obstructed end (anastomosis). Results concern sensitivity of errors associated to the time-step size and mesh refinement, but essentially consist of the quantitative estimation of non-Newtonian effects based on Casson's rheological model, treated in retarded form. The time-step lag of such effects is the main reason for evaluating the sensitivity of errors. Due to the high computational cost characterizing the problems to be faced, we expect that the present results will be useful when real geometries should be modeled. The main conclusions are that non-Newtonian effects may be relevant (especially for secondary flows) and that, in most cases, for the same level of errors the use of Casson's law does not generate excessive additional computational costs. Thus, within this strategy, the user can accurately solve the problem using this rheological model without having to worry if the non-Newtonian effects are important or not.

  10. Nonlinear ultrasonic waves in bubbly liquids with nonhomogeneous bubble distribution: Numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear propagation of ultrasonic waves in mixtures of air bubbles in water, but for which the bubble distribution is nonhomogeneous. The problem is modelled by means of a set of differential equations which describes the coupling of the acoustic field and bubbles vibration, and solved in the time domain via the use and adaptation of the SNOW-BL code. The attenuation and nonlinear effects are assumed to be due to the bubbles exclusively. The nonhomogeneity of the bubble distribution is introduced by the presence of bubble layers (or clouds) which can act as acoustic screens, and alters the behaviour of the ultrasonic waves. The effect of the spatial distribution of bubbles on the nonlinearity of the acoustic field is analyzed. Depending on the bubble density, dimension, shape, and position of the layers, its effects on the acoustic field change. Effects such as shielding and resonance of the bubbly layers are especially studied. The numerical experiments are carried out in two configurations: linear and nonlinear, i.e. for low and high excitation pressure amplitude, respectively, and the features of the phenomenon are compared. The parameters of the medium are chosen such as to reproduce air bubbly water involved in the stable cavitation process.

  11. What can large-scale magnetohydrodynamic numerical experiments tell us about coronal heating?

    PubMed

    Peter, H

    2015-05-28

    The upper atmosphere of the Sun is governed by the complex structure of the magnetic field. This controls the heating of the coronal plasma to over a million kelvin. Numerical experiments in the form of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations are used to investigate the intimate interaction between magnetic field and plasma. These models allow one to synthesize the coronal emission just as it would be observed by real solar instrumentation. Large-scale models encompassing a whole active region form evolving coronal loops with properties similar to those seen in extreme ultraviolet light from the Sun, and reproduce a number of average observed quantities. This suggests that the spatial and temporal distributions of the heating as well as the energy distribution of individual heat deposition events in the model are a good representation of the real Sun. This provides evidence that the braiding of fieldlines through magneto-convective motions in the photosphere is a good concept to heat the upper atmosphere of the Sun.

  12. What can large-scale magnetohydrodynamic numerical experiments tell us about coronal heating?

    PubMed

    Peter, H

    2015-05-28

    The upper atmosphere of the Sun is governed by the complex structure of the magnetic field. This controls the heating of the coronal plasma to over a million kelvin. Numerical experiments in the form of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations are used to investigate the intimate interaction between magnetic field and plasma. These models allow one to synthesize the coronal emission just as it would be observed by real solar instrumentation. Large-scale models encompassing a whole active region form evolving coronal loops with properties similar to those seen in extreme ultraviolet light from the Sun, and reproduce a number of average observed quantities. This suggests that the spatial and temporal distributions of the heating as well as the energy distribution of individual heat deposition events in the model are a good representation of the real Sun. This provides evidence that the braiding of fieldlines through magneto-convective motions in the photosphere is a good concept to heat the upper atmosphere of the Sun. PMID:25897097

  13. Numerical simulations of recent proton acceleration experiments with sub-100 TW laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Recent experiments carried out at the Italian National Research Center, National Optics Institute Department in Pisa, are showing interesting results regarding maximum proton energies achievable with sub-100 TW laser systems. While laser systems are being continuously upgraded in laboratories around the world, at the same time a new trend on stabilizing and making ion acceleration results reproducible is growing in importance. Almost all applications require a beam with fixed performance, so that the energy spectrum and the total charge exhibit moderate shot to shot variations. This result is surely far from being achieved, but many paths are being explored in order to reach it. Some of the reasons for this variability come from fluctuations in laser intensity and focusing, due to optics instability. Other variation sources come from small differences in the target structure. The target structure can vary substantially, when it is impacted by the main pulse, due to the prepulse duration and intensity, the shape of the main pulse and the total energy deposited. In order to qualitatively describe the prepulse effect, we will present a two dimensional parametric scan of its relevant parameters. A single case is also analyzed with a full three dimensional simulation, obtaining reasonable agreement between the numerical and the experimental energy spectrum.

  14. Numerical and laboratory experiments on the dynamics of plume-ridge interaction. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, C.; Gable, C.W.

    1995-09-01

    Mantle plumes and passive upwelling beneath ridges are the two dominant modes of mantle transport and thermal/chemical fluxing between the Earth`s deep interior and surface. While plumes and ridges independently contribute to crustal accretion, they also interact and the dispersion of plumes within the upper mantle is strongly modulated by mid-ocean ridges. The simplest mode of interaction, with the plume centered on the ridge, has been well documented and modeled. The remaining question is how plumes and ridges interact when the plume is located off-axis; it has been suggested that a pipeline-like flow from the off-axis plume to the ridge axis at the base of the rigid lithosphere may develop. Mid-ocean ridges migrating away from hot mantle plumes can be affected by plume discharges over long times and ridge migration distances. Salient feature of this model is that off-axis plumes communicate with the ridge through a channel resulting from the refraction and dispersion of an axi-symmetric plume conduit along the base of the sloping lithosphere. To test the dynamics of this model, a series of numerical and laboratory dynamic experiments on the problem of a fixed ridge and an off-axis buoyant upwelling were conducted. Results are discussed.

  15. Dynamics of soil water evaporation during soil drying: laboratory experiment and numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3.

  16. Numerical simulation of the operation of the GPR experiment on NETLANDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletti, V.; Martinat, B.; Reineix, A.; Berthelier, J. J.; Ney, R.

    2003-02-01

    The first objective of the Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) experiment on NETLANDER is to investigate the geological structures of the Martian subsurface. The aim of this paper is to present initial results obtained in the first phase of a long-term effort to build a numerical model of the GPR operation on Mars and test dedicated signal-processing algorithms on the simulated data. The simulation is based on the use of a Finite Difference Time Domain method, and we have pointed out some of its advantages that allow us to take into account complex features of the underground. This model has given reliable estimates of the power budget of the radar for a simple but still representative model of the Martian subsurface. In addition, several detailed features such as gradients and roughness at the interfaces were introduced to appraise their possible influence on the GPR performances. In the frame of a simplified geometry of both the GPR antennas and the various underground interfaces, a simple and first-order method was developed and tested on simulated data to show the ability of the GPR to retrieve a three-dimensional distribution of the underground reflectors. Based on this model, and even with some rather crude hypothesis on the subsurface electromagnetic characteristics, information on the direction and distances of the reflectors has been retrieved with a satisfactory approximation.

  17. Secretory pathways generating immunosuppressive NKG2D ligands

    PubMed Central

    Baragaño Raneros, Aroa; Suarez-Álvarez, Beatriz; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Natural Killer Group 2 member D (NKG2D) activating receptor, present on the surface of various immune cells, plays an important role in activating the anticancer immune response by their interaction with stress-inducible NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL) on transformed cells. However, cancer cells have developed numerous mechanisms to evade the immune system via the downregulation of NKG2DL from the cell surface, including the release of NKG2DL from the cell surface in a soluble form. Here, we review the mechanisms involved in the production of soluble NKG2DL (sNKG2DL) and the potential therapeutic strategies aiming to block the release of these immunosuppressive ligands. Therapeutically enabling the NKG2D-NKG2DL interaction would promote immunorecognition of malignant cells, thus abrogating disease progression. PMID:25050215

  18. Computing 2D constrained delaunay triangulation using the GPU.

    PubMed

    Qi, Meng; Cao, Thanh-Tung; Tan, Tiow-Seng

    2013-05-01

    We propose the first graphics processing unit (GPU) solution to compute the 2D constrained Delaunay triangulation (CDT) of a planar straight line graph (PSLG) consisting of points and edges. There are many existing CPU algorithms to solve the CDT problem in computational geometry, yet there has been no prior approach to solve this problem efficiently using the parallel computing power of the GPU. For the special case of the CDT problem where the PSLG consists of just points, which is simply the normal Delaunay triangulation (DT) problem, a hybrid approach using the GPU together with the CPU to partially speed up the computation has already been presented in the literature. Our work, on the other hand, accelerates the entire computation on the GPU. Our implementation using the CUDA programming model on NVIDIA GPUs is numerically robust, and runs up to an order of magnitude faster than the best sequential implementations on the CPU. This result is reflected in our experiment with both randomly generated PSLGs and real-world GIS data having millions of points and edges.

  19. Science-Based Approach for Advancing Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy: Integrating Numerical Simulations with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Kang, S.; Chamorro, L. P.; Hill, C.

    2011-12-01

    experimentally in the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory Main Channel. The experiments and simulations are compared with each other and shown to be in very good agreement both in terms of the mean flow and the turbulence statistics. The results are analyzed to study the structure of turbulence in the wake of the turbine and also identify the effects of turbulent fluctuations in the approach flow on the power produced by the turbine. Overall our results make a strong case that high-resolution numerical modeling, validated with detailed laboratory measurements, is a viable tool for assessing and optimizing the performance of MHK devices.

  20. Shear-driven particle size segregation: Models, analysis, numerical solutions, and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Lindsay Bard Hilbert

    , we find a layer of small particles below a layer of large particles. We also measure a velocity profile from the Couette cell experimental data, which provides parameters used to derive the solution of the initial boundary value problem. The initial condition for the partial differential equation corresponds to the one dimensional initial configuration of the experiment. We solve two initial boundary value problems, one with a piecewise linear shear rate and one with an exponential shear rate, where the parameters for both cases are derived from the experimental data. In each case, we use the method of characteristics to solve the initial boundary value problem. In both cases, almost all pieces of the solution can be explicitly calculated, and those that cannot are calculated numerically. In the piecewise linear case, there is a material interface across which the characteristic speed jumps; in the exponential case, the characteristics are curved. We compare the model with the exponential shear rate to the experimental data. The model solution is the volume fraction of small particles at time t and location z. We cannot measure the volume fraction locally in the experiment; instead, we map the volume fraction to a theoretical height which we compare to the experimental experimental height data. The height of the sample is an indirect measurement of the amount of mixing or segregation. We conclude that the model captures qualitative features of the experimental data, but there are features of the experiment that the current version of the model does not describe.

  1. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  2. Numerical experiments with an implicit particle filter for the shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souopgui, I.; Chorin, A. J.; Hussaini, M.

    2012-12-01

    The estimation of initial conditions for the shallow water equations for a given set of later data is a well known test problem for data assimilation codes. A popular approach to this problem is the variational method (4D-Var), i.e. the computation of the mode of the posterior probability density function (pdf) via the adjoint technique. Here, we improve on 4D-Var by computing the conditional mean (the minimum least square error estimator) rather than the mode (a biased estimator) and we do so with implicit sampling, a Monte Carlo (MC) importance sampling method. The idea in implicit sampling is to first search for the high-probability region of the posterior pdf and then to find samples in this region. Because the samples are concentrated in the high-probability region, fewer samples are required than with competing MC schemes. The search for the high-probability region can be implemented by a minimization that is very similar to the minimization in 4D-Var, and we make use of a 4D-Var code in our implementation. The samples are obtained by solving algebraic equations with a random right-hand-side. These equations can be solved efficiently, so that the additional cost of our approach, compared to traditional 4D-Var, is small. The long-term goal is to assimilate experimental data, obtained with the CORIOLIS turntable in Grenoble (France), to study the drift of a vortex. We present results from numerical twin experiments as a first step towards our long-term goal. We discretize the shallow water equations on a square domain (2.5m× 2.5m) using finite differences on a staggered grid of size 28× 28 and a fourth order Runge-Kutta. We assume open boundary conditions and estimate the initial state (velocities and surface height) given noisy observations of the state. We solve the optimization problem using a 4D-Var code that relies on a L-BFGS method; the random algebraic equations are solved with random maps, i.e. we look for solutions in given, but random, directions

  3. Electrodynamics of Axisymmetric Pulsar Magnetosphere with Electron-Positron Discharge: A Numerical Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Alexander Y.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2014-11-01

    We present the first self-consistent global simulations of pulsar magnetospheres with operating e ± discharge. We focus on the simple configuration of an aligned or anti-aligned rotator. The star is spun up from a zero (vacuum) state to a high angular velocity, and we follow the coupled evolution of its external electromagnetic field and plasma particles using the "particle-in-cell" method. A plasma magnetosphere begins to form through the extraction of particles from the star; these particles are accelerated by the rotation-induced electric field, producing curvature radiation and igniting e ± discharge. We follow the system evolution for several revolution periods, longer than required to reach a quasi-steady state. Our numerical experiment puts to test previous ideas for the plasma flow and gaps in the pulsar magnetosphere. We first consider rotators capable of producing pairs out to the light cylinder through photon-photon collisions. We find that their magnetospheres are similar to the previously obtained force-free solutions with a Y-shaped current sheet. The magnetosphere continually ejects e ± pairs and ions. Pair creation is sustained by a strong electric field along the current sheet. We observe powerful curvature and synchrotron emission from the current sheet, consistent with Fermi observations of gamma-ray pulsars. We then study pulsars that can only create pairs in the strong-field region near the neutron star, well inside the light cylinder. We find that both aligned and anti-aligned rotators relax to the "dead" state with suppressed pair creation and electric currents, regardless of the discharge voltage.

  4. Characterization of stony soils' hydraulic conductivity using laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichault, M.; Beckers, E.; Degré, A.; Garré, S.

    2015-10-01

    Determining soil hydraulic properties is of major concern in various fields of study. Though stony soils are widespread across the globe, most studies deal with gravel-free soils so that the literature describing the impact of stones on soil's hydraulic conductivity is still rather scarce. Most frequently, models characterizing the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils assume that the only effect of rock fragments is to reduce the volume available for water flow and therefore they predict a decrease in hydraulic conductivity with an increasing stoniness. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of rock fragments on the saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This was done by means of laboratory and numerical experiments involving different amounts and types of coarse fragments. We compared our results with values predicted by the aforementioned models. Our study suggests that considering that stones only reduce the volume available for water flow might be ill-founded. We pointed out several drivers of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils, not considered by these models. On the one hand, the shape and the size of inclusions may substantially affect the hydraulic conductivity. On the other hand, the presence of rock fragments can counteract and even overcome the effect of a reduced volume in some cases. We attribute this to the creation of voids at the fine earth-stone interface. Nevertheless, these differences are mainly important near to saturation. However, we come up with a more nuanced view regarding the validity of the models under unsaturated conditions. Indeed, under unsaturated conditions, the models seem to represent the hydraulic behaviour of stones reasonably well.

  5. Numerical experiments on possible impact of substorms on energetic electrons in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Y.; Fok, M. C. H.; Tanaka, T.

    2014-12-01

    The abrupt reconstruction of the outer radiation belt is often observed after substorms, and is believed to result from internal acceleration or external transport. The internal acceleration is thought to take place outside the plasmapause through Doppler shifted cyclotron resonance, or relativistic turning acceleration with whistler mode chorus waves. Electrons are thought to be accelerated by the waves when characteristic pitch angle distribution, hard energy spectrum and earthward gradient of phase space density are identified, but it seems that direct observational evidence for the energy transfer from waves to electrons has not been explicitly provided. The external transport is thought to take place when electrons are accelerated by strong electric fields. We have solved bounce-averaged drift transport equations under the electric and magnetic fields given by the recently developed global MHD simulation. We reproduced the sequence of a substorm, and determined onset as a sudden decrease in the AL index and a sudden increase in the ionospheric conductivity (a proxy of aurora). Near the onset, a strong electric field is formed in the inner magnetosphere in a longitudinally narrow region with a thickness of the order of earth radius (Re), which rapidly transported relativistic electrons inward. Simultaneously, keV electrons were also injected inward, which may become a seed of relativistic electrons. Temperature anisotropy becomes large near the leading edge of the injected hot electrons. As the plasmapause shrinks, the ratio of the plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency becomes small outside the plasmapause, which may favor the growth of chorus waves. We estimated the evolution of the phase space density of electrons due to the interaction with chorus waves under the assumption that the wave amplitude is small. We will demonstrate the results of numerical experiments on the energy spectrum, pitch angle distribution and radial gradient of the phase space

  6. Numerical Experiments Into the Style of Accretion and Megathrust Behavior Along the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, S. M.; Ghisetti, F.; Barnes, P.; Reyes, A. G.; Fagereng, A.; Henrys, F.; Barker, D. H. N.; Henrys, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    GPS data show that the northern portion of the Hikurangi subduction thrust fault beneath the eastern North Island of New Zealand is creeping steadily, while the southern segment is locked and appears capable of producing great earthquakes. This change is mirrored by variations in fluid chemistry from springs and seeps, with faster fluid expulsion and less water-rock interaction in the central and northern margin compared to the southern margin. Wedge morphology and deformation also change along-strike, with a wide accretionary imbricate wedge in southern and central Hikurangi transitioning to a non-accreting, steep wedge in the north that experiences periodic subduction erosion from seamount subduction. We use results from restoration of depth-converted seismic sections along the margin to constrain the initial conditions for numerical models that link mechanical wedge development to fluid flow. These models are used to investigate the effect of sediment inputs, lower plate roughness (including seamounts), and fracture permeability on megathrust strength. We test model predictions for wedge morphology, fault development, and fluid-flow rates along localised pathways over time against current wedge structure and fluid chemistry. Our preliminary results show that the central and southern Hikurangi accretionary wedges approximate growth of a critical wedge geometry, while northern Hikurangi margin morphology episodically cycles as seamounts enter the margin. Sediment subducted around the seamounts provides a fluid source that can drive fluid overpressure on and around the subduction interface. Whether this overpressure causes significant frictional weakening of the megathrust depends on the development of fracture permeability and its interactions with upper plate faults. To produce high rates of fluid flow consistent with fluid chemistry in the central and northern margin, significant permeable pathways must develop, locally limiting megathrust overpressure.

  7. ELECTRODYNAMICS OF AXISYMMETRIC PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE WITH ELECTRON-POSITRON DISCHARGE: A NUMERICAL EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Alexander Y.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2014-11-01

    We present the first self-consistent global simulations of pulsar magnetospheres with operating e {sup ±} discharge. We focus on the simple configuration of an aligned or anti-aligned rotator. The star is spun up from a zero (vacuum) state to a high angular velocity, and we follow the coupled evolution of its external electromagnetic field and plasma particles using the ''particle-in-cell'' method. A plasma magnetosphere begins to form through the extraction of particles from the star; these particles are accelerated by the rotation-induced electric field, producing curvature radiation and igniting e {sup ±} discharge. We follow the system evolution for several revolution periods, longer than required to reach a quasi-steady state. Our numerical experiment puts to test previous ideas for the plasma flow and gaps in the pulsar magnetosphere. We first consider rotators capable of producing pairs out to the light cylinder through photon-photon collisions. We find that their magnetospheres are similar to the previously obtained force-free solutions with a Y-shaped current sheet. The magnetosphere continually ejects e {sup ±} pairs and ions. Pair creation is sustained by a strong electric field along the current sheet. We observe powerful curvature and synchrotron emission from the current sheet, consistent with Fermi observations of gamma-ray pulsars. We then study pulsars that can only create pairs in the strong-field region near the neutron star, well inside the light cylinder. We find that both aligned and anti-aligned rotators relax to the ''dead'' state with suppressed pair creation and electric currents, regardless of the discharge voltage.

  8. A Cylindrical, Inner Volume Selecting 2D-T2-Prep Improves GRAPPA-Accelerated Image Quality in MRA of the Right Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Coristine, Andrew J.; Yerly, Jerome; Stuber, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background Two-dimensional (2D) spatially selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses may be used to excite restricted volumes. By incorporating a "pencil beam" 2D pulse into a T2-Prep, one may create a "2D-T2-Prep" that combines T2-weighting with an intrinsic outer volume suppression. This may particularly benefit parallel imaging techniques, where artefacts typically originate from residual foldover signal. By suppressing foldover signal with a 2D-T2-Prep, image quality may therefore improve. We present numerical simulations, phantom and in vivo validations to address this hypothesis. Methods A 2D-T2-Prep and a conventional T2-Prep were used with GRAPPA-accelerated MRI (R = 1.6). The techniques were first compared in numerical phantoms, where per pixel maps of SNR (SNRmulti), noise, and g-factor were predicted for idealized sequences. Physical phantoms, with compartments doped to mimic blood, myocardium, fat, and coronary vasculature, were scanned with both T2-Preparation techniques to determine the actual SNRmulti and vessel sharpness. For in vivo experiments, the right coronary artery (RCA) was imaged in 10 healthy adults, using accelerations of R = 1,3, and 6, and vessel sharpness was measured for each. Results In both simulations and phantom experiments, the 2D-T2-Prep improved SNR relative to the conventional T2-Prep, by an amount that depended on both the acceleration factor and the degree of outer volume suppression. For in vivo images of the RCA, vessel sharpness improved most at higher acceleration factors, demonstrating that the 2D-T2-Prep especially benefits accelerated coronary MRA. Conclusion Suppressing outer volume signal with a 2D-T2-Prep improves image quality particularly well in GRAPPA-accelerated acquisitions in simulations, phantoms, and volunteers, demonstrating that it should be considered when performing accelerated coronary MRA. PMID:27736866

  9. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  10. Along-axis transition between narrow and wide rifts: Insights from 3D numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptev, Alexander; Calais, Eric; Burov, Evgueni; Leroy, Sylvie; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Based on performed high-resolution rheologically consistent three-dimensional thermo-mechanical numerical models, we show that there is a significant difference in the influence of the rheological profile on rifting style in the case of dominant active (plume-activated) rifting compared to dominant passive (far-field tectonic stresses) rifting. Narrow rifting, conventionally attributed to cold strong lithosphere in passive rifting mode, may develop in weak hot ultra-stretched lithosphere during active rifting, after plume impingement on a tectonically pre-stressed lithosphere. In that case, initially ultra-wide small-amplitude rift patterns focus, in a few Myr, in large-scale faults that form a narrow rift. Also, wide rifting may develop during ultra-slow spreading of strong lithosphere, and "switch" to the narrow rifting upon plume impingement. For further understanding the mechanisms behind the interactions between the mantle plume and far-field stresses in case of realistic horizontally heterogeneous lithosphere, we have tested our models on the case of the central East African Rift system (EARS). The EARS south of the Ethiopian Rift Valley bifurcates in two branches (eastern, magma-rich and western, magma-poor) surrounding the strong Tanzanian craton. Broad zones of low seismic velocity observed throughout the upper mantle beneath the central part of the EARS are consistent with the spreading of a deep mantle plume. The extensional features and topographic expression of the Eastern rift varies significantly north-southward: in northern Kenya the area of deformation is very wide (some 150-250 km in E-W direction), to the south the rift narrows to 60-70 km, yet further to the south this localized deformation widens again. Here we investigate this transition between localized and wide rifting using thermo-mechanical numerical modeling that couples, in a dynamic sense, the rise of the upper mantle material with the deformation of the African lithosphere below the

  11. Assessment of the Influence of Fractures on the Dynamics of Coal Seam Fires by Numerical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuttke, Manfred W.; Zeng, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    Uncontrolled burning coal seam fires still constitute major problems for the coal industry by destroying the resource, a serious hazard for the local people by severe environmental pollution, and a tremendous threat to the global environment by the emission of greenhouse gases and aerosols. In particular when the seams are lying shallow the alteration of the immediate surrounding of the coal seam fire feeds back on the dynamics of the fire. Thermal stress induced fracturing produces direct connections of the fire zone with the atmosphere. This influences the supply with oxygen, the venting of the exhaust gases, and the dissipation of heat. The first two processes are expected to enhance the fire propagation whereas the latter effect should slow it down. With our dedicated coal seam fire code ACME ("Amendable Coal-fire Modeling Exercise") we study these coupled effects of fractures in simulations of typical coal seam fire scenarios based on data from Xinjiang, China. Fractures are predefined as 1D/2D objects in a 2D/3D model geometry and are opened depending on the passage of the heat wave produced by the coal seam fire.

  12. Is 2-D turbulence relevant in the atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, Shaun; Schertzer, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Starting with (Taylor, 1935), the paradigm of isotropic (and scaling!) turbulence was developed initially for laboratory applications, but following (Kolmogorov, 1941), three dimensional isotropic turbulence was progressively applied to the atmosphere. Since the atmosphere is strongly stratified, a single wide scale range model which is both isotropic and scaling is not possible so that theorists had to immediately choose between the two symmetries: isotropy or scale invariance. Following the development of models of two dimensional isotropic turbulence ((Fjortoft, 1953), but especially (Kraichnan, 1967) and (Charney, 1971)), the mainstream choice was to first make the convenient assumption of isotropy and to drop wide range scale invariance. Starting at the end of the 1970's this "isotropy primary" (IP) paradigm has lead to a series of increasingly complex isotropic 2D/isotropic 3D models of atmospheric dynamics which continue to dominate the theoretical landscape. Justifications for IP approaches have focused almost exclusively on the horizontal statistics of the horizontal wind in both numerical models and analyses and from aircraft campaigns, especially the highly cited GASP (Nastrom and Gage, 1983), (Gage and Nastrom, 1986; Nastrom and Gage, 1985) and MOZAIC (Cho and Lindborg, 2001) experiments. Since understanding the anisotropy clearly requires comparisons between horizontal and vertical statistics/structures this focus has been unfortunate. Over the same thirty year period that 2D/3D isotropic models were being elaborated, evidence slowly accumulated in favour of the opposite theoretical choice: to drop the isotropy assumption but to retain wide range scaling. The models in the alternative paradigm are scaling but strongly anisotropic with vertical sections of structures becoming increasingly stratified at larger and larger scales albeit in a power law manner; we collectively refer to these as "SP" for "scaling primary" approaches. Early authors explicitly

  13. A parallel splitting wavelet method for 2D conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Alex A.; Kozakevicius, Alice J.; Jakobsson, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The current work presents a parallel formulation using the MPI protocol for an adaptive high order finite difference scheme to solve 2D conservation laws. Adaptivity is achieved at each time iteration by the application of an interpolating wavelet transform in each space dimension. High order approximations for the numerical fluxes are computed by ENO and WENO schemes. Since time evolution is made by a TVD Runge-Kutta space splitting scheme, the problem is naturally suitable for parallelization. Numerical simulations and speedup results are presented for Euler equations in gas dynamics problems.

  14. Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalajian, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many…

  15. Investigating Lava Properties using Experiments, Video Analysis, Infrared Thermometry and Numerical Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, E.; Spiegelman, M.; Karson, J.; Wysocki, R.

    2012-12-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of lava provide primary controls on lava flow behavior and are critical parameters in flow simulations. However, these properties are difficult to measure at field conditions or correctly extrapolate from the scale of small-size samples. We address this challenge by conducting controlled experiments using lab-made, meter scale basaltic lava flows and carefully monitoring their cooling and deformation using high spatial and temporal resolution video and infrared cameras. Our experimental setup is part of the Syracuse University Lava Project (\\url{http://lavaproject.syr.edu}) and includes a large furnace capable of melting up to 450 kg of basalt at temperatures well above the basalt liquidus. The lava is poured onto tilted planes or channels made of sand, steel, clay or gravel, to produce meters-long flows. This experimental setup is probably the only facility that allows such large scale controlled lava flows made of natural basaltic material. We record the motion of the lava using a high-resolution video camera placed directly above the flows, and the temperature using forward-looking infrared (FLIR) cameras and thermocouples. After the experiments, we analyze the images for lava deformation and cooling behavior. We compare the observations with numerical forward-models to constrain the thermal and rheological parameters and laws which best describe the lava. For the video analysis, we employ the technique of differential optical flow, which uses the time-variations of the spatial gradients of the image intensity to estimate velocity between consecutive frames. An important benefit for using optical flow, compared with other velocimetry methods, is that it outputs a spatially coherent flow field rather than point measurements. We demonstrate that the optical flow results agree with other measures of the flow velocity, and estimate the error due to noise and time-variability to be under 30 percent of the measured velocity. Our

  16. Flow-induced 2D protein crystallization: characterization of the coupled interfacial and bulk flows.

    PubMed

    Young, James E; Posada, David; Lopez, Juan M; Hirsa, Amir H

    2015-05-14

    Two-dimensional crystallization of the protein streptavidin, crystallizing below a biotinylated lipid film spread on a quiescent air-water interface is a well studied phenomenon. More recently, 2D crystallization induced by a shearing interfacial flow has been observed at film surface pressures significantly lower than those required in a quiescent system. Here, we quantify the interfacial and bulk flow associated with 2D protein crystallization through numerical modeling of the flow along with a Newtonian surface model. Experiments were conducted over a wide range of conditions resulting in a state diagram delineating the flow strength required to induce crystals for various surface pressures. Through measurements of the velocity profile at the air-water interface, we found that even in the cases where crystals are formed, the macroscopic flow at the interface is well described by the Newtonian model. However, the results show that even in the absence of any protein in the system, the viscous response of the biotinylated lipid film is complicated and strongly dependent on the strength of the flow. This observation suggests that the insoluble lipid film plays a key role in flow-induced 2D protein crystallization.

  17. Numerical Predictions of Wind Turbine Power and Aerodynamic Loads for the NREL Phase II and IV Combined Experiment Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duque, Earl P. N.; Johnson, Wayne; vanDam, C. P.; Chao, David D.; Cortes, Regina; Yee, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Accurate, reliable and robust numerical predictions of wind turbine rotor power remain a challenge to the wind energy industry. The literature reports various methods that compare predictions to experiments. The methods vary from Blade Element Momentum Theory (BEM), Vortex Lattice (VL), to variants of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RaNS). The BEM and VL methods consistently show discrepancies in predicting rotor power at higher wind speeds mainly due to inadequacies with inboard stall and stall delay models. The RaNS methodologies show promise in predicting blade stall. However, inaccurate rotor vortex wake convection, boundary layer turbulence modeling and grid resolution has limited their accuracy. In addition, the inherently unsteady stalled flow conditions become computationally expensive for even the best endowed research labs. Although numerical power predictions have been compared to experiment. The availability of good wind turbine data sufficient for code validation experimental data that has been extracted from the IEA Annex XIV download site for the NREL Combined Experiment phase II and phase IV rotor. In addition, the comparisons will show data that has been further reduced into steady wind and zero yaw conditions suitable for comparisons to "steady wind" rotor power predictions. In summary, the paper will present and discuss the capabilities and limitations of the three numerical methods and make available a database of experimental data suitable to help other numerical methods practitioners validate their own work.

  18. Noninvasive deep Raman detection with 2D correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Min; Park, Hyo Sun; Cho, Youngho; Jin, Seung Min; Lee, Kang Taek; Jung, Young Mee; Suh, Yung Doug

    2014-07-01

    The detection of poisonous chemicals enclosed in daily necessaries is prerequisite essential for homeland security with the increasing threat of terrorism. For the detection of toxic chemicals, we combined a sensitive deep Raman spectroscopic method with 2D correlation analysis. We obtained the Raman spectra from concealed chemicals employing spatially offset Raman spectroscopy in which incident line-shaped light experiences multiple scatterings before being delivered to inner component and yielding deep Raman signal. Furthermore, we restored the pure Raman spectrum of each component using 2D correlation spectroscopic analysis with chemical inspection. Using this method, we could elucidate subsurface component under thick powder and packed contents in a bottle.

  19. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of the methyl radical isotopomers, CH3, CH2D, CHD2 and CD3: synergy between VUV synchrotron radiation experiments and explicitly correlated coupled cluster calculations.

    PubMed

    Cunha de Miranda, Bárbara K; Alcaraz, Christian; Elhanine, Mohamed; Noller, Bastian; Hemberger, Patrick; Fischer, Ingo; Garcia, Gustavo A; Soldi-Lose, Héloïse; Gans, Bérenger; Mendes, Luiz A Vieira; Boyé-Péronne, Séverine; Douin, Stéphane; Zabka, Jan; Botschwina, Peter

    2010-04-15

    Threshold photoelectron spectra (TPES) of the isotopomers of the methyl radical (CH(3), CH(2)D, CHD(2), and CD(3)) have been recorded in the 9.5-10.5 eV VUV photon energy range using third generation synchrotron radiation to investigate the vibrational spectroscopy of the corresponding cations at a 7-11 meV resolution. A threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) spectrometer based on velocity map imaging and Wiley-McLaren time-of-flight has been used to simultaneously record the TPES of several radical species produced in a Ar-seeded beam by dc flash-pyrolysis of nitromethane (CH(x)D(y)NO(2), x + y = 3). Vibrational bands belonging to the symmetric stretching and out-of-plane bending modes have been observed and P, Q, and R branches have been identified in the analysis of the rotational profiles. Vibrational configuration interaction (VCI), in conjunction with near-equilibrium potential energy surfaces calculated by the explicitly correlated coupled cluster method CCSD(T*)-F12a, is used to calculate vibrational frequencies for the four radical isotopomers and the corresponding cations. Agreement with data from high-resolution IR spectroscopy is very good and a large number of predictions is made. In particular, the calculated wavenumbers for the out-of-plane bending vibrations, nu(2)(CH(3)(+)) = 1404 cm(-1), nu(4)(CH(2)D(+)) = 1308 cm(-1), nu(4)(CHD(2)(+)) = 1205 cm(-1), and nu(2)(CD(3)(+)) = 1090 cm(-1), should be accurate to ca. 2 cm(-1). Additionally, computed Franck-Condon factors are used to estimate the importance of autoionization relative to direct ionization. The chosen models globally account for the observed transitions, but in contrast to PES spectroscopy, evidence for rotational and vibrational autoionization is found. It is shown that state-selected methyl cations can be produced by TPEPICO spectroscopy for ion-molecule reaction studies, which are very important for the understanding of the planetary ionosphere chemistry. PMID:20218643

  20. Quantum dynamics of H2, D2, and HD in the small dodecahedral cage of clathrate hydrate: evaluating H2-water nanocage interaction potentials by comparison of theory with inelastic neutron scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minzhong; Sebastianelli, Francesco; Bacić, Zlatko

    2008-06-28

    We have performed rigorous quantum five-dimensional (5D) calculations and analysis of the translation-rotation (T-R) energy levels of one H(2), D(2), and HD molecule inside the small dodecahedral (H(2)O)(20) cage of the structure II clathrate hydrate, which was treated as rigid. The H(2)- cage intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) used previously in the molecular dynamics simulations of the hydrogen hydrates [Alavi et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 024507 (2005)] was employed. This PES, denoted here as SPC/E, combines an effective, empirical water-water pair potential [Berendsen et al., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987)] and electrostatic interactions between the partial charges placed on H(2)O and H(2). The 5D T-R eigenstates of HD were calculated also on another 5D H(2)-cage PES denoted PA-D, used by us earlier to investigate the quantum T-R dynamics of H(2) and D(2) in the small cage [Xu et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 24806 (2006)]. In the PA-D PES, the hydrogen-water pair potential is described by the ab initio 5D PES of the isolated H(2)-H(2)O dimer. The quality of the SPC/E and the PA-D H(2)-cage PESs was tested by direct comparison of the T-R excitation energies calculated on them to the results of two recent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) studies of H(2) and HD inside the small clathrate cage. The translational fundamental and overtone excitations, as well as the triplet splittings of the j=0-->j=1 rotational transitions, of H(2) and HD in the small cage calculated on the SPC/E PES agree very well with the INS results and represent a significant improvement over the results computed on the PA-D PES. Our calculations on the SPC/E PES also make predictions about several spectroscopic observables for the encapsulated H(2), D(2), and HD, which have not been measured yet. PMID:18601373

  1. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  2. Laboratory-scale experiments and numerical modeling of cosolvent flushing of multi-component NAPLs in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Agaoglu, Berken; Scheytt, Traugott; Copty, Nadim K

    2012-10-01

    This study examines the mechanistic processes governing multiphase flow of a water-cosolvent-NAPL system in saturated porous media. Laboratory batch and column flushing experiments were conducted to determine the equilibrium properties of pure NAPL and synthetically prepared NAPL mixtures as well as NAPL recovery mechanisms for different water-ethanol contents. The effect of contact time was investigated by considering different steady and intermittent flow velocities. A modified version of multiphase flow simulator (UTCHEM) was used to compare the multiphase model simulations with the column experiment results. The effect of employing different grid geometries (1D, 2D, 3D), heterogeneity and different initial NAPL saturation configurations was also examined in the model. It is shown that the change in velocity affects the mass transfer rate between phases as well as the ultimate NAPL recovery percentage. The experiments with low flow rate flushing of pure NAPL and the 3D UTCHEM simulations gave similar effluent concentrations and NAPL cumulative recoveries. Model simulations over-estimated NAPL recovery for high specific discharges and rate-limited mass transfer, suggesting a constant mass transfer coefficient for the entire flushing experiment may not be valid. When multi-component NAPLs are present, the dissolution rate of individual organic compounds (namely, toluene and benzene) into the ethanol-water flushing solution is found not to correlate with their equilibrium solubility values. PMID:23010548

  3. Simulated KWAJEX Convective Systems Using a 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model and Their Comparisons with Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, Chung-Lin; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    The 1999 Kwajalein Atoll field experiment (KWAJEX), one of several major TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) field experiments, has successfully obtained a wealth of information and observation data on tropical convective systems over the western Central Pacific region. In this paper, clouds and convective systems that developed during three active periods (Aug 7-12, Aug 17-21, and Aug 29-Sep 13) around Kwajalein Atoll site are simulated using both 2D and 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) models. Based on numerical results, the clouds and cloud systems are generally unorganized and short lived. These features are validated by radar observations that support the model results. Both the 2D and 3D simulated rainfall amounts and their stratiform contribution as well as the heat, water vapor, and moist static energy budgets are examined for the three convective episodes. Rainfall amounts are quantitatively similar between the two simulations, but the stratiform contribution is considerably larger in the 2D simulation. Regardless of dimension, fo all three cases, the large-scale forcing and net condensation are the two major physical processes that account for the evolution of the budgets with surface latent heat flux and net radiation solar and long-wave radiation)being secondary processes. Quantitative budget differences between 2D and 3D as well as between various episodes will be detailed.Morover, simulated radar signatures and Q1/Q2 fields from the three simulations are compared to each other and with radar and sounding observations.

  4. 2D materials: to graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2011-01-01

    This review is an attempt to illustrate the different alternatives in the field of 2D materials. Graphene seems to be just the tip of the iceberg and we show how the discovery of alternative 2D materials is starting to show the rest of this iceberg. The review comprises the current state-of-the-art of the vast literature in concepts and methods already known for isolation and characterization of graphene, and rationalizes the quite disperse literature in other 2D materials such as metal oxides, hydroxides and chalcogenides, and metal-organic frameworks.

  5. Focusing surface wave imaging with flexible 2D array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyuan; Fu, Junqiang; Li, Zhe; Xu, Chunguang; Xiao, Dingguo; Wang, Shaohan

    2016-04-01

    Curved surface is widely exist in key parts of energy and power equipment, such as, turbine blade cylinder block and so on. Cycling loading and harsh working condition of enable fatigue cracks appear on the surface. The crack should be found in time to avoid catastrophic damage to the equipment. A flexible 2D array transducer was developed. 2D Phased Array focusing method (2DPA), Mode-Spatial Double Phased focusing method (MSDPF) and the imaging method using the flexible 2D array probe are studied. Experiments using these focusing and imaging method are carried out. Surface crack image is obtained with both 2DPA and MSDPF focusing method. It have been proved that MSDPF can be more adaptable for curved surface and more calculate efficient than 2DPA.

  6. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  7. Sparse radar imaging using 2D compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingkai; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zengping; Su, Shaoying

    2014-10-01

    Radar imaging is an ill-posed linear inverse problem and compressed sensing (CS) has been proved to have tremendous potential in this field. This paper surveys the theory of radar imaging and a conclusion is drawn that the processing of ISAR imaging can be denoted mathematically as a problem of 2D sparse decomposition. Based on CS, we propose a novel measuring strategy for ISAR imaging radar and utilize random sub-sampling in both range and azimuth dimensions, which will reduce the amount of sampling data tremendously. In order to handle 2D reconstructing problem, the ordinary solution is converting the 2D problem into 1D by Kronecker product, which will increase the size of dictionary and computational cost sharply. In this paper, we introduce the 2D-SL0 algorithm into the reconstruction of imaging. It is proved that 2D-SL0 can achieve equivalent result as other 1D reconstructing methods, but the computational complexity and memory usage is reduced significantly. Moreover, we will state the results of simulating experiments and prove the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  8. Ultrafast 2D NMR: an emerging tool in analytical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry--from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  9. Electron transport and energy degradation in the ionosphere: Evaluation of the numerical solution, comparison with laboratory experiments and auroral observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Lilensten, J.

    1994-01-01

    Auroral electron transport calculations are a critical part of auroral models. We evaluate a numerical solution to the transport and energy degradation problem. The numerical solution is verified by reproducing simplified problems to which analytic solutions exist, internal self-consistency tests, comparison with laboratory experiments of electron beams penetrating a collision chamber, and by comparison with auroral observations, particularly the emission ratio of the N2 second positive to N2(+) first negative emissions. Our numerical solutions agree with range measurements in collision chambers. The calculated N(2)2P to N2(+)1N emission ratio is independent of the spectral characteristics of the incident electrons, and agrees with the value observed in aurora. Using different sets of energy loss cross sections and different functions to describe the energy distribution of secondary electrons that emerge from ionization collisions, we discuss the uncertainties of the solutions to the electron transport equation resulting from the uncertainties of these input parameters.

  10. ELLIPT2D: A Flexible Finite Element Code Written Python

    SciTech Connect

    Pletzer, A.; Mollis, J.C.

    2001-03-22

    The use of the Python scripting language for scientific applications and in particular to solve partial differential equations is explored. It is shown that Python's rich data structure and object-oriented features can be exploited to write programs that are not only significantly more concise than their counter parts written in Fortran, C or C++, but are also numerically efficient. To illustrate this, a two-dimensional finite element code (ELLIPT2D) has been written. ELLIPT2D provides a flexible and easy-to-use framework for solving a large class of second-order elliptic problems. The program allows for structured or unstructured meshes. All functions defining the elliptic operator are user supplied and so are the boundary conditions, which can be of Dirichlet, Neumann or Robbins type. ELLIPT2D makes extensive use of dictionaries (hash tables) as a way to represent sparse matrices.Other key features of the Python language that have been widely used include: operator over loading, error handling, array slicing, and the Tkinter module for building graphical use interfaces. As an example of the utility of ELLIPT2D, a nonlinear solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation is computed using a Newton iterative scheme. A second application focuses on a solution of the toroidal Laplace equation coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic stability code, a problem arising in the context of magnetic fusion research.

  11. Appropriate solid-body models as initial conditions for SPH-based numerical collision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, C.; Maindl, T. I.; Dvorak, R.; Schäfer, C.; Speith, R.

    2016-02-01

    Providing the simulation algorithm with suitable initial conditions is a crucial first step in almost all numerical computations, except for the most trivial cases. Even the most sophisticated simulation program will not produce meaningful results if not started with an appropriate initial configuration, satisfying demands like isotropy, a low level of noise and physical accuracy. Some of these requirements are unique to Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) - the numerical method considered here - others are of fundamental relevance, independent of the chosen numerical technique. The main focus of this work lies on considerations concerning initial conditions for subsequent SPH simulation runs. The geometrical arrangement of an initial SPH particle setup is discussed, particularly w.r.t. regular lattice configurations and associated symmetry effects. In order to avoid unphysical behavior the initial particle configuration has to be in a relaxed (i.e. equilibrated) state where necessary. This is of particular importance for simulations of giant collisions, where the involved bodies naturally exhibit a hydrostatic internal structure. Beyond the common numerical procedure, a semi-analytical approach for relaxation is introduced and validated, practically eliminating the need for spending significant amounts of valuable computing time solely for the production of a relaxed initial state in a lot of situations. Finally the basic relevance of relaxation itself is studied, focusing on collision simulations in different mass ranges important in the context of planet formation and the transport of water.

  12. Shell-and-tube type latent heat thermal energy storage: numerical analysis and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösler, Fabian; Brüggemann, Dieter

    2011-08-01

    The melting process of industrial grade paraffin wax inside a shell-and-tube storage is analyzed by means of numerical simulation and experimental results. For this purpose, the enthalpy porosity method is extended by a continuous liquid fraction function. The extended method is tested using results gained from a gallium melt test inside a rectangular enclosure.

  13. Linking Physical and Numerical Modelling in Hydrogeology Using Sand Tank Experiments and Comsol Multiphysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singha, Kamini; Loheide, Steven P., II

    2011-01-01

    Visualising subsurface processes in hydrogeology and building intuition for how these processes are controlled by changes in forcing is hard for many undergraduate students. While numerical modelling is one way to help undergraduate students explore outcomes of multiple scenarios, many codes are not user-friendly with respect to defining domains,…

  14. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  15. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  16. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  17. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  18. Mixing-to-eruption timescales: an integrated model combining numerical simulations and high-temperature experiments with natural melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagna, Chiara; Perugini, Diego; De Campos, Christina; Longo, Antonella; Dingwell, Donald Bruce; Papale, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Arrival of magma from depth into shallow reservoirs and associated mixing processes have been documented as possible triggers of explosive eruptions. Quantifying the timing from beginning of mixing to eruption is of fundamental importance in volcanology in order to put constraints about the possible onset of a new eruption. Here we integrate numerical simulations and high-temperature experiment performed with natural melts with the aim to attempt identifying the mixing-to-eruption timescales. We performed two-dimensional numerical simulations of the arrival of gas-rich magmas into shallow reservoirs. We solve the fluid dynamics for the two interacting magmas evaluating the space-time evolution of the physical properties of the mixture. Convection and mingling develop quickly into the chamber and feeding conduit/dyke. Over time scales of hours, the magmas in the reservoir appear to have mingled throughout, and convective patterns become harder to identify. High-temperature magma mixing experiments have been performed using a centrifuge and using basaltic and phonolitic melts from Campi Flegrei (Italy) as initial end-members. Concentration Variance Decay (CVD), an inevitable consequence of magma mixing, is exponential with time. The rate of CVD is a powerful new geochronometer for the time from mixing to eruption/quenching. The mingling-to-eruption time of three explosive volcanic eruptions from Campi Flegrei (Italy) yield durations on the order of tens of minutes. These results are in perfect agreement with the numerical simulations that suggest a maximum mixing time of a few hours to obtain a hybrid mixture. We show that integration of numerical simulation and high-temperature experiments can provide unprecedented results about mixing processes in volcanic systems. The combined application of numerical simulations and CVD geochronometer to the eruptive products of active volcanoes could be decisive for the preparation of hazard mitigation during volcanic unrest.

  19. Why homogeneous boundary conditions lead to heterogeneous internal strain in analogue simple shear experiments - explained by numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner, Ulrike; Frehner, Marcel; Mancktelow, Neil S.; Grujic, Djordje

    2010-05-01

    Analogue modeling of geological structures, investigating for example the rotation and interaction of rigid or weak inclusions in a matrix, single layer folding, or fold interference patterns, commonly employs a linear simple shear or general shear rig. While the boundaries of such deformation rigs theoretically prescribe a homogeneous isochoric (plane strain) flow, the internal deformation pattern of the analogue material (paraffin wax or silicone putties) may strongly deviate from the intended homogeneous strain conditions. For example, in simple shear experiments (x-y-coordinate system, simple shear in x-direction) the following observations can be made: (1) Close to model boundaries initially parallel to the y-direction of the apparatus a prominent deflection of passive marker lines develops during the experiment, indicating a strong perturbation strain. (2) The central part of the model rotates with the opposite sense of rotation compared to the imposed vorticity, documented by the imposed marker grid. We employ two-dimensional numerical finite element models to investigate the observed deviation from a homogeneous simple shear flow field in simple shear rig experiments. A Newtonian rheology is used to represent the analogue material. We tested different boundary conditions that do not represent perfect simple shear boundary conditions, but could possibly be present in analogue experiments. The numerical results show that neither traction-free slip nor free surface boundary conditions at the four walls, nor any combination of these boundary conditions produces the deformation pattern observed in analogue experiments. Therefore, we conclude that the imposed boundary conditions at the walls of the analogue rigs are not the reason for the observed heterogeneous strain field. In analogue experiments, the analogue material commonly lies on top of a weak viscous material (e.g. vaseline) or is sandwiched between two layers of such a material. These layers are also

  20. Direct Numerical Simulation of Fracture Behaviour for Random Short Wood Fibres Reinforced Composites, Comparison with Digital Image Correlation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, M.; Touchard, F.; Bezine, G.; Brillaud, J.

    2010-06-01

    The work is to predict fracture behaviour of bio-composites from the tensile properties of its components. In this work, we have realized a direct numerical simulation of fracture behaviour for random short spruce fibers reinforced composites. For calculations, wood fibers have been considered as linear elastic bodies, polypropylene matrix as an elastic-plastic material. Then, numerical results have been compared with experimental results that have been obtained by digital image correlation. This comparison indicates that random fiber FE model of random short spruce fibers reinforced composites can be able to fairly reflect the influence of random fibers microstructure in the composite on its fracture behavior. The calculation of both random fiber and homogeneous FE model and their comparison with experiments show that the average values of J-integral in a region in the front of the crack tip from both numerical FE models are in good agreement with the average J value of DIC experiment in the same region when the numerical and experimental CT specimens of the short spruce fiber reinforced composite are subjected to the same extension at their loading point.

  1. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  2. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  3. Benchmark experiments and numerical modelling of the columnar-equiaxed dendritic growth in the transparent alloy Neopentylglycol-(d)Camphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturz, L.; Wu, M.; Zimmermann, G.; Ludwig, A.; Ahmadein, M.

    2015-06-01

    Solidification benchmark experiments on columnar and equiaxed dendritic growth, as well as the columnar-equiaxed transition have been carried out under diffusion-dominated conditions for heat and mass transfer in a low-gravity environment. The system under investigation is the transparent organic alloy system Neopentylglycol-37.5wt.-%(d)Camphor, processed aboard a TEXUS sounding rocket flight. Solidifications was observed by standard optical methods in addition to measurements of the thermal fields within the sheet like experimental cells of 1 mm thickness. The dendrite tip kinetic, primary dendrite arm spacing, temporal and spatial temperature evolution, columnar tip velocity and the critical parameters at the CET have been analysed. Here we focus on a detailed comparison of the experiment “TRACE” with a 5-phase volume averaging model to validate the numerical model and to give insight into the corresponding physical mechanisms and parameters leading to CET. The results are discussed in terms of sensitivity versus numerical parameters.

  4. Glitter in a 2D monolayer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-10-21

    We predict a highly stable and robust atomically thin gold monolayer with a hexagonal close packed lattice stabilized by metallic bonding with contributions from strong relativistic effects and aurophilic interactions. We have shown that the framework of the Au monolayer can survive 10 ps MD annealing simulations up to 1400 K. The framework is also able to survive large motions out of the plane. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk we observe significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.94 vs. 0.52 eV per bond). This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. It is a non-magnetic metal, and was found to be the global minima in the 2D space. Phonon dispersion calculations demonstrate high kinetic stability with no negative modes. This 2D gold monolayer corresponds to the top monolayer of the bulk Au(111) face-centered cubic lattice. The close-packed lattice maximizes the aurophilic interactions. We find that the electrons are completely delocalized in the plane and behave as 2D nearly free electron gas. We hope that the present work can inspire the experimental fabrication of novel free standing 2D metal systems.

  5. 2d index and surface operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadde, Abhijit; Gukov, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we compute the superconformal index of 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theories. The 2d superconformal index, a.k.a. flavored elliptic genus, is computed by a unitary matrix integral much like the matrix integral that computes the 4d superconformal index. We compute the 2d index explicitly for a number of examples. In the case of abelian gauge theories we see that the index is invariant under flop transition and under CY-LG correspondence. The index also provides a powerful check of the Seiberg-type duality for non-abelian gauge theories discovered by Hori and Tong. In the later half of the paper, we study half-BPS surface operators in = 2 super-conformal gauge theories. They are engineered by coupling the 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theory living on the support of the surface operator to the 4d = 2 theory, so that different realizations of the same surface operator with a given Levi type are related by a 2d analogue of the Seiberg duality. The index of this coupled system is computed by using the tools developed in the first half of the paper. The superconformal index in the presence of surface defect is expected to be invariant under generalized S-duality. We demonstrate that it is indeed the case. In doing so the Seiberg-type duality of the 2d theory plays an important role.

  6. Wettability effect on capillary trapping of supercritical CO2 at pore-scale: micromodel experiment and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Wan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Wettability of reservoir minerals along pore surfaces plays a controlling role in capillary trapping of supercritical (sc) CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. The mechanisms controlling scCO2 residual trapping are still not fully understood. We studied the effect of pore surface wettability on CO2 residual saturation at the pore-scale using engineered high pressure and high temperature micromodel (transparent pore networks) experiments and numerical modeling. Through chemical treatment of the micromodel pore surfaces, water-wet, intermediate-wet, and CO2-wet micromodels can be obtained. Both drainage and imbibition experiments were conducted at 8.5 MPa and 45 °C with controlled flow rate. Dynamic images of fluid-fluid displacement processes were recorded using a microscope with a CCD camera. Residual saturations were determined by analysis of late stage imbibition images of flow path structures. We performed direct numerical simulations of the full Navier-Stokes equations using a volume-of-fluid based finite-volume framework for the primary drainage and the followed imbibition for the micromodel experiments with different contact angles. The numerical simulations agreed well with our experimental observations. We found that more scCO2 can be trapped within the CO2-wet micromodel whereas lower residual scCO2 saturation occurred within the water-wet micromodels in both our experiments and the numerical simulations. These results provide direct and consistent evidence of the effect of wettability, and have important implications for scCO2 trapping in geologic carbon sequestration.

  7. Strain localisation in two-phase materials: Insights from centimetre-scale numerical models and laboratory experiments with ice mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, S.; Czaplinska, D.; Piazolo, S.; Wilson, C. J. L.; Quinteros, J.

    2015-12-01

    Most numerical models of lithosphere deformation approximate the rheological behavior of polymineralic crust and mantle via single-phase flow laws assuming that the weakest or most abundant material controls the bulk rheology. However, previous work showed that in two phase aggregates the bulk viscosity of the dominant phase is significantly affected by second phase particles. Here we combine two unconventional approaches to quantify the relative impact of such particles on strain localisation and bulk response: (1) We run centimetre-scale numerical models of a matrix with inclusions using the elasto-visco-plastic FEM software Slim3D. Recrystallization-induced weakening processes in the matrix, i.e. grain boundary migration and nucleation, are approximated using strain-dependent viscous softening. (2) We conduct high T, constant strain rate deformation experiments with a matrix of deuterated ice (D2O) containing rigid or soft particles, i.e. calcite and graphite, respectively. Ice is a valuable rock analogue, as it replicates the microstructural and fabric changes as well as the non-Newtonian response of other anisotropic minerals, such as olivine and quartz. The laboratory experiments exhibit two types of rheological behaviour: stress partitioning between ice and particles and strain localization in rheologically softer material. To quantify the contribution of both response types, we calibrate numerical simulations with data derived from laboratory experiments. The strain rate, stress, and viscosity evolution of the numerical experiment provides insight to non-linear strain localization processes, particle motion and time-dependent stress concentrations during the deformation. We fit the parameters of the viscous softening function and thereby quantify the amount of additional weakening in the matrix of ice mixtures in comparison to pure ice, which allows to constrain softening parameters used in large-scale simulations of glacial flow and lithosphere deformation.

  8. Numerical experiments and field results on the size of steady state plumes.

    PubMed

    Maier, U; Grathwohl, P

    2006-05-01

    Contaminated groundwater poses a serious risk for drinking water supplies. Under certain conditions, however, groundwater contamination remains restricted to a tolerable extent because of natural attenuation processes. We present an innovative approach to evaluate the size of these so-called steady-state plumes by 2-D and 1-D modelling in homogeneous aquifers. If longitudinal mixing is negligible, scenarios can be modelled in a simplified way using a 1-D domain vertical to the direction of flow. We analysed the sensitivity of the plume length with respect to biodegradation kinetics, flow velocity, transverse vertical dispersivity alphat, the source and aquifer geometry and reaction stoichiometry. Our findings indicate that for many readily biodegradable compounds transverse-dispersive mixing rather than reaction kinetics is the limiting factor for natural attenuation. Therefore, if alphat, aquifer and source geometry and concentrations of electron acceptors and donors are known, the length of the steady state contaminant plume can be predicted. The approach is validated under field conditions for an ammonium plume at a former landfill site in SW Germany.

  9. Numerical Analyses and Experiments on the Characteristics of Ball-Type Constant-Velocity Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Kei; Nagatani, Haruo; Imoto, Masayuki; Kohara, Takeshi

    Ball-type constant-velocity joints are extremely important components of the front wheel drive systems of cars. However the method to analyze the characteristics of this type of joint has not been established. The authors previously presented papers on the analysis based on statics, in that no frictional forces inside the joints were taken into account. Recently the authors presented advanced analysis based on dynamics, in which the frictional forces were considered. In this paper the numerical analyses of a ball fixed joint (BJ) and a double offset joint (DOJ) used for the front wheel drive of a car are carried out using the simultaneous equations induced in the former analysis and the simultaneous differential equations induced in the latter analysis. Contact forces acting inside DOJ are measured using piezoelectric sensors. The results of the numerical analyses based on dynamics show better coincidence with the measured value than those based on statics.

  10. Localized vortices in a nonlinear shallow water model: examples and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisel, S. A.; Tolchennikov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Exact solutions of the system of nonlinear shallow water equations on paraboloid are constructed by the method of group analysis. These solutions describe fast wave motion of the fluid layer and slow evolution of symmetric localized vortices. Explicit formulae are obtained for asymptotic solution related to the linear shallow water approximation. Numerical methods are used by the modeling the trajectory of the vortex center in the case of asymmetric vortices.

  11. Rheological Properties of Quasi-2D Fluids in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; Trittel, Torsten; Eremin, Alexey; Harth, Kirsten; Clark, Noel; Maclennan, Joseph; Glaser, Matthew; Park, Cheol; Hall, Nancy; Tin, Padetha

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, research on complex fluids and fluids in restricted geometries has attracted much attention in the scientific community. This can be attributed not only to the development of novel materials based on complex fluids but also to a variety of important physical phenomena which have barely been explored. One example is the behavior of membranes and thin fluid films, which can be described by two-dimensional (2D) rheology behavior that is quite different from 3D fluids. In this study, we have investigated the rheological properties of freely suspended films of a thermotropic liquid crystal in microgravity experiments. This model system mimics isotropic and anisotropic quasi 2D fluids [46]. We use inkjet printing technology to dispense small droplets (inclusions) onto the film surface. The motion of these inclusions provides information on the rheological properties of the films and allows the study of a variety of flow instabilities. Flat films have been investigated on a sub-orbital rocket flight and curved films (bubbles) have been studied in the ISS project OASIS. Microgravity is essential when the films are curved in order to avoid sedimentation. The experiments yield the mobility of the droplets in the films as well as the mutual mobility of pairs of particles. Experimental results will be presented for 2D-isotropic (smectic-A) and 2D-nematic (smectic-C) phases.

  12. Numerical Experiments with a Turbulent Single-Mode Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    2000-04-01

    Direct numerical simulation is a powerful tool for studying turbulent flows. Unfortunately, it is also computationally expensive and often beyond the reach of the largest, fastest computers. Consequently, a variety of turbulence models have been devised to allow tractable and affordable simulations of averaged flow fields. Unfortunately, these present a variety of practical difficulties, including the incorporation of varying degrees of empiricism and phenomenology, which leads to a lack of universality. This unsatisfactory state of affairs has led to the speculation that one can avoid the expense and bother of using a turbulence model by relying on the grid and numerical diffusion of the computational fluid dynamics algorithm to introduce a spectral cutoff on the flow field and to provide dissipation at the grid scale, thereby mimicking two main effects of a large eddy simulation model. This paper shows numerical examples of a single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which this procedure produces questionable results. We then show a dramatic improvement when two simple subgrid-scale models are employed. This study also illustrates the extreme sensitivity to initial conditions that is a common feature of turbulent flows.

  13. FPCAS2D user's guide, version 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.

    1994-12-01

    The FPCAS2D computer code has been developed for aeroelastic stability analysis of bladed disks such as those in fans, compressors, turbines, propellers, or propfans. The aerodynamic analysis used in this code is based on the unsteady two-dimensional full potential equation which is solved for a cascade of blades. The structural analysis is based on a two degree-of-freedom rigid typical section model for each blade. Detailed explanations of the aerodynamic analysis, the numerical algorithms, and the aeroelastic analysis are not given in this report. This guide can be used to assist in the preparation of the input data required by the FPCAS2D code. A complete description of the input data is provided in this report. In addition, four test cases, including inputs and outputs, are provided.

  14. Temperature Fields in Soft Tissue during LPUS Treatment: Numerical Prediction and Experiment Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wojcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2010-03-09

    Recent research has shown that beneficial therapeutic effects in soft tissues can be induced by the low power ultrasound (LPUS). For example, increasing of cells immunity to stress (among others thermal stress) can be obtained through the enhanced heat shock proteins (Hsp) expression induced by the low intensity ultrasound. The possibility to control the Hsp expression enhancement in soft tissues in vivo stimulated by ultrasound can be the potential new therapeutic approach to the neurodegenerative diseases which utilizes the known feature of cells to increase their immunity to stresses through the Hsp expression enhancement. The controlling of the Hsp expression enhancement by adjusting of exposure level to ultrasound energy would allow to evaluate and optimize the ultrasound-mediated treatment efficiency. Ultrasonic regimes are controlled by adjusting the pulsed ultrasound waves intensity, frequency, duration, duty cycle and exposure time. Our objective was to develop the numerical model capable of predicting in space and time temperature fields induced by a circular focused transducer generating tone bursts in multilayer nonlinear attenuating media and to compare the numerically calculated results with the experimental data in vitro. The acoustic pressure field in multilayer biological media was calculated using our original numerical solver. For prediction of temperature fields the Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation was employed. Temperature field measurements in vitro were carried out in a fresh rat liver using the 15 mm diameter, 25 mm focal length and 2 MHz central frequency transducer generating tone bursts with the spatial peak temporal average acoustic intensity varied between 0.325 and 1.95 W/cm{sup 2}, duration varied from 20 to 500 cycles at the same 20% duty cycle and the exposure time varied up to 20 minutes. The measurement data were compared with numerical simulation results obtained under experimental boundary conditions. Good agreement between

  15. Temperature Fields in Soft Tissue during LPUS Treatment: Numerical Prediction and Experiment Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wójcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2010-03-01

    Recent research has shown that beneficial therapeutic effects in soft tissues can be induced by the low power ultrasound (LPUS). For example, increasing of cells immunity to stress (among others thermal stress) can be obtained through the enhanced heat shock proteins (Hsp) expression induced by the low intensity ultrasound. The possibility to control the Hsp expression enhancement in soft tissues in vivo stimulated by ultrasound can be the potential new therapeutic approach to the neurodegenerative diseases which utilizes the known feature of cells to increase their immunity to stresses through the Hsp expression enhancement. The controlling of the Hsp expression enhancement by adjusting of exposure level to ultrasound energy would allow to evaluate and optimize the ultrasound-mediated treatment efficiency. Ultrasonic regimes are controlled by adjusting the pulsed ultrasound waves intensity, frequency, duration, duty cycle and exposure time. Our objective was to develop the numerical model capable of predicting in space and time temperature fields induced by a circular focused transducer generating tone bursts in multilayer nonlinear attenuating media and to compare the numerically calculated results with the experimental data in vitro. The acoustic pressure field in multilayer biological media was calculated using our original numerical solver. For prediction of temperature fields the Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation was employed. Temperature field measurements in vitro were carried out in a fresh rat liver using the 15 mm diameter, 25 mm focal length and 2 MHz central frequency transducer generating tone bursts with the spatial peak temporal average acoustic intensity varied between 0.325 and 1.95 W/cm2, duration varied from 20 to 500 cycles at the same 20% duty cycle and the exposure time varied up to 20 minutes. The measurement data were compared with numerical simulation results obtained under experimental boundary conditions. Good agreement between the

  16. Grid Cell Responses in 1D Environments Assessed as Slices through a 2D Lattice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, KiJung; Lewallen, Sam; Kinkhabwala, Amina A; Tank, David W; Fiete, Ila R

    2016-03-01

    Grid cells, defined by their striking periodic spatial responses in open 2D arenas, appear to respond differently on 1D tracks: the multiple response fields are not periodically arranged, peak amplitudes vary across fields, and the mean spacing between fields is larger than in 2D environments. We ask whether such 1D responses are consistent with the system's 2D dynamics. Combining analytical and numerical methods, we show that the 1D responses of grid cells with stable 1D fields are consistent with a linear slice through a 2D triangular lattice. Further, the 1D responses of comodular cells are well described by parallel slices, and the offsets in the starting points of the 1D slices can predict the measured 2D relative spatial phase between the cells. From these results, we conclude that the 2D dynamics of these cells is preserved in 1D, suggesting a common computation during both types of navigation behavior. PMID:26898777

  17. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field. [Perdeuterated p-demethoxybenzene, perdeuterated malonic acid, diethyl terephthalate-d4, nonadecane-2,2'-D2, sodium propionate-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution /sup 2/H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Accessing numeric data via flags and tags: A final report on a real world experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottenstette, J. P.; Freeman, J. E.; Staskin, E. R.; Hargrave, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    An experiment is reported which: extended the concepts of data flagging and tagging to the aerospace scientific and technical literature; generated experience with the assignment of data summaries and data terms by documentation specialists; and obtained real world assessments of data summaries and data terms in information products and services. Inclusion of data summaries and data terms improved users' understanding of referenced documents from a subject perspective as well as from a data perspective; furthermore, a radical shift in document ordering behavior occurred during the experiment toward proportionately more requests for data-summarized items.

  19. 2D molybdenum disulphide (2D-MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J; Fearn, Jamie M; Brownson, Dale A C; Smith, Graham C; Ji, Xiaobo; Banks, Craig E

    2016-08-21

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets (2D-MoS2) have proven to be an effective electrocatalyst, with particular attention being focused on their use towards increasing the efficiency of the reactions associated with hydrogen fuel cells. Whilst the majority of research has focused on the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER), herein we explore the use of 2D-MoS2 as a potential electrocatalyst for the much less researched Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). We stray from literature conventions and perform experiments in 0.1 M H2SO4 acidic electrolyte for the first time, evaluating the electrochemical performance of the ORR with 2D-MoS2 electrically wired/immobilised upon several carbon based electrodes (namely; Boron Doped Diamond (BDD), Edge Plane Pyrolytic Graphite (EPPG), Glassy Carbon (GC) and Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE)) whilst exploring a range of 2D-MoS2 coverages/masses. Consequently, the findings of this study are highly applicable to real world fuel cell applications. We show that significant improvements in ORR activity can be achieved through the careful selection of the underlying/supporting carbon materials that electrically wire the 2D-MoS2 and utilisation of an optimal mass of 2D-MoS2. The ORR onset is observed to be reduced to ca. +0.10 V for EPPG, GC and SPEs at 2D-MoS2 (1524 ng cm(-2) modification), which is far closer to Pt at +0.46 V compared to bare/unmodified EPPG, GC and SPE counterparts. This report is the first to demonstrate such beneficial electrochemical responses in acidic conditions using a 2D-MoS2 based electrocatalyst material on a carbon-based substrate (SPEs in this case). Investigation of the beneficial reaction mechanism reveals the ORR to occur via a 4 electron process in specific conditions; elsewhere a 2 electron process is observed. This work offers valuable insights for those wishing to design, fabricate and/or electrochemically test 2D-nanosheet materials towards the ORR. PMID:27448174

  20. 2D molybdenum disulphide (2D-MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J; Fearn, Jamie M; Brownson, Dale A C; Smith, Graham C; Ji, Xiaobo; Banks, Craig E

    2016-08-21

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets (2D-MoS2) have proven to be an effective electrocatalyst, with particular attention being focused on their use towards increasing the efficiency of the reactions associated with hydrogen fuel cells. Whilst the majority of research has focused on the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER), herein we explore the use of 2D-MoS2 as a potential electrocatalyst for the much less researched Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). We stray from literature conventions and perform experiments in 0.1 M H2SO4 acidic electrolyte for the first time, evaluating the electrochemical performance of the ORR with 2D-MoS2 electrically wired/immobilised upon several carbon based electrodes (namely; Boron Doped Diamond (BDD), Edge Plane Pyrolytic Graphite (EPPG), Glassy Carbon (GC) and Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE)) whilst exploring a range of 2D-MoS2 coverages/masses. Consequently, the findings of this study are highly applicable to real world fuel cell applications. We show that significant improvements in ORR activity can be achieved through the careful selection of the underlying/supporting carbon materials that electrically wire the 2D-MoS2 and utilisation of an optimal mass of 2D-MoS2. The ORR onset is observed to be reduced to ca. +0.10 V for EPPG, GC and SPEs at 2D-MoS2 (1524 ng cm(-2) modification), which is far closer to Pt at +0.46 V compared to bare/unmodified EPPG, GC and SPE counterparts. This report is the first to demonstrate such beneficial electrochemical responses in acidic conditions using a 2D-MoS2 based electrocatalyst material on a carbon-based substrate (SPEs in this case). Investigation of the beneficial reaction mechanism reveals the ORR to occur via a 4 electron process in specific conditions; elsewhere a 2 electron process is observed. This work offers valuable insights for those wishing to design, fabricate and/or electrochemically test 2D-nanosheet materials towards the ORR.

  1. Interrogating Heterogeneous Compaction of Meteoritic Material at the Mesoscale Using Analog Experiments and Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, J. G.; Rutherford, M. E.; Davison, T. M.; Eakins, D. E.; Collins, G. S.

    2016-08-01

    We compare experimental results and simulations of mesoscale shock compaction, as potential analogs to the shock metamorphism of meteoritic material. Qualitative agreement suggests the experiments are useful analogs to study meteoritic compaction.

  2. Energy Budget of Liquid Drop Impact at Maximum Spreading: Numerical Simulations and Experiments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Bong; Derome, Dominique; Dolatabadi, Ali; Carmeliet, Jan

    2016-02-01

    The maximum spreading of an impinging droplet on a rigid surface is studied for low to high impact velocity, until the droplet starts splashing. We investigate experimentally and numerically the role of liquid properties, such as surface tension and viscosity, on drop impact using three liquids. It is found that the use of the experimental dynamic contact angle at maximum spreading in the Kistler model, which is used as a boundary condition for the CFD-VOF calculation, gives good agreement between experimental and numerical results. Analytical models commonly used to predict the boundary layer thickness and time at maximum spreading are found to be less correct, meaning that energy balance models relying on these relations have to be considered with care. The time of maximum spreading is found to depend on both the impact velocity and surface tension, and neither dependency is predicted correctly in common analytical models. The relative proportion of the viscous dissipation in the total energy budget increases with impact velocity with respect to surface energy. At high impact velocity, the contribution of surface energy, even before splashing, is still substantial, meaning that both surface energy and viscous dissipation have to be taken into account, and scaling laws depending only on viscous dissipation do not apply. At low impact velocity, viscous dissipation seems to play an important role in low-surface-tension liquids such as ethanol. PMID:26745364

  3. Numerical study of relativistic frequency shift for the cold-atom clock experiment in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Lambert, S. B.

    2007-02-01

    This paper is motivated by the development of several space missions using an Earth-orbit laser-cooled atomic clock, providing a time-keeping accuracy of the order of 10-16 10-18 in fractional frequency. We focus here on a particular part of the future data processing, namely the relativistic effects on frequency shift. These effects appear to be numerous and intricate, and it is important to precisely quantify their order of magnitude. Obviously, at this level of accuracy, a detailed analysis of all natural or artificial potential sources of error is required, and such a study is still missing at this time. We present here a numerical study of one-way relativistic frequency shifts of orders 1/c2, 1/c3 and 1/c4. These shifts are computed in the case of the ACES mission, i.e. a clock aboard the International Space Station and passing above a mid-latitude observing site. We obtain orders of magnitude for all interesting relativistic effects. We show that the influence on frequency shift of the mass quadrupole moment J2 of the Earth at the order 1/c3 has an amplitude around 10-18, below the expected sensitivity of ACES but close to the one of future missions such as RACE.

  4. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  5. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  6. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  7. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  8. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  9. Controlling avalanche criticality in 2D nano arrays.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Y C; Yochelis, S; Dahmen, K A; Jung, G; Paltiel, Y

    2013-01-01

    Many physical systems respond to slowly changing external force through avalanches spanning broad range of sizes. Some systems crackle even without apparent external force, such as bursts of neuronal activity or charge transfer avalanches in 2D molecular layers. Advanced development of theoretical models describing disorder-induced critical phenomena calls for experiments probing the dynamics upon tuneable disorder. Here we show that isomeric structural transitions in 2D organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) exhibit critical dynamics with experimentally tuneable disorder. The system consists of field effect transistor coupled through SAM to illuminated semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). Charges photoinduced in NCs are transferred through SAM to the transistor surface and modulate its conductivity. Avalanches of isomeric structural transitions are revealed by measuring the current noise I(t) of the transistor. Accumulated surface traps charges reduce dipole moments of the molecules, decrease their coupling, and thus decrease the critical disorder of the SAM enabling its tuning during experiments.

  10. Numerical simulations of the katabatic layer observed during the GMEX experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Elkhalfi, A.; Rosset, R.; Mascart, P.

    1994-12-31

    The GIMEX experiment (Greenland Ice Margin EXperiment, 1991) was carried out in the Soendre Stromfjord area (67{degree}05`N 50{degree}14W), in the southwestern part of Greenland during the summer of 1991. Van den Broeke et al. (1994) have described in detail the experimental set up. The topography of the area and the location of the stations along a west-east transect perpendicular to the edge of the Greenland ice sheet is presented. The micrometeorological measurements come from a series of masts, in particular masts 4, 5, 6, 7 and 9 and from the captive balloon (BC) site. From the 52 days of the experiment the authors have selected the 12 July 1991. This day was characterized by a calm and stationary large-scale meteorological situation with small inter-diurnal variations.

  11. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  12. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  13. Validation experiment of a numerically processed millimeter-wave interferometer in a laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kogi, Y; Higashi, T; Matsukawa, S; Mase, A; Kohagura, J; Nagayama, Y; Kawahata, K; Kuwahara, D; Yoshikawa, M

    2014-11-01

    We propose a new interferometer system for density profile measurements. This system produces multiple measurement chords by a leaky-wave antenna driven by multiple frequency inputs. The proposed system was validated in laboratory evaluation experiments. We confirmed that the interferometer generates a clear image of a Teflon plate as well as the phase shift corresponding to the plate thickness. In another experiment, we confirmed that quasi-optical mirrors can produce multiple measurement chords; however, the finite spot size of the probe beam degrades the sharpness of the resulting image.

  14. Validation experiment of a numerically processed millimeter-wave interferometer in a laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kogi, Y. Higashi, T.; Matsukawa, S.; Mase, A.; Kohagura, J.; Yoshikawa, M.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Kuwahara, D.

    2014-11-15

    We propose a new interferometer system for density profile measurements. This system produces multiple measurement chords by a leaky-wave antenna driven by multiple frequency inputs. The proposed system was validated in laboratory evaluation experiments. We confirmed that the interferometer generates a clear image of a Teflon plate as well as the phase shift corresponding to the plate thickness. In another experiment, we confirmed that quasi-optical mirrors can produce multiple measurement chords; however, the finite spot size of the probe beam degrades the sharpness of the resulting image.

  15. Application of surface-harmonics code SUHAM-U and Monte-Carlo code UNK-MC for calculations of 2D light water benchmark-experiment VENUS-2 with UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Davidenko, V. D.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Tsibulsky, V. F.

    2006-07-01

    Verification of the SUHAM-U code has been carried out by the calculation of two-dimensional benchmark-experiment on critical light-water facility VENUS-2. Comparisons with experimental data and calculations by Monte-Carlo code UNK with the same nuclear data library B645 for basic isotopes have been fulfilled. Calculations of two-dimensional facility were carried out with using experimentally measured buckling values. Possibility of SUHAM code application for computations of PWR reactor with uranium and MOX fuel has been demonstrated. (authors)

  16. Is Cu involved in prion oligopeptide stability? Experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minicozzi, V.; Morante, S.

    The high-sociological impact of neurodegenerative diseases (like Alzheimer disease, Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies, Parkinson disease, etc.) has renewed the interest of researchers in the study of misfolding processes and in particular of the rôle played by metals in plaque formation as their unbalanced concentration can be regarded as a possible concurrent cause of protein aggregation. Metals are essential players in many of the fundamental activities of cells. Storing, metabolism, and trafficking of metals through the cellular membrane and within the cytoplasm are mediated by many proteins via well-tuned mechanisms because of the toxicity of free ions. In this review article, we summarize the results of the most recent experimental and numerical investigations aimed at understanding the possible rôle of Cu in stabilizing the Prion protein structure and in the formation of protein polymers.

  17. Numerical Analysis of a Pulse Detonation Cross Flow Heat Load Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Naples, Andrew .; Hoke, John L.; Schauer, Fred

    2011-01-01

    A comparison between experimentally measured and numerically simulated, time-averaged, point heat transfer rates in a pulse detonation (PDE) engine is presented. The comparison includes measurements and calculations for heat transfer to a cylinder in crossflow and to the tube wall itself using a novel spool design. Measurements are obtained at several locations and under several operating conditions. The measured and computed results are shown to be in substantial agreement, thereby validating the modeling approach. The model, which is based in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is then used to interpret the results. A preheating of the incoming fuel charge is predicted, which results in increased volumetric flow and subsequent overfilling. The effect is validated with additional measurements.

  18. Experiments and numerical simulation on the laminar flame speeds of dichloromethane and trichloromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Leylegian, J.C.; Zhu, D.L.; Law, C.K.; Wang, H.

    1998-08-01

    The laminar flame speeds of blends of dichloromethane and trichloromethane with methane in air at room temperature and atmospheric pressure were experimentally determined using the counterflow twin-flame technique, varying both the amount of chlorinated compound in the fuel and the equivalence ratio of the unburned mixture. A detailed kinetic model previously employed for simulation of chloromethane combustion was expanded to include the oxidation kinetics of dichloromethane and trichloromethane. Numerical simulation shows that the expanded kinetic model predicted the flame speeds to within 3 cm/s of the measured values. Carbon flux and sensitivity analyses indicate that the reaction kinetics of the methane flame doped with chlorinated methanes are qualitatively similar, despite the variation in the chlorinated methane fuel structure.

  19. Recent update of the RPLUS2D/3D codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Y.-L. Peter

    1991-01-01

    The development of the RPLUS2D/3D codes is summarized. These codes utilize LU algorithms to solve chemical non-equilibrium flows in a body-fitted coordinate system. The motivation behind the development of these codes is the need to numerically predict chemical non-equilibrium flows for the National AeroSpace Plane Program. Recent improvements include vectorization method, blocking algorithms for geometric flexibility, out-of-core storage for large-size problems, and an LU-SW/UP combination for CPU-time efficiency and solution quality.

  20. Cryogenic cavitating flow in 2D laval nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Naoki; Nagashima, Toshio

    2003-05-01

    Cavitation is one of the troublesome problems in rocket turbo pumps, and since most of high-efficiency rocket propellants are cryogenic fluids, so called “thermodynamic effect” becomes more evident than in water. In the present study, numerical and experimental study of liquid nitrogen cavitation in 2D Laval nozzle was carried out, so that the influence of thermodynamic effect was examined. It was revealed that temperature and cavitation have strong inter-relationship with each other in thermo-sensitive cryogenic fluids.

  1. 2D/3D Synthetic Vision Navigation Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, J. J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Sweeters, jason L.

    2008-01-01

    Flight-deck display software was designed and developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) terrain, obstacle, and flight-path perspectives on a single navigation display. The objective was to optimize the presentation of synthetic vision (SV) system technology that permits pilots to view multiple perspectives of flight-deck display symbology and 3D terrain information. Research was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the concept. The concept has numerous unique implementation features that would permit enhanced operational concepts and efficiencies in both current and future aircraft.

  2. Two- and Three-Dimensional Numerical Experiments Representing Two Limiting Cases of an In-Line Pair of Finger Seal Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Steinetz, B. M.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.; Proctor, M. P.; Kiraly, L. James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The work presented here concerns the numerical development and simulation of the flow, pressure patterns and motion of a pair of fingers arranged behind each other and axially aligned in-line. The fingers represent the basic elemental component of a Finger Seal (FS) and form a tight seal around the rotor. Yet their flexibility allows compliance with rotor motion and in a passive-adaptive mode complies also with the hydrodynamic forces induced by the flowing fluid. While the paper does not treat the actual staggered configuration of a finger seal, the inline arrangement represents a first step towards that final goal. The numerical 2-D (axial-radial) and 3-D results presented herein were obtained using a commercial package (CFD-ACE+). Both models use an integrated numerical approach, which couples the hydrodynamic fluid model (Navier-Stokes based) to the solid mechanics code that models the compliance of the fingers.

  3. 2D:4D digit ratio predicts delay of gratification in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Sergio; Moreira, Bruno; Da Costa, Newton

    2014-01-01

    We replicate the Stanford marshmallow experiment with a sample of 141 preschoolers and find a correlation between lack of self-control and 2D:4D digit ratio. Children with low 2D:4D digit ratio are less likely to delay gratification. Low 2D:4D digit ratio may indicate high fetal testosterone. If this hypothesis is true, our finding means high fetal testosterone children are less likely to delay gratification.

  4. 2D:4D Digit Ratio Predicts Delay of Gratification in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Sergio; Moreira, Bruno; Da Costa, Newton

    2014-01-01

    We replicate the Stanford marshmallow experiment with a sample of 141 preschoolers and find a correlation between lack of self-control and 2D:4D digit ratio. Children with low 2D:4D digit ratio are less likely to delay gratification. Low 2D:4D digit ratio may indicate high fetal testosterone. If this hypothesis is true, our finding means high fetal testosterone children are less likely to delay gratification. PMID:25490040

  5. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  6. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  7. Imaging the shallow volcanic conduit from magma analogue decompression experiments: their implication for volcanic eruptions and applications to numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, Laura; Cimarelli, Corrado; Scheu, Bettina; Di Genova, Danilo; Colucci, Simone; De'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    Experimental volcanology is a powerful tool to reconstruct the dynamics of magmatic fluids within the conduit. More specifically analogue models, allow constraining the conduit dynamics by independently examine physical variables and their reciprocal relationships. Accurate scaling of the experiments to the natural systems is necessary to derive quantitative information on the studied processes. Here we present a suite of experiments investigating the decompressive response of magma analogues with different properties (i.e. fluid viscosity, suspended particle shape and/or content) and their scaling to the natural basaltic systems. In the experiments Ar-saturated silicone oils with different viscosities are used as proxies for volatile-bearing mafic magmas. Varying percentages of micrometric particles are added to the fluid to investigate the role of crystals content as well as crystal shape on the dynamics of the expanding flow. Through decompression, the degassing mixture is characterized by a regime of periodical oscillations of the bubbly front determined by phases of foam collapse and renewal. We find that time-scale of these oscillations has important implications for understanding the cyclical eruptive behaviour observed at basaltic volcanoes. Applicability of the experimental results to natural mafic systems has been verified in the scaling by using a set of a-dimensional numbers. The experimental dataset has been finally used to validate a numerical code implemented in the Openfoam framework. The original compressible multiphase solver twoPhaseEulerFoam was implemented to take into account the multicomponent nature of the fluid mixtures (liquid and gas) and their phase transition, as also reproduced in the experiments. Decompression experiments and their scaling to volcanic system provided fundamental information on the dynamics of volatiles within the shallow conduit. Furthermore, they are an invaluable tool to validate complex numerical codes for

  8. 2D molybdenum disulphide (2D-MoS2) modified electrodes explored towards the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley-Neale, Samuel J.; Fearn, Jamie M.; Brownson, Dale A. C.; Smith, Graham C.; Ji, Xiaobo; Banks, Craig E.

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets (2D-MoS2) have proven to be an effective electrocatalyst, with particular attention being focused on their use towards increasing the efficiency of the reactions associated with hydrogen fuel cells. Whilst the majority of research has focused on the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER), herein we explore the use of 2D-MoS2 as a potential electrocatalyst for the much less researched Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). We stray from literature conventions and perform experiments in 0.1 M H2SO4 acidic electrolyte for the first time, evaluating the electrochemical performance of the ORR with 2D-MoS2 electrically wired/immobilised upon several carbon based electrodes (namely; Boron Doped Diamond (BDD), Edge Plane Pyrolytic Graphite (EPPG), Glassy Carbon (GC) and Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE)) whilst exploring a range of 2D-MoS2 coverages/masses. Consequently, the findings of this study are highly applicable to real world fuel cell applications. We show that significant improvements in ORR activity can be achieved through the careful selection of the underlying/supporting carbon materials that electrically wire the 2D-MoS2 and utilisation of an optimal mass of 2D-MoS2. The ORR onset is observed to be reduced to ca. +0.10 V for EPPG, GC and SPEs at 2D-MoS2 (1524 ng cm-2 modification), which is far closer to Pt at +0.46 V compared to bare/unmodified EPPG, GC and SPE counterparts. This report is the first to demonstrate such beneficial electrochemical responses in acidic conditions using a 2D-MoS2 based electrocatalyst material on a carbon-based substrate (SPEs in this case). Investigation of the beneficial reaction mechanism reveals the ORR to occur via a 4 electron process in specific conditions; elsewhere a 2 electron process is observed. This work offers valuable insights for those wishing to design, fabricate and/or electrochemically test 2D-nanosheet materials towards the ORR.Two-dimensional molybdenum disulphide nanosheets

  9. Numerical Experiments of Counterflowiing Jet Effects on Supersonic Slender-Body Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Mullane, Michael; Cheng, Gary C.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the use of counterflowing jets can greatly reduce the drag and heat loads on blunt-body geometries, especially when the long penetration mode jet condition can be established. Previously, the authors had done some preliminary numerical studies to determine the ability to establish long penetration mode jets on a typical Mach 1.6 slender configuration, and study its impact on the boom signature. The results indicated that a jet with a longer penetration length was required to achieve any impact on the boom signature of a typical Mach 1.6 slender configuration. This paper focuses on an in-depth parametric study, done using the space-time conservation element solution element Navier-Stokes flow solver, for investigating the effect of various counterflowing jet conditions/configurations on two supersonic slender-body models (cone-cylinder and quartic body of revolution). The study is aimed at gaining a better understanding of the relationship between the shock penetration length and reduction of drag and boom signature for these two supersonic slender-body configurations. Different jet flow rates, Mach numbers, nozzle jet exit diameters and jet-to-base diameter ratios were examined. The results show the characteristics of a short-to-long-to-short penetration-mode pattern with the increase of jet mass flow rates, observed across various counterflowing jet nozzle configurations. Though the optimal shock penetration length for potential boom-signature mitigation is tied to the long penetration mode, it often results in a very unsteady flow and leads to large oscillations of surface pressure and drag. Furthermore, depending on the geometry of the slender body, longer jet penetration did not always result in maximum drag reduction. For the quartic geometry, the maximum drag reduction corresponds well to the longest shock penetration length, while this was not the case for the cone-cylinder-as the geometry was already optimized for

  10. Aerosol and cloud chemistry of amines from CCS - reactivity experiments and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Christian; Tilgner, Andreas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Capturing CO2 from the exhaust of power plants using amine scrubbing is a common technology. Therefore, amines can be released during the carbon capture process. To investigate the tropospheric chemical fate of amines from CO2 capturing processes and their oxidation products, the impact of aqueous aerosol particles and cloud droplets on the amine chemistry has been considered. Aqueous phase reactivity experiments of NO3 radicals and ozone with relevant amines and their corresponding nitrosamines were performed. Furthermore, nitrosamine formation and nitrosamine photolysis was investigated during laboratory experiments. These experiments implicated that aqueous phase photolysis can be an effective sink for nitrosamines and that ozone is unreactive towards amines and nitrosamines. Multiphase phase oxidation schemes of amines, nitrosamines and amides were developed, coupled to the existing multiphase chemistry mechanism CAPRAM and built into the Lagrangian parcel model SPACCIM using published and newly measured data. As a result, both deliquescent particles and cloud droplets are important compartments for the multiphase processing of amines and their products. Amines can be readily oxidised by OH radicals in the gas and cloud phase during daytime summer conditions. However, amine oxidation is restricted during winter conditions with low photochemical activity leading to long lifetimes of amines. The importance of the gas and aqueous phase depends strongly on the partitioning of the different amines. Furthermore, the simulations revealed that the aqueous formation of nitrosamines in aerosol particles and could droplets is not a relevant process under tropospheric conditions.

  11. Desiccation of unsaturated porous media: Intermediate-scale experiments and numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Dane, J. H.; Truex, Michael J.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2009-08-01

    Soil desiccation (drying) is recognized as a potentially robust vadose zone remediation process involving water evaporation induced by air injection and extraction. Desiccation has the potential to immobilize contaminants and could potentially improve access for other gas-phase treatments by reducing water saturation and therefore increasing sediment gas-phase permeability. Before this technology could be deployed in the field, concerns related to energy limitations, osmotic effects, and potential contaminant remobilization after rewetting need to be addressed. A series of detailed wedge-shaped, intermediate-scale laboratory experiments in unsaturated homogeneous and simple heterogeneous systems was conducted to improve the understanding of the impact of energy balance issues on soil desiccation. The experiments were simulated with the multifluid flow simulator STOMP, using independently obtained hydraulic and thermal porous medium properties. In all the experiments, the injection of dry air proved to be an effective means for removing essentially all moisture from the test media. Evaporative cooling was observed which generally decreased with increased distance from the gas inlet chamber. Observations of temperature in fine-grained sands in the heterogeneous systems show two local temperature minima associated with the cooling. The first one occurs because of evaporation in the adjacent medium-grained sand whereas the second minimum is attributed to evaporative cooling in the fine-grained sand itself. Results of the laboratory tests were simulated accurately when thermal properties of the flow cell walls and insulation material were taken into account, indicating that the proper physics were incorporated into the simulator.

  12. Numerical experiments on short-term meteorological effects of solar variability. [earth atmosphere model considering solar luminosity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.; Hansen, J. E.; Stone, P. H.; Quirk, W. J.; Lacis, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Set of numerical experiments has been carried out to test the short range sensitivity of a large atmospheric general circulation model to changes in solar constant and ozone amount. On the basis of the results of 12-day integrations with very large variations in these parameters, it is concluded that realistic variations would produce insignificant meteorological effects. Thus any causal relationships between solar variability and weather, for time scales of two weeks or less, will have to rely upon changes in parameters other than solar constant or ozone amounts, or upon mechanisms not yet incorporated in the model.

  13. Flight, Wind Tunnel, and Numerical Experiments with a Slender Cone at Incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, David J.; Fisher, David F.; McRae, David S.

    1982-01-01

    The three-dimensional leeward separation about a 5-deg semi-angle cone of 11 deg angle of incidence was Investigated in night, in the wind tunnel, and by numerical computations. The test conditions were Mach numbers of 0.6, 1.5, and 1.8 at Reynolds numbers between 7 and 10 million based on freestream conditions and a 76.2-cm (30-in.) length of surface. The surface pressure conditions measured included those of fluctuating and mean static, as well as recovery pressures generated by obstacle blocks to provide skin friction and separation-line locations. The mean static pressures from flight and wind tunnel were in reasonably good agreement. The computed results gave the same distributions, but were slightly more positive in magnitude. The experimentally measured primary and secondary separation line locations compared closely with computed results. There were substantial differences In level between the surface root-mean-square pressure fluctuations obtained in night and in the wind tunnel, due, It Is thought, to a relatively high acoustic disturbance level in the tunnel compared with the quiescent atmospheric conditions in night.

  14. The effect of deformation history on the interpretation of seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle: experiments and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneh, Y.; Skemer, P. A.; Morales, L. F. G.; Kaminski, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    The main source of seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle is the deformation-induced crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of olivine. The interpretation of seismic anisotropy relies on models and experiments that predict certain relationships between olivine CPO and the deformation kinematics. Under some conditions, such as the interiors of oceanic plates, these relationships may be quite simple. However, near plate boundaries flow patterns are complex and the interpretation of seismic anisotropy is not straight-forward. In this contribution we describe the effect of deformation history on the re-orientation of olivine CPO as a function of strain. High pressure and temperature deformation experiments were performed on the Åheim dunite, which exhibits a pre-existing texture. Experiments were conducted in three different configurations with the pre-existing foliation at 0°, 45°, and 90° to the axis of compression, simulating three unique deformation histories. Deformation microstructures and texture are analyzed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The experiments show that up to strains of ~0.7 the three configurations evolve differently from one another, and from models initiated with random textures. Moreover, none of the models achieved the expected textural steady-state. The experiments results are then compared to numerical simulations using a Viscoplastic Self Consistent (VPSC) approach, and D-Rex. The input for the models is the Åheim dunite CPO in the three configurations used in the experiments. It is shown that, generally, texture symmetry evolves similarly in the models and the experiments although there are notable differences in texture strength. To achieve better agreement between experiments and models, new model parameterizations are proposed. Finally, we use the new parameterization of D-Rex to simulate a range of plausible deformation histories and associated seismic anisotropy in a variety of flow settings.

  15. Relaxation of ferroelectric states in 2D distributions of quantum dots: EELS simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, C. M.; Meza-Montes, L.; Moctezuma, R. E.; Carrillo, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    The relaxation time of collective electronic states in a 2D distribution of quantum dots is investigated theoretically by simulating EELS experiments. From the numerical calculation of the probability of energy loss of an electron beam, traveling parallel to the distribution, it is possible to estimate the damping time of ferroelectric-like states. We generate this collective response of the distribution by introducing a mean field interaction among the quantum dots, and then, the model is extended incorporating effects of long-range correlations through a Bragg-Williams approximation. The behavior of the dielectric function, the energy loss function, and the relaxation time of ferroelectric-like states is then investigated as a function of the temperature of the distribution and the damping constant of the electronic states in the single quantum dots. The robustness of the trends and tendencies of our results indicate that this scheme of analysis can guide experimentalists to develop tailored quantum dots distributions for specific applications.

  16. 2-D impulse noise suppression by recursive gaussian maximum likelihood estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Yang, Jian; Shu, Huazhong; Shi, Luyao; Wu, Jiasong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Toumoulin, Christine

    2014-01-01

    An effective approach termed Recursive Gaussian Maximum Likelihood Estimation (RGMLE) is developed in this paper to suppress 2-D impulse noise. And two algorithms termed RGMLE-C and RGMLE-CS are derived by using spatially-adaptive variances, which are respectively estimated based on certainty and joint certainty & similarity information. To give reliable implementation of RGMLE-C and RGMLE-CS algorithms, a novel recursion stopping strategy is proposed by evaluating the estimation error of uncorrupted pixels. Numerical experiments on different noise densities show that the proposed two algorithms can lead to significantly better results than some typical median type filters. Efficient implementation is also realized via GPU (Graphic Processing Unit)-based parallelization techniques.

  17. The stability of freely-propagating ion acoustic waves in 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Thomas; Berger, Richard; Banks, Jeffrey; Brunner, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    The stability of a freely-propagating ion acoustic wave (IAW) is a basic science problem that is made difficult by the need to resolve electron kinetic effects over a timescale that greatly exceeds the IAW period during numerical simulation. Recent results examining IAW stability using a 1D+1V Vlasov-Poisson solver indicate that instability is a fundamental property of IAWs that occurs over most if not all of the parameter space of relevance to ICF experiments. We present here new results addressing the fundamental question of IAW stability across a broad range of plasma conditions in a 2D+2V system using LOKI, ranging from a regime of relatively weak to a regime of relatively strong ion kinetic effects. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL (DE-AC52-07NA27344) and funded by the LDRD Program at LLNL (12-ERD-061).

  18. Screening and transport in 2D semiconductor systems at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Das Sarma, S.; Hwang, E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature carrier transport properties in 2D semiconductor systems can be theoretically well-understood within RPA-Boltzmann theory as being limited by scattering from screened Coulomb disorder arising from random quenched charged impurities in the environment. In this work, we derive a number of analytical formula, supported by realistic numerical calculations, for the relevant density, mobility, and temperature range where 2D transport should manifest strong intrinsic (i.e., arising purely from electronic effects) metallic temperature dependence in different semiconductor materials arising entirely from the 2D screening properties, thus providing an explanation for why the strong temperature dependence of the 2D resistivity can only be observed in high-quality and low-disorder 2D samples and also why some high-quality 2D materials manifest much weaker metallicity than other materials. We also discuss effects of interaction and disorder on the 2D screening properties in this context as well as compare 2D and 3D screening functions to comment why such a strong intrinsic temperature dependence arising from screening cannot occur in 3D metallic carrier transport. Experimentally verifiable predictions are made about the quantitative magnitude of the maximum possible low-temperature metallicity in 2D systems and the scaling behavior of the temperature scale controlling the quantum to classical crossover. PMID:26572738

  19. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule—CN—noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  20. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  1. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-26

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule-CN-noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology. PMID:27541575

  2. Precipitation forecasting by a mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model: eight years of experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Schubiger, F.; Binder, P.

    The Swiss Model, a hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model, has been used at MeteoSwiss for operational forecasting at the meso-beta scale (mesh-size 14 km) from 1994 until 2001. The quality of the quantitative precipitation forecasts is evaluated for the eight years of operation. The seasonal precipitation over Switzerland and its dependence on altitude is examined for both model forecasts and observations using the Swiss rain gauge network sampling daily precipitation at over 400 stations for verification. The mean diurnal cycle of precipitation is verified against the automatic surface observation network on the basis of hourly recordings. In winter, there is no diurnal forcing of precipitation and the modelled precipitation agrees with the observed values. In summer, the convection in the model starts too early, overestimates the amount of precipitation and is too short-lived. Skill scores calculated for six-hourly precipitation sums show a constant level of performance over the model life cycle. Dry and wet seasons influence the model performance more than the model changes during its operational period. The comprehensive verification of the model precipitation is complemented by the discussion of a number of heavy rain events investigated during the RAPHAEL project. The sensitivities to a number of model components are illustrated, namely the driving boundary fields, the internal partitioning of parameterised and grid-scale precipitation, the advection scheme and the vertical resolution. While a small impact of the advection scheme had to be expected, the increasing overprediction of rain with increasing vertical resolution in the RAPHAEL case studies was larger than previously thought. The frequent update of the boundary conditions enhances the positioning of the rain in the model.

  3. PINTEX Data: Numeric results from the Polarized Internal Target Experiments (PINTEX) at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility

    DOE Data Explorer

    Meyer, H. O.

    The PINTEX group studied proton-proton and proton-deuteron scattering and reactions between 100 and 500 MeV at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). More than a dozen experiments made use of electron-cooled polarized proton or deuteron beams, orbiting in the 'Indiana Cooler' storage ring, and of a polarized atomic-beam target of hydrogen or deuterium in the path of the stored beam. The collaboration involved researchers from several midwestern universities, as well as a number of European institutions. The PINTEX program ended when the Indiana Cooler was shut down in August 2002. The website contains links to some of the numerical results, descriptions of experiments, and a complete list of publications resulting from PINTEX.

  4. 3-D heterogeneous field data versus 2-D simulations. How can it be accomplished in a sedimentary porous formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvini, G.; Salandin, P.

    2009-12-01

    To analyze the impact of the hydraulic conductivity K spatial variability in a real field case (as an example to delimitate a well catchment), numerical simulations can be reasonably developed in a two-dimensional vertical average context. Nevertheless the plume evolution is a consequence of a more complex three-dimensional heterogeneous structure whose vertical variability dominates the dispersion phenomena at local scale. In larger domains, the effect of the vertical heterogeneity combines itself with that one due to the horizontal variability of K, and only when the plume has travelled a large number of (horizontal) integral scales, its evolution can be analyzed in a regional context, under the hypothesis that the transmissivity spatial distribution prevails. Until this limit is reached, the vertical and horizontal variability of K are combined to give a fully 3-D dispersion process. In all these situations, to successfully accomplish the 3-D heterogeneous structure of the aquifer in 2-D simulations, more than the planimetric depth-averaged variability of K must be accounted for. To define the uncertainty related to the use of different planimetric schematizations of the real hydraulic conductivity spatial distribution, we present here the results of some numerical experiments that compare the 3-D plume evolution with 2-D simulations developed by tacking into account different hydraulic conductivity distribution schematization, by considering a hierarchical architecture of media also. This description of a sedimentary formation combined with the finite size of the plume requires theoretical and numerical tools able to take into account the flow field inhomogeneity and the ergodicity lack that characterize the transport phenomena. Following this way it will be possible to quantify / reduce the uncertainty related to a 2-D schematization in a large number of real cases where the domain spans between the local and the regional scale and whose dimension may lead to

  5. An Experimenting Field Approach for the Numerical Solution of Multiphase Flow in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; Bao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we apply the experimenting pressure field technique to the problem of the flow of two or more immiscible phases in porous media. In this technique, a set of predefined pressure fields are introduced to the governing partial differential equations. This implies that the velocity vector field and the divergence at each cell of the solution mesh can be determined. However, since none of these fields is the true pressure field entailed by the boundary conditions and/or the source terms, the divergence at each cell will not be the correct one. Rather the residue which is the difference between the true divergence and the calculated one is obtained. These fields are designed such that these residuals are used to construct the matrix of coefficients of the pressure equation and the right-hand side. The experimenting pressure fields are generated in the solver routine and are fed to the different routines, which may be called physics routines, which return to the solver the elements of the matrix of coefficients. Therefore, this methodology separates the solver routines from the physics routines and therefore results in simpler, easy to construct, maintain, and update algorithms.

  6. Remedial Amendment Delivery near the Water Table Using Shear Thinning Fluids: Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Zhong, Lirong; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-08-19

    The use of shear thinning fluids (STFs) containing xanthan is a potential enhancement for emplacing a solute amendment near the water table and within the capillary fringe. Most research to date related to STF behavior has involved saturated and confined conditions. A series of flow cell experiments were conducted to investigate STF emplacement in variable saturated homogeneous and layered heterogeneous systems. Besides flow visualization using dyes, amendment concentrations and pressure data were obtained at several locations. The experiments showed that injection of STFs considerably improved the subsurface distribution near the water table by mitigating preferential flow through higher permeability zones compared to no-polymer injections. The phosphate amendment migrated with the xanthan SFT without retardation. Despite the high viscosity of the STF, no excessive mounding or preferential flow were observed in the unsaturated zone. The STOMP simulator was able to predict the experimentally observed fluid displacement and amendment concentrations reasonably well. Cross flow between layers could be interpreted as the main mechanism to transport STFs into lower permeability layers based on the observed pressure gradient and concentration data in layers of differing hydraulic conductivity.

  7. Convective flows generated by evaporation: experiments, linear stability analysis and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunstan, Jocelyn; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Park, Simon; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    A novel form of convection was observed in a suspension of non-motile Photobacterium phosphoreum bacteria. The pattern resembles classical bioconvection, however this strain has limited if any motility, which excludes this possible explanation. After performing a series of control experiments we found that the convection was actually driven by the evaporation of the salty bacterial medium, and the same kind of plumes were observed using polystyrene beads suspended in water with salt added. A mathematical model was formulated for the process and studied using a linear stability analysis and finite element method simulations, reproducing most of the observed experimental features. From the linear stability analysis, a threshold in salt concentration to observe convective motion was obtained, as well as the wavelength of the pattern at the onset of the instability. This was complemented by finite element simulations, which produced plume dynamics remarkably similar to the experimental observations. Evaporation-driven convection on the millimeter scale has not been studied extensively, and its effect may have been underestimated in other experiments.

  8. Numerical simulations of lab-scale brine-water mixing experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Imane; Webb, Stephen Walter

    2006-10-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments simulating the injection of fresh water into brine in a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) cavern were performed at Sandia National Laboratories for various conditions of injection rate and small and large injection tube diameters. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code FLUENT was used to simulate these experiments to evaluate the predictive capability of FLUENT for brine-water mixing in an SPR cavern. The data-model comparisons show that FLUENT simulations predict the mixing plume depth reasonably well. Predictions of the near-wall brine concentrations compare very well with the experimental data. The simulated time for the mixing plume to reach the vessel wall was underpredicted for the small injection tubes but reasonable for the large injection tubes. The difference in the time to reach the wall is probably due to the three-dimensional nature of the mixing plume as it spreads out at the air-brine or oil-brine interface. The depth of the mixing plume as it spreads out along the interface was within a factor of 2 of the experimental data. The FLUENT simulation results predict the plume mixing accurately, especially the water concentration when the mixing plume reaches the wall. This parameter value is the most significant feature of the mixing process because it will determine the amount of enhanced leaching at the oil-brine interface.

  9. CO2-induced dissolution of low permeability carbonates. Part II: Numerical modeling of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yue; Smith, Megan; Sholokhova, Yelena; Carroll, Susan

    2013-12-01

    We used the 3D continuum-scale reactive transport models to simulate eight core flood experiments for two different carbonate rocks. In these experiments the core samples were reacted with brines equilibrated with pCO2 = 3, 2, 1, 0.5 MPa (Smith et al., 2013 [27]). The carbonate rocks were from specific Marly dolostone and Vuggy limestone flow units at the IEAGHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project in south-eastern Saskatchewan, Canada. Initial model porosity, permeability, mineral, and surface area distributions were constructed from micro tomography and microscopy characterization data. We constrained model reaction kinetics and porosity-permeability equations with the experimental data. The experimental data included time-dependent solution chemistry and differential pressure measured across the core, and the initial and final pore space and mineral distribution. Calibration of the model with the experimental data allowed investigation of effects of carbonate reactivity, flow velocity, effective permeability, and time on the development and consequences of stable and unstable dissolution fronts. The continuum scale model captured the evolution of distinct dissolution fronts that developed as a consequence of carbonate mineral dissolution and pore scale transport properties. The results show that initial heterogeneity and porosity contrast control the development of the dissolution fronts in these highly reactive systems. This finding is consistent with linear stability analysis and the known positive feedback between mineral dissolution and fluid flow in carbonate formations. Differences in the carbonate kinetic drivers resulting from the range of pCO2 used in the experiments and the different proportions of more reactive calcite and less reactive dolomite contributed to the development of new pore space, but not to the type of dissolution fronts observed for the two different rock types. The development of the dissolution front was much more

  10. 2D OR NOT 2D: THE EFFECT OF DIMENSIONALITY ON THE DYNAMICS OF FINGERING CONVECTION AT LOW PRANDTL NUMBER

    SciTech Connect

    Garaud, Pascale; Brummell, Nicholas

    2015-12-10

    Fingering convection (otherwise known as thermohaline convection) is an instability that occurs in stellar radiative interiors in the presence of unstable compositional gradients. Numerical simulations have been used in order to estimate the efficiency of mixing induced by this instability. However, fully three-dimensional (3D) computations in the parameter regime appropriate for stellar astrophysics (i.e., low Prandtl number) are prohibitively expensive. This raises the question of whether two-dimensional (2D) simulations could be used instead to achieve the same goals. In this work, we address this issue by comparing the outcome of 2D and 3D simulations of fingering convection at low Prandtl number. We find that 2D simulations are never appropriate. However, we also find that the required 3D computational domain does not have to be very wide: the third dimension only needs to contain a minimum of two wavelengths of the fastest-growing linearly unstable mode to capture the essentially 3D dynamics of small-scale fingering. Narrow domains, however, should still be used with caution since they could limit the subsequent development of any large-scale dynamics typically associated with fingering convection.

  11. 2D or Not 2D: The Effect of Dimensionality on the Dynamics of Fingering Convection at Low Prandtl Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaud, Pascale; Brummell, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Fingering convection (otherwise known as thermohaline convection) is an instability that occurs in stellar radiative interiors in the presence of unstable compositional gradients. Numerical simulations have been used in order to estimate the efficiency of mixing induced by this instability. However, fully three-dimensional (3D) computations in the parameter regime appropriate for stellar astrophysics (i.e., low Prandtl number) are prohibitively expensive. This raises the question of whether two-dimensional (2D) simulations could be used instead to achieve the same goals. In this work, we address this issue by comparing the outcome of 2D and 3D simulations of fingering convection at low Prandtl number. We find that 2D simulations are never appropriate. However, we also find that the required 3D computational domain does not have to be very wide: the third dimension only needs to contain a minimum of two wavelengths of the fastest-growing linearly unstable mode to capture the essentially 3D dynamics of small-scale fingering. Narrow domains, however, should still be used with caution since they could limit the subsequent development of any large-scale dynamics typically associated with fingering convection.

  12. On the hydrodynamics of planktonic microcrustacean locomotion: Numerical simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Malkiel, Edwin; Katz, Joeph

    2007-11-01

    We develop a sharp-interface immersed boundary method for carrying out highly resolved simulations of the flow induced by a self-propelled copepod and integrate the simulations with high-resolution experiments to elucidate some aspects of the hydrodynamics of copepod swimming. A realistic copepod-like body is constructed, which includes most important parts of the animal's anatomy: the antennules, legs, and tail. The kinematics of the individual body appendages during an escape maneuver are prescribed based on data obtained using cinematic digital holography. The self-propelled motion of the copepod induced by the prescribed kinematics is simulated via a strongly-coupled fluid-structure interaction approach. The computed flowfields are compared with experimental results and analyzed to elucidate the structure and dynamics of the coherent wake vortices and quantify the specific contribution of each appendage on the production of propulsive thrust.

  13. Copper Tube Compression in Z-Current Geometry, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Cyclope Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Metallic tubes compressions in Z-current geometry were performed at the Cyclope facility from Gramat Research Center in order to study the behavior of metals under large strain at high strain rate. 3D configurations of cylinder compressions have been calculated here to benchmark the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the Cyclope experiments. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.

  14. Comparison between numerical simulation and visualization experiment on water behavior in single straight flow channel polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Hiromitsu; Ito, Kohei; Oshima, Toshihiro; Sasaki, Kazunari

    A relationship between a flooding and a cell voltage drop for polymer electrolyte fuel cell was investigated experimentally and numerically. A visualization cell, which has single straight gas flow channel (GFC) and observation window, was fabricated to visualize the flooding in GFC. We ran the cell with changing operation condition, and measured the time evolution of cell voltage and took the images of cathode GFC. Considering the operation condition, we executed a developed numerical simulation, which is based on multiphase mixture model with a formulation on water transport through the surface of polymer electrolyte membrane and the interface of gas diffusion layer/GFC. As a result in experiment, we found that the cell voltage decreased with time and this decrease was accelerated by larger current and smaller air flow rate. Our simulation succeeded to demonstrate this trend of cell voltage. In experiment, we also found that the water flushing in GFC caused an immediate voltage change, resulting in voltage recovery or electricity generation stop. Although our simulation could not replicate this immediate voltage change, the supersaturated area obtained by our simulation well corresponded to fogging area appeared on the window surface in the GFC.

  15. Pore-Water Extraction Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.

    2011-06-30

    A series of flow cell experiments was conducted to demonstrate the process of water removal through pore-water extraction in unsaturated systems. In this process, a vacuum (negative pressure) is applied at the extraction well establishing gas and water pressure gradients towards the well. The gradient may force water and dissolved contaminants, such as 99Tc, to move towards the well. The tested flow cell configurations consist of packings, with or without fine-grained well pack material, representing, in terms of particle size distribution, subsurface sediments at the SX tank farm. A pore water extraction process should not be considered to be equal to soil vapor extraction because during soil vapor extraction, the main goal may be to maximize gas removal. For pore water extraction systems, pressure gradients in both the gas and water phases need to be considered while for soil vapor extraction purposes, gas phase flow is the only concern. In general, based on the limited set (six) of flow experiments that were conducted, it can be concluded that pore water extraction rates and cumulative outflow are related to water content, the applied vacuum, and the dimensions of the sediment layer providing the extracted water. In particular, it was observed that application of a 100-cm vacuum (negative pressure) in a controlled manner leads to pore-water extraction until the water pressure gradients towards the well approach zero. Increased cumulative outflow was obtained with an increase in initial water content from 0.11 to 0.18, an increase in the applied vacuum to 200 cm, and when the water-supplying sediment was not limited. The experimental matrix was not sufficiently large to come to conclusions regarding maximizing cumulative outflow.

  16. Multiphase flow experiments, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the water - gas - solute movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Ma, X.; Su, N.

    2013-12-01

    The movement of water and solute into and through the vadose zone is, in essence, an issue of immiscible displacement in pore-space network of a soil. Therefore, multiphase flow and transport in porous media, referring to three medium: air, water, and the solute, pose one of the largest unresolved challenges for porous medium fluid seepage. However, this phenomenon has always been largely neglected. It is expected that a reliable analysis model of the multi-phase flow in soil can truly reflect the process of natural movement about the infiltration, which is impossible to be observed directly. In such cases, geophysical applications of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides the opportunity to measure the water movements into soils directly over a large scale from tiny pore to regional scale, accordingly enable it available both on the laboratory and on the field. In addition, the NMR provides useful information about the pore space properties. In this study, we proposed both laboratory and field experiments to measure the multi-phase flow parameters, together with optimize the model in computer programming based on the fractional partial differential equations (fPDE). In addition, we establish, for the first time, an infiltration model including solute flowing with water, which has huge influence on agriculture and soil environment pollution. Afterwards, with data collected from experiments, we simulate the model and analyze the spatial variability of parameters. Simulations are also conducted according to the model to evaluate the effects of airflow on water infiltration and other effects such as solute and absorption. It has significant meaning to oxygen irrigation aiming to higher crop yield, and shed more light into the dam slope stability. In summary, our framework is a first-time model added in solute to have a mathematic analysis with the fPDE and more instructive to agriculture activities.

  17. Numerical simulation of the geographical sources of water for Continental Scale Experiments (CSEs) Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Sud, Yogesh; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Walker, Gregory K.

    2003-01-01

    There are several important research questions that the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) is actively pursuing, namely: What is the intensity of the water cycle and how does it change? And what is the sustainability of water resources? Much of the research to address these questions is directed at understanding the atmospheric water cycle. In this paper, we have used a new diagnostic tool, called Water Vapor Tracers (WVTs), to quantify the how much precipitation originated as continental or oceanic evaporation. This shows how long water can remain in the atmosphere and how far it can travel. The model-simulated data are analyzed over regions of interest to the GEWEX community, specifically, their Continental Scale Experiments (CSEs) that are in place in the United States, Europe, Asia, Brazil, Africa and Canada. The paper presents quantitative data on how much each continent and ocean on Earth supplies water for each CSE. Furthermore, the analysis also shows the seasonal variation of the water sources. For example, in the United States, summertime precipitation is dominated by continental (land surface) sources of water, while wintertime precipitation is dominated by the Pacific Ocean sources of water. We also analyze the residence time of water in the atmosphere. The new diagnostic shows a longer residence time for water (9.2 days) than more traditional estimates (7.5 days). We emphasize that the results are based on model simulations and they depend on the model s veracity. However, there are many potential uses for the new diagnostic tool in understanding weather processes and large and small scales.

  18. COST Action MP0806 'Particles in Turbulence': International Conference on Fundamentals, Experiments, Numeric and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Markus; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Toschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Turbulent flows are ubiquitous in nature and technology. Turbulent flows govern the transport of particulate matter in nature. For example, in atmospheric flows turbulence impacts the dynamics of aerosols, droplets, spores and of the living world by either chemo-attractant transport or transport of the insects themselves. In marine flows examples include the bubble dynamics that governs the uptake of oxygen and carbon dioxide at the ocean air interface, or the impact of turbulence on the life of phyto- and zoo-plankton, or the spread of pollutants in the oceans and estuaries. Turbulence is equally important for technology from process engineering in chemical and pharmaceutical industries to energy transport and energy generation. The COST Action MP0806 'Particles in Turbulence' has as the primary objective the support of the fundamental research on the statistical properties of particle transport in turbulent flows. The Action provides excellent opportunities for the exchange of ideas by bringing together scientists from different areas of research and applications, or different views on the problem. The COST Action MP0806 organizes several events annually. The conference held at the University of Potsdam from 16 to 18 March 2011 was the main meeting of the Action in 2011. In total 87 researchers from 18 countries (of which 12 were European) met and presented their work, discussed new ideas on theoretical, numerical and experimental approaches, as well as on applications to various scientific domains. The conference attracted also a number of participants from outside the COST Action. The scientific presentations focused on inertial and finite-size particles, particle collisions, as well as advection and reaction in simple and complex flow geometries. Very interesting results were presented at the forefront of the field: the increasing computational power combined with novel numerical techniques now allows for the first time simulation of the dynamics of finites

  19. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  20. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  1. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  2. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  3. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  4. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  5. Towards the field-scale experiments and numerical modeling of pesticides in tropical soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, J.; Ray, C.; Sanda, M.; Vogel, T.; Green, R.; Loo, B.

    2004-12-01

    Intensive use of pesticides in agriculture inevitably poses an increased threat to groundwater. Recent findings of pesticide residues in selected drinking water wells in Hawaii brings further attention to this problem since the primary source for potable water in Hawaii is groundwater from basal or dike-confined aquifers. A challenging research project was carried out at the University of Hawaii to elucidate potential impacts of selected pesticides on groundwater and to understand pesticide behavior in tropical soils. The major outcome of the project will be a recommendation to the Hawaii Department of Agriculture whether to restrict or approve these pesticide products entering Hawaii's agricultural market. Three sites on Oahu, one on Maui, and one on Kauai were selected for field evaluation of leaching. The soil types on Oahu are Wahiawa Oxisol (Poamoho), Molokai Oxisol (Kunia), and Waialua Vertisol (Waimanalo). The soil at Kula, Maui is an andisol (loam of Kula series) and that at Mana, Kauai is a Vertisol of Malama series. Three herbicides (S-metolachlor, imazaquin, sulfometuron methyl), one fungicide (trifloxystrobin), and one insecticide (imidacloprid) were used in our study. In addition, a commonly used herbicide (atrazine) and potassium bromide tracer were applied as reference chemicals. After spraying, the plots were covered with straw to decrease evaporation from bare soil surface and irrigated with aerial sprinklers for a period of 16 weeks. Disturbed soil samples from various depths were taken at regular intervals for pesticide analysis. Water flow dynamics was monitored with TDR probes and tensiometers installed at three depths. Weather data were acquired simultaneously. In-situ measurements of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity were done using a tension disc infiltrometer. Laboratory experiments of soil-water retention, as well as degradation, sorption, and column displacement experiments for the selected pesticides were conducted. Hence, comprehensive

  6. Numerical Simulation of Non-Inductive Startup of the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bryan, John B.

    The dynamics and relaxation of magnetic flux ropes produced during non-inductive startup of the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment are simulated with nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic and two-fluid plasma models. A current filament is produced by a single injector and directed along multiple passes by toroidal and vertical vacuum magnetic field components. Adjacent passes of the current filament merge and reconnect, releasing an axisymmetric current ring from the driven channel. Squashing degree analysis indicates the presence of a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) during ring formation, but the QSL does not solely correspond to magnetic reconnection. Chaotic scattering is also apparent from the distribution of magnetic field-line lengths. The merging of adjacent passes constitutes coherent dynamo action that affects the toroidally-averaged magnetic-field distribution. The MHD dynamo--primarily from the vertical displacement of the current channel--concentrates symmetric poloidal flux and transfers significant energy to the forming flux-rope ring. Accumulation of poloidal flux over many reconnection events contributes to the development of a poloidal magnetic field null near the central column that redirects the driven current filament, such that its path traces a toroidal surface. After cessation of the simulated current drive, temperature and current profiles broaden and closed flux surfaces form rapidly and encompass a large plasma volume. High toroidal-mode number harmonics of the magnetic energy decay preferentially, leaving a tokamak-like plasma suitable for transition to other forms of current drive. Computations with the two-fluid terms in Ohm's Law produce qualitatively similar plasma evolution to the MHD computations. However, for the computations with the two-fluid plasma model, the ion fluid significantly decouples from the electron fluid, weakening the dynamics during magnetic reconnection. This effect is quantified by comparing global and local plasma parameters in

  7. Numerical investigation of the seismo-acoustic responses of the Source Physics Experiment underground explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoun, T.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Vorobiev, O.; Glenn, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed three-dimensional high resolution simulations of underground explosions conducted recently in jointed rock outcrop as part of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) being conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The main goal of the current study is to investigate the effects of the structural and geomechanical properties on the spall phenomena due to underground explosions and its subsequent effect on the seismo-acoustic signature at far distances. Two parametric studies have been undertaken to assess the impact of different 1) conceptual geological models including a single layer and two layers model, with and without joints and with and without varying geomechanical properties, and 2) depth of bursts of the explosions and explosion yields. Through these investigations we have explored not only the near-field response of the explosions but also the far-field responses of the seismic and the acoustic signatures. The near-field simulations were conducted using the Eulerian and Lagrangian codes, GEODYN and GEODYN -L, respectively, while the far-field seismic simulations were conducted using the elastic wave propagation code, WPP, and the acoustic response using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz-Rayleigh time-dependent approximation code, KHR. Though a series of simulations, we have recorded the velocity field histories a) at the ground surface on an acoustic-source-patch for the acoustic simulations, and 2) on a seismic-source-box for the seismic simulations. We first analyzed the SPE3 and SPE4-prime experimental data and simulated results, and then simulated SPE5, SPE6/7 to anticipate their seismo-acoustic responses given conditions of uncertainties. SPE experiments were conducted in a granitic formation; we have extended the parametric study to include other geological settings such dolomite and alluvial formations. These parametric studies enabled us 1) investigating the geotechnical and geophysical key parameters that impact the seismo

  8. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  9. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  10. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  11. On the thrust performance of a 2D flapping foil in a forward flight condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Sunil Manohar; Lua, Kim Boon; Lim, Tee Tai

    2015-11-01

    Past studies have shown that the thrust performance of a 2D airfoil undergoing simple harmonic motion in both pitch and heave in a forward flight condition is dependent on maximum effective angle of attack (αo) and Strouhal number (ST) . For a given αo, it is found that the thrust coefficient (CT) increases with ST until it reaches a peak value at the critical Strouhal number (STc) ; beyond which CT deteriorates considerably. In order to extend STc and therefore increase the max.CT, the airfoil must oscillate at a higher αo. Further, it is found that, regardless of αo thrust degeneration is accompanied by cessation of the induced effective angle of attack profile (α(t)) to exhibit simple harmonic function of time. As to why non simple harmonic function of α(t) is detrimental to thrust generation is not fully understood. In an attempt to better understand this phenomenon, both numerical simulations and comparative experiments are performed on a 2D flapping elliptic foil at Re of 5000. Our results show that the proximity of the leading edge vortex from the previous stroke to the oscillating foil plays a crucial role in the thrust generation. Detailed results will be discussed in the presentation.

  12. 3D/2D image registration using weighted histogram of gradient directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafurian, Soheil; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Tan, Virak; Li, Kang

    2015-03-01

    Three dimensional (3D) to two dimensional (2D) image registration is crucial in many medical applications such as image-guided evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders. One of the key problems is to estimate the 3D CT- reconstructed bone model positions (translation and rotation) which maximize the similarity between the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and the 2D fluoroscopic images using a registration method. This problem is computational-intensive due to a large search space and the complicated DRR generation process. Also, finding a similarity measure which converges to the global optimum instead of local optima adds to the challenge. To circumvent these issues, most existing registration methods need a manual initialization, which requires user interaction and is prone to human error. In this paper, we introduce a novel feature-based registration method using the weighted histogram of gradient directions of images. This method simplifies the computation by searching the parameter space (rotation and translation) sequentially rather than simultaneously. In our numeric simulation experiments, the proposed registration algorithm was able to achieve sub-millimeter and sub-degree accuracies. Moreover, our method is robust to the initial guess. It can tolerate up to +/-90°rotation offset from the global optimal solution, which minimizes the need for human interaction to initialize the algorithm.

  13. Ion acoustic wave collapse via two-ion wave decay: 2D Vlasov simulation and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Thomas; Berger, Richard; Banks, Jeffrey; Brunner, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    The decay of ion acoustic waves (IAWs) via two-ion wave decay may transfer energy from the electric field of the IAWs to the particles, resulting in a significant heating of resonant particles. This process has previously been shown in numerical simulations to decrease the plasma reflectivity due to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Two-ion wave decay is a fundamental property of ion acoustic waves that occurs over most if not all of the parameter space of relevance to inertial confinement fusion experiments, and can lead to a sudden collapse of IAWs. The treatment of all species kinetically, and in particular the electrons, is required to describe the decay process correctly. We present fully kinetic 2D+2V Vlasov simulations of IAWs undergoing decay to a highly nonlinear turbulent state using the code LOKI. The scaling of the decay rate with characteristic plasma parameters and wave amplitude is shown. A new theory describing two-ion wave decay in 2D, that incorporates key kinetic properties of the electrons, is presented and used to explain quantitatively for the first time the observed decay of IAWs. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734. Funded by LDRD 15-ERD-038 and supported by LLNL Grand Challenge allocation.

  14. Effect of 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) metabolism in vitamin D-deficient rats infused with 1,25-(OH)2D3

    SciTech Connect

    Yamato, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Fukumoto, S.; Ikeda, K.; Ishizuka, S.; Ogata, E.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that administration of 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (24,25-(OH)2D3) to calcium (Ca)-deficient rats causes a dose-dependent reduction in markedly elevated serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 level. Although the results suggested that the metabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 was accelerated by 24,25-(OH)2D3, those experiments could not define whether the enhanced metabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 played a role in the reduction in the serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 level. In the present study, in order to address this issue more specifically, serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 was maintained solely by exogenous administration through miniosmotic pumps of 1,25-(OH)2D3 into vitamin D-deficient rats. Thus, by measuring the serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 concentration, the effect of 24,25-(OH)2D3 on the MCR of 1,25-(OH)2D3 could be examined. Administration of 24,25-(OH)2D3 caused a dose-dependent enhancement in the MCR of 1,25-(OH)2D3, and 1 microgram/100 g rat.day 24,25-(OH)2D3, which elevated serum 24,25-(OH)2D3 to 8.6 +/- 1.3 ng/ml, significantly increased MCR and suppressed serum levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3. The effect of 24,25-(OH)2D3 on 1,25-(OH)2D3 metabolism developed with a rapid time course, and the recovery of iv injected (1 beta-3H)1,25-(OH)2D3 in blood was significantly reduced within 1 h. In addition, there was an increase in radioactivity in the water-soluble fraction of serum as well as in urine, suggesting that 1,25-(OH)2D3 is rapidly degraded to a water-soluble metabolite(s). Furthermore, the reduction in serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 was associated with a reduction in both serum and urinary Ca levels. Because the conversion of (3H)24,25-(OH)2D3 to (3H)1,24,25-(OH)2D3 or other metabolites was minimal in these rats, 24,25-(OH)2D3 appears to act without being converted into other metabolites. These results demonstrate that 24,25-(OH)2D3 rapidly stimulates the metabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and reduces its serum level.

  15. The effect of grain boundary sliding on the rheology of polymineralic rocks: Nature and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevitt, J. M.; Piazolo, S.; Evans, L.; Toy, V. G.

    2013-12-01

    Geodynamic models of deformation in the crust and mantle require constitutive equations to provide a physical description of the rheology. A particularly challenging task is to derive constitutive equations that account for a variety of different micromechanical processes. In this project, microstructural maps of naturally deformed mylonites motivate numerical simulations in Elle, an open-source modeling platform for simulating the two-dimensional evolution of microstructures. The simulati