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Sample records for 2-d p-wave velocity

  1. Uppermost mantle P wave velocities beneath Turkey and Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Chen, W.; Molnar, P.

    1980-01-01

    The uppermost mantle P wave velocities beneath Turkey and Iran were estimated by applying the conventional travel time-distance relation method to arrival times of well located earthquakes recorded at a few stations. The average uppermost mantle P wave velocity under Turkey is estimated from two stations of the World Wide Standardized Seismograph Network (WWSSN), Istanbul and Tabriz. The data are consistent with a crust of uniform, but poorly determined, thickness and an uppermost mantle P wave velocity of 7.73 +- 0.08 km/s. This velocity is very similar to that for the Aegean Sea and suggests that its structure could be closely related to that beneath Turkey. For Iran, the results calculated from travel times to three WWSSN stations, Meshed, Shiraz, and Tabriz, can be explained by a crust dipping toward the south-southeast at about 1/sup 0/ with an uppermost mantle P wave velocity of 8.0 +- 0.1 km/s. If the crustal thickness were 34 km in the north it would reach about 49 km in the south. Based on these uppermost mantle velocities, the temperature at Moho beneath Turkey is probably close to the melting temperature of peridotite but that beneath Iran is probably lower.

  2. Teleseismic P-wave Velocity Tomography Beneath The Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Nyblade, A. A.; Rodgers, A.; Al-Amri, A.

    2004-12-01

    We have imaged tomographically the three-dimensional velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Arabian Peninsula using teleseismic P-waves. The data came from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network (SANDSN) operated by King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and three permanent stations (RAYN, EIL and MRNI). The KACST network consists of 38 stations (27 broadband and 11 short-period) spread throughout most of western Saudi Arabia. P wave travel time residuals were obtained for 131 earthquakes in the distance range from 30\\deg to 90\\deg, resulting in 1716 rays paths. We find a pronounced low velocity anomaly beneath the southeastern Arabian Shield and southern Red Sea that likely represents a northward continuation of the Afar hotspot. We also image smaller low velocity anomalies beneath the Dead Sea Transform, the Gulf of Aqaba, and the northeastern corner of the Arabian Shield. The origin of these low velocity anomalies is uncertain.

  3. P wave velocity structure beneath Greenland using teleseismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Lee, W.; Yoo, H.

    2013-12-01

    A three-dimensional P-wave velocity model was inverted with 3032 ray paths from 416 events observed on the GLISN network from 2009 to 2013. The relative travel times were computed with respect to the IASP91 global reference model using the multi-channel cross correlation method (MCCC) by VanDecar and Crosson {, 1990 #1}. Our model space was parameterized laterally with 1°×1° from 55°N to 85°N in latitude and from 20°W to 80°W in longitude. This high latitude model space causes spatial distortion in the model parameters on the spherical coordinate for the teleseismic body wave tomography. To minimize a distortion in the model parameters the spherical coordinate system was rotated as the referent stations SUMG and SCO, located on the middle of Greenland, to equator, and all stations and seismic events were converted to this new coordinate system. All ray paths were computed by a three dimensional ray tracing algorithm developed with pseudobending technique and Snell's law {Zhao, 1992 #1}, and travel times were corrected by ice and crustal thicknesses for each observed station as well. Our inverted model shows a broad low velocity anomaly ( -1.5%) in the mid-eastern parts of Greenland, which is connected to the low velocity anomaly beneath Iceland. Another low velocity anomaly was observed below 300km in the middle of Greenland where the Icelandic mantle plume was located in 60Ma. P wave velocity anomaly depth slices from 150 km to 400 km on the rotated coordinate from the center of Green land to the equator.

  4. Hammering Yucca Flat, Part One: P-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, D. G.; Abbott, R. E.; Preston, L. A.; Hampshire, J. B., II

    2015-12-01

    Explosion-source phenomenology is best studied when competing signals (such as instrument, site, and propagation effects), are well understood. The second phase of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), is moving from granite geology to alluvium geology at Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site. To improve subsurface characterization of Yucca Flat (and therefore better understand propagation and site effects), an active-source seismic survey was conducted using a novel 13,000-kg impulsive hammer source. The source points, spaced 200 m apart, covered a N-S transect spanning 18 km. Three component, 2-Hz geophones were used to record useable signals out to 10 km. We inverted for P-wave velocity by computing travel times using a finite-difference 3D eikonal solver, and then compared that to the picked travel times using a linearized iterative inversion scheme. Preliminary results from traditional reflection processing methods are also presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath the Baikal Rift Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, R. A.; Nyblade, A. A.; Boman, E. C.

    2001-12-01

    Over 100 p wave travel times from the 1500 km en echelon Baikal Rift system are used in this study.The events range 3 to 13 degrees from Talaya, Russia (TLY) along the axis of southwest northeast trending rift in East Siberia. A Herglotz Wiechert inversion of these events resolved a crust of 6.4 km/s and a gradient in the mantle starting at 35 km depth and 7.7 km/s down to 200 km depth and 8.2 km/s. This is compatible with Gao et al,1994 cross sectional structure which cuts the rift at about 400km from TLY. The Baikal Rift hosts the deepest lake and is the most seismically active rift in the world. It is one of the few continental rifts, it separates the Siberian craton and the Syan-Baikal mobile fold belt. Two events, the March 21 1999 magnitude 5.7 earthquake 638 km from TLY and the November 13th 1995 magnitude 5.9 earthquake 863 km from TLY were modeled for there PnL wave structure using the discrete wavenumber method and the Harvard CMT solutions with adjusted depths from p-pP times. The PnL signals match well. A genetic algorithm will used to perturb the velocity structure and compare to a selection of the events between 3 and 13 degrees many will require moment tensor solutions.

  6. The correlations between the saturated and dry P-wave velocity of rocks.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, S

    2007-11-01

    Sometimes engineers need to estimate the wet-rock P-wave velocity from the dry-rock P-wave velocity. An estimation equation embracing all rock classes will be useful for the rock engineers. To investigate the predictability of wet-rock P-wave velocity from the dry-rock P-wave velocity, P-wave velocity measurements were performed on 41 different rock types, 11 of which were igneous, 15 of which were sedimentary and 15 of which was metamorphic. In addition to the dry- and wet-rock P-wave velocity measurements, the P-wave velocity changing as a function of saturation degree was studied. Moreover, dry-rock S-wave velocity measurements were conducted. The test results were modeled using Gassmann's and Wood's theory and it was seen that the measured data did not fit the theories. The unconformity is due to the fact that the theories are valid for high-porosity unconsolidated sediments at low frequencies. Gassmann's equation was modified for the rocks except high-porosity unconsolidated sediments. The dry- and wet-rock P-wave velocity values were evaluated using regression analysis. A strong linear correlation between the dry- and wet-rock P-wave velocities was found. Regression analyses were repeated for the rock classes and it was shown that correlation coefficients were increased. Concluding remark is that the derived equations can be used for the prediction of wet-rock P-wave velocity from the dry-rock P-wave velocity.

  7. Influence of water saturation on ultrasonic P-wave velocity in weakly compacted sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikri Niyartama, Thaqibul; Fauzi, Umar; Fatkhan

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of Ultrasonic P-wave velocities were conducted in weakly compacted sandstone with varying degree of water saturations. We used P wave transducer at frequency 63 kHz and imbibition technique in order to study the influence of water saturation on the P-wave velocity. Our experiment showed that the P-wave velocity (Vp) was reduced significantly at the beginning of the imbibition process. The variations on travel times and the amplitude changes were detected at any degree of saturation. The first and second amplitude of P wave decreased as water saturation (Sw ) increased in the range of 0.1 to 0.6 in B5 sample, the amplitude increased again afterward. The shifting peaks of the signal that indicated attenuation were also observed in the experimental.

  8. Anisotropic P-wave velocity analysis and seismic imaging in onshore Kutch sedimentary basin of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Laxmidhar; Khare, Prakash; Sarkar, Dipankar

    2011-08-01

    The long-offset P-wave seismic reflection data has observable non-hyperbolic moveout, which depend on two parameters such as normal moveout velocity ( Vnmo) and the anisotropy parameter( η). Anisotropy (e.g., directional dependence of velocity at a fixed spatial location in a medium) plays an important role in seismic imaging. It is difficult to know the presence of anisotropy in the subsurface geological formations only from P-wave seismic data and special analysis is required for this. The presence of anisotropy causes two major distortions of moveout in P-wave seismic reflection data. First, in contrast to isotropic media, normal-moveout (NMO) velocity differs from the vertical velocity; and the second is substantial increase of deviations in hyperbolic moveout in an anisotropic layer. Hence, with the help of conventional velocity analysis based on short-spread moveout (stacking) velocities do not provide enough information to determine the true vertical velocity in a transversely isotropic media with vertical symmetry axis (VTI media). Therefore, it is essential to estimate the single anisotropic parameter ( η) from the long-offset P-wave seismic data. It has been demonstrated here as a case study with long-offset P-wave seismic data acquired in onshore Kutch sedimentary basin of western India that suitable velocity analysis using Vnmo and η can improve the stacking image obtained from conventional velocity analysis.

  9. Gas hydrate and P-Wave Velocity Distribution in the Yaquina Basin at the Peruvian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebscher, C.; Gajewski, D.; Grobys, J.; Kukowski, N.; Netzeband, G.; Wagner, M.; Bialas, J.

    2003-04-01

    The lower boundary of the methane hydrate stability zone in continental margin sediments is often marked by a strong, phase reversed reflection subparallel to the seafloor, called the bottom simulating reflector (BSR). High resolution multichannel seismic (MCS) data from the Yaquina Basin offshore Peru at 8 deg S show a BSR that is varying laterally in amplitude as well as in continuity. The amplitudes of the reflections above the BSR also vary with the appearance of the BSR. Where the BSR is strong, the reflections above it are weaker compared to areas where the BSR is weak. And although the strong part of the BSR is underlain immediately by strong reflections, reflections several hundred meters beneath the BSR appear weaker than those where the BSR is weak. This variation indicates significant heterogeneity in the distribution of gas and gas hydrate in this area. Chemoherms observed at the Yaquina Basin sea floor indicate the presence of free gas in the sediments up to the seafloor. The presence of gas and gas hydrate within the sediment sequence significantly influences the P-wave velocity in the affected layers. Therefore a detailed analysis of velocity variations enables to understand the apparently different conditions for the formation of gas hydrate along the BSR and the migration paths of the free gas. Ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data from profiles coincident with the MCS data can provide such detailed velocity depth information. Velocity analysis from OBS data included 2D-ray tracing and 1D-interval-velocity analysis by means of DIX-inversion. In order to find a trade-off between vertical resolution and minimization of errors caused by the sensitivity of the DIX' formula to velocity variations in thin layers, the data have undergone a Kirchhoff wave-equation datuming and adjacent coherence filtering was applied to the data to eliminate the one sided travel path through the water column of the OBS-observations. The derived velocity structure confirms

  10. Anisotropic changes in P-wave velocity and attenuation during deformation and fluid infiltration of granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanchits, S.A.; Lockner, D.A.; Ponomarev, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    Fluid infiltration and pore fluid pressure changes are known to have a significant effect on the occurrence of earthquakes. Yet, for most damaging earthquakes, with nucleation zones below a few kilometers depth, direct measurements of fluid pressure variations are not available. Instead, pore fluid pressures are inferred primarily from seismic-wave propagation characteristics such as Vp/Vs ratio, attenuation, and reflectivity contacts. We present laboratory measurements of changes in P-wave velocity and attenuation during the injection of water into a granite sample as it was loaded to failure. A cylindrical sample of Westerly granite was deformed at constant confining and pore pressures of 50 and 1 MPa, respectively. Axial load was increased in discrete steps by controlling axial displacement. Anisotropic P-wave velocity and attenuation fields were determined during the experiment using an array of 13 piezoelectric transducers. At the final loading steps (86% and 95% of peak stress), both spatial and temporal changes in P-wave velocity and peak-to-peak amplitudes of P and S waves were observed. P-wave velocity anisotropy reached a maximum of 26%. Transient increases in attenuation of up to 483 dB/m were also observed and were associated with diffusion of water into the sample. We show that velocity and attenuation of P waves are sensitive to the process of opening of microcracks and the subsequent resaturation of these cracks as water diffuses in from the surrounding region. Symmetry of the orientation of newly formed microcracks results in anisotropic velocity and attenuation fields that systematically evolve in response to changes in stress and influx of water. With proper scaling, these measurements provide constraints on the magnitude and duration of velocity and attenuation transients that can be expected to accompany the nucleation of earthquakes in the Earth's crust.

  11. Correlating P-wave Velocity with the Physico-Mechanical Properties of Different Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Manoj

    2013-04-01

    In mining and civil engineering projects, physico-mechanical properties of the rock affect both the project design and the construction operation. Determination of various physico-mechanical properties of rocks is expensive and time consuming, and sometimes it is very difficult to get cores to perform direct tests to evaluate the rock mass. The purpose of this work is to investigate the relationships between the different physico-mechanical properties of the various rock types with the P-wave velocity. Measurement of P-wave velocity is relatively cheap, non-destructive and easy to carry out. In this study, representative rock mass samples of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks were collected from the different locations of India to obtain an empirical relation between P-wave velocity and uniaxial compressive strength, tensile strength, punch shear, density, slake durability index, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, impact strength index and Schmidt hammer rebound number. A very strong correlation was found between the P-wave velocity and different physico-mechanical properties of various rock types with very high coefficients of determination. To check the sensitivity of the empirical equations, Students t test was also performed, which confirmed the validity of the proposed correlations.

  12. Changes in P-wave velocity with different full waveform sonic transmitter centre frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almalki, Majed; Harris, Brett; Dupuis, J. Christian

    2015-05-01

    Full waveform sonic logging, with the transmitter set at different centre frequencies, often provides different compressional wave velocities over the same interval. There may be several reasons why these velocity differences are recovered where the source has different frequency content. Examples include: intrinsic dispersion, scattering dispersion, geometric dispersion, processing artefacts and acquisition artefacts. We acquired and analysed multifrequency monopole full waveform sonic logging data from the cored drill hole intersecting a high-permeability sandy aquifer in the Northern Gnangara Mound, Perth Basin, Western Australia. A key interval of the shallow, sand-dominated Yarragadee Formation was selected and logged four times with transmitter centre frequencies set to 1, 3, 5 and 15 kHz. We compute apparent velocity dispersion as the percentage velocity differences in the P-wave velocity recovered from full waveform sonic logs completed at different dominant transmitter centre frequencies. We find that high-permeability sediments could be placed into broad groups: cross-bedded and non-cross-bedded sandstones. We find a distinctly different relationship between apparent P-wave velocity dispersion and permeability for cross-bedded and non-cross-bedded sandstones. Cross plots for the two sediment types show a general trend of increasing apparent dispersion with increasing permeability. Grouping the sandstone layers based on sediment type, as observed from core samples, illustrates different but positive correlation between the apparent P-wave velocity dispersion and permeability in these shallow, weakly-consolidated sandstones. The cross-bedded sandstone, for its part, has a wider range of permeability than the non-cross-bedded sandstone but a smaller range of apparent P-wave velocity dispersion. Given these results, our hypothesis is that while permeability plays a role, other factors such as geometric dispersion or scattering dispersion likely contribute the

  13. 3D P-wave Velocity Structure Beneath the Eastern Canadian Shield and Northern Appalachian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villemaire, M.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Bastow, I. D.

    2010-12-01

    Previous seismic studies of the upper mantle of the Canadian Shield have indicated some low-velocity anomalies within the cratonic lithosphere in the Abitibi-Grenville region. The lack of seismograph station coverage to the east and south-east of the studied area prevented definition of the 3D geometry of these anomalies. Adding new stations from the province of Quebec and from the northeastern United States allows us to carry out new studies of the P-wave velocity structure of the upper mantle, in order to better understand the complexity of the region and the interaction of the lithosphere with possible thermal anomalies in the underlying mantle. We analysed teleseismic P wave arrivals from almost 200 earthquakes, recorded at 45 stations deployed across the provinces of Quebec and Ontario and across the northeastern US. The relative arrival times of teleseismic P waves across the array were measured using the cross-correlation method of VanDecar & Crosson (1990). The travel time data were then inverted to estimate the 3D P-wave velocity structure beneath the region, using the least-squares tomographic inversion code of VanDecar (1991). The model shows some interesting features. We see a diffuse low-velocity structure beneath New-England that extends to at least 500 km depth, and that may be related to the Appalachian Mountain belt. There is also a linear low-velocity structure, flanked by higher velocities, perpendicular to the Grenville Front, and along the Ottawa Valley. We interpret this feature as a mantle signature of the Great Meteor Hotspot track. We have looked for systematic differences between the mantle underlying the Archean Superior craton and the Proterozoic Grenville Province but did not find a significant difference in the upper mantle. We investigate the role of thermal and compositional effects to interpret the velocity models and to relate the patterns of the anomalies to past and present tectonic structures.

  14. A detailed three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure in Italy from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, Raffaele; Castello, Barbara; Chiarabba, Claudio; Grazia Ciaccio, Maria

    2010-05-01

    We here present an updated high resolution tomographic P-wave velocity model of the lithosphere in Italy, obtained by adding about 296,600 P-wave arrival observations from ~7.200 earthquakes, from the preliminary update of the CSI 2.0, recorded in the period 2003-2007, to the previously inverted dataset (165,000 P-wave arrivals).Additional events have been strictly selected for location quality (azimuthal gap < 135°; horizontal error <= 2km; vertical error <= 4km; rms < 1s) and a number of P-wave observations >= 8. Our results confirm the main structural features in the best resolved parts of the inverted volume and show a much better resolution in some of the previously less resolved areas, due to both the larger number of inverted phases and the more even distribution of seismic stations. Surface basins and relationships between the Adriatic, Tyrrhenian, and European plates are better imaged. The integrated analysis of 20 years of seismicity and the high resolution tomographic images obtained, allows us to add new constraints to the kynematics and the geodynamics of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in this region. We also present preliminary results obtained by thickening the nodes spacing from 15km x15km to 10km x 10km and we finally compare the complex velocity structures imaged by the inversion of the two different grid spacing.

  15. Determination of basic physical and mechanical properties of basaltic rocks from P-wave velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakuş, Askeri; Akatay, Mahmut

    2013-12-01

    Physical and mechanical properties of basaltic rocks used as main building material in historical buildings in Diyarbakir show great diversity depending on the place of origin. Especially, earthquake studies as well as restoration jobs and civil engineers and architects who work on building dynamics need to know basic material properties of basaltic rocks that are the main building material. In this study, the basalt samples obtained from 18 different locations of the Diyarbakir area were tested in order to estimate the main material properties of basalts used in historical buildings without collecting samples from them. Subsequently, statistical relationships between the nondestructive P-wave velocity and other properties of basalts were investigated. Consequently, highly correlated models (R2 = 0.717-0.890) were obtained between P-wave velocity and density, porosity, uniaxial compressive strength, Brazilian tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and Poisson's ratio.

  16. Crustal P-wave velocity model for the central-western region of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, J.; Escudero, C. R.; Perez, O. G.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Several studies require a p-wave velocity model to obtain accurate results moreover such models could provide an insight of the tectonic structure of the study area. Accordingly, in this study we estimate the crustal 3D p-wave velocity model for the Jalisco Block located at the central-western region of Mexico. The Jalisco Block is limited on its eastern side by the Colima and Tepic-Zacoalcos Rifts, and the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt; while on its western side it is limited by the Mesoamerican Trench. Cocos and Rivera plates are subducting beneath the Jalisco Block conforming a tectonically complex region. We used earthquakes occurring within the limits of lithosphere volume from which we want to estimate the velocity model. Such events were registered by the Mapping the Rivera Subduction Zone experiment (MARS) and the Seismic and Acelerometric Network of Jalisco (RESAJ). During MARS experiment 51broadband stations active from January 2006 to June 2007 were deployed while RESAJ by July of 2012consists of nine active stations however more stations will be deployed until reach 30 stations. The velocity model is estimated using the Fast Marching Tomography (FMTOMO) software. FMTOMO uses the Fast Marching Method (FMM) in order to solve the forward problem; the FMM is a numerical algorithm that tracks the interfaces evolution along a nodes narrow band, and travel times are updated solving the eikonal equation. Finally , the inverse problem is about adjusting the model parameters (interface depth, velocity, hypocenter location) in order to try to satisfy the observed data (travel times). We perform a resolution test using several events that show good resolution results up to a 60 km depth. We present a 3D p-wave velocity model, we compare our results within the MARS data with previous results for greater depths, approximately the upper mantle, finally we also present studies towards the northern portion of the Jalisco Block using the RESAJ data.

  17. Prediction of building limestone physical and mechanical properties by means of ultrasonic P-wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Concu, Giovanna; De Nicolo, Barbara; Valdes, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate ultrasonic P-wave velocity as a feature for predicting some physical and mechanical properties that describe the behavior of local building limestone. To this end, both ultrasonic testing and compressive tests were carried out on several limestone specimens and statistical correlation between ultrasonic velocity and density, compressive strength, and modulus of elasticity was studied. The effectiveness of ultrasonic velocity was evaluated by regression, with the aim of observing the coefficient of determination r(2) between ultrasonic velocity and the aforementioned parameters, and the mathematical expressions of the correlations were found and discussed. The strong relations that were established between ultrasonic velocity and limestone properties indicate that these parameters can be reasonably estimated by means of this nondestructive parameter. This may be of great value in a preliminary phase of the diagnosis and inspection of stone masonry conditions, especially when the possibility of sampling material cores is reduced.

  18. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Mt. Etna, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villasenor, A.; Benz, H.M.; Filippi, L.; De Luca, G.; Scarpa, R.; Patane, G.; Vinciguerra, S.

    1998-01-01

    The three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Mt. Etna is determined to depths of 15 km by tomographic inversion of first arrival times from local earthquakes recorded by a network of 29 permanent and temporary seismographs. Results show a near-vertical low-velocity zone that extends from beneath the central craters to a depth of 10 km. This low-velocity region is coincident with a band of steeply-dipping seismicity, suggesting a magmatic conduit that feeds the summit eruptions. The most prominent structure is an approximately 8-km-diameter high-velocity body located between 2 and 12 km depth below the southeast flank of the volcano. This high-velocity body is interpreted as a remnant mafic intrusion that is an important structural feature influencing both volcanism and east flank slope stability and faulting.

  19. Prediction of Building Limestone Physical and Mechanical Properties by Means of Ultrasonic P-Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Concu, Giovanna; De Nicolo, Barbara; Valdes, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate ultrasonic P-wave velocity as a feature for predicting some physical and mechanical properties that describe the behavior of local building limestone. To this end, both ultrasonic testing and compressive tests were carried out on several limestone specimens and statistical correlation between ultrasonic velocity and density, compressive strength, and modulus of elasticity was studied. The effectiveness of ultrasonic velocity was evaluated by regression, with the aim of observing the coefficient of determination r2 between ultrasonic velocity and the aforementioned parameters, and the mathematical expressions of the correlations were found and discussed. The strong relations that were established between ultrasonic velocity and limestone properties indicate that these parameters can be reasonably estimated by means of this nondestructive parameter. This may be of great value in a preliminary phase of the diagnosis and inspection of stone masonry conditions, especially when the possibility of sampling material cores is reduced. PMID:24511286

  20. Regional P wave velocity structure of the Northern Cascadia Subduction Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramachandran, K.; Hyndman, R.D.; Brocher, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the first regional three-dimensional, P wave velocity model for the Northern Cascadia Subduction. Zone (SW British Columbia and NW Washington State) constructed through tomographic inversion of first-arrival traveltime data from active source experiments together with earthquake traveltime data recorded at permanent stations. The velocity model images the structure of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, megathrust, and the fore-arc crust and upper mantle. Beneath southern Vancouver Island the megathrust above the Juan de Fuca plate is characterized by a broad zone (25-35 km depth) having relatively low velocities of 6.4-6.6 km/s. This relative low velocity zone coincides with the location of most of the episodic tremors recently mapped beneath Vancouver Island, and its low velocity may also partially reflect the presence of trapped fluids and sheared lower crustal rocks. The rocks of the Olympic Subduction Complex are inferred to deform aseismically as evidenced by the lack of earthquakes withi the low-velocity rocks. The fore-arc upper mantle beneath the Strait of Georgia and Puget Sound is characterized by velocities of 7.2-7.6 km/s. Such low velocities represent regional serpentinization of the upper fore-arc mantle and provide evidence for slab dewatering and densification. Tertiary sedimentary basins in the Strait of Georgia and Puget Lowland imaged by the velocity model lie above the inferred region of slab dewatering and densification and may therefore partly result from a higher rate of slab sinking. In contrast, sedimentary basins in the Strait of Juan de Fuca lie in a synclinal depression in the Crescent Terrane. The correlation of in-slab earthquake hypocenters M>4 with P wave velocities greater than 7.8 km/s at the hypocenters suggests that they originate near the oceanic Moho of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. The P-wave boundary of the Large-Low Shear Velocity Province beneath the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Daniel A.; Rost, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    The Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) in the lower mantle represent volumetrically significant thermal or chemical or thermo-chemical heterogeneities. Their structure and boundaries have been widely studied, mainly using S-waves, but much less is known about their signature in the P-wavefield. We use an extensive dataset recorded at USArray to create, for the first time, a high-resolution map of the location, shape, sharpness, and extent of the boundary of the Pacific LLSVP using P(Pdiff)-waves. We find that the northern edge of the Pacific LLSVP is shallow dipping (26° relative to the horizontal) and diffuse (∼120 km wide transition zone) whereas the eastern edge is steeper dipping (70°) and apparently sharp (∼40 km wide). We trace the LLSVP boundary up to ∼500 km above the CMB in most areas, and 700 km between 120° and 90°W at the eastern extent of the boundary. Apparent P-wave velocity drops are ∼1-3% relative to PREM, indicating a strong influence of LLSVPs on P-wave velocity, at least in the high-frequency wavefield, in contrast to previous studies. A localised patch with a greater velocity drop of ∼15-25% is detected, defined by large magnitude gradients of the travel-time residuals. We identify this as a likely location of an Ultra-Low Velocity Zone (ULVZ), matching the location of a previously detected ULVZ in this area. The boundary of a separate low velocity anomaly, of a similar height to the LLSVP, is detected in the north-west Pacific, matching tomographic images. This outlier appears to be connected to the main LLSVP through a narrow channel close to the CMB and may be in the process of joining or splitting from the main LLSVP. We also see strong velocity increases in the lower mantle to the east of the LLSVP, likely detecting subducted material beneath central America. The LLSVP P-wave boundary is similar to that determined in high-resolution S-wave studies and follows the -0.4% ΔVS iso-velocity contour in the S40RTS

  2. On Animating 2D Velocity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex

    2000-01-01

    A velocity field. even one that represents a steady state flow implies a dynamical system. Animated velocity fields is an important tool in understanding such complex phenomena. This paper looks at a number of techniques that animate velocity fields and propose two new alternatives, These are texture advection and streamline cycling. The common theme among these techniques is the use of advection on some texture to generate a realistic animation of the velocity field. Texture synthesis and selection for these methods are presented. Strengths and weaknesses of the techniques are also discussed in conjunction with several examples.

  3. On Animating 2D Velocity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A velocity field, even one that represents a steady state flow, implies a dynamical system. Animated velocity fields is an important tool in understanding such complex phenomena. This paper looks at a number of techniques that animate velocity fields and propose two new alternatives. These are texture advection and streamline cycling. The common theme among these techniques is the use of advection on some texture to generate a realistic animation of the velocity field. Texture synthesis and selection for these methods are presented. Strengths and weaknesses of the techniques are also discussed in conjunctions with several examples.

  4. P wave velocity of Proterozoic upper mantle beneath central and southern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Vogfjord, Kristin S.; Langston, Charles A.

    1996-05-01

    P wave velocity structure of Proterozoic upper mantle beneath central and southern Africa was investigated by forward modeling of Pnl waveforms from four moderate size earthquakes. The source-receiver path of one event crosses central Africa and lies outside the African superswell while the source-receiver paths for the other events cross Proterozoic lithosphere within southern Africa, inside the African superswell. Three observables (Pn waveshape, PL-Pn time, and Pn/PL amplitude ratio) from the Pnl waveform were used to constrain upper mantle velocity models in a grid search procedure. For central Africa, synthetic seismograms were computed for 5880 upper mantle models using the generalized ray method and wavenumber integration; synthetic seismograms for 216 models were computed for southern Africa. Successful models were taken as those whose synthetic seismograms had similar waveshapes to the observed waveforms, as well as PL-Pn times within 3 s of the observed times and Pn/PL amplitude ratios within 30% of the observed ratio. Successful models for central Africa yield a range of uppermost mantle velocity between 7.9 and 8.3 km s-1, velocities between 8.3 and 8.5 km s-1 at a depth of 200 km, and velocity gradients that are constant or slightly positive. For southern Africa, successful models yield uppermost mantle velocities between 8.1 and 8.3 km s-1, velocities between 7.9 and 8.4 km s-1 at a depth of 130 km, and velocity gradients between -0.001 and 0.001 s-1. Because velocity gradients are controlled strongly by structure at the bottoming depths for Pn waves, it is not easy to compare the velocity gradients obtained for central and southern Africa. For central Africa, Pn waves turn at depths of about 150-200 km, whereas for southern Africa they bottom at ˜100-150 km depth. With regard to the origin of the African superswell, our results do not have sufficient resolution to test hypotheses that invoke simple lithospheric reheating. However, our models are not

  5. Minimum 1-D P-wave velocity reference model for Northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeifar, Meysam; Diehl, Tobias; Kissling, Edi

    2016-04-01

    Uniform high-precision earthquake location is of importance in a seismically active area like northern Iran where the earthquake catalogue is a prerequisite for seismic hazard assessment and tectonic interpretation. We compile a complete and consistent local earthquake data set for the northern Iran region, using information from two independently operating seismological networks, Iran Seismological Center (IRSC) network, administered by the Geophysical Institute of Tehran University, and Iran Broadband network administered by International Institute of Engineering Earthquake and Seismology (IIEES). Special care is taken during the merging process to reduce the number of errors in the data, including station parameters, event pairing, phase identification, and to the assessment of quantitative observation uncertainties. The derived P-wave 1D-velocity model for Northern Iran may serve for consistent routine high-precision earthquake location and as initial reference model for 3D seismic tomography.

  6. P wave crustal velocity structure in the greater Mount Rainier area from local earthquake tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Lees, J.M.; Malone, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    We present results from a local earthquake tomographic imaging experiment in the greater Mount Rainier area. We inverted P wave arrival times from local earthquakes recorded at permanent and temporary Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network seismographs between 1980 and 1996. We used a method similar to that described by Lees and Crosson [1989], modified to incorporate the parameter separation method for decoupling the hypocenter and velocity problems. In the upper 7 km of the resulting model there is good correlation between velocity anomalies and surface geology. Many focal mechanisms within the St. Helens seismic zone have nodal planes parallel to the epicentral trend as well as to a north-south trending low-velocity trough, leading us to speculate that the trough represents a zone of structural weakness in which a moderate (M 6.5-7.0) earthquake could occur. In contrast, the western Rainier seismic zone does not correlate in any simple way with anomaly patterns or focal mechanism fault planes, leading us to infer that it is less likely to experience a moderate earthquake. A ???10 km-wide low-velocity anomaly occurs 5 to 18 km beneath the summit of Mount Rainier, which we interpret to be a signal of a region composed of hot, fractured rock with possible small amounts of melt or fluid. No systematic velocity pattern is observed in association with the southern Washington Cascades conductor. A midcrustal anomaly parallels the Olympic-Wallowa lineament as well as several other geophysical trends, indicating that it may play an important role in regional tectonics. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Three-dimensional P wave velocity model for the San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurber, C.H.; Brocher, T.M.; Zhang, H.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2007-01-01

    A new three-dimensional P wave velocity model for the greater San Francisco Bay region has been derived using the double-difference seismic tomography method, using data from about 5,500 chemical explosions or air gun blasts and approximately 6,000 earthquakes. The model region covers 140 km NE-SW by 240 km NW-SE, extending from 20 km south of Monterey to Santa Rosa and reaching from the Pacific coast to the edge of the Great Valley. Our model provides the first regional view of a number of basement highs that are imaged in the uppermost few kilometers of the model, and images a number of velocity anomaly lows associated with known Mesozoic and Cenozoic basins in the study area. High velocity (Vp > 6.5 km/s) features at ???15-km depth beneath part of the edge of the Great Valley and along the San Francisco peninsula are interpreted as ophiolite bodies. The relocated earthquakes provide a clear picture of the geometry of the major faults in the region, illuminating fault dips that are generally consistent with previous studies. Ninety-five percent of the earthquakes have depths between 2.3 and 15.2 km, and the corresponding seismic velocities at the hypocenters range from 4.8 km/s (presumably corresponding to Franciscan basement or Mesozoic sedimentary rocks of the Great Valley Sequence) to 6.8 km/s. The top of the seismogenic zone is thus largely controlled by basement depth, but the base of the seismogenic zone is not restricted to seismic velocities of ???6.3 km/s in this region, as had been previously proposed. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Seismic velocities at the core-mantle boundary inferred from P waves diffracted around the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvander, Matthieu; Ponce, Bruno; Souriau, Annie

    1997-05-01

    The very base of the mantle is investigated with core-diffracted P-wave (P diff) travel times published by the International Seismological Centre (ISC) for the period 1964-1987. Apparent slownesses are computed for two-station profiles using a difference method. As the short-period P diff mostly sample a very thin layer above the core-mantle boundary (CMB), a good approximation of the true velocity structure at the CMB can be derived from the apparent slownesses. More than 27000 profiles are built, and this provides an unprecedented P diff sampling of the CMB. The overall slowness distribution has an average value of 4.62 s/deg, which corresponds to a velocity more than 4% lower than that of most mean radial models. An analysis of the residuals of absolute ISC P and P diff travel times is independently carried out and confirms this result. It also shows that the degree of heterogeneities is significantly higher at the CMB than in the lower mantle. A search for lateral velocity variations is then undertaken; a first large-scale investigation reveals the presence of coherent slowness anomalies of very large dimensions of the order of 3000 km at the CMB. A tomographic inversion is then performed, which confirms the existence of pronounced (±8-10%) lateral velocity variations and provides a reliable map of the heterogeneities in the northern hemisphere. The influence of heterogeneity in the overlying mantle, of noise in the data and of CMB topography is evaluated; it seemingly proves minor compared with the contribution of heterogeneities at the CMB. Our results support the rising idea of a thin, low-velocity laterally varying boundary layer at the base of the D″ layer. The two principal candidate interpretations are the occurrence of partial melting, or the presence of a chemically distinct layer, featuring infiltrated core material.

  9. Are high p-wave velocity sediments on thin Tethyan crust, deep-water carbonates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, Marc-Andre; Graindorge, David; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Dellong, David; Kopp, Heidrun; Sallares, Valenti; Bartolome, Rafael; Gallais, Flora

    2016-04-01

    Seismic reflection profiles from the Central Mediterranean and Gulf of Cadiz regions indicate the widespread presence of a seismic unit, marked by strong continuous reflectors, directly overlying the basement. Seismic velocity analysis from seismic reflection and refraction studies indicate high p-wave velocities of 3.5 - 4.5 km/s in this layer. These same seismic studies image a thin crust, typically 6-9 km thick, in most cases thought to be oceanic in nature and related to the Tethys oceanic domain separating Africa (Gondwana) from Laurussia. We interpret this 2-3 km thick reflective layer to be carbonates, deposited in the late Triassic, Jurassic and early Cretaceous in the Tethys Ocean, in deep marine basins. Few drilling studies have penetrated into this layer. In one case (DSDP site 135, drilled at 4152 m water depth on Coral Patch Ridge in the western Gulf of Cadiz), Aptian (early Cretaceous) marls and limestone were drilled (560-689 m sub-seafloor depth). The Calcite compensation depth during the Jurassic to Early Cretaceous was about 4000 m to 3500 m according to compilations from the Atlantic and Indian Oceans and is consistent with deposition of deep-water carbonates. For the NW Moroccan margin (Mazagan transect near El Jadida) there is a 2 km thick sedimentary layer with p-wave velocities of 4.0 - 4.5 km/s at the base of a 4 - 6 km thick sedimentary section. This layer extends from seafloor thought to be oceanic crust (west of the West African Coast magnetic anomaly) across a domain of thin/transitional crust with abundant Triassic salt diapirs to the foot of the margin. This reflective basal layer is also observed in reflection and refraction profiles from the Seine abyssal plain, below the toe of the Cadiz accretionary wedge (S. Algarve margin), in the Ionian abyssal plain and below the toe of the Calabrian accretionary wedge, all regions floored by this thin Tethyan crust. Work is in progress to determine the exact nature of this crust.

  10. Velocity variations and uncertainty from transdimensional P-wave tomography of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, Scott; Lekić, Vedran

    2017-03-01

    High-resolution models of seismic velocity variations constructed using body-wave tomography inform the study of the origin, fate, and thermochemical state of mantle domains. In order to reliably relate these variations to material properties including temperature, composition, and volatile content, we must accurately retrieve both the patterns and amplitudes of variations and quantify the uncertainty associated with the estimates of each. For these reasons, we image the mantle beneath North America with P-wave traveltimes from USArray using a novel method for 3-D probabilistic body-wave tomography. The method uses a Transdimensional Hierarchical Bayesian (THB) framework with a reversible-jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (rj-MCMC) algorithm in order to generate an ensemble of possible velocity models. We analyze this ensemble solution to obtain the posterior probability distribution of velocities, thereby yielding error bars and enabling rigorous hypothesis testing. Overall, we determine that the average uncertainty (1σ) of compressional wave velocity estimates beneath North America is ∼0.25% dVP/VP, increasing with proximity to complex structure and decreasing with depth. The addition of USArray data reduces the uncertainty beneath the Eastern US by over 50% in the upper mantle and 25-40% below the transition zone and ∼30% throughout the mantle beneath the Western US. In the absence of damping and smoothing, we recover amplitudes of variations 10-80% higher than a standard inversion approach. Accounting for differences in data coverage, we infer that the length-scale of heterogeneity is ∼50% longer at shallow depths beneath the continental platform than beneath tectonically active regions. We illustrate the model trade-off analysis for the Cascadia slab and the New Madrid Seismic Zone, where we find that smearing due to the limitations of the illumination is relatively minor.

  11. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure beneath the Indonesian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspito, Nanang T.; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Miyatake, Takashi; Shimazaki, Kunihiko; Hirahara, Kazuro

    1993-04-01

    We present the P-wave seismic tomography image of the mantle to a depth of 1200 km beneath the Indonesian region. The ARTB inversion method is applied to a dataset of 118,203 P-wave travel times of local and teleseismic events taken from ISC bulletins. Although the resolution is sufficient for detailed discussion in only a limited part of the study region, the results clarify the general tectonic framework in this region and indicate a possible remnant seismic slab in the lower mantle. Structures beneath the Philippine Islands and the Molucca Sea region are well resolved and high-velocity zones corresponding to the slabs of the Molucca Sea and Philippine Sea plates are well delineated. Seismic zones beneath the Manila, Negros and Cotabato trenches are characterized by high-velocity anomalies, although shallow structures were not resolved. The Molucca Sea collision zone and volcanic zones of the Sangihe and Philippine arcs are dominated by low-velocity anomalies. The Philippine Sea slab subducts beneath the Philippine Islands at least to a depth of 200 km and may reach depths of 450 km. The southern end of the slab extends at least to about 6°N near southern Mindanao. In the south, the two opposing subducting slabs of the Molucca Sea plate are clearly defined by the two opposing high-velocity zones. The eastward dipping slab can be traced about 400 km beneath the Halmahera arc and may extend as far north as about 5°N. Unfortunately, resolution is not sufficient to reveal detailed structures at the boundary region between the Halmahera and Philippine Sea slabs. The westward dipping slab may subduct to the lower mantle although its extent at depth is not well resolved. This slab trends N-S from about 10°N in the Philippine Islands to northern Sulawesi. A NE-SW-trending high-velocity zone is found in the lower mantle beneath the Molucca Sea region. This high-velocity zone may represent a remnant of the former subduction zone which formed the Sulawesi arc during the

  12. The relationship between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity of pressure cores obtained in the Eastern Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Jin, Y.; Kida, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Fujii, T.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    P-wave velocity is an important parameter to estimate gas hydrate saturation in sediments. In this study, the relationship between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity have been analyzed using natural hydrate-bearing-sediments obtained in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Japan. The sediment samples were collected by the Hybrid Pressure Coring System developed by Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology during June-July 2012, aboard the deep sea drilling vessel CHIKYU. P-wave velocity was measured on board by the Pressure Core Analysis and Transfer System developed by Geotek Ltd. The samples were maintained at a near in-situ pressure condition during coring and measurement. After the measurement, the samples were stored core storage chambers and transported to MHRC under pressure. The samples were manipulated and cut by the Pressure-core Non-destructive Analysis Tools or PNATs developed by MHRC. The cutting sections were determined on the basis of P-wave velocity and visual observations through an acrylic window equipped in the PNATs. The cut samples were depressurized to measure gas volume for saturation calculations. It was found that P-wave velocity correlates well with hydrate saturation and can be reproduced by the hydrate frame component model. Using pressure cores and pressure core analysis technology, nondestructive and near in-situ correlation between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity can be obtained. This study was supported by funding from the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan.

  13. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Deep Galicia Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy; Davy, Richard; Sawyer, Dale; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Reston, Timothy; Shillington, Donna; Ranero, Cesar

    2015-04-01

    The combined wide-angle reflection-refraction and multi-channel seismic (MCS) experiment, Galicia 3D, was carried out in 2013 at the Galicia rifted margin in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain. The main geological features within the 64 by 20 km (1280 km²) 3D box investigated by the survey are the peridotite ridge (PR), the fault bounded, rotated basement blocks and the S reflector, which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault. 44 short period four-component ocean bottom seismometers and 28 ocean bottom hydrophones were deployed in the 3D box. 3D MCS profiles sampling the whole box were acquired with two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. fired alternately every 37.5 m. We present the results from 3D first-arrival time tomography that constrains the P-wave velocity in the 3D box, for the entire depth sampled by reflection data. Results are validated by synthetic tests and by the comparison with Galicia 3D MCS lines. The main outcomes are as follows: 1- The 3.5 km/s iso-velocity contour mimics the top of the acoustic basement observed on MCS profiles. Block bounding faults are imaged as velocity contrasts and basement blocks exhibit 3D topographic variations. 2- On the southern profiles, the top of the PR rises up to 5.5 km depth whereas, 20 km northward, its basement expression (at 6.5 km depth) nearly disappears. 3- The 6.5 km/s iso-velocity contour matches the topography of the S reflector where the latter is visible on MCS profiles. Within a depth interval of 0.6 km (in average), velocities beneath the S reflector increase from 6.5 km/s to 7 km/s, which would correspond to a decrease in the degree of serpentinization from ~45 % to ~30 % if these velocity variations are caused solely by variations in hydration. At the intersections between the block bounding normal faults and the S reflector, this decrease happens over a larger depth interval (> 1 km), suggesting that faults act as conduit for the water flow in the upper mantle.

  14. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Deep Galicia Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, G.; Minshull, T. A.; Davy, R. G.; Sawyer, D. S.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C. A.; Reston, T. J.; Shillington, D. J.; Ranero, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The combined wide-angle reflection-refraction and multi-channel seismic (MCS) experiment, Galicia 3D, was carried out in 2013 at the Galicia rifted margin in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain. The main geological features within the 64 by 20 km (1280 km²) 3D box investigated by the survey are the peridotite ridge (PR), the fault bounded, rotated basement blocks and the S reflector, which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault. 44 short period four-component ocean bottom seismometers and 28 ocean bottom hydrophones were deployed in the 3D box. 3D MCS profiles sampling the whole box were acquired with two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. fired alternately every 37.5 m. We present the results from 3D first-arrival time tomography that constrains the P-wave velocity in the 3D box, for the entire depth sampled by reflection data. Results are validated by synthetic tests and by the comparison with Galicia 3D MCS lines. The main outcomes are as follows: 1- The 3.5 km/s iso-velocity contour mimics the top of the acoustic basement observed on MCS profiles. Block bounding faults are imaged as velocity contrasts and basement blocks exhibit 3D topographic variations. 2- On the southern profiles, the top of the PR rises up to 5.5 km depth whereas, 20 km northward, its basement expression (at 6.5 km depth) nearly disappears. 3- The 6.5 km/s iso-velocity contour matches the topography of the S reflector where the latter is visible on MCS profiles. Within a depth interval of 0.6 km (in average), velocities beneath the S reflector increase from 6.5 km/s to 7 km/s, which would correspond to a decrease in the degree of serpentinization from ~45 % to ~30 % if these velocity variations are caused solely by variations in hydration. At the intersections between the block bounding normal faults and the S reflector, this decrease happens over a larger depth interval (> 1 km), suggesting that faults act as conduit for the water flow in the upper mantle.

  15. Time varying velocity structures in Earth's outer core: Constraints from exotic P-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, E. A.; Irving, J. C.; Deuss, A. F.; Cormier, V. F.

    2011-12-01

    The outer core is one of the most dynamic divisions of our planet. However, despite undergoing vigorous convection, the outer core is not necessarily a uniform, homogeneous layer of the Earth. Accumulation of light element enriched iron at the top of the outer core, below the core-mantle boundary, may lead to the formation of a stably stratified layer, corresponding to the E' layer as defined by Bullen. The E' layer would have different properties to the rest of the outer core and may be a source of scattering. The lowermost outer core, the F layer, may also have different physical properties than the rest of the outer core, either due to the crystallisation of iron or the release of light elements as the inner core grows. Time varying structure in the Earth's core has been observed in some previous studies, particularly using earthquake doublets. The vigorous convection in the outer core may lead to small-scale lateral variations in its velocity structure over time, due to the movement of fluids and slurry near to the core-mantle and inner core boundaries. We investigate the velocity and attenuation structure of the upper 1500 km of the outer core using high frequency PmKP seismic phases. PmKP waves travel as P-waves throughout the Earth, bouncing m-1 times on the underside of the core-mantle boundary. By analysing the relative arrival times and amplitudes of the PmKP waves and other seismic phases, and comparing these to synthetic waveforms, it is possible to constrain the velocity and attenuation characteristics of the upper 1500 km of the outer core. We correct for known mantle structure and explore the effects of core-mantle boundary topography. To investigate the scattering characteristics of the uppermost outer core and the sharpness of any stratified layers we search for precursors to PmKP phases, which are elusive. P4KP-PcP differential travel times suggest that the uppermost 1300 km of the outer core is up to 0.4% slower than PREM. There is some evidence

  16. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  17. Experimental study on monitoring CO2 sequestration by conjoint analysis of the P-wave velocity and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Yang, Shenglai; Huan, Kangning; Li, Fangfang; Huang, Wei; Zheng, Aiai; Zhang, Xing

    2013-09-03

    CO2 sequestration has been considered to be one of the most straightforward carbon management strategies for industrial CO2 emission. Monitoring of the CO2 injection process is one of the best ways to make sure the safety storage but is also a major challenge in CO2 geological sequestration. Previous field and laboratory researches have shown that seismic methods are among the most promising monitoring methods because of the obvious reduction in P-wave velocities caused by CO2 injection. However, as CO2 injection continues, the P-wave velocity becomes increasingly insensitive according to the pilot projects when CO2 saturation is higher than 20-40%. Therefore, the conventional seismic method needs improvement or replacement to solve its limitations. In this study, P-wave velocity and amplitude responses to supercritical CO2 injection in brine-saturated core samples from Jilin oilfield were tested using core displacement and an ultrasonic detection integrated system. Results showed that neither the P-wave velocity nor amplitude could simply be used to monitor the CO2 injection process because of the insensitive or nonmonotonous response. Consequently, a new index was established by synthetically considering these two parameters to invert and monitor the CO2 process, which can be thought of as a newer and more effective assessment criterion for the seismic method.

  18. Anisotropy of Electrical Resistivity and P-wave Velocity in Discrete Samples From Nantroseize Expeditions 315 and 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, L.; Henry, P.; Humbert, F.; Knuth, M.; Likos, W.; Scientists, I.

    2008-12-01

    We present results of electrical conductivity and P-wave velocity measurements in discrete samples processed onboard Chikyu during Nantroseize expeditions 315 and 316 in the Mega Splay fault and Frontal Thrust of the Nankai accretionary prism. Quasi cubes of 20 mm thickness nominally saturated with seawater were measured across the three parallel sets of faces, first for electrical conductivity, then for P-wave velocity. Average properties and their anisotropies appeared to show some sensitivity to both lithological and fault related features. Overall, strong transverse anisotropy due to sedimentary compaction was observed for both properties with minimum electrical conductivity and P-wave velocity along the vertical core axis direction. Within the horizontal plane perpendicular to the core axis, slight anisotropies were also measured, which are likely related to tectonically driven horizontal shortening, affecting noticeably the original compaction fabric. In order to get some structural insight, samples were reoriented in our laboratories using alternative field demagnetization technique and the in-plane (i.e. perpendicular to the core axis) data rotated accordingly. For the P-wave anisotropy, initial cubes were shaped into polyhedrons in order to get even more accurate estimates. These additional measurements allowed for retrieving for each sample the 3 principal values and vectors of the best fitting ellipsoidal function. Resulting stereoplots were then compared with electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and structural data.

  19. Seismic modelling study of P-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in patchy-saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaobo; Dong, Liangguo; Zhao, Qun

    2014-12-01

    Seismic wave propagation in patchy-saturated porous media is studied by numerical simulation in time domain at the seismic frequency band (1-1000 Hz). The models consist of hundreds of representative elementary volumes (REVs), where the REV is partially saturated with water and gas pockets. Seismic modelling experiments are implemented in a traditional way, with ‘periodic’ boundary conditions applied to get rid of undrained boundary conditions at the outer edges of the REVs. The characteristics of confining pressure, induced pore pressure, solid particle velocities and Darcy filtration velocities are analysed. The snapshots show that strong pore pressure gradients are generated across the interface between gas and water phases, and significant fluid flow occurs. The conversion of a fast P-wave into a dissipating slow P-wave takes place at seismic frequencies, and the converted slow P-wave diffuses strongly in both gas- and water-saturated phases. These numerical results can help us to understand the loss mechanism at seismic frequencies. Then, P-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion of a heterogeneous REV are calculated during traditional seismic modelling at seismic frequencies. The numerical results show good agreement with theoretical predictions obtained from patchy saturation theory. Furthermore, the effects of different fluid distributions on P-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion are analysed numerically. A series of experiments are implemented by considering large, small and random gas-patchy inclusions. The decrease of gas pocket size makes the peak frequency move towards high frequencies. Random distribution of gas patches may affect both the peak attenuation and peak frequencies. Seismic attenuation caused by Biot global flow, elastic scattering and wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) associated with patchy saturation are computed numerically. The results show that the contribution of Biot’s global flow and scattering to the overall attenuation

  20. P-Wave Velocity Tomography from Local Earthquakes in Western Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa-Chávez, Juan A.; Escudero, Christian R.; Núñez-Cornú, Francisco J.; Bandy, William L.

    2016-10-01

    In western Mexico, the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates beneath the North America plate has deformed and fragmented the overriding plate, forming several structural rifts and crustal blocks. To obtain a reliable subsurface image of the continental crust and uppermost mantle in this complex area, we used P-wave arrivals of local earthquakes along with the Fast Marching Method tomography technique. We followed an inversion scheme consisting of (1) the use of a high-quality earthquake catalog and corrected phase picks, (2) the selection of earthquakes using a maximum location error threshold, (3) the estimation of an improved 1-D reference velocity model, and (4) the use of checkerboard testing to determine the optimum configuration of the velocity nodes and inversion parameters. Surprisingly, the tomography results show a very simple δVp distribution that can be described as being controlled by geologic structures formed during two stages of the separation of the Rivera and Cocos plates. The earlier period represents the initial stages of the separation of the Rivera and Cocos plates beneath western Mexico; the later period represents the more advanced stage of rifting where the Rivera and Cocos plates had separated sufficiently to allow melt to accumulate below the Colima Volcanic complex. During the earlier period (14 or 10-1.6 Ma), NE-SW-oriented structures/lineaments (such as the Southern Colima Rift) were formed as the two plates separated. During the second period (1.6 Ma to the present), the deformation is attributed to magma, generated within and above the tear zone between the Rivera and Cocos plates, rising beneath the region of the Colima Volcanic Complex. The rising magma fractured the overlying crust, forming a classic triple-rift junction geometry. This triple-rift system is confined to the mid- to lower crust perhaps indicating that this rifting process is still in an early stage. This fracturing, along with fluid circulation and associated

  1. Oceanic lithospheric S-wave velocities from the analysis of P-wave polarization at the ocean floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, Katrin; Krüger, Frank; Dahm, Torsten; Lange, Dietrich

    2016-12-01

    Our knowledge of the absolute S-wave velocities of the oceanic lithosphere is mainly based on global surface wave tomography, local active seismic or compliance measurements using oceanic infragravity waves. The results of tomography give a rather smooth picture of the actual S-wave velocity structure and local measurements have limitations regarding the range of elastic parameters or the geometry of the measurement. Here, we use the P-wave polarization (apparent P-wave incidence angle) of teleseismic events to investigate the S-wave velocity structure of the oceanic crust and the upper tens of kilometres of the mantle beneath single stations. In this study, we present an up to our knowledge new relation of the apparent P-wave incidence angle at the ocean bottom dependent on the half-space S-wave velocity. We analyse the angle in different period ranges at ocean bottom stations (OBSs) to derive apparent S-wave velocity profiles. These profiles are dependent on the S-wave velocity as well as on the thickness of the layers in the subsurface. Consequently, their interpretation results in a set of equally valid models. We analyse the apparent P-wave incidence angles of an OBS data set which was collected in the Eastern Mid Atlantic. We are able to determine reasonable S-wave-velocity-depth models by a three-step quantitative modelling after a manual data quality control, although layer resonance sometimes influences the estimated apparent S-wave velocities. The apparent S-wave velocity profiles are well explained by an oceanic PREM model in which the upper part is replaced by four layers consisting of a water column, a sediment, a crust and a layer representing the uppermost mantle. The obtained sediment has a thickness between 0.3 and 0.9 km with S-wave velocities between 0.7 and 1.4 km s-1. The estimated total crustal thickness varies between 4 and 10 km with S-wave velocities between 3.5 and 4.3 km s-1. We find a slight increase of the total crustal thickness from

  2. The Evolution of P-wave Velocity in Fault Gouge: Initial Results for Samples from the SAFOD Volume.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, M. W.; Tobin, H. J.; Marone, C.

    2008-12-01

    We present initial results from a new technique for observing the evolution of elastic properties in sheared fault zone materials via acoustic wave velocity. The relationship between the mechanical strength of fault gouge and acoustic velocity during active deformation has important implications not only for a physical understanding of elasticity in deforming granular media, but also for the interpretation of the seismic velocity at the field scale. Experiments are conducted at atmospheric temperature and saturation state in a double-direct-shear testing apparatus, with normal stress stepped from 1 to 19 MPa to interrogate behavior during compaction, and sheared at a rate of 10 microns/second to observe changes in velocity with increasing strain. Tests are divided between those involving continuous shear to a displacement of 22.5 mm, and those with intervals of 3.75 mm shear separated by unloading and reloading sequences in normal stress. Velocity is measured by time-of-flight between two piezoelectric P-wave transducers set into the sample configuration on either side of the shearing layers. Samples tested include common laboratory standards for simulated fault gouge and field samples taken from representative localities in the 3D rock volume containing the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth experiment in Parkfield, California. The velocities of sand and clay end-member gouges are observed to behave differently under shear, and mixtures of quartz sand and montmorillonite behave differently from both end-member materials. Initial results suggest that particle sorting exerts a strong influence on both the absolute velocity and the evolution of velocity in response to increasing shear strain where the elastic properties of the grains are similar. We also observe a first-order relationship between the coefficient of friction and P-wave velocity that appears to be related to grain reorganization at the onset of shear following initial compaction.

  3. Density and P-wave velocity structure beneath the Paraná Magmatic Province: Refertilization of an ancient lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Carlos; Ussami, Naomi; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    We estimate density and P-wave velocity perturbations in the mantle beneath the southeastern South America plate from geoid anomalies and P-wave traveltime residuals to constrain the structure of the lithosphere underneath the Paraná Magmatic Province (PMP) and conterminous geological provinces. Our analysis shows a consistent correlation between density and velocity anomalies. The P-wave speed and density are 1% and 15 kg/m3 lower, respectively, in the upper mantle under the Late Cretaceous to Cenozoic alkaline provinces, except beneath the Goiás Alkaline Province (GAP), where density (+20 kg/m3) and velocity (+0.5%) are relatively high. Underneath the PMP, the density is higher by about 50 kg/m3 in the north and 25 kg/m3 in the south, to a depth of 250 - 300 km. These values correlate with high-velocity perturbations of +0.5% and +0.3%, respectively. Profiles of density perturbation versus depth in the upper mantle are different for the PMP and the adjacent Archean São Francisco (SFC) and Amazonian (AC) cratons. The Paleoproterozoic PMP basement has a high-density root. The density is relatively low in the SFC and AC lithospheres. A reduction of density is a typical characteristic of chemically depleted Archean cratons. A more fertile Proterozoic and Phanerozoic subcontinental lithospheric mantle has a higher density, as deduced from density estimates of mantle xenoliths of different ages and composition. In conjunction with Re-Os isotopic studies of the PMP basalts, chemical and isotopic analyses of peridodite xenoliths from the GAP in the northern PMP, and electromagnetic induction experiments of the PMP lithosphere, our density and P-wave speed models suggest that the densification of the PMP lithosphere and flood basalt generation are related to mantle refertilization. Metasomatic refertilization resulted from the introduction of asthenospheric components from the mantle wedge above Proterozoic subduction zones, which surrounded the Paraná lithosphere

  4. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure and precise earthquake relocation at Great Sitkin Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pesicek, Jeremy; Thurber, Clifford H.; DeShon, Heather R.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Zhang, Haijiang

    2008-01-01

    Waveform cross-correlation with bispectrum verification is combined with double-difference tomography to increase the precision of earthquake locations and constrain regional 3D P-wave velocity heterogeneity at Great Sitkin volcano, Alaska. From 1999 through 2005, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) recorded ∼1700 earthquakes in the vicinity of Great Sitkin, including two ML 4.3 earthquakes that are among the largest events in the AVO catalog. The majority of earthquakes occurred during 2002 and formed two temporally and spatially separate event sequences. The first sequence began on 17 March 2002 and was centered ∼20 km west of the volcano. The second sequence occurred on the southeast flank of Great Sitkin and began 28 May 2002. It was preceded by two episodes of volcanic tremor. Earthquake relocations of this activity on the southeast flank define a vertical planar feature oriented radially from the summit and in the direction of the assumed regional maximum compressive stress due to convergence along the Alaska subduction zone. This swarm may have been caused or accompanied by the emplacement of a dike. Relocations of the mainshock–aftershock sequence occurring west of Great Sitkin are consistent with rupture on a strike-slip fault. Tomographic images support the presence of a vertically dipping fault striking parallel to the direction of convergence in this region. The remaining catalog hypocenters relocate along discrete features beneath the volcano summit; here, low P-wave velocities possibly indicate the presence of magma beneath the volcano.

  5. One dimensional P wave velocity structure of the crust beneath west Java and accurate hypocentre locations from local earthquake inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Supardiyono; Santosa, Bagus Jaya

    2012-06-20

    A one-dimensional (1-D) velocity model and station corrections for the West Java zone were computed by inverting P-wave arrival times recorded on a local seismic network of 14 stations. A total of 61 local events with a minimum of 6 P-phases, rms 0.56 s and a maximum gap of 299 Degree-Sign were selected. Comparison with previous earthquake locations shows an improvement for the relocated earthquakes. Tests were carried out to verify the robustness of inversion results in order to corroborate the conclusions drawn out from our reasearch. The obtained minimum 1-D velocity model can be used to improve routine earthquake locations and represents a further step toward more detailed seismotectonic studies in this area of West Java.

  6. Crust and upper mantle P wave velocity structure beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Results from the Jemez teleseismic tomography experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steck, Lee K.; Thurber, Clifford H.; Fehler, Michael C.; Lutter, William J.; Roberts, Peter M.; Baldridge, W. Scott; Stafford, Darrik G.; Sessions, Robert

    1998-10-01

    New results are presented from the teleseismic component of the Jemez Tomography Experiment conducted across Valles caldera in northern New Mexico. We invert 4872 relative P wave arrival times recorded on 50 portable stations to determine velocity structure to depths of 40 km. The three principle features of our model for Valles caldera are: (1) near-surface low velocities of -17% beneath the Toledo embayment and the Valle Grande, (2) midcrustal low velocities of -23% in an ellipsoidal volume underneath the northwest quadrant of the caldera, and (3) a broad zone of low velocities (-15%) in the lower crust or upper mantle. Crust shallower than 20 km is generally fast to the northwest of the caldera and slow to the southeast. Near-surface low velocities are interpreted as thick deposits of Bandelier tuff and postcaldera volcaniclastic rocks. Lateral variation in the thickness of these deposits supports increased caldera collapse to the southeast, beneath the Valle Grande. We interpret the midcrustal low-velocity zone to contain a minimum melt fraction of 10%. While we cannot rule out the possibility that this zone is the remnant 1.2 Ma Bandelier magma chamber, the eruption history and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks erupted in Valles caldera following the Bandelier tuff make it more likely that magma results from a new pulse of intrusion, indicating that melt flux into the upper crust beneath Valles caldera continues. The low-velocity zone near the crust-mantle boundary is consistent with either partial melt in the lower crust or mafic rocks without partial melt in the upper mantle. In either case, this low-velocity anomaly indicates that underplating by mantle-derived melts has occurred.

  7. Crust and upper mantle P wave velocity structure beneath Valles caldera, New Mexico: Results from the Jemez teleseismic tomography experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, Lee K.; Fehler, Michael C.; Roberts, Peter M.; Baldridge, W. Scott; Stafford, Darrik G.; Lutter, William J.; Sessions, Robert

    1998-10-01

    New results are presented from the teleseismic component of the Jemez Tomography Experiment conducted across Valles caldera in northern New Mexico. We invert 4872 relative {ital P} wave arrival times recorded on 50 portable stations to determine velocity structure to depths of 40 km. The three principle features of our model for Valles caldera are: (1) near-surface low velocities of {minus}17{percent} beneath the Toledo embayment and the Valle Grande, (2) midcrustal low velocities of {minus}23{percent} in an ellipsoidal volume underneath the northwest quadrant of the caldera, and (3) a broad zone of low velocities ({minus}15{percent}) in the lower crust or upper mantle. Crust shallower than 20 km is generally fast to the northwest of the caldera and slow to the southeast. Near-surface low velocities are interpreted as thick deposits of Bandelier tuff and postcaldera volcaniclastic rocks. Lateral variation in the thickness of these deposits supports increased caldera collapse to the southeast, beneath the Valle Grande. We interpret the midcrustal low-velocity zone to contain a minimum melt fraction of 10{percent}. While we cannot rule out the possibility that this zone is the remnant 1.2 Ma Bandelier magma chamber, the eruption history and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks erupted in Valles caldera following the Bandelier tuff make it more likely that magma results from a new pulse of intrusion, indicating that melt flux into the upper crust beneath Valles caldera continues. The low-velocity zone near the crust-mantle boundary is consistent with either partial melt in the lower crust or mafic rocks without partial melt in the upper mantle. In either case, this low-velocity anomaly indicates that underplating by mantle-derived melts has occurred. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  8. Imaging earth's interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth's mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  9. Imaging earth`s interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth`s mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  10. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Bandai volcano in northeastern Japan inferred from active seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, Teruo; Tanaka, Satoru; Ueki, Sadato; Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakamichi, Haruhisa; Nishimura, Takeshi; Oikawa, Jun; Tsutsui, Tomoki; Nishi, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Sosuke; Miyamachi, Hiroki; Yamasato, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Yutaka

    2004-12-01

    The three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of the Bandai volcano has been revealed by tomographic inversion using approximately 2200 travel-time data collected during an active seismic survey comprising 298 temporary seismic stations and eight artificial shots. The key result of this study is the delineation of a high-velocity anomaly (Vp>4.6 km/s at sea-level) immediately below the summit peak. This feature extends to depths of 1-2 km below sea-level. The near-surface horizontal position of the high-velocity anomaly coincides well with that of a positive Bouguer gravity anomaly. Geological data demonstrate that sector collapses have occurred in all directions from the summit and that the summit crater has been repeatedly refilled with magmatic material. These observations suggest that the high-velocity region revealed in this study is a manifestation of an almost-solidified magmatic plumbing system. We have also noted that a near-surface low-velocity region (Vp<3.0 km/s at sea-level) on the southern foot of the volcano corresponds to the position of volcanic sediments including ash and debris avalanche material. In addition, we have made use of the tomographic results to recompute the hypocenters of earthquake occurring during seismic swarms beneath the summit in 1988 and 2000. Relocating the earthquakes using the three-dimensional velocity model clearly indicates that they predominantly occurred on two steeply dipping planes. Low-frequency earthquakes observed during the swarms in 2000 occurred in the seismic gap between the two clusters. The hypocentral regions of the seismic swarms and the low-frequency earthquakes are close to the higher-velocity zone beneath the volcano's summit. These observations suggest that the recent seismic activity beneath the summit is likely associated with thermal energy being released within the solidifying magmatic plumbing system.

  11. P wave velocity of the uppermost mantle of the Rio Grande rift region of North Central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Murdock, J.N.; Jaksha, L.H.

    1981-08-10

    A network of seismograph stations has operated in north-central New Mexico since 1975. The network is approximtely 200 by 300 km in size and encompasses the Rio Grande rift there. Several seismic refraction experiments have been reported in the literature for the region of the network and adjacent areas. Because all of the seismic refraction lines are unreversed, P/sub n/ velocities reported were mainly of the inverse travel time slope for the direction of the corresponding line. The values of the inverse slope for those studies range from 7.6 to 8.2 km/s. The purpose of our study is to estimate the P wave velocity of the uppermost mantle by using the time term method. First, we timed the P/sub n/ waves of strong signals from five explosions and eight shallow earthquakes recorded by the network. The main data set, which contains 87 time-distance pairs, was processed by using the time term method. The P/sub n/ velocity estimated by this method is 8.0 +- 0.1 km/s. To corroborate this estimate, we then processed 10 subsets of the main data set in the same way. Almost allof the solutions show velocities 7.9--8.1 km/s, in agreement with the velocity determined for the main data set. The station time terms of the main data set also are substantied, and they suggest that the base of the crust dips northward by a few degrees in the region of the survey. The smallest value reported by other investigators for the inverse slope (7.6 km/s) appears to be related to the dip. The normal P wave velocity of the uppermost mantle of north-central New Mexico places restrictions on thermal models of the rift. For instance, the results exlude the likelihood of a wide zone of asthenosphere at the base of the crust beneath the rift, but they do not exclude a narrow such zone.

  12. Miocene Extension, Volcanism and Possibly Associated Upper Crustal P-Wave Velocity Anomalies in the Northeastern Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorklund, T.; Burke, K.; Zhou, H.; Yeats, R. S.

    2001-12-01

    Volcanic activity and the formation of the Puente Hills half-graben (PHHG) in the northeastern Los Angeles basin constrain the timing of extension within the greater Los Angeles basin. Eruption of the Glendora Volcanics (ca. 16-14 Ma) and El Modeno Volcanics (ca. 14 Ma) mark the beginning of lithospheric extension. Continuing extension is recorded in strata of the PHHG, with movement on the proto-Whittier normal fault and intrusion of diabase sills into the La Vida Member (13.5-9.4 Ma) of the Puente Formation. A change from extension to N-S horizontal contraction and vertical uplift at ca. 8 Ma, which resulted in compressional inversion of the PHHG, has produced the Puente Hills anticline and the throughgoing Whittier fault. Our high-resolution 3-D P-wave velocity model (with block dimensions 10x10x3 km) shows two anomalous higher-velocity bodies (6.63 km/s) at depths of 9-18 km, which we also relate to extension. The 6.63 km/s velocity of the higher velocity volumes represents an increase over regional velocities of ca. 4 to 8 percent. These tomographic anomalies may be generated by plutons, possibly gabbro with a bulk density ca. 3 gm/cc, that were magma sources for at least some of the overlying volcanic rock. A velocity anomaly near the Whittier Narrows, here named the Whittier Narrows pluton, extends vertically over three stacked grid blocks at depths of 9-18 km and is well placed to have been a source for the Glendora Volcanics and the La Vida diabase sills. A southeast trending layer of four high-velocity grid blocks at depths of 9-12 km marks a possible source for El Modeno Volcanics, here named El Modeno pluton. Three active faults converge and appear to terminate in the vicinity of the Whittier Narrows pluton: (1) the Elysian Park blind thrust, (2) the Puente Hills blind thrust, and (3) the Whittier fault. The Whittier Narrows pluton may play a controlling role in locating and segmenting the faults. The locations of the Whittier Narrows and El Modeno

  13. Estimated Moho Temperature from Observed Heat Flow and Comparison with P-Wave Velocity in the East Sea, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, W. Y.; Wood, W. T.

    2014-12-01

    We have estimated temperatures at the Moho surface by employing a published empirical relationship of Perry et al's work (JGR, doi:10.1029/2005JB003921) to the observed heat flow measurements in the East Sea (Sea of Japan), Korea. We assumed in our computation that the parameter values are all the same although the Perry et al's relationship between crustal thickness and heat flows to compute Moho temperature was derived for the Canadian Shield. For the heat flow data, we used the published global heat flow data (http://www.heatflow.und.edu) augmented with some recent heat flow measurements from Korea, and the LLN3_G3Dv3 for P-wave tomography model (JGR, doi:10.1029/2012JB009525). Preliminary results do not show a significant correlation between the computed Moho temperature and the P-wave velocity model perhaps due to uncertainty in the parameter values used in the computation as well as the empirical relation. An empirical relationship between the observed heat flow and the Moho temperature for the Canadian shield might be different for a backarec basin area like the East Sea, Korea. However, we noted that there exists a moderate negative correlation between the total crustal thickness and heat flow - less heat flows with increasing crustal thickness with a relation of Heat_Flow (mW/m2) = 205 - 18.3 * Crustal_Thickness (km). The modeled Moho temperature displays a trend of higher values (900o K -1400o K) from Japan toward the beneath of Yamato Basin and Rise in the NW direction, and beneath the Ulleung Basin area. Another higher Moho temperature (>1000o K) contour band is observed in the area north of Japan Basin, approximately centered along the 139.5o E.

  14. Crustal P-wave velocity structure from Altyn Tagh to Longmen mountains along the Taiwan-Altay geoscience transect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.-X.; Mooney, W.D.; Han, G.-H.; Yuan, X.-C.; Jiang, M.

    2005-01-01

    Based upon the seismic experiments along Geoscience Transect from the Altyn Tagh to the Longmen Mountains, the crustal P-wave velocity structure was derived to outline the characteristics of the crustal structure. The section shows a few significant features. The crustal thickness varies dramatically, and is consistent with tectonic settings. The Moho boundary abruptly drops to 73km depth beneath the southern Altyn Tagh from 50km below the Tarim basin, then rises again to about 58km depth beneath the Qaidam basin. Finally, the Moho drops again to about 70km underneath the Songpan-Garze Terrane and rises to 60km near the Longmen Mountains with a step-shape. Further southeast, the crust thins to 52km beneath the Sichuan basin in the southeast of the Longmen Mountains. In the north of the Kunlun fault, a low-velocity zone, which may be a layer of melted rocks due to high temperature and pressure at depth, exists in the the bottom of the middle crust. The two depressions of the Moho correlate with the Qilian and Songpan-Garze terranes, implying that these two mountains have thick roots. According to our results, it is deduced that the thick crust of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau probably is a result of east-west and northwest-southeast crustal shortening since Mesozoic time during the collision between the Asian and Indian plates.

  15. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure derived from local earthquakes at the Katmai group of volcanoes, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jolly, A.D.; Moran, S.C.; McNutt, S.R.; Stone, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    The three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure beneath the Katmai group of volcanoes is determined by inversion of more than 10,000 rays from over 1000 earthquakes recorded on a local 18 station short-period network between September 1996 and May 2001. The inversion is well constrained from sea level to about 6??km below sea level and encompasses all of the Katmai volcanoes; Martin, Mageik, Trident, Griggs, Novarupta, Snowy, and Katmai caldera. The inversion reduced the average RMS travel-time error from 0.22??s for locations from the standard one-dimensional model to 0.13??s for the best three-dimensional model. The final model, from the 6th inversion step, reveals a prominent low velocity zone (3.6-5.0??km/s) centered at Katmai Pass and extending from Mageik to Trident volcanoes. The anomaly has values about 20-25% slower than velocities outboard of the region (5.0-6.5??km/s). Moderately low velocities (4.5-6.0??km/s) are observed along the volcanic axis between Martin and Katmai Caldera. Griggs volcano, located about 10??km behind (northwest of) the volcanic axis, has unremarkable velocities (5.0-5.7??km/s) compared to non-volcanic regions. The highest velocities are observed between Snowy and Griggs volcanoes (5.5-6.5??km/s). Relocated hypocenters for the best 3-D model are shifted significantly relative to the standard model with clusters of seismicity at Martin volcano shifting systematically deeper by about 1??km to depths of 0 to 4??km below sea level. Hypocenters for the Katmai Caldera are more tightly clustered, relocating beneath the 1912 scarp walls. The relocated hypocenters allow us to compare spatial frequency-size distributions (b-values) using one-dimensional and three-dimensional models. We find that the distribution of b is significantly changed for Martin volcano, which was characterized by variable values (0.8 < b < 2.0) with standard locations and more uniform values (0.8 < b < 1.2) after relocation. Other seismic clusters at Mageik (1.2 < b

  16. S and P-wave velocity structure beneath the Hawaiian hotspot from the PLUME deployments of ocean-bottom and land seismometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, C. J.; Laske, G.; Solomon, S. C.; Collins, J. A.; Detrick, R. S.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bercovici, D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2011-12-01

    Seismological studies can provide key constraints on the existence and characteristics of mantle plumes. Remotely located oceanic hotspots pose challenges for mantle seismic imaging with land stations because of the limited areal extent of oceanic islands and thus are excellent targets for dedicated marine experiments. The PLUME project at Hawaii successfully deployed two networks of ~35 ocean-bottom seismometers and a concurrent set of portable land seismometers, providing unprecedented, dense seismic coverage around Hawaii across an ~1,000-km-wide aperture. Three-dimensional finite-frequency body-wave tomographic images of S- and P-wave velocity structure beneath the Hawaiian Islands show an upper-mantle low-velocity anomaly that is elongated in the direction of the island chain and surrounded by a high-velocity anomaly in the shallow upper mantle that is parabolic in map view. Low velocities continue downward to the mantle transition zone between 410 and 660 km depth and extend into the topmost lower mantle. For P-waves, comparisons of inversions with separate data sets at different frequencies suggest that contamination by water reverberations is not markedly biasing the imaging. Many aspects of the S- and P-wave images are consistent with each other and support the hypothesis that the Hawaiian hotspot is the result of an upwelling, high-temperature plume. The broad upper-mantle low-velocity region beneath the Hawaiian Islands may reflect the "diverging pancake" at the top of the upwelling zone; the surrounding region of high velocities could represent a downwelling curtain; and the low-velocity anomalies southeast of Hawaii in the transition zone and topmost lower mantle are consistent with predictions of a tilted plume conduit. However, there are some differences in upper mantle structure between P-wave and S-wave velocity. Inversions without station terms show a southwestward shift in the location of lowest P-wave velocities in the uppermost mantle relative

  17. Developing Regionalized Models of Lithospheric Thickness and Velocity Structure Across Eurasia and the Middle East from Jointly Inverting P-Wave and S-Wave Receiver Functions with Rayleigh Wave Group and Phase Velocities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    DEVELOPING REGIONALIZED MODELS OF LITHOSPHERIC THICKNESS AND VELOCITY STRUCTURE ACROSS EURASIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST FROM JOINTLY INVERTING P-WAVE...09NA293221 and DE-AC52-07NA273442 Proposal No. BAA09-13 ABSTRACT The main goal of this project is to develop models of lithospheric velocity...of the lithosphere are key for accurately modeling not only travel times but also surface-wave dispersion velocities and full waveforms at regional

  18. P-wave velocity structure beneath Mt. Melbourne in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica: Evidence of partial melting and volcanic magma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yongcheol; Yoo, Hyun Jae; Lee, Won Sang; Lee, Choon-Ki; Lee, Joohan; Park, Hadong; Kim, Jinseok; Kim, Yeadong

    2015-12-01

    Mt. Melbourne is a late Cenozoic intraplate volcano located ∼30 km northeast of Jang Bogo Station in Antarctica. The volcano is quiescent with fumarolic activity at the summit. To monitor volcanic activity and glacial movements near Jang Bogo Station, a seismic network was installed during the 2010-11 Antarctic summer field season. The network is maintained during the summer field season every year, and the number of stations has been increased. We used continuous seismic data recorded by the network and an Italian seismic station (TNV) at Mario Zucchelli Station to develop a 3-D P-wave velocity model for the Mt. Melbourne area based on the teleseismic P-wave tomographic method. The new 3-D model presented a relative velocity structure for the lower part of the crust and upper mantle between depths of 30 and 160 km and revealed the presence of two low-velocity anomalies beneath Mt. Melbourne and the Priestley Fault. The low-velocity anomaly beneath Mt. Melbourne may be caused by the edge flow of hot mantle material at the lithospheric step between the thick East Antarctic Craton and thin Ross Sea crust. The other low-velocity anomaly along the Priestley Fault may have been beneath Mt. Melbourne and moved to the southern tip of the Deep Freeze Range, where the crustal thickness is relatively thin. The anomaly was trapped on the fault line and laterally flowed along the fault line in the northwest direction.

  19. Joint Inversion of Geoid Anomaly and Teleseismic P-Wave Delay Times: Modeling Density and Velocity Perturbations Beneath the Parana Magmatic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, C. A. M.; Ussami, N.; Ritsema, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Parana Magmatic Province (PMP) is one of the largest continental igneous provinces (LIP) on Earth. It is well dated at 133 Ma preceding the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, but the causative geodynamic processes are still poorly understood. Although a low-velocity anomaly has been imaged by seismic tomography in the northeast region of the PMP and interpreted as a fossil conduct of a mantle plume that is related to the flood basalt eruptions, geochemical data indicate that such magmatism is caused by the melting of a heterogeneous and enriched lithospheric mantle with no deep plume participation. Models of density perturbations in the upper mantle estimated from joint inversion of geoid anomalies and P-wave delay times will offer important constraints on mantle dynamics. A new generation of accurate global geopotential models derived from satellite-missions (e.g. GRACE, GOCE) allows us to estimate density distribution within the Earth from geoid inversion. In order to obtain the residual geoid anomaly related to the density structure of the mantle, we use the EGM2008 model removing estimated geoid perturbations owing to variations in crustal structure (i.e., topographical masses, Moho depth, thickness of sediments and basalts). Using a spherical-Earth approximation, the density model space is represented by a set of tesseroids and the velocity model is parameterized in nodes of a spherical grid where cubic B-splines are utilized as an interpolation function. To constrain the density inversion, we add more than 10,000 manually picked teleseismic P-wave delay times. During the inversion procedure, density and P-wave velocity are linked through the optimization of a constant linear factor correlating density and velocity perturbation. Such optimization will be performed using a probability density function (PDF) [Tarantola, 2005]. We will present the preliminary results of this joint inversion scheme and hypothesize on the geodynamic processes responsible for

  20. Developing Regionalized Models of Lithospheric Thickness and Velocity Structure Across Eurasia and the Middle East from Jointly Inverting P-Wave and S-Wave Receiver Functions with Rayleigh Wave Group and Phase Velocities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    DEVELOPING REGIONALIZED MODELS OF LITHOSPHERIC THICKNESS AND VELOCITY STRUCTURE ACROSS EURASIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST FROM JOINTLY INVERTING P-WAVE... lithospheric velocity structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East. We expect the regionalized models will improve...important differences in lithospheric structure between the cratonic regions of Eastern Europe and the tectonic regions of Western Europe and the

  1. Test of high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model of Poland by back-azimuthal sections of teleseismic receiver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde-Piorko, Monika; Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2015-04-01

    Geological and seismic structure under area of Poland is well studied by over one hundred thousand boreholes, over thirty deep seismic refraction and wide angle reflection profiles and by vertical seismic profiling, magnetic, gravity, magnetotelluric and thermal methods. Compilation of these studies allowed to create a high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model down to 60 km depth in the area of Poland (Polkowski et al. 2014). Model also provides details about the geometry of main layers of sediments (Tertiary and Quaternary, Cretaceous, Jurassic, Triassic, Permian, old Paleozoic), consolidated/crystalline crust (upper, middle and lower) and uppermost mantle. This model gives an unique opportunity for calculation synthetic receiver function and compering it with observed receiver function calculated for permanent and temporary seismic stations. Modified ray-tracing method (Langston, 1977) can be used directly to calculate the response of the structure with dipping interfaces to the incoming plane wave with fixed slowness and back-azimuth. So, 3D P-wave velocity model has been interpolated to 2.5D P-wave velocity model beneath each seismic station and back-azimuthal sections of components of receiver function have been calculated. Vp/Vs ratio is assumed to be 1.8, 1.67, 1.73, 1.77 and 1.8 in the sediments, upper/middle/lower consolidated/crystalline crust and uppermost mantle, respectively. Densities were calculated with combined formulas of Berteussen (1977) and Gardner et al. (1974). Additionally, to test a visibility of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary phases at receiver function sections models have been extended to 250 km depth based on P4-mantle model (Wilde-Piórko et al., 2010). National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284 and by NCN grant UMO-2011/01/B/ST10/06653.

  2. Estimating Attenuation Coefficients and P-Wave Velocities of the Shallow San Jacinto Fault Zone from Betsy Gunshots Data Recorded by a Spatially Dense Array with 1108 Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozakin, Yaman; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-04-01

    We estimate values of P wave velocity and P attenuation coefficients (QP) for the subsurface material at the Sage Brush Flat site along the Clark branch of the San Jacinto Fault Zone. The data are generated by 33 Betsy gunshots and recorded by a spatially dense array of 1108 vertical component geophones deployed in a rectangular grid that is approximately 600 m x 600 m. We automatically pick the arrival times of the seismic body waves from each explosion arriving at stations within 200 m. These measurements are used to derive an average velocity map with velocity values ranging from 500 m/s to 1250 m/s. We estimate the energy of the early P waves by squaring the amplitudes in a short window relative to the automatic picks. These energies are fitted to a decay function representing the geometrical spreading and intrinsic attenuation. By separating the stations into spatial bins and calculating attenuation values for each by linear regression, we construct a QP values map. Most of the QP values are in 5-20 range, which is consistent with other studies of shallow fault zone regions.

  3. Ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements with variable effective pressure at the boundary between slope basin sediments and the accretionary prism: IODP Expedition 315 Site C0001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Knuth, M. W.; Tobin, H. J.; 314/315/316 Scientist, I.

    2008-12-01

    IODP Expedition 315 Site C0001 is located on the hanging wall of the midslope megasplay fault in the Nankai subduction zone off Kii peninsula (SW Japan), and penetrated an unconformity between ~200 m thick slope basin sediments and the accretionary prism. While a down-section porosity increase was clearly observed at the boundary from ~50% to ~60%, logging velocity does not appear to decrease at the boundary, which suggests that different diagenetic processes might exist above and below the boundary. In this study, we conducted ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements with pore pressure control. We also conducted observations of sediment and chemical analysis. We examined the relationships between the acoustic properties, sediment textures, logging data from IODP Expedition 314 Site C0001 and data from shipboard core analysis. The ultrasonic P-wave velocity measurements were conducted under constant pore pressure (500 kPa) and varying confining pressure to control effective pressure. The confining pressure ranges from 550 kPa to a maximum calculated from the density of overlying sediments (lithostatic pressure - hydrostatic pressure). 8 samples were analyzed, located from ~70 m to ~450 m below the sea floor. P-wave velocity ranges from ~1620 m/s to ~1990 m/s under the hydrostatic pressure condition. These velocities are in good agreement with the logging data. Porosity-velocity relationship in the analyzed data also coincide with that observed in the logging data. Samples shallower than ~300 m fall within previously-defined empirical relationships for normal- and high- consolidation. The deeper samples (at ~370 m and ~450 m below sea floor) show much higher velocity than that predicted by the empirical relationship, suggesting that significant cementation is present in those samples. The textural observations of sediments indicate a decrease in pore space with depth. Quartz and feldspar grains are surrounded by clay mineral matrices. Grain size seems to be almost

  4. P-Wave and S-Wave Velocity Structure of Submarine Landslide Associated With Gas Hydrate Layer on Frontal Ridge of Northern Cascadia Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, T.; Lu, H.; Yelisetti, S.; Spence, G.

    2015-12-01

    The submarine landslide associated with gas hydrate is a potential risk for environment and engineering projects, and thus from long time ago it has been a hot topic of hydrate research. The study target is Slipstream submarine landslide, one of the slope failures observed on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin off Vancouver Island. The previous studies indicated a possible connection between this submarine landslide feature and gas hydrate, whose occurrence is indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating reflector (BSR), at a depth of ~265-275 m beneath the seafloor (mbsf). The OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) data collected during SeaJade (Seafloor Earthquake Array - Japan Canada Cascadia Experiment) project were used to derive the subseafloor velocity structure for both P- and S-wave using travel times picked from refraction and reflection events. The P-wave velocity structure above the BSR showed anomalous high velocities of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 mbsf, closely matching the estimated depth of the glide plane (100 ± 10 m). Forward modelling of S-waves was carried out using the data from the OBS horizontal components. The S-wave velocities, interpreted in conjunction with the P-wave results, provide the key constraints on the gas hydrate distribution within the pores. The hydrate distribution in the pores is important for determining concentrations, and also for determining the frame strength which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges. The increase in S-wave velocity suggests that the hydrate is distributed as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment.

  5. Rock Physics Interpretation of P-Wave Q and Velocity Structure, Geology, Fluids and Fractures at the Southeast Portion of The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P; Hutchings, L; Wagoner, J; Kasameyer, P

    2001-04-06

    We examine how quantitative rock physics models, such as effective medium theories, can improve the interpretation of seismic parameters and material and fluid properties at The Geysers. We use effective medium theories to estimate effects of fractures on velocities for The Geysers rocks. We compare theoretical velocity estimates to laboratory measurements from the literature and our seismic velocity values from 1992 earthquake data. We approximate the reservoir as being homogeneous in mineral composition, with a constant density of fractures whose total void ratio is reduced by lithostatic pressure. Thus, we expect low velocities near the surface, increasing with depth up to the values observed in the lab on intact samples, 5.5 - 5.7 km/sec. We use a one-dimensional inversion of P-waves to obtain an ''expected'' P-wave velocity (Vp) and attenuation (Qp) relation as a function of depth for The Geysers rocks. We then use a three-dimensional Vp and Qp inversion to find anomalous zones within the reservoir. We find portions with ''high'' Vp and Qp, high Vp and low Qp, and low Vp and low Qp. We interpret the regions with high Vp and Qp to be relatively less fractured, and the regions with low Vp and Qp to be significantly fractured. The high V and Q anomaly is centered on the zone of greatest pressure drop, and is mostly within the shallowest part of the felsite. The anomalous zones within the greywacke reservoir are on either side of the felsite, in areas of more moderate pressure depletion. More work is required to interpret the significance of these observations.

  6. New P-wave Velocity Images of the Lowermost Mantle from a Bayesian Inversion of PKP, PcP, and P4KP Differential Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M.; Tkalcic, H.; Bodin, T.; Sambridge, M.; Tanaka, S.; Rawlinson, N.

    2012-12-01

    Determining the scale-length, magnitude, and distribution of chemical and thermal heterogeneities in the lowermost mantle is crucial to understanding whole mantle dynamics, and yet it remains a much debated and ongoing challenge in geophysics. Common shortcomings of current seismically-derived lowermost mantle models are often the result of a lack of access to and scrutiny in performing travel time measurements from waveform data, consequently incomplete raypath coverage, arbitrary model parameterization, inaccurate uncertainty estimates, and an inadequate definition of the misfit function in the optimization framework. In response, we present a new approach to global tomography where apart from improving the existing ray path coverage using only high quality cross-correlated waveform, the problem is addressed within a Bayesian framework and explicit regularization of model parameters is not required. Our results show that velocity heterogeneities exist on a variety of scales, with anomalies between 600 and 2900 km in lateral extent dominating the lowermost mantle heterogeneity pattern. This provides an important link between the very short-scale imaging achieved through scattering experiments and the long wave-length maps resulting from more traditional tomographic approaches. We also show that the power of heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle has an rms P-wave velocity variation of 0.88%, which is significantly larger than previous global-scale estimates, is fully justified by the data. Comparison of our P-wave velocity model with high-resolution S-wave velocity models refutes a purely thermal origin of mantle heterogeneity. The pattern of correlation between our model and S-wave models, combined with the characteristic scale-length and amplitude of heterogeneity revealed by this study, will help to significantly refine allowable models of thermo-chemical convection in the lowermost mantle. We obtain high resolution images of the lowermost mantle P-wave velocity

  7. The Updated LLNL-G3D Global P-Wave Velocity Model and Its Performance in Seismic Event Location

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    in our previous reports) and sharp details of subducted slabs around the world. Based on preliminary relocation tests, using LLNL-G3Dv2 travel-time...details of subducted slabs around the world. Based on preliminary relocation tests, using LLNL-G3Dv2 travel-time predictions typically reduces...simultaneously. In addition, sensitivity is spread across broad depth zones and/or multiple model units to mitigate the issue of path-velocity

  8. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume I P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (I), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  9. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  10. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume III P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (III), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 390 to 1220 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 40 ft (later relocated to 27.5 ft due to visibility in borehole after rain) in Borehole C4997, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4997, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  11. Multiple triangulation analysis: application to determine the velocity of 2-D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.-Z.; Zong, Q.-G.; Wang, J.; Pu, Z. Y.; Zhang, X. G.; Shi, Q. Q.; Cao, J. B.

    2006-11-01

    In order to avoid the ambiguity of the application of the Triangulation Method (multi-spacecraft timing method) to two-dimensional structures, another version of this method, the Multiple Triangulation Analysis (MTA) is used, to calculate the velocities of these structures based on 4-point measurements. We describe the principle of MTA and apply this approach to a real event observed by the Cluster constellation on 2 October 2003. The resulting velocity of the 2-D structure agrees with the ones obtained by some other methods fairly well. So we believe that MTA is a reliable version of the Triangulation Method for 2-D structures, and thus provides us a new way to describe their motion.

  12. Hall-velocity limited magnetoconductivity in a 2D Wigner solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fozooni, P.; Djerfi, K.; Kristensen, Anders; Lea, M. J.; Richardson, P. J.; Santrich-Badal, A.; Blackburn, A.; van der Heijden, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    The magnetoconductivity σ( B) of a classical 2D electron crystal on superfluid4He is non-linear. Experimentally we find a contribution to σ( B) which at constant field, gives σ( B)∞ J x, the current density, while at constant current, σ( B) ∞ 1/ B. In this region the Hall velocity νH slowly approaches the ripplon velocity νI at the first reciprocal lattice vector, due to strong electron-ripplon interactions with the helium. The magnetoconductivity decreases sharply for νH>νI. Fluctuations in σ( B) are seen above the melting temperature.

  13. Tomographic inversion of P-wave velocity and Q structures beneath the Kirishima volcanic complex, Southern Japan, based on finite difference calculations of complex traveltimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomatsu, T.; Kumagai, H.; Dawson, P.B.

    2001-01-01

    We estimate the P-wave velocity and attenuation structures beneath the Kirishima volcanic complex, southern Japan, by inverting the complex traveltimes (arrival times and pulse widths) of waveform data obtained during an active seismic experiment conducted in 1994. In this experiment, six 200-250 kg shots were recorded at 163 temporary seismic stations deployed on the volcanic complex. We use first-arrival times for the shots, which were hand-measured interactively. The waveform data are Fourier transformed into the frequency domain and analysed using a new method based on autoregressive modelling of complex decaying oscillations in the frequency domain to determine pulse widths for the first-arrival phases. A non-linear inversion method is used to invert 893 first-arrival times and 325 pulse widths to estimate the velocity and attenuation structures of the volcanic complex. Wavefronts for the inversion are calculated with a finite difference method based on the Eikonal equation, which is well suited to estimating the complex traveltimes for the structures of the Kirishima volcano complex, where large structural heterogeneities are expected. The attenuation structure is derived using ray paths derived from the velocity structure. We obtain 3-D velocity and attenuation structures down to 1.5 and 0.5 km below sea level, respectively. High-velocity pipe-like structures with correspondingly low attenuation are found under the summit craters. These pipe-like structures are interpreted as remnant conduits of solidified magma. No evidence of a shallow magma chamber is visible in the tomographic images.

  14. Catalog of velocity distributions around a reconnection site in 2D PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Lukas; Bourdin, Philippe-A.; Nakamura, Takuma K. M.; Nakamura, Rumi; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-04-01

    The velocity distribution of electrons and ions are known to be a marker for regions where magnetic reconnection develops. Past theoretical and computational works demonstrated that non-gyrotropic and anisotropic distributions depending on particle meandering motions and accelerations are seen around the reconnection point. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is expected to resolve such kinetic scale reconnection regions. We present a catalog of velocity distribution functions that can give hints on the location within the current sheet relative to the reconnection point, which is sometimes unclear from pure spacecraft observations. We use 2D PIC simulations of anti-parallel magnetic reconnection to obtain velocity distributions at different locations, like in the center of the reconnection site, the ion and electron diffusion regions, or the reconnection inflow and outflow regions. With sufficiently large number of particles we resolve the distribution functions also in rather small regions. Such catalog may be compared with future MMS observations of the Earth's magnetotail.

  15. 3D P-wave velocity structure of the deep Galicia rifted margin: A first analysis of the Galicia 3D wide-angle seismic dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy A.; Davy, Richard G.; Karplus, Marianne S.; Kaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Krabbenhoeft, Anne; Sawyer, Dale; Reston, Timothy J.; Shillington, Donna J.; Ranero, César R.

    2014-05-01

    Galicia 3D, a reflection-refraction and long offset seismic experiment was carried out from May through September 2013, at the Galicia rifted margin (in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain) as a collaboration between US, UK, German and Spanish groups. The 3D multichannel seismic acquisition conducted by R/V Marcus Langseth covered a 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2) zone where the main geological features are the Peridotite Ridge (PR), composed of serpentinized peridotite and thought be upper mantle exhumed to the seafloor during rifting, and the S reflector which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault overlain by fault bounded, rotated, continental crustal blocks. In the 3D box, two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. were fired alternately (in flip-flop configuration) every 37.5 m. All shots are recorded by 44 short period four component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and 26 ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) deployed and recovered by R/V Poseidon, as well as four 6 km hydrophone streamers with 12.5 m channel spacing towed by R/V Marcus Langseth. We present the preliminary results of the first arrival time tomography study which is carried out with a subset of the wide-angle dataset, in order to generate a 3D P-wave velocity volume for the entire depth sampled by the reflection data. After the relocation of OBSs and OBHs, an automatic first-arrival time picking approach is applied to a subset of the dataset, which comprises more than 5.5 million source-receiver pairs. Then, the first-arrival times are checked visually, in 3-dimensions. The a priori model used for the first-arrival time tomography is built up using information from previous seismic surveys carried out at the Galicia margin (e.g. ISE, 1997). The FAST algorithm of Zelt and Barton (1998) is used for the first-arrival time inversion. The 3D P-wave velocity volume can be used in interpreting the reflection dataset, as a starting point for migration, to quantify the thinning of the crustal layers

  16. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations in the

  17. Experimental study of two-phase fluid flow in two different porosity types of sandstone by P-wave velocity and electrical Impedance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, H.; Mitani, Y.; Kitamura, K.; Ikemi, H.; Takaki, S.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) is recently expected as the promising method to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It is important to investigate CO2 behavior in the reservoir, to evaluate the safety and to account the stored CO2 volume. In this study, experimental investigation is conducted to discuss the relationships between injected fluid speed (Flow rate: FR) or capillary number (Ca) and non-wetting fluid flow by compressional wave velocity (Vp) and electrical impedance (Z). In the experiment, N2 and supercritical CO2 were injected into the two sandstones with different porosity (φ), Berea sandstone (φ: 18 %), and Ainoura sandstone (φ: 11.9 %). The dimension of the rock specimens is cored cylinder with a 35 mm diameter and 70 mm height. Experimental conditions are nearly same as the reservoir of deep underground (Confining pressure:15MPa, 40℃). Initial conditions of the specimen are brine (0.1wt%-KCl) saturated. Four piezo-electrical transducers (PZTs) are set on the each surface of the top, middle, lower of the specimen to monitor the CO2 bahavior by Vp. To measuring Z, we use for electrodes method with Ag-AgCl electrodes. Four electrodes are wounded around specimen on the both sides of PZTs. We measured the changes of these parameters with injecting N2, injected fluid speed (FR), the differential pore pressure (DP), N2 saturation (SN2), P-wave velocity (Vp) and electrical impedance (Z), respectively. We also estimated the Ca from measured FR. From these experimental results, there are no obvious Vp changes with increasing Ca, while Z measurement indicates clear and continuous increment. In regards to Vp, Vp reduced at the small FR (0.1 to 0.2 ml/min). As the Ca increases, Vp doesn't indicate large reduction. On the other hand, Z is more sensitive to change the fluid saturation than Vp. It is well-known that both of Vp and Z are the function of fluid saturation. Though, these experimental results are not consistent with previous studies. In

  18. Methods to determine the Orientation and Velocity of 2-D structures based on multi- spacecraft data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Pu, Z.; Zhou, X.; Wang, J.; Zong, Q.; Shi, Q.

    2006-12-01

    Many techniques have been developed to study the axial orientation and/or velocity of 2-D structures (flux ropes), by analyzing in situ data from single or multiple spacecraft. To obtain the axial orientation, there are magnetic based MVA (BMVA), current based MVA (CMVA), Minimum Direction Derivative (MDD) and Multiple Triangulation Analysis (MTA) as a modified version of timing method. To further calculate the velocity, we have DeHoffmann-Teller analysis, Spatio-Temporal Difference (STD) and several version of timing method including MTA. After a brief introduction on the principle of these methods, we theoretically estimate their error ranges based on modeled structures to examine the validity of these techniques. Because of their different principles, their error bars are shown to be distinct, depending on the parameters (such as radius, model selected and even the satellite crossing path) of the certain structure. The error estimation thus provides us some clue on the selection of methods under different conditions. Some real events are further analyzed using these techniques as the example.

  19. Surface wave phase velocities from 2-D surface wave tomography studies in the Anatolian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif Kutlu, Yusuf; Erduran, Murat; Çakır, Özcan; Vinnik, Lev; Kosarev, Grigoriy; Oreshin, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    We study the Rayleigh and Love surface wave fundamental mode propagation beneath the Anatolian plate. To examine the inter-station phase velocities a two-station method is used along with the Multiple Filter Technique (MFT) in the Computer Programs in Seismology (Herrmann and Ammon, 2004). The near-station waveform is deconvolved from the far-station waveform removing the propagation effects between the source and the station. This method requires that the near and far stations are aligned with the epicentre on a great circle path. The azimuthal difference of the earthquake to the two-stations and the azimuthal difference between the earthquake and the station are restricted to be smaller than 5o. We selected 3378 teleseismic events (Mw >= 5.7) recorded by 394 broadband local stations with high signal-to-noise ratio within the years 1999-2013. Corrected for the instrument response suitable seismogram pairs are analyzed with the two-station method yielding a collection of phase velocity curves in various period ranges (mainly in the range 25-185 sec). Diffraction from lateral heterogeneities, multipathing, interference of Rayleigh and Love waves can alter the dispersion measurements. In order to obtain quality measurements, we select only smooth portions of the phase velocity curves, remove outliers and average over many measurements. We discard these average phase velocity curves suspected of suffering from phase wrapping errors by comparing them with a reference Earth model (IASP91 by Kennett and Engdahl, 1991). The outlined analysis procedure yields 3035 Rayleigh and 1637 Love individual phase velocity curves. To obtain Rayleigh and Love wave travel times for a given region we performed 2-D tomographic inversion for which the Fast Marching Surface Tomography (FMST) code developed by N. Rawlinson at the Australian National University was utilized. This software package is based on the multistage fast marching method by Rawlinson and Sambridge (2004a, 2004b). The

  20. Finsler p p -waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, Andrea; Pabst, Cornelia

    2016-11-01

    In this work we present Finsler gravitational waves. These are a Finslerian version of the well-known p p -waves, generalizing the very special relativity line element. Our Finsler p p -waves are an exact solution of Finslerian Einstein's equations in vacuum and describe gravitational waves propagating in an anisotropic background.

  1. Illuminating the near-sonic rupture velocities of the intracontinental Kokoxili Mw 7.8 and Denali fault Mw 7.9 strike-slip earthquakes with global P wave back projection imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kristoffer T.; Shearer, Peter M.

    2009-02-01

    The Denali and Kokoxili strike-slip earthquakes are two of the longest recent intracontinental ruptures. Previous studies report a range of rupture velocities. Here we image these earthquakes by reverse time migration of the intermediate-frequency P wave train recorded by global broadband seismometers. This technique permits a relatively direct measure of rupture velocity (speed and direction) as constrained by the radiated seismic energy, free from restrictive assumptions or rupture speed bounds placed on the solution. We compare our results with published seismic, GPS displacement, and surface slip inversion results. Both ruptures were initially subshear and transitioned over a distance no longer than 40 km to supershear speeds close to the P wave speed of ˜5.6 km/s. We investigate the accuracy of our results with synthetic data and experiment with using different imaging parameters and seismic subnetworks. These tests allow us to rule out the possibility of subshear speeds along the supershear segments. Although we cannot exclude supershear speeds of 4.5-6.5 km/s, our most reliable rupture velocities of ˜5.6 km/s are close to the local P wave speeds. We hypothesize that these intracontinental faults have weak shear strengths or high breakdown slips or crustal rigidities and experience at least moderate slip or slip rate weakening. Our observations and previous published results lead us to speculate that very long, surface-extending faults with general homogeneity in prestress and fault strength, together with smaller adjacent fault segments to provide triggering, may be necessary ingredients for the sub-Rayleigh to supershear rupture speed transition in strike-slip earthquakes.

  2. Method to Rapidly Collect Thousands of Velocity Observations to Validate Million-Element 2D Hydrodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, J. R.; Pasternack, G. B.; Bratovich, P.; Massa, D.; Reedy, G.; Johnson, T.

    2010-12-01

    Two-dimensional (depth-averaged) hydrodynamic models have existed for decades and are used to study a variety of hydrogeomorphic processes as well as to design river rehabilitation projects. Rapid computer and coding advances are revolutionizing the size and detail of 2D models. Meanwhile, advances in topo mapping and environmental informatics are providing the data inputs to drive large, detailed simulations. Million-element computational meshes are in hand. With simulations of this size and detail, the primary challenge has shifted to finding rapid and inexpensive means for testing model predictions against observations. Standard methods for collecting velocity data include boat-mounted ADCP and point-based sensors on boats or wading rods. These methods are labor intensive and often limited to a narrow flow range. Also, they generate small datasets at a few cross-sections, which is inadequate to characterize the statistical structure of the relation between predictions and observations. Drawing on the long-standing oceanographic method of using drogues to track water currents, previous studies have demonstrated the potential of small dGPS units to obtain surface velocity in rivers. However, dGPS is too inaccurate to test 2D models. Also, there is financial risk in losing drogues in rough currents. In this study, an RTK GPS unit was mounted onto a manned whitewater kayak. The boater positioned himself into the current and used floating debris to maintain a speed and heading consistent with the ambient surface flow field. RTK GPS measurements were taken ever 5 sec. From these positions, a 2D velocity vector was obtained. The method was tested over ~20 km of the lower Yuba River in California in flows ranging from 500-5000 cfs, yielding 5816 observations. To compare velocity magnitude against the 2D model-predicted depth-averaged value, kayak-based surface values were scaled down by an optimized constant (0.72), which had no negative effect on regression analysis

  3. A hybrid experimental-numerical technique for determining 3D velocity fields from planar 2D PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, A.; Sigurdson, M.; Mezić, I.; Meinhart, C. D.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of 3D, three component velocity fields is central to the understanding and development of effective microfluidic devices for lab-on-chip mixing applications. In this paper we present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for the generation of 3D flow information from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data and finite element simulations of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer. A numerical least-squares optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based 3D multiphysics simulation in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved estimation of the steady state velocity field. This 3D velocity field can be used to assess mixing phenomena more accurately than would be possible through simulation alone. Our technique can also be used to estimate uncertain quantities in experimental situations by fitting the gathered field data to a simulated physical model. The optimization algorithm reduced the root-mean-squared difference between the experimental and simulated velocity fields in the target region by more than a factor of 4, resulting in an average error less than 12% of the average velocity magnitude.

  4. Uncertainty in calculating vorticity from 2D velocity fields using circulation and least-squares approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamson, S.; Lonnes, S.

    1995-11-01

    The most common method for determining vorticity from planar velocity information is the circulation method. Its performance has been evaluated using a plane of velocity data obtained from a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a three dimensional plane shear layer. Both the ability to reproduce the vorticity from the exact velocity field and one perturbed by a 5% random “uncertainty” were assessed. To minimize the sensitivity to velocity uncertainties, a new method was developed using a least-squares approach. The local velocity data is fit to a model velocity field consisting of uniform translation, rigid rotation, a point source, and plane shear. The least-squares method was evaluated in the same manner as the circulation method. The largest differences between the actual and calculated vorticity fields were due to the filter-like nature of the methods. The new method is less sensitive to experimental uncertainty. However the circulation method proved to be slightly better at reproducing the DNS field. The least-squares method provides additional information beyond the circulation method results. Using the correlation overline {Pω ω } and a vorticity threshold criteria to identify regions of rigid rotation (or eddies), the rigid rotation component of the least-squares method indicates these same regions.

  5. Effective filtering and interpolation of 2D discrete velocity fields with Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saumier, Louis-Philippe; Khouider, Boualem; Agueh, Martial

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a new variational technique to interpolate and filter a two-dimensional velocity vector field which is discretely sampled in a region of {{{R}}}2 and sampled only once at a time, on a small time-interval [0,{{Δ }}t]. The main idea is to find a solution of the Navier-Stokes equations that is closest to a prescribed field in the sense that it minimizes the l 2 norm of the difference between this solution and the target field. The minimization is performed on the initial vorticity by expanding it into radial basis functions of Gaussian type, with a fixed size expressed by a parameter ɛ. In addition, a penalty term with parameter k e is added to the minimizing functional in order to select a solution with a small kinetic energy. This additional term makes the minimizing functional strongly convex, and therefore ensures that the minimization problem is well-posed. The interplay between the parameters k e and ɛ effectively contributes to smoothing the discrete velocity field, as demonstrated by the numerical experiments on synthetic and real data.

  6. Three-Dimensional P-wave Velocity Structure Beneath Long Valley Caldera, California, Using Local-Regional Double-Difference Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez, H. M.; Thurber, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    Eastern California's Long Valley Caldera (LVC) and the Mono-Inyo Crater volcanic systems have been active for the past ~3.6 million years. Long Valley is known to produce very large silicic eruptions, the last of which resulted in the formation of a 17 km by 32 km wide, east-west trending caldera. Relatively recent unrest began between 1978-1980 with five ML ≥ 5.7 non-double-couple (NDC) earthquakes and associated aftershock swarms. Similar shallow seismic swarms have continued south of the resurgent dome and beneath Mammoth Mountain, surrounding sites of increased CO2 gas emissions. Nearly two decades of increased volcanic activity led to the 1997 installation of a temporary three-component array of 69 seismometers. This network, deployed by the Durham University, the USGS, and Duke University, recorded over 4,000 high-frequency events from May to September. A local tomographic inversion of 283 events surrounding Mammoth Mountain yielded a velocity structure with low Vp and Vp/Vs anomalies at 2-3 km bsl beneath the resurgent dome and Casa Diablo hot springs. These anomalies were interpreted to be CO2 reservoirs (Foulger et al., 2003). Several teleseismic and regional tomography studies have also imaged low Vp anomalies beneath the caldera at ~5-15 km depth, interpreted to be the underlying magma reservoir (Dawson et al., 1990; Weiland et al., 1995; Thurber et al., 2009). This study aims to improve the resolution of the LVC regional velocity model by performing tomographic inversions using the local events from 1997 in conjunction with regional events recorded by the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) between 1980 and 2010 and available refraction data. Initial tomographic inversions reveal a low velocity zone at ~2 to 6 km depth beneath the caldera. This structure may simply represent the caldera fill. Further iterations and the incorporation of teleseismic data may better resolve the overall shape and size of the underlying magma reservoir.

  7. Detailed temporally resolved 2-D Velocity Measurements in a Novel Heat Exchanger Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guezennec, Yann G.; Ko, Jang-Hyok; Choi, Woong-Chul

    1998-11-01

    Using flow visualization as a primary tool, a novel, high-performance heat transfer surface for compact heat exchangers was designed, specifically for low Reynolds number applications. This geometry was specifically created to enhance or generate strong three-dimensional transport even at low Reynolds number. It consists of a staggered array of "pin" mounted normal to the fins. A 15:1 model of this heat exchanger surface core was built out of Plexiglas to provide optical access and this model was placed in a 1'x1' water channel. The flow speed was adjusted to match the Reynolds based on the hydraulic diameter based on the fin pitch. The flow was seeded with small polystyrene particles and illuminated by a laser sheet from an Argon Ion laser. The fluid motion was recorded using a CCD camera and an S-VHS video recorder. In post-processing, the video records were automatically digitized and processed using a cinematographic PIV technique. The temporal evolution of the 2-D flow field (side view) clearly shows the presence of unsteady, shed vortical regions behind the pins, modulated by the spatially-periodic acceleration/deceleration and meandering of the mean flow between the periodic array of staggered pins. In the perpendicular view (top view), the results show the presence of two strong cross-stream transport mechanisms, mainly the horse-shoe vortex near the pin-fin junctions and the very strong spanwise transport in the separated wake region of the pins. This transport is most likely associated with the strong interaction of the longitudinal vortices (emanating form the horseshoe) and the spanwise vortices from the pin wake. This vortex interaction sets up a strong spanwise pressure gradient inducing large cross-stream transport from the fin to the core flow. Animation of the results illustrating these effects will be presented.

  8. Retrieving lithospheric velocity structures beneath Taiwan region by nonlinear joint inversion of local and teleseismic P-wave data: Slab continuity and deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Wu, Y.; Song, X.; Chang, C.; Kuo-Chen, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Taiwan region in Southeast Asia situated at a junction among the passive continental margin and two opposite subduction systems (Rykyu trench to the east and Manila trench to the south) exhibits a complicated tectonic framework. Its detail architecture (particularly under the central to northern Taiwan) of the continental lithosphere and subducting slabs remains very uncertain. Demanded by the tectonic models as lithospheric collision, continental subduction, tandem suturing, slab tearing, etc., accessing better images for lithospheric velocity structures is therefore highly desired. To a scale of lithospheric structures, it is usually out of ability of local earthquake tomography and needs additional data sources. Wang et al. (2006, 2009) and Kuo-Chen et al. (2012) have utilized teleseismic data for resolution expansion, and both confirmed the existence of an east-dipping aseismic slab. Nevertheless, their slab images still somewhat restricted south of 24°N, lacking an insight into slab interaction in northern Taiwan. With the attempt to retrieve higher-resoltuion lithospheric strutures, we collected two large independent datasets each has respective advantages (Kuo-Chen et al., 2012; Huang et al., 2013b), as well as the teleseismic data recorded by the Island-wide broadband seismic network. Rather than the direct joint inversion, we adopted a two-step strategy to achieve an accurate local model beforehand to most eliminate the crustal heterogeneity, and then stepped on the teleseismic joint inversion in a fully nonlinear manner without fixing the ray-incident points at the model bottom. The results show that both the subducting slabs of Eurasian Plate (EP) and Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) can be retrieved readily, but EP, under the central Taiwan, shows complicated imaging where a plausible NW-SE trending deflection of the slab happened around 23.2°N. South of this latitude, a hyper-thin slab indicate the entrance of South China Sea subpleate. To the north

  9. Novel p-wave superfluids of fermionic polar molecules

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, A. K.; Matveenko, S. I.; Yudson, V. I.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.

    2016-01-01

    Recently suggested subwavelength lattices offer remarkable prospects for the observation of novel superfluids of fermionic polar molecules. It becomes realistic to obtain a topological p-wave superfluid of microwave-dressed polar molecules in 2D lattices at temperatures of the order of tens of nanokelvins, which is promising for topologically protected quantum information processing. Another foreseen novel phase is an interlayer p-wave superfluid of polar molecules in a bilayer geometry. PMID:27278711

  10. Estimating Subglacial Structure Using P-Wave Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, C.; Ammon, C. J.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Ramirez, C.; Nyblade, A.

    2017-02-01

    Reverberations of teleseismic compressional (P-) waves within a glacier or ice sheet may mask signals associated with crustal structure beneath the ice. We remove the signal associated with the ice from teleseismic P-waves using a wavefield downward continuation and decomposition technique that depends on known ice layer properties such as ice thickness, velocity, and attenuation. We test the method using data from nine stations in Antarctica and one station in Greenland. We deconvolve the downward-continued seismic wave vectors to create P-wave receiver functions that minimize the ice-layer reverberations in order to better measure signals from deeper structures. The subsurface P-wave receiver functions have similar sensitivities to crustal structure as those calculated from stations installed on bedrock. Synthetic experiments indicate subsurface P-wave receiver functions can constrain crustal structure more tightly than surface P-wave receiver functions when ice layer properties are known. We model the subsurface P-wave receiver functions using a Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion and constrain the product of crustal thickness and the column-average crustal-slowness beneath the stations. Our subglacial shear-speed and thickness estimates are consistent with previous investigations at most stations. At station SUMG in south-central Greenland, our results suggest a thicker crust than from previous estimates.

  11. Perpendicular ultrasound velocity measurement by 2D cross correlation of RF data. Part A: validation in a straight tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beulen, Bart; Bijnens, Nathalie; Rutten, Marcel; Brands, Peter; van de Vosse, Frans

    2010-11-01

    An ultrasound velocity assessment technique was validated, which allows the estimation of velocity components perpendicular to the ultrasound beam, using a commercially available ultrasound scanner equipped with a linear array probe. This enables the simultaneous measurement of axial blood velocity and vessel wall position, rendering a viable and accurate flow assessment. The validation was performed by comparing axial velocity profiles as measured in an experimental setup to analytical and computational fluid dynamics calculations. Physiologically relevant pulsating flows were considered, employing a blood analog fluid, which mimics both the acoustic and rheological properties of blood. In the core region (| r|/ a < 0.9), an accuracy of 3 cm s-1 was reached. For an accurate estimation of flow, no averaging in time was required, making a beat to beat analysis of pulsating flows possible.

  12. Black Hole Window into p-Wave Dark Matter Annihilation.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Jessie; Shapiro, Stuart L; Fields, Brian D

    2015-12-04

    We present a new method to measure or constrain p-wave-suppressed cross sections for dark matter (DM) annihilations inside the steep density spikes induced by supermassive black holes. We demonstrate that the high DM densities, together with the increased velocity dispersion, within such spikes combine to make thermal p-wave annihilation cross sections potentially visible in γ-ray observations of the Galactic center (GC). The resulting DM signal is a bright central point source with emission originating from DM annihilations in the absence of a detectable spatially extended signal from the halo. We define two simple reference theories of DM with a thermal p-wave annihilation cross section and establish new limits on the combined particle and astrophysical parameter space of these models, demonstrating that Fermi Large Area Telescope is currently sensitive to thermal p-wave DM over a wide range of possible scenarios for the DM distribution in the GC.

  13. Instantaneous 2D Velocity and Temperature Measurements in High Speed Flows Based on Spectrally Resolved Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic for high speed flows is described for the simultaneous, instantaneous measurement of gas temperature and velocity at a number (up to about one hundred) of locations in a plane illuminated by an injection-seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. Molecular Rayleigh scattered light is collected and passed through a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer. The resulting image is analyzed to determine the gas temperature and bulk velocity at each of the regions. The Cramer Rao lower bound for measurement uncertainty is calculated. Experimental data is presented for a free jet and for preliminary measurements in the Lewis 4 inch by 10 inch supersonic wind tunnel.

  14. Generation of a pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity section by inversion of a series of 1D dispersion curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves utilizes a multichannel recording system to estimate near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities from high-frequency Rayleigh waves. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity (vS) section is constructed by aligning 1D models at the midpoint of each receiver spread and using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. The receiver spread length sets the theoretical lower limit and any vS structure with its lateral dimension smaller than this length will not be properly resolved in the final vS section. A source interval smaller than the spread length will not improve the horizontal resolution because spatial smearing has already been introduced by the receiver spread. In this paper, we first analyze the horizontal resolution of a pair of synthetic traces. Resolution analysis shows that (1) a pair of traces with a smaller receiver spacing achieves higher horizontal resolution of inverted S-wave velocities but results in a larger relative error; (2) the relative error of the phase velocity at a high frequency is smaller than at a low frequency; and (3) a relative error of the inverted S-wave velocity is affected by the signal-to-noise ratio of data. These results provide us with a guideline to balance the trade-off between receiver spacing (horizontal resolution) and accuracy of the inverted S-wave velocity. We then present a scheme to generate a pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section with high horizontal resolution using multichannel records by inverting high-frequency surface-wave dispersion curves calculated through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. This method chooses only a pair of consecutive traces within a shot gather to calculate a dispersion curve. We finally invert surface-wave dispersion curves of synthetic and real-world data. Inversion results of both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that

  15. Continuous Data Assimilation for a 2D Bénard Convection System Through Horizontal Velocity Measurements Alone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Aseel; Lunasin, Evelyn; Titi, Edriss S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose a continuous data assimilation (downscaling) algorithm for a two-dimensional Bénard convection problem. Specifically we consider the two-dimensional Boussinesq system of a layer of incompressible fluid between two solid horizontal walls, with no-normal flow and stress-free boundary conditions on the walls, and the fluid is heated from the bottom and cooled from the top. In this algorithm, we incorporate the observables as a feedback (nudging) term in the evolution equation of the horizontal velocity. We show that under an appropriate choice of the nudging parameter and the size of the spatial coarse mesh observables, and under the assumption that the observed data are error free, the solution of the proposed algorithm converges at an exponential rate, asymptotically in time, to the unique exact unknown reference solution of the original system, associated with the observed data on the horizontal component of the velocity.

  16. Blind test of methods for obtaining 2-D near-surface seismic velocity models from first-arrival traveltimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, Colin A.; Haines, Seth; Powers, Michael H.; Sheehan, Jacob; Rohdewald, Siegfried; Link, Curtis; Hayashi, Koichi; Zhao, Don; Zhou, Hua-wei; Burton, Bethany L.; Petersen, Uni K.; Bonal, Nedra D.; Doll, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Seismic refraction methods are used in environmental and engineering studies to image the shallow subsurface. We present a blind test of inversion and tomographic refraction analysis methods using a synthetic first-arrival-time dataset that was made available to the community in 2010. The data are realistic in terms of the near-surface velocity model, shot-receiver geometry and the data's frequency and added noise. Fourteen estimated models were determined by ten participants using eight different inversion algorithms, with the true model unknown to the participants until it was revealed at a session at the 2011 SAGEEP meeting. The estimated models are generally consistent in terms of their large-scale features, demonstrating the robustness of refraction data inversion in general, and the eight inversion algorithms in particular. When compared to the true model, all of the estimated models contain a smooth expression of its two main features: a large offset in the bedrock and the top of a steeply dipping low-velocity fault zone. The estimated models do not contain a subtle low-velocity zone and other fine-scale features, in accord with conventional wisdom. Together, the results support confidence in the reliability and robustness of modern refraction inversion and tomographic methods.

  17. Retrieval of the P wave reflectivity response from autocorrelation of seismic noise: Jakarta Basin, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil R.; Lumley, David

    2017-01-01

    We autocorrelate the continuously recorded seismic wavefield across a dense network of seismometers to map the P wave reflectivity response of the Jakarta Basin, Indonesia. The proximity of this mega city to known active faults and the subduction of the Australian plate, especially when the predominance of masonry construction and thick sedimentary basin fill are considered, suggests that it is a hot spot for seismic risk. In order to understand the type of ground motion that earthquakes might cause in the basin, it is essential to obtain reliable information on its seismic velocity structure. The body wave reflections are sensitive to the sharp velocity contrasts, which makes them useful in seismic imaging. Results show autocorrelograms at different seismic stations with reflected-wave travel time variations, which reflect the variation in basement depth across the thick sedimentary basin. We also confirm the validity of the observed autocorrelation waveforms by conducting a 2-D full waveform modeling.

  18. 2D ion velocity distribution function measurements by laser-induced fluorescence above a radio-frequency biased silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Nathaniel; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Zhang, Yiting; Kushner, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Ion dynamics have been measured in the sheath above a 30 cm diameter, 2.2 MHz-biased silicon wafer in a plasma processing etch tool using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The velocity distribution function of argon ions was measured at thousands of positions above and radially along the edge of the wafer by sending a planar laser sheet from a pulsed, tunable dye laser into the tool. The RF sheath is clearly resolved. The laser sheet entered the machine both parallel and perpendicular to the wafer in order to measure the distribution function for both parallel and perpendicular velocities/energies (0.4 eV < Emax<600 eV). The resulting fluorescence was recorded using a fast CCD camera, which provided spatial (0.4 mm) and temporal (30 ns) resolution. Data was taken at eight different phases of the 2.2 MHz cycle. The distribution functions were found to be spatially non-uniform near the edge of the wafer and the distribution of energies extremely phase-dependent. Several cm above the wafer the distribution is Maxwellian and independent of phase. Results are compared with simulations; for example, the experimental time-averaged ion energy distribution function compares favorably with a computer model carefully constructed to emulate the device.

  19. 2D ion velocity distribution function measurements by laser-induced fluorescence above a radio-frequency biased silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Nathaniel; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Zhang, Yiting; Kushner, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Ion dynamics have been measured in the sheath above a 30 cm diameter, 2.2 MHz-biased silicon wafer in a plasma processing etch tool using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The velocity distribution function of argon ions was measured at thousands of positions above and radially along the edge of the wafer by sending a planar laser sheet from a pulsed, tunable dye laser into the tool. The RF sheath is clearly resolved. The laser sheet entered the machine both parallel and perpendicular to the wafer in order to measure the distribution function for both parallel and perpendicular velocities/energies (0.4 eV < Emax< 600 eV). The resulting fluorescence was recorded using a fast CCD camera, which provided spatial (0.4 mm) and temporal (30 ns) resolution. Data was taken at eight different phases of the 2.2 MHz cycle. The distribution functions were found to be spatially non-uniform near the edge of the wafer and the distribution of energies extremely phase-dependent. Several cm above the wafer the distribution is Maxwellian and independent of phase. Results are compared with simulations; for example, the experimental time-averaged ion energy distribution function compares favorably with a computer model carefully constructed to emulate the device.

  20. Demonstration of synchronised scanning Lidar measurements of 2D velocity fields in a boundary-layer wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dooren, M. F.; Kühn, M.; PetroviĆ, V.; Bottasso, C. L.; Campagnolo, F.; Sjöholm, M.; Angelou, N.; Mikkelsen, T.; Croce, A.; Zasso, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper combines the currently relevant research methodologies of scaled wind turbine model experiments in wind tunnels with remote-sensing short-range WindScanner Lidar measurement technology. The wind tunnel of the Politecnico di Milano was equipped with three wind turbine models and two short-range WindScanner Lidars to demonstrate the benefits of synchronised scanning Lidars in such experimental surroundings for the first time. The dual- Lidar system can provide fully synchronised trajectory scans with sampling time scales ranging from seconds to minutes. First, staring mode measurements were compared to hot wire probe measurements commonly used in wind tunnels. This yielded goodness of fit coefficients of 0.969 and 0.902 for the 1 Hz averaged u- and v-components of the wind speed, respectively, validating the 2D measurement capability of the Lidar scanners. Subsequently, the measurement of wake profiles on a line as well as wake area scans were executed to illustrate the applicability of Lidar scanning to measuring small scale wind flow effects. The downsides of Lidar with respect to the hot wire probes are the larger measurement probe volume and the loss of some measurements due to moving blades. In contrast, the benefits are the high flexibility in conducting both point measurements and area scanning, and the fact that remote sensing techniques do not disturb the flow while measuring. The research campaign revealed a high potential for using short-range WindScanner Lidar for accurately measuring small scale flow structures in a wind tunnel.

  1. New insights in the velocity dependency of the external mass transfer coefficient in 2D and 3D porous media for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Deridder, Sander; Desmet, Gert

    2012-03-02

    Numerical calculations of the mobile zone mass transfer rate in a variety of ordered 2D and 3D structures are presented. These calculations are in line with earlier theoretical and experimental findings made in the field of chemical engineering and suggest that the Sherwood-number (Sh(m)) appearing in the mobile phase mass transfer term of the general plate height expression of liquid chromatography is not correctly predicted by the Wilson-Geankoplis--or the Kataoka--or the penetration model expression that have been used up to now to in the field of LC, and that at least more research is needed before these expressions can be continued to be used with confidence. The aforementioned expressions were obtained by neglecting the effect of axial dispersion on the mass transfer process, and it seems that they therefore underestimate the true Sh(m)-number by a factor of 2-5 around the minimum of the van Deemter-curve. New correlations describing the variation of the Sh(m)-coefficient as a function of the reduced velocity for a number of other packing geometries (tetrahedral monolith, 2D pillar array) are proposed. These correlations are in agreement with earlier theoretical and experimental studies showing that at low velocities the local-driving force-based Sh(m)-value is of the order of 10-20 in a packed bed column with an external porosity on the order of 35-40%.

  2. Laboratory monitoring of P-waves in partially saturated sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrière, J.; Bordes, C.; Brito, D.; Sénéchal, P.; Perroud, H.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic data depends on a variety of hydrogeological properties of the prospected porous media such as porosity, permeability and fluid saturation. We have performed a laboratory experiment in the kiloHertz range in order to analyze the role of partial saturation on direct propagating P-waves phase velocity and attenuation. The experiment consists of a sand-filled tank 107 cm x 34 cm x 35cm equipped with accelerometers and water capacitance probes. The P-waves seismic propagation is generated by hitting a steel ball on a granite plate on the one lateral side of the container. Several imbibition/drainage cycles are performed between the water residual saturation and the gas residual saturation. The laboratory seismic data are processed by two Continuous Wavelet Transforms using one real mother wavelet (Mexican hat) and one complex (Morlet) to recover velocity and attenuation as a function of frequency. Phase velocity of direct P-wave decreases with an increase of water content and is quite consistent with the low frequency limit of the Biot's theory both for imbibition and drainage. The interpretation of the P-waves attenuation needs to go beyond the macroscopic fluid flow of Biot's theory and to introduce a viscoelastic contribution linked to the grain to grain overall losses which are described by a constant Q-model. A strong hysteresis between imbibition and drainage is observed and explained by introducing an effective permeability depending on water and gas relative permeabilities (Van Genuchten model).

  3. Seismic Velocity Structure Across the Quebrada and Gofar Oceanic Transform Faults from 2D Refraction Tomography - A Comparison of Faults with High and Low Seismic Slip Deficits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.; Lizarralde, D.

    2009-12-01

    We perform two 2-D tomographic inversions using data collected as a part of the Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar (QDG) Transform Fault Active/Passive Experiment. The QDG transform faults are located in the southern Pacific Ocean and offset the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at approximately 4° south. In the spring of 2008, two ~100 km refraction profiles were collected, each using 8 short period Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) from OBSIP and over 900 shots from the RV Marcus Langseth, across the easternmost segments of the Quebrada and Gofar transform faults. The two refraction profiles are modeled using a 2-D tomographic code that allows joint inversion of the Pg, PmP, and Pn arrivals (Korenaga et al., 2000). Variations in crustal velocity and thickness, as well as the width and depth extent of a significant low velocity zone within and below the transform valley provide some insight into the material properties of each of the fault-zones. Reduced seismic velocities that are 0.5 to over 1.0 km/s slower than velocities associated with the oceanic crust outside the fault zone may indicate the highly fractured fault zone lithology. The low velocity zone associated with the Quebrada fault also extends to the south of the active fault zone, beneath a fossil fault trace. Because Gofar is offset by an intratransform spreading center, we are able to compare ‘normal’ oceanic crust produced at the EPR to the south of the fault with crust associated with the ~15 km intratransform spreading center to the north. These two high slip rate (14 cm/yr) faults look similar morphologically and demonstrate comparable microseismicity characteristics, however their abilities to generate large earthquakes differ significantly. Gofar generates large earthquakes (Mw ~6) regularly every few years, but in the past 24 years only one large (Mw 5.6) event has been reliably located on Quebrada. The contrasting seismic behavior of these faults represents the range of behavior observed in the global

  4. MTCLAB: A MATLAB ®-based program for traveltime quality analysis and pre-inversion velocity tuning in 2D transmission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martínez, J. L.; Fernández-Alvarez, J. P.; Pedruelo-González, L. M.

    2008-03-01

    A MATLAB ®-based computer code that analyses the traveltime distribution and performs quality analysis at the pre-inversion stage for 2D transmission experiments is presented. The core tools of this approach are the so-called mean traveltime curves. For any general recording geometry, the user may select any pair of subsets of contiguous sources and receivers. The portion of the domain swept by the implied rays defines a zone of analysis, and for each source (receiver) the outcoming (incoming) ray fan is named a source (receiver) gather. The empirical mean traveltime curves are constructed, for each zone, by assigning the average and the standard deviation of the traveltimes in the gathers to the positions of the sources (receivers). The theoretical expressions assume isotropic homogeneous velocity inside each zone. The empirical counterparts use the observed traveltimes and make no assumptions. Isotropic velocity in each zone is inferred by least-squares fitting of the empirical mean traveltime curves. The user may refine the analysis considering different zones (multi-zone analysis). Initially the whole domain is modelled as a single zone. The procedure compares empirical versus theoretical curves. In addition, residuals can be plotted using source-receiver positions as plane coordinates. The results are used to unravel the possible presence of anomalous gathers, heterogeneities, anisotropies, etc. Depending on the kind of anomalies, velocity estimation and mean time residuals are different in the source and receiver gather curves. This software helps to grasp a better understanding of the data variability before the inversion and provides to the geophysicist an approximate zonal isotropic model and a range of velocity variation that can be used in the inverse problem as a priori information (regularization term). Its use is described through tutorial examples. A guided user interface leads the user through the algorithm steps.

  5. Simulated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Increases P-Wave Duration and P-Wave Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Wons, Annette M.; Rossi, Valentina; Bratton, Daniel J.; Schlatzer, Christian; Schwarz, Esther I.; Camen, Giovanni; Kohler, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Background A high P-wave duration and dispersion (Pd) have been reported to be a prognostic factor for the occurrence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), a condition linked to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We tested the hypothesis of whether a short-term increase of P-wave duration and Pd can be induced by respiratory manoeuvres simulating OSA in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Methods 12-lead-electrocardiography (ECG) was recorded continuously in 24 healthy subjects and 33 patients with PAF, while simulating obstructive apnea (Mueller manoeuvre, MM), obstructive hypopnea (inspiration through a threshold load, ITH), central apnea (AP), and during normal breathing (BL) in randomized order. The P-wave duration and Pd was calculated by using dedicated software for ECG-analysis. Results P-wave duration and Pd significantly increased during MM and ITH compared to BL in all subjects (+13.1ms and +13.8ms during MM; +11.7ms and +12.9ms during ITH; p<0.001 for all comparisons). In MM, the increase was larger in healthy subjects when compared to patients with PAF (p<0.05). Conclusion Intrathoracic pressure swings through simulated obstructive sleep apnea increase P-wave duration and Pd in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Our findings imply that intrathoracic pressure swings prolong the intra-atrial and inter-atrial conduction time and therefore may represent an independent trigger factor for the development for PAF. PMID:27071039

  6. P-Wave Electron-Hydrogen Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhtia, Anand

    2012-01-01

    A variational wave function incorporating short range correlations via Hylleraas type functions plus long-range polarization terms of the polarized orbital type but with smooth cut-off factors has been used to calculate P-wave phase shifts for electron-hydrogen scattering. This approach gives the direct r(exp -4) potential and a non-local optical potential which is definite. The resulting phase shifts have rigorous lower bounds and the convergence is much faster than those obtained without the modification of the target function. Final results will be presented at the conference.

  7. Holographic p-wave superfluid in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shancheng; Pan, Qiyuan; Jing, Jiliang

    2017-02-01

    We construct the holographic p-wave superfluid in Gauss-Bonnet gravity via a Maxwell complex vector field model and investigate the effect of the curvature correction on the superfluid phase transition in the probe limit. We obtain the rich phase structure and find that the higher curvature correction hinders the condensate of the vector field but makes it easier for the appearance of translating point from the second-order transition to the first-order one or for the emergence of the Cave of Winds. Moreover, for the supercurrents versus the superfluid velocity, we observe that our results near the critical temperature are independent of the Gauss-Bonnet parameter and agree well with the Ginzburg-Landau prediction.

  8. Simultaneous 2-D Measurements of Transient Velocity and Temperature Fields in a Thermal Starting Plume: Laboratory Models of Entrainment and Structure of Mantle Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, I.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kurita, K.

    2002-12-01

    Both numerical and experimental models of thermal plumes suggest that mantle plumes entrain surrounding mantle and their morphology (temperature and compositional fields in the plume head) evolves as they rise. Recent geochemical and isotopic studies of mantle plume products have revealed mixing of the ambient mantle with the primitive plume source. In order to make a quantitative comparison of the geophysical modeling with geological evidences, it is desired to show a precise image of spatial and temporal evolution of temperature and compositional fields in the plumes. Here, we present preliminary results of our laboratory experiments on thermal starting plumes using a quantitative technique of digital image processing. By coupling Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) we can measure simultaneous 2-dimensional transient velocity and temperature fields in a thermal plume. Our experiments were conducted in a transparent rectangular tank containing a viscous fluid. Buoyancy in the form of heat was injected into the fluid by operating a heater at the base of the tank. The flow was marked with tracer particles for velocity and with the fluorescence dye, Rhodamine B, for temperature measurements. The particles and the fluorescence dye were illuminated and exited by a thin vertical sheet of laser light that was oriented to contain the axis of symmetry. We succeeded in simultaneous measurements of ascent velocity of the plume head, precise velocity field within the plume head, and evolution of the temperature field. This makes clear their relation and is useful for considering the entrainment process of plumes. Our aim of this study is to clarify the physics of entrainment and mixing phenomena of starting plumes, and to make quantitative geophysical models of mantle plumes connecting with geological and seismic evidences. In this presentation, we will show that this quantitative technique is a powerful tool for approaching these issues.

  9. P wave azimuthal and radial anisotropy of the Hokkaido subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiongwei; Zhao, Dapeng; Li, Jiabiao; Ruan, Aiguo

    2016-04-01

    We present the first three-dimensional P wave radial anisotropy tomography of the Hokkaido subduction zone, as well as P wave azimuthal anisotropy and S wave tomography, which are determined by inverting 298,430 P wave and 233,934 S wave arrival times from 14,245 local earthquakes recorded by 344 seismic stations. Our results reveal significant velocity heterogeneity, seismic anisotropy, and upwelling flows beneath the study region. In the mantle wedge, prominent low-velocity (low-V) anomalies exhibit trench-normal fast-velocity directions (FVDs) and a negative radial anisotropy (i.e., vertical velocity > horizontal velocity), which may reflect upwelling mantle flows. Fan-shaped FVDs are found at depths of 65-90 km, and a detailed 3-D mantle flow pattern is revealed, which may be caused by a combination of oblique subduction of the Pacific plate and collision of the Kuril arc with the Honshu arc beneath southern Hokkaido. The radial anisotropy changes at ~100 km depth, which may reflect variations in temperature and fluid conditions there. The subducting Pacific slab exhibits a positive radial anisotropy (i.e., horizontal velocity > vertical velocity), which may reflect the original fossil anisotropy when the Pacific plate formed at the mid-ocean ridge.

  10. 2D shear wave velocity mapping of the Hartoušov CO2 degassing area in the Cheb Basin, NW Bohemia (Czech Republic), using Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Estrella, H.; Henke, M.

    2015-12-01

    For the characterization of the subsurface of the Hartoušov CO2 degassing area in the Cheb Basin, NW Bohemia, Czech Republic several different approaches have been made. However, no active seismic characterization has been presented, nor published. The Multi­channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) offers an useful tool to estimate vertical and horizontal velocity changes of the shallow subsurface. This can correlate to variations on rock elastic properties and/or fluid content, and represents the subsurface-layering.Surface waves were stimulated using a sledgehammer as source, and were measured with 48 vertical geophones with spacing of 1 m and the roll along method with a setup dis­placement of 2 m. Two source offsets, 10 m and 30 m, were used to increase the data quality and the resolution.The analysis of propagation velocities leads to dispersion curves from which 1D shear wave velocity profiles can be inverted. Those will be interpolated to create a 2D ground stiffness map. The measurements were taken in the NW area of the main degassing zone and are partially in the same spot of former investigations, i.e. CO2 concentration and gas flux measurements, electric and gravimetric surveys and continuous seismic noise mea­surements.Changes in the structure of the 2D velocity maps can be explained potentially with the oc­currence of fluid paths and their diffusion in the subsurface or the existence of the Počatky-Plesná fault zone, which position is not fully understood yet or both features in combination.

  11. Model Parameterization and P-wave AVA Direct Inversion for Young's Impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao

    2017-03-01

    AVA inversion is an important tool for elastic parameters estimation to guide the lithology prediction and "sweet spot" identification of hydrocarbon reservoirs. The product of the Young's modulus and density (named as Young's impedance in this study) is known as an effective lithology and brittleness indicator of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs. Density is difficult to predict from seismic data, which renders the estimation of the Young's impedance inaccurate in conventional approaches. In this study, a pragmatic seismic AVA inversion approach with only P-wave pre-stack seismic data is proposed to estimate the Young's impedance to avoid the uncertainty brought by density. First, based on the linearized P-wave approximate reflectivity equation in terms of P-wave and S-wave moduli, the P-wave approximate reflectivity equation in terms of the Young's impedance is derived according to the relationship between P-wave modulus, S-wave modulus, Young's modulus and Poisson ratio. This equation is further compared to the exact Zoeppritz equation and the linearized P-wave approximate reflectivity equation in terms of P- and S-wave velocities and density, which illustrates that this equation is accurate enough to be used for AVA inversion when the incident angle is within the critical angle. Parameter sensitivity analysis illustrates that the high correlation between the Young's impedance and density render the estimation of the Young's impedance difficult. Therefore, a de-correlation scheme is used in the pragmatic AVA inversion with Bayesian inference to estimate Young's impedance only with pre-stack P-wave seismic data. Synthetic examples demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to predict the Young's impedance stably even with moderate noise and the field data examples verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach in Young's impedance estimation and "sweet spots" evaluation.

  12. P-wave Receiver Functions reveal the Bohemian Massif crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampfova Exnerova, Hana; Plomerova, Jaroslava; Vecsey, Ludek

    2015-04-01

    In this study we present initial results of P-wave Receiver Functions (RF) calculated from broad-band waveforms of teleseismic events recorded by temporary and permanent stations in the Bohemian Massif (BM, Central Europe). Temporary arrays BOHEMA I (2001-2003), BOHEMA II (2004-2005) and BOHEMA III (2005-2006) operated during passive seismic experiments oriented towards studying velocity structure of the lithosphere and the upper mantle. Receiver Functions show relative response of the Earth structure under a seismic station and nowadays represent frequently-used method to retrieve structure of the crust, whose knowledge is needed in various studies of the upper mantle. The recorded waveforms are composites of direct P and P-to-S converted waves that reverberate in the structure beneath the receiver (Ammon, 1997). The RFs are sensitive to seismic velocity contrast and are thus suited to identifying velocity discontinuities in the crust, including the Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho). Relative travel-time delays of the converted phases detected in the RFs are transformed into estimates of discontinuity depths assuming external information on the vp/vs and P velocity. To evaluate RFs we use the Multiple-taper spectral correlation (MTC) method (Park and Levin, 2000) and process signals from teleseismic events at epicentral distances of 30 - 100° with magnitude Mw > 5.5. Recordings are filtered with Butterworth band-pass filter of 2 - 8 s. To select automatically signals which are strong enough, we calculate signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) in two steps. In the first step we calculate SNR for signals from intervals (-1s, 3s)/(-10s, -2s), where P-arrival time represent time zero. In the second step we broaden the intervals and calculate SNR for (-1s, 9s)/(-60s, -2s). We also employ forward modelling of the RFs using Interactive Receiver Functions Forward Modeller (IRFFM) (Tkalčić et al., 2010) to produce, in the first step, one-dimensional velocity models under

  13. Assessment of Left Ventricular 2D Flow Pathlines during Early Diastole Using Spatial Modulation of Magnetization with Polarity Alternating Velocity Encoding (SPAMM-PAV): a study in normal volunteers and canine animals with myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ziheng; Friedman, Daniel; Dione, Donald P.; Lin, Ben A.; Duncan, James S.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Sampath, Smita

    2013-01-01

    A high temporal resolution 2D flow pathline analysis method that describes the spatio-temporal distribution of blood entering the left ventricle during early diastolic filling is presented. Filling patterns in normal volunteers (n=8) and canine animals (baseline (n=1) and infarcted (n=6)) are studied using this approach. Data is acquired using our recently reported MR technique, SPAMM-PAV, which permits simultaneous quantification of blood velocities and myocardial strain at high temporal resolution of 14 ms. Virtual emitter particles, released from the mitral valve plane every time frame during rapid filling, are tracked to depict the propagation of 2D pathlines on the imaged plane. The pathline regional distribution patterns are compared with regional myocardial longitudinal strains and regional chamber longitudinal pressure gradients. Our results demonstrate strong spatial inter-dependence between left ventricular (LV) filling patterns and LV mechanical function. Significant differences in pathline-described filling patterns are observed in the infarcted animals. Quantitative analysis of net kinetic energy for each set of pathlines is performed. Peak net kinetic energy of 0.06±0.01 mJ in normal volunteers, 0.043 mJ in baseline dog, 0.143±0.03 mJ in three infarcted dogs with nominal flow dysfunction, and 0.016±0.007 mJ in three infarcted dogs with severe flow dysfunction is observed. PMID:23044637

  14. P-wave seismic imaging through dipping transversely isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Jennifer Meryl

    2000-10-01

    P-wave seismic anisotropy is of growing concern to the exploration industry. The transmissional effects through dipping anisotropic strata, such as shales, cause substantial depth and lateral positioning errors when imaging subsurface targets. Using anisotropic physical models the limitations of conventional isotropic migration routines were determined to be significant. In addition, these models were used to validate both anisotropic depth migration routines and an anisotropic, numerical raytracer. In order to include anisotropy in these processes, one must be able to quantify the anisotropy using two parameters, epsilon and delta. These parameters were determined from headwave velocity measurements on anisotropic strata, in the parallel-, perpendicular- and 45°-to-bedding directions. This new method was developed using refraction seismic techniques to measure the necessary velocities in the Wapiabi Formation shales, the Brazeau Group interbedded sandstones and shales, the Cardium Formation sandstones and the Palliser Formation limestones. The Wapiabi Formation and Brazeau Group rocks were determined to be anisotropic with epsilon = 0.23 +/- 0.05, delta = --0.05 +/- 0.07 and epsilon = 0.11 +/- 0.04, delta = 0.42 +/- 0.06, respectively. The sandstones and limestones of the Cardium and Palliser formations were both determined to be isotropic, in these studies. In a complementary experiment, a new procedure using vertical seismic profiling (VSP) techniques was developed to measure the anisotropic headwave velocities. Using a multi-offset source configuration on an appropriately dipping, uniform panel of anisotropic strata, the required velocities were measured directly and modelled. In this study, the geologic model was modelled using an anisotropic raytracer, developed for the experiment. The anisotropy was successfully modelled using anisotropic parameters based on the refraction seismic results. With a firm idea of the anisotropic parameters from the

  15. On accuracy of the finite-difference and finite-element schemes with respect to P-wave to S-wave speed ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Galis, Martin; Pazak, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Numerical modelling of seismic motion in sedimentary basins often has to account for P-wave to S-wave speed ratios as large as five and even larger, mainly in sediments below groundwater level. Therefore, we analyse seven schemes for their behaviour with a varying P-wave to S-wave speed ratio. Four finite-difference (FD) schemes include (1) displacement conventional-grid, (2) displacement-stress partly-staggered-grid, (3) displacement-stress staggered-grid and (4) velocity-stress staggered-grid schemes. Three displacement finite-element schemes differ in integration: (1) Lobatto four-point, (2) Gauss four-point and (3) Gauss one-point. To compare schemes at the most fundamental level, and identify basic aspects responsible for their behaviours with the varying speed ratio, we analyse 2-D second-order schemes assuming an elastic homogeneous isotropic medium and a uniform grid. We compare structures of the schemes and applied FD approximations. We define (full) local errors in amplitude and polarization in one time step, and normalize them for a unit time. We present results of extensive numerical calculations for wide ranges of values of the speed ratio and a spatial sampling ratio, and the entire range of directions of propagation with respect to the spatial grid. The application of some schemes to real sedimentary basins in general requires considerably finer spatial sampling than usually applied. Consistency in approximating first spatial derivatives appears to be the key factor for the behaviour of a scheme with respect to the P-wave to S-wave speed ratio.

  16. Lithospheric structure of the Illinois Basin from teleseismic P-wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B.; Gilbert, H. J.; Hamburger, M. W.; Merrell, T.; Pavlis, G. L.; Sherrill, E.

    2013-12-01

    We examine heterogeneity of the crust and upper mantle associated with a major intracratonic basin, using arrival time data from a regional EarthScope experiment extending across the western margin of the Illinois Basin. We measured 24,062 P-wave residuals associated with 399 teleseismic events recorded from January 2012 to March 2013 by 122 stations in the Illinois Basin region. We used data from the Ozark Illinois INdiana Kentucky (OIINK) Flexible Array, the permanent New Madrid Seismic Network, and a portion of the Earthscope Transportable Array. Precise relative arrival times were determined using array cross-correlation methods. We plotted the measured arrivals as residual maps to identify first order patterns of velocity heterogeneity and to fix outliers. These data were then inverted for P-wave velocity using non-linear tomography code developed by Steven Roecker. Our preliminary results indicate the upper 200 km of the mantle can be characterized by two blocks with a transition zone centered roughly parallel to the Ohio River boundary of Illinois and Kentucky. Estimated P-wave velocities are higher in Kentucky, located southeast of the transition zone compared to Missouri and Illinois, located northwest. We caution that at this stage our tomography model may be biased as we have not accounted for variations in crustal structure or applied corrections associated with the Illinois Basin. Parallel work with receiver functions by our group and the known geometry of the Illinois Basin will be used to calculate these corrections and modify the tomographic model accordingly.

  17. Observation of P-Wave Capture Strength in the Deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Laird Hayman

    The ^2H(d,gamma) ^4He reaction is expected to be dominated by electric quadrupole (E2) s-wave (l = 0) capture to the D-state (l = 2) of ^4He below E _{rm d}(lab) = 500 keV, where the centrifugal barrier should suppress the electric quadrupole (E2) d-wave (l = 2) capture to the S-state (l = 0). Enhancement of the total cross section below E_{ rm d}(lab) = 500 keV has been attributed to this mechanism, although no direct evidence exists to support this claim. To investigate this issue, we have measured the vector and tensor analyzing powers of the ^2 H(vec{rm d}{, }gamma)^4He reaction using an 80 keV beam of polarized deuterons. We present results for the vector and tensor analyzing powers A_ {rm y}(theta) and A _{rm yy}(theta) and the differential cross section sigma(theta) /A_0 for E_ {rm d}(lab) = 80 - 0 keV at theta_{rm c.m. } = 0^circ, 45^ circ, and 82^circ. A model-independent transition matrix element analysis of the data finds that a major portion of the capture strength results from electric dipole (E1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) p-wave capture (l = 1). The data are also compared to a recent microscopic coupled -channel resonating group model calculation which includes electric quadrupole (E2), electric dipole (E1), magnetic quadrupole (M2), and magnetic dipole (M1) transitions and the coupled deuteron-deuteron, proton-triton, and neutron -^3He channels. The model produces fair agreement with the experimental data when a semi-realistic force is used.

  18. Effects of p-wave annihilation on the angular power spectrum of extragalactic gamma-rays from dark matter annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Sheldon; Dutta, Bhaskar

    2011-10-01

    We present a formalism for estimating the angular power spectrum of extragalactic gamma-rays produced by dark matter annihilating with any general velocity-dependent cross section. The relevant density and velocity distribution of dark matter is modeled as an ensemble of smooth, universal, rigid, disjoint, spherical halos with distribution and universal properties constrained by simulation data. We apply this formalism to theories of dark matter with p-wave annihilation, for which the relative-velocity-weighted annihilation cross section is σv=a+bv2. We determine that this significantly increases the gamma-ray power if b/a≳106. The effect of p-wave annihilation on the angular power spectrum is very similar for the sample of particle physics models we explored, suggesting that the important effect for a given b/a is largely determined by the cosmic dark matter distribution. If the dark matter relic from strong p-wave theories is thermally produced, the intensities of annihilation gamma-rays are strongly p-wave suppressed, making them difficult to observe. If an angular power spectrum consistent with a strong p wave were to be observed, it would likely indicate nonthermal production of dark matter in the early Universe.

  19. Holographic p-wave superconductor models with Weyl corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Pan, Qiyuan; Jing, Jiliang

    2015-04-01

    We study the effect of the Weyl corrections on the holographic p-wave dual models in the backgrounds of AdS soliton and AdS black hole via a Maxwell complex vector field model by using the numerical and analytical methods. We find that, in the soliton background, the Weyl corrections do not influence the properties of the holographic p-wave insulator/superconductor phase transition, which is different from that of the Yang-Mills theory. However, in the black hole background, we observe that similarly to the Weyl correction effects in the Yang-Mills theory, the higher Weyl corrections make it easier for the p-wave metal/superconductor phase transition to be triggered, which shows that these two p-wave models with Weyl corrections share some similar features for the condensation of the vector operator.

  20. Effective field theory for a p -wave superconductor in the subgap regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, T. H.; Kvorning, T.; Nair, V. P.; Sreejith, G. J.

    2015-02-01

    We construct an effective field theory for the 2 d spinless p -wave paired superconductor that faithfully describes the topological properties of the bulk state, and also provides a model for the subgap states at vortex cores and edges. In particular, it captures the topologically protected zero modes and has the correct ground-state degeneracy on the torus. We also show that our effective field theory becomes a topological field theory in a well defined scaling limit and that the vortices have the expected non-Abelian braiding statistics.

  1. Constraining seismic velocity features combining short and long period signals: Test ground is Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, Fatih; Eken, Tuna; Yolsal-Çevikbilen, Seda; Taymaz, Tuncay

    2015-04-01

    Verifying the seismic velocity models requires combining different techniques to obtain more reliable basement for further steps, e.g., earthquake location, moment tensor analysis etc. Especially, 2D/3D heterogeneities and velocity contrasts are the key unknowns to be addressed in order to achieve the best-possible setup for further analysis. In that frame, short and long period signals are combined to better constrain the unusual velocity features. Our approach employs P-wave particle motions and receiver functions to discriminate the velocity structure of different crustal blocks. P-wave particle motions are basically used to differentiate direction of incoming waves, which is an indirect measure of potential velocity contrast/heterogeneity in horizontal axis. In the meanwhile, P-wave receiver functions are used to estimate frequency dependent S-wave velocities at different crustal spots. Turkey, seismically the most active region in Europe, is selected to be the test ground for joint analysis scheme. The region has been continuously monitored by AFAD (Prime Ministry, Ankara) and Kandilli Observatory (Boğaziçi Üniversity, Istanbul). Furthermore, some particular regions have been densely monitored for a couple of years by temporary seismic networks, e.g., the IRIS network deployed in the frame of the North Anatolian Fault experiment. We integrated all available data to reach to the highest possible coverage for selected test sites. The results are jointly interpreted to refine existing crustal models in Turkey.

  2. P-wave dispersion: What we know till now?

    PubMed Central

    Aytemir, Kudret; Oto, Ali

    2016-01-01

    P-wave dispersion is defined as the difference between the maximum and the minimum P-wave duration recorded from multiple different-surface ECG leads. It has been known that increased P-wave duration and P-wave dispersion reflect prolongation of intraatrial and interatrial conduction time and the inhomogeneous propagation of sinus impulses, which are well-known electrophysiologic characteristics in patients with atrial arrhythmias and especially paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Extensive clinical evaluation of P-wave dispersion has been performed in the assessment of the risk for atrial fibrillation in patients without apparent heart disease, in hypertensives, in patients with coronary artery disease, in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, in patients with congenital heart diseases, as well as in other groups of patients suffering from various cardiac or non-cardiac diseases. In this paper, we aimed to summarize the measurement methods, current use in different clinical situations, strengths and limitations of the of P-wave dispersion. PMID:27081484

  3. Ray-theoretical modeling of secondary microseism P waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farra, V.; Stutzmann, E.; Gualtieri, L.; Schimmel, M.; Ardhuin, F.

    2016-09-01

    Secondary microseism sources are pressure fluctuations close to the ocean surface. They generate acoustic P waves that propagate in water down to the ocean bottom where they are partly reflected and partly transmitted into the crust to continue their propagation through the Earth. We present the theory for computing the displacement power spectral density of secondary microseism P waves recorded by receivers in the far field. In the frequency domain, the P-wave displacement can be modeled as the product of (1) the pressure source, (2) the source site effect that accounts for the constructive interference of multiply reflected P waves in the ocean, (3) the propagation from the ocean bottom to the stations and (4) the receiver site effect. Secondary microseism P waves have weak amplitudes, but they can be investigated by beamforming analysis. We validate our approach by analysing the seismic signals generated by typhoon Ioke (2006) and recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network. Backprojecting the beam onto the ocean surface enables to follow the source motion. The observed beam centroid is in the vicinity of the pressure source derived from the ocean wave model WAVEWATCH IIIR. The pressure source is then used for modeling the beam and a good agreement is obtained between measured and modeled beam amplitude variation over time. This modeling approach can be used to invert P-wave noise data and retrieve the source intensity and lateral extent.

  4. Development of the Borehole 2-D Seismic Tomography Software Using MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, A. D.; Syahputra, A.; Fatkhan, F.; Sule, R.; Hendriyana, A.

    2011-12-01

    We developed 2-D borehole seismic tomography software that we called "EARTHMAX-2D TOMOGRAPHY" to image subsurface physical properties including P-wave and S-wave velocities between two boreholes. We used Graphic User Interface (GUI) facilities of MATLAB programming language to create the software. In this software, we used travel time of seismic waves from source to receiver by using pseudo bending ray tracing method as input for tomography inversion. We can also set up a model parameterization, initial velocity model, ray tracing processes, conduct borehole seismic tomography inversion, and finally visualize the inversion results. The LSQR method was applied to solve of tomography inversion solution. We provided the Checkerboard Test Resolution (CTR) to evaluate the model resolution of the tomography inversion. As validation of this developed software, we tested it for geotechnical purposes. We then conducted data acquisition in the "ITB X-field" that is located on ITB campus. We used two boreholes that have a depth of 39 meters. Seismic wave sources were generated by impulse generator and sparker and then they were recorded by borehole hydrophone string type 3. Later on, we analyzed and picked seismic arrival time as input for tomography inversion. As results, we can image the estimated weathering layer, sediment layer, and basement rock in the field depicted by seismic wave structures. More detailed information about the developed software will be presented. Keywords: borehole, tomography, earthmax-2D, inversion

  5. QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Yolbaş, Servet; Yıldırım, Ahmet; Düzenci, Deccane; Karakaya, Bülent; Dağlı, Mustafa Necati; Koca, Süleyman Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic disease characterized by widespread pain. Somatic complaints associated with the cardiovascular system, such as chest pain and palpitations, are frequently seen in FM patients. P and QT dispersions are simple and inexpensive measurements reflecting the regional heterogeneity of atrial and ventricular repolarization, respectively. QT dispersion can cause serious ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of the present study was to evaluate QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with FM. Material and Methods The study involved 48 FM patients who fulfilled the established criteria and 32 healthy controls (HC). A standard 12-lead electrocardiogram was performed on all participants. QT dispersion was defined as the difference between the longest and the shortest QT intervals. Similarly, the differences between the shortest and longest P waves were defined as P wave dispersion. Results The QT dispersion and corrected QT dispersion were shorter in the FM group compared with the HC group (p<0.001 for both). In terms of the P wave dispersion value, there was no significant difference between the FM and HC groups (p=0.088). Conclusion Longer QT and P wave dispersions are not problems in patients with FM. Therefore, it may be concluded that fibromyalgia does not include an increased risk of atrial and/or ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:28149660

  6. Spectral modulation effect in teleseismic P-waves from DPRK nuclear tests recorded at different azimuths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Yefim; Kim, So Gu; Hofstetter, Abraham

    2014-05-01

    Two underground nuclear explosions conducted by North Korea in 2009 and 2013 were recorded by the Israel Seismic Network. Pronounced coherent minima (spectral nulls) at 1.2-1.3 Hz were revealed in the spectra of teleseismic P-waves. For a ground-truth explosion with a shallow source depth (relatively to an earthquake), this phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of the interference between the down-going P-wave and the pP phase reflected from the Earth's surface. A similar effect was observed at ISN stations for the Pakistan nuclear explosion at a different frequency 1.7 Hz indicating a source and not site-effect. Similar spectral minima with about the same frequency were observed in teleseismic P-waves of all three North Korea explosions (including the 2006 test) recorded at network stations and arrays in Kazakhstan (KURK), Norway (NORESS, ARCESS), Australia (Alice Springs, Warramunga) and Canada (Yellowknife), covering a broad azimuthal range. Data of the 2013 test at Warramunga array showed harmonic spectral modulation with several minima, evidencing a clear interference effect. These observations support the above-mentioned interpretation. Based on the null frequency dependency on the near-surface acoustic velocity and the source depth, the depth of the North Korea tests was estimated as ~2 km (different from the value ~1 km reported by USGS for the third test). This unusual depth estimation needs an additional validation based on more stations and verification by other methods.

  7. P wave anisotropic tomography of the Nankai subduction zone in Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhao, Dapeng

    2012-05-01

    The active subduction of the young Philippine Sea (PHS) plate and the old Pacific plate has resulted in significant seismic heterogeneity and anisotropy in Southwest (SW) Japan. In this work we determined a detailed 3-D P wave anisotropic tomography of the crust and upper mantle beneath SW Japan using ˜540,000 P wave arrival times from 5,249 local earthquakes recorded by 1095 stations. The PHS slab is imaged clearly as a high-velocity (high-V) anomaly which exhibits considerable lateral variations. Significant low-velocity (low-V) anomalies are revealed above and below the PHS slab. The low-V anomalies above the PHS slab may reflect the upwelling flow in the mantle wedge and the PHS slab dehydration, and they form the source zone of the arc volcanoes in SW Japan. The low-V zones under the PHS slab may reflect the upwelling flow in the big mantle wedge above the Pacific slab. The anisotropy in the crust and upper mantle is complex. In Kyushu, the P wave fast velocity direction (FVD) is generally trench-normal in the mantle wedge under the back-arc, which is consistent with the corner flow driven by the PHS slab subduction. The FVD is trench-parallel in the subducting PHS slab under Kyushu. We think that the intraslab seismicity is a potential indicator to the slab anisotropy. That is, the PHS slab with seismicity has kept its original fossil anisotropy formed at the mid-ocean ridge, while the aseismic PHS slab has reproduced the anisotropy according to its current deformation.

  8. Teleseismic P-wave polarization analysis at the Gräfenberg array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiano, L.; Meier, T.; Krüger, F.; Keers, H.; Weidle, C.

    2016-12-01

    P-wave polarization at the Gräfenberg array (GRF) in southern Germany is analysed in terms of azimuthal deviations and deviations in the vertical polarization using 20 yr of broad-band recordings. An automated procedure for estimating P-wave polarization parameters is suggested, based on the definition of a characteristic function, which evaluates the polarization angles and their time variability as well as the amplitude, linearity and the signal-to-noise ratio of the P wave. P-wave polarization at the GRF array is shown to depend mainly on frequency and backazimuth and only slightly on epicentral distance indicating depth-dependent local anisotropy and lateral heterogeneity. A harmonic analysis is applied to the azimuthal anomalies to analyse their periodicity as a function of backazimuth. The dominant periods are 180° and 360°. At low frequencies, between 0.03 and 0.1 Hz, the observed fast directions of azimuthal anisotropy inferred from the 180° periodicity are similar across the array. The average fast direction of azimuthal anisotropy at these frequencies is N20°E with an uncertainty of about 8° and is consistent with fast directions of Pn-wave propagation. Lateral velocity gradients determined for the low-frequency band are compatible with the Moho topography of the area. A more complex pattern in the horizontal fast axis orientation beneath the GRF array is observed in the high-frequency band between 0.1 and 0.5 Hz, and is attributed to anisotropy in the upper crust. A remarkable rotation of the horizontal fast axis orientation across the suture between the geological units Moldanubicum and Saxothuringicum is observed. In contrast, the 360° periodicity at high frequencies is rather consistent across the array and may either point to lower velocities in the upper crust towards the Bohemian Massif and/or to anisotropy dipping predominantly in the NE-SW direction. Altogether, P-wave polarization analysis indicates the presence of layered lithospheric

  9. Predicting the macroseismic intensity from early radiated P wave energy for on-site earthquake early warning in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brondi, P.; Picozzi, M.; Emolo, A.; Zollo, A.; Mucciarelli, M.

    2015-10-01

    Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) are potentially effective tools for risk mitigation in active seismic regions. The present study explores the possibility of predicting the macroseismic intensity within EEW timeframes using the squared velocity integral (IV2) measured on the early P wave signals, a proxy for the P wave radiated energy of earthquakes. This study shows that IV2 correlates better than the peak displacement measured on P waves with both the peak ground velocity and the Housner Intensity, with the latter being recognized by engineers as a reliable proxy for damage assessment. Therefore, using the strong motion recordings of the Italian Accelerometric Archive, a novel relationship between the parameter IV2 and the macroseismic intensity (IM) has been derived. The validity of this relationship has been assessed using the strong motion recordings of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia Strong Motion Data and Osservatorio Sismico delle Strutture databases, as well as, in the case of the MW 6, 29 May 2012 Emilia earthquake (Italy), comparing the predicted intensities with the ones observed after a macroseismic survey. Our results indicate that P wave IV2 can become a key parameter for the design of on-site EEWS, capable of proving real-time predictions of the IM at target sites.

  10. Improved P-wave Tomography of the Lowermost Mantle and Consequences for Mantle and Core Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalcic, H.; Young, M. K.; Muir, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The core mantle boundary (CMB) separates the liquid iron core from the slowly-convecting solid mantle. The ~300 km thick barrier above the boundary has proven to be far more than a simple dividing layer; rather it is a complex region with a range of proposed phenomena such as thermal and compositional heterogeneity, partial melting and anisotropy. Characterizing the heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle through seismic tomography will prove crucial to accurately understanding key geodynamical processes within our planet, not just in the mantle above, but also a possible "mapping" onto the inner core boundary (ICB) through a thermochemical convection in the outer core, which in turn might control the growth of the inner core (e.g. Aubert et al., 2008; Gubbins et al., 2011). Here we obtain high-resolution compressional wave (P-wave) velocity images and uncertainty estimates for the lowermost mantle using travel time data collected by waveform cross-correlation. Strikingly, independent datasets of seismic phases that "see" the lowermost mantle in a different way yield similar P-wave velocity distributions at lower harmonic degrees. We also consider the effect of CMB topography. The images obtained are void of explicit model parameterization and regularization (through transdimensional Bayesian tomography) and contain features on multiple spatial scales. Subsequent spectral analyses reveal a power of heterogeneity three times larger than previous estimates. The P-wave tomograms of the lowermost mantle contain the harmonic degree 2-structure, similar to tomographic images derived from S-wave data (e.g. Ritsema et al. 2011), but with additional higher harmonic degrees (notably, 3-7). In other words, the heterogeneity size is uniformly distributed between about 500 and 6000 km. Inter alia, the resulting heterogeneity spectrum provides a bridge between the long-wavelength features of most global models and the very short-scale dimensions of scatterers mapped in independent

  11. Finite-difference P wave travel time seismic tomography of the crust and uppermost mantle in the Italian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, L.; Serretti, P.; Morelli, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a 3-D P wave velocity model of the crust and shallowest mantle under the Italian region, that includes a revised Moho depth map, obtained by regional seismic travel time tomography. We invert 191,850 Pn and Pg wave arrival times from 6850 earthquakes that occurred within the region from 1988 to 2007, recorded by 264 permanent seismic stations. We adopt a high-resolution linear B-spline model representation, with 0.1° horizontal and 2 km vertical grid spacing, and an accurate finite-difference forward calculation scheme. Our nonlinear iterative inversion process uses the recent European reference 3-D crustal model EPcrust as a priori information. Our resulting model shows two arcs of relatively low velocity in the crust running along both the Alps and the Apennines, underlying the collision belts between plates. Beneath the Western Alps we detect the presence of the Ivrea body, denoted by a strong high P wave velocity anomaly. We also map the Moho discontinuity resulting from the inversion, imaged as the relatively sharp transition between crust and mantle, where P wave velocity steps up to values larger than 8 km/s. This simple condition yields an image quite in agreement with previous studies that use explicit representations for the discontinuity. We find a complex lithospheric structure characterized by shallower Moho close by the Tyrrhenian Sea, intermediate depth along the Adriatic coast, and deepest Moho under the two mountain belts.

  12. Imaging the Juan de Fuca plate beneath southern Oregon using teleseismic P wave residuals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Iyer, H.M.; Dawson, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    Images the Juan de Fuca plate in southern Oregon using seismic tomography. P wave travel time residuals from a 366-km-long seismic array operated in southern Oregon in 1982 are inverted. The southeast striking array extended from the Coast ranges to the Modoc Plateau and crossed the High Cascades at Crater Lake, Oregon. Three features under the array were imaged: one high-velocity zone and two low-velocity zones. The high-velocity zone is 3-4% faster than the surrounding upper mantle. It dips steeply at 65?? to the east beneath the Cascade Range and extends down to at least 200 km. It is proposed that this high-velocity feature is subducted Juan de Fuca plate. Two low-velocity zones were also imaged, both of which are 3-4% slower than the surrounding earth structure. The southeastern low-velocity zone may be caused by partially molten crust underlying the Crater Lake volcano region. -from Authors

  13. P-wave attenuation anisotropy in TI media and its application in fracture parameters inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi-Yuan; Hu, Tian-Yue; He, Chuan; Tan, Yu-Yang

    2016-12-01

    The existence of aligned fractures in fluid-saturated rocks leads to obvious attenuation anisotropy and velocity anisotropy. Attenuation anisotropy analysis can be applied to estimate fracture density and scale, which provide important information for reservoir identification. This paper derives P-wave attenuation anisotropy in the ATI media where the symmetry axis is in the arbitrary direction theoretically and modifies the spectral ratio method to measure attenuation anisotropy in the ATI media, thus avoiding a large measurement error when applied to wide azimuth or full azimuth data. Fracture dip and azimuth can be estimated through attenuation anisotropy analysis. For small-scale fractures, fracture scale and fracture density can be determined with enhanced convergence if velocity and attenuation information are both used. We also apply the modified spectralratio method to microseismic field data from an oilfield in East China and extract the fracture dip through attenuation anisotropy analysis. The result agrees with the microseismic monitoring.

  14. P-wave autodissociating resonant states of positronium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zong-Chao; Ho, Y. K.

    1998-05-01

    P-wave autodissociating resonances in positronium-hydrogen scattering are calculated using the method of complex-coordinate rotation. The two lowest P-wave resonance energies and widths are determined by employing extensive Hylleraas-type wave functions, with the sizes of basis sets up to N=2513 terms. The calculated energy and width for the lowest P-state are E_r=-0.59253± 0.00005 a.u. and Γ=0.00160± 0.00010 a.u. We will show the details of our calculations, as well as a comparison with the published values. Results for S- and D-waves will also be presented.

  15. Skyrmion-induced bound states in a p -wave superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöyhönen, Kim; Westström, Alex; Pershoguba, Sergey S.; Ojanen, Teemu; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2016-12-01

    In s -wave systems, it has been theoretically shown that a ferromagnetic film hosting a skyrmion can induce a bound state embedded in the opposite-spin continuum. In this work, we consider a case of skyrmion-induced state in a p -wave superconductor. We find that the skyrmion induces a bound state that generally resides within the spectral gap and is isolated from all other states, in contrast to the case of conventional superconductors. To this end, we derive an approximate expression for the T matrix, through which we calculate the spin-polarized local density of states which is observable in scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We find the unique spectroscopic features of the skyrmion-induced bound state and discuss how our predictions could be employed as experimental probes for p -wave superconducting states.

  16. Holographic p-wave superconductors from Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Nie Zhangyu; Zhang Haiqing

    2010-09-15

    We study the holographic p-wave superconductors in a five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet gravity with an SU(2) Yang-Mills gauge field. In the probe approximation, we find that when the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient grows, the condensation of the vector field becomes harder, both the perpendicular and parallel components, with respect to the direction of the condensation, of the anisotropic conductivity decrease. We also study the mass of the quasiparticle excitations, the gap frequency and the DC conductivities of the p-wave superconductor. All of them depend on the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient. In addition, we observe a strange behavior for the condensation and the relation between the gap frequency and the mass of quasiparticles when the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient is larger than 9/100, which is the upper bound for the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient from the causality of the dual field theory.

  17. Long range p -wave proximity effect into a disordered metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keser, Aydin Cem; Stanev, Valentin; Galitski, Victor

    2015-03-01

    We use quasiclassical methods of superconductivity to study the superconducting proximity effect from a topological p -wave superconductor into a disordered quasi-one-dimensional metallic wire. We demonstrate that the corresponding Eilenberger equations with disorder reduce to a closed nonlinear equation for the superconducting component of the matrix Green's function. Remarkably, this equation is formally equivalent to a classical mechanical system (i.e., Newton's equations), with the Green function corresponding to a coordinate of a fictitious particle and the coordinate along the wire corresponding to time. This mapping allows us to obtain exact solutions in the disordered nanowire in terms of elliptic functions. A surprising result that comes out of this solution is that the p -wave superconductivity proximity induced into the disordered metal remains long range, decaying as slowly as the conventional s -wave superconductivity. It is also shown that impurity scattering leads to the appearance of a zero-energy peak.

  18. Shear wave velocity structure of Reed Bank, southern continental margin of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaodong; Ruan, Aiguo; Zhao, Minghui; Qiu, Xuelin; Wu, Zhenli; Niu, Xiongwei

    2015-03-01

    The shear wave velocity structure of a wide angle seismic profile (OBS973-2) across Reed Bank in the southern continental margin of the South China Sea (SCS) is simulated by 2-D ray-tracing method, based on its previous P-wave model. This profile is 369-km-long and consists of fifteen three-component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS). The main results are as follows.(1) The model consists of seven layers and the shear wave velocity increases from 0.7 km/s at the top of sediment layer to 4.0 km/s in the lower crust. (2) The Moho depth decreases from 20-22 km at the Reed Bank to 9-11 km at the deep oceanic basin with the shear wave velocity of 4.2 km/s below the Moho. (3) The Vp/Vs ratio decreases with depth through the sedimentary layers, attributed to increased compaction and consolidation of the rocks. (4) In the continental upper crust (at model distance 90-170 km), S-wave velocity (2.5-3.2 km/s) is relatively low and Vp/Vs ratio (1.75-1.82) is relatively high compared with the other parts of the crust, corresponding to the lower P-wave velocity in the previous P-wave model and normal faults revealed by MCS data, indicating that a strong regional extensional movement had occurred during the formation process of the SCS at the Reed Bank area. (5) The S-wave structures indicate that Reed Bank crust has different rock compositions from that in the east section of the northern margin, denying the presence of conjugate relationship of Reed Bank with Dongsha islands. According to P-wave models and other data, we inferred that Reed Bank and Macclesfield were separated from the same continental crust during the rifting and break-up process.

  19. Kondo resonance from p-wave hybridization in graphene.

    PubMed

    Jafari, S A; Tohyama, T

    2014-10-15

    The p-wave hybridization in graphene present a distinct class of Kondo problem in pseudogap Fermi systems with bath density of states (DOS) ρ₀(ε) ∝ |ε|. The peculiar geometry of substitutional and hollow-site ad-atoms, and effectively the vacancies allow for a p-wave form of momentum dependence in the hybridization of the associated local orbital with the Dirac fermions of the graphene host which results in a different picture than the s-wave momentum independent hybridization. For the p-wave hybridization function, away from the Dirac point we find closed-form formulae for the Kondo temperature TK which in contrast to the s-wave case is non-zero for any value of hybridization strength V of the single impurity Anderson model (SIAM). At the Dirac point where the DOS vanishes, we find a conceivably small value of Vmin above which the Kondo screening takes place even in the presence of particle-hole symmetry. We also show that the non-Lorentzian line shape of the local spectrum arising from anomalous hybridization function leads to much larger TK in vacant graphene compared to a metallic host with similar bandwidth and SIAM parameters.

  20. Kramer Pesch Effect in Chiral p-Wave Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yusuke; Hayashi, Nobuhiko

    2001-11-01

    The pair-potential and current density around a single vortex of the two-dimensional chiral p-wave superconductor with \\mbi{d}=\\hat{\\mbi{z}}(px ± i py) are determined self-consistently within the quasiclassical theory of superconductivity. Shrinking of the vortex core at low temperatures are considered numerically and analytically. Temperature-dependences of the spatial variation of pair-potential and circular current around the core and density of states at zero energy are the same as those in the isotropic s-wave case. When the senses of vorticity and chirality are opposite, however, we find two novel results; 1) the scattering rate due to non-magnetic impurities is considerably suppressed, compared to that in the s-wave vortex. From this observation, we expect that the chiral p-wave superconductors provide the best chance to observe the shrinking of the vortex (“Kramer Pesch effect”) experimentally. 2) The pair-potential of chiral p-wave superconductors inside vortex core recovers a combined time-reversal-Gauge symmetry, although this symmetry is broken in the region far from the vortex core. This local recovery of symmetry leads to the suppression of the impurity effect inside vortex core.

  1. The consequence of measured porosities and clay contents on P-wave AVO for shaly sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Adel A. A.

    2004-12-01

    The modified AVO (amplitude versus offset) equations presented in Othman (2003 Tecnologia de la Intrusión de Agua de Mar en Acuifros Costeros: Paises Mediterráneos—Coastal Acquifer Intrusion Technology: Mediterranean Countries (Madrid: IGME) pp 295-302) are confirmed by application of our data. About 26 layers composed mainly of shales and sandstones encountered in an oil well in the Gulf of Suez are utilized in the present study. P-wave velocity, density, porosity and the clay content of these rocks are principal feedback parameters in this investigation. The attributes of the assessed AVO coefficient (Ra) are studied with reference to several parameter ratios in the AVO case. These ratios include the porosity ratio (phgr1/phgr2), Poisson's ratio (σ1/σ2), density ratio (ρ1/ρ2), clay content ratio (C1/C2) and P-wave velocity ratio (α1/α2). Subscripts 1 and 2 respectively refer to the upper and lower layers relative to the interface. The applied data reveal linear relationships between the velocity ratio, α1/α2, and the porosity ratio, phgr1/phgr2. α1/α2 is found to decrease with increasing phgr1/phgr2. The clay content ratio C1/C2 increases linearly with increasing phgr1/phgr2 as well as with increasing Poisson's ratio, σ1/σ2. The density ratio, ρ1/ρ2, demonstrates a weak decrease proportional to phgr1/phgr2. Ra generally increases with increasing phgr1/phgr2, C1/C2 and σ1/σ2. On the other hand, Ra decreases with increasing ρ1/ρ2 and α1/α2. These relations are valid for the offset condition according to our data.

  2. P -wave coupled channel effects in electron-positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Meng-Lin; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Wang, Qian

    2016-11-01

    P -wave coupled channel effects arising from the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds in e+e- annihilations are systematically studied. We provide an exploratory study by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation with short-ranged contact potentials obtained in the heavy quark limit. These contact potentials can be extracted from the P -wave interactions in the e+e- annihilations, and then be employed to investigate possible isosinglet P -wave hadronic molecules. In particular, such an investigation may provide information about exotic candidates with quantum numbers JPC=1-+ . In the mass region of the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds, there are two quark model bare states, i.e. the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ), which are assigned as (13D1) and (31S1) states, respectively. By an overall fit of the cross sections of e+e-→D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , D*D¯*, we determine the physical coupling constants to each channel and extract the pole positions of the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ). The deviation of the ratios from that in the heavy quark spin symmetry (HQSS) limit reflects the HQSS breaking effect due to the mass splitting between the D and the D*. Besides the two poles, we also find a pole a few MeV above the D D¯ *+c .c . threshold which can be related to the so-called G (3900 ) observed earlier by BABAR and Belle. This scenario can be further scrutinized by measuring the angular distribution in the D*D¯* channel with high luminosity experiments.

  3. Imaging seismic velocities for hydrate-bearing sediments using converted waves near Yuan-An Ridge, off southwest Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, W. B.; Shih, T. Y.; Lin, W. Y.; Wang, T. K.; Liu, C. S.; Wang, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Data from P-waves and from S-waves generated by P-S conversion on reflection from airgun shots recorded along four lines of ocean bottom seismometers were used to construct 2-D velocity sections near the Yuan-An Ridge, off southwest Taiwan. The locations of the ocean bottom seismometers were determined to high accuracy by an inversion based on the shot traveltimes. Traveltime inversion and forward modeling of multicomponent wide-angle seismic data result in detailed P-wave (Vp) and S-wave (Vs) velocities of hydrate-bearing sediment layers. The inversion indicates a relatively high P-wave velocity beneath topographic ridges which represent a series of thrust-cored anticlines develop in the accretionary wedge. S-wave velocities of the sediments over the entire section, down to 400 m below seafloor, range from 320 to 570 ms-1. We suggested the lateral variation in Vp/Vs profiles in the hydrate-affected zones may be related to the migration conduit of gas-rich fluid and a characteristic of hydrate content. We model Vp using equations based on a modification of Wood’s equation to estimate the gas hydrate saturation. The hydrate saturation varies from 5% at the top ∼200 m below the seafloor to 10-15% of pore space close to the bottom simulating reflector (BSR) in the survey area.

  4. Preliminary Results for Crustal Structure in Southeastern Africa from P-wave Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachingwe, M.; Nyblade, A.; Mulibo, G. D.; Mulowezi, A.; Kunkuta, E.; De Magalhães, V.; Wiens, D. A.; Wysession, M. E.; Julia, J.

    2013-12-01

    The crustal structure of southeastern Africa is investigated by modeling P-wave receiver functions using H-k stacking and joint inversion methods. P-wave receiver functions are analyzed for 29 broadband seismic stations in Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique. Estimates for the Moho depth and Poisson's ratio are determined from H-k stacking, and estimates for the shear wave velocity are determined by the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion. Preliminary results show that Moho depths beneath southeastern Africa range from 32 km to 51 km. Thicker crust is found in Proterozoic terrains, such as the Irumide Belt, while thinner crust is found in reworked Archean terrains, such as the Bangweulu Block. These results are consistent with previous studies and global averages for Precambrian terrains. The preliminary results also show a range of Poisson's ratios from 0.2 to 0.3. These new results for southeastern Africa are being combined with similar results from elsewhere in eastern and southern Africa to improve our understanding of African crustal structure.

  5. Depth variations of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy beneath Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Zhao, Dapeng; Xu, Jiandong; Zhou, Bengang; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-01-01

    A high-resolution model of P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath Mainland China and surrounding regions is determined using a large number of arrival-time data recorded by the China seismic network, the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and temporary seismic arrays deployed on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results provide important new insights into the subducted Indian plate and mantle dynamics in East Asia. Our tomographic images show that the northern limit of the subducting Indian plate has reached the Jinsha River suture in eastern Tibet. A striking variation of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy is revealed in the Indian lithosphere: the fast velocity direction (FVD) is NE-SW beneath the Indian continent, whereas the FVD is arc parallel beneath the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau, which may reflect re-orientation of minerals due to lithospheric extension, in response to the India-Eurasia collision. There are multiple anisotropic layers with variable FVDs in some parts of the Tibetan Plateau, which may be the cause of the dominant null splitting measurements in these regions. A circular pattern of FVDs is revealed around the Philippine Sea slab beneath SE China, which reflects asthenospheric strain caused by toroidal mantle flow around the edge of the subducting slab. PMID:27432744

  6. Depth variations of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy beneath Mainland China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zhao, Dapeng; Xu, Jiandong; Zhou, Bengang; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-07-01

    A high-resolution model of P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath Mainland China and surrounding regions is determined using a large number of arrival-time data recorded by the China seismic network, the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and temporary seismic arrays deployed on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results provide important new insights into the subducted Indian plate and mantle dynamics in East Asia. Our tomographic images show that the northern limit of the subducting Indian plate has reached the Jinsha River suture in eastern Tibet. A striking variation of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy is revealed in the Indian lithosphere: the fast velocity direction (FVD) is NE-SW beneath the Indian continent, whereas the FVD is arc parallel beneath the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau, which may reflect re-orientation of minerals due to lithospheric extension, in response to the India-Eurasia collision. There are multiple anisotropic layers with variable FVDs in some parts of the Tibetan Plateau, which may be the cause of the dominant null splitting measurements in these regions. A circular pattern of FVDs is revealed around the Philippine Sea slab beneath SE China, which reflects asthenospheric strain caused by toroidal mantle flow around the edge of the subducting slab.

  7. Depth variations of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy beneath Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Zhao, Dapeng; Xu, Jiandong; Zhou, Bengang; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-07-19

    A high-resolution model of P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath Mainland China and surrounding regions is determined using a large number of arrival-time data recorded by the China seismic network, the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and temporary seismic arrays deployed on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results provide important new insights into the subducted Indian plate and mantle dynamics in East Asia. Our tomographic images show that the northern limit of the subducting Indian plate has reached the Jinsha River suture in eastern Tibet. A striking variation of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy is revealed in the Indian lithosphere: the fast velocity direction (FVD) is NE-SW beneath the Indian continent, whereas the FVD is arc parallel beneath the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau, which may reflect re-orientation of minerals due to lithospheric extension, in response to the India-Eurasia collision. There are multiple anisotropic layers with variable FVDs in some parts of the Tibetan Plateau, which may be the cause of the dominant null splitting measurements in these regions. A circular pattern of FVDs is revealed around the Philippine Sea slab beneath SE China, which reflects asthenospheric strain caused by toroidal mantle flow around the edge of the subducting slab.

  8. Rupture history of the 1997 Cariaco, Venezuela, earthquake from teleseismic P waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendoza, C.

    2000-01-01

    A two-step finite-fault waveform inversion scheme is applied to the broadband teleseismic P waves recorded for the strike-slip, Cariaco, Venezuela, earthquake of 9 July 1997 to recover the distribution of mainshock slip. The earthquake is first analyzed using a long narrow fault with a maximum rise time of 20 sec. This line-source analysis indicates that slip propagated to the west with a constant rupture velocity and a relatively short rise time. The results are then used to constrain a second inversion of the P waveforms using a 60-km by 20-km two-dimensional fault. The rupture shows a zone of large slip (1.3-m peak) near the hypocenter and a second, broader source extending updip and to the west at depths shallower than 5 km. The second source has a peak slip of 2.1 meters and accounts for most of the moment of 1.1 × 1026 dyne-cm (6.6 Mww) estimated from the P waves. The inferred rupture pattern is consistent with macroseismic effects observed in the epicentral area.

  9. Observability of surface currents in p-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakurskiy, S. V.; Klenov, N. V.; Soloviev, I. I.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu; Golubov, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    A general approach is formulated to describe spontaneous surface current distribution in a chiral p-wave superconductor. We use the quasiclassical Eilenberger formalism in the Ricatti parametrization to describe various types of the superconductor surface, including arbitrary roughness and metallic behavior of the surface layer. We calculate angle resolved distributions of the spontaneous surface currents and formulate the conditions of their observability. We argue that local measurements of these currents by muon spin rotation technique may provide an information on the underlying pairing symmetry in the bulk superconductor.

  10. p-Wave Cold Collisions in an Optical Lattice Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, N. D.; Sherman, J. A.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.; Stecher, J. von; Rey, A. M.

    2011-09-02

    We study ultracold collisions in fermionic ytterbium by precisely measuring the energy shifts they impart on the atoms' internal clock states. Exploiting Fermi statistics, we uncover p-wave collisions, in both weakly and strongly interacting regimes. With the higher density afforded by two-dimensional lattice confinement, we demonstrate that strong interactions can lead to a novel suppression of this collision shift. In addition to reducing the systematic errors of lattice clocks, this work has application to quantum information and quantum simulation with alkaline-earth atoms.

  11. A Split of Direction of Propagation and Attenuation of P Waves in the Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daminelli, R.; Tento, A.; Marcellini, A.

    2013-12-01

    On July 17, 2011 a ML 4.8 earthquake occurred in the PO valley at a 48 km epicentral distance from a seismic station located at Palazzo Te (Mantova). The station is situated on deep quaternary sediments: the uppermost layers are mainly composed of clay and silty clay with interbedded sands; the Robertson index is 1.4P wave particle motion, that appears rather difficult to explain if we assume the homogeneity of the P waves (that means attenuation is scalar). Note that the degree of nonlinearity is very low given that the maximum strain can be roughly estimated as 10-5 on the basis of maximum ground velocity of the P wave train considered and the Vp. On the contrary we show that P wave particle motion can be fully (and easily) described by a Homogeneous Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic model (HILV). HILV, as in the 2009 Borcherdt formulation adopted here, allows two different directions of propagation and attenuation; in other words attenuation becomes a vector that is not necessarily parallel to the propagation vector. The results evidence that the incidence angle and the inhomogeneity angle (it is the angle between propagation and attenuation vectors and it is closely related to Q factor) are in good agreement with the geological conditions of the site. Finally, we observed that these results are very similar to the ones obtained when we analyzed two explosions recorded by a seismic station in Milano, also situated in the Po valley at some 140 km from Mantova (Marcellini & Tento, 2011). Borcherdt, R.D. (2009) 'Viscoelastic Waves in Layered Media', Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 305 pp. Marcellini, A. and A. Tento (2011) ' Explosive Sources Prove the Validity of Homogeneous Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic Models', BSSA, Vol. 101, No. 4, pp. 1576-1583.

  12. A Novel Route to Reach a p-Wave Superfluid Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tokitake; Inotani, Daisuke; Ohashi, Yoji

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically propose an idea to realize a p-wave superfluid Fermi gas. To overcome the experimental difficulty that a p-wave pairing interaction to form p-wave Cooper pairs damages the system before the condensation growth, we first prepare a p-wave pair amplitude (Φp) in a spin-orbit coupled s-wave superfluid Fermi gas, without any p-wave interaction. Then, by suddenly changing the s-wave interaction with a p-wave one (Up) by using a Feshbach resonance, we reach the p-wave superfluid phase with the p-wave superfluid order parameter being symbolically written as Δp ˜ UpΦp. In this letter, we assess this scenario within the framework of a time-dependent Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory. Our results would contribute to the study toward the realization of unconventional pairing states in an ultracold Fermi gas.

  13. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  14. p-Wave superconductors in D-brane systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yanyan

    2012-11-01

    In this work we take the intersecting D-brane models to explore some properties of p-wave superconductor at strong coupling. Our studies are focused on four-dimensional spacetime, which is not completely researched as in planar case. Optimistically, the AdS/CFT approach to superconductor, or more precisely superconducting-like phase transition, can give us some intuitions about mysterious high Tc superconductors. Concretely, we use defect D4/D6 and D4/D4 (noncritical) models to carry out comparative investigations. To make the system in the finite temperature bath, we assume that the superconducting phase is in the deconfined and chiral symmetry restoring phase for black D4-brane geometry. For the background fields, we use both analytical and numerical methods to solve the coupled nonlinear equations of motion. Near the phase transition, both methods give the mean filed behavior for the superconducting condensate. We then study gauge field perturbations of the systems to probe the AC conductivity. Similar to previous results, there comes out a gap in low frequency regime and the conductivity gets exponentially small as the condensation is enhanced. In contrast to previous investigations, we also compute the AC conductivity along the x direction, which needs to study a coupled sets of fluctuation modes. This shows us the anisotropic feature of p-wave superconductors.

  15. Anatomy of a Periodically Driven p-Wave Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Erhai

    2016-10-01

    The topological properties of periodically driven many-body systems often have no static analogs and defy a simple description based on the effective Hamiltonian. To explore the emergent edge modes in driven p-wave superconductors in two dimensions, we analysed a toy model of Kitaev chains (one-dimensional spinless p-wave superconductors with Majorana edge states) coupled by time-periodic hopping. We showed that with proper driving, the coupled Kitaev chains can turn into a fully gapped superconductor, which is analogous to the px+ipy state but has two, rather than one, chiral edge modes. A different driving protocol turns it into a gapless superconductor with isolated point nodes and completely flat edge states at quasienergy ω=0 or π/T, with T as the driving period. The time evolution operator U(kx, ky, t) of the toy model is computed exactly to yield the phase bands. And the "topological singularities" of the phase bands are exhausted and compared to those of a periodically driven Hofstadter model, which features counter-propagating chiral edge modes. These examples demonstrate the unique edge states in driven superconducting systems and suggest driving as a potentially fruitful route to engineer new topological superconductors.

  16. Skyrmion Flux Lattices in p,-wave Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Toner, John; Belitz, Dietrich

    2007-03-01

    In p,-wave superconductors, topological excitations known as skyrmions are allowed, in addition to the usual vortices. In strongly type-II materials in an external magnetic field, a skyrmion flux lattice is expected to be energetically favored compared to a vortex flux lattice [1]. We analytically calculate the energy, magnetization curves (B(H)), and elasticity of skyrmion flux lattices in p,-wave superconductors near the lower critical field Hc1, and use these results with the Lindemann criterion to predict their melting curve [2]. In striking contrast to vortex flux lattices, which always melt at an external field H > Hc1, skyrmion flux lattices never melt near Hc1. This provides a simple and unambiguous test for the presence of skyrmions. In addition, the internal magnetic field distributions (which are measurable by muon spin rotation techniques [3]) of skyrmion and vortex lattices are very different. [1] A. Knigavko, B. Rosenstein, and Y.F. Chen, Phys. Rev. B 60, 550 (1999). [2] Qi Li, John Toner, and D. Belitz, cond-mat/0607391 [3] J.E. Sonier, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, S4499 (2004)

  17. Tall P waves associated with severe hypokalemia and combined electrolyte depletion.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Chiharu; Tamaru, Kosaku; Kuwahara, Hiroyasu

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman with anorexia nervosa showing tall P waves on electrocardiogram (ECG) was reported. Her ECG showed tall P waves (5.5mm in voltage, lead II) at 2.2mEq/L of serum potassium. After the treatment, P waves decreased in voltage with the normalization of serum potassium. Tall P waves may be considered to be the so-called pseudo-P pulmonale, and added to the criteria of hypokalemia on ECG.

  18. Three-dimensional modeling of the Nevada Test Site and vicinity from teleseismic P-wave residuals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monfort, Mary E.; Evans, John R.

    1982-01-01

    A teleseismic P-wave travel-time residual study is described which reveals the regional compressional-velocity structure of southern Nevada and neighboring parts of California to a depth of 280 km. During 1980, 98 teleseismic events were recorded at as many as 53 sites in this area. P-wave residuals were calculated relative to a network-wide average residual for each event and are displayed on maps of the stations for each of four event-azimuth quadrants. Fluctuations in these map-patterns of residuals with approach azimuth combined with results of linear, three-dimensional inversions of some 2887 residuals indicate the following characteristics of the velocity structure of the southern Nevada region: 1) a low-velocity body exists in the upper crust 50 km northeast of Beatty, Nevada, near the Miocene Timber Mountain-Silent Canyon caldera complex. Another highly-localized low-velocity anomaly occurs near the southwest corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These two anomalies seem to be part of a low-velocity trough extending from Death Valley, California, to about 50 km north of NTS. 2) There is a high-velocity body in the mantle between 81 and 131 km deep centered about i0 km north of the edge of the Timber Mountain caldera, 3) a broad low-velocity body is delineated between 81 and 131 km deep centered about 30 km north of Las Vegas, 4) there is a monotonic increase in travel-time delays from west to east across the region, probably indicating an eastward decrease in velocity, and lower than average velocities in southeastern Nevada below 31 km, and 5) considerable complexity in three-dimensional velocity structure exists in this part of the southern Great Basin. Inversions of teleseismic P-wave travel-time residuals were also performed on data from 12 seismometers in the immediate vicinity of the Nevada Test Site to make good use of the closer station spacing i in that area. Results of these inversions show more details of the velocity structure but generally the

  19. Formation and Propagation of Love Waves in a Surface Layer with a P-Wave Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    AD- A225 559 GL-TR-90-0100 Formation and Propagation of Love Waves in a Surface Layer with a P-Wave Source A. L. Florence S. A. Miller PTh FILE COP...describing outgoing waves is (p(r,t) = - f(s) s = t - (r- a)/ cr (27) In terms of the function f(s), the displacement, velocity, and stresses are cr r2...28) cr r2 (29) CyrpC2 - +2(1- 2,0) ’ + = 1 -1 (r2 (30) ce P21 - I -M I= I$ C(2r )x + ) (31) in which 1) is Poisson’s ratio. For a given cavity wall

  20. Spatial variations of P wave attenuation in the mantle beneath North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yong Keun; Ritsema, Jeroen; Goes, Saskia

    2009-06-01

    We estimate the spatial variation of the seismic parameter t* using teleseismic (epicentral distance = 30°-85°) P wave spectra of about 200 deep (focal depths > 200 km) earthquakes recorded by 378 broadband seismometers in the United States and Canada. Relative P wave spectral ratios up to 1 Hz for about 63,000 station pairs with high signal-to-noise ratio and impulsive P waveforms are inverted for t*P by least squares inversion. The continental-scale t*P pattern correlates to the age of geological terrains and the seismic, heat flow, gravity, and magnetic variations across North America. Predominantly low values of t*P are obtained in stable central North America (SNA), and high t*P values are obtained for stations in the tectonically active western part of the continent (TNA). This variation is similar to that observed previously in short-period amplitude anomalies, spectral ratio variations, and ScS reverberations. On average, we resolve a contrast in t*P between SNA and TNA of about 0.2 s. We resolve regional variations in t*P, which correlate with tectonics. Relatively low t*P is associated with currently active subduction below Alaska. Relatively high t*P is found in SNA below the Appalachians and the Gulf Coast. The consistency between t*P and tectonics suggests that the observed variations in t*P are, on the scale of around 200-500 km, predominantly due to intrinsic attenuation. The similar patterns in t*P and predicted values for a recent global attenuation model confirm this further. The compatibility with the t*P computed for attenuation estimated via a thermal interpretation of shear wave velocity anomalies illustrates that variations in seismic velocity are predominantly due to physical effects with a strong attenuation signature, most likely temperature or a combination of temperature and water content.

  1. 2D semiconductor optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    The advent of graphene and related 2D materials has recently led to a new technology: heterostructures based on these atomically thin crystals. The paradigm proved itself extremely versatile and led to rapid demonstration of tunnelling diodes with negative differential resistance, tunnelling transistors, photovoltaic devices, etc. By taking the complexity and functionality of such van der Waals heterostructures to the next level we introduce quantum wells engineered with one atomic plane precision. Light emission from such quantum wells, quantum dots and polaritonic effects will be discussed.

  2. Finite-fault source inversion using teleseismic P waves: Simple parameterization and rapid analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendoza, C.; Hartzell, S.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the ability of teleseismic P waves to provide a timely image of the rupture history for large earthquakes using a simple, 2D finite‐fault source parameterization. We analyze the broadband displacement waveforms recorded for the 2010 Mw∼7 Darfield (New Zealand) and El Mayor‐Cucapah (Baja California) earthquakes using a single planar fault with a fixed rake. Both of these earthquakes were observed to have complicated fault geometries following detailed source studies conducted by other investigators using various data types. Our kinematic, finite‐fault analysis of the events yields rupture models that similarly identify the principal areas of large coseismic slip along the fault. The results also indicate that the amount of stabilization required to spatially smooth the slip across the fault and minimize the seismic moment is related to the amplitudes of the observed P waveforms and can be estimated from the absolute values of the elements of the coefficient matrix. This empirical relationship persists for earthquakes of different magnitudes and is consistent with the stabilization constraint obtained from the L‐curve in Tikhonov regularization. We use the relation to estimate the smoothing parameters for the 2011 Mw 7.1 East Turkey, 2012 Mw 8.6 Northern Sumatra, and 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku, Japan, earthquakes and invert the teleseismic P waves in a single step to recover timely, preliminary slip models that identify the principal source features observed in finite‐fault solutions obtained by the U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center (USGS/NEIC) from the analysis of body‐ and surface‐wave data. These results indicate that smoothing constraints can be estimated a priori to derive a preliminary, first‐order image of the coseismic slip using teleseismic records.

  3. Low P-wave velocity at the base of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnero, Edward J.; Grand, Stephen P.; Helmberger, Donald V.

    1993-09-01

    Anomalous differential times between LP SPdKS and SKS are presented for two different source-receiver geometries. The SPdKS-SKS times depend most strongly on V(P) at the base of the mantle near the SKS core entrance and exit locations. The anomalous times can be fit, on average, by models containing a 5 percent reduction in V(P) from PREM at the core-mantle boundary, distributed over 100 km.

  4. Systematics of S- and P-wave radiation widths

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.S.

    1980-09-22

    The question of calculating differences in s- and p-wave radiation widths as a valid evaluation tool is explored. A purely statistical approach such as that provided by the Brink-Axel formula depends upon two factors: 1) an adequate description of the giant dipole resonance shape at energies well below the resonance, and 2) an adequate description of the level densities between the ground state and the excitation of the compound nucleus near the neutron separation energy. Some success has been obtained in certain regions of the periodic table with this simple approach, e.g., in the actinides where all nuclei exhibit similar rigid permanent deformations. However, if the method is to be used as a general evaluation procedure throughout the periodic table and particularly in regions where the radiative transition probabilities are enhanced by direct processes, it appears that much more nuclear structure information needs to be incorporated into the calculations.

  5. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Down-Hole Tests in the Archeological "Palatine Hill" Area (Rome, Italy): Evaluation and Influence of 2D Effects on the Shear Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fiore, V.; Cavuoto, G.; Tarallo, D.; Punzo, M.; Evangelista, L.

    2016-05-01

    A joint analysis of down-hole (DH) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements offers a complete evaluation of shear wave velocity profiles, especially for sites where a strong lateral variability is expected, such as archeological sites. In this complex stratigraphic setting, the high "subsoil anisotropy" (i.e., sharp lithological changes due to the presence of anthropogenic backfill deposits and/or buried man-made structures) implies a different role for DH and MASW tests. This paper discusses some results of a broad experimental program conducted on the Palatine Hill, one of the most ancient areas of the city of Rome (Italy). The experiments were part of a project on seismic microzoning and consisted of 20 MASW and 11 DH tests. The main objective of this study was to examine the difficulties related to the interpretation of the DH and MASW tests and the reliability limits inherent in the application of the noninvasive method in complex stratigraphic settings. As is well known, DH tests provide good determinations of shear wave velocities (Vs) for different lithologies and man-made materials, whereas MASW tests provide average values for the subsoil volume investigated. The data obtained from each method with blind tests were compared and were correlated to site-specific subsurface conditions, including lateral variability. Differences between punctual (DH) and global (MASW) Vs measurements are discussed, quantifying the errors by synthetic comparison and by site response analyses. This study demonstrates that, for archeological sites, VS profiles obtained from the DH and MASW methods differ by more than 15 %. However, the local site effect showed comparable results in terms of natural frequencies, whereas the resolution of the inverted shear wave velocity was influenced by the fundamental mode of propagation.

  6. High-resolution 3-D P wave attenuation structure of the New Madrid Seismic Zone using local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisrat, Shishay T.; DeShon, Heather R.; Pesicek, Jeremy; Thurber, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D), high-resolution P wave seismic attenuation model for the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) is determined using P wave path attenuation (t*) values of small-magnitude earthquakes (MD < 3.9). Events were recorded at 89 broadband and short-period seismometers of the Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Zone Network and 40 short-period seismometers of the Portable Array for Numerical Data Acquisition experiment. The amplitude spectra of all the earthquakes are simultaneously inverted for source, path (t*), and site parameters. The t* values are inverted for QP using local earthquake tomography methods and a known 3-D P wave velocity model for the region. The four major seismicity arms of the NMSZ exhibit reduced QP (higher attenuation) than the surrounding crust. The highest attenuation anomalies coincide with areas of previously reported high swarm activity attributed to fluid-rich fractures along the southeast extension of the Reelfoot fault. The QP results are consistent with previous attenuation studies in the region, which showed that active fault zones and fractured crust in the NMSZ are highly attenuating.

  7. Pseudo 3-D P wave refraction seismic monitoring of permafrost in steep unstable bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautblatter, Michael; Draebing, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    permafrost in steep rock walls can cause hazardous rock creep and rock slope failure. Spatial and temporal patterns of permafrost degradation that operate at the scale of instability are complex and poorly understood. For the first time, we used P wave seismic refraction tomography (SRT) to monitor the degradation of permafrost in steep rock walls. A 2.5-D survey with five 80 m long parallel transects was installed across an unstable steep NE-SW facing crestline in the Matter Valley, Switzerland. P wave velocity was calibrated in the laboratory for water-saturated low-porosity paragneiss samples between 20°C and -5°C and increases significantly along and perpendicular to the cleavage by 0.55-0.66 km/s (10-13%) and 2.4-2.7 km/s (>100%), respectively, when freezing. Seismic refraction is, thus, technically feasible to detect permafrost in low-porosity rocks that constitute steep rock walls. Ray densities up to 100 and more delimit the boundary between unfrozen and frozen bedrock and facilitate accurate active layer positioning. SRT shows monthly (August and September 2006) and annual active layer dynamics (August 2006 and 2007) and reveals a contiguous permafrost body below the NE face with annual changes of active layer depth from 2 to 10 m. Large ice-filled fractures, lateral onfreezing of glacierets, and a persistent snow cornice cause previously unreported permafrost patterns close to the surface and along the crestline which correspond to active seasonal rock displacements up to several mm/a. SRT provides a geometrically highly resolved subsurface monitoring of active layer dynamics in steep permafrost rocks at the scale of instability.

  8. Threshold effects in P -wave bottom-strange mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Pablo G.; Segovia, Jorge; Entem, David R.; Fernández, Francisco

    2017-02-01

    Using a nonrelativistic constituent quark model in which the degrees of freedom are quark-antiquark and meson-meson components, we have recently shown that the D(*)K thresholds play an important role in lowering the mass of the c s ¯ states associated with the physical Ds0 *(2317 ) and Ds 1(2460 ) mesons. This observation is also supported by other theoretical approaches such as lattice-regularized QCD or chiral unitary theory in coupled channels. Herein, we extend our computation to the lowest P -wave Bs mesons, taking into account the corresponding JP=0+, 1+ and 2+ bottom-strange states predicted by the naive quark model and the B K and B*K thresholds. We assume that mixing with Bs(*)η and isospin-violating decays to Bs(*)π are negligible. This computation is important because there is no experimental data in the b s ¯ sector for the equivalent jqP=1 /2+ (Ds0 *(2317 ), Ds 1(2460 )) heavy-quark multiplet and, as it has been seen in the c s ¯ sector, the naive theoretical result can be wrong by more than 100 MeV. Our calculation allows us to introduce the coupling with the D -wave B*K channel and to compute the probabilities associated with the different Fock components of the physical state.

  9. Crustal structure of Nigeria and Southern Ghana, West Africa from P-wave receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Ofonime; Nyblade, Andrew; Okereke, Chiedu; Oden, Michael; Emry, Erica; Julià, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    We report new estimates of crustal thickness (Moho depth), Poisson's ratio and shear-wave velocities for eleven broadband seismological stations in Nigeria and Ghana. Data used for this study came from teleseismic earthquakes recorded at epicentral distances between 30° and 95° and with moment magnitudes greater than or equal to 5.5. P-wave receiver functions were modeled using the Moho Ps arrival times, H-k stacking, and joint inversion of receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities. The average crustal thickness of the stations in the Neoproterozoic basement complex of Nigeria is 36 km, and 23 km for the stations in the Cretaceous Benue Trough. The crustal structure of the Paleoproterozoic Birimian Terrain, and Neoproterozoic Dahomeyan Terrain and Togo Structural Unit in southern Ghana is similar, with an average Moho depth of 44 km. Poisson's ratios for all the stations range from 0.24 to 0.26, indicating a bulk felsic to intermediate crustal composition. The crustal structure of the basement complex in Nigeria is similar to the average crustal structure of Neoproterozoic terrains in other parts of Africa, but the two Neoproterozoic terrains in southern Ghana have a thicker crust with a thick mafic lower crust, ranging in thickness from 12 to 17 km. Both the thicker crust and thick mafic lower crustal section are consistent with many Precambrian suture zones, and thus we suggest that both features are relict from the collisional event during the formation of Gondwana.

  10. Increased P-wave dispersion a risk for atrial fibrillation in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ertuğrul, İlker; Akgül, Sinem; Derman, Orhan; Karagöz, Tevfik; Kanbur, Nuray

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that a prolonged P-wave dispersion is a risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to evaluate P-wave dispersion in adolescents with anorexia nervosa at diagnosis. We evaluated electrocardiographic findings, particularly the P-wave dispersion, at initial assessment in 47 adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Comparison of P-wave dispersion between adolescents with anorexia nervosa and controls showed a statistically significant higher P-wave dispersion in patients with anorexia nervosa (72 ± 16.3 msec) when compared to the control group (43.8 ± 9.5 msec). Percent of body weight lost, lower body mass index, and higher weight loss rate in the patients with anorexia nervosa had no effect on P-wave dispersion. Due to the fact that anorexia nervosa has a high mortality rate we believe that cardiac pathologies such as atrial fibrillation must also be considered in the medical evaluation.

  11. Strong lateral variations of S-wave velocity in the upper mantle across the western Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Chao; Pedersen, Helle; Paul, Anne; Zhao, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Absolute S-wave velocity gives more insight into temperature and mineralogy than relative P-wave velocity variations (ΔV p/ V p) imaged by teleseismic traveltime tomography. Moreover, teleseismic P-wave tomography has poor vertical but good horizontal resolution. By contrast, the inversion of surface waves dispersion data gives absolute S-wave velocity with a good vertical but relatively poor horizontal resolution. However, the horizontal resolution of surface wave imaging can be improved by using closely spaced stations in mini-arrays. In this work, we use Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion data to measure absolute S-wave velocities beneath the CIFALPS profile across the French-Italian western Alps. We apply the array processing technique proposed by Pedersen et al. (2003) to derive Rayleigh wave phase dispersion curves between 20 s and 100 s period in 15 mini-arrays along the CIFALPS line. We estimate a 1-D S-wave velocity model at depth 50-150 km beneath each mini-array by inverting the dispersion curves jointly with receiver functions. The joint inversion helps separating the crustal and mantle contributions in the inversion of dispersion curves. Distinct lithospheric structures and marked lateral variations are revealed beneath the study region, correlating well with regional geological and tectonic features. The average S-wave velocity from 50 to 150 km depth beneath the CIFALPS area is ˜4.48km/s, almost the same as in model AK135, indicating a normal upper mantle structure in average. Lateral variations are dominated by relatively low velocities (˜4.4km/s) in the mantle of the European plate, very low velocities (4.0km/s, i.e. approximately 12% lower than AK135) beneath the Dora Maira internal crystalline massif and high velocities (˜ 5.0km/s, i.e. 12% higher than AK135) beneath the Po plain. The lateral variations of S-wave velocity perturbation show the same features as the P wave tomography (Zhao et al., submitted), but with different amplitudes

  12. Imaging the Antarctic mantle using adaptively parameterized P-wave tomography: Evidence for heterogeneous structure beneath West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Samantha E.; Graw, Jordan H.; Kenyon, Lindsey M.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Aster, Richard C.; Huerta, Audrey D.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Wilson, Terry

    2014-12-01

    Previously developed continental-scale surface wave models for Antarctica provide only broad interpretations of the mantle structure, and the best resolved features in recent regional-scale seismic models are restricted above ∼300-400 km depth. We have developed the first continental-scale P-wave velocity model beneath Antarctica using an adaptively parameterized tomography approach that includes data from many new seismic networks. Our model shows considerable, previously unrecognized mantle heterogeneity, especially beneath West Antarctica. A pronounced slow velocity anomaly extends between Ross Island and Victoria Land, further grid south than previous studies indicate. However, at least for mantle depths ≥∼200 km, this anomaly does not extend grid north along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) and beneath the West Antarctic Rift System. The boundary between these slow velocities and fast velocities underlying East Antarctica is ∼100-150 km beneath the front of the TAMs, consistent with flexural uplift models. The lateral extent of the low velocity anomaly is best explained by focused, rift-related decompression melting. In West Antarctica, Marie Byrd Land is underlain by a deep (∼800 km) low velocity anomaly. Synthetic tests illustrate that the low velocities also extend laterally below the transition zone, consistent with a mantle plume ponded below the 660 km discontinuity. The slow anomalies beneath Ross Island and Marie Byrd Land are separate features, highlighting the heterogeneous upper mantle of West Antarctica.

  13. Teleseismic P-wave tomography and mantle dynamics beneath Eastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jianshe; Zhao, Dapeng

    2016-05-01

    We determined a new 3-D P-wave velocity model of the upper mantle beneath eastern Tibet using 112,613 high-quality arrival-time data collected from teleseismic seismograms recorded by a new portable seismic array in Yunnan and permanent networks in southwestern China. Our results provide new insights into the mantle structure and dynamics of eastern Tibet. High-velocity (high-V) anomalies are revealed down to 200 km depth under the Sichuan basin and the Ordos and Alashan blocks. Low-velocity (low-V) anomalies are imaged in the upper mantle under the Kunlun-Qilian and Qinling fold zones, and the Songpan-Ganzi, Qiangtang, Lhasa and Chuan-Dian diamond blocks, suggesting that eastward moving low-V materials are extruded to eastern China after the obstruction by the Sichuan basin, and the Ordos and Alashan blocks. Furthermore, the extent and thickness of these low-V anomalies are correlated with the surface topography, suggesting that the uplift of eastern Tibet could be partially related to these low-V materials having a higher temperature and strong positive buoyancy. In the mantle transition zone (MTZ), broad high-V anomalies are visible from the Burma arc northward to the Kunlun fault and eastward to the Xiaojiang fault, and they are connected upward with the Wadati-Benioff seismic zone. These results suggest that the subducted Indian slab has traveled horizontally for a long distance after it descended into the MTZ, and return corner flow and deep slab dehydration have contributed to forming the low-V anomalies in the big mantle wedge. Our results shed new light on the dynamics of the eastern Tibetan plateau.

  14. P Wave Indices: Derivation of Reference Values from the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Jared W.; Johnson, Victor M.; Sullivan, Lisa M.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2012-01-01

    Background P wave indices, an electrocardiographic phenotype reflecting atrial electrophysiology and morphology, may be altered in multiple disease states or by cardiovascular risk factors. Reference values for P wave indices, providing cut points for their classification and interpretation, have not yet been established and are essential towards facilitating clinical application and comparison between studies. Methods We randomly selected 20 men and 20 women from 10-year age intervals between <25 years to 76–85 years from the Framingham Heart Study Original and Offspring Cohorts, excluding subjects with prevalent cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes or obesity. The total included 295 subjects; eligibility in women >75 years was limited by exclusion criteria. We used a digital measurement technique with demonstrated intrarater reproducibility to determine P wave indices. P wave indices examined included the maximum, mean, lead II and PR durations, dispersion, and the standard deviation of duration. Results All P wave indices were significantly (P<0.0001) correlated with advancing age. Means of all P wave indices were lower in women as compared to men. PR interval duration was strongly correlated with maximum, mean, and lead II mean P wave durations. In multivariable models adjusting for significant anthropometric and clinical associations risk factors, significant differences persisted by age and sex in P wave indices. Conclusions In our healthy sample without cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes or obesity, men and older subjects had longer mean P wave indices. Our description of P wave indices establishes reference values for future comparative studies and facilitates the classification of P wave indices. PMID:20946557

  15. Velocity analysis for transversely isotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhalifah, T.; Tsvankin, I.

    1994-08-01

    The main difficulty in extending seismic processing to anisotropic media is the recovery of anisotropic velocity fields from surface reflection data. Velocity analysis for transversely isotropic (TI) media can be done by inverting the dependence of P-wave moveout velocities on the ray parameter. P-wave NMO velocity in homogeneous TI media with a vertical symmetry axis depends just on the zero-dip value V{sub nmo} and a new effective parameter {eta} that reduces to the difference between Thomsen parameters {epsilon} and {delta} in the limit of weak anisotropy. It is possible to obtain {eta} and reconstruct the NMO velocity as a function of ray parameter using moveout velocities for two different dips. Moreover, V{sub nmo}(0) and {eta} determine not only the NMO velocity, but also also long-spread (nonhyperbollic) P-wave moveout for horizontal reflectors and time-migration impulse response. Inversion of dip-moveout information allows performance of all time-processing steps in TI media using only surface P-wave data. Isotropic time-processing methods remain entirely valid for elliptical anisotropy ({epsilon} = {delta}). Accurate time-to-depth conversion, however, requires the vertical velocity V{sub P0} be resolved independently. If I-P0 is known, then allisotropies {epsilon} and {delta} can be found by inverting two P-wave NMO velocities corresponding to a horizontal and a dipping reflector. If no information is available, all three parameters (V {sub P0}, {epsilon}, and {delta}) can be obtained by combining inversion results with shear-wave information. such as the P-SV or SV-SV wave NMO velocities for a horizontal reflector. Generalization of Tsvankin`s single-layer NMO equation for layered anisotropic media with a dipping reflector provides a basis for extending anisotropic velocity analysis to vertically inhomogeneous media. The influence of a stratified overburden on moveout velocity can be stripped through a Dix-type differentiation procedure.

  16. Crustal structure of North Dakota from joint inversion of surface wave dispersion and teleseismic P-wave reciever functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Braden Michael

    Studying and determining crustal structure of the Earth is important for understanding the interior of the Earth. Using methods like receiver functions and surface wave dispersion allows the determination of differences in structure and composition through the crust. Jointly inverting receiver functions and surface wave dispersion reduces the error and over-interpretation of the crustal structure estimation. Receiver functions and surface wave dispersion invert well together because receiver functions are very sensitive to velocity contrasts and vertical travel times, and surface wave dispersion is sensitive to average velocity and insensitive to sharp velocity contrasts. By jointly inverting receiver functions and surface wave dispersion, shear wave velocity profiles can be created to determine the properties of the crustal structure and velocity contrasts. With the use of IRIS Transportable Array stations data throughout the United States, this thesis takes a closer look at the crustal structure of North Dakota through the joint inversion of surface wave dispersion and teleseismic P-wave receiver functions. The receiver functions in North Dakota show shallow sediment effects that affect the joint inversion process. In western North Dakota the Williston basin and in eastern North Dakota the Red River Valley cause ringing effects in the receiver functions. The shallow sediments in North Dakota control and overpower the rest of the crustal signal in the receiver functions, and thus affect the ability of determining the crustal shear wave velocity structure of North Dakota through the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion, thus the use of background geology is necessary.

  17. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-364 E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Aircraft (E-2D AHE) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined

  18. Anomalous incident-angle and elliptical-polarization rotation of an elastically refracted P-wave.

    PubMed

    Fa, Lin; Fa, Yuxiao; Zhang, Yandong; Ding, Pengfei; Gong, Jiamin; Li, Guohui; Li, Lijun; Tang, Shaojie; Zhao, Meishan

    2015-08-05

    We report a newly discovered anomalous incident-angle of an elastically refracted P-wave, arising from a P-wave impinging on an interface between two VTI media with strong anisotropy. This anomalous incident-angle is found to be located in the post-critical incident-angle region corresponding to a refracted P-wave. Invoking Snell's law for a refracted P-wave provides two distinctive solutions before and after the anomalous incident-angle. For an inhomogeneously refracted and elliptically polarized P-wave at the anomalous incident-angle, its rotational direction experiences an acute variation, from left-hand elliptical to right-hand elliptical polarization. The new findings provide us an enhanced understanding of acoustical-wave scattering and lead potentially to widespread and novel applications.

  19. Anomalous incident-angle and elliptical-polarization rotation of an elastically refracted P-wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, Lin; Fa, Yuxiao; Zhang, Yandong; Ding, Pengfei; Gong, Jiamin; Li, Guohui; Li, Lijun; Tang, Shaojie; Zhao, Meishan

    2015-08-01

    We report a newly discovered anomalous incident-angle of an elastically refracted P-wave, arising from a P-wave impinging on an interface between two VTI media with strong anisotropy. This anomalous incident-angle is found to be located in the post-critical incident-angle region corresponding to a refracted P-wave. Invoking Snell’s law for a refracted P-wave provides two distinctive solutions before and after the anomalous incident-angle. For an inhomogeneously refracted and elliptically polarized P-wave at the anomalous incident-angle, its rotational direction experiences an acute variation, from left-hand elliptical to right-hand elliptical polarization. The new findings provide us an enhanced understanding of acoustical-wave scattering and lead potentially to widespread and novel applications.

  20. An APL function for modeling p-wave induced liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doehring, Donald O.; Charlie, Wayne A.; Veyera, George E.

    This paper presents an APL function that models particle acceleration, velocity, displacement, and porewater pressure responses induced by the passage of compressional waves through water-saturated soil. Inputs to the function include: mass of soil elements, boundary conditions, spring constants, damping ratio, forces applied to the first element, threshold strain and a time increment. Output closely approximates the results of laboratory and field measurements of this phenomenon.

  1. Reactivation and mantle dynamics of North China Craton: insight from P-wave anisotropy tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, You; Zhao, Dapeng

    2013-12-01

    We determined the first 3-D P-wave anisotropic tomography beneath the North China Craton (NCC) using a large number of high-quality arrival-time data from local earthquakes and teleseismic events, which reveals depth-dependent azimuthal anisotropy in the crust and upper mantle down to 600 km depth. In the NCC western block, the fast velocity direction (FVD) varies from east-west in the southern part to northeast-southwest in the northern part, which may reflect either the interaction between the Yangtze block and NCC or fossil lithospheric fabrics in the craton. Under the NCC eastern block, a uniform northwest-southeast FVD is revealed in the lower part of the upper mantle (300-410 km depths) and the mantle transition zone (410-660 km depths), which may reflect horizontal and upwelling flows in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone. The NCC central block exhibits a northeast-southwest FVD, consistent with the surface tectonic orientation there, suggesting that the cold and thick (>300 km) cratonic root of the NCC western block may obstruct the northwest-southeast trending mantle flow induced by the Pacific Plate subduction, resulting in a northeast-southwest trending mantle flow under the central block. Our present results indicate that the corner flow in the BMW associated with the deep subduction of the Pacific Plate is the main cause of NCC reactivation and mantle dynamics under East China.

  2. Increased P-wave dispersion in patients with newly diagnosed lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Musa; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Simsek, Hakki; Akdag, Serkan; Akyol, Aytac; Gumrukcuoglu, Hasan Ali; Yaman, Mehmet; Bayram, Yasemin; Karadag, Ayse Serap

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune mucocutaneous disease. Recent research has emphasized the strong association between inflammation and both P-wave dispersion and dyslipidemia. The difference between the maximum and minimum P-wave durations on an electrocardiogram is defined as P-wave dispersion. The prolongation of P-wave dispersion has been demonstrated to be an independent risk factor for developing atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to investigate P-wave dispersion in patients with lichen planus. METHODS: Fifty-eight patients with lichen planus and 37 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. We obtained electrocardiographic recordings from all participants and used them to calculate the P-wave variables. We also assessed the levels of highly sensitive C-reactive protein, which is an inflammatory marker, and the lipid levels for each group. The results were reported as the means ± standard deviations and percentages. RESULTS: The P-wave dispersion was significantly higher in lichen planus patients than in the control group. Additionally, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in lichen planus patients compared to the controls. There was a significant positive correlation between highly sensitive C-reactive protein and P-wave dispersion (r = 0.549, p<0.001) in lichen planus patients. CONCLUSIONS: P-wave dispersion increased on the surface electrocardiographic measurements of lichen planus patients. This result may be important in the early detection of subclinical cardiac involvement. Increased P-wave dispersion, in terms of the tendency for atrial fibrillation, should be considered in these patients. PMID:23778479

  3. Joint Optimization of Vertical Component Gravity and Seismic P-wave First Arrivals by Simulated Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Basler-Reeder, K.; Kent, G. M.; Pullammanappallil, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous joint seismic-gravity optimization improves P-wave velocity models in areas with sharp lateral velocity contrasts. Optimization is achieved using simulated annealing, a metaheuristic global optimization algorithm that does not require an accurate initial model. Balancing the seismic-gravity objective function is accomplished by a novel approach based on analysis of Pareto charts. Gravity modeling uses a newly developed convolution algorithm, while seismic modeling utilizes the highly efficient Vidale eikonal equation traveltime generation technique. Synthetic tests show that joint optimization improves velocity model accuracy and provides velocity control below the deepest headwave raypath. Detailed first arrival picking followed by trial velocity modeling remediates inconsistent data. We use a set of highly refined first arrival picks to compare results of a convergent joint seismic-gravity optimization to the Plotrefa™ and SeisOpt® Pro™ velocity modeling packages. Plotrefa™ uses a nonlinear least squares approach that is initial model dependent and produces shallow velocity artifacts. SeisOpt® Pro™ utilizes the simulated annealing algorithm and is limited to depths above the deepest raypath. Joint optimization increases the depth of constrained velocities, improving reflector coherency at depth. Kirchoff prestack depth migrations reveal that joint optimization ameliorates shallow velocity artifacts caused by limitations in refraction ray coverage. Seismic and gravity data from the San Emidio Geothermal field of the northwest Basin and Range province demonstrate that joint optimization changes interpretation outcomes. The prior shallow-valley interpretation gives way to a deep valley model, while shallow antiformal reflectors that could have been interpreted as antiformal folds are flattened. Furthermore, joint optimization provides a clearer image of the rangefront fault. This technique can readily be applied to existing datasets and could

  4. Segmented African Lithosphere Beneath Anatolia Imaged by Teleseismic P-Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryol, Cemal; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan; Ozacar, Atilla

    2010-05-01

    Anatolia, a part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt, is shaped by a variety of complex tectonic processes that define the major tectonic provinces across which different deformation regimes exist. Collision related plateau formation dominates the present lithospheric deformation to the east and slab roll-back related back-arc extension takes place in the west. The two zones are connected at the northern part of the region by strike-slip faulting along the right-lateral North Anatolian Fault Zone. Recent seismological studies show that the Eastern Anatolian Plateau (EAP) is supported by hot asthenosphereric material that was emplaced beneath the plateau following the detachment of subducted Arabian lithosphere. The westward continuation of the deeper structure of Anatolia was previously less well constrained due to the lack of geophysical observations. In order to study the deeper lithosphere and mantle structure beneath Anatolia, we used teleseismic P-wave tomography and data from several temporary and permanent seismic networks deployed in the region. A major part of the data comes from the North Anatolian Fault passive seismic experiment (NAF) that consists of 39 broadband seismic stations operated at the north central part of Anatolia between 2005 and 2008. We also used data collected from permanent seismic stations of the National Earthquake Monitoring Center (NEMC) and stations from the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE). Approximately 34,000 P-wave travel time residuals, measured in multiple frequency bands, are inverted using approximate finite-frequency sensitivity kernels. Our tomograms reveal a fast anomaly that corresponds to the subducted portion of the African lithosphere along the Cyprean Arc. This fast anomaly dips northward beneath central Anatolia with an angle of approximately 45 degrees. However, the anomaly disappears rather sharply to the east beneath the western margin of the EAP and to the west beneath the Isparta Angle. The western

  5. Finite Frequency Measurements of Conventional and Core-diffracted P-waves (P and Pdiff)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, K.; Sigloch, K.; Stähler, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Core-diffracted waves are body waves that dive deep enough to sense the core, and by interaction with this wave guide become dispersive. They sample the core-mantle boundary and the lower third of the mantle extensively. In ray theoretical modeling, the deepest part of the ray starts to graze the core at around 97 degrees distance, but ray theory is a very poor approximation to propagation of core-diffracted waves. In reality, finite-frequency waves with their spatially extend sensitivity regions start to sense the core at significantly smaller distances already. The actual, non-ray-like sensitivities have been difficult to model, as have been the associated synthetic seismograms. Core-diffracted waves have therefore not been used in tomography, despite abundant observations of these phases on modern broadband seismograms. Hence current global body-wave tomographies illuminate the lower third of the mantle much less well than the upper and especially the middle third. This study aims for broadband, global waveform tomography that seamlessly incorporates core-diffracted phases alongside conventional, teleseismic waves as well as regional body-waves. Here, we investigate the properties of P-diffracted waves in terms of waveform characteristics and travel-time measurements as compared to teleseismic P-wave measured by the same methods. Travel time anomalies, the primary data for tomography, are measured by waveform cross-correlation of data with synthetics, where the synthetics are calculated from fully numerical wave propagation in a spherically symmetric background model. These same numerical tools will be used to calculate the associated sensitivity kernels for tomography (figure, top). Demonstrating the extent to which waveform modeling can fit real data, we assemble and discuss a global data set of 851,905 Pdiff and 2,368,452 P-wave multi-frequency cross-correlation travel times. Findings are summarized in the Pdiff travel time map (figure, bottom) in which most

  6. Applications of Doppler Tomography in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M.; Budaj, J.; Agafonov, M.; Sharova, O.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past few years, the applications of Doppler tomography have been extended beyond the usual calculation of 2D velocity images of circumstellar gas flows. This technique has now been used with the new Shellspec spectrum synthesis code to demonstrate the effective modeling of the accretion disk and gas stream in the TT Hya Algol binary. The 2D tomography procedure projects all sources of emission onto a single central (Vx, Vy) velocity plane even though the gas is expected to flow beyond that plane. So, new 3D velocity images were derived with the Radioastronomical Approach method by assuming a grid of Vz values transverse to the central 2D plane. The 3D approach has been applied to the U CrB and RS Vul Algol-type binaries to reveal substantial flow structures beyond the central velocity plane.

  7. 2-D Drift Velocities from the IMAGE EUV Plasmaspheric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D.; Adrian, M.

    2007-01-01

    The IMAGE Mission extreme ultraviolet imager (EUY) observes He+ plasmaspheric ions throughout the inner magnetosphere. Limited by ionizing radiation and viewing close to the Sun, images of the He+ distribution are available every 10 minutes for many hours as the spacecraft passes through apogee in its highly elliptical orbit. As a consistent constituent at about 15%, He+ is an excellent surrogate for monitoring all of the processes that control the dynamics of plasmaspheric plasma. In particular, the motion ofHe+ transverse to the ambient magnetic field is a direct indication of convective electric fields. The analysis of boundary motions has already achieved new insights into the electrodynamic coupling processes taking place between energetic magnetospheric plasmas and the ionosphere. Yet to be fulfilled, however, is the original promise that global EUY images of the plasmasphere might yield two-dimensional pictures of meso-scale to macro-scale electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. This work details the technique and initial application of an IMAGE EUY analysis that appears capable of following thermal plasma motion on a global basis.

  8. Crustal structure beneath Long Valley caldera from modeling of teleseismic P wave polarizations and Ps converted waves

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, L.K.; Prothero, W.A. Jr.

    1994-04-10

    In this study, the authors present new constraints on the nature of the low-velocity zone beneath Long Valley caldera, based on the measured propagation directions of teleseismic P waves and on modeling of P to S converted waves. The low-velocity body is a large asymmetrical volume which deepens to the east, extending from depths of 7 to 30 km. It contains lower velocities than originally proposed by earlier teleseismic studies. In particular, there is a tabular feature between 7 and 11 km depth that has a reduction in velocity of about 30%. These low velocities imply a much greater percentage of melt in the crust beneath Long Valley caldera than previously estimated. Array analysis of large delayed arrivals identifies them to be Ps converted waves from the shoulders and roof of this tabular zone. These conversions bound the depth to the magma chamber roof to be within about 10 km of the surface. These results are consistent with elements from several other studies, and the authors present an integrated and improved model of crustal structure at Long Valley. The concordance of the deeper low-velocity zones with regional structural trends implies that the shallow low-velocity feature is a cupola on top of an asymmetric diapiric ridge rising up from the migmatized lower crust of the Basin and Range. The authors present two contrasting interpretations of the geometry of low-velocity zones in the crust: one implies a time-invariant magma chamber and conduit system for Long Valley caldera, the other implies an evolution of that system from a simple vertical regime to its current asymmetrical geometry. 37 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Simulations of P-SV wave scattering due to cracks by the 2-D finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yuji; Shiina, Takahiro; Kawahara, Jun; Okamoto, Taro; Miyashita, Kaoru

    2013-12-01

    We simulate P-SV wave scattering by 2-D parallel cracks using the finite difference method (FDM). Here, special emphasis is put on simplicity; we apply a standard FDM (second-order velocity-stress scheme with a staggered grid) to media including traction-free, infinitesimally thin cracks, which are expressed in a simple manner. As an accuracy test of the present method, we calculate the displacement discontinuity along an isolated crack caused by harmonic waves using the method, which is compared with the corresponding results based on a reliable boundary integral equation method. The test resultantly indicates that the present method yields sufficient accuracy. As an application of this method, we also simulate wave propagation in media with randomly distributed cracks. We experimentally determine the attenuation and velocity dispersion induced by scattering from the synthetic seismograms, using a waveform averaging technique. It is shown that the results are well explained by a theory based on the Foldy approximation, if the crack density is sufficiently low. The theory appears valid with a crack density up to at least 0.1 for SV wave incidence, whereas the validity limit appears lower for P wave incidence.

  10. Complex seismic amplitude inversion for P-wave and S-wave quality factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2015-07-01

    Stratum quality factors (P-wave and S-wave quality factors, Qp and Qs) have gradually been utilized in the study of physical state of crust and uppermost mantle, tectonic evolution, hydrogeololgy, gas hydrates, petroleum exploration, etc. Different opinions of the seismic attenuation mechanism result in various approaches to estimate the P-wave and S-wave quality factors. Considering the viscoelasticity of the underground medium, the constitutive matrix of the Earth medium is written as the superposition of homogeneous background medium, elastic perturbation medium and viscoelastic perturbation medium. Under the hypothesis of Born integral and stationary phase approximation, the seismic reflectivity is initially raised in terms of P-wave and S-wave moduli, density, P-wave and S-wave quality factors. Furthermore, incorporating the complex seismic traces with the seismic wavelets at different offsets, a two-step inversion approach is proposed to estimate the P-wave and S-wave quality factors. The AVO/AVA Bayesian inversion approach is suggested to estimate the P-wave modulus and S-wave modulus with the real component of the pre-stack seismic data initially. Taking the estimated P-wave and S-wave moduli as prior information, the P-wave and S-wave quality factors are further estimated with the imaginary component of the complex pre-stack seismic data, which is the quadrature of the original data. Finally, synthetic examples demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to estimate P-wave and S-wave quality factors stably and properly, and two field data examples demonstrate that the proposed approach may work as an efficient approach to fluid identification.

  11. A crustal seismic velocity model for the UK, Ireland and surrounding seas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, A.; England, R.W.; Maguire, Peter K.H.

    2007-01-01

    A regional model of the 3-D variation in seismic P-wave velocity structure in the crust of NW Europe has been compiled from wide-angle reflection/refraction profiles. Along each 2-D profile a velocity-depth function has been digitised at 5 km intervals. These 1-D velocity functions were mapped into three dimensions using ordinary kriging with weights determined to minimise the difference between digitised and interpolated values. An analysis of variograms of the digitised data suggested a radial isotropic weighting scheme was most appropriate. Horizontal dimensions of the model cells are optimised at 40 ?? 40 km and the vertical dimension at 1 km. The resulting model provides a higher resolution image of the 3-D variation in seismic velocity structure of the UK, Ireland and surrounding areas than existing models. The construction of the model through kriging allows the uncertainty in the velocity structure to be assessed. This uncertainty indicates the high density of data required to confidently interpolate the crustal velocity structure, and shows that for this region the velocity is poorly constrained for large areas away from the input data. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  12. The Hontomin CO2 geologic storage site: results from 2D seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calahorrano, A.; Martí, D.; Alcalde, J.; Marzán, I.; Ayarza, P.; Carbonell, R.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Spanish research program on Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS), leaded by the state-owned foundation CIUDEN, initiated the storage project with the creation of the first Spanish technological laboratory devoted to subsurface storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in 2010 near the village of Hontomín (North West of Spain). This research site aims investigating the different phases involved in the CO2 injection process in underground geologic formations at real scale and monitoring its long-term behavior. The seismic baseline study consist on five innovative and non-standard seismic experiments including: 1) a 35 km2 of 3D seismic survey, 2) a 2D seismic survey, 3) a Seismovie survey, 4) a 30 passive-seismic network and 5) a Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) survey programmed for this year. Here we focus on the 2D seismic reflection survey that was acquired with new generation 3-component receivers. A total of 408 receivers with 25 m interval were deployed along 2 orthogonal profiles, orientated ~NS-EW, centered near the injection point. The seismic source consisted on 4 15-Tn M22 vibroseis trucks with a 16-sec sweep vibrating at each 25 m distance. Data processing included static corrections, spherical divergence correction, airwave muting, predictive deconvolution, stack, time-variant band-pass filtering and time migration. First analysis of the vertical component data confirm the dome-geometry of the reservoir observed by previous studies and give details on the tectonic structure of the potential injection zone. The data also show two main seismic features corresponding to 1) a loss of the P-wave first arrival amplitudes resulting in a shadow zone at offsets of ~600-1500 m. and 2) a high-amplitude reflection at the base of the shadow zone. We related the presence of the shadow zone with a ~750 m-thick layer of low velocity or small velocity-gradient, associated to Early-Middle Cretaceous deposits that globally correspond to variable grain-size siliciclastic

  13. S-wave velocity structure and tectonic implications of the northwestern sub-basin and Macclesfield of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaodong; Ruan, Aiguo; Li, Jiabiao; Niu, Xiongwei; Wu, Zhenli; Ding, Weiwei

    2016-10-01

    Based on the optimum P-wave model, the S-wave velocity structure of a wide angle seismic profile (OBS2006-1), across the northwestern sub-basin (NWSB) and the Macclesfield, is simulated by a 2-D ray-tracing method. The results indicate the S-wave velocities in the upper and lower crust of the NWSB are 3.2-3.6 km/s and 3.6-4.0 km/s, with Vp/Vs ratios of 1.82-1.88 and 1.74-1.82, respectively, which reflect typical oceanic crust characteristics. The S-wave velocity in the upper crust of the NWSB is a little higher in the NNW segment than that in the SSE segment, while the lateral variation of Vp/Vs ratio is in the opposite. We suggest that the NWSB might have experienced asymmetrical magma flows during sea floor spreading, which may have blurred the magnetic anomaly lineation. The comparison of S-wave velocities along the northern margin of the SCS shows that the west section is different from the east section, and the northwestern margin has a non-volcanic crust structure. The S-wave structures and P-wave velocity models along the northern margin, Macclesfield and Reed Bank show that the Macclesfield might have a conjugate relationship with the Reed Bank.

  14. Global P-wave tomography of mantle plumes and subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Zhao, D.

    2008-12-01

    There are many volcanoes on the Earth which can be generally classified into 3 categories: island arc volcanoes, mid-ocean ridge volcanoes, and hotspot volcanoes. Hotspot volcanoes denote intraplate volcanoes like Hawaii, or anomalously large mid-ocean ridge volcanoes like Iceland. So far many researchers have studied the origin of hotspot volcanoes and have used mantle plume hypothesis to explain them. However, we still have little knowledge about mantle plumes yet. In this study, we determined a new model of whole mantle P-wave tomography to understand the origin of hotspot volcanoes. We used the global tomography method of Zhao (2001, 2004). A 3-D grid net was set up in the mantle, and velocity perturbations at every grid nodes were taken as unknown parameters. The iasp91 velocity model (Kennett and Engdahl, 1991) was taken as the 1-D initial model. We selected 9106 earthquakes from the events occurred in the last forty years from the ISC catalog. About 1.6 million arrival-time data of five-type P phases (P, pP, PP, PcP, and Pdiff) were used to conduct the tomographic inversion. In our previous model (Zhao, 2004), the grid interval in the E-W direction is too small in the polar regions. In this study, in order to remedy this problem, we use a flexible-grid approach to make the lateral grid intervals in the polar regions nearly the same as the other portions of the mantle. As a result, the tomographic images in the polar regions are remarkably improved. Our new tomographic model shows huge low-velocity (low-V) zones in the entire mantle under Tahiti and Lake Victoria, which reflect the Pacific and African superplumes, being consistent with the previous studies. A clear low-V zone is revealed under Mt. Erebus volcano in Antarctica. Other major hotspots also exhibit significant low-V zones in the mantle under their surface locations. Beneath Bering Sea, we found that the Pacific slab is subducting from the Aleutian trench and it is stagnant in the mantle transition

  15. High-resolution 3-D P-wave tomographic imaging of the shallow magmatic system of Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandomeneghi, D.; Aster, R. C.; Barclay, A. H.; Chaput, J. A.; Kyle, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Erebus volcano (Ross Island), the most active volcano in Antarctica, is characterized by a persistent phonolitic lava lake at its summit and a wide range of seismic signals associated with its underlying long-lived magmatic system. The magmatic structure in a 3 by 3 km area around the summit has been imaged using high-quality data from a seismic tomographic experiment carried out during the 2008-2009 austral field season (Zandomeneghi et al., 2010). An array of 78 short period, 14 broadband, and 4 permanent Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory seismic stations and a program of 12 shots were used to model the velocity structure in the uppermost kilometer over the volcano conduit. P-wave travel times were inverted for the 3-D velocity structure using the shortest-time ray tracing (50-m grid spacing) and LSQR inversion (100-m node spacing) of a tomography code (Toomey et al., 1994) that allows for the inclusion of topography. Regularization is controlled by damping and smoothing weights and smoothing lengths, and addresses complications that are inherent in a strongly heterogeneous medium featuring rough topography and a dense parameterization and distribution of receivers/sources. The tomography reveals a composite distribution of very high and low P-wave velocity anomalies (i.e., exceeding 20% in some regions), indicating a complex sub-lava-lake magmatic geometry immediately beneath the summit region and in surrounding areas, as well as the presence of significant high velocity shallow regions. The strongest and broadest low velocity zone is located W-NW of the crater rim, indicating the presence of an off-axis shallow magma body. This feature spatially corresponds to the inferred centroid source of VLP signals associated with Strombolian eruptions and lava lake refill (Aster et al., 2008). Other resolved structures correlate with the Side Crater and with lineaments of ice cave thermal anomalies extending NE and SW of the rim. High velocities in the summit area possibly

  16. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  17. Breakdown of QCD factorization for P-wave quarkonium production at low transverse momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J. P.; Wang, J. X.; Zhao, S.

    2014-10-01

    Quarkonium production at low transverse momentum in hadron collisions can be used to extract Transverse-Momentum-Dependent (TMD) gluon distribution functions, if TMD factorization holds there. We show that TMD factorization for the case of P-wave quarkonium with JPC =0++ ,2++ holds at one-loop level, but is violated beyond one-loop level. TMD factorization for other P-wave quarkonium is also violated already at one-loop level.

  18. Irreversibility-inversions in 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew; de Lillo, Filippo; Boffetta, Guido

    2016-11-01

    We consider a recent theoretical prediction that for inertial particles in 2D turbulence, the nature of the irreversibility of their pair dispersion inverts when the particle inertia exceeds a certain value. In particular, when the particle Stokes number, St , is below a certain value, the forward-in-time (FIT) dispersion should be faster than the backward-in-time (BIT) dispersion, but for St above this value, this should invert so that BIT becomes faster than FIT dispersion. This non-trivial behavior arises because of the competition between two physically distinct irreversibility mechanisms that operate in different regimes of St . In 3D turbulence, both mechanisms act to produce faster BIT than FIT dispersion, but in 2D, the two mechanisms have opposite effects because of the inverse energy cascade in the turbulent velocity field. We supplement the qualitative argument given by Bragg et al. by deriving quantitative predictions of this effect in the short-time dispersion limit. These predictions are then confirmed by results of inertial particle dispersion in a direct numerical simulation of 2D turbulence.

  19. Contact Tensor in a p-Wave Fermi Gas with Anisotropic Feshbach Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shuhei M.; Ueda, Masahito

    2016-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations have revealed that a Fermi gas with a p-wave Feshbach resonance has universal relations between the system's high-momentum behavior and thermodynamics. A new feature introduced by the p-wave interaction is anisotropy in the Feshbach resonances; three degenerate p-wave resonances split according to the magnetic quantum number of the closed-channel molecules | m | due to the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction. Here, we investigate the consequences of the anisotropy. We show that the momentum distribution has a high-momentum asymptote nk ~k-2 ∑ m, m' = - 1 1 >Cm, m'Y1m * (\\kcirc)Y1m' (\\kcirc) , in which we introduce the p-wave contact tensor Cm ,m'. In contrast to the previous studies, it has nine components. We identify them as the number, angular momentum, and nematicity of the closed-channel molecules. We also discuss two examples, the anisotropic p-wave superfluid and a gas confined in a cigar-shaped trap, which exhibit a nematicity component in the p-wave contact tensor.

  20. Experimental study of the stress effect on attenuation of normally incident P-wave through coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Junjun; Wang, Enyuan; Chen, Liang; Li, Xuelong; Xu, Zhaoyong; Li, Guoai

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to experimentally investigate the stress effect on normally incident P-wave attenuation through coal specimens. Laboratory tests were carried out using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system, and a modified method was proposed to determine the quality factor (Q) of P-waves through coal specimens. Larger quality factor denotes less energy attenuated during P-wave propagating through coal. Experimental results indicate that the quality factor and stress (σ) within coal specimens are positively correlated. The P-wave propagation through coal specimens causes crack closure at the beginning of the coal fracture process in SHPB tests, an innovative model was thus proposed to describe the relationship between the crack closure length and the dynamic stress induced by P-wave. Finally, the stress effect on P-wave attenuation through coal was quantitatively represented by a power function Q = a(c-bσ)- 6, and the material constants a, b, and c were determined as 1.227, 1.314, and 0.005, respectively. The results obtained in this study would be helpful for engineers to estimate seismic energy attenuation and coal mass instability in coal mines.

  1. Strongly interacting p -wave Fermi gas in two dimensions: Universal relations and breathing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi-Cai; Zhang, Shizhong

    2017-02-01

    The contact is an important concept that characterizes the universal properties of a strongly interacting quantum gas. It appears in both thermodynamic (energy, pressure, etc.) and dynamic quantities (radio-frequency and Bragg spectroscopies, etc.) of the system. Very recently, the concept of contact was extended to higher partial waves; in particular, the p -wave contacts have been experimentally probed in recent experiments. So far, discussions on p -wave contacts have been limited to three dimensions. In this paper, we generalize the p -wave contacts to two dimensions and derive a series of universal relations, including the adiabatic relations, high-momentum distribution, virial theorem, and pressure relation. At the high-temperature and low-density limit, we calculate the p -wave contacts explicitly using virial expansion. A formula which directly connects the shift of the breathing-mode frequency and the p -wave contacts is given in a harmonically trapped system. Finally, we also derive the relationships between interaction parameters in three- and two-dimensional Fermi gases and discuss possible experimental realization of a two-dimensional Fermi gas with p -wave interactions.

  2. Estimating Earthquake Source Parameters from P-wave Spectra: Lessons from Theory and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, P. M.; Denolle, M.; Kaneko, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Observations make clear that some earthquakes radiate relatively more high frequency energy that others of the same moment. But translating these differences into traditional source parameter measures, such as stress drop and radiated energy, can be problematic. Some of the issues include: (1) Because of directivity and other rupture propagation details, theoretical results show that recorded spectra will vary in shape among stations. Observational studies often neglect this effect or assume it will average out when multiple stations are used, but this averaging is rarely perfect, particularly considering the narrow range of takeoff angles used in teleseismic studies. (2) Depth phases for shallow events create interference in the spectra that can severely bias spectral estimates, unless depth phases are taken into account. (3) Corner frequency is not a well-defined parameter and different methods for its computation will yield different results. In addition, stress drop estimates inferred from corner frequencies rely on specific theoretical rupture models, and different assumed crack geometries and rupture velocities will yield different stress drop values. (4) Attenuation corrections may be inaccurate or not fully reflect local 3D near-source attenuation structure. The use of empirical Green's function (EGF) events can help, but these often have signal-to-noise issues or are not very close to the target earthquake. (5) Energy estimates typically rely on some degree of extrapolation of spectra beyond their observational band, introducing model assumptions into what is intended to be a direct measure of an earthquake property. (6) P-wave spectra are analyzed much more than S-wave spectra because of their greater frequency content, but they only carry a small fraction of the total radiated seismic energy and thus total energy estimates may rely on poorly known Es/Ep scaling relations. We will discuss strategies to address these problems and to compute improved source

  3. Teleseismic P wave spectra from USArray and implications for upper mantle attenuation and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafferky, Samantha; Schmandt, Brandon

    2015-10-01

    Teleseismic P wave amplitude spectra from deep earthquakes recorded by USArray are inverted for maps of upper mantle Δt* for multiple frequency bands within 0.08-2 Hz. All frequency bands show high Δt* regions in the southwestern U.S., southern Rocky Mountains, and Appalachian margin. Low Δt* is more common across the cratonic interior. Inversions with narrower frequency bands yield similar patterns, but greater Δt* magnitudes. Even the two standard deviation Δt* magnitude for the widest band is ˜2-7 times greater than predicted by global QS tomography or an anelastic olivine thermal model, suggesting that much of the Δt* signal is nonthermal in origin. Nonthermal contributions are further indicated by only a moderate correlation between Δt* and P travel times. Some geographic variations, such as high Δt* in parts of the cratonic interior with high mantle velocities and low heat flow, demonstrate that the influence of temperature is regionally overwhelmed. Transverse spectra are used to investigate the importance of scattering because they would receive no P energy in the absence of 3-D heterogeneity or anisotropy. Transverse to vertical (T/Z) spectral ratios for stations with high Δt* are higher and exhibit steeper increases with frequency compared to T/Z spectra for low Δt* stations. The large magnitude of Δt* estimates and the T/Z spectra are consistent with major contributions to Δt* from scattering. A weak positive correlation between intrinsic attenuation and apparent attenuation due to scattering may contribute to Δt* magnitude and the moderate correlation of Δt* with travel times.

  4. The leading twist light-cone distribution amplitudes for the S-wave and P-wave Bc mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ji; Yang, Deshan

    2016-07-01

    The light-cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs) serve as important nonperturbative inputs for the study of hard exclusive processes. In this paper, we calculate ten LCDAs at twist-2 for the S-wave and P-wave B c mesons up to the next-to-leading order (NLO) of the strong coupling α s and leading order of the velocity expansion. Each one of these ten LCDAs is expressed as a product of a perturbatively calculable distribution and a universal NRQCD matrix-element. By use of the spin symmetry, only two NRQCD matrix-elements will be involved. The reduction of the number of non-perturbative inputs will improve the predictive power of collinear factorization.

  5. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  6. A P-wave based, on-site method for Earthquake Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollo, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    Can we rapidly predict the potential damage of earthquakes by-passing the estimation of its location and magnitude? One possible approach is to predict the expected peak ground shaking at the site and the earthquake magnitude from the initial P-peak amplitude and characteristic period, respectively. The idea, first developed by Wu and Kanamori (2005), is to combine the two parameters for declaring the alert once the real-time measured quantities have passed pre-defined thresholds. Our proposed on-site early warning method generalized this approach, based on the analysis of strong motion data from modern accelerograph networks in Japan, Taiwan and Italy (Zollo et al., 2010). It is based on the real-time measurement of the period (τc) and peak displacement (Pd) parameters at one or more co-located stations at a given target site to be protected against the earthquake effects. By converting these real-time proxies in predicted values of Peak Ground Velocity (PGV) or instrumental intensity (IMM) and magnitude, an alert level is issued at the recording site based on a decisional table with four entries defined upon threshold values of the parameters Pd and Tc. The latter ones are set according to the error bounds estimated on the derived prediction equations. A near-source network of stations running the onsite method can provide the event location and transmit the information about the alert levels recorded at near-source stations to more distant sites, before the arrival of the most destructive phase. The network-based approach allows for the rapid and robust estimation of the Potential Damage Zone (PDZ), that is the area where most of earthquake damage is expected (Colombelli et al., 2012). A new strategy for a P-wave based, on-site earthquake early warning system has been developed and tested on Japanese strong motion data and under testing on Italian data. The key elements are the real-time, continuous measurement of three peak amplitude parameters and their

  7. Azimuthal anisotropy analysis using P-wave multiazimuth seismic data in Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming, US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelly, Klint T.

    Coal is an important source of energy, but combustion of coal releases a significant amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere. Consequently, developing efficient carbon capture and sequestration strategies to mitigate global warming is of great practical significance. Characterization of reservoirs proposed for carbon capture and sequestration is important for efficient injection of CO2 and monitoring reservoir performance over time. The efficiency and long term effectiveness of CO2 storage is largely governed by the presence and orientation of fractures within a reservoir and its associated seal. The presence of natural fractures which can act as conduits for CO2 leakage gives rise to seismic anisotropy that is related to the fracture orientation and fracture density, and this relation can be studied through anisotropy analysis. Estimation of fracture orientation and fracture density is essential for long term CO 2 storage and monitoring. Well logs, cores and well tests provide information about stress fields and fractures at the well location but away from the well one has to rely on seismic data. Seismic-derived attributes like semblance and curvature provide useful tools for qualitative analysis of fractures, but they do not provide a direct measure of fracture orientation and fracture density. Moreover, such analyses depend on the quality of stacked seismic data. Multiazimuth seismic data, on the other hand, provide information about the variations in the seismic velocity in different azimuths and can thus provide a direct estimate of fracture orientation and fracture density. This research, which focus on the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming, USA, used single component (P-wave) multiazimuth seismic data and well data to create flattened angle gathers for different azimuths using prestack waveform inversion. Here, an advanced waveform technique, prestack waveform inversion, was used to obtain suitable velocities for proper offset-to-angle conversion as

  8. Evaluation of the P Wave Axis in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Rezzan Deniz; Bulut, Mustafa; Acar, Şencan; Izci, Servet; Fidan, Serdar; Yesin, Mahmut; Efe, Suleyman Cagan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: P wave axis is one of the most practical clinical tool for evaluation of cardiovascular disease. The aim of our study was to evaluate the P wave axis in electrocardiogram (ECG), left atrial function and association between the disease activity score in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods: Standard 12-lead surface ECGs were recorded by at a paper speed of 25 m/s and an amplifier gain of 10 mm/mV. The heart rate (HR), the duration of PR, QRS, QTd (dispersion), the axis of P wave were measured by ECG machine automatically. Results: The P wave axis was significantly increased in patients with SLE (49 ± 20 vs. 40 ± 18, P = 0.037) and the disease activity score was found positively correlated with P wave axis (r: 0.382, P = 0.011). The LA volume and the peak systolic strain of the left atrium (LA) were statistically different between the groups (P = 0.024 and P = 0.000). The parameters of the diastolic function; E/A and E/e’ were better in the control group than the patients with SLE (1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 1.3 ± 0.3, P = 0.041 and 6.6 ± 2.8 vs. 5.4 ± 1.4, P = 0.036, respectively). Conclusion: P wave axis was found significantly increased in patients with SLE and positively correlated with SELENA-SLEDAI score. As the risk score increases in patients with SLE, P wave axis changes which may predict the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. PMID:26702344

  9. Universal High-Momentum Asymptote and Thermodynamic Relations in a Spinless Fermi Gas with a Resonant p -Wave Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shuhei M.; Ueda, Masahito

    2015-09-01

    We investigate universal relations in a spinless Fermi gas near a p -wave Feshbach resonance, and show that the momentum distribution nk has an asymptote proportional to k-2 with the proportionality constant—the p -wave contact—scaling with the number of closed-channel molecules. We prove the adiabatic sweep theorem for a p -wave resonance which reveals the thermodynamic implication of the p -wave contact. In contrast to the unitary Fermi gas in which Tan's contact is universal, the p -wave contact depends on the short-range details of the interaction.

  10. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  11. Extensions of 2D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sevrin, A.

    1993-06-01

    After reviewing some aspects of gravity in two dimensions, I show that non-trivial embeddings of sl(2) in a semi-simple (super) Lie algebra give rise to a very large class of extensions of 2D gravity. The induced action is constructed as a gauged WZW model and an exact expression for the effective action is given.

  12. Shifts and widths of p-wave confinement induced resonances in atomic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidian, Shahpoor; Melezhik, Vladimir S.; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-08-01

    We develop and analyze a theoretical model to study p-wave Feshbach resonances of identical fermions in atomic waveguides by extending the two-channel model of Lange et al (2009 Phys. Rev. A 79 013622) and Saeidian et al (2012 Phys. Rev. A 86 062713). The experimentally known parameters of Feshbach resonances in free space are used as input of the model. We calculate the shifts and widths of p-wave magnetic Feshbach resonance of 40K atoms emerging in harmonic waveguides as p-wave confinement induced resonance (CIR). Particularly, we show a possibility to control the width and shift of the p-wave CIR by the trap frequency and the applied magnetic field which could be used in corresponding experiments. Our analysis also demonstrates the importance of the inclusion of the effective range in the computational schemes for the description of the p-wave CIRs contrary to the case of s-wave CIRs where the influence of this term is negligible.

  13. Detection of seismic events triggered by P-waves from the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Masatoshi

    2012-12-01

    Large-amplitude surface waves from the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake triggered many seismic events across Japan, while the smaller amplitude P-wave triggering remains unclear. A spectral method was used to detect seismic events triggered by the first arriving P-waves over Japan. This method uses a reference event to correct for source and propagation effects, so that the local response near the station can be examined in detail. P-wave triggering was found in the regions where triggered non-volcanic tremor (NVT) has been observed, and some seismic and volcanic regions. The triggering strain due to P-waves is of the order of 10-8 to 10-7, which is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the triggering strain necessary for the surface wave triggering. In the regions of NVT, the triggered event was not identified with slow events, but with other seismic events such as tectonic earthquakes. The sequence of triggering in the regions started with P-wave arrivals. The subsequent surface waves contributed to triggering of NVT, possibly together with slow slip, which resulted in the large amplitude of the NVT.

  14. Hypocenter determination of aftershocks of the 2010 Maule earthquake (Mw=8.8) with automatically picked P waves from an amphibious seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieser, K.; Grevemeyer, I.; Flueh, E. R.; Lange, D.; Tilmann, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Chilean subduction zone is among the seismically most active plate boundaries in the world and coastal ranges suffer from a magnitude 8 or larger megathrust earthquake every 10-20 years. The Constitución-Concepción or Maule segment in central Chile between ~35.5°S and 37°S was considered to be a mature seismic gap, rupturing last in 1835 and being seismically quiet without any magnitude 4.5 or larger earthquakes reported in global catalogues. It is located to the north of the nucleation area of the 1960 magnitude 9.5 Valdivia earthquake and to the south of the 1928 magnitude 8 Talca earthquake. On 27 February 2010 this segment ruptured in a Mw=8.8 earthquake, nucleating near 36°S and affecting a 500-600 km long segment of the margin between 34°S and 38.5°S that is roughly three times larger than the seismic gap. Aftershocks occurred along a roughly 600 km long portion of the central Chilean margin, most of them offshore. Therefore, a network of 30 ocean-bottom-seismometers was deployed in the northern portion of the rupture area for a three month period, recording local offshore aftershocks between 20 September 2010 and 25 December 2010. In addition, data of a network consisting of 33 landstations of the GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam were included into the network, providing an ideal coverage of both the rupture plane and areas affected by post-seismic slip as deduced from geodetic data. Aftershock locations are based on automatically detected P waves onsets and a 2D velocity model of the combined on- and offshore network. 3181 earthquakes were located of which 1012 had an RMS < 0.5 s and a confidence ellipsoid semi-axis < 10 km. The most profound features are (i) a zone without seismicity between the trench-axis and the seismic front roughly 50 km landward of the trench, (ii) a 80 km wide band of seismicity stretching from the seismic front along the plate boundary fault terminating roughly at the depth where the continental Moho intersects the

  15. Crustal structure beneath two seismic broadband stations revealed from teleseismic P-wave receiver function analysis in the Virunga volcanic area, Western Rift Valley of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuluka, Georges Mavonga

    2010-12-01

    The shear velocity structure beneath the Virunga volcanic area was estimated by using an average solution in the time domain inversion of stacked teleseismic receiver functions provided by two seismic broadband stations KUNENE (KNN) and KIBUMBA (KBB). These two stations are 29 km apart and located at the eastern and western escarpment of the Western Rift Valley of Africa in the Virunga area, respectively. The velocity model was presented as P-wave velocity models. From these models, the crust mantle transition zone beneath the area sampled by KNN and KBB in the Virunga area was determined at depth from about 36 to 39 km and 30 to 41 km, respectively. A low velocity zone was observed below stations KNN and KBB at depths between 20-30 km and 18-28 km, respectively, and with average velocity 5.9 km/s and 6.0 km/s. This low velocity zone may probably related to a magma chamber or a melt-rich sill. The models show also high velocity material (6.8-7.4 km/s) lying beneath stations KNN and KBB at depths 3-20 km and 3-10 km, respectively, which is indicative of magma cumulates within the volcanic edifice. The result obtained in this study was applied to the determination of epicentres during the period prior to the 27 November 2006 Nyamuragira eruption. This eruption was preceded by a swarm of hybrid volcanic earthquakes with clear P-waves onset. Using the receiver function model was found to improve the location of events. The located events correlate well with the location of the eruptive site and data provided by the INSAR observations of surface deformation associated with eruption.

  16. Holographic p-Wave Superconductors in Quintessence AdS Black Hole Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Song-Bai; Pan, Qi-Yuan

    2013-10-01

    We construct a holographic p-wave superconductor model in the background of quintessence AdS black hole with an SU(2) Yang—Mills gauge field and then probe the effects of quintessence on the holographic p-wave superconductor. We investigate the relation between the critical temperature and the state parameter of quintessence, and present the numerical results for electric conductivity. It is shown that the condensation of the vector field becomes harder as the absolute value of the state parameter increases. Unlike the scalar condensate in the s-wave model, the condensation of the vector field in p-wave model can occur in the total value range of the state parameter wq of quintessence. These results could help us know more about holographic superconductor and dark energy.

  17. P-wave and S-wave traveltime residuals in Caledonian and adjacent units of Northern Europe and Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejrani, Babak; Balling, Niels; Holm Jacobsen, Bo; Kind, Rainer; Tilmann, Frederik; England, Richard; Bom Nielsen, Søren

    2014-05-01

    This work combines P-wave and S-wave travel time residuals from in total 477 temporary and 56 permanent stations deployed across Caledonian and adjacent units in Northern Europe and Greenland (Tor, Gregersen et al. 2002; SVEKALAPKO, Sandoval et al., 2003; CALAS, Medhus et al, 2012a; MAGNUS, Weidle et al. 2010; SCANLIPS south, England & Ebbing 2012; SCANLIPS north, Hejrani et al. 2012; JULS Hejrani et al. 2013; plus permanent stations in the region). We picked data from 2002 to 2012 (1221 events) using a cross correlation technique on all waveforms recorded for each event. In this way we achieve maximum consistency of relative residuals over the whole region (Medhus et al. 2012b). On the European side 18362 P-wave travel time residuals was delivered. In East Greenland 1735 P-wave residuals were recovered at the Central Fjord array (13 stations) and 2294 residuals from the sparse GLISN-array (23 stations). Likewise, we picked a total of 6034 residuals of the SV phase (For the Tor and SVEKALAPKO projects we used data from Amaru et al. 2008). Relative residuals within the region are mainly due to sub-crustal uppermost mantle velocity anomalies. A dominant subvertical boundary was detected by Medhus et al. (2012), running along the Tornquist zone, east of the Oslo Graben and crossing under high topography of the southern Scandes. We delineated this boundary in more detail, tracking it towards the Atlantic margin north of Trondheim. Further north (Scanlips north), a similar subvertical upper mantle boundary seems to be present close to the coast, coinciding with the edge of the stretched crust. The North German Caledonides were probed by the new JULS (JUtland Lower Saxony) profile which closes the gap between Tor and CALAS arrays. Mantle structure found by the Tor project was confirmed, and modelling was extended to the eastern edge of the North Sea. References: Amaru, M. L., Spakman, W., Villaseñor, A., Sandoval, S., Kissling, E., 2008, A new absolute arrival time data

  18. Observation of broad p -wave Feshbach resonances in ultracold 85Rb-87Rb mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shen; Cui, Yue; Shen, Chuyang; Wu, Yewei; Tey, Meng Khoon; You, Li; Gao, Bo

    2016-12-01

    We observe Feshbach resonances in ultracold mixtures of 85Rb and 87Rb atoms in the 85Rb|2 ,+2 >+87Rb|1 ,+1 > and 85Rb|2 ,-2 >+87Rb|1 ,-1 > scattering channels. The positions and properties of the resonances are predicted and characterized using the semianalytic multichannel quantum-defect theory by Gao. Of particular interest, a number of broad entrance-channel-dominated p -wave resonances are identified, implicating exciting opportunities for studying a variety of p -wave interaction-dominated physics.

  19. Finite-momentum superfluidity and phase transitions in a p-wave resonant Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sungsoo; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2011-10-15

    We study a degenerate two-species gas of bosonic atoms interacting through a p-wave Feshbach resonance as, for example, realized in a {sup 85}Rb-{sup 87}Rb mixture. We show that, in addition to a conventional atomic and a p-wave molecular spinor-1 superfluidity at large positive and negative detunings, respectively, the system generically exhibits a finite-momentum atomic-molecular superfluidity at intermediate detuning around the unitary point. We analyze the detailed nature of the corresponding phases and the associated quantum and thermal phase transitions.

  20. Evidence for back scattering of near-podal seismic P'P' waves from the 150-220 km zone in Earth's upper mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Tkalcic, H; Flanagan, M P; Cormier, V F

    2005-07-15

    The deepest and most inaccessible parts of Earth's interior--the core and core-mantle boundary regions can be studied from compressional waves that turn in the core and are routinely observed following large earthquakes at epicentral distances between 145{sup o} and 180{sup o} (also called P', PKIKP or PKP waves). P'P' (PKPPKP) are P' waves that travel from a hypocenter through the Earth's core, reflect from the free surface and travel back through the core to a recording station on the surface. P'P' waves are sometimes accompanied by precursors, which were reported first in the 1960s as small-amplitude arrivals on seismograms at epicentral distances of about 50{sup o}-70{sup o}. Most prominent of these observed precursors were explained by P'P' waves generated by earthquakes or explosions that did not reach the Earth's surface but were reflected from the underside of first order velocity discontinuities at 410 and 660 km in the upper mantle mantle. Here we report the discovery of hitherto unobserved near-podal P'P' waves (at epicentral distance less than 10{sup o}) and very prominent precursors preceding the main energy by as much as 55 seconds. We interpret these precursors as a back scattered energy from undocumented structure in the upper mantle, in a zone between 150 and 220 km depth beneath Earth's surface. From these observations, we identify a frequency dependence of Q (attenuation quality factor) in the lithosphere that can be modeled by a flat relaxation spectrum below about 0.05-0.1 Hz and increasing with as the first power of frequency above this value, confirming pioneering work by B. Gutenberg.

  1. Crustal evolution and metallogeny in relation to mantle dynamics: A perspective from P-wave tomography of the South China Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chuansong; Santosh, M.

    2016-10-01

    The South China Block, composed of the Yangtze and Cathaysia sub-blocks which were sutured along the Jiangnan Orogen, preserves the records of multiple tectonothermal and metallogenic events coeval with global supercontinental cycles. In this study, we attempt to evaluate the mantle dynamics in this region based on P-wave tomographic analyses from data recorded by the China seismic network from 2007 to 2014. Our study reveals significant velocity perturbations in the upper mantle and mantle transition zone beneath this region which we correlate with various features including remnant and stagnant slabs resulting from Neoproterozoic subduction events and prominent mantle upwellings. Four vertical cross-sections along the latitudinal profiles indicate significant low velocity perturbation located at the mantle transition zone and upper mantle beneath the Cathaysia block and Jiangnan orogenic belt. South China is one of the major multi-metal provinces of the globe, and carries several large-scale ore deposits associated with a variety of tectonic settings. The distribution of major mineral deposits in the Yangtze and Cathaysia blocks as well as along the Jiangnan Orogen reveals a remarkable correlation between the location of the deposits and deep-seated low velocity P-wave anomalies. These features highlight the role of mantle dynamics and resultant crust mantle-interaction as well as crustal melting and recycling in generating the major metallogenic belts in this region.

  2. Upper mantle P velocities beneath the North America craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, R.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we determined the detailed mechanisms of three earthquakes occurring in Quebec, Texas and Idaho for use in modeling triplication data. The first event provided pure-path triplication recordings at over 400 USArray stations. Although amplitudes of the direct P waves are small, the depth phase sP is clear and displays shadow-zone characteristics indicative a low velocity layer (LVL) in the upper mantle, where the amplitude of the AB branch decreases rapidly at a distance of 16 degrees. Another feature of the LVL is that the AB branch can be seen at distances larger than 23 degrees. Similar to the Canadian Shield velocity model S25 (LeFevre and Helmberger, 1989), we found a LVL between 160 km and 215 km and obtained excellent fits assuming 1D model. The other two events are located near the craton margins and have been recorded by the MOMA array (Texas event) and CANOE array (Idaho event). These mixed paths are mostly craton with modified 1D models producing good fits. We, also, produced 2D modeling results that use tomographic images for correcting the source structures.

  3. P-wave holographic superconductor/insulator phase transitions affected by dark matter sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogatko, Marek; Wysokinski, Karol I.

    2016-03-01

    The holographic approach to building the p-wave superconductors results in three different models: the Maxwell-vector, the SU(2) Yang-Mills and the helical. In the probe limit approximation, we analytically examine the properties of the first two models in the theory with dark matter sector. It turns out that the effect of dark matter on the Maxwell-vector p-wave model is the same as on the s-wave superconductor studied earlier. For the non-Abelian model we study the phase transitions between p-wave holographic insulator/superconductor and metal/superconductor. Studies of marginally stable modes in the theory under consideration allow us to determine features of p-wave holographic droplet in a constant magnetic field. The dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on the coupling constant α to the dark matter sector is affected by the dark matter density ρD . For ρ D > ρ the transition temperature is a decreasing function of α. The critical chemical potential μ c for the quantum phase transition between insulator and metal depends on the chemical potential of dark matter μ D and for μ D = 0 is a decreasing function of α.

  4. Diffusive Thermal Conductivity of Superfluid Fermi Gas in p-Wave State at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Khademi, Dehkordi; Nasirimoghadam, S.; Nabipoor, F.; M. A., Shahzamanian

    2012-12-01

    The diffusive thermal conductivity tensor of p-wave superfluid at low temperatures is calculated by using the Boltzmann equation approach. We use the Sykes and Brooker procedure and show that Kxx is equal to Kyy and these are related to T-1, also Kzz is proporated to T-3.

  5. Detecting π -phase superfluids with p -wave symmetry in a quasi-one-dimensional optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Li, Xiaopeng; Hulet, Randall G.; Liu, W. Vincent

    2016-09-01

    We propose an experimental protocol to study p -wave superfluidity in a spin-polarized cold Fermi gas tuned by an s -wave Feshbach resonance. A crucial ingredient is to add a quasi-one-dimensional optical lattice and tune the fillings of two spins to the s and p band, respectively. The pairing order parameter is confirmed to inherit p -wave symmetry in its center-of-mass motion. We find that it can further develop into a state of unexpected π -phase modulation in a broad parameter regime. Experimental signatures are predicted in the momentum distributions, density of states, and spatial densities for a realistic experimental setup with a shallow trap. The π -phase p -wave superfluid is reminiscent of the π state in superconductor-ferromagnet heterostructures but differs in symmetry and physical origin. The spatially varying phases of the superfluid gap provide an approach to synthetic magnetic fields for neutral atoms. It would represent another example of p -wave pairing, first discovered in 3He liquids.

  6. P-wave dispersion in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Seden; Arslan, Akif; Yürekli, Vedat Ali; Kutluhan, Süleyman; Koyuncuoğlu, Hasan Rifat; Demirci, Serpil

    2017-03-01

    Cardiac autonomic dysfunction assessed by the presence of arrhythmia, by the methods, such as heart rate variability or blood pressure variability, and by the electrocardiographic abnormalities is common in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The goal of present study was to analyze the P-wave dispersion (PWD), which is the non-invasive marker of atrial arrhythmia, in GBS patients and to compare those with healthy individuals. Thirty-five patients with GBS (mean age 53.6 ± 15.5 years) and 35 healthy controls (mean age 49.2 ± 14.1 years) were included to this study. Demographic and clinical information of the patients with GBS were assessed retrospectively. A 12-lead surface electrocardiogram was acquired from all participants. Minimum and maximum P-wave duration and PWD were measured in the patients with GBS and healthy controls. Maximum P-wave duration and PWD were significantly longer, and minimum P-wave duration was significantly lower in the patients with GBS rather than the control group (p = 0.037, p < 0.001, p = 0.007, respectively). GBS disability scores were positively correlated with the maximum P-wave duration (p = 0.015, r = 0.406) and PWD (p = 0.001, r = 0.525). We found that PWD was significantly prolonged in GBS patients compared with the controls. The increased PWD which is cheap, quick, non-invasive and feasible electrocardiographic marker may be related to increased risk for atrial fibrillation in patients with GBS.

  7. Fast Moment Magnitude Determination from P-wave Trains for Bucharest Rapid Early Warning System (BREWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizurek, Grzegorz; Marmureanu, Alexandru; Wiszniowski, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Bucharest, with a population of approximately 2 million people, has suffered damage from earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone, which is located about 170 km from Bucharest, at a depth of 80-200 km. Consequently, an earthquake early warning system (Bucharest Rapid earthquake Early Warning System or BREWS) was constructed to provide some warning about impending shaking from large earthquakes in the Vrancea zone. In order to provide quick estimates of magnitude, seismic moment was first determined from P-waves and then a moment magnitude was determined from the moment. However, this magnitude may not be consistent with previous estimates of magnitude from the Romanian Seismic Network. This paper introduces the algorithm using P-wave spectral levels and compares them with catalog estimates. The testing procedure used waveforms from about 90 events with catalog magnitudes from 3.5 to 5.4. Corrections to the P-wave determined magnitudes according to dominant intermediate depth events mechanism were tested for November 22, 2014, M5.6 and October 17, M6 events. The corrections worked well, but unveiled overestimation of the average magnitude result of about 0.2 magnitude unit in the case of shallow depth event ( H < 60 km). The P-wave spectral approach allows for the relatively fast estimates of magnitude for use in BREWS. The average correction taking into account the most common focal mechanism for radiation pattern coefficient may lead to overestimation of the magnitude for shallow events of about 0.2 magnitude unit. However, in case of events of intermediate depth of M6 the resulting M w is underestimated at about 0.1-0.2. We conclude that our P-wave spectral approach is sufficiently robust for the needs of BREWS for both shallow and intermediate depth events.

  8. Improvement of Epicentral Direction Estimation by P-wave Polarization Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Mitsutaka

    2016-04-01

    Polarization analysis has been used to analyze the polarization characteristics of waves and developed in various spheres, for example, electromagnetics, optics, and seismology. As for seismology, polarization analysis is used to discriminate seismic phases or to enhance specific phase (e.g., Flinn, 1965)[1], by taking advantage of the difference in polarization characteristics of seismic phases. In earthquake early warning, polarization analysis is used to estimate the epicentral direction using single station, based on the polarization direction of P-wave portion in seismic records (e.g., Smart and Sproules(1981) [2], Noda et al.,(2012) [3]). Therefore, improvement of the Estimation of Epicentral Direction by Polarization Analysis (EEDPA) directly leads to enhance the accuracy and promptness of earthquake early warning. In this study, the author tried to improve EEDPA by using seismic records of events occurred around Japan from 2003 to 2013. The author selected the events that satisfy following conditions. MJMA larger than 6.5 (JMA: Japan Meteorological Agency). Seismic records are available at least 3 stations within 300km in epicentral distance. Seismic records obtained at stations with no information on seismometer orientation were excluded, so that precise and quantitative evaluation of accuracy of EEDPA becomes possible. In the analysis, polarization has calculated by Vidale(1986) [4] that extended the method proposed by Montalbetti and Kanasewich(1970)[5] to use analytical signal. As a result of the analysis, the author found that accuracy of EEDPA improves by about 15% if velocity records, not displacement records, are used contrary to the author's expectation. Use of velocity records enables reduction of CPU time in integration of seismic records and improvement in promptness of EEDPA, although this analysis is still rough and further scrutiny is essential. At this moment, the author used seismic records that obtained by simply integrating acceleration

  9. 2-D Stress Accumulation Analysis of the North Anatolian Fault East of the Marmara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, B.; McQuarrie, N.; Harbert, W.; Lin, J.

    2011-12-01

    On August 17th, 1999, a magnitude 7.4 earthquake shook the city of Kocaeli (Izmit), Turkey killing over 17,000 people. The epicenter was approximately 100-km east of Turkey's largest city, Istanbul, along the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) system. This 1600-km long, strike-slip boundary divides the Anatolian plate and the Eurasian plate. The NAF slips at an average rate of 2-3-cm y-1, and has an earthquake recurrence interval of approximately 300 years. To further understand the NAF system and its dynamics, a simplified 2-D mesh model was developed to describe fault stress accumulation along an ~110-km stretch of the NAF system east of the Marmara Sea. This region was selected because it is where two sets of faults within the NAF system converge, and then diverge. One set diverges to the NW to bound the northern rim of the Marmara Sea, while the second set continues to the SW along the southern rim of the Marmara Sea. The 2-D mesh separates the study area into three geologic provinces defined by these faults: the Istanbul Zone, the Armatlu-Almacik Zone, and the Sakarya Zone. The resulting mesh was then processed using the Numerical Manifold Method (NMM) and PyLith, a finite element code deformation software. The NMM and PyLith simulations model the stress field in the region by employing surface fault geometry, rock physics parameters of the surface geology, and relative plate motions as determined by GPS velocities from Turkey's extensive network of GPS stations. Surface geology was simplified into the three rock types, and rock physics parameters were assigned using general physical parameters for each rock type and extrapolating further data from the Canadian Rock Physics Database. For the three zones, an average value for density and P-wave velocity was assigned using this database, and these averaged values were used to calculate S-wave velocity, shear modulus, bulk modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and Lamé's first parameter for use in processing the

  10. High-resolution near-surface velocity model building using full-waveform inversion—a case study from southwest Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, A.; Malinowski, M.; Malehmir, A.

    2014-06-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is an iterative optimization technique that provides high-resolution models of subsurface properties. Frequency-domain, acoustic FWI was applied to seismic data acquired over a known quick-clay landslide scar in southwest Sweden. We inverted data from three 2-D seismic profiles, 261-572 m long, two of them shot with small charges of dynamite and one with a sledgehammer. To our best knowledge this is the first published application of FWI to sledgehammer data. Both sources provided data suitable for waveform inversion, the sledgehammer data containing even wider frequency spectrum. Inversion was performed for frequency groups between 27.5 and 43.1 Hz for the explosive data and 27.5-51.0 Hz for the sledgehammer. The lowest inverted frequency was limited by the resonance frequency of the standard 28-Hz geophones used in the survey. High-velocity granitic bedrock in the area is undulated and very shallow (15-100 m below the surface), and exhibits a large P-wave velocity contrast to the overlying normally consolidated sediments. In order to mitigate the non-linearity of the inverse problem we designed a multiscale layer-stripping inversion strategy. Obtained P-wave velocity models allowed to delineate the top of the bedrock and revealed distinct layers within the overlying sediments of clays and coarse-grained materials. Models were verified in an extensive set of validating procedures and used for pre-stack depth migration, which confirmed their robustness.

  11. P wave attenuation of the Yellowstone Caldera from three-dimensional inversion of spectral decay using explosion source seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clawson, Steven R.; Smith, Robert B.; Benz, Harley M.

    1989-06-01

    Using explosion source, seismic refraction data, recorded in the 1978 and 1980 Yellowstone-Snake River Plain seismic experiments, a three-dimensional inversion of differential P wave attenuation was used to assess the relative variations in Q-1 in and around the volcanically active, 45 km by 70 km, Yellowstone caldera, northwestern Wyoming. Differential attenuation was derived from spectral decay of upper crustal Pg phases, observed from six explosions and recorded at 90 temporary stations. Because of the relatively short time windows used to determine the spectral content, a maximum entropy technique was employed to estimate the spectra that yielded an optimally small variance. Differential P wave attenuation was calculated from least squares determinations of the spectral ratios corrected for source and path effects. The observed differential attenuation parameters were then inverted using a weighted least squares technique for a discretized, 70×105 km, three-dimensional surface and upper crustal Q-1 model of the Yellowstone caldera and surrounding region. Results showed that the surface layer, to depths of 2 km within the Yellowstone caldera, is characterized by relatively high attenuation with low Q values less than 30, compared to values of 38 to 50 outside the caldera. The higher attenuation in the caldera's surface layer is thought to be associated with Quaternary lake sediments, highly altered rhyolites, and the possible influence of steam in areas of hydrothermal activity. In the crystalline upper crust, at depths of 2 km to 12 km, Q values of 40 to 70 were observed in areas of thick sedimentary fill northwest of the caldera and in areas of hydrothermal activity. Within the caldera, upper crustal attenuation generally corresponded to Q of 200 in areas that are interpreted to be associated with hot but now solidified granitic material. In comparison, relatively high attenuation, Q = 40, was observed in the upper crust of the northeastern Yellowstone

  12. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  13. Valleytronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaibley, John R.; Yu, Hongyi; Clark, Genevieve; Rivera, Pasqual; Ross, Jason S.; Seyler, Kyle L.; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor technology is currently based on the manipulation of electronic charge; however, electrons have additional degrees of freedom, such as spin and valley, that can be used to encode and process information. Over the past several decades, there has been significant progress in manipulating electron spin for semiconductor spintronic devices, motivated by potential spin-based information processing and storage applications. However, experimental progress towards manipulating the valley degree of freedom for potential valleytronic devices has been limited until very recently. We review the latest advances in valleytronics, which have largely been enabled by the isolation of 2D materials (such as graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides) that host an easily accessible electronic valley degree of freedom, allowing for dynamic control.

  14. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  15. Investigation of structural heterogeneity at the SPE site using combined P–wave travel times and Rg phase velocities

    DOE PAGES

    Rowe, Charlotte A.; Patton, Howard J.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present analyses of the 2D seismic structure beneath Source Physics Experiments (SPE) geophone lines that extended radially at 100 m spacing from 100 to 2000 m from the source borehole. With seismic sources at only one end of the geophone lines, standard refraction profiling methods cannot resolve seismic velocity structures unambiguously. In previous work, we demonstrated overall agreement between body-wave refraction modeling and Rg dispersion curves for the least complex of the five lines. A more detailed inspection supports a 2D reinterpretation of the structure. We obtained Rg phase velocity measurements in both the time and frequency domains,more » then used iterative adjustment of the initial 1D body-wave model to predict Rg dispersion curves to fit the observed values. Our method applied to the most topographically severe of the geophone lines is supplemented with a 2D ray-tracing approach, whose application to P-wave arrivals supports the Rg analysis. In addition, midline sources will allow us to refine our characterization in future work.« less

  16. P-wave travel-time tomography reveals multiple mantle upwellings beneath the northern East-Africa Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, J. O. S.; Civiero, C.; Goes, S. D. B.; Ahmed, A.; Ayele, A.; Doubre, C.; Goitom, B.; Keir, D.; Kendall, M.; Leroy, S. D.; Ogubazghi, G.; Rumpker, G.; Stuart, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    The East African Rift (EAR) shows evidence for active magmatism from the eruption of flood basalts 30 Ma to active volcanism associated with rifting today. Mantle plumes have been invoked as the likely cause. However, the nature of mantle upwelling is debated, with proposed models ranging from a single broad plume, the African Superplume, connected to the LLSVP beneath Southern Africa, to multiple distinct sources of upwelling along the East-Africa Rift. We present a new relative travel-time tomography model that images detailed P-wave velocities below the northern East-African rift from the surface to lower mantle depths. Data comes from 439 stations that cover the area from Tanzania to Saudi Arabia. The aperture of the integrated dataset allows us to image for the first time low-velocity structures of ~ 100-km length scales down to depths of 900 km beneath this region. Our images provide evidence of at least two separate low-velocity structures with a diameter of ~200 km that continue through the transition zone and into the lower mantle: the first, and most pronounced, is beneath the Afar Depression, which extends to at least 900 km depth and a second is located beneath the Main Ethiopian Rift that extends to at least 750 km. Taking into account seismic sensitivity to temperature and thermally controlled phase boundary topography, we interpret these features as multiple focused upwellings from below the transition zone with excess temperatures of ~ 100-150 K. Such temperatures are also fully consistent with previous petrological and other geophysical estimates. Furthermore, the separate structures could explain differences in geochemistry of erupted magmas along the rift zone, as well as the dynamic topography seen at the surface. Our findings thus support the involvement of multiple plumes in the evolution of the EAR and a direct connection between lower mantle features and the volcanism at the surface.

  17. On Accuracy of the Finite-difference, Finite-element and Spectral-element Schemes for Modeling Seismic Motion in Media With a Large P-wave to S-wave Speed Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Pazak, Peter; Galis, Martin; Chaljub, Emmanuel

    2010-05-01

    The P-wave to S-wave speed ratios (Vp/Vs) as large as 5 and even larger often have to be accounted for in numerical modeling of seismic motion in structurally and rheologically realistic models of sedimentary basins and valleys. Although sediments with large Vp/Vs usually do not make a major part of the computational region, their effect can be significant because they are at or very close to the free surface. However, the accuracy of the numerical schemes with respect to varying Vp/Vs is not often addressed in studies presenting schemes. In order to identify the very basic inherent aspects of the numerical schemes responsible for their behavior with varying Vp/Vs ratio, we included the most basic 2nd-order 2D numerical schemes on a uniform grid in a homogeneous medium. Although basic in the specified sense, the schemes comprise the decisive features for accuracy of wide class of numerical schemes. We also included 3D higher-order schemes. We investigated the following schemes (FD - finite-difference, FE - finite-element): FD displacement conventional grid, FD optimally-accurate displacement conventional grid, FD displacement-stress partly-staggered grid, FD displacement-stress staggered-grid, FD velocity-stress staggered-grid, FE Lobatto integration, FE Gauss integration, spectral element. We defined and calculated local errors of the schemes in amplitude and polarization normalized for a unit time. Extensive numerical calculations for wide ranges of values of the Vp/Vs ratio, spatial sampling ratio and stability ratio, and entire range of directions of propagation with respect to the spatial grid led to interesting and surprising findings. In parallel with the numerical results and their analysis we compare the numerical schemes themselves in terms of their inherent structures, applied approximations, and truncation errors.

  18. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman–2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational–vibrational, electronic–vibrational and electronic–electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes. PMID:28281541

  19. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hutson, William O.; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-01

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  20. Quantum coherence selective 2D Raman-2D electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Austin P; Hutson, William O; Harel, Elad

    2017-03-10

    Electronic and vibrational correlations report on the dynamics and structure of molecular species, yet revealing these correlations experimentally has proved extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate a method that probes correlations between states within the vibrational and electronic manifold with quantum coherence selectivity. Specifically, we measure a fully coherent four-dimensional spectrum which simultaneously encodes vibrational-vibrational, electronic-vibrational and electronic-electronic interactions. By combining near-impulsive resonant and non-resonant excitation, the desired fifth-order signal of a complex organic molecule in solution is measured free of unwanted lower-order contamination. A critical feature of this method is electronic and vibrational frequency resolution, enabling isolation and assignment of individual quantum coherence pathways. The vibronic structure of the system is then revealed within an otherwise broad and featureless 2D electronic spectrum. This method is suited for studying elusive quantum effects in which electronic transitions strongly couple to phonons and vibrations, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

  1. Gold-standard performance for 2D hydrodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, G. B.; MacVicar, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional, depth-averaged hydrodynamic (2D) models are emerging as an increasingly useful tool for environmental water resources engineering. One of the remaining technical hurdles to the wider adoption and acceptance of 2D modeling is the lack of standards for 2D model performance evaluation when the riverbed undulates, causing lateral flow divergence and convergence. The goal of this study was to establish a gold-standard that quantifies the upper limit of model performance for 2D models of undulating riverbeds when topography is perfectly known and surface roughness is well constrained. A review was conducted of published model performance metrics and the value ranges exhibited by models thus far for each one. Typically predicted velocity differs from observed by 20 to 30 % and the coefficient of determination between the two ranges from 0.5 to 0.8, though there tends to be a bias toward overpredicting low velocity and underpredicting high velocity. To establish a gold standard as to the best performance possible for a 2D model of an undulating bed, two straight, rectangular-walled flume experiments were done with no bed slope and only different bed undulations and water surface slopes. One flume tested model performance in the presence of a porous, homogenous gravel bed with a long flat section, then a linear slope down to a flat pool bottom, and then the same linear slope back up to the flat bed. The other flume had a PVC plastic solid bed with a long flat section followed by a sequence of five identical riffle-pool pairs in close proximity, so it tested model performance given frequent undulations. Detailed water surface elevation and velocity measurements were made for both flumes. Comparing predicted versus observed velocity magnitude for 3 discharges with the gravel-bed flume and 1 discharge for the PVC-bed flume, the coefficient of determination ranged from 0.952 to 0.987 and the slope for the regression line was 0.957 to 1.02. Unsigned velocity

  2. Detection of anomalous features in an earthen dam using inversion of P-wave first-arrival times and surface-wave dispersion curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. Y.; Jeon, K. M.; Hong, M. H.; Park, Young-gyu

    2011-02-01

    To locate anomalous features including seepage pathways through the Daeryong earth-fill dam, P and Rayleigh waves were recorded along a 250-m profile on the crest of the dam. Seismic energy was generated using a 5-kg sledgehammer and detected by 24 4.5-Hz vertical-axis geophones installed at 3-m intervals. P-wave and apparent S-wave velocities of the reservoir dam and underlying bedrock were then inverted from first-arrival traveltimes and dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves, respectively. Apparent dynamic Poisson's ratios as high as 0.46 were obtained at the base of the dam near its north-east end, where an outlet conduit occurs, and in the clay core body near the south-west end of the profile where the dam was repeatedly grouted to abate seepage before our survey. These anomalies of higher Poisson's ratios in the upper part of clay core were also associated with effusion of grout on the downstream slope of the dam during post-survey grouting to abate leakage. Combining P-wave traveltime tomography and inversion of Rayleigh wave velocities was very effective in detecting potential pathways for seepage and previous grouted zones in this earthen dam.

  3. From the Alpine region to the Central Apennines (Italy): 3d upper lithospheric P-velocity model with controlled source seismology data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, R.; Tondi, R.; de Luca, L.; Lippitsch, R.; Sandoval, S.; Kissling, E.

    2003-04-01

    The complex lithosphere structure of the Italian region leads to difficulties in uniquely interpreting the results obtained with geophysical investigation methods. Relating to P waves velocity models, the geometry of the moho is the main first order structure influencing the interpretation of controlled source seismology (CSS) profile data and results from local earthquake tomography (LET). Moreover, the crustal structures complexities, though poorly resolved by teleseismic tomography, strongly distort teleseismic wave fronts and thus influence teleseismic traveltimes. In 1996 a method was developed by F. Waldhauser to determine the 3D topography and lateral continuity of seismic interfaces using 2D-derived controlled-source seismic reflector data. This method has been successfully applied to retrieve the moho geometry in the complex Alpine region with the aim to obtain the simplest possible 3D structure consistent with all reflector data and error estimates. For the Alpine region a 3D crustal P-wave velocity model has been thus developed from comparative use of published information from active and passive sources surveys. Here we present the extension of this map to the Italian peninsula to include Northern and Central Apennines. Information from the CROP project and from other CSS experiments performed in the past 40 years, both on land and offshore, has been included to cover the whole area. The first order features of Adriatic and Tyrrhenian moho have been recovered and a Vp crustal velocity model has been produced. For the Northern Apennines we compare the newly derived crustal model with the 3D structure of the crust obtained by the inversion of P-wave first arrivals picked on the CSS data, and of gravity data collected on land and off-shore (see Tondi et al., session SM3).

  4. Properties of skyrmions and multi-quanta vortices in chiral p-wave superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Garaud, Julien; Babaev, Egor

    2015-01-01

    Chiral p-wave superconducting state supports a rich spectrum of topological excitations different from those in conventional superconducting states. Besides domain walls separating different chiral states, chiral p-wave state supports both singular and coreless vortices also interpreted as skyrmions. Here, we present a numerical study of the energetic properties of isolated singular and coreless vortex states as functions of anisotropy and magnetic field penetration length. In a given chiral state, single quantum vortices with opposite winding have different energies and thus only one kind is energetically favoured. We find that with the appropriate sign of the phase winding, two-quanta (coreless) vortices are always energetically preferred over two isolated single quanta (singular) vortices. We also report solutions carrying more flux quanta. However those are typically more energetically expensive/metastable as compared to those carrying two flux quanta. PMID:26631985

  5. Scaling relation between earthquake magnitude and the departure time from P wave similar growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noda, Shunta; Ellsworth, William L.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new scaling relation between earthquake magnitude (M) and a characteristic of initial P wave displacement. By examining Japanese K-NET data averaged in bins partitioned by Mw and hypocentral distance, we demonstrate that the P wave displacement briefly displays similar growth at the onset of rupture and that the departure time (Tdp), which is defined as the time of departure from similarity of the absolute displacement after applying a band-pass filter, correlates with the final M in a range of 4.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 7. The scaling relation between Mw and Tdp implies that useful information on the final M can be derived while the event is still in progress because Tdp occurs before the completion of rupture. We conclude that the scaling relation is important not only for earthquake early warning but also for the source physics of earthquakes.

  6. Dynamics of skyrmions and edge states in the resistive regime of mesoscopic p-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Becerra, V.; Milošević, M. V.

    2017-02-01

    In a mesoscopic sample of a chiral p-wave superconductor, novel states comprising skyrmions and edge states have been stabilized in out-of-plane applied magnetic field. Using the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations we shed light on the dynamic response of such states to an external applied current. Three different regimes are obtained, namely, the superconducting (stationary), resistive (non-stationary) and normal regime, similarly to conventional s-wave superconductors. However, in the resistive regime and depending on the external current, we found that moving skyrmions and the edge state behave distinctly different from the conventional kinematic vortex, thereby providing new fingerprints for identification of p-wave superconductivity.

  7. Properties of skyrmions and multi-quanta vortices in chiral p-wave superconductors.

    PubMed

    Garaud, Julien; Babaev, Egor

    2015-12-03

    Chiral p-wave superconducting state supports a rich spectrum of topological excitations different from those in conventional superconducting states. Besides domain walls separating different chiral states, chiral p-wave state supports both singular and coreless vortices also interpreted as skyrmions. Here, we present a numerical study of the energetic properties of isolated singular and coreless vortex states as functions of anisotropy and magnetic field penetration length. In a given chiral state, single quantum vortices with opposite winding have different energies and thus only one kind is energetically favoured. We find that with the appropriate sign of the phase winding, two-quanta (coreless) vortices are always energetically preferred over two isolated single quanta (singular) vortices. We also report solutions carrying more flux quanta. However those are typically more energetically expensive/metastable as compared to those carrying two flux quanta.

  8. Effects of vorticity and impurity on NMR relaxation rate in chiral p-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kenta K.; Ichioka, Masanori; Onari, Seiichiro

    2016-11-01

    In order to study site-selective NMR in chiral p-wave superconductors, we calculate local nuclear relaxation rate T1-1 in the vortex lattice state by Eilenberger theory with and without non-magnetic impurity scattering in the Born limit and unitary limit. The local T1-1 in the NMR resonance line shape is different between two chiral states p±, depending on whether the chirality is parallel or anti-parallel to the vorticity. In the p--wave, anomalous suppression of local T1-1 occurs around the vortex core due to the negative coherence term coming from odd-frequency s-wave Cooper pair induced around the vortex. We especially examine the site dependence of the anomalous suppression of local T1-1, including the applied magnetic field dependence and the impurity effects.

  9. Q for P waves in the sediments of the Virginia Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, M.C.; Beale, J.N.; Catchings, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    The seismic quality factor Q for P waves in Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments is estimated using data from the 2004 U.S. Geological Survey seismic survey in eastern Virginia. The estimates are based on spectral ratios derived from reflections and sediment-guided P waves in Late Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments within the annular trough of the Late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure. The estimates of Q for the frequency range of 10-150 Hz are from 75 to 100, with the best estimate of 80 based on multichannel stacking of spectral ratios from receivers in the offset range of 200-2000 m. This result is approximately a factor of 2 larger than the results previously reported for the Charleston, South Carolina, area, and it is approximately one-half of that recently reported for the Mississippi Embayment.

  10. Quantum electron plasma, visible and ultraviolet P-wave and thin metallic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkanov, A. A.; Zverev, N. V.

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of the visible and ultraviolet electromagnetic P-wave with the thin flat metallic film localized between two dielectric media is studied numerically in the framework of the quantum degenerate electron plasma approach. The reflectance, transmittance and absorptance power coefficients are chosen for investigation. It is shown that for the frequencies in the visible and ultraviolet ranges, the quantum power coefficients differ from the ones evaluated in framework of both the classical spatial dispersion and the Drude-Lorentz approaches.

  11. ECG Segmentation and P-Wave Feature Extraction: Application to Patients Prone to Atrial Fibrillation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    detection of patients prone to atrial fibrillation (AF), one of the most frequent arrhythmias. It focuses first on the segmentation of the...Keywords : atrial fibrillation , ECG segmentation, P-wave, hidden Markov model, wavelets, ECG database I. INTRODUCTION Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a very... atrial thrombosis, with the subsequent risk of a stroke. The aim of this study is to try to automatically detect patients prone to atrial fibrillation (AF

  12. Improving depth resolution of teleseismic tomography by simultaneous inversion of teleseismic and global P-wave traveltime data-application to the Vrancea region in Southeastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidle, C.; Widiyantoro, S.

    2005-09-01

    Over the years, teleseismic tomography has developed to be a sophisticated method to study the Earth's upper mantle on a regional scale. Using data from tomographic experiments with temporary station networks, one faces some inherent problems, which include limited resolution at depth and artefacts due to a plane-wave approximation at the bottom of the model volume. Simultaneous inversion of dense regionally recorded teleseismic and global P-wave traveltime data provides an opportunity to overcome these specific problems. The calculation of the entire ray path using a 3-D ray tracing algorithm and a non-linear iterative inversion scheme allow to localize heterogeneities in the Earth's mantle and to improve resolution at depth. Application of a variable parametrization scheme provides not only a regional high-resolution model but additionally allows to include a priori constrained structures such as a crustal model derived from independent studies. We investigated the effect of different inversion strategies for a priori constrained model parameters and found that, for upper-mantle studies, one must allow further perturbation of the known velocity structure during inversion to avoid artefacts down to the mantle transition zone. We apply this approach to the Romanian Vrancea region in Southeastern Europe. The results show a near-vertical, narrow high-velocity body underneath that region extending down to 280 km depth, approximately outlining the narrowly spaced seismogenic volume and a deeper, differently oriented positive anomaly coupled to the shallower segment at the latter's southwestern edge. At north, northwest and west of the Vrancea region, we find an extended region of decreased seismic P-wave velocity down to 200 km depth, being interpreted as a shallow lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary and asthenospheric mantle flow due to lateral migration of the high-velocity body. From synthetic reconstruction tests, we found that inversion of the combined data set of

  13. Large-momentum distribution of a polarized Fermi gas and p -wave contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shi-Guo; Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui

    2016-12-01

    We present a derivation of the adiabatic energy relations as well as the large momentum distribution of a polarized Fermi gas near p -wave Feshbach resonances. The leading asymptotic behavior k-2 and subleading behavior k-4 of the large momentum distribution have recently been predicted by Z. Yu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 135304 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.135304] and by M. Y. He et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 045301 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.045301] using two different approaches. Here, we show that the subleading asymptotic behavior (˜k-4 ) cannot fully be captured by the contact defined from the adiabatic energy relation related to the p -wave effective range, and there should be an extra term resulting from the center-of-mass motion of the pairs. The omission of this extra term is perhaps a reasonable approximation at zero temperature. However, it should be taken into account at finite temperature and should have significant importance to understand the recently measured momentum distribution in a resonant p -wave Fermi gas of ultracold 40K atoms [C. Luciuk et al., Nat. Phys. 12, 599 (2016), 10.1038/nphys3670].

  14. Multiple scattering dynamics of fermions at an isolated p-wave resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R.; Roberts, K. O.; Tiesinga, E.; Wade, A. C. J.; Blakie, P. B.; Deb, A. B.; Kjærgaard, N.

    2016-07-01

    The wavefunction for indistinguishable fermions is anti-symmetric under particle exchange, which directly leads to the Pauli exclusion principle, and hence underlies the structure of atoms and the properties of almost all materials. In the dynamics of collisions between two indistinguishable fermions, this requirement strictly prohibits scattering into 90° angles. Here we experimentally investigate the collisions of ultracold clouds fermionic 40K atoms by directly measuring scattering distributions. With increasing collision energy we identify the Wigner threshold for p-wave scattering with its tell-tale dumb-bell shape and no 90° yield. Above this threshold, effects of multiple scattering become manifest as deviations from the underlying binary p-wave shape, adding particles either isotropically or axially. A shape resonance for 40K facilitates the separate observation of these two processes. The isotropically enhanced multiple scattering mode is a generic p-wave threshold phenomenon, whereas the axially enhanced mode should occur in any colliding particle system with an elastic scattering resonance.

  15. Multiple scattering dynamics of fermions at an isolated p-wave resonance

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R.; Roberts, K. O.; Tiesinga, E.; Wade, A. C. J.; Blakie, P. B.; Deb, A. B.; Kjærgaard, N.

    2016-01-01

    The wavefunction for indistinguishable fermions is anti-symmetric under particle exchange, which directly leads to the Pauli exclusion principle, and hence underlies the structure of atoms and the properties of almost all materials. In the dynamics of collisions between two indistinguishable fermions, this requirement strictly prohibits scattering into 90° angles. Here we experimentally investigate the collisions of ultracold clouds fermionic 40K atoms by directly measuring scattering distributions. With increasing collision energy we identify the Wigner threshold for p-wave scattering with its tell-tale dumb-bell shape and no 90° yield. Above this threshold, effects of multiple scattering become manifest as deviations from the underlying binary p-wave shape, adding particles either isotropically or axially. A shape resonance for 40K facilitates the separate observation of these two processes. The isotropically enhanced multiple scattering mode is a generic p-wave threshold phenomenon, whereas the axially enhanced mode should occur in any colliding particle system with an elastic scattering resonance. PMID:27396294

  16. Preliminary result of P-wave speed tomography beneath North Sumatera region

    SciTech Connect

    Jatnika, Jajat; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Wandono

    2015-04-24

    The structure of P-wave speed beneath the North Sumatra region was determined using P-wave arrival times compiled by MCGA from time periods of January 2009 to December 2012 combining with PASSCAL data for February to May 1995. In total, there are 2,246 local earthquake events with 10,666 P-wave phases from 63 stations seismic around the study area. Ray tracing to estimate travel time from source to receiver in this study by applying pseudo-bending method while the damped LSQR method was used for the tomographic inversion. Based on assessment of ray coverage, earthquakes and stations distribution, horizontal grid nodes was set up of 30×30 km2 for inside the study area and 80×80 km2 for outside the study area. The tomographic inversion results show low Vp anomaly beneath Toba caldera complex region and around the Sumatra Fault Zones (SFZ). These features are consistent with previous study. The low Vp anomaly beneath Toba caldera complex are observed around Mt. Pusuk Bukit at depths of 5 km down to 100 km. The interpretation is these anomalies may be associated with ascending hot materials from subduction processes at depths of 80 km down to 100 km. The obtained Vp structure from local tomography will give valuable information to enhance understanding of tectonic and volcanic in this study area.

  17. Prolonged P-Wave and QT Dispersion in Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Nuh; Kutluk, Günsel; Dedeoğlu, Reyhan; Öztarhan, Kazım; Tulunoğlu, Aras; Şap, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) with unclear underlying aetiologies. Severe cardiac arrhythmias have been emphasised in a few studies on adult IBD patients. This study aimed to investigate the alteration of the P-wave and QT interval dispersion parameters to assess the risk of atrial conduction and ventricular repolarisation abnormalities in pediatric IBD patients. Patients and Methods. Thirty-six IBD patients in remission (UC: 20, CD: 16) aged 3–18 years and 36 age- and sex-matched control patients were enrolled in the study. Twelve-lead electrocardiograms were used to determine durations of P-wave, QT, and corrected QT (QTc) interval dispersion. Transthoracic echocardiograms and 24-hour rhythm Holter recordings were obtained for both groups. Results. The P-wave dispersion, QT dispersion, and QTc interval dispersion (Pdisp, QTdisp, and QTcdisp) were significantly longer in the patient group. The mean values of Pminimum, Pmaximum, and QTcminimum were significantly different between the two groups. The echocardiography and Holter monitoring results were not significantly different between the groups. Furthermore, no differences in these parameters were detected between the CD and UC groups. Conclusion. Results suggest that paediatric IBD patients may carry potential risks for serious atrial and ventricular arrhythmias over time even during remission. PMID:28316985

  18. S-P wave travel time residuals and lateral inhomogeneity in the mantle beneath Tibet and the Himalaya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, P.; Chen, W.-P.

    1984-01-01

    S-P wave travel time residuals were measured in earthquakes in Tibet and the Himalaya in order to study lateral inhomogeneities in the earth's mantle. Average S-P residuals, measured with respect to Jeffrey-Bullen (J-B) tables for 11 earthquakes in the Himalaya are less than +1 second. Average J-B S-P from 10 of 11 earthquakes in Tibet, however, are greater than +1 second even when corrected for local crustal thickness. The largest values, ranging between 2.5 and 4.9 seconds are for five events in central and northern Tibet, and they imply that the average velocities in the crust and upper mantle in this part of Tibet are 4 to 10 percent lower than those beneath the Himalaya. On the basis of the data, it is concluded that it is unlikely that a shield structure lies beneath north central Tibet unless the S-P residuals are due to structural variations occurring deeper than 250 km.

  19. Effect of low dose sotalol on the signal averaged P wave in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, P. J.; Cooper, J.; de Bono, D. P.; Vincent, R.; Garratt, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the effects of low dose sotalol on the signal averaged surface P wave in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. DESIGN--A longitudinal within patient crossover study. SETTING--Cardiac departments of a regional cardiothoracic centre and a district general hospital. PATIENTS--Sixteen patients with documented paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. The median (range) age of the patients was 65.5 (36-70) years; 11 were men. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Analysis of the signal averaged P wave recorded from patients not receiving antiarrhythmic medication and after 4-6 weeks' treatment with sotalol. P wave limits were defined automatically by a computer algorithm. Filtered P wave duration and energies contained in frequency bands from 20, 30, 40, 60, and 80 to 150 Hz of the P wave spectrum expressed as absolute values (P20, P30, etc) and as ratios of high to low frequency energy (PR20, PR30, etc) were measured. RESULTS--No difference in P wave duration was observed between the groups studied (mean (SEM) 149 (4) without medication and 152 (3) ms with sotalol). Significant decreases in high frequency P wave energy (for example P60: 4.3 (0.4) v 3.3 (0.3) microV2.s, P = 0.003) and energy ratio (PR60: 5.6 (0.5) v 4.7 (0.6), P = 0.03) were observed during sotalol treatment. These changes were independent of heart rate. CONCLUSIONS--Treatment with low dose sotalol reduces high frequency P wave energy but does not change P wave duration. These results are consistent with the class III effect of the drug and suggest that signal averaging of the surface P wave may be a useful non-invasive measure of drug induced changes in atrial electrophysiology. PMID:8541169

  20. 2d-LCA - an alternative to x-wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2014-11-01

    The 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-LCA) is an innovative sensor for two-dimensional velocity measurements in fluids. It uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon and SU-8 as a sensing element and is capable of performing mesurements with extremly high temporal resolutions up to 150 kHz. The size of the cantilever defines its spatial resolution, which is in the order of 150 μm only. Another big feature is a large angular range of 180° in total. The 2d-LCA has been developed as an alternative measurement method to x-wires with the motivation to create a sensor that can operate in areas where the use of hot-wire anemometry is difficult. These areas include measurements in liquids and in near-wall or particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high speed flows. Comparative measurements with the 2d-LCA and hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the new anemometer. The data of both measurement techniques were analyzed using the same stochastic methods including a spectral analysis as well as an inspection of increment statistics and structure functions. Furthermore, key parameters, such as mean values of both velocity components, angles of attack and the characteristic length scales were determined from both data sets. The analysis reveals a great agreement between both anemometers and thus confirms the new approach.

  1. A simple method of predicting S-wave velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Prediction of shear-wave velocity plays an important role in seismic modeling, amplitude analysis with offset, and other exploration applications. This paper presents a method for predicting S-wave velocity from the P-wave velocity on the basis of the moduli of dry rock. Elastic velocities of water-saturated sediments at low frequencies can be predicted from the moduli of dry rock by using Gassmann's equation; hence, if the moduli of dry rock can be estimated from P-wave velocities, then S-wave velocities easily can be predicted from the moduli. Dry rock bulk modulus can be related to the shear modulus through a compaction constant. The numerical results indicate that the predicted S-wave velocities for consolidated and unconsolidated sediments agree well with measured velocities if differential pressure is greater than approximately 5 MPa. An advantage of this method is that there are no adjustable parameters to be chosen, such as the pore-aspect ratios required in some other methods. The predicted S-wave velocity depends only on the measured P-wave velocity and porosity. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  2. The shallow P-velocity structure of the southern Dead Sea basin derived from near-vertical incidence reflection seismic data in project DESIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryberg, T.; Paschke, M.; Stiller, M.; Weber, M. H.; Desire Group

    2010-12-01

    As a part of the DEad Sea Integrated REsearch (DESIRE) project a seismic near-vertical incidence reflection (NVR) experiment with a profile length of 122 km was completed in spring 2006. The profile crossed the southern Dead Sea basin (DSB), a pull-apart basin due to the strike-slip motion along the Dead Sea Transform (DST). The DST is part of a multi-stage left lateral fault system which connects the spreading centre in the Red Sea with the Taurus collision zone in Turkey over a length of about 1,100 km. The experiment, with the main aim to explore lithologic structures in this area, was carried out in a roll-along acquisition procedure and comprises 972 source locations and 1.045 receiver locations. Each source was recorded by ~180 active receivers and a field dataset with 175,000 traces was created. From this dataset, 124,444 P-wave first-break traveltimes has been picked for this study. A tomographic inversion was carried out, resulting in a 2-D P-wave velocity model. Within the DSB, the model shows clearly the position of the Lisan salt diapir, identified by a high velocity zone. Further features are low velocity zones with P-velocities of ~3 km/s embedded in regions with ~4 km/s in the shallow part on the west side of the DSB. To verify the existence of this low velocity zone, a recovery test and also inversions with different starting models has been carried out. Correlations between the velocity model, a migrated NVR depth section and a geological model based on borehole and surface information will be presented.

  3. Crustal thickness estimation in the Maule Region (Chile) from P-wave receiver function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannowski, A.; Grevemeyer, I.; Thorwart, M. M.; Rabbel, W.; Flueh, E. R.

    2010-12-01

    A temporary passive seismic network of 31 broad-band stations was deployed in the region around Talca and Constitución between 35°S to 36°S latitude and 71°W to 72.5°W longitude. The network was operated between March and October 2008. Thus, we recorded data prior the magnitude Mw=8.8 earthquake of 27 February 2010 at a latitude of the major slip and surface uplift. The experiment was conducted to address fundamental questions on deformation processes, crustal and mantle structures, and fluid flow. We present first results of a teleseismic P receiver function study that covers the coastal region and reaches to the Andes. The aim is to determine the structure and thickness of the continental crust and constrain the state of hydration of the mantle wedge. The P-wave receiver function technique requires large teleseismic earthquakes from different distances and backazimuths. A few percent of the incident P-wave energy from a teleseismic event will be converted into S-wave (Ps) at significant and relatively sharp discontinuities beneath the station. A small converted S phase is produced that arrives at the station within the P wave coda directly after the direct P-wave. The converted Ps phase and their crustal multiples contain information about crustal properties, such as Moho depth and the crustal vp/vs ratio. We use teleseismic events with magnitudes mb > 5.5 at epicentral distances between 30° and 95° to examine P-to-S converted seismic phases. Our preliminary results provide new information about the thickness of the continental crust beneath the coastal region in Central Chile. At most of the stations we observed significant energy from P to S converted waves between 4 and 5 s after the direct P-wave within a positive phase interpreted as the Moho, occurring at 35 to 40 km. Thus, the great Maule earthquake of 27 February 2010 nucleated up-dip of the continental Moho and hence ruptured along a plate contact between subducted sediments and continental crust

  4. The 2D and 3D hypersonic flows with unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thareja, Rajiv

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on 2D and 3D hypersonic flows with unstructured meshes are presented. Topics covered include: mesh generation, mesh refinement, shock-shock interaction, velocity contours, mesh movement, vehicle bottom surface, and adapted meshes.

  5. Global regularity and uniqueness of weak solution for the 2-D liquid crystal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Zhifei

    We prove the global existence and regularity of weak solution for the 2-D liquid crystal flows with the large initial velocity. The uniqueness of weak solution is also proved by using the Littlewood-Paley analysis.

  6. Shear viscosity measurements in a 2D Yukawa liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, Volodymyr

    2005-03-01

    Shear viscosity was measured for a 2D strongly-coupled Yukawa liquid. First, we formed a dilute monolayer suspension of microspheres in a partially-ionized rarefied gas, i.e., a dusty plasma. In the absence of manipulation, the suspension forms a 2D triangular lattice. We used a new in-situ method of applying a shear stress using the scattering forces applied by counter-propagating laser beams. The lattice melted and a shear flow formed. Using digital video microscopy for direct imaging and particle tracking, the microscopic dynamics of the shear flow are observed. Averaging the velocities of individual microspheres, a velocity flow profile was calculated. Using the Navier-Stokes equation with an additional frictional term to account for gas drag, we fit the velocity profile. The fit yielded the value of the shear viscosity. The kinematic viscosity of our particle suspension is of order 1 mm^2s-1, which is comparable to that for liquid water. We believe this is the first report of a rheological measurement in a 2D dusty plasma. This talk is based on V. Nosenko and J. Goree, PRL 93, 155004 (2004).

  7. Spectral Modulation Effect in Teleseismic P-waves from North Korean Nuclear Tests Recorded in Broad Azimuthal Range and Possible Source Depth Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Y.; Kim, S. G.; Hofstetter, R.

    2016-04-01

    Three underground nuclear explosions, conducted by North Korea in 2006, 2009 and 2013, are analyzed. The last two tests were recorded by the Israel Seismic Network. Pronounced coherent minima (spectral nulls) at 1.2-1.3 Hz were revealed in the spectra of teleseismic P -waves. For a ground-truth explosion with a shallow source depth, this phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of the interference between the down-going P-wave and the pP phase reflected from the Earth's surface. This effect was also observed at ISN stations for a Pakistan nuclear explosion at a different frequency 1.7 Hz and the PNE Rubin-2 in West Siberia at 1 Hz, indicating a source-effect and not a site-effect. Similar spectral minima having essentially the same frequency, as at ISN, were observed in teleseismic P-waves for all the three North Korean explosions recorded at networks and arrays in Kazakhstan (KURK), Norway (NNSN), Australia (ASAR, WRA) and Canada (YKA), covering a broad azimuthal range. Data of 2009 and 2013 tests at WRA and KURK arrays showed harmonic spectral modulation with three multiple minima frequencies, evidencing the clear interference effect. These observations support the above-mentioned interpretation. Based on the null frequency dependency on the near-surface acoustic velocity and the source depth, the depth of the North Korean tests was estimated about 2.0-2.1 km. It was shown that the observed null frequencies and the obtained source depth estimates correspond to P- pP interference phenomena in both cases of a vertical shaft or a horizontal drift in a mountain. This unusual depth estimation needs additional validation based on more stations and verification by other methods.

  8. Mean flow and anisotropic cascades in decaying 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    Many large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows are decaying 2D turbulent flows embedded in a non-uniform mean flow. Despite its importance for large-scale weather systems, the affect of non-uniform mean flows on decaying 2D turbulence remains unknown. In the absence of mean flow it is well known that decaying 2D turbulent flows exhibit the enstrophy cascade. More generally, for any 2D turbulent flow, all computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that the spectrum of longitudinal and transverse velocity fluctuations correspond to the same cascade, signifying isotropy of cascades. Here we report experiments on decaying 2D turbulence in soap films with a non-uniform mean flow. We find that the flow transitions from the usual isotropic enstrophy cascade to a series of unusual and, to our knowledge, never before observed or predicted, anisotropic cascades where the longitudinal and transverse spectra are mutually independent. We discuss implications of our results for decaying geophysical turbulence.

  9. 2-D Clinostat for Simulated Microgravity Experiments with Arabidopsis Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Xugang; Krause, Lars; Görög, Mark; Schüler, Oliver; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Kircher, Stefan; Lasok, Hanna; Haser, Thomas; Rapp, Katja; Schmidt, Jürgen; Yu, Xin; Pasternak, Taras; Aubry-Hivet, Dorothée; Tietz, Olaf; Dovzhenko, Alexander; Palme, Klaus; Ditengou, Franck Anicet

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based simulators of microgravity such as fast rotating 2-D clinostats are valuable tools to study gravity related processes. We describe here a versatile g-value-adjustable 2-D clinostat that is suitable for plant analysis. To avoid seedling adaptation to 1 g after clinorotation, we designed chambers that allow rapid fixation. A detailed protocol for fixation, RNA isolation and the analysis of selected genes is described. Using this clinostat we show that mRNA levels of LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), MIZU-KUSSEI 1 (MIZ1) and microRNA MIR163 are down-regulated in 5-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana roots after 3 min and 6 min of clinorotation using a maximal reduced g-force of 0.02 g, hence demonstrating that this 2-D clinostat enables the characterization of early transcriptomic events during root response to microgravity. We further show that this 2-D clinostat is able to compensate the action of gravitational force as both gravitropic-dependent statolith sedimentation and subsequent auxin redistribution (monitoring D R5 r e v :: G F P reporter) are abolished when plants are clinorotated. Our results demonstrate that 2-D clinostats equipped with interchangeable growth chambers and tunable rotation velocity are suitable for studying how plants perceive and respond to simulated microgravity.

  10. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  11. P wave and far-field R wave detection in pacemaker patient atrial electrograms.

    PubMed

    Theres, H; Sun, W; Combs, W; Panken, E; Mead, H; Baumann, G; Stangl, K

    2000-04-01

    This study was undertaken to develop and test a morphology-based adaptive algorithm for real-time detection of P waves and far-field R waves (FFRWs) in pacemaker patient atrial electrograms. Cardiac event discrimination in right atrial electrograms has been a problem resulting in improper atrial sensing in implantable devices; potentially requiring clinical evaluation and device reprogramming. A morphology-based adaptive algorithm was first evaluated with electrograms recorded from 25 dual chamber pacemaker implant patients. A digital signal processing (DSP) system was designed to implement the algorithm and test real-time detection. In the second phase, the DSP implementation was evaluated in 13 patients. Atrial and ventricular electrograms were processed in real-time following algorithm training performed in the first few seconds for each patient. Electrograms were later manually annotated for comparative analysis. The sensitivity for FFRW detection in the atrial electrogram during off-line analysis was 92.5% (+/- 10.9) and the positive predictive value was 99.1% (+/- 1.8). Real-time P wave detection using a DSP system had a sensitivity of 98.9% (+/- 1.3) and a positive predictivity of 97.3% (+/- 3.5). FFRW detection had a sensitivity of 91.0% (+/- 12.4) and a positive predictivity of 97.1% (+/- 4.2) in atrial electrograms. DSP algorithm tested can accurately detect both P waves and FFRWs in right atrium real-time. Advanced signal processing techniques can be applied to arrhythmia detection and may eventually improve detection, reduce clinician interventions, and improve unipolar and bipolar lead sensing.

  12. Orienting ocean-bottom seismometers from P-wave and Rayleigh wave polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, John-Robert; Barruol, Guilhem; Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Sigloch, Karin; Crawford, Wayne C.; Deen, Martha

    2017-03-01

    We present two independent, automated methods for estimating the absolute horizontal misorientation of seismic sensors. We apply both methods to 44 free-fall ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) of the RHUM-RUM experiment (http://www.rhum-rum.net/). The techniques measure the 3-D directions of particle motion of (1) P-waves and (2) Rayleigh waves of earthquake recordings. For P-waves, we used a principal component analysis to determine the directions of particle motions (polarizations) in multiple frequency passbands. We correct for polarization deviations due to seismic anisotropy and dipping discontinuities using a simple fit equation, which yields significantly more accurate OBS orientations. For Rayleigh waves, we evaluated the degree of elliptical polarization in the vertical plane in the time and frequency domain. The results obtained for the RHUM-RUM OBS stations differed, on average, by 3.1° and 3.7° between the methods, using circular mean and median statistics, which is within the methods' estimate uncertainties. Using P-waves, we obtained orientation estimates for 31 ocean-bottom seismometers with an average uncertainty (95 per cent confidence interval) of 11° per station. For 7 of these OBS, data coverage was sufficient to correct polarization measurements for underlying seismic anisotropy and dipping discontinuities, improving their average orientation uncertainty from 11° to 6° per station. Using Rayleigh waves, we obtained misorientation estimates for 40 OBS, with an average uncertainty of 16° per station. The good agreement of results obtained using the two methods indicates that they should also be useful for detecting misorientations of terrestrial seismic stations.

  13. Application of scattering theory to P-wave amplitude fluctuations in the crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kazuo; Takemura, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    The amplitudes of high-frequency seismic waves generated by local and/or regional earthquakes vary from site to site, even at similar hypocentral distances. It had been suggested that, in addition to local site effects (e.g., variable attenuation and amplification in surficial layers), complex wave propagation in inhomogeneous crustal media is responsible for this observation. To quantitatively investigate this effect, we performed observational, theoretical, and numerical studies on the characteristics of seismic amplitude fluctuations in inhomogeneous crust. Our observations of P-wave amplitude for small to moderately sized crustal earthquakes revealed that fluctuations in P-wave amplitude increase with increasing frequency and hypocentral distance, with large fluctuations showing up to ten-times difference between the largest and the smallest P-wave amplitudes. Based on our theoretical investigation, we developed an equation to evaluate the amplitude fluctuations of time-harmonic waves that radiated isotropically from a point source and propagated spherically in acoustic von Kármán-type random media. Our equation predicted relationships between amplitude fluctuations and observational parameters (e.g., wave frequency and hypocentral distance). Our numerical investigation, which was based on the finite difference method, enabled us to investigate the characteristics of wave propagation in both acoustic and elastic random inhomogeneous media using a variety of source time functions. The numerical simulations indicate that amplitude fluctuation characteristics differ a little between medium types (i.e., acoustic or elastic) or source time function durations. These results confirm the applicability of our analytical equation to practical seismic data analysis.

  14. Orienting Ocean-Bottom Seismometers from P-wave and Rayleigh wave polarisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, John-Robert; Barruol, Guilhem; Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Sigloch, Karin; Crawford, Wayne; Deen, Martha

    2016-11-01

    We present two independent, automated methods for estimating the absolute horizontal misorientation of seismic sensors from their recorded data. We apply both methods to 44 free-fall ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) of the RHUM-RUM experiment (http://www.rhum-rum.net/). The techniques measure the three-dimensional directions of particle motion of (1) P-waves and (2) Rayleigh waves of earthquake recordings. For P-waves, we used a principal component analysis to determine the directions of particle motions (polarisations) in multiple frequency passbands. We correct for polarisation deviations due to seismic anisotropy and dipping discontinuities using a simple fit equation, which yields significantly more accurate OBS orientations. For Rayleigh waves, we evaluated the degree of elliptical polarisation in the vertical plane in the time and frequency domain. The results obtained for the RUM-RHUM OBS stations differed, on average, by 3.1° and 3.7° between the methods, using circular mean and median statistics, which is within the methods' estimate uncertainties. Using P-waves, we obtained orientation estimates for 31 ocean-bottom seismometers with an average uncertainty (95% confidence interval) of 11° per station. For 7 of these OBS, data coverage was sufficient to correct polarisation measurements for underlying seismic anisotropy and dipping discontinuities, improving their average orientation uncertainty from 11° to 6° per station. Using Rayleigh waves, we obtained misorientation estimates for 40 OBS, with an average uncertainty of 16° per station. The good agreement of results obtained using the two methods indicates that they should also be useful for detecting misorientations of terrestrial seismic stations.

  15. FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled numerical simulation of wavefields near excavation boundaries in underground mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Cai, M.

    2016-11-01

    A nonlinear velocity model that considers the influence of confinement and rock mass failure on wave velocity is developed. A numerical method, which couples FLAC and SPECFEM2D, is developed for ground motion modeling near excavation boundaries in underground mines. The motivation of developing the FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled approach is to take merits of each code, such as the stress analysis capability in FLAC and the powerful wave propagation analysis capability in SPECFEM2D. Because stress redistribution and failure of the rock mass around an excavation are considered, realistic non-uniform velocity fields for the SPECFEM2D model can be obtained, and this is a notable feature of this study. Very large differences in wavefields and ground motion are observed between the results from the non-uniform and the uniform velocity models. If the non-uniform velocity model is used, the ground motion around a stope can be amplified up to five times larger than that given by the design scaling law. If a uniform velocity model is used, the amplification factor is only about three. Using the FLAC/SPECFEM2D coupled modeling approach, accurate velocity models can be constructed and this in turn will assist in predicting ground motions accurately around underground excavations.

  16. Condensates of p-Wave Pairs Are Exact Solutions for Rotating Two-Component Bose Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Papenbrock, T; Kavoulakis, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    We derive exact analytical results for the wave functions and energies of harmonically trapped two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with weakly repulsive interactions under rotation. The isospin symmetric wave functions are universal and do not depend on the matrix elements of the two-body interaction. The comparison with the results from numerical diagonalization shows that the ground state and low-lying excitations consist of condensates of p-wave pairs for repulsive contact interactions, Coulomb interactions, and the repulsive interactions between aligned dipoles.

  17. Condensates of p-wave pairs are exact solutions for rotating two-component Bose gases.

    PubMed

    Papenbrock, T; Reimann, S M; Kavoulakis, G M

    2012-02-17

    We derive exact analytical results for the wave functions and energies of harmonically trapped two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with weakly repulsive interactions under rotation. The isospin symmetric wave functions are universal and do not depend on the matrix elements of the two-body interaction. The comparison with the results from numerical diagonalization shows that the ground state and low-lying excitations consist of condensates of p-wave pairs for repulsive contact interactions, Coulomb interactions, and the repulsive interactions between aligned dipoles.

  18. Holographic s-wave and p-wave Josephson junction with backreaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Shuai

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the holographic models of s-wave and p-wave Josephoson junction away from probe limit in (3+1)-dimensional spacetime, respectively. With the backreaction of the matter, we obtained the anisotropic black hole solution with the condensation of matter fields. We observe that the critical temperature of Josephoson junction decreases with increasing backreaction. In addition to this, the tunneling current and condenstion of Josephoson junction become smaller as backreaction grows larger, but the relationship between current and phase difference still holds for sine function. Moreover, condenstion of Josephoson junction deceases with increasing width of junction exponentially.

  19. Acoustic velocity log numerical simulation and saturation estimation of gas hydrate reservoir in Shenhu area, South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method.

  20. Acoustic Velocity Log Numerical Simulation and Saturation Estimation of Gas Hydrate Reservoir in Shenhu Area, South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method. PMID:23935407

  1. The shallow P-velocity structure of the southern Dead Sea basin derived from near-vertical incidence reflection seismic data in project DESIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschke, M.; Stiller, M.; Ryberg, T.; Weber, M.

    2012-02-01

    As a part of the DEad Sea Integrated REsearch (DESIRE) project a near-vertical incidence reflection (NVR) experiment with a profile length of 122 km was completed in spring 2006. The profile crossed the southern Dead Sea basin (DSB), a pull-apart basin due to the strike-slip motion along the Dead Sea Transform (DST). The DST with a total displacement of 107 km since about 18 Ma is part of a left-lateral fault system which connects the spreading centre in the Red Sea with the Taurus collision zone in Turkey over a distance of about 1100 km. The seismic experiment comprises 972 source locations and 1045 receiver locations. Each source was recorded by ˜180 active receivers and a field data set with 175 000 traces was created. From this data set, 124 444 P-wave first-break traveltimes have been picked. With these traveltimes a tomographic inversion was carried out, resulting in a 2-D P-wave velocity model with a rms error of 20.9 ms. This model is dominated by a low-velocity region associated with the DSB. Within the DSB, the model shows clearly the position of the Lisan salt diapir, identified by a high-velocity zone. A further feature is an unexpected laterally low-velocity zone with P-velocities of 3 km s-1 embedded in regions with 4 km s-1 in the shallow part on the west side of the DSB. Another observation is an anticlinal structure west of the DSB interpretated to the related Syrian arc fold belt.

  2. Investigation of structural heterogeneity at the SPE site using combined P–wave travel times and Rg phase velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Charlotte A.; Patton, Howard J.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present analyses of the 2D seismic structure beneath Source Physics Experiments (SPE) geophone lines that extended radially at 100 m spacing from 100 to 2000 m from the source borehole. With seismic sources at only one end of the geophone lines, standard refraction profiling methods cannot resolve seismic velocity structures unambiguously. In previous work, we demonstrated overall agreement between body-wave refraction modeling and Rg dispersion curves for the least complex of the five lines. A more detailed inspection supports a 2D reinterpretation of the structure. We obtained Rg phase velocity measurements in both the time and frequency domains, then used iterative adjustment of the initial 1D body-wave model to predict Rg dispersion curves to fit the observed values. Our method applied to the most topographically severe of the geophone lines is supplemented with a 2D ray-tracing approach, whose application to P-wave arrivals supports the Rg analysis. In addition, midline sources will allow us to refine our characterization in future work.

  3. P-wave tomographic images in the Central Betics-Alborán Sea (South Spain) using local earthquakes: Contribution for a continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Inmaculada; Morales, José; Zhao, Dapeng; Torcal, Federico; Vidal, Francisco

    To investigate the relationship between shallow and intermediate-depth earthquakes and the crust and upper mantle structure beneath the Betic-Cordillera and Alborán sea region, we have applied seismic tomography to 2569 P-wave arrival times from 367 microearthquakes recorded by both permanent and temporary seismic stations deployed in the region. These earthquakes occurred in the depth range of 0 to 110 km beneath the Central Betic Cordilleras and Alborán sea. Our results have revealed significant structural heterogeneities in the crust and upper mantle beneath the study area. In the upper crust there is a high-velocity anomaly at Sierra Gorda (western boundary of the Granada basin) penetrating to 15 km depth, which is in good agreement with the aeromagnetic anomaly. In the Granada basin, a low-velocity anomaly is located in the middle crust, which coincides with a previously detected greater cutoff depth of seismicity, and are considered to be associated with a highly fractured zone generated by an intracrustal detachment. The northern boundary of the Alborán sea (Málaga coast) is well imaged as low velocities from 50 to 90 km depths. This low-velocity zone in the upper mantle is associated with the intermediate-depth seismicity, which outline a section of continental crust related to the collision/subduction beneath the northern part of the Alborán sea-southern part of the Central Betics.

  4. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculations assume local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  5. MAGNUM2D. Radionuclide Transport Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    1988-08-01

    MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water/rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and interconnecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculation assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, nonisothermal Darcian flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER postprocessor interpolates nonregularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH postprocessor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times.

  6. LLNL-G3Dv3: Global P wave tomography model for improved regional and teleseismic travel time prediction: LLNL-G3DV3---GLOBAL P WAVE TOMOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, N. A.; Myers, S. C.; Johannesson, G.; Matzel, E.

    2012-10-06

    [1] We develop a global-scale P wave velocity model (LLNL-G3Dv3) designed to accurately predict seismic travel times at regional and teleseismic distances simultaneously. The model provides a new image of Earth's interior, but the underlying practical purpose of the model is to provide enhanced seismic event location capabilities. The LLNL-G3Dv3 model is based on ∼2.8 millionP and Pnarrivals that are re-processed using our global multiple-event locator called Bayesloc. We construct LLNL-G3Dv3 within a spherical tessellation based framework, allowing for explicit representation of undulating and discontinuous layers including the crust and transition zone layers. Using a multiscale inversion technique, regional trends as well as fine details are captured where the data allow. LLNL-G3Dv3 exhibits large-scale structures including cratons and superplumes as well numerous complex details in the upper mantle including within the transition zone. Particularly, the model reveals new details of a vast network of subducted slabs trapped within the transition beneath much of Eurasia, including beneath the Tibetan Plateau. We demonstrate the impact of Bayesloc multiple-event location on the resulting tomographic images through comparison with images produced without the benefit of multiple-event constraints (single-event locations). We find that the multiple-event locations allow for better reconciliation of the large set of direct P phases recorded at 0–97° distance and yield a smoother and more continuous image relative to the single-event locations. Travel times predicted from a 3-D model are also found to be strongly influenced by the initial locations of the input data, even when an iterative inversion/relocation technique is employed.

  7. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  8. P-Wave to Rayleigh-wave conversion coefficients for wedge corners; model experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gangi, A.F.; Wesson, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    An analytic solution is not available for the diffraction of elastic waves by wedges; however, numerical solutions of finite-difference type are available for selected wedge angles. The P- to Rayleigh-wave conversion coefficients at wedge tips have been measured on two-dimensional seismic models for stress-free wedges with wedge angles, ??0, of 10, 30, 60, 90 and 120??. The conversion coefficients show two broad peaks and a minimum as a function of the angle between the wedge face and the direction of the incident P-wave. The minimum occurs for the P wave incident parallel to the wedge face and one maximum is near an incidence angle of 90?? to the wedge face. The amplitude of this maximum, relative to the other, decreases as the wedge angle increases. The asymmetry of the conversion coefficients, CPR(??; ??0), relative to parallel incidence (?? = 0) increases as the wedge angle increases. The locations of the maxima and the minimum as well as the asymmetry can be explained qualitatively. The conversion coefficients are measured with an accuracy of ??5% in those regions where there are no interfering waves. A comparison of the data for the 10?? wedge with the theoretical results for a half plane (0?? wedge) shows good correlation. ?? 1978.

  9. Line nodes and surface Majorana flat bands in static and kicked p -wave superconducting Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huai-Qiang; Chen, M. N.; Bomantara, Raditya Weda; Gong, Jiangbin; Xing, D. Y.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the effect of introducing nearest-neighbor p -wave superconducting pairing to both the static and kicked extended Harper model with two periodic phase parameters acting as artificial dimensions to simulate three-dimensional systems. It is found that in both the static model and the kicked model, by varying the p -wave pairing order parameter, the system can switch between a fully gapped phase and a gapless phase with point nodes or line nodes. The topological property of both the static and kicked model is revealed by calculating corresponding topological invariants defined in the one-dimensional lattice dimension. Under open boundary conditions along the physical dimension, Majorana flat bands at energy zero (quasienergy zero and π ) emerge in the static (kicked) model at the two-dimensional surface Brillouin zone. For certain values of pairing order parameter, (Floquet) Su-Schrieffer-Heeger-like edge modes appear in the form of arcs connecting different (Floquet) Majorana flat bands. Finally, we find that in the kicked model, it is possible to generate two controllable Floquet Majorana modes, one at quasienergy zero and the other at quasienergy π , at the same parameter values.

  10. Factors influencing perceived angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Calderone, Jack B.

    1991-01-01

    Angular velocity perception is examined for rotations both in depth and in the image plane and the influence of several object properties on this motion parameter is explored. Two major object properties are considered, namely, texture density which determines the rate of edge transitions for rotations in depth, i.e., the number of texture elements that pass an object's boundary per unit of time, and object size which determines the tangential linear velocities and 2D image velocities of texture elements for a given angular velocity. Results of experiments show that edge-transition rate biased angular velocity estimates only when edges were highly salient. Element velocities had an impact on perceived angular velocity; this bias was associated with 2D image velocity rather than 3D tangential velocity. Despite these biases judgements were most strongly determined by the true angular velocity. Sensitivity to this higher order motion parameter appeared to be good for rotations both in depth (y-axis) and parallel to the line of sight (z-axis).

  11. P-wave locking in the postventricular atrial refractory period of cardiac resynchronization devices. Management with the Biotronik system.

    PubMed

    Barold, S S; Stroobandt, R X; Herweg, B; Kucher, A

    2012-06-01

    Electrical desynchronization in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) occurs when sinus P waves are continually locked in the postventricular atrial refractory period (PVARP). This process is characterized by sequences of a P wave as an atrial event in the PVARP followed by a conducted and sensed ventricular event. Such sequences are more common in patients with a prolonged PR interval, often initiated by premature ventricular complexes (PVC) and terminated by PVCs or slowing of the sinus rate. Specific algorithms automatically identify a recurring pattern of P wave locking in the PVARP, whereupon they shorten the PVARP temporarily until atrial tracking is restored with the programmed sensed AV interval. The Biotronik family of Lumax CRT devices use an AV control window which is not an algorithm that "unlocks" P waves trapped in the PVARP. Rather, it prevents P waves from becoming trapped in the PVARP. A ventricular sensed event occurring within the AV control interval does not start a PVARP so that P wave locking cannot occur when the AV conduction time is shorter than the AV control interval.

  12. Effects of CO2 on P-wave attenuation in porous media with micro-cracks: A synthetic modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekanem, A. M.; Li, X. Y.; Chapman, M.; Main, I. G.

    2016-12-01

    The presence of CO2 in hydrocarbon reservoirs can cause significant changes in seismic wave properties. In turn these properties can be used to map CO2 saturation in hydrocarbon reservoirs or aquifers - either from natural sources or by injection from the surface. We present the results of a synthetic modelling study of the effects of supercritical CO2 saturation on P-wave attenuation in a medium consisting of four horizontal layers, including a target aquifer. The target aquifer is modelled fully by an effective medium containing pores saturated with brine and/or CO2 and randomly-aligned microcracks at different densities. The other layers are modelled solely by their bulk seismic velocities and densities. We first compute synthetic seismograms for a reference case where the third layer is completely isotropic with no cracks, no pores and no fluid saturation. We then calculate synthetic seismograms for finite crack densities of 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03 at varying degrees of CO2 saturation in the third layer. The results of our analysis indicate that attenuation is sensitive both to CO2 saturation and the crack density. For a given crack density, attenuation increases gradually with decreasing percentage of CO2 saturation and reaches a maximum at around 10% saturation. The induced attenuation increases with crack density and with offset. These observations hold out the potential of using seismic attenuation as an additional diagnostic in the characterisation of rock formations for a variety of applications, including hydrocarbon exploration and production, subsurface storage of CO2 or geothermal energy extraction.

  13. Velocity structure and evolution of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.; Dainty, A. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Anderson, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    Seismic data from the Apollo Passive Seismic Network stations are analyzed to determine the velocity structure and to infer the composition and physical properties of the lunar interior. Data from artificial impacts (SIBV booster and LM-ascent stage) cover a distance range of 9 to 1750 km. Travel times and amplitudes, as well as theoretical seismograms, are used to derive a velocity model for the outer 150 km of the moon. The P-wave velocity model confirms an earlier report of a lunar crust in the eastern part of Oceanus Procellarum. The crust is about 60 km thick and may consist of two layers in the mare regions. Possible values for the P-wave velocity in the uppermost mantle are between 7.6 and 9.0 km/sec. The 9 km/sec velocity represents either a localized heterogeneous unit, or a thin layer less than about 40 km in thickness. The elastic properties of the deep interior, as inferred from the seismograms of natural events (meteoroid impacts and moonquakes) occurring at great distances, indicate that there is an increase in attenuation and a possible decrease of velocity at depths below about 1000 km.

  14. Upper Crustal Structure of the Cleft Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge using 2D Streamer travel time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Canales, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nedimovic, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    We use long off-set (6 km) multichannel seismic reflection data to obtain the P-wave seismic structure of the upper ~2 km of the crust along the southern part of the intermediate-spreading Juan de Fuca Ridge (Cleft segment). Along this segment, the top of the Axial Magma Chamber (AMC) deepens from south to north from about 2.0 km at the southern end of the segment to about 2.3 km at the northern end. Both segment ends are characterized by high-temperature hydrothermal venting. Our objective is to study the effects of high temperature hydrothermal circulation on the seismic structure of the shallow crust. We jointly inverted refracted and reflected travel times (from the top of the AMC) to obtain the 2 dimensional velocity structure of the earth along ~60 km of the ridge axis. Prior to tomographic inversion, processing of marine seismic data included trace editing, trapezoidal band pass filtering (3-5-15-30 Hz), formation of partial off-set stacks of 5 shots (i.e, supershots) to increase the signal to noise ratio and downward continuation of the wavefield to a datum just above the sea floor (i.e, phase shift in the frequency-wave number domain of both source and receiver gathers to extract travel time information from refracted arrivals at near offset. Traveltime picking of the arrivals was done using a semi automated first break routine. The picked travel times of the first refracted arrivals and the reflected arrivals from the AMC are then input into a tomography inversion algorithm to build a 2D velocity model. Our results do not show detectable velocity variations associated with the presence of active high-temperature hydrothermal discharge, probably because the length scale of hydrothermal alteration is smaller than the resolving power of traveltime tomography. However our results are a first step towards higher-resolution seismic imaging models using waveform inversion. We will also present results from off-axis data to understand the early evolution of the

  15. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  16. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  17. Probing the 2-D Kinematic Structure of Early-Type Galaxies Out to 3 Effective Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Robert N.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Spolaor, Max; Trevor Mendel, J.; Spitler, Lee

    2010-06-01

    We detail an innovative new technique for measuring the 2-D velocity moments (rotation velocity, velocity dispersion and Gauss-Hermite coefficients h3 and h4) using spectra from Keck DEIMOS multi-object spectroscopic observations. The data are used to reconstruct 2-D rotation velocity maps. Here we present data for one of five early-type galaxies whose kinematics we have measured out to ~3 effective radii (see [1]). From these data 2D kinematic maps are constructed. We show such analyses can provide significant insights into the global kinematic structure of galaxies, and, in some cases, challenge the accepted morphological classification. Our results are of particular importance to studies which attempt to classify galaxies by their kinematic structure within one effective radius, such as the recent definition of fast- and slow- rotator classes by the SAURON project.

  18. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  19. Uniqueness of modeling results from teleseismic P-Wave tomography in Project Tor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, S.; Voss, P.; Nielsen, L. V.; Achauer, U.; Busche, H.; Rabbel, W.; Shomali, Z. H.

    2010-01-01

    Within Project Tor, which is about Teleseismic Tomography across the Tornquist Zone in Germany-Denmark-Sweden, we have confirmed very significant deep lithosphere differences. And modeling is substantiated via completely independent methods. In 1996-1997 our 130 seismographs constituted the largest seismic antenna ever in Europe. The Tor area was chosen along a well studied crustal profile of an earlier project, and the modeling efforts were concentrated on the deep lithosphere and asthenosphere differences to depths around 300 km. The Tor data have been subjected to P-wave travel time tomography, surface wave and receiver function analysis as well as anisotropy and scattering measurements. An important goal of the project was to make several independent inversions of the tomography data, and compare the results in an attempt to evaluate uniqueness, resolution and accuracy of these inversions. The comparisons of this paper involve more diversity in methods than any previous comparison. The geological outcome is a substantiation of earlier statements that: "The transition is interpreted to be sharp and steep in two places. It goes all through the lithosphere at the northern rim of the Tornquist Zone near the border between Sweden and Denmark, and here the lithosphere difference is large to depths more than 200 km. The other lithosphere difference, of smaller scale, is found near the southern edge of the Ringkøbing-Fyn High near the border between Denmark and Germany. Also this transition is sharp and steep, and goes all through the lithosphere to depths around 120 km. These two sharp transitions divide the Tor region into 3 different lithosphere structures distinguishable in P-wave travel time tomography, surface wave dispersion, P- and S-wave anisotropy and partly in P-wave scattering". The mentioned broad-scale features are judged to be unambiguously determined, with well-described resolution and accuracy. Unfortunately a detail like the slope of the subcrustal

  20. Role of the P-wave high frequency energy and duration as noninvasive cardiovascular predictors of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Raúl; Martínez, Arturo; Rieta, José J

    2015-04-01

    A normal cardiac activation starts in the sinoatrial node and then spreads throughout the atrial myocardium, thus defining the P-wave of the electrocardiogram. However, when the onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) approximates, a highly disturbed electrical activity occurs within the atria, thus provoking fragmented and eventually longer P-waves. Although this altered atrial conduction has been successfully quantified just before PAF onset from the signal-averaged P-wave spectral analysis, its evolution during the hours preceding the arrhythmia has not been assessed yet. This work focuses on quantifying the P-wave spectral content variability over the 2h preceding PAF onset with the aim of anticipating as much as possible the arrhythmic episode envision. For that purpose, the time course of several metrics estimating absolute energy and ratios of high- to low-frequency power in different bands between 20 and 200Hz has been computed from the P-wave autoregressive spectral estimation. All the analyzed metrics showed an increasing variability trend as PAF onset approximated, providing the P-wave high-frequency energy (between 80 and 150Hz) a diagnostic accuracy around 80% to discern between healthy subjects, patients far from PAF and patients less than 1h close to a PAF episode. This discriminant power was similar to that provided by the most classical time-domain approach, i.e., the P-wave duration. Furthermore, the linear combination of both metrics improved the diagnostic accuracy up to 88.07%, thus constituting a reliable noninvasive harbinger of PAF onset with a reasonable anticipation. The information provided by this methodology could be very useful in clinical practice either to optimize the antiarrhythmic treatment in patients at high-risk of PAF onset and to limit drug administration in low risk patients.

  1. Proposed Aharonov-Casher interferometry of non-Abelian vortices in chiral p-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosfeld, Eytan; Seradjeh, Babak; Vishveshwara, Smitha

    2011-03-01

    We propose a two-path vortex interferometry experiment based on the Aharonov- Casher effect for detecting the non-Abelian nature of vortices in a chiral p-wave superconductor. The effect is based on observing vortex interference patterns upon enclosing a finite charge of externally controllable magnitude within the interference path. We predict that when the interfering vortices enclose an odd number of identical vortices in their path, the interference pattern disappears only for non-Abelian vortices. When pairing involves two distinct spin species, we derive the mutual statistics between half quantum and full quantum vortices and show that, remarkably, our predictions still hold for the situation of a full quantum vortex enclosing a half quantum vortex in its path. We discuss the experimentally relevant conditions under which these effects can be observed. Work supported by ICMT at UIUC, NSERC of Canada, CAS fellowship at UIUC, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. Magnetic-field effects on p-wave phase transition in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Lu, Jun-Wang; Jin, Yong-Yi; Lu, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Si-Yu; Wang, Cui

    2014-07-01

    In the probe limit, we study the holographic p-wave phase transition in the Gauss-Bonnet gravity via numerical and analytical methods. Concretely, we study the influences of the external magnetic field on the Maxwell complex vector model in the five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole and soliton backgrounds, respectively. For the two backgrounds, the results show that the magnetic field enhances the superconductor phase transition in the case of the lowest Landau level, while the increasing Gauss-Bonnet parameter always hinders the vector condensate. Moreover, the Maxwell complex vector model is a generalization of the SU(2) Yang-Mills model all the time. In addition, the analytical results backup the numerical results. Furthermore, this model might provide a holographic realization for the QCD vacuum instability.

  3. Holographic phase transitions of p-wave superconductors in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with backreaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Nie Zhangyu; Zhang Haiqing

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the phase transitions of holographic p-wave superconductors in (4+1)-dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills-Gauss-Bonnet theories, in a grand canonical ensemble. Turning on the backreaction of the Yang-Mills field, it is found that the condensations of vector order parameter become harder if the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient grows up or the backreaction becomes stronger. In particular, the vector order parameter exhibits the features of first order and second order phase transitions, while only the second order phase transition is observed in the probe limit. We discuss the roles that the Gauss-Bonnet term and the backreaction play in changing the order of phase transition.

  4. Triplet p-wave pairing correlation in low-doped zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tianxing; Yang, Fan; Huang, Zhongbing; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2017-02-01

    We reveal an edge spin triplet p–wave superconducting pairing correlation in slightly doped zigzag graphene nanoribbons. By employing a method that combines random-phase approximation, the finite-temperature determinant quantum Monte Carlo approach, and the ground-state constrained-path quantum Monte Carlo method, it is shown that such a spin-triplet pairing is mediated by the ferromagnetic fluctuations caused by the flat band at the edge. The spin susceptibility and effective pairing interactions at the edge strongly increase as the on-site Coulomb interaction increases, indicating the importance of electron-electron correlations. It is also found that the doping-dependent ground-state p-wave pairing correlation bears some similarity to the famous superconducting dome in the phase diagram of a high-temperature superconductor, while the spin correlation at the edge is weakened as the system is doped away from half filling.

  5. Triplet p-wave pairing correlation in low-doped zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tianxing; Yang, Fan; Huang, Zhongbing; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2017-01-01

    We reveal an edge spin triplet p–wave superconducting pairing correlation in slightly doped zigzag graphene nanoribbons. By employing a method that combines random-phase approximation, the finite-temperature determinant quantum Monte Carlo approach, and the ground-state constrained-path quantum Monte Carlo method, it is shown that such a spin-triplet pairing is mediated by the ferromagnetic fluctuations caused by the flat band at the edge. The spin susceptibility and effective pairing interactions at the edge strongly increase as the on-site Coulomb interaction increases, indicating the importance of electron-electron correlations. It is also found that the doping-dependent ground-state p-wave pairing correlation bears some similarity to the famous superconducting dome in the phase diagram of a high-temperature superconductor, while the spin correlation at the edge is weakened as the system is doped away from half filling. PMID:28186185

  6. Finite-frequency P-wave tomography of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin: Implications for the lithospheric evolution in Western Laurentia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunfeng; Gu, Yu Jeffrey; Hung, Shu-Huei

    2017-02-01

    The lithosphere beneath the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin has potentially undergone Precambrian subduction and collisional orogenesis, resulting in a complex network of crustal domains. To improve the understanding of its evolutionary history, we combine data from the USArray and three regional networks to invert for P-wave velocities of the upper mantle using finite-frequency tomography. Our model reveals distinct, vertically continuous high (> 1%) velocity perturbations at depths above 200 km beneath the Precambrian Buffalo Head Terrane, Hearne craton and Medicine Hat Block, which sharply contrasts with those beneath the Canadian Rockies (<- 1%) at comparable depths. The P velocity increases from - 0.5% above 70 km depth to 1.5% at 330 km depth beneath southern Alberta, which provides compelling evidence for a deep, structurally complex Hearne craton. In comparison, the lithosphere is substantially thinner beneath the adjacent Buffalo Head Terrane (160 km) and Medicine Hat Block (200 km). These findings are consistent with earlier theories of tectonic assembly in this region, which featured distinct Archean and Proterozoic plate convergences between the Hearne craton and its neighboring domains. The highly variable, bimodally distributed craton thicknesses may also reflect different lithospheric destruction processes beneath the western margin of Laurentia.

  7. Association between red cell distribution width and P-wave dispersion in patients with atrial tachyarrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qiang; Li, Yuanmin; Guo, Huimei; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Although red cell distribution width (RDW) and P-wave dispersion (Pwd) are strong independent predictors of atrial tachyarrhythmia (ATa), the association between these two factors in the occurrence of ATA has hitherto not been reported. We retrospectively analyzed the cases of ATa patients who underwent Holter monitoring at our hospital from October 2013 to August 2014. Clinical data including RDW and color doppler ultrasonography data were collected, and Pwd was calculated from synchronous recording of P-wave intervals of 12-lead electrocardiograms. Patients were categorized into three groups in ascending order of RDW values. Between-group comparisons yielded significant differences in Pwd, left ventricular diastolic diameter (LVDD), and left atrial diameter (LAD; P < 0.05). Pearson correlation analysis revealed that the RDW level positively correlated with the Kleiger grade of atrial arrhythmia (r = 0.280, P < 0.001), Pwd (r = 0.148, P = 0.001), and LAD (r = 0.297, P < 0.001); Pwd positively correlated with the Kleiger grade of atrial arrhythmia (r = 0.257, P < 0.001), aortic root diameter (r = 0.143, P < 0.002), and LAD (r = 0.201, P < 0.001). Binary logistic multiple regression analysis with ATa as the dependent variable revealed that Pwd [odds ratio (OR) = 1.024], RDW [OR = 1.215], and aortic root diameter [OR = 1.030] were significant risk factors for ATa occurrence. This is the first study to establish a correlation between RDW and Pwd in the occurrence of ATa; however, further prospective studies using large cohorts are required to validate the correlation. PMID:26221382

  8. P-wave superfluid in a quasi-two-dimensional dipolar Bose-Fermi quantum gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kain, Ben; Ling, Hong

    2013-03-01

    The p-wave (px + ipy) superfluid has attracted significant attention in recent years mainly because its vortex core supports a Majorana fermion which, due to its non-Abelian statistics, can be explored for implementing topological quantum computation (TQC). Mixing in bosons may lead to p-wave pairing in a Fermi gas. In a dipolar condensate, the dipole-dipole interaction represents a control knob inaccessible to nondipolar Bosons. Thus, mixing dipolar bosons with fermions opens up new possibilities. We consider a mixture of a spin-polarized Fermi gas and a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate in a quasi-two-dimensional trap setting. We take the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field approach and develop a theory for studying the stability of the mixture and estimating the critical temperature of the p-wave superfluid. We use this theory to identify the experimentally accessible parameter space in which the mixture is stable against phase separation and the p-wave superfluid pairing can be resonantly enhanced. An enhanced p-wave superfluid order parameter can make the fault tolerant TQC less susceptible to thermal fluctuations. This work aims to stimulate experimental activity in creating dipolar Bose-Fermi mixtures. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation and the US Army Research Office

  9. Comparison of primary repair and patch plasty procedure on the P wave in adult atrial septal defect closure

    PubMed Central

    Ucak, Alper; Temizkan, Veysel; Ugur, Murat; Selcuk, Arif; Yilmaz, Ahmet Turan; Yedekci, Ahmet Erturk; Uz, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction: In this study we compared the effects of two different surgical procedures for closure of adult atrial septal defect (ASD) on postoperative P-wave changes. Methods: Patients who underwent cardiac surgery for secundum type ASD closure were evaluated retrospectively. Seventy-two patients with primary repair of ASD and 29 patients with pericardial patch plasty repair were compared according to Pmax, Pmin and P-wave dispersions (Pd). Results: In each group, the increases in postoperative maximum P-wave duration (Pmax) and minimum P-wave duration (Pmin) were statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between post- and pre-operative Pd values. In the comparison between group 1 and group 2 in terms of postoperative P-wave changes (Pmax, Pmin, Pd) there was no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: Comparing patch plasty and primary repair for the surgical closure of ASD in the early to mid-postoperative period, no difference was found and both surgical procedures can be performed in adult ASDs. PMID:27149297

  10. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  11. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  12. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  13. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  14. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  15. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  16. Implications of elastic wave velocities for Apollo 17 rock powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talwani, P.; Nur, A.; Kovach, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities of lunar rock powders 172701, 172161, 170051, and 175081 were measured at room temperature and to 2.5 kb confining pressure. The results compare well with those of terrestrial volcanic ash and powdered basalt. P-wave velocity values up to pressures corresponding to a lunar depth of 1.4 km preclude cold compaction alone as an explanation for the observed seismic velocity structure at the Apollo 17 site. Application of small amounts of heat with simultaneous application of pressure causes rock powders to achieve equivalence of seismic velocities for competent rocks.

  17. p-wave triggered superconductivity in single-layer graphene on an electron-doped oxide superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Di Bernardo, A.; Millo, O.; Barbone, M.; Alpern, H.; Kalcheim, Y.; Sassi, U.; Ott, A. K.; De Fazio, D.; Yoon, D.; Amado, M.; Ferrari, A. C.; Linder, J.; Robinson, J. W. A.

    2017-01-01

    Electron pairing in the vast majority of superconductors follows the Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, which describes the condensation of electrons into pairs with antiparallel spins in a singlet state with an s-wave symmetry. Unconventional superconductivity was predicted in single-layer graphene (SLG), with the electrons pairing with a p-wave or chiral d-wave symmetry, depending on the position of the Fermi energy with respect to the Dirac point. By placing SLG on an electron-doped (non-chiral) d-wave superconductor and performing local scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, here we show evidence for a p-wave triggered superconducting density of states in SLG. The realization of unconventional superconductivity in SLG offers an exciting new route for the development of p-wave superconductivity using two-dimensional materials with transition temperatures above 4.2 K. PMID:28102222

  18. p-wave triggered superconductivity in single-layer graphene on an electron-doped oxide superconductor.

    PubMed

    Di Bernardo, A; Millo, O; Barbone, M; Alpern, H; Kalcheim, Y; Sassi, U; Ott, A K; De Fazio, D; Yoon, D; Amado, M; Ferrari, A C; Linder, J; Robinson, J W A

    2017-01-19

    Electron pairing in the vast majority of superconductors follows the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, which describes the condensation of electrons into pairs with antiparallel spins in a singlet state with an s-wave symmetry. Unconventional superconductivity was predicted in single-layer graphene (SLG), with the electrons pairing with a p-wave or chiral d-wave symmetry, depending on the position of the Fermi energy with respect to the Dirac point. By placing SLG on an electron-doped (non-chiral) d-wave superconductor and performing local scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, here we show evidence for a p-wave triggered superconducting density of states in SLG. The realization of unconventional superconductivity in SLG offers an exciting new route for the development of p-wave superconductivity using two-dimensional materials with transition temperatures above 4.2 K.

  19. Impurity effect on Kramer-Pesch core shrinkage in s-wave vortex and chiral p-wave vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Kato, Yusuke; Sigrist, Manfred

    2005-04-01

    The low-temperature shrinking of the vortex core (Kramer-Pesch effect) is studied for an isolated single vortex for chiral p-wave and s-wave superconducting phases. The effect of nonmagnetic impurities on the vortex core radius is numerically investigated in the Born limit by means of a quasiclassical approach. It is shown that in the chiral p-wave phase the Kramer-Pesch effect displays a certain robustness against impurities owing to a specific quantum effect, while the s-wave phase reacts more sensitively to impurity scattering. This suggests chiral p-wave superconductors as promising candidates for the experimental observation of the Kramer-Pesch effect.

  20. Electrocardiogram voltage attenuation and shortening of the duration of P-waves, QRS complexes, and QT intervals.

    PubMed

    Madias, John E

    2013-01-01

    Multiple pathologies in concert may lead to attenuation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) voltage. A case of a patient illustrating the above is presented, who showed marked attenuation of the ECG voltage. Automated values of the amplitude of the ECG QRS complexes, P-waves, and T-waves (in mm), duration of the QRS complexes, P-waves, and QT intervals (in ms), in 2 ECGs were compared. The patient was a 64-year-old woman who developed in the setting of a fatal illness, pleural and pericardial effusions, pneumomediastinum, pneumoperitoneum, subcutaneous emphysema in the neck and chest, peripheral edema with weight gain of 43.4 lbs, marked hypoalbuminemia, abnormal liver tests, and renal failure. All the above pathologies led to a marked attenuation of the ECG voltage, and shortening of the mean P-wave, QRS complexes, and QTc interval durations. The postulated mechanism of the observed ECG phenomena is discussed.

  1. p-wave triggered superconductivity in single-layer graphene on an electron-doped oxide superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Bernardo, A.; Millo, O.; Barbone, M.; Alpern, H.; Kalcheim, Y.; Sassi, U.; Ott, A. K.; de Fazio, D.; Yoon, D.; Amado, M.; Ferrari, A. C.; Linder, J.; Robinson, J. W. A.

    2017-01-01

    Electron pairing in the vast majority of superconductors follows the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, which describes the condensation of electrons into pairs with antiparallel spins in a singlet state with an s-wave symmetry. Unconventional superconductivity was predicted in single-layer graphene (SLG), with the electrons pairing with a p-wave or chiral d-wave symmetry, depending on the position of the Fermi energy with respect to the Dirac point. By placing SLG on an electron-doped (non-chiral) d-wave superconductor and performing local scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, here we show evidence for a p-wave triggered superconducting density of states in SLG. The realization of unconventional superconductivity in SLG offers an exciting new route for the development of p-wave superconductivity using two-dimensional materials with transition temperatures above 4.2 K.

  2. 3D crustal seismic velocity model for the Gulf of Cadiz and adjacent areas (SW Iberia margin) based on seismic reflection and refraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Lucía; Cantavella, Juan Vicente; Barco, Jaime; Carranza, Marta; Burforn, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic margin of the SW Iberian Peninsula and northern Morocco has been subject of study during the last 30 years. Many seismic reflection and refraction profiles have been carried out offshore, providing detailed information about the crustal structure of the main seafloor tectonic domains in the region, from the South Portuguese Zone and the Gulf of Cadiz to the Abyssal Plains and the Josephine Seamount. The interest to obtain a detailed and realistic velocity model for this area, integrating the available data from these studies, is clear, mainly to improve real-time earthquake hypocentral location and for tsunami and earthquake early warning. Since currently real-time seismic location tools allow the implementation of 3D velocity models, we aim to generate a full 3D crustal model. For this purpose we have reviewed more than 50 profiles obtained in different seismic surveys, from 1980 to 2008. Data from the most relevant and reliable 2D seismic velocity published profiles were retrieved. We first generated a Moho depth map of the studied area (latitude 32°N - 41°N and longitude 15°W - 5°W) by extracting Moho depths along each digitized profile with a 10 km spacing, and then interpolating this dataset using ordinary kriging method and generating the contour isodepth map. Then, a 3D crustal velocity model has been obtained. Selected vertical sections at different distances along each profile were considered to retrieve P-wave velocity values at each interface in order to reproduce the geometry and the velocity gradient within each layer. A double linear interpolation, both in distance and depth, with sampling rates of 10 km and 1 km respectively, was carried out to generate a (latitude, longitude, depth, velocity) matrix. This database of all the profiles was interpolated to obtain the P-wave velocity distribution map every kilometer of depth. The new 3D velocity model has been integrated in NonLinLoc location program to relocate several representative

  3. Identifying seismic noise sources and their amplitude from P wave microseisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, Jennifer; Harmon, Nicholas; Srokosz, Meric

    2016-04-01

    Understanding sources of seismic noise is important for a range of applications including seismic imagery, time-lapse, and climate studies. For locating sources from seismic data, body waves offer an advantage over surface waves because they can reveal the distance to the source as well as direction. Studies have found that body waves do originate from regions predicted by models (Obrebski et al., 2013), where wave interaction intensity and site effect combine to produce the source (Ardhuin & Herbers, 2013). Here, we undertake a quantitative comparison between observed body wave microseisms and modelled sources- in terms of location, amplitude, and spectral shape- with the aim of understanding how well sources are observed and potentially what they reveal about the underlying ocean wavefield. We used seismic stations from the Southern California Seismic Network, and computed beamformer output as a function of time, frequency, slowness and azimuth. During winter months (October - mid March) the dominant arrivals at frequencies 0.18-0.22 Hz were P waves that originated from the North Pacific, whilst arrivals from the North Atlantic dominated at slightly lower frequencies of 0.16-0.18 Hz. Based on this, we chose to focus on P waves during winter, and back-projected the beamformer energy onto a global grid using P wave travel timetables (following Gerstoft et al., 2008). We modelled the seismic sources using Wavewatch III and site effect coefficients calculated following Ardhuin and Herbers (2013). We output the beamformer and the modelled sources on a 2° global grid averaged over 6 hour periods from September 2012 to September 2014, at seismic frequencies of 0.06 to 0.3 Hz. We then integrated the spectra over the full frequency range. Here we focus on results from the first winter in the North Pacific. Preliminary results indicate that the logarithm of the modelled source and the logarithm of the beamformer output are well described by a two-term exponential model

  4. Novel P Wave Indices to Predict Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence After Radiofrequency Ablation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoliang; Jiang, Jingzhou; Ma, Yuedong; Tang, Anli

    2016-01-01

    Background Circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI) is a widely used treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Several P wave duration (PWD) parameters have been suggested to predict post-ablation recurrence, but their use remains controversial. This study aimed to identify novel P wave indices that predict post-ablation AF recurrence. Material/Methods We selected 171 consecutive patients undergoing CPVI for paroxysmal AF. Electrocardiography (ECG) recordings were obtained at the beginning and the end of ablation. PWD was measured in all 12 leads. The PWD variation was calculated by subtracting the pre-ablation PWD from the post-ablation PWD. Results PWD was significantly shortened in leads II, III, aVF, and V1 after ablation. During a mean follow-up of 19.96±4.32 months, AF recurrence occurred in 32 (18.7%) patients. No significant differences in baseline characteristics or pre- or post-ablation PWD were observed between the AF recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Patients with AF recurrence exhibited a smaller PWD variation in leads II (1.21(−0.56, 2.40) vs. −5.77(−9.10, −4.06) ms, P<0.001), III (−5.92(−9.87, 3.27) vs. −9.44(−11.89, −5.57) ms, P=0.001) and V1 (−4.43(−6.64, −3.13) vs. −6.33(−8.19,−4.59) ms, P=0.003). Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that smaller PWD variations in lead II and III were independent risk factors for AF recurrence. PWD variation ≥−2.21 ms in lead II displayed the highest combined sensitivity and specificity (85.29% and 83.94%, respectively) for predicting post-ablation AF recurrence. A PWD variation ≥0 ms displayed the best practical value in predicting AF recurrence. Conclusions PWD variation in lead II is an effective predictor of post-ablation AF recurrence. PMID:27450644

  5. Mariscope: Observing P Waves (and much more) Everywhere in the Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolet, G.; Hello, Y.; Bonnieux, S.; Sukhovich, A.; Simons, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    The lack of stations on islands or the ocean bottom deprives seismic tomographers of almost 2/3 of the information potentially available for global seismic tomography. The "Mermaid", developed at Geoazur, is an underwater seismograph, based on a TWR Apex float. P wave signals are automatically identified and transmitted using the detection algorithm from Sukhovich et al. (GRL, 2011), GPS is used to locate the sensor at the time of transmission. We have studied the performance of Mermaids under different noise conditions in the Mediterranean, Indian Ocean and most recently near the Galapagos islands and will show a selection of observations. In the Mediterranean, we regularly detect P waves at teleseismic distances of earthquakes with magnitude 6, occasionally below that. Local and regional earthquakes of much lower magnitude, such as a M 4.9 earthquake near Barcelonette (figure), yield seismograms with a high signal to noise ratio.In the much noisier environment of the Indian Ocean the threshold for useful seismograms is close to magnitude 6.5. Yet we were also able to record 235 low magnitude events when a Mermaid was close to a swarm near the Indian Ocean triple junction, with the lowest magnitude estimated to be 2.1; this sequence also enabled us to put an upper limit of about 250 m to the error in sensor location at the time of recording. Preliminary data from the Galapagos indicate low noise conditions similar to those in the Mediterranean, with good recordings of events in the magnitude 5 range.A new prototype of a spherical "MultiMermaid" is currently being tested. It allows for multidisciplinary observations (seismic and kHz acoustics, magnetic field, temperature, bathymetry) and will function about five years with lithium batteries. A global deployment of such instruments in a five-year program is affordable: project MariScope aims for at least 300 floating seismometers in the world's oceans. At the time of writing of this abstract, a proposal is being

  6. P-wave and QT dispersion in patients with conversion disorder

    PubMed Central

    Izci, Filiz; Hocagil, Hilal; Izci, Servet; Izci, Vedat; Koc, Merve Iris; Acar, Rezzan Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate QT dispersion (QTd), which is the noninvasive marker of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death, and P-wave dispersion, which is the noninvasive marker of atrial arrhythmia, in patients with conversion disorder (CD). Patients and methods A total of 60 patients with no known organic disease who were admitted to outpatient emergency clinic and were diagnosed with CD after psychiatric consultation were included in this study along with 60 healthy control subjects. Beck Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Scale were administered to patients and 12-lead electrocardiogram measurements were obtained. Pd and QTd were calculated by a single blinded cardiologist. Results There was no statistically significant difference in terms of age, sex, education level, socioeconomic status, weight, height, and body mass index between CD patients and controls. Beck Anxiety Inventory scores (25.2±10.8 and 3.8±3.2, respectively, P<0.001) and Beck Depression Scale scores (11.24±6.15 and 6.58±5.69, respectively, P<0.01) were significantly higher in CD patients. P-wave dispersion measurements did not show any significant differences between conversion patients and control group (46±5.7 vs 44±5.5, respectively, P=0.156). Regarding QTc and QTd, there was a statistically significant increase in all intervals in conversion patients (416±10 vs 398±12, P<0.001, and 47±4.8 vs 20±6.1, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusion A similar relation to that in literature between QTd and anxiety and somatoform disorders was also observed in CD patients. QTc and QTd were significantly increased compared to the control group in patients with CD. These results suggest a possibility of increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia resulting from QTd in CD patients. Larger samples are needed to evaluate the clinical course and prognosis in terms of arrhythmia risk in CD patients. PMID:25848293

  7. Three-dimenstional crustal velocity structure beneath the strait of georgia, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, B.C.; Ellis, R.M.; Zelt, C.A.; Hyndman, R.D.; Lowe, C.; Spence, G.D.; Fisher, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Strait of Georgia is a topographic depression straddling the boundary between the Insular and Coast belts in southwestern British Columbia. Two shallow earthquakes located within the strait (M = 4.6 in 1997 and M = 5.0 in 1975) and felt throughout the Vancouver area illustrate the seismic potential of this region. As part of the 1998 Seismic Hazards Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS) experiment, seismic instruments were placed in and around the Strait of Georgia to record shots from a marine source within the strait. We apply a tomographic inversion procedure to first-arrival travel-time data to derive a minimum-structure 3-D P-wave velocity model for the upper crust to about 13 km depth. We also present a 2-D velocity model for a profile orientated across the Strait of Georgia derived using a minimum-parameter traveltime inversion approach. This paper represents the first detailed look at crustal velocity variations within the major Cretaceous to Cenozoic Georgia Basin, which underlies the Strait of Georgia. The 3-D velocity model clearly delineates the structure of the Georgia Basin. Taking the 6 km s-1 isovelocity contour to represent the top of the underlying basement, the basin thickens from between 2 and 4 km in the northwestern half of the strait to between 8 and 9 km at the southeastern end of the study region. Basin velocities in the northeastern half are 4.5-6 km s-1 and primarily represent the Upper Cretaceous Nanaimo Group. Velocities to the south are lower (3-6 km s-1) because of the additional presence of the overlying Tertiary Huntingdon Formation and more recent sediments, including glacial and modern Fraser River deposits. In contrast to the relatively smoothly varying velocity structure of the basin, velocities of the basement rocks, which comprise primarily Palaeozoic to Jurassic rocks of the Wrangellia Terrane and possibly Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous granitic rocks of the Coast Belt, show significantly more structure, probably an indication

  8. The p-wave superconductivity in the presence of Rashba interaction in 2DEG.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ke-Chuan; Hu, C D

    2016-07-26

    We investigate the effect of the Rashba interaction on two dimensional superconductivity. The presence of the Rashba interaction lifts the spin degeneracy and gives rise to the spectrum of two bands. There are intraband and interband pairs scattering which result in the coupled gap equations. We find that there are isotropic and anisotropic components in the gap function. The latter has the form of cos φk where . The former is suppressed because the intraband and the interband scatterings nearly cancel each other. Hence, -the system should exhibit the p-wave superconductivity. We perform a detailed study of electron-phonon interaction for 2DEG and find that, if only normal processes are considered, the effective coupling strength constant of this new superconductivity is about one-half of the s-wave case in the ordinary 2DEG because of the angular average of the additional in the anisotropic gap function. By taking into account of Umklapp processes, we find they are the major contribution in the electron-phonon coupling in superconductivity and enhance the transition temperature Tc.

  9. The p-wave superconductivity in the presence of Rashba interaction in 2DEG

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Ke-Chuan; Hu, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the Rashba interaction on two dimensional superconductivity. The presence of the Rashba interaction lifts the spin degeneracy and gives rise to the spectrum of two bands. There are intraband and interband pairs scattering which result in the coupled gap equations. We find that there are isotropic and anisotropic components in the gap function. The latter has the form of cos φk where . The former is suppressed because the intraband and the interband scatterings nearly cancel each other. Hence, −the system should exhibit the p-wave superconductivity. We perform a detailed study of electron-phonon interaction for 2DEG and find that, if only normal processes are considered, the effective coupling strength constant of this new superconductivity is about one-half of the s-wave case in the ordinary 2DEG because of the angular average of the additional in the anisotropic gap function. By taking into account of Umklapp processes, we find they are the major contribution in the electron-phonon coupling in superconductivity and enhance the transition temperature Tc. PMID:27459677

  10. Hybrid Theory of P-Wave Electron-Hydrogen Elastic Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand

    2012-01-01

    We report on a study of electron-hydrogen scattering, using a combination of a modified method of polarized orbitals and the optical potential formalism. The calculation is restricted to P waves in the elastic region, where the correlation functions are of Hylleraas type. It is found that the phase shifts are not significantly affected by the modification of the target function by a method similar to the method of polarized orbitals and they are close to the phase shifts calculated earlier by Bhatia. This indicates that the correlation function is general enough to include the target distortion (polarization) in the presence of the incident electron. The important fact is that in the present calculation, to obtain similar results only 35-term correlation function is needed in the wave function compared to the 220-term wave function required in the above-mentioned previous calculation. Results for the phase shifts, obtained in the present hybrid formalism, are rigorous lower bounds to the exact phase shifts.

  11. Generalized Aubry-André-Harper model with p -wave superconducting pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qi-Bo; Chen, Shu; Lü, Rong

    2016-09-01

    We investigate a generalized Aubry-André-Harper (AAH) model with p -wave superconducting pairing. Both the hopping amplitudes between the nearest-neighboring lattice sites and the on-site potentials in this system are modulated by a cosine function with a periodicity of 1 /α . In the incommensurate case [α =(√{5 }-1 )/2 ] , due to the modulations on the hopping amplitudes, the critical region of this quasiperiodic system is significantly reduced and the system becomes easier to be turned from extended states to localized states. In the commensurate case (α =1 /2 ), we find that this model shows three different phases when we tune the system parameters: Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH)-like trivial, SSH-like topological, and Kitaev-like topological phases. The phase diagrams and the topological quantum numbers for these phases are presented in this work. This generalized AAH model combined with superconducting pairing provides us with a useful test field for studying the phase transitions from extended states to Anderson localized states and the transitions between different topological phases.

  12. Finite nuclear size and Lamb shift of p-wave atomic states

    SciTech Connect

    Milstein, A.I.; Sushkov, O.P.; Terekhov, I.S.

    2003-06-01

    We consider corrections to the Lamb shift of the p-wave atomic states due to the finite nuclear size (FNS). In other words, these are radiative corrections to the atomic isotope shift related to the FNS. It is shown that the structure of the corrections is qualitatively different to that for the s-wave states. The perturbation theory expansion for the relative correction for a p{sub 1/2} state starts with a {alpha} ln(1/Z{alpha}) term, while for the s{sub 1/2} states it starts with a Z{alpha}{sup 2} term. Here, {alpha} is the fine-structure constant and Z is the nuclear charge. In the present work, we calculate the {alpha} terms for that 2p states, the result for the 2p{sub 1/2} state reads (8{alpha}/9{pi}){l_brace}ln[1/(Z{alpha}){sup 2}]+0.710{r_brace}. Even more interesting are the p{sub 3/2} states. In this case the 'correction' is several orders of magnitude larger than the 'leading' FNS shift. However, absolute values of energy shifts related to these corrections are very small.

  13. p-wave holographic superconductors and five-dimensional gauged supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, Francesco; Rodriguez-Gomez, Diego; Russo, Jorge G.

    2011-01-01

    We explore five-dimensional mathcal{N} = 4 SU(2) × U(1) and mathcal{N} = 8 SO(6) gauged supergravities as frameworks for condensed matter applications. These theories contain charged (dilatonic) black holes and 2-forms which have non-trivial quantum numbers with respect to U(1) subgroups of SO(6). A question of interest is whether they also contain black holes with two-form hair with the required asymptotic to give rise to holographic superconductivity. We first consider the mathcal{N} = 4 case, which contains a complex two-form potential A μν which has U(1) charge ±1. We find that a slight generalization, where the two-form potential has an arbitrary charge q, leads to a five-dimensional model that exhibits second-order superconducting transitions of p-wave type where the role of order parameter is played by A μν , provided q ≳ 5 .6. We identify the operator that condenses in the dual CFT, which is closely related to mathcal{N} = 4 Super Yang-Mills theory with chemical potentials. Similar phase transitions between R-charged black holes and black holes with 2-form hair are found in a generalized version of the mathcal{N} = 8 gauged supergravity Lagrangian where the two-forms have charge q ≳ 1 .8.

  14. Miocene rifting in the Los Angeles basin: Evidence from the Puente Hills half-graben, volcanic rocks, and P-wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorklund, Tom; Burke, Kevin; Zhou, Hua-Wei; Yeats, Robert S.

    2002-05-01

    Formation of the Puente Hills half-graben in the northeastern Los Angeles basin and eruption of the Glendora and El Modeno Volcanics (16 14 Ma) help to define the timing of extension in the basin. Normal faulting on the proto-Whittier fault ca. 14 Ma established the Puente Hills half-graben, in which sedimentary strata accumulated between ca. 14 and 10 Ma and into which diabase sills intruded. North-South contraction began to invert the Puente Hills half-graben ca. 7 Ma, leading to formation of the Puente Hills anticline and the Whittier fault. Our high-resolution three-dimensional P-wave velocity model shows two anomalous higher velocity (6.63 km/s) bodies at depths between 9 and 18 km, which we attribute to dioritic plutons named here for Whittier Narrows and El Modeno. The stocklike Whittier Narrows pluton could have been a source for the Glendora Volcanics and the diabase sills in the Puente Hills half-graben. The sill-shaped El Modeno pluton was a likely source for the El Modeno Volcanics. The northwesterly alignment of the plutons may mark the location of the northeastern Los Angeles basin rift boundary, which is associated with the clockwise rotation of the western Transverse Ranges. Three active faults, the Elysian Park blind thrust, the Puente Hills blind thrust, and the Whittier fault, converge on the Whittier Narrows pluton, which may have played a role in their location and segmentation.

  15. Effects of inflow velocity profile on two-dimensional hemodynamic analysis by ordinary and ultrasonic-measurement-integrated simulations.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takaumi; Sone, Shusaku; Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Kadowaki, Hiroko; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasonic-measurement-integrated (2D-UMI) simulation correctly reproduces hemodynamics even with an inexact inflow velocity distribution. This study aimed to investigate which is superior, a two-dimensional ordinary (2D-O) simulation with an accurate inflow velocity distribution or a 2D-UMI simulation with an inaccurate one. 2D-O and 2D-UMI simulations were performed for blood flow in a carotid artery with four upstream velocity boundary conditions: a velocity profile with backprojected measured Doppler velocities (condition A), and velocity profiles with a measured Doppler velocity distribution, a parabolic one, and a uniform one, magnitude being obtained by inflow velocity estimation (conditions B, C, and D, respectively). The error of Doppler velocity against the measurement data was sensitive to the inflow velocity distribution in the 2D-O simulation, but not in the 2D-UMI simulation with the inflow velocity estimation. Among the results in conditions B, C, and D, the error in the worst 2D-UMI simulation with condition D was 31 % of that in the best 2D-O simulation with condition B, implying the superiority of the 2D-UMI simulation with an inaccurate inflow velocity distribution over the 2D-O simulation with an exact one. Condition A resulted in a larger error than the other conditions in both the 2D-O and 2D-UMI simulations.

  16. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  17. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  18. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-10-06

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V(-1), ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  19. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  20. Large Area Synthesis of 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have generated significant interest for numerous applications including sensors, flexible electronics, heterostructures and optoelectronics due to their interesting, thickness-dependent properties. Despite recent progress, the synthesis of high-quality and highly uniform TMDs on a large scale is still a challenge. In this talk, synthesis routes for WSe2 and MoS2 that achieve monolayer thickness uniformity across large area substrates with electrical properties equivalent to geological crystals will be described. Controlled doping of 2D semiconductors is also critically required. However, methods established for conventional semiconductors, such as ion implantation, are not easily applicable to 2D materials because of their atomically thin structure. Redox-active molecular dopants will be demonstrated which provide large changes in carrier density and workfunction through the choice of dopant, treatment time, and the solution concentration. Finally, several applications of these large-area, uniform 2D materials will be described including heterostructures, biosensors and strain sensors.

  1. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  2. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Elastic velocities of partially gas-saturated unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    Fluid in sediments significantly affects elastic properties of sediments and gas in the pore space can be identified by a marked reduction of P-wave velocity or a decrease of Poisson's ratio. The elastic properties of gas-saturated sediments can be predicted by the classical Biot-Gassmann theory (BGT). However, parameters for the BGT such as the Biot coefficient or moduli of dry frame of unconsolidated and high porosity sediments are not readily available. Dependence of velocities on differential pressure or porosity for partially gas-saturated sediments is formulated using properties derived from velocities of water-saturated sediments. Laboratory samples for unconsolidated and consolidated sediments and well log data acquired for unconsolidated marine sediments agree well with the predictions. However, because the P-wave velocity depends highly on how the gas is saturated in the pore space such as uniform or patch, the amounts of gas estimated from the P-wave velocity contains high uncertainty. The modeled Vp/Vs ratio of partially gas-saturated sediment using the patch distribution is usually greater than 1.6, whereas the ratio modeled assuming a uniform distribution is about 1.6. Thus, Poisson's ratio or Vp/Vs ratio may be used to differentiate patch from uniform saturation, but differences between various models of patch saturation cannot be easily identified. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 2D Distributed Sensing Via TDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    plate VEGF CompositeSensor Experimental Setup Air 279 mm 61 78 VARTM profile: slope RTM profile: rectangle 22 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware...2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Vision: Non-contact 2D sensing ü VARTM setup constructed within TL can be sensed by its EM field: 2D...300.0 mm/ns. 1 2 1 Jul 2003© 2003 University of Delaware All rights reserved Model Validation “ RTM Flow” TDR Response to 139 mm VEGC

  5. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  6. Thermocapillary bubble dynamics in a 2D axis swirl domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhendal, Yousuf; Turan, Ali

    2014-09-01

    The lack of significant buoyancy effects in zero-gravity conditions poses an issue with fluid transfer in a stagnant liquid. In this paper, bubble movement in a stagnant liquid is analysed and presented numerically using a computational fluid dynamics approach. The governing continuum and conservation equations for two-phase flow are solved using the commercial software package Ansys-Fluent v.13. The volume of fluid method is used to track the liquid/gas interface in 2D and 3D domains, which has been found to be a valuable tool for studying the phenomenon of gas-liquid interaction, and the validation results are in reasonable agreement with earlier experimental observations. The flow is driven via Marangoni influence induced by the temperature difference, which in turn drives the bubble from the cold to the hot region. The results indicate that the inherent velocity of bubbles decreases with an increase in Marangoni number; this is in agreement with the results of previous experiments conducted in Kang et al. (Microgravity Sci Technol 20:67-71, 2008). Some three-dimensional simulations will also be performed to compare and examine the results with two-dimensional simulations. The thermocapillary bubble flow in a 2D swirl axisymmetry driven by the rotation of the walls was also carried out for different angular velocities in zero gravity. The bubble migration speed was found to decrease with increasing angular velocity. This occurrence is due to an increase in the pressure gradient between the cylinder's outer wall and the axis of rotation, which forces the lowest pressure region to shift from the sides of the bubble to the axis of rotation. A deformation of the bubble and the formation of the two vortices inside the bubble are also observed. These new and original findings aim to help support research into space applications.

  7. Thermocapillary bubble dynamics in a 2D axis swirl domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhendal, Yousuf; Turan, Ali

    2015-04-01

    The lack of significant buoyancy effects in zero-gravity conditions poses an issue with fluid transfer in a stagnant liquid. In this paper, bubble movement in a stagnant liquid is analysed and presented numerically using a computational fluid dynamics approach. The governing continuum and conservation equations for two-phase flow are solved using the commercial software package Ansys-Fluent v.13. The volume of fluid method is used to track the liquid/gas interface in 2D and 3D domains, which has been found to be a valuable tool for studying the phenomenon of gas-liquid interaction, and the validation results are in reasonable agreement with earlier experimental observations. The flow is driven via Marangoni influence induced by the temperature difference, which in turn drives the bubble from the cold to the hot region. The results indicate that the inherent velocity of bubbles decreases with an increase in Marangoni number; this is in agreement with the results of previous experiments conducted in Kang et al. (Microgravity Sci Technol 20:67-71, 2008). Some three-dimensional simulations will also be performed to compare and examine the results with two-dimensional simulations. The thermocapillary bubble flow in a 2D swirl axisymmetry driven by the rotation of the walls was also carried out for different angular velocities in zero gravity. The bubble migration speed was found to decrease with increasing angular velocity. This occurrence is due to an increase in the pressure gradient between the cylinder's outer wall and the axis of rotation, which forces the lowest pressure region to shift from the sides of the bubble to the axis of rotation. A deformation of the bubble and the formation of the two vortices inside the bubble are also observed. These new and original findings aim to help support research into space applications.

  8. High-temperature thermodynamics of strongly interacting s-wave and p-wave Fermi gases in a harmonic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Shiguo; Li Shiqun; Drummond, Peter D.; Liu Xiaji

    2011-06-15

    We theoretically investigate the high-temperature thermodynamics of a strongly interacting trapped Fermi gas near either s-wave or p-wave Feshbach resonances, using a second-order quantum virial expansion. The second virial coefficient is calculated based on the energy spectrum of two interacting fermions in a harmonic trap. We consider both isotropic and anisotropic harmonic potentials. For the two-fermion interaction, either s-wave or p-wave, we use a pseudopotential parametrized by a scattering length and an effective range. This turns out to be the simplest way of encoding the energy dependence of the low-energy scattering amplitude or phase shift. This treatment of the pseudopotential can be easily generalized to higher partial-wave interactions. We discuss how the second virial coefficient and thermodynamics are affected by the existence of these finite-range interaction effects. The virial expansion result for a strongly interacting s-wave Fermi gas has already been proved very useful. In the case of p-wave interactions, our results for the high-temperature equation of state are applicable to future high-precision thermodynamic measurements for a spin-polarized Fermi gas near a p-wave Feshbach resonance.

  9. Detecting π-phase superfluids with p-wave symmetry in a quasi-1D optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Li, Xiaopeng; Hulet, Randall G.; Liu, W. Vincent

    2016-05-01

    We propose an experimental protocol to create a p-wave superfluid in a spin-polarized cold Fermi gas tuned by an s-wave Feshbach resonance. A crucial ingredient is to add an anisotropic 3D optical lattice and tune the fillings of two spins to the s and p band, respectively. The pairing order parameter is confirmed to inherit p-wave symmetry in its center-of-mass motion. We find that it can further develop into a state of unexpected π-phase modulation in a broad parameter regime. Experimental signatures are predicted in the momentum distributions, density of states and spatial densities for a realistic experimental setup. The π-phase p-wave superfluid is reminiscent of the π-state in superconductor-ferromagnet heterostructures but differs in symmetry and physical origin. The spatially-varying phases of the superfluid gap provide a novel approach to synthetic magnetic fields for neutral atoms. It would represent another example of p-wave pairing, first discovered in He-3 liquids. Work supported in part by U.S. ARO, AFOSR, NSF, ONR, Charles E. Kaufman Foundation, and The Pittsburgh Foundation, LPS-MPO-CMTC, JQI-NSF-PFC, ARO-Atomtronics-MURI, the Welch Foundation, ARO-MURI and NSF of China.

  10. Two-body state with p -wave interaction in a one-dimensional waveguide under transversely anisotropic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tian-You; Peng, Shi-Guo; Jiang, Kaijun

    2015-04-01

    We theoretically study two atoms with p -wave interaction in a one-dimensional waveguide, investigating how the transverse anisotropy of the confinement affects the two-body state, especially the properties of the resonance. For a bound-state solution, we find there are a total of three two-body bound states due to the richness of the orbital magnetic quantum number of the p -wave interaction, while only one bound state is supported by the s -wave interaction. Two of them become nondegenerate due to the breaking of the rotation symmetry under a transversely anisotropic confinement. For a scattering solution, the effective one-dimensional scattering amplitude and scattering length are derived. We find the position of the p -wave confinement-induced resonance shifts apparently versus the transverse anisotropy. In addition, a two-channel mechanism for the confinement-induced resonance in a one-dimensional waveguide is generalized to the p -wave interaction, which was previously proposed only for the s -wave interaction. All our calculations are based on the parametrization of the 40K-atom experiments and can thus be confirmed in future experiments.

  11. Alteration of the P-wave non-linear dynamics near the onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Arturo; Abásolo, Daniel; Alcaraz, Raúl; Rieta, José J

    2015-07-01

    The analysis of P-wave variability from the electrocardiogram (ECG) has been suggested as an early predictor of the onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). Hence, a preventive treatment could be used to avoid the loss of normal sinus rhythm, thus minimising health risks and improving the patient's quality of life. In these previous studies the variability of different temporal and morphological P-wave features has been only analysed in a linear fashion. However, the electrophysiological alteration occurring in the atria before the onset of PAF has to be considered as an inherently complex, chaotic and non-stationary process. This work analyses the presence of non-linear dynamics in the P-wave progression before the onset of PAF through the application of the central tendency measure (CTM), which is a non-linear metric summarising the degree of variability in a time series. Two hour-length ECG intervals just before the arrhythmia onset belonging to 46 different PAF patients were analysed. In agreement with the invasively observed inhomogeneous atrial conduction preceding the onset of PAF, CTM for all the considered P-wave features showed higher variability when the arrhythmia was closer to its onset. A diagnostic accuracy around 80% to discern between ECG segments far from PAF and close to PAF was obtained with the CTM of the metrics considered. This result was similar to previous P-wave variability methods based on linear approaches. However, the combination of linear and non-linear methods with a decision tree improved considerably their discriminant ability up to 90%, thus suggesting that both dynamics could coexist at the same time in the fragmented depolarisation of the atria preceding the arrhythmia.

  12. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  13. The basics of 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The technique of two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for separating complex mixtures of proteins, but since its inception in the mid 1970s, it acquired the stigma of being a very difficult application to master and was generally used to its best effect by experts. The introduction of commercially available immobilized pH gradients in the early 1990s provided enhanced reproducibility and easier protocols, leading to a pronounced increase in popularity of the technique. However gel-to-gel variation was still difficult to control without the use of technical replicates. In the mid 1990s (at the same time as the birth of "proteomics"), the concept of multiplexing fluorescently labeled proteins for 2D gel separation was realized by Jon Minden's group and has led to the ability to design experiments to virtually eliminate gel-to-gel variation, resulting in biological replicates being used for statistical analysis with the ability to detect very small changes in relative protein abundance. This technology is referred to as 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE).

  14. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; ...

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  15. Distinct crustal structure of the North American Midcontinent Rift from P wave receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Lee, Suzan; Wolin, Emily; Bollmann, Trevor A.; Revenaugh, Justin; Wiens, Douglas A.; Frederiksen, Andrew W.; Darbyshire, Fiona A.; Aleqabi, Ghassan I.; Wysession, Michael E.; Stein, Seth; Jurdy, Donna M.

    2016-11-01

    Eighty-two broadband seismic stations of the Superior Province Rifting Earthscope Experiment (SPREE) collected 2.5 years of continuous seismic data in the area of the high gravity anomaly associated with the Midcontinent Rift (MCR). Over 100 high-quality teleseismic earthquakes were used for crustal P wave receiver function analysis. Our analysis reveals that the base of the sedimentary layer is shallow outside the MCR, thickens near the flanks where gravity anomalies are low, and shallows again in the MCR's center where the gravity anomalies peak. This pattern is similar to that found from local geophysical studies and is consistent with reverse faulting having accompanied the cessation of rifting at 1.1 Ga. Intermittent intracrustal boundaries imaged by our analysis might represent the bottom of the MCR's mostly buried dense volcanic layers. Outside the MCR, the Moho is strong, sharp, and relatively flat, both beneath the Archean Superior Province and the Proterozoic terranes to its south. Inside the MCR, two weaker candidate Mohos are found at depths up to 25 km apart in the rift's center. The intermediate layer between these discontinuities tapers toward the edges of the MCR. The presence of this transitional layer is remarkably consistent along the strike of the MCR, including beneath its jog in southern Minnesota, near the Belle Plaine Fault. We interpret these results as evidence for extensive underplating as a defining characteristic of the rift, which remains continuous along the Minnesota jog, where due to its orientation, it is minimally affected by the reverse faulting that characterizes the NNE striking parts of the rift.

  16. Attenuation measurements of ultrasonic P-wave and S-wave in partially frozen unconsolidated sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, J.; Suzuki, M.; Kato, Y.; Rokugawa, S.; Kato, A.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic attenuation which controls both the amplitude decay of seismic waves and the accompanying frequency change is a signature of the wave-rock interaction. Seismic attenuation in rocks is a highly variable parameter, which depends on the confining pressure, porosity, degree of fluid saturation, and fluid type. Although seismic attenuation has been widely used to estimate physical conditions and rock properties in various fields, the loss mechanisms responsible for seismic attenuation often are unclear and controversial. To elucidate a plausible mechanism for seismic attenuation, the joint use of both P- and S-waves will provide more helpful information because these two types of waves respond differently to fluid and solid combinations. We have conducted ultrasonic P- and S-wave transmission measurements to examine the influence of ice-brine coexisting system grown in the pore space of unconsolidated sands on ultrasonic P- and S-waves. We observed the variations of a transmitted wave with a frequency content of 100-1000 kHz , changing its temperature from 20°C to -15°C. We use not only impulse-type signals but also sweep-type signals to prevent from the spectral leakage effect caused by the effect of windowing. We concern with attenuation at ultrasonic frequencies of 500-1000 kHz for P-waves and 100-400 kHz for S-waves. Our observation of the variation of the Poisson's ratio and the ratio of P- to S-wave attenuation with changing temperature indicates the possibilities of the joint use of both P- and S-waves to elucidate a plausible mechanism for seismic attenuation.

  17. The p-wave upper mantle structure beneath an active spreading centre - The Gulf of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Over 1400 seismograms of earthquakes in Mexico are analyzed and data sets for the travel time, apparent phase velocity, and relative amplitude information are utilized to produce a tightly constrained, detailed model for depths to 900 km beneath an active oceanic ridge region, the Gulf of California. The data are combined by first inverting the travel times, perturbing that model to fit the p-delta data, and then performing trial and error synthetic seismogram modelling to fit the short-period waveforms. The final model satisfies all three data sets. The ridge model is similar to existing upper mantle models for shield, tectonic-continental, and arc-trench regimes below 400 km, but differs significantly in the upper 350 km. Ridge model velocities are very low in this depth range; the model 'catches up' with the others with a very large velocity gradient from 225 to 390 km.

  18. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  19. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-02-06

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  20. Multiple mantle upwellings in the transition zone beneath the northern East-African Rift system from relative P-wave travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civiero, Chiara; Hammond, James O. S.; Goes, Saskia; Fishwick, Stewart; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Ayele, Atalay; Doubre, Cecile; Goitom, Berhe; Keir, Derek; Kendall, J.-Michael; Leroy, Sylvie; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Rümpker, Georg; Stuart, Graham W.

    2015-09-01

    Mantle plumes and consequent plate extension have been invoked as the likely cause of East African Rift volcanism. However, the nature of mantle upwelling is debated, with proposed configurations ranging from a single broad plume connected to the large low-shear-velocity province beneath Southern Africa, the so-called African Superplume, to multiple lower-mantle sources along the rift. We present a new P-wave travel-time tomography model below the northern East-African, Red Sea, and Gulf of Aden rifts and surrounding areas. Data are from stations that span an area from Madagascar to Saudi Arabia. The aperture of the integrated data set allows us to image structures of ˜100 km length-scale down to depths of 700-800 km beneath the study region. Our images provide evidence of two clusters of low-velocity structures consisting of features with diameter of 100-200 km that extend through the transition zone, the first beneath Afar and a second just west of the Main Ethiopian Rift, a region with off-rift volcanism. Considering seismic sensitivity to temperature, we interpret these features as upwellings with excess temperatures of 100 ± 50 K. The scale of the upwellings is smaller than expected for lower mantle plume sources. This, together with the change in pattern of the low-velocity anomalies across the base of the transition zone, suggests that ponding or flow of deep-plume material below the transition zone may be spawning these upper mantle upwellings. This article was corrected on 28 SEP 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  1. Compatible embedding for 2D shape animation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, William V; Barla, Pascal; Anjyo, Ken-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We present new algorithms for the compatible embedding of 2D shapes. Such embeddings offer a convenient way to interpolate shapes having complex, detailed features. Compared to existing techniques, our approach requires less user input, and is faster, more robust, and simpler to implement, making it ideal for interactive use in practical applications. Our new approach consists of three parts. First, our boundary matching algorithm locates salient features using the perceptually motivated principles of scale-space and uses these as automatic correspondences to guide an elastic curve matching algorithm. Second, we simplify boundaries while maintaining their parametric correspondence and the embedding of the original shapes. Finally, we extend the mapping to shapes' interiors via a new compatible triangulation algorithm. The combination of our algorithms allows us to demonstrate 2D shape interpolation with instant feedback. The proposed algorithms exhibit a combination of simplicity, speed, and accuracy that has not been achieved in previous work.

  2. Schottky diodes from 2D germanane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Esteves, Richard J.; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Pestov, Dmitry; Arachchige, Indika U.; McLeskey, James T.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode made using 2D germanane (hydrogenated germanene). When compared to germanium, the 2D structure has higher electron mobility, an optimal band-gap, and exceptional stability making germanane an outstanding candidate for a variety of opto-electronic devices. One-atom-thick sheets of hydrogenated puckered germanium atoms have been synthesized from a CaGe2 framework via intercalation and characterized by XRD, Raman, and FTIR techniques. The material was then used to fabricate Schottky diodes by suspending the germanane in benzonitrile and drop-casting it onto interdigitated metal electrodes. The devices demonstrate significant rectifying behavior and the outstanding potential of this material.

  3. Extrinsic Cation Selectivity of 2D Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    From a systematic study of the concentration driven diffusion of positive and negative ions across porous 2D membranes of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), we prove their cation selectivity. Using the current–voltage characteristics of graphene and h-BN monolayers separating reservoirs of different salt concentrations, we calculate the reversal potential as a measure of selectivity. We tune the Debye screening length by exchanging the salt concentrations and demonstrate that negative surface charge gives rise to cation selectivity. Surprisingly, h-BN and graphene membranes show similar characteristics, strongly suggesting a common origin of selectivity in aqueous solvents. For the first time, we demonstrate that the cation flux can be increased by using ozone to create additional pores in graphene while maintaining excellent selectivity. We discuss opportunities to exploit our scalable method to use 2D membranes for applications including osmotic power conversion. PMID:28157333

  4. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  5. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  6. Quasiparticle interference in unconventional 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-03-01

    At present, research of 2D systems mainly focuses on two kinds of materials: graphene-like materials and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Both of them host unconventional 2D electronic properties: pseudospin and the associated chirality of electrons in graphene-like materials, and spin-valley-coupled electronic structures in the TMDs. These exotic electronic properties have attracted tremendous interest for possible applications in nanodevices in the future. Investigation on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) in 2D systems is an effective way to uncover these properties. In this review, we will begin with a brief introduction to 2D systems, including their atomic structures and electronic bands. Then, we will discuss the formation of Friedel oscillation due to QPI in constant energy contours of electron bands, and show the basic concept of Fourier-transform scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (FT-STM/STS), which can resolve Friedel oscillation patterns in real space and consequently obtain the QPI patterns in reciprocal space. In the next two parts, we will summarize some pivotal results in the investigation of QPI in graphene and silicene, in which systems the low-energy quasiparticles are described by the massless Dirac equation. The FT-STM experiments show there are two different interference channels (intervalley and intravalley scattering) and backscattering suppression, which associate with the Dirac cones and the chirality of quasiparticles. The monolayer and bilayer graphene on different substrates (SiC and metal surfaces), and the monolayer and multilayer silicene on a Ag(1 1 1) surface will be addressed. The fifth part will introduce the FT-STM research on QPI in TMDs (monolayer and bilayer of WSe2), which allow us to infer the spin texture of both conduction and valence bands, and present spin-valley coupling by tracking allowed and forbidden scattering channels.

  7. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  8. 2D Metals by Repeated Size Reduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanwen; Tang, Hao; Fang, Minghao; Si, Wenjie; Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Zhaohui; Gu, Lin; Pan, Wei; Yao, Jie; Nan, Cewen; Wu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    A general and convenient strategy for manufacturing freestanding metal nanolayers is developed on large scale. By the simple process of repeatedly folding and calendering stacked metal sheets followed by chemical etching, free-standing 2D metal (e.g., Ag, Au, Fe, Cu, and Ni) nanosheets are obtained with thicknesses as small as 1 nm and with sizes of the order of several micrometers.

  9. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  10. Envelope Synthesis in Layered Random Media with Background-Velocity Discontinuities Based on the Markov Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emoto, K.; Sato, H.; Nishimura, T.

    2010-12-01

    Short-period seismograms provide rich information of small-scale heterogeneities in the earth. However, such seismograms are too complex due to random velocity inhomogeneities to use deterministic methods for the wave form synthesis. We can use stochastic methods for the synthesis of wave envelopes instead. The Markov approximation, which is a stochastic extension of the phase screen method, is a powerful tool for the synthesis of wave envelopes in random media when the wavelength is shorter than the correlation distance of the inhomogeneity. Recently, Saito et al. (2008) synthesized the envelopes in layered random media with a constant background velocity, and Emoto et al. (2010) calculated envelopes on the free surface of random media. Considering more realistic cases, we synthesize vector wave envelopes on the free surface of 2-D layered random media with background velocity discontinuities for the vertical incidence of a plane wavelet. In the Markov approximation, we define the two frequency mutual coherence function (TFMCF) of the potential on the transverse plane which is perpendicular to the global propagation direction. The TFMCF satisfies the parabolic type wave equation when backscattering is negligible. We use the angular spectrum, which is the TFMCF in the wavenumber domain, represents the ray angle distribution of scattered wave’s power. First, we solve the parabolic wave equation in the bottom layer and calculate the angular spectrum at the layer boundary. We multiply the angular spectrum by the transmission or conversion coefficient at the velocity discontinuity, where scattered waves are treated as a superposition of plane waves just beneath the boundary. We note that PS conversion occurs at the velocity boundary. Then, taking the inverse Fourier transform to the space domain (modified TFMCF), we solve the parabolic wave equation in the upper layer where the modified TFMCF calculated before is used as the initial condition. We repeat this

  11. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  12. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  13. Evaluation of 2D shallow-water model for spillway flow with a complex geometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the two-dimensional (2D) shallow water model is formulated based on several assumptions such as hydrostatic pressure distribution and vertical velocity is negligible, as a simple alternative to the complex 3D model, it has been used to compute water flows in which these assumptions may be ...

  14. Production of P-wave charmed mesons in hadronic B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Chua, Chun-Khiang

    2006-08-01

    Production of even-parity charmed mesons in hadronic B decays is studied. Specifically, we focus on the Cabibbo-allowed decays B¯→D**π and D¯s**D(*), where D** denotes generically a P-wave charmed meson. While the measured color-allowed decays B¯0→D**+π- are consistent with the theoretical expectation, the experimental observation of B-→D**0π- for the broad D** states is astonishing as it requires that the color-suppressed contribution dominates over the color-allowed one, even though the former is 1/mb suppressed in the heavy quark limit. In order to accommodate the data of B¯→D**π-, it is found that the real part of a2/a1 has a sign opposite to that in B¯→Dπ decays, where a1 and a2 are the effective parameters for color-allowed and color-suppressed decay amplitudes, respectively. The decay constants and form factors for D** and the Isgur-Wise functions τ1/2(ω) and τ3/2(ω) are extracted from the data of B→D**π decays. The Isgur-Wise functions calculated in the covariant light-front quark model are in good agreement with experiment. The neutral modes B¯0→D**0π0 for D**=D0*(2400), D1'(2430), and B¯0→D1'0(2430)ω are predicted to have branching ratios of order 10-4 which are also supported by the isospin argument. The decay constants of Ds0*(2317) and Ds1'(2460) are inferred from the measurements of B¯→Ds**-D to be 58 86 MeV and 130 200 MeV, respectively. Contrary to the decay constants fD0* and fD1' which are similar in size, the large disparity between fDs0* and fDs1' is surprising and unexpected.

  15. Recent Depth determination of Moderate Earthquakes in Brazil Using Teleseismic P-wave Modeling and pP and sP phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F.; Assumpcao, M.

    2013-05-01

    We determined depths of shallow ( depth < 25 km) recent earthquakes with moderate magnitude (range of 3 to 5 mb) in Brazil using teleseismic P-waves modeling of P, pP and sP phases The events are located in the Pantanal Basin, São Francisco Craton and Amazon river fan. The stations (delta > 25 °) were grouped according to distance and azimuth and every record was visually inspected; those with a good signal/noise ratio (SNR) were divided in windows of ten degrees distance and stacked. We usually consider groups with at least two stations, but sometimes, a good record of single station with different azimuth was also used to improve the focal depth. We used the hudson96 program of Herrmann seismology package (Herrmann, 2002) to do the modeling. One advantage of the program is the possibility of using different velocity models for the source, the path and the receiver. We used the dispersion of Rayleigh and Loves waves record in closer stations to build a velocity model of the source, and the ak135 model for the path and the receiver. The modeling is especially useful for the shallowest events (less than ~ 1 km) where the P, pP, sP phases are so close that is not possible to separate them. For three earthquakes in the Amazon Fan: 5.3 mb in 1998, 4.8 mb in 2006 and 5.1 mb in 2007, we identified the depth phase pP by stacking teleseismic records grouped by distance and azimuth. Using refraction seismic models in the region (Watts et al., 2009) we determined a depth of 14 km for the 2007 event and 26 km for 1998 event. In the event of 2006, closer to the coast, it was not possible see the pP phase, indicating that it was a shallow earthquake. Synthetic seismograms were calculated to constrain 2 km depth. For the event in the Pantanal basin (4.8 mb) the pP-P time difference indicates a 5.7 km depth, while teleseismic P-wave modeling gives a 6.0 km depth. This shows that the earthquake occurred in basement beneath the sedimentary basin. The 3.3 Mw event of Brasilia

  16. Defect Dynamics and Zipping of 2D Colloidal Crystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowley, Chris; Smullin, Sylvia; Ling, Xinsheng

    1998-03-01

    We use video microscopy to study defect dynamics in 2D colloidal (charged polystyrene microspheres) crystallites formed at the water-air interface. For small 2D crystallites, one might expect to see free edge dislocations in such small systems since the cost of forming such defects scales logarithmically with the size of the crystallite. But we found that as soon as an edge dislocation forms, it quickly moves to the edge of the crystallite and disappears. This is due to an attraction with an image dislocation outside the edge. As a result, most crystallites are defect-free during most of the time. Interesting things happen when two crystallites try to bind to each other, or zip together. A sharp transition occurs at the shared edge of the two crystallites during the zipping process. This is clearly manifested by a sudden change in the relative velocity between two drifting crystallites or a sudden re-orientation of one of the crystallites relative to the other. This work was supported by the startup funds and a Richard Salomon Faculty Research Award from Brown University.

  17. Influence of Elevation Data Source on 2D Hydraulic Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, Krzysztof; StĘpnik, Mateusz; Kurczyński, Zdzisław

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the influence of the source of various elevation data on hydraulic modelling in open channels. In the research, digital terrain models from different datasets were evaluated and used in two-dimensional hydraulic models. The following aerial and satellite elevation data were used to create the representation of terrain-digital terrain model: airborne laser scanning, image matching, elevation data collected in the LPIS, EuroDEM, and ASTER GDEM. From the results of five 2D hydrodynamic models with different input elevation data, the maximum depth and flow velocity of water were derived and compared with the results of the most accurate ALS data. For such an analysis a statistical evaluation and differences between hydraulic modelling results were prepared. The presented research proved the importance of the quality of elevation data in hydraulic modelling and showed that only ALS and photogrammetric data can be the most reliable elevation data source in accurate 2D hydraulic modelling.

  18. 2D superconductivity by ionic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yoshi

    2D superconductivity is attracting a renewed interest due to the discoveries of new highly crystalline 2D superconductors in the past decade. Superconductivity at the oxide interfaces triggered by LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has become one of the promising routes for creation of new 2D superconductors. Also, the MBE grown metallic monolayers including FeSe are also offering a new platform of 2D superconductors. In the last two years, there appear a variety of monolayer/bilayer superconductors fabricated by CVD or mechanical exfoliation. Among these, electric field induced superconductivity by electric double layer transistor (EDLT) is a unique platform of 2D superconductivity, because of its ability of high density charge accumulation, and also because of the versatility in terms of materials, stemming from oxides to organics and layered chalcogenides. In this presentation, the following issues of electric filed induced superconductivity will be addressed; (1) Tunable carrier density, (2) Weak pinning, (3) Absence of inversion symmetry. (1) Since the sheet carrier density is quasi-continuously tunable from 0 to the order of 1014 cm-2, one is able to establish an electronic phase diagram of superconductivity, which will be compared with that of bulk superconductors. (2) The thickness of superconductivity can be estimated as 2 - 10 nm, dependent on materials, and is much smaller than the in-plane coherence length. Such a thin but low resistance at normal state results in extremely weak pinning beyond the dirty Boson model in the amorphous metallic films. (3) Due to the electric filed, the inversion symmetry is inherently broken in EDLT. This feature appears in the enhancement of Pauli limit of the upper critical field for the in-plane magnetic fields. In transition metal dichalcogenide with a substantial spin-orbit interactions, we were able to confirm the stabilization of Cooper pair due to its spin-valley locking. This work has been supported by Grant-in-Aid for Specially

  19. Multichannel molecular state and rectified short-range boundary condition for spin-orbit-coupled ultracold fermions near p -wave resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaoling

    2017-03-01

    We study the interplay of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and strong p -wave interactions to the scattering property of spin-1/2 ultracold Fermi gases. Based on a two-channel square-well potential generating p -wave resonance, we show that the presence of an isotropic SOC, even for its length being much longer than the potential range, can greatly modify the p -wave short-range boundary condition (BC). As a result, the conventional p -wave BC cannot predict the induced molecules near p -wave resonances, which can be fully destroyed due to strong interference between the s - and p -wave channels. By analyzing the intrinsic reasons for the breakdown of the conventional BC, we propose a p -wave BC that can excellently reproduce the exact molecule solutions and also equally apply for a wide class of single-particle potentials besides SOC. This work reveals the significant effect of SOC on both the short- and long-range properties of fermions near p -wave resonances, paving the way for future explorations of interesting few- and many-body physics in such systems.

  20. Site-selective NMR for odd-frequency Cooper pairs around vortex in chiral p -wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kenta K.; Ichioka, Masanori; Onari, Seiichiro

    2016-03-01

    In order to identify the pairing symmetry with chirality, we study site-selective NMR in chiral p -wave superconductors. We calculate local nuclear relaxation rate T1-1 in the vortex lattice state by Eilenberger theory, including the applied magnetic field dependence. We find that T1-1 in the NMR resonance line shape is different between two chiral states p±(=px±i py) , depending on whether the chirality is parallel or antiparallel to the vorticity. Anomalous suppression of T1-1 occurs around the vortex core in the chiral p- wave due to the negative coherence term coming from the odd-frequency s -wave Cooper pair induced around the vortex with Majorana state.

  1. Fine-scale velocity structure of upper oceanic crust from full waveform inversion of downward continued seismic reflection data at the Lucky Strike Volcano, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Singh, S. C.; Kent, G. M.; Crawford, W.

    2012-04-01

    We present a fine-scale 2D velocity structure beneath the Lucky Strike Volcano on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) using an elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) method. The FWI is a data driven procedure that allows simultaneous exploitation of both reflections and refractions energy in multi-channel seismic data to create a single self-consistent, high-resolution velocity image of the upper crust that can be used for geologic interpretation. The long-wavelength background P-wave velocity model required by the local optimization approach was created using a combination of downward continuation and 3D first-arrival travel-time tomography. The elastic waveform inversion was applied to carefully windowed downward continued data, where wide-angle reflections and refractions arrive in front of the water-wave and are thus isolated from the high-amplitude seafloor scattering energy that is particularly acute in areas of rough igneous seafloor. Waveform inversion reduces the misfit of the initial model by 76% after 19 iterations and strongly reduced the size of the residuals relative to the signal size. The final model shows fine scale structure beneath the northern part of the Lucky Strike volcano on a resolution of tens of meters. Evidence for successive lava sequences testifies to the constructional origin of the upper section of layer 2A. Normal faults are revealed within the shallow crust and are strongly correlated with seafloor observations.

  2. Effects of shallow-layer reverberation on measurement of teleseismic P-wave travel times for ocean bottom seismograph data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, Masayuki; Ishihara, Yasushi; Suetsugu, Daisuke

    2017-03-01

    We conducted synthetic experiments to evaluate the effects of shallow-layer reverberation in oceanic regions on P-wave travel times measured by waveform cross-correlation. Time shift due to waveform distortion by the reverberation was estimated as a function of period. Reverberations in the crystalline crust advance the P-waves by a frequency-independent time shift of about 0.3 s in oceans. Sediment does not affect the time shifts in the mid-ocean regions, but effects as large as -0.8 s or more occur where sediment thickness is greater than 600 m for periods longer than 15 s. The water layer causes time delays (+0.3 s) in the relatively shallow (<3500 m) water region for periods longer than 20 s. The time shift may influence mantle images obtained if the reverberation effects are not accounted for in seismic tomography. We propose a simple method to correct relative P-wave travel times at two sites for shallow-layer reverberation by the cross-convolution of the crustal responses at the two sites. [Figure not available: see fulltext. Caption: .

  3. Teleseismic P-wave tomography and the upper mantle structure of the Sulu orogenic belt (China): implications for Triassic collision and exhumation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Miao; Tan, Handong; Jiang, Mei; Xu, Zhiqin; Li, Zhonghai; Xu, Lehong

    2016-12-01

    As the largest ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic tectonic unit outcropping in the world, the Dabie-Sulu UHP metamorphic belt is considered to be one of the best areas for studying the continental dynamics. However, their continental collision and exhumation mechanism are still debated. We performed a 3D teleseismic P-wave tomography beneath the Sulu orogen for the purpose of understanding the deep structure. The tomographic results show that there is a prominently near-SN-trending low-velocity zone (LVZ) close to the Tanlu fault (TLF), indicating a slab tear of the subducted Yangtze plate (YZP) during the initial Early Triassic collision. Our results also suggest that both the Yangze crustal slab and the North China lithospheric slab were dragged downwards by the subducted oceanic slab, which constituted a ‘two-sided’ subduction mode. A conceptual geodynamic model is proposed to explain the exhumation of Sulu high- to UHP rocks and imply a polyphase exhumation driven by buoyancy of continental materials at different depth and upward extrusion of crustal partial melting rocks to the surface at the later stage.

  4. Reference measurements on a Francis model turbine with 2D Laser-Doppler-Anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, A.; Kirschner, O.; Riedelbauch, S.; Jester-Zuerker, R.; Jung, A.

    2016-11-01

    To validate the investigations of a high-resolution CFD simulation of a Francis turbine, measurements with 2D Laser-Doppler-Anemometry are carried out. The turbine is operated in part load, where a rotating vortex rope occurs. To validate both, mean velocities and velocity fluctuations, the measurements are classified relative to the vortex rope position. Several acrylic glass windows are installed in the turbine walls such as upstream of the spiral case inlet, in the vaneless space and in the draft tube. The current investigation is focused on a measurement plane below the runner. 2D velocity components are measured on this whole plane by measuring several narrow spaced radial lines. To avoid optical refraction of the laser beam a plan parallel window is inserted in the cone wall. The laser probe is positioned with a 2D traverse system consisting of a circumferential rail and a radial aligned linear traverse. The velocity data are synchronized with the rotational frequency of the rotating vortex rope. The results of one measurement line show the dependency of the axial and circumferential velocities on the vortex rope position.

  5. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  6. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  7. Codon Constraints on Closed 2D Shapes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    19843$ CODON CONSTRAINTS ON CLOSED 2D SHAPES Go Whitman Richards "I Donald D. Hoffman’ D T 18 Abstract: Codons are simple primitives for describing plane...RSONAL AUT"ORtIS) Richards, Whitman & Hoffman, Donald D. 13&. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED N/A P8 AT F RRrT t~r. Ago..D,) is, PlE COUNT Reprint...outlines, if figure and ground are ignored. Later, we will address the problem of indexing identical codon descriptors that have different figure

  8. Nonlinear standing waves in 2-D acoustic resonators.

    PubMed

    Cervenka, Milan; Bednarik, Michal

    2006-12-22

    This paper deals with 2-D simulation of finite-amplitude standing waves behavior in rectangular acoustic resonators. Set of three partial differential equations in third approximation formulated in conservative form is derived from fundamental equations of gas dynamics. These equations form a closed set for two components of acoustic velocity vector and density, the equations account for external driving force, gas dynamic nonlinearities and thermoviscous dissipation. Pressure is obtained from solution of the set by means of an analytical formula. The equations are formulated in the Cartesian coordinate system. The model equations set is solved numerically in time domain using a central semi-discrete difference scheme developed for integration of sets of convection-diffusion equations with two or more spatial coordinates. Numerical results show various patterns of acoustic field in resonators driven using vibrating piston with spatial distribution of velocity. Excitation of lateral shock-wave mode is observed when resonant conditions are fulfilled for longitudinal as well as for transversal direction along the resonator cavity.

  9. P-wave tomography of eastern North America: Evidence for mantle evolution from Archean to Phanerozoic, and modification during subsequent hot spot tectonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villemaire, M.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Bastow, I. D.

    2012-12-01

    The unique physical and chemical properties of cratonic lithosphere are thought to be key to its long-term survival and its resistance to pervasive modification by tectonic processes. Study of mantle structure in southeast Canada and the northeast US offers an excellent opportunity to address this issue because the region spans 3 billion years of Earth history, including Archean formation of the Superior craton and younger accretion of terranes to eastern Laurentia during the Proterozoic Grenville and Phanerozoic Appalachian orogenies. Trending NW-SE through each of these terranes is the track of the Great Meteor hot spot, which affected the region during the Mesozoic. Here we study mantle seismic velocity structure beneath this region of eastern North America using tomographic inversion of teleseismic P-wave relative arrival-times recorded by a large-aperture seismograph network. There are no large-scale systematic differences between Superior and Grenville mantle wave speed structure, which may suggest that tectonic stabilization of cratons occurred in a similar fashion during the Archean and Proterozoic. Cratonic lithosphere is largely thought to be resistant to modification by hot spot processes, in contrast to younger terranes where lithospheric erosion and significant magmatism are expected. Low velocities beneath the regions affected by the Great Meteor hot spot are broadest beneath the Paleozoic Appalachian terranes, indicating pervasive modification of the lithosphere during magmatism. The zone of modification narrows considerably into the Proterozoic Grenville province before disappearing completely in the Archean Superior craton, where the surface signature of Mesozoic magmatism is limited to kimberlite eruptions.

  10. Remarks on thermalization in 2D CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Engelhardt, Dalit

    2016-12-01

    We revisit certain aspects of thermalization in 2D conformal field theory (CFT). In particular, we consider similarities and differences between the time dependence of correlation functions in various states in rational and non-rational CFTs. We also consider the distinction between global and local thermalization and explain how states obtained by acting with a diffeomorphism on the ground state can appear locally thermal, and we review why the time-dependent expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor is generally a poor diagnostic of global thermalization. Since all 2D CFTs have an infinite set of commuting conserved charges, generic initial states might be expected to give rise to a generalized Gibbs ensemble rather than a pure thermal ensemble at late times. We construct the holographic dual of the generalized Gibbs ensemble and show that, to leading order, it is still described by a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole. The extra conserved charges, while rendering c <1 theories essentially integrable, therefore seem to have little effect on large-c conformal field theories.

  11. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  12. The deeper structure of the southern Dead Sea basin derived from neural network analysis of velocity and attenuation tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braeuer, Benjamin; Haberland, Christian; Bauer, Klaus; Weber, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The Dead Sea basin is a pull-apart basin at the Dead Sea transform fault, the boundary between the African and the Arabian plates. Though the DSB has been studied for a long time, the available knowledge - based mainly on surface geology, drilling and seismic reflection surveys - gives only a partial picture of its shallow structure. Therefore, within the framework of the international DESIRE (DEad Sea Integrated REsearch) project, a dense temporary local seismological network was operated in the southern Dead Sea area. Within 18 month of recording 650 events were detected. In addition to an already published tomography study revealing the distribution of P velocities and the Vp/Vs ratios a 2D P-wave attenuation tomography (parameter Qp) was performed. The neural network technique of Self-organizing maps (SOM) is used for the joint interpretation of these three parameters (Vp, Vp/Vs, Qp). The resulting clusters in the petrophysical parameter space are assigned to the main lithological units below the southern part of the Dead Sea basin: (1) The basin sediments characterized by strong attenuation, high vp/vs ratios and low P velocities. (2) The pre-basin sediments characterized by medium to strong attenuation, low Vp/Vs ratios and medium P velocities. (3) The basement characterized by low to moderate attenuation, medium vp/vs ratios and high P velocities. Thus, the asymmetric southern Dead Sea basin is filled with basin sediments down to depth of 7 to 12 km. Below the basin sediments, the pre-basin sediments are extending to a depth between 13 and 18 km.

  13. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  14. Investigation of 1-D crustal velocity structure beneath Izmir Gulf and surroundings by using local earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Orhan; Özer, Ćaglar

    2016-04-01

    In this study; we examined one dimensional crustal velocity structure of Izmir gulf and surroundings. We used nearly one thousand high quality (A and B class) earthquake data which recorded by Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency (AFAD) [1], Bogazici University (BU-KOERI) [2] and National Observatory of Athens (NOA) [3,4]. We tried several synthetic tests to understand power of new velocity structure, and examined phase residuals, RMS values and shifting tests. After evaluating these tests; we decided one dimensional velocity structure and minimum 1-D P wave velocities, hypocentral parameter and earthquake locations from VELEST algorithm. Distribution of earthquakes was visibly improved by using new minimum velocity structure.

  15. Strong-Coupling Properties of a p-Wave Interacting Fermi Gas on the Viewpoint of Specific Heat at Constant Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inotani, Daisuke; van Wyk, Pieter; Ohashi, Yoji

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically investigate the specific heat CV at constant volume in the normal state of a p-wave interacting Fermi gas. Including fluctuations in the p-wave Cooper channel within the framework of the strong-coupling theory developed by Nozières and Schmitt-Rink, we clarify how CV as a function of temperature varies, as one moves from the weak-coupling regime to the strong-coupling limit. In the weak-coupling regime, CV is shown to be enhanced by p-wave pairing fluctuations, near the superfluid phase transition temperature Tc. Similar enhancement of CV(T ≃ Tc) is also obtained in the strong-coupling regime, which, however, reflects that system is close an ideal Bose gas of p-wave two-body bound molecules. Using these results, we classify the normal state into (1) the normal Fermi gas regime, (2) the p-wave molecular Bose gas regime, and (3) the region between the two, where p-wave pairing fluctuations are dominant. Since the current experiments can only access the normal phase of a p-wave interacting Fermi gas, our results would be useful for experiments to understand strong-coupling properties of this Fermi system above Tc.

  16. Representativeness of 2D models to simulate 3D unstable variable density flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Bastian; Xie, Yueqing; Stumpp, Christine; Maloszewski, Piotr; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-11-01

    Variable density flow in porous media has been studied primarily using numerical models because it is a semi-chaotic and transient process. Most of these studies have been 2D, owing to the computational restrictions on 3D simulations, and the ability to observe variable density flow in 2D experimentation. However, it is recognised that variable density flow is a three-dimensional process. A 3D system may cause weaker variable density flow than a 2D system due to stronger dispersion, but may also result in bigger fingers and hence stronger variable density flow because of more space for fingers to coalesce. This study aimed to determine the representativeness of 2D modelling to simulate 3D variable density flow. 3D homogeneous sand column experiments were conducted at three different water flow velocities with three different bromide tracer solutions mixed with methanol resulting in different density ratios. Both 2D axisymmetric and 3D numerical simulations were performed to reproduce experimental data. Experimental results showed that the magnitude of variable density flow increases with decreasing flow rates and decreasing density ratios. The shapes of the observed breakthrough curves differed significantly from those produced by 2D axisymmetric and 3D simulations. Compared to 2D simulations, the onset of instabilities was delayed but the growth was more pronounced in 3D simulations. Despite this difference, both 2D axisymmetric and 3D models successfully simulated mass recovery with high efficiency (between 77% and 99%). This study indicates that 2D simulations are sufficient to understand integrated features of variable density flow in homogeneous sand column experiments.

  17. P Wave Duration and Risk of Longitudinal Atrial Fibrillation Risk in Persons ≥60 Years Old (from the Framingham Heart Study)

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Jared W.; Johnson, Victor M.; Sullivan, Lisa M.; Gorodeski, Eiran Z.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Levy, Daniel; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term risk prediction is a priority for the prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF). P wave indices are electrocardiographic measurements describing atrial conduction. The role of P wave indices in the prospective determination of AF and mortality risk has had limited assessment. We quantified by digital caliper the P wave indices of maximum duration and dispersion in 1,550 Framingham Heart Study participants ≥60 years old (58% women) from single-channel electrocardiograms recorded from 1968 through 1971. We examined the association of selected P wave indices and long-term outcomes using Cox proportional hazards regression incorporating age, gender, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, treatment for hypertension, significant murmur, heart failure, and PR interval. Over a median follow-up of 15.8 years (range 0 to 38.7), 359 participants developed AF and 1,525 died. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) per SD increase in maximum P wave duration were 1.15 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90 to 1.47, p = 0.27) for AF and 1.02 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.08, p = 0.18) for mortality. The upper 5% of P wave maximum duration had a multivariable-adjusted HR of 2.51 (95% CI 1.13 to 5.57, p = 0.024) for AF and an HR of 1.11 (95% CI 0.87 to 1.40, p = 0.20) for mortality. We found no significant associations between P wave dispersion with incidence of AF or mortality. In conclusion, maximum P wave duration at the upper fifth percentile was associated with long-term AF risk in an elderly community-based cohort. P wave duration is an electrocardiographic endophenotype for AF. PMID:21255761

  18. Transition to turbulence: 2D directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantry, Matthew; Tuckerman, Laurette; Barkley, Dwight

    2016-11-01

    The transition to turbulence in simple shear flows has been studied for well over a century, yet in the last few years has seen major leaps forward. In pipe flow, this transition shows the hallmarks of (1 + 1) D directed percolation, a universality class of continuous phase transitions. In spanwisely confined Taylor-Couette flow the same class is found, suggesting the phenomenon is generic to shear flows. However in plane Couette flow the largest simulations and experiments to-date find evidence for a discrete transition. Here we study a planar shear flow, called Waleffe flow, devoid of walls yet showing the fundamentals of planar transition to turbulence. Working with a quasi-2D yet Navier-Stokes derived model of this flow we are able to attack the (2 + 1) D transition problem. Going beyond the system sizes previously possible we find all of the required scalings of directed percolation and thus establish planar shears flow in this class.

  19. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  20. Simulation of Yeast Cooperation in 2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Huang, Y; Wu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of cooperation has been an active research area in evolutionary biology in decades. An important type of cooperation is developed from group selection, when individuals form spatial groups to prevent them from foreign invasions. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in a mixed population of cooperating and cheating yeast strains in 2D with the interactions among the yeast cells restricted to their small neighborhoods. We conduct a computer simulation based on a game theoretic model and show that cooperation is increased when the interactions are spatially restricted, whether the game is of a prisoner's dilemma, snow drifting, or mutual benefit type. We study the evolution of homogeneous groups of cooperators or cheaters and describe the conditions for them to sustain or expand in an opponent population. We show that under certain spatial restrictions, cooperator groups are able to sustain and expand as group sizes become large, while cheater groups fail to expand and keep them from collapse.

  1. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  2. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  3. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  4. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  5. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  6. Monitoring seismic wave velocities in situ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEvilly, T.V.; Clymer, R.

    1979-01-01

    Beginning in the early 1960's, reports from the Soviet Union described travel-time anomalies of 5 to 20 percent preceding large earthquakes. In the early 970's, similar observations began to be reported outside the U.S.S.R. The most convincing were anomalously low values of the velocity ration, Vp/Vs, before four earthquakes of magnitudes 2.5 to 3.3 at Blue Mountain Lake, N.Y.; the anomalies were based on large amounts of high-quality data. In Japan, significant decreases were observed in the travel-time ratio, ts/tp, before two thrust-type earthquakes of magnitudes 6. and 5.3. Finally, there is the much discussed report of an anomaly before the magnitude 6.4 San Fernando, Calif., earthquake of 1971 and the implication that the change was caused principally by a decrease in the velocity of the primary (P) wave.

  7. Teleseismic array analysis of upper mantle compressional velocity structure. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Relative array analysis of upper mantle lateral velocity variations in southern California, analysis techniques for dense data profiles, the P-wave upper mantle structure beneath an active spreading center: the Gulf of California, and the upper mantle under the Cascade ranges: a comparison with the Gulf of California are presented.

  8. Analysis of upper mantle structure using wave field continuation of P waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.; Clayton, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Wave field continuation theory, which allows transformation of the seismic record section data directly into velocity-depth space, is tested for upper mantle analysis using a large array-recorded data set obtained at the 200-station Caltech-USGS Southern California Seismic Network that is representative of the structure beneath the gulf of California. The method's resolution capability is illustrated by the comparison of the slant stacks and downward continuation of both synthetic and data record sections. It is stressed that when high-quality, densely sampled digital data are available, the technique is easy to implement, provides an inversion which contains all the data in the global format, and produces an objective estimate of depth resolution as a function of ray parameter.

  9. Transmission of acoustic waves through mixing layers and 2D isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juve, D.; Blanc-Benon, P.; Comte-Bellot, G.

    Ray tracing and parabolic equation methods have been used to study the properties of acoustic waves transmitted through turbulent velocity fields. A numerical simulation permits individual realizations of the turbulent field, which then allow, if desired, an ensemble averaging of the fields. Two flows have been considered, 2D isotropic turbulence and a 2D mixing layer. The following complementary aspects are developed: the occurrence of caustics, the reinforced or weakened zones of the acoustic field, the eigenrays between a source and a receiver, and the associated travel times, variances, and scintillation index.

  10. Investigations of spectral resolution and angle dependency in a 2-D tracking Doppler method.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, Tonje D; Avdal, Jorgen; Ekroll, Ingvild K; Dahl, Torbjorn; Lovstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans

    2014-07-01

    An important source of error in velocity measurements from conventional pulsed wave (PW) Doppler is the angle used for velocity calibration. Because there are great uncertainties and interobserver variability in the methods used for Doppler angle correction in the clinic today, it is desirable to develop new and more robust methods. In this work, we have investigated how a previously presented method, 2-D tracking Doppler, depends on the tracking angle. A signal model was further developed to include tracking along any angle, providing velocity spectra which showed good agreement with both experimental data and simulations. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) bandwidth and the peak value of predicted power spectra were calculated for varying tracking angles. It was shown that the spectra have lowest bandwidth and maximum power when the tracking angle is equal to the beam-to-flow angle. This may facilitate new techniques for velocity calibration, e.g., by manually adjusting the tracking angle, while observing the effect on the spectral display. An in vitro study was performed in which the Doppler angles were predicted by the minimum FWHM and the maximum power of the 2-D tracking Doppler spectra for 3 different flow angles. The estimated Doppler angles had an overall error of 0.24° ± 0.75° when using the minimum FWHM. With an in vivo example, it was demonstrated that the 2-D tracking Doppler method is suited for measurements in a patient with carotid stenosis.

  11. Permeability and porosity images based on P-wave surface seismic data: Application to a south Florida aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Bennett, Michael W.

    2006-02-01

    P-wave surface seismic reflection data, acquired from a carbonate aquifer in southeastern Florida, are used to delineate flow units in a proposed aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) horizon. The impedance image determined by inversion from P-wave reflection data captures most of the boundaries between hydraulic facies. The hydraulic facies properties are based on integration of the well logs and the lithology, which consists of vuggy carbonate units and sandstones. Within the proposed ASR horizon, located in the upper Floridan aquifer, low-permeability zones consist of sandstones and highly permeable zones are carbonates with interconnected vuggy porosity. High-resolution porosity, permeability, and impedance images based on cross-well reflection and well logs help us evaluate the P-wave seismic reflection results. We use well logs and cross-well seismic data to support whether two-dimensional seismic reflection measurements detect important flow units delineated by cross-well high-resolution seismic data. The data analysis demonstrates that major flow units are resolved and imaged with two-dimensional seismic reflection techniques, although not as clearly as in the high-resolution cross-well data. The results suggest that the surface seismic reflection method, integrated with well logs and geology, provides the tools to assess water resources in this south Florida carbonate aquifer. However, we recommend conducting a cross-well survey in areas where an understanding of the petrophysics is imperative to relating the seismic attributes to rock and fluid properties. This can be a critical step for planning purposes when considering a large surface-oriented seismic survey.

  12. Extremal inversion of lunar travel time data. [seismic velocity structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, N.; Jackson, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    The tau method, developed by Bessonova et al. (1974), of inversion of travel times is applied to lunar P-wave travel time data to find limits on the velocity structure of the moon. Tau is the singular solution to the Clairaut equation. Models with low-velocity zones, with low-velocity zones at differing depths, and without low-velocity zones, were found to be consistent with data and within the determined limits. Models with and without a discontinuity at about 25-km depth have been found which agree with all travel time data to within two standard deviations. In other words, the existence of the discontinuity and its size and location have not been uniquely resolved. Models with low-velocity channels are also possible.

  13. ''Super 2D,'' Innovative seismic reprocessing: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Conne, D.K.M.; Bolander, A.G.; MacDonald, R.J.; Strelioff, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The ''Super 2D'' processing sequence involves taking a randomly oriented grid of multivintage two-dimensional seismic data and reprocessing to tie the data where required, then interpolating the data set to a regular grid suitable for three-dimensional processing and interpretation. A data set from Alberta, provided by a Canadian oil company, comprises 15 two-dimensional seismic lines collected and processed over a period of 6 years by various contractors. Field conditions, advances in technology, and changing objectives combined to result in a data set that densely sampled a small area, but did not tie in well enough to be interpreted as a whole. The data mistied in time, phase, and frequency, as well as having a problem with multiples in the zone of interest that had been partly attenuated in varying degrees. Therefore, the first objective of reprocessing was to resolve these problems. The authors' current land data processing sequence, which includes frequency balancing followed by source wavelet designature, F/K multiple attenuation, trim statics, and F-X filtering, as well as close attention to statics and velocity control, resolved all the mistie issues and produced a standardized data volume. This data volume was now suitable for the second stage of this sequence (i.e., interpolating to a regular grid and subsequent three-dimensional processing). The volume was three-dimensionally migrated (finite difference), filtered, and scaled. The full range of three-dimensional display and interpretational options, including loading on an interactive system, are now possible. This, along with standardizing the data set and improving the spatial location of events via three-dimensional migration are the key results of the ''Super 2D'' sequence.

  14. Ferromagnetism stabilized by lattice distortion at the surface of the p-wave superconductor Sr(2)RuO(4)

    PubMed

    Matzdorf; Fang; Ismail; Zhang; Kimura; Tokura; Terakura; Plummer

    2000-08-04

    Ferromagnetic (FM) spin fluctuations are believed to mediate the spin-triplet pairing for the p-wave superconductivity in Sr(2)RuO(4). Our experiments show that, at the surface, a bulk soft-phonon mode freezes into a static lattice distortion associated with an in-plane rotation of the RuO(6) octahedron. First-principle calculations confirm this structure and predict a FM ground state at the surface. This coupling between structure and magnetism in the environment of broken symmetry at the surface allows a reconsideration of the coupling mechanism in the bulk.

  15. Comparative studies on gravisensitive protists on ground (2D and 3D clinostats) and in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmersbach, Ruth; Strauch, Sebastian M.; Seibt, Dieter; Schuber, Marianne

    2006-09-01

    In order to prepare and support space experiments, 2D and 3D clinostats are widely applied to study the influence of simulated weightlessness on biological systems. In order to evaluate the results a comparison between the data obtained in simulation experiments and in real microgravity is necessary. We are currently analyzing the gravity-dependent behavior of the protists Paramecium biaurelia (ciliate) and Euglena gracilis (photosynthetic flagellate) on these different experimental platforms. So far, first results are presented concerning the behaviour of Euglena on a 2D fast rotating clinostat and a 3D clinostat as well as under real microgravity conditions (TEXUS sounding rocket flight), of Paramecium on a 2D clinostat and in microgravity. Our data show similar results during 2D and 3D clinorotation compared to real microgravity with respect to loss of orientation (gravitaxis) of Paramecium and Euglena and a decrease of linearity of the cell tracks of Euglena. However, the increase of the mean swimming velocities, especially during 3D clinorotation (Euglena) and 2D clinorotation of Paramecium might indicate a persisting mechanostimulation of the cells. Further studies including long-term 2D and 3D clinostat exposition will enable us to demonstrate the qualification of the applied simulation methods.

  16. 3-D Velocity Model of the Coachella Valley, Southern California Based on Explosive Shots from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, P.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Hole, J. A.; Goldman, M.; Scheirer, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    We have analyzed explosive shot data from the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) across a 2-D seismic array and 5 profiles in the Coachella Valley to produce a 3-D P-wave velocity model that will be used in calculations of strong ground shaking. Accurate maps of seismicity and active faults rely both on detailed geological field mapping and a suitable velocity model to accurately locate earthquakes. Adjoint tomography of an older version of the SCEC 3-D velocity model shows that crustal heterogeneities strongly influence seismic wave propagation from moderate earthquakes (Tape et al., 2010). These authors improve the crustal model and subsequently simulate the details of ground motion at periods of 2 s and longer for hundreds of ray paths. Even with improvements such as the above, the current SCEC velocity model for the Salton Trough does not provide a match of the timing or waveforms of the horizontal S-wave motions, which Wei et al. (2013) interpret as caused by inaccuracies in the shallow velocity structure. They effectively demonstrate that the inclusion of shallow basin structure improves the fit in both travel times and waveforms. Our velocity model benefits from the inclusion of known location and times of a subset of 126 shots detonated over a 3-week period during the SSIP. This results in an improved velocity model particularly in the shallow crust. In addition, one of the main challenges in developing 3-D velocity models is an uneven stations-source distribution. To better overcome this challenge, we also include the first arrival times of the SSIP shots at the more widely spaced Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) in our inversion, since the layout of the SSIP is complementary to the SCSN. References: Tape, C., et al., 2010, Seismic tomography of the Southern California crust based on spectral-element and adjoint methods: Geophysical Journal International, v. 180, no. 1, p. 433-462. Wei, S., et al., 2013, Complementary slip distributions

  17. A New Regional 3-D Velocity Model for Asia from the Joint Inversion of P-Wave Travel Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    global reference model ( Montagner and Kennett, 1996; Kennett et al., 1995). The attenuation profile is held constant everywhere in our model, except over...discrepancy’ between surface waves and body waves that other researchers have described (Baig and Dahlen, 2004; Montagner 216 2008 Monitoring Research...travel times, Geophys. J. Int’l. 122: 108-124. Montagner , J.-P. and B. L. N. Kennett (1996). How to reconcile body-wave and normal-mode reference earth

  18. Three dimensional images of geothermal systems: local earthquake P-wave velocity tomography at the Hengill and Krafla geothermal areas, Iceland, and The Geysers, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Prisk, A.; Foulger, G.R.; Evans, J.R.; ,

    1993-01-01

    Local earthquake tomography - the use of earthquake signals to form a 3-dimensional structural image - is now a mature geophysical analysis method, particularly suited to the study of geothermal reservoirs, which are often seismically active and severely laterally inhomogeneous. Studies have been conducted of the Hengill (Iceland), Krafla (Iceland) and The Geysers (California) geothermal areas. All three systems are exploited for electricity and/or heat production, and all are highly seismically active. Tomographic studies of volumes a few km in dimension were conducted for each area using the method of Thurber (1983).

  19. P-waves imaging of the FRI and BK zones at the Grimsel Rock Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr. ); Blueming, P.; Sattel, G. )

    1990-08-01

    This report is one of a series documenting the results of the Nagra-DOE Cooperative (NDC-I) research program in which the cooperating scientists explore the geological, geophysical, hydrological, geochemical, and structural effects anticipated from the use of a rock mass as a geological repository for nuclear waste. Tomographic imaging studies using a high frequency (10 Khz.) piezoelectric source and a three component receiver were carried out in two different regions of the underground Nagra Grimsel test facility in Switzerland. Both sites were in fractured granite, one being in a strongly foliated granite (FRI site), and the other being in a relatively homogeneous granite (BK zone). The object of the work was to determine if the seismic techniques could be useful in imaging the fracture zones and provide information on the hydrologic conditions. Both amplitude and velocity tomograms were obtained from the Data. The results indicate that the fracture zones strongly influenced the seismic wave propagation, thus imaging the fracture zones that were hydrologically important. 11 refs., 24 figs.

  20. Persistence Measures for 2d Soap Froth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Ruskin, H. J.; Zhu, B.

    Soap froths as typical disordered cellular structures, exhibiting spatial and temporal evolution, have been studied through their distributions and topological properties. Recently, persistence measures, which permit representation of the froth as a two-phase system, have been introduced to study froth dynamics at different length scales. Several aspects of the dynamics may be considered and cluster persistence has been observed through froth experiment. Using a direct simulation method, we have investigated persistent properties in 2D froth both by monitoring the persistence of survivor cells, a topologically independent measure, and in terms of cluster persistence. It appears that the area fraction behavior for both survivor and cluster persistence is similar for Voronoi froth and uniform froth (with defects). Survivor and cluster persistent fractions are also similar for a uniform froth, particularly when geometries are constrained, but differences observed for the Voronoi case appear to be attributable to the strong topological dependency inherent in cluster persistence. Survivor persistence, on the other hand, depends on the number rather than size and position of remaining bubbles and does not exhibit the characteristic decay to zero.

  1. SEM signal emulation for 2D patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, Evgenii; Muelders, Thomas; Klostermann, Ulrich; Gao, Weimin; Braylovska, Mariya

    2016-03-01

    The application of accurate and predictive physical resist simulation is seen as one important use model for fast and efficient exploration of new patterning technology options, especially if fully qualified OPC models are not yet available at an early pre-production stage. The methodology of using a top-down CD-SEM metrology to extract the 3D resist profile information, such as the critical dimension (CD) at various resist heights, has to be associated with a series of presumptions which may introduce such small, but systematic CD errors. Ideally, the metrology effects should be carefully minimized during measurement process, or if possible be taken into account through proper metrology modeling. In this paper we discuss the application of a fast SEM signal emulation describing the SEM image formation. The algorithm is applied to simulated resist 3D profiles and produces emulated SEM image results for 1D and 2D patterns. It allows estimating resist simulation quality by comparing CDs which were extracted from the emulated and from the measured SEM images. Moreover, SEM emulation is applied for resist model calibration to capture subtle error signatures through dose and defocus. Finally, it should be noted that our SEM emulation methodology is based on the approximation of physical phenomena which are taking place in real SEM image formation. This approximation allows achieving better speed performance compared to a fully physical model.

  2. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  3. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  4. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  5. Teleseismic P wave tomography of South Island, New Zealand upper mantle: Evidence of subduction of Pacific lithosphere since 45 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zietlow, Daniel W.; Molnar, Peter H.; Sheehan, Anne F.

    2016-06-01

    A P wave speed tomogram produced from teleseismic travel time measurements made on and offshore the South Island of New Zealand shows a nearly vertical zone with wave speeds that are 4.5% higher than the background average reaching to depths of approximately 450 km under the northwestern region of the island. This structure is consistent with oblique west-southwest subduction of Pacific lithosphere since about 45 Ma, when subduction beneath the region began. The high-speed zone reaches about 200-300 km below the depths of the deepest intermediate-depth earthquakes (subcrustal to ~200 km) and therefore suggests that ~200-300 km of slab below them is required to produce sufficient weight to induce the intermediate-depth seismicity. In the southwestern South Island, high P wave speeds indicate subduction of the Australian plate at the Puysegur Trench to approximately 200 km depth. A band with speeds ~2-3.5% lower than the background average is found along the east coast of the South Island to depths of ~150-200 km and underlies Miocene or younger volcanism; these low speeds are consistent with thinned lithosphere. A core of high speeds under the Southern Alps associated with a convergent margin and mountain building imaged in previous investigations is not well resolved in this study. This could suggest that such high speeds are limited in both width and depth and not resolvable by our data.

  6. Pore-Scale Modeling of Pore Structure Effects on P-Wave Scattering Attenuation in Dry Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  7. Phase diagram of a non-Abelian Aubry-André-Harper model with p -wave superfluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Xia-Ji; Xianlong, Gao; Hu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We study theoretically a one-dimensional quasiperiodic Fermi system with topological p -wave superfluidity, which can be deduced from a topologically nontrivial tight-binding model on the square lattice in a uniform magnetic field and subject to a non-Abelian gauge field. The system may be regarded as a non-Abelian generalization of the well-known Aubry-André-Harper model. We investigate its phase diagram as a function of the strength of the quasidisorder and the amplitude of the p -wave order parameter through a number of numerical investigations, including a multifractal analysis. There are four distinct phases separated by three critical lines, i.e., two phases with all extended wave functions [(I) and (IV)], a topologically trivial phase (II) with all localized wave functions, and a critical phase (III) with all multifractal wave functions. Phase (I) is related to phase (IV) by duality. It also seems to be related to phase (II) by duality. Our proposed phase diagram may be observable in current cold-atom experiments, in view of simulating non-Abelian gauge fields and topological insulators/superfluids with ultracold atoms.

  8. P wave detection in ECG signals using an extended Kalman filter: an evaluation in different arrhythmia contexts.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, M; Mohammadzadeh Asl, B

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring atrial activity via P waves, is an important feature of the arrhythmia detection procedure. The aim of this paper is to present an algorithm for P wave detection in normal and some abnormal records by improving existing methods in the field of signal processing. In contrast to the classical approaches, which are completely blind to signal dynamics, our proposed method uses the extended Kalman filter, EKF25, to estimate the state variables of the equations modeling the dynamic of an ECG signal. This method is a modified version of the nonlinear dynamical model previously introduced for a generation of synthetic ECG signals and fiducial point extraction in normal ones. It is capable of estimating the separate types of activity of the heart with reasonable accuracy and performs well in the presence of morphological variations in the waveforms and ectopic beats. The MIT-BIH Arrhythmia and QT databases have been used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results show that this method has Se  =  98.38% and Pr  =  96.74% in the overall records (considering normal and abnormal rhythms).

  9. Pore-scale modeling of pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zizhen; Wang, Ruihe; Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks.

  10. Location of high-frequency P wave microseismic noise in the Pacific Ocean using multiple small aperture arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Pyle, Moira L.; Koper, Keith D.; Euler, Garrett G.; ...

    2015-04-20

    We investigate source locations of P-wave microseisms within a narrow frequency band (0.67–1.33 Hz) that is significantly higher than the classic microseism band (~0.05–0.3 Hz). Employing a backprojection method, we analyze data recorded during January 2010 from five International Monitoring System arrays that border the Pacific Ocean. We develop a ranking scheme that allows us to combine beam power from multiple arrays to obtain robust locations of the microseisms. Some individual arrays exhibit a strong regional component, but results from the combination of all arrays show high-frequency P wave energy emanating from the North Pacific basin, in general agreement withmore » previous observations in the double-frequency (DF) microseism band (~0.1–0.3 Hz). This suggests that the North Pacific source of ambient P noise covers a broad range of frequencies and that the wave-wave interaction model is likely valid at shorter periods.« less

  11. Antiferromagnetism, f -wave, and chiral p -wave superconductivity in a kagome lattice with possible application to s d2 graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wan-Sheng; Liu, Yuan-Chun; Xiang, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Qiang-Hua

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the electronic instabilities in a kagome lattice with Rashba spin-orbital coupling by the unbiased singular-mode functional renormalization group. At the parent 1 /3 filling, the normal state is a quantum spin Hall system. Since the bottom of the conduction band is near the van Hove singularity, the electron-doped system is highly susceptible to competing orders upon electron interactions. The topological nature of the parent system enriches the complexity and novelty of such orders. We find 120∘-type intra-unit-cell antiferromagnetic order, f -wave superconductivity, and chiral p -wave superconductivity with increasing electron doping above the van Hove point. In both types of superconducting phases, there is a mixture of comparable spin singlet and triplet components because of the Rashba coupling. The chiral p -wave superconducting state is characterized by a Chern number Z =1 , supporting a branch of Weyl fermion states on each edge. The model bares close relevance to the so-called s d2 graphenes proposed recently.

  12. Stability of two-dimensional (2D) natural convection flows in air-filled differentially heated cavities: 2D/3D disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Shihe; Le Quéré, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Following our previous two-dimensional (2D) studies of flows in differentially heated cavities filled with air, we studied the stability of 2D natural convection flows in these cavities with respect to 3D periodic perturbations. The basis of the numerical methods is a time-stepping code using the Chebyshev spectral collocation method and the direct Uzawa method for velocity-pressure coupling. Newton's iteration, Arnoldi's method and the continuation method have been used in order to, respectively, compute the 2D steady-state base solution, estimate the leading eigenmodes of the Jacobian and perform linear stability analysis. Differentially heated air-filled cavities of aspect ratios from 1 to 7 were investigated. Neutral curves (Rayleigh number versus wave number) have been obtained. It turned out that only for aspect ratio 7, 3D stationary instability occurs at slightly higher Rayleigh numbers than the onset of 2D time-dependent flow and that for other aspect ratios 3D instability always takes place before 2D time-dependent flows. 3D unstable modes are stationary and anti-centro-symmetric. 3D nonlinear simulations revealed that the corresponding pitchfork bifurcations are supercritical and that 3D instability leads only to weak flow in the third direction. Further 3D computations are also performed at higher Rayleigh number in order to understand the effects of the weak 3D fluid motion on the onset of time-dependent flow. 3D flow structures are responsible for the onset of time-dependent flow for aspect ratios 1, 2 and 3, while for larger aspect ratios they do not alter the transition scenario, which was observed in the 2D cases and that vertical boundary layers become unstable to traveling waves.

  13. Relative dispersion in 2D stochastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piterbarg, L. I.

    We investigate the relative dispersion for two types of stochastic flows—Brownian flow (Kraichnan model) and a flow with memory (inertial particles). In the first case well-known asymptotics are rigorously derived for a self-similar spectrum of the velocity field by using a half-century-old Feller's theorem. Exact limits of the asymptotics and exact values for dimensionless constants are obtained. The second part of the paper addresses a relatively new object: the first-order Markov stochastic flow modelling inertial particle motion. Both local and non-local dynamics are investigated. In the first case an exact exponential asymptotic is obtained for the relative dispersion. In turn, two regimes are considered in the case of non-smooth forcing: weak and strong turbulence. For weak turbulence the obtained asymptotic of relative dispersion is similar to that of the Brownian flow. As for strong turbulence, an upper bound is obtained for the scaling of relative dispersion.

  14. Molecular size and amino acid composition of H-2d antigen solubilized in Nonidet P-40.

    PubMed

    Rossowski, W; Kloczewiak, M; Radzikowski, C; Strzadala, L

    1976-01-01

    H-2d antigenic material solubilized by the detergent Nonidet P-40 from L-1210 mouse leukemia cells was isolated by gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-100. A single peak eluted in the void volume consisted of about 90% protein, 8% hexose and traces of sialic acids. In sedimentation velocity runs, the antigen sedimented as a single peak of 3-1 S. Molecular weight determined by sedimentation equilibrium as well as calculated from amino acid composition was found to be in the range of 53,000 daltons and approx. 45,000-51,000 when calculated from sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Secondary structure of H-2d glycoprotein was predicted from the amino acid composition. For NP-40-solubilized H-2d antigen, about 34% of helix, 13% beta sheet and 41% turns was found.

  15. The 2d-LCA as an alternative to x-wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    The 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-LCA) is an innovative sensor for two-dimensional velocity measurements in fluids. It uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon and SU-8 as a sensing element and is capable of performing mesurements with extremly high temporal resolutions up to 150kHz. The size of the cantilever defines its spatial resolution, which is in the order of 150 μm only. Another big feature is a large angular range of 180° in total. The 2d-LCA has been developed as an alternative measurement method to x-wires with the motivation to create a sensor that can operate in areas where the use of hot-wire anemometry is difficult. These areas include measurements in liquids and in near-wall or particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high speed flows. Comparative measurements with the 2d-LCA and hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the new anemometer. The data of both measurement techniques were analyzed using the same stochastic methods including a spectral analysis as well as an inspection of increment statistics and structure functions. Furthermore, key parameters, such as mean values of both velocity components, angles of attack and the characteristic length scales were determined from both data sets. The analysis reveals a great agreement between both anemometers and thus confirms the new approach.

  16. 2D discrete Fourier transform on sliding windows.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Su

    2015-03-01

    Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is the most widely used method for determining the frequency spectra of digital signals. In this paper, a 2D sliding DFT (2D SDFT) algorithm is proposed for fast implementation of the DFT on 2D sliding windows. The proposed 2D SDFT algorithm directly computes the DFT bins of the current window using the precalculated bins of the previous window. Since the proposed algorithm is designed to accelerate the sliding transform process of a 2D input signal, it can be directly applied to computer vision and image processing applications. The theoretical analysis shows that the computational requirement of the proposed 2D SDFT algorithm is the lowest among existing 2D DFT algorithms. Moreover, the output of the 2D SDFT is mathematically equivalent to that of the traditional DFT at all pixel positions.

  17. Analysis of 2D Phase Contrast MRI in Renal Arteries by Self Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöllner, Frank G.; Schad, Lothar R.

    We present an approach based on self organizing maps to segment renal arteries from 2D PC Cine MR, images to measure blood velocity and flow. Such information are important in grading renal artery stenosis and support the decision on surgical interventions like percu-tan transluminal angioplasty. Results show that the renal arteries could be extracted automatically. The corresponding velocity profiles show high correlation (r=0.99) compared those from manual delineated vessels. Furthermore, the method could detect possible blood flow patterns within the vessel.

  18. 2-D inner-shelf current observations from a single VHF WEllen RAdar (WERA) station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voulgaris, G.; Kumar, N.; Gurgel, K.-W.; Warner, J.C.; List, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of High Frequency (HF) radars used worldwide operate at medium to high frequencies (8 to 30 MHz) providing spatial resolutions ranging from 3 to 1.5 km and ranges from 150 to 50 km. This paper presents results from the deployment of a single Very High Frequency (VHF, 48 MHz) WEllen RAdar (WERA) radar with spatial resolution of 150 m and range 10-15 km, used in the nearshore off Cape Hatteras, NC, USA. It consisted of a linear array of 12 antennas operating in beam forming mode. Radial velocities were estimated from radar backscatter for a variety of wind and nearshore wave conditions. A methodology similar to that used for converting acoustically derived beam velocities to an orthogonal system is presented for obtaining 2-D current fields from a single station. The accuracy of the VHF radar-derived radial velocities is examined using a new statistical technique that evaluates the system over the range of measured velocities. The VHF radar velocities showed a bias of 3 to 7 cm/s over the experimental period explainable by the differences in radar penetration and in-situ measurement height. The 2-D current field shows good agreement with the in-situ measurements. Deviations and inaccuracies are well explained by the geometric dilution analysis. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  19. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  20. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  1. NIKE2D96. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P.; Engelmann, B.; Halquist, J.O.

    1992-01-24

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  2. Numerical simulation of rock cutting using 2D AUTODYN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldemichael, D. E.; Rani, A. M. Abdul; Lemma, T. A.; Altaf, K.

    2015-12-01

    In a drilling process for oil and gas exploration, understanding of the interaction between the cutting tool and the rock is important for optimization of the drilling process using polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutters. In this study the finite element method in ANSYS AUTODYN-2D is used to simulate the dynamics of cutter rock interaction, rock failure, and fragmentation. A two-dimensional single PDC cutter and rock model were used to simulate the orthogonal cutting process and to investigate the effect of different parameters such as depth of cut, and back rake angle on two types of rocks (sandstone and limestone). In the simulation, the cutting tool was dragged against stationary rock at predetermined linear velocity and the depth of cut (1,2, and 3 mm) and the back rake angles(-10°, 0°, and +10°) were varied. The simulation result shows that the +10° back rake angle results in higher rate of penetration (ROP). Increasing depth of cut leads to higher ROP at the cost of higher cutting force.

  3. Simultaneous 2D Doppler backscattering from edge turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David; Brunner, Kai; Freethy, Simon; Huang, Billy; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Vann, Roddy

    2015-11-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic (previously at MAST and now at NSTX-U) actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (80 degree beam width) and broadband (10-34.5 GHz) beam. It digitizes the phase and amplitude of the Doppler backscattered signal using a receiving array of eight antennas which can be focused in any direction post shot to an angular range of 6-24 degree FWHM. This allows Doppler BackScattering (DBS) experiments to be conducted in every direction within the field of view simultaneously. This capability is unique to SAMI and is a novel way of conducting DBS experiments. SAMI has measured the magnetic pitch angle in the edge for the first time using a backscattering diagnostic. This is possible with simultaneous 2D DBS because the maximum backscattered power is perpendicular to the turbulence and turbulence is elongated along the magnetic field. SAMI has also studied the effect of NBI and the L-H transition on turbulent velocity, and turbulence suppression in the edge during H-mode. Initial results from all of these studies will be presented. This work is supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Grants EP/K504178 and EP/H016732.

  4. Global small solutions of 2-D incompressible MHD system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fanghua; Xu, Li; Zhang, Ping

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the global wellposedness of 2-D incompressible magneto-hydrodynamical system with smooth initial data which is close to some non-trivial steady state. It is a coupled system between the Navier-Stokes equations and a free transport equation with a universal nonlinear coupling structure. The main difficulty of the proof lies in exploring the dissipative mechanism of the system. To achieve this and to avoid the difficulty of propagating anisotropic regularity for the free transport equation, we first reformulate our system (1.1) in the Lagrangian coordinates (2.19). Then we employ anisotropic Littlewood-Paley analysis to establish the key a prioriL1 (R+ ; Lip (R2)) estimate for the Lagrangian velocity field Yt. With this estimate, we can prove the global wellposedness of (2.19) with smooth and small initial data by using the energy method. We emphasize that the algebraic structure of (2.19) is crucial for the proofs to work. The global wellposedness of the original system (1.1) then follows by a suitable change of variables.

  5. Seismic velocities for hydrate-bearing sediments using weighted equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Collett, T.S.; Dillon, William P.

    1996-01-01

    A weighted equation based on the three-phase time-average and Wood equations is applied to derive a relationship between the compressional wave (P wave) velocity and the amount of hydrates filling the pore space. The proposed theory predicts accurate P wave velocities of marine sediments in the porosity range of 40-80% and provides a practical means of estimating the amount of in situ hydrate using seismic velocity. The shear (S) wave velocity is derived under the assumption that the P to S wave velocity ratio of the hydrated sediments is proportional to the weighted average of the P to S wave velocity ratios of the constituent components of the sediment. In the case that all constituent components are known, a weighted equation using multiphase time-average and Wood equations is possible. However, this study showed that a three-phase equation with modified matrix velocity, compensated for the clay content, is sufficient to accurately predict the compressional wave velocities for the marine sediments. This theory was applied to the laboratory measurements of the P and S wave velocities in permafrost samples to infer the amount of ice in the unconsolidated sediment. The results are comparable to the results obtained by repeatedly applying the two-phase wave scattering theory. The theory predicts that the Poisson's ratio of the hydrated sediments decreases as the hydrate concentration increases and the porosity decreases. In consequence, the amplitude versus offset (AVO) data for the bottom-simulating reflections may reveal positive, negative, or no AVO anomalies depending on the concentration of hydrates in the sediments.

  6. Localized compressional velocity decrease precursory to the kalapana, hawaii, earthquake.

    PubMed

    Johnston, A C

    1978-02-24

    A delay in the arrival times of compressional or P waves of 0.15 to 0.2 second from deep distant earthquakes has been detected at the closest seismograph station to the 20 November 1975 earthquake at Kalapana, Hawaii (surface-wave magnitude MS = 7.2). This delay appeared approximately 3.5 years prior to the quake, and travel times returned to normal several months before it. The P-wave arrival times at other nearby stations remained constant during this period, an indication that the decreased velocity implied by the delay in travel time was associated with this normal-faulting earthquake and was confined to distances less than 20 kilometers from the epicenter.

  7. Rupture imaging of the Mw 7.9 12 May 2008 Wenchuan earthquake from back projection of teleseismic P waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Koper, Keith D.; Sufri, Oner; Zhu, Lupei; Hutko, Alexander R.

    2009-04-01

    The Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake of 12 May 2008 was the most destructive Chinese earthquake since the 1976 Tangshan event. Tens of thousands of people were killed, hundreds of thousands were injured, and millions were left homeless. Here we infer the detailed rupture process of the Wenchuan earthquake by back-projecting teleseismic P energy from several arrays of seismometers. This technique has only recently become feasible and is potentially faster than traditional finite-fault inversion of teleseismic body waves; therefore, it may reduce the notification time to emergency response agencies. Using the IRIS DMC, we collected 255 vertical component broadband P waves at 30-95° from the epicenter. We found that at periods of 5 s and greater, nearly all of these P waves were coherent enough to be used in a global array. We applied a simple down-sampling heuristic to define a global subarray of 70 stations that reduced the asymmetry and sidelobes of the array response function (ARF). We also considered three regional subarrays of seismometers in Alaska, Australia, and Europe that had apertures less than 30° and P waves that were coherent to periods as short as 1 s. Individual ARFs for these subarrays were skewed toward the subarrays; however, the linear sum of the regional subarray beams at 1 s produced a symmetric ARF, similar to that of the groomed global subarray at 5 s. For both configurations we obtained the same rupture direction, rupture length, and rupture time. We found that the Wenchuan earthquake had three distinct pulses of high beam power at 0, 23, and 57 s after the origin time, with the pulse at 23 s being highest, and that it ruptured unilaterally to the northeast for about 300 km and 110 s, with an average speed of 2.8 km/s. It is possible that similar results can be determined for future large dip-slip earthquakes within 20-30 min of the origin time using relatively sparse global networks of seismometers such as those the USGS uses to locate

  8. Rupture imaging of the Mw 7.9 12 May 2008 Wenchuan earthquake from back projection of teleseismic P waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Y.; Koper, K.D.; Sufri, O.; Zhu, L.; Hutko, Alexander R.

    2009-01-01

    [1] The Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake of 12 May 2008 was the most destructive Chinese earthquake since the 1976 Tangshan event. Tens of thousands of people were killed, hundreds of thousands were injured, and millions were left homeless. Here we infer the detailed rupture process of the Wenchuan earthquake by back-projecting teleseismic P energy from several arrays of seismometers. This technique has only recently become feasible and is potentially faster than traditional finite-fault inversion of teleseismic body waves; therefore, it may reduce the notification time to emergency response agencies. Using the IRIS DMC, we collected 255 vertical component broadband P waves at 30-95?? from the epicenter. We found that at periods of 5 s and greater, nearly all of these P waves were coherent enough to be used in a global array. We applied a simple down-sampling heuristic to define a global subarray of 70 stations that reduced the asymmetry and sidelobes of the array response function (ARF). We also considered three regional subarrays of seismometers in Alaska, Australia, and Europe that had apertures less than 30?? and P waves that were coherent to periods as short as 1 s. Individual ARFs for these subarrays were skewed toward the subarrays; however, the linear sum of the regional subarray beams at 1 s produced a symmetric ARF, similar to that of the groomed global subarray at 5 s. For both configurations we obtained the same rupture direction, rupture length, and rupture time. We found that the Wenchuan earthquake had three distinct pulses of high beam power at 0, 23, and 57 s after the origin time, with the pulse at 23 s being highest, and that it ruptured unilaterally to the northeast for about 300 km and 110 s, with an average speed of 2.8 km/s. It is possible that similar results can be determined for future large dip-slip earthquakes within 20-30 min of the origin time using relatively sparse global networks of seismometers such as those the USGS uses to locate

  9. The energy radiated by the 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake estimated from 10-minute P-wave windows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Boatwright, J.

    2007-01-01

    The rupture process of the Mw 9.1 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake lasted for approximately 500 sec, nearly twice as long as the teleseismic time windows between the P and PP arrival times generally used to compute radiated energy. In order to measure the P waves radiated by the entire earthquake, we analyze records that extend from the P-wave to the S-wave arrival times from stations at distances ?? >60??. These 8- to 10-min windows contain the PP, PPP, and ScP arrivals, along with other multiply reflected phases. To gauge the effect of including these additional phases, we form the spectral ratio of the source spectrum estimated from extended windows (between TP and TS) to the source spectrum estimated from normal windows (between TP and TPP). The extended windows are analyzed as though they contained only the P-pP-sP wave group. We analyze four smaller earthquakes that occurred in the vicinity of the Mw 9.1 mainshock, with similar depths and focal mechanisms. These smaller events range in magnitude from an Mw 6.0 aftershock of 9 January 2005 to the Mw 8.6 Nias earthquake that occurred to the south of the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake on 28 March 2005. We average the spectral ratios for these four events to obtain a frequency-dependent operator for the extended windows. We then correct the source spectrum estimated from the extended records of the 26 December 2004 mainshock to obtain a complete or corrected source spectrum for the entire rupture process (???600 sec) of the great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake. Our estimate of the total seismic energy radiated by this earthquake is 1.4 ?? 1017 J. When we compare the corrected source spectrum for the entire earthquake to the source spectrum from the first ???250 sec of the rupture process (obtained from normal teleseismic windows), we find that the mainshock radiated much more seismic energy in the first half of the rupture process than in the second half, especially over the period range from 3 sec to 40 sec.

  10. Crustal velocities near Coalinga, California, modeled from a combined earthquake/explosion refraction profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macgregor-Scott, N.; Walter, A.

    1988-01-01

    Crustal velocity structure for the region near Coalinga, California, has been derived from both earthquake and explosion seismic phase data recorded along a NW-SE seismic-refraction profile on the western flank of the Great Valley east of the Diablo Range. Comparison of the two data sets reveals P-wave phases in common which can be correlated with changes in the velocity structure below the earthquake hypocenters. In addition, the earthquake records reveal secondary phases at station ranges of less than 20 km that could be the result of S- to P-wave conversions at velocity interfaces above the earthquake hypocenters. Two-dimensional ray-trace modeling of the P-wave travel times resulted in a P-wave velocity model for the western flank of the Great Valley comprised of: 1) a 7- to 9-km thick section of sedimentary strata with velocities similar to those found elsewhere in the Great Valley (1.6 to 5.2 km s-1); 2) a middle crust extending to about 14 km depth with velocities comparable to those reported for the Franciscan assemblage in the Diablo Range (5.6 to 5.9 km s-1); and 3) a 13- to 14-km thick lower crust with velocities similar to those reported beneath the Diablo Range and the Great Valley (6.5 to 7.30 km s-1). This lower crust may have been derived from subducted oceanic crust that was thickened by accretionary underplating or crustal shortening. -Authors

  11. Three-dimensional P and S wave velocity structure of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benz, H.M.; Chouet, B.A.; Dawson, P.B.; Lahr, J.C.; Page, R.A.; Hole, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The three-dimensional P and S wave structure of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, and the underlying crust to depths of 7-8 km is determined from 6219 P wave and 4008 S wave first-arrival times recorded by a 30-station seismograph network deployed on and around the volcano. First-arrival times are calculated using a finite-difference technique, which allows for flexible parameterization of the slowness model and easy inclusion of topography and source-receiver geometry. The three-dimensional P wave velocity structure and hypocenters are determined simultaneously, while the three-dimensional S wave velocity model is determined using the relocated seismicity and an initial S wave velocity model derived from the P wave velocity model assuming an average Vp/Vs ratio of 1.78. Convergence is steady with approximately 73% and 52% reduction in P and S wave arrival time RMS, respectively, after 10 iterations. The most prominent feature observed in the three-dimensional velocity models derived for both P and S waves is a relative low-velocity, near-vertical, pipelike structure approximately 1 km in diameter that extends from 1 to 6 km beneath sea level. This feature aligns axially with the bulk of seismicity and is interpreted as a highly fractured and altered zone encompassing a magma conduit. The velocity structure beneath the north flank of the volcano between depths of 1 and 6 km is characterized by large lateral velocity variations. High velocities within this region are interpreted as remnant dikes and sills and low velocities as regions along which magma migrates. No large low-velocity body suggestive of a magma chamber is resolved in the the upper 7-8 km of the crust.

  12. Predicting S-wave velocities for unconsolidated sediments at low effective pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate S-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important in performing a reliable elastic inversion for gas hydrate-bearing sediments and in evaluating velocity models for predicting S-wave velocities, but few S-wave velocities are measured at low effective pressure. Predicting S-wave velocities by using conventional methods based on the Biot-Gassmann theory appears to be inaccurate for laboratory-measured velocities at effective pressures less than about 4-5 megapascals (MPa). Measured laboratory and well log velocities show two distinct trends for S-wave velocities with respect to P-wave velocity: one for the S-wave velocity less than about 0.6 kilometer per second (km/s) which approximately corresponds to effective pressure of about 4-5 MPa, and the other for S-wave velocities greater than 0.6 km/s. To accurately predict S-wave velocities at low effective pressure less than about 4-5 MPa, a pressure-dependent parameter that relates the consolidation parameter to shear modulus of the sediments at low effective pressure is proposed. The proposed method in predicting S-wave velocity at low effective pressure worked well for velocities of water-saturated sands measured in the laboratory. However, this method underestimates the well-log S-wave velocities measured in the Gulf of Mexico, whereas the conventional method performs well for the well log velocities. The P-wave velocity dispersion due to fluid in the pore spaces, which is more pronounced at high frequency with low effective pressures less than about 4 MPa, is probably a cause for this discrepancy.

  13. Elastic wave velocities of Apollo 14, 15, and 16 rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizutani, H.; Newbigging, D. F.

    1973-01-01

    Elastic wave velocities of two Apollo 14 rocks, 14053 and 14321, three Apollo 15 rocks, 15058, 15415, and 15545, and one Apollo 16 rock 60315 have been determined at pressures up to 10 kb. For sample 14321, the variation of the compressional wave velocities with temperature has been measured over the temperature range from 27 to 200 C. Overall elastic properties of these samples except sample 15415 are very similar to those of Apollo 11, 12, and 14 rocks and are concordant with Toksoz et al.'s (1972) interpretation that lunar upper crust is of basaltic composition. Temperature derivative of the P wave velocity for sample 14321 is a half to one order of magnitude larger than that for single crystalline minerals. This suggests that the seismic velocity in the lunar crust may be affected significantly by the temperature distribution.

  14. A compositional origin to ultralow-velocity zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Samuel P.; Thorne, Michael S.; Miyagi, Lowell; Rost, Sebastian

    2015-02-01

    We analyzed vertical component short-period ScP waveforms for 26 earthquakes occurring in the Tonga-Fiji trench recorded at the Alice Springs Array in central Australia. These waveforms show strong precursory and postcursory seismic arrivals consistent with ultralow-velocity zone (ULVZ) layering beneath the Coral Sea. We used the Viterbi sparse spike detection method to measure differential travel times and amplitudes of the postcursor arrival ScSP and the precursor arrival SPcP relative to ScP. We compare our measurements to a database of 340,000 synthetic seismograms finding that these data are best fit by a ULVZ model with an S wave velocity reduction of 24%, a P wave velocity reduction of 23%, a thickness of 8.5 km, and a density increase of 6%. This 1:1 VS:VP velocity decrease is commensurate with a ULVZ compositional origin and is most consistent with highly iron enriched ferropericlase.

  15. Integrin associated proteins differentially regulate neutrophil polarity and directed migration in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Yamahashi, Yukie; Cavnar, Peter J; Hind, Laurel E; Berthier, Erwin; Bennin, David A; Beebe, David; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Directed neutrophil migration in blood vessels and tissues is critical for proper immune function; however, the mechanisms that regulate three-dimensional neutrophil chemotaxis remain unclear. It has been shown that integrins are dispensable for interstitial three-dimensional (3D) leukocyte migration; however, the role of integrin regulatory proteins during directed neutrophil migration is not known. Using a novel microfluidic gradient generator amenable to 2D and 3D analysis, we found that the integrin regulatory proteins Kindlin-3, RIAM, and talin-1 differentially regulate neutrophil polarization and directed migration to gradients of chemoattractant in 2D versus 3D. Both talin-1-deficient and RIAM-deficient neutrophil-like cells had impaired adhesion, polarization, and migration on 2D surfaces whereas in 3D the cells polarized but had impaired 3D chemotactic velocity. Kindlin-3 deficient cells were able to polarize and migrate on 2D surfaces but had impaired directionality. In a 3D environment, Kindlin-3 deficient cells displayed efficient chemotaxis. These findings demonstrate that the role of integrin regulatory proteins in cell polarity and directed migration can be different in 2D and 3D.

  16. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  17. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  18. Proposed Aharonov-Casher interference measurement of non-Abelian vortices in chiral p-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosfeld, Eytan; Seradjeh, Babak; Vishveshwara, Smitha

    2011-03-01

    We propose a two-path vortex interferometry experiment based on the Aharonov-Casher effect for detecting the non-Abelian nature of vortices in a chiral P-wave superconductor. The effect is based on observing vortex interference patterns upon enclosing a finite charge of externally controllable magnitude within the interference path. We predict that when the interfering vortices enclose an odd number of identical vortices in their path, the interference pattern disappears only for non-Abelian vortices. When pairing involves two distinct spin species, we derive the mutual statistics between half quantum and full quantum vortices and show that, remarkably, our predictions still hold for the situation of a full quantum vortex enclosing a half quantum vortex in its path. We discuss the experimentally relevant conditions under which these effects can be observed.

  19. Coupled ππ, KK¯ scattering in P-wave and the ρ resonance from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Wilson, David J.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; ...

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we determine elastic and coupled-channel amplitudes for isospin-1 meson-meson scattering inmore » $P$-wave, by calculating correlation functions using lattice QCD with light quark masses such that $$m_\\pi = 236$$ MeV in a cubic volume of $$\\sim (4 \\,\\mathrm{fm})^3$$. Variational analyses of large matrices of correlation functions computed using operator constructions resembling $$\\pi\\pi$$, $$K\\overline{K}$$ and $$q\\bar{q}$$, in several moving frames and several lattice irreducible representations, leads to discrete energy spectra from which scattering amplitudes are extracted. In the elastic $$\\pi\\pi$$ scattering region we obtain a detailed energy-dependence for the phase-shift, corresponding to a $$\\rho$$ resonance, and we extend the analysis into the coupled-channel $$K\\overline{K}$$ region for the first time, finding a small coupling between the channels.« less

  20. The rupture process and asperity distribution of three great earthquakes from long-period diffracted P-waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Kanamori, H.

    1983-01-01

    The variation of maximum earthquake size along the subduction zones has been interpreted as a variation in the seismic coupling ostensibly related to the mechanical conditions of the fault zone. Great differences are noted between the seismographs of the three great earthquakes whose rupture processes are presently considered: in the Kurile Islands (1963), The Rat Islands (1965) and Alaska (1964). On-scale long period P waves were recorded in all cases. Source time functions are deconvolved from the observed periods. It is concluded that maximum earthquake size is related to the asperity distribution on the fault. The subduction zones with the largest earthquakes have very large asperities, as in the Alaskan case, while the zones with the smaller great earthquakes, such as the Kurile Islands, have smaller scattered asperities.

  1. Crossover from Majorana edge- to end-states in quasi-one-dimensional p-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2011-08-01

    In a recent work [Potter and Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.105.227003 105, 227003 (2010)], it was demonstrated by means of numerical diagonalization that the Majorana end states can be localized at opposite ends of a sample of an ideal spinless p-wave superconductor with the strip geometry beyond the strict one-dimensional limit. Here, we reexamine this issue and study the topological quantum phase transition in the same system. We give the phase diagrams of the presence of Majorana end modes by using of Z2 topological index. It is found that the topological property of a strip geometry will change in an oscillatory way with respect of the sample width.

  2. The Effect of Crack Orientation on the Nonlinear Interaction of a P-wave with an S-wave

    SciTech Connect

    TenCate, J. A.; Malcolm, A. E.; Feng, X.; Fehler, M. C.

    2016-06-06

    Cracks, joints, fluids, and other pore-scale structures have long been hypothesized to be the cause of the large elastic nonlinearity observed in rocks. It is difficult to definitively say which pore-scale features are most important, however, because of the difficulty in isolating the source of the nonlinear interaction. In this work, we focus on the influence of cracks on the recorded nonlinear signal and in particular on how the orientation of microcracks changes the strength of the nonlinear interaction. We do this by studying the effect of orientation on the measurements in a rock with anisotropy correlated with the presence and alignment of microcracks. We measure the nonlinear response via the traveltime delay induced in a low-amplitude P wave probe by a high-amplitude S wave pump. We find evidence that crack orientation has a significant effect on the nonlinear signal.

  3. The Effect of Crack Orientation on the Nonlinear Interaction of a P-wave with an S-wave

    DOE PAGES

    TenCate, J. A.; Malcolm, A. E.; Feng, X.; ...

    2016-06-06

    Cracks, joints, fluids, and other pore-scale structures have long been hypothesized to be the cause of the large elastic nonlinearity observed in rocks. It is difficult to definitively say which pore-scale features are most important, however, because of the difficulty in isolating the source of the nonlinear interaction. In this work, we focus on the influence of cracks on the recorded nonlinear signal and in particular on how the orientation of microcracks changes the strength of the nonlinear interaction. We do this by studying the effect of orientation on the measurements in a rock with anisotropy correlated with the presencemore » and alignment of microcracks. We measure the nonlinear response via the traveltime delay induced in a low-amplitude P wave probe by a high-amplitude S wave pump. We find evidence that crack orientation has a significant effect on the nonlinear signal.« less

  4. P-wave dispersion and its relationship with the severity of the disease in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Fatih; Firatli, Inci; Katkat, Fahrettin; Gurmen, Tevfik; Ayca, Burak; Kalyoncuoglu, Muhsin; Abaci, Okay; Sari, Mustafa; Ersanli, Murat; Kucukoglu, Serdar; Yigit, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: P- wave dispersion (PD) is an indicator of inhomogeneous and discontinuous propagation of sinus impulses. In the present study we aimed to investigate the PD and its association with the severity of the disease. in patients with stable coronary artery disease. METHODS: We prospectively analyzed 60 subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 25 subjects with nor-mal coronary angiograms (control group). The maximum and minimum P-wave duration and PD were measured from the 12-lead surface electrocardiograms. The CAD severity was assessed by the severity score (Gensini score) and the number of vessels involved (vessel score). RESULTS: P max was longer in CAD group compared with the control group (p<0.001). PD was greater in the CAD group, compared with the control group (p<0.001). However, P min did not differ between the two groups. In bi-variate correlation, increased PD was correlated with presence of diabetes mellitus (r=0.316, p=0.014), smoking (r=0.348, p=0.006), left ventricular ejection fraction (r=-0.372, p=0.003), vessel score (r=0.848, p=0.001), and Gensini score (r=0.825, p=0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that PD was independently associ¬ated with vessel score ((3=0.139, p=0.002) and Gensini score ((3=0.132, p=0.007). CONCLUSION: PD was greater in patients with CAD than in controls and it was associated with CAD severity. PMID:28058305

  5. Hydration and Velocity Heterogeneity in the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, J. R.; Holl, C. M.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Manghnani, M. H.; Amulele, G.

    2003-12-01

    Olivine, wadsleyite, and ringwoodite are the mineral phases generally believed to compose the majority of the upper mantle and transition zone. Although nominally anhydrous, these phases can incorporate enough hydroxyl to significantly affect their P and S seismic velocities and to compose the planet's largest reservoir of water. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction, we have measured the effect of hydration on compression of Fo90 ringwoodite to 12 GPa. Using powder diffraction of synchrotron radiation we have measured compression to 50 GPa. Using GHz ultrasonic measurements on single crystals containing about one percent water by weight, we observe a reduction of P-wave velocity equivalent to an increase in temperature of 600° C and on S-wave velocity of 1000° C at ambient pressure. Single-crystal velocity measurements at pressure are in progress. The data obtained to date indicate that hydration of ringwoodite will have a larger effect on velocities in the Transition Zone (TZ) than does temperature within the uncertainties of each. We have measured the isothermal bulk moduli of hydrous wadsleyite by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and find a similar effect of hydration on the bulk modulus. Lateral velocity variations in the TZ are therefore more likely to reflect variations in hydration than variations in temperature, at least in regions distant from subduction zones. In tomographic images of the TZ in regions distant from active subduction, red is more likely to mean `wet' than it is to mean `hot'. Observed seismic velocities in the TZ are consistent with a pyrolite composition with 0.5 to 1.0 percent by weight H2O, but are not consistent with dry pyrolite compositions. This degree of hydration would allow for TZ storage of two to three times the amount of water currently in the hydrosphere.

  6. Upper mantle P velocity structure beneath the Baikal Rift from modeling regional seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, Richard A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.

    2003-02-01

    Uppermost mantle P wave velocity structure beneath the Baikal rift and southern margin of the Siberian Platform has been investigated by using a grid search method to model Pnl waveforms from two moderate earthquakes recorded by station TLY at the southwestern end of Lake Baikal. The results yielded a limited number of successful models which indicate the presence of upper mantle P wave velocities beneath the rift axis and the margin of the platform that are 2-5% lower than expected. The magnitude of the velocity anomalies and their location support the presence of a thermal anomaly that extends laterally beyond the rift proper, possibly created by small-scale convection or a plume-like, thermal upwelling.

  7. Crustal high-velocity anomaly at the East European Craton margin in SE Poland (TESZ) modelled by 3-D seismic tomography of refracted and reflected arrivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Środa, Piotr; Dec, Monika

    2016-04-01

    The area of Trans-European Suture Zone in SE Poland represents a contact of major tectonic units of different consolidation age - from the Precambrian East European Craton, through Palaeozoic West European Platform to Cenozoic Carpathian orogen. The region was built by several phases of crustal accretion, which resulted in a complex collage of tectonic blocks. In 2000, this region was studied by several seismic wide-angle profiles of CELEBRATION 2000 experiment, providing a dense coverage of seismic data in SE Poland and allowing for detailed investigations of the crustal structure and properties in this area. Beneath the marginal part of the EEC, the 2-D modelling of in-line data form several CELEBRATION profiles revealed a prominent high P-wave velocity anomaly in the upper crust, with Vp of 6.7-7.1 km/s, starting at 10-16 km depth (e.g., Środa et al., 2006). Anomalously high velocities are observed in the area located approximately beneath Lublin trough, to the NE of Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone. Based on 3-D tomography of first arrivals of in- and off-line CELEBRATION 2000 recordings (Malinowski et al., 2008), elevated velocities are also reported in the same area and seem to continue to the SW, off the craton margin. Gravimetric modelling also revealed anomalously high density in the same region at similar depths. High seismic velocities and densities are interpreted as indicative for a pronounced mafic intrusion, possibly related to extensional processes at the EEC margin. Previous 3-D models of the high-velocity intrusion were based on first arrivals (crustal refractions) only. In this study, also off-line reflections (not modelled up to now) are used, in order to enlarge the data set and to better constrain the geometry and properties of the velocity anomaly. A code for 3-D joint tomographic inversion of refracted and reflected arrivals, with model parametrization allowing for velocity discontinuities was used (Rawlinson, 2007). With this approach, besides the

  8. The 1D and 2D Hα Kinematics of Galaxies in ZFIRE at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcorn, Leo Yvonne; Tran, Kim-Vy; Glazebrook, Karl; Labbe, Ivo; Straatman, Caroline; Kacprzak, Glenn; ZFIRE, ZFOURGE

    2017-01-01

    We perform a kinematic analysis of star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2 in the COSMOS legacy field using near-infrared spectroscopy from Keck/MOSFIRE and F160W imaging from CANDELS as part of the ZFIRE survey. Our sample consists of galaxies from the overdense regions at z = 2.1 in COSMOS as well as field objects from 1.9 < z < 2.5. We measure Hα integrated velocity dispersions, and through modeling 2D exponential disks with arctangent velocity profiles, we measure rotational velocities and gas velocity dispersions. Our 1D kinematics show no statistically significant differences on the basis of environment, and we conclude that the kinematics of star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2 are not significantly different between the cluster and field. By testing our models against 2D simulations, we find we can recover our input kinematics to within 14% of the input values, allowing us to further constrain the debated evolution of the Tully-Fisher relation at z ~ 2.

  9. Residual lens effects in 2D mode of auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based switchable 2D/3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijter, M.; IJzerman, W. L.; de Boer, D. K. G.; de Zwart, S. T.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss residual lens effects in multi-view switchable auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based 2D/3D displays. With the introduction of a switchable lenticular, it is possible to switch between a 2D mode and a 3D mode. The 2D mode displays conventional content, whereas the 3D mode provides the sensation of depth to the viewer. The uniformity of a display in the 2D mode is quantified by the quality parameter modulation depth. In order to reduce the modulation depth in the 2D mode, birefringent lens plates are investigated analytically and numerically, by ray tracing. We can conclude that the modulation depth in the 2D mode can be substantially decreased by using birefringent lens plates with a perfect index match between lens material and lens plate. Birefringent lens plates do not disturb the 3D performance of a switchable 2D/3D display.

  10. Specific Heat and Effects of Uniaxial Anisotropy of a p-Wave Pairing Interaction in a Strongly Interacting Ultracold Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inotani, Daisuke; van Wyk, Pieter; Ohashi, Yoji

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the specific heat CV at constant volume and effects of uniaxial anisotropy of a p-wave attractive interaction in the normal state of an ultracold Fermi gas. Within the framework of the strong-coupling theory developed by Nozières and Schmitt-Rink, we evaluate this thermodynamic quantity as a function of temperature, in the whole interaction regime. While the uniaxial anisotropy is not crucial for CV in the weak-coupling regime, CV is found to be sensitive to the uniaxial anisotropy in the strong-coupling regime. This originates from the population imbalance among pi-wave molecules (i = x,y,z), indicating that the specific heat is a useful observable to see which kinds of p-wave molecules dominantly exist in the strong-coupling regime when the p-wave interaction has uniaxial anisotropy. Using this strong point, we classify the strong-coupling regime into some characteristic regions. Since a p-wave pairing interaction with uniaxial anisotropy has been discovered in a 40K Fermi gas, our results would be useful in considering strong-coupling properties of a p-wave interacting Fermi gas, when the interaction is uniaxially anisotropic.

  11. Association of P wave duration and dispersion with the risk for atrial fibrillation: practical considerations in the setting of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Okan; Tandogan, Izzet; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Yalta, Kenan; Aydin, Osman

    2010-10-08

    P wave dispersion (PWD) is defined as the difference between maximum P wave duration (Pmax) and minimum P wave duration recorded from multiple surface electrocardiogram (ECG) leads. An increase