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Sample records for 2-d particle-in-cell pic

  1. Spacecraft charging analysis with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D

    SciTech Connect

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Marchand, R.; Markidis, S.

    2013-10-15

    We present the first results on the analysis of spacecraft charging with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, designed for running on massively parallel supercomputers. The numerical algorithm is presented, highlighting the implementation of the electrostatic solver and the immersed boundary algorithm; the latter which creates the possibility to handle complex spacecraft geometries. As a first step in the verification process, a comparison is made between the floating potential obtained with iPic3D and with Orbital Motion Limited theory for a spherical particle in a uniform stationary plasma. Second, the numerical model is verified for a CubeSat benchmark by comparing simulation results with those of PTetra for space environment conditions with increasing levels of complexity. In particular, we consider spacecraft charging from plasma particle collection, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The influence of a background magnetic field on the floating potential profile near the spacecraft is also considered. Although the numerical approaches in iPic3D and PTetra are rather different, good agreement is found between the two models, raising the level of confidence in both codes to predict and evaluate the complex plasma environment around spacecraft.

  2. Particle distributions in collisionless magnetic reconnection: An implicit Particle-In-Cell (PIC) description

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.W.; Francis, G.E.; Max, C.E.

    1990-06-29

    Evidence from magnetospheric and solar flare research supports the belief that collisionless magnetic reconnection can proceed on the Alfven-wave crossing timescale. Reconnection behavior that occurs this rapidly in collisionless plasmas is not well understood because underlying mechanisms depend on the details of the ion and electron distributions in the vicinity of the emerging X-points. We use the direct implicit Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code AVANTI to study the details of these distributions as they evolve in the self-consistent E and B fields of magnetic reconnection. We first consider a simple neutral sheet model. We observe rapid movement of the current-carrying electrons away from the emerging X-point. Later in time an oscillation of the trapped magnetic flux is found, superimposed upon continued linear growth due to plasma inflow at the ion sound speed. The addition of a current-aligned and a normal B field widen the scope of our studies.

  3. A multi-dimensional nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic Vlasov-Darwin particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangye; Chacón, Luis; CoCoMans Team

    2014-10-01

    For decades, the Vlasov-Darwin model has been recognized to be attractive for PIC simulations (to avoid radiative noise issues) in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes. However, the Darwin model results in elliptic field equations that renders explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. Improving on linearly implicit schemes, fully implicit PIC algorithms for both electrostatic and electromagnetic regimes, with exact discrete energy and charge conservation properties, have been recently developed in 1D. This study builds on these recent algorithms to develop an implicit, orbit-averaged, time-space-centered finite difference scheme for the particle-field equations in multiple dimensions. The algorithm conserves energy, charge, and canonical-momentum exactly, even with grid packing. A simple fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large timesteps, O (√{mi/me}c/veT) larger than the explicit CFL. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 2D3V.

  4. A 2D electrostatic PIC code for the Mark III Hypercube

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, R.D.; Liewer, P.C.; Decyk, V.K.

    1990-12-31

    We have implemented a 2D electrostastic plasma particle in cell (PIC) simulation code on the Caltech/JPL Mark IIIfp Hypercube. The code simulates plasma effects by evolving in time the trajectories of thousands to millions of charged particles subject to their self-consistent fields. Each particle`s position and velocity is advanced in time using a leap frog method for integrating Newton`s equations of motion in electric and magnetic fields. The electric field due to these moving charged particles is calculated on a spatial grid at each time by solving Poisson`s equation in Fourier space. These two tasks represent the largest part of the computation. To obtain efficient operation on a distributed memory parallel computer, we are using the General Concurrent PIC (GCPIC) algorithm previously developed for a 1D parallel PIC code.

  5. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code simulation results and comparison with theory scaling laws for photoelectron-generated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dipp, T.M. |

    1993-12-01

    The generation of radiation via photoelectrons induced off of a conducting surface was explored using Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code computer simulations. Using the MAGIC PIC code, the simulations were performed in one dimension to handle the diverse scale lengths of the particles and fields in the problem. The simulations involved monoenergetic, nonrelativistic photoelectrons emitted normal to the illuminated conducting surface. A sinusoidal, 100% modulated, 6.3263 ns pulse train, as well as unmodulated emission, were used to explore the behavior of the particles, fields, and generated radiation. A special postprocessor was written to convert the PIC code simulated electron sheath into far-field radiation parameters by means of rigorous retarded time calculations. The results of the small-spot PIC simulations were used to generate various graphs showing resonance and nonresonance radiation quantities such as radiated lobe patterns, frequency, and power. A database of PIC simulation results was created and, using a nonlinear curve-fitting program, compared with theoretical scaling laws. Overall, the small-spot behavior predicted by the theoretical scaling laws was generally observed in the PIC simulation data, providing confidence in both the theoretical scaling laws and the PIC simulations.

  6. 2D PIC simulations for an EN discharge with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Michael A.; Kawamura, Emi; Lichtenberg, Allan J.

    2009-10-01

    We conducted 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for an electronegative (EN) discharge with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions, and compared the results to a previously developed 1D (radial) analytical model of an EN plasma with strongly magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions [1]. In both cases, there is a static uniform applied magnetic field in the axial direction. The 1D radial model mimics the wall losses of the particles in the axial direction by introducing a bulk loss frequency term νL. A special (desired) solution was found in which only positive and negative ions but no electrons escaped radially. The 2D PIC results show good agreement with the 1D model over a range of parameters and indicate that the analytical form of νL employed in [1] is reasonably accurate. However, for the PIC simulations, there is always a finite flux of electrons to the radial wall which is about 10 to 30% of the negative ion flux.[4pt] [1] G. Leray, P. Chabert, A.J. Lichtenberg and M.A. Lieberman, J. Phys. D, accepted for publication 2009.

  7. A 2-D Implicit, Energy and Charge Conserving Particle In Cell Method

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Allen L.; Knoll, Dana A.; Cieren, Emmanuel B.; Feltman, Nicolas; Leibs, Christopher A.; McCarthy, Colleen; Murthy, Karthik S.; Wang, Yijie

    2012-09-10

    Recently, a fully implicit electrostatic 1D charge- and energy-conserving particle-in-cell algorithm was proposed and implemented by Chen et al ([2],[3]). Central to the algorithm is an advanced particle pusher. Particles are moved using an energy conserving scheme and are forced to stop at cell faces to conserve charge. Moreover, a time estimator is used to control errors in momentum. Here we implement and extend this advanced particle pusher to include 2D and electromagnetic fields. Derivations of all modifications made are presented in full. Special consideration is taken to ensure easy coupling into the implicit moment based method proposed by Taitano et al [19]. Focus is then given to optimizing the presented particle pusher on emerging architectures. Two multicore implementations, and one GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) implementation are discussed and analyzed.

  8. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT`S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field (``port approximation``). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  9. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT'S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field ( port approximation''). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  10. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of long-anode magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rajendra Kumar; Maurya, Shivendra; Singh, Vindhyavasini Prasad

    2016-03-01

    Long Anode Magnetron (LAM) is a design scheme adopted to attain greater thermal stability and higher power levels for the conventional magnetrons. So a LAM for 5MW Power level at 2.858 GHz was `Virtual Prototyped' using Admittance Matching field theory (AMT) andthen a PIC Study (Beam-wave interaction) was conducted using CST Particle Studio (CST-PS) which is explained in this paper. The convincing results thus obtained were - hot resonant frequency of 2.834 GHz. Output power of 5 MW at beam voltage of 58kV and applied magnetic field of 2200 Gauss with an overall efficiency of 45%. The simulated parameters values on comparison with the E2V LAM tube (M5028) were in good agreement which validates the feasibility of the design approach.

  11. 2D electrostatic PIC algorithm for laser induced studying plasma in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, C. A.; Riascos, H.; Gonzalez, C.

    2016-02-01

    Particle-In-Cell(PIC) method is widely used for simulating plasma kinetic models. A 2D-PIC electrostatic algorithm is implemented for simulating the expansion of a laser- induced plasma plume. For potential and Electric Field calculation, Dirichlet and periodic boundary conditions are used in the X (perpendicular to the ablated material) and Y directions, respectively. Poisson-solver employs FFTW3 library and the five-point Laplacian to compute the electric potential. Electric field calculation is made by central finite differences method. Leap-frog scheme updates particle positions and velocities at each iteration. Plume expansion anlysis is done for the Emission and Post-Emission stages. In the Emission phase (while the laser is turned on), fast electron expansion is observed and ion particles remain near the surface of the ablated material. In the post-emission stage (with the laser turned off) the charge separation produces an electric field that accelerates the ions leading to the formation of a KeV per particle Ion-Front. At the end of the expansion, fastest electrons escape from the simulation space; an almost homogeneous ion-electron distribution is observed, decreasing the electric field value and the Coulomb interactions.

  12. Response of plasma facing components in Tokamaks due to intense energy deposition using Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genco, Filippo

    Damage to plasma-facing components (PFC) due to various plasma instabilities is still a major concern for the successful development of fusion energy and represents a significant research obstacle in the community. It is of great importance to fully understand the behavior and lifetime expectancy of PFC under both low energy cycles during normal events and highly energetic events as disruptions, Edge-Localized Modes (ELM), Vertical Displacement Events (VDE), and Run-away electron (RE). The consequences of these high energetic dumps with energy fluxes ranging from 10 MJ/m2 up to 200 MJ/m 2 applied in very short periods (0.1 to 5 ms) can be catastrophic both for safety and economic reasons. Those phenomena can cause a) large temperature increase in the target material b) consequent melting, evaporation and erosion losses due to the extremely high heat fluxes c) possible structural damage and permanent degradation of the entire bulk material with probable burnout of the coolant tubes; d) plasma contamination, transport of target material into the chamber far from where it was originally picked. The modeling of off-normal events such as Disruptions and ELMs requires the simultaneous solution of three main problems along time: a) the heat transfer in the plasma facing component b) the interaction of the produced vapor from the surface with the incoming plasma particles c) the transport of the radiation produced in the vapor-plasma cloud. In addition the moving boundaries problem has to be considered and solved at the material surface. Considering the carbon divertor as target, the moving boundaries are two since for the given conditions, carbon doesn't melt: the plasma front and the moving eroded material surface. The current solution methods for this problem use finite differences and moving coordinates system based on the Crank-Nicholson method and Alternating Directions Implicit Method (ADI). Currently Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods are widely used for solving

  13. Performance of the UCAN2 Gyrokinetic Particle In Cell (PIC) Code on Two Massively Parallel Mainframes with Intel ``Sandy Bridge'' Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboeuf, Jean-Noel; Decyk, Viktor; Newman, David; Sanchez, Raul

    2013-10-01

    The massively parallel, 2D domain-decomposed, nonlinear, 3D, toroidal, electrostatic, gyrokinetic, Particle in Cell (PIC), Cartesian geometry UCAN2 code, with particle ions and adiabatic electrons, has been ported to two emerging mainframes. These two computers, one at NERSC in the US built by Cray named Edison and the other at the Barcelona Supercomputer Center (BSC) in Spain built by IBM named MareNostrum III (MNIII) just happen to share the same Intel ``Sandy Bridge'' processors. The successful port of UCAN2 to MNIII which came online first has enabled us to be up and running efficiently in record time on Edison. Overall, the performance of UCAN2 on Edison is superior to that on MNIII, particularly at large numbers of processors (>1024) for the same Intel IFORT compiler. This appears to be due to different MPI modules (OpenMPI on MNIII and MPICH2 on Edison) and different interconnection networks (Infiniband on MNIII and Cray's Aries on Edison) on the two mainframes. Details of these ports and comparative benchmarks are presented. Work supported by OFES, USDOE, under contract no. DE-FG02-04ER54741 with the University of Alaska at Fairbanks.

  14. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2014-02-01

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than λD. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed.

  15. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, P. Serianni, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2014-02-15

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than λ{sub D}. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed.

  16. A 2D Particle in Cell model for ion extraction and focusing in electrostatic accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2014-02-01

    Negative ions are fundamental to produce intense and high energy neutral beams used to heat the plasma in fusion devices. The processes regulating the ion extraction involve the formation of a sheath on a scale comparable to the Debye length of the plasma. On the other hand, the ion acceleration as a beam is obtained on distances greater than λD. The paper presents a model for both the phases of ion extraction and acceleration of the ions and its implementation in a numerical code. The space charge of particles is deposited following usual Particle in Cell codes technique, while the field is solved with finite element methods. Some hypotheses on the beam plasma transition are described, allowing to model both regions at the same time. The code was tested with the geometry of the NIO1 negative ions source, and the results are compared with existing ray tracing codes and discussed.

  17. TWANG-PIC, a novel gyro-averaged one-dimensional particle-in-cell code for interpretation of gyrotron experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Braunmueller, F. Tran, T. M.; Alberti, S.; Genoud, J.; Hogge, J.-Ph.; Tran, M. Q.; Vuillemin, Q.

    2015-06-15

    A new gyrotron simulation code for simulating the beam-wave interaction using a monomode time-dependent self-consistent model is presented. The new code TWANG-PIC is derived from the trajectory-based code TWANG by describing the electron motion in a gyro-averaged one-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach. In comparison to common PIC-codes, it is distinguished by its computation speed, which makes its use in parameter scans and in experiment interpretation possible. A benchmark of the new code is presented as well as a comparative study between the two codes. This study shows that the inclusion of a time-dependence in the electron equations, as it is the case in the PIC-approach, is mandatory for simulating any kind of non-stationary oscillations in gyrotrons. Finally, the new code is compared with experimental results and some implications of the violated model assumptions in the TWANG code are disclosed for a gyrotron experiment in which non-stationary regimes have been observed and for a critical case that is of interest in high power gyrotron development.

  18. Numerical experiments on unstructured PIC stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Day, David Minot

    2011-04-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) is a method for plasmas simulation. Particles are pushed with Verlet time integration. Fields are modeled using finite differences on a tensor product mesh (cells). The Unstructured PIC methods studied here use instead finite element discretizations on unstructured (simplicial) meshes. PIC is constrained by stability limits (upper bounds) on mesh and time step sizes. Numerical evidence (2D) and analysis will be presented showing that similar bounds constrain unstructured PIC.

  19. Catalog of velocity distributions around a reconnection site in 2D PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Lukas; Bourdin, Philippe-A.; Nakamura, Takuma K. M.; Nakamura, Rumi; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-04-01

    The velocity distribution of electrons and ions are known to be a marker for regions where magnetic reconnection develops. Past theoretical and computational works demonstrated that non-gyrotropic and anisotropic distributions depending on particle meandering motions and accelerations are seen around the reconnection point. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is expected to resolve such kinetic scale reconnection regions. We present a catalog of velocity distribution functions that can give hints on the location within the current sheet relative to the reconnection point, which is sometimes unclear from pure spacecraft observations. We use 2D PIC simulations of anti-parallel magnetic reconnection to obtain velocity distributions at different locations, like in the center of the reconnection site, the ion and electron diffusion regions, or the reconnection inflow and outflow regions. With sufficiently large number of particles we resolve the distribution functions also in rather small regions. Such catalog may be compared with future MMS observations of the Earth's magnetotail.

  20. Plasma asymmetry due to the magnetic filter in fusion-type negative ion sources: Comparisons between two and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fubiani, G. Boeuf, J. P.

    2014-07-15

    Previously reported 2D Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC-MCC) simulations of negative ion sources under conditions similar to those of the ITER neutral beam injection system have shown that the presence of the magnetic filter tends to generate asymmetry in the plasma properties in the extraction region. In this paper, we show that these conclusions are confirmed by 3D PIC-MCC simulations and we provide quantitative comparisons between the 2D and 3D model predictions.

  1. Conformal Electromagnetic Particle in Cell: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Meierbachtol, Collin S.; Greenwood, Andrew D.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2015-10-26

    We review conformal (or body-fitted) electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) numerical solution schemes. Included is a chronological history of relevant particle physics algorithms often employed in these conformal simulations. We also provide brief mathematical descriptions of particle-tracking algorithms and current weighting schemes, along with a brief summary of major time-dependent electromagnetic solution methods. Several research areas are also highlighted for recommended future development of new conformal EM-PIC methods.

  2. Fully implicit, energy-conserving electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations in multiple dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon, Luis; Chen, Guangye

    2015-11-01

    We discuss a new, implicit 2D-3V particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm for non-radiative, electromagnetic kinetic plasma simulations, based on the Vlasov-Darwin model. The Vlasov-Darwin model avoids radiative noise issues, but is elliptic and renders explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. Absolutely stable, fully implicit, charge and energy conserving PIC algorithms for both electrostatic and electromagnetic regimes have been recently developed in 1D. In this study, we build on these recent successes to develop a multi-D, fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov-Darwin model. The algorithm conserves global energy, local charge, and particle canonical-momentum exactly. The nonlinear iteration is effectively accelerated with a fluid preconditioner, allowing the efficient use of large timesteps compared to the explicit CFL. We demonstrate the potential of the approach with various numerical examples in 2D-3V.

  3. Ligand Efficiency Outperforms pIC50 on Both 2D MLR and 3D CoMFA Models: A Case Study on AR Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazhong; Bai, Fang; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-12-01

    The concept of ligand efficiency is defined as biological activity in each molecular size and is widely accepted throughout the drug design community. Among different LE indices, surface efficiency index (SEI) was reported to be the best one in support vector machine modeling, much better than the generally and traditionally used end-point pIC50. In this study, 2D multiple linear regression and 3D comparative molecular field analysis methods are employed to investigate the structure-activity relationships of a series of androgen receptor antagonists, using pIC50 and SEI as dependent variables to verify the influence of using different kinds of end-points. The obtained results suggest that SEI outperforms pIC50 on both MLR and CoMFA models with higher stability and predictive ability. After analyzing the characteristics of the two dependent variables SEI and pIC50, we deduce that the superiority of SEI maybe lie in that SEI could reflect the relationship between molecular structures and corresponding bioactivities, in nature, better than pIC50. This study indicates that SEI could be a more rational parameter to be optimized in the drug discovery process than pIC50.

  4. Multi-dimensional, fully implicit, exactly conserving electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations in curvilinear geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangye; Chacon, Luis

    2015-11-01

    We discuss a new, conservative, fully implicit 2D3V Vlasov-Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm in curvilinear geometry for non-radiative, electromagnetic kinetic plasma simulations. Unlike standard explicit PIC schemes, fully implicit PIC algorithms are unconditionally stable and allow exact discrete energy and charge conservation. Here, we extend these algorithms to curvilinear geometry. The algorithm retains its exact conservation properties in curvilinear grids. The nonlinear iteration is effectively accelerated with a fluid preconditioner for weakly to modestly magnetized plasmas, which allows efficient use of large timesteps, O (√{mi/me}c/veT) larger than the explicit CFL. In this presentation, we will introduce the main algorithmic components of the approach, and demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 1D (slow shock) and 2D (island coalescense).

  5. Particle-in-cell simulations of Hall plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Martins, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Hall plasma thrusters can be modelled using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In these simulations, the plasma is described by a set of equations which represent a coupled system of charged particles and electromagnetic fields. The fields are computed using a spatial grid (i.e., a discretization in space), whereas the particles can move continuously in space. Briefly, the particle and fields dynamics are computed as follows. First, forces due to electric and magnetic fields are employed to calculate the velocities and positions of particles. Next, the velocities and positions of particles are used to compute the charge and current densities at discrete positions in space. Finally, these densities are used to solve the electromagnetic field equations in the grid, which are interpolated at the position of the particles to obtain the acting forces, and restart this cycle. We will present numerical simulations using software for PIC simulations to study turbulence, wave and instabilities that arise in Hall plasma thrusters. We have sucessfully reproduced a numerical simulation of a SPT-100 Hall thruster using a two-dimensional (2D) model. In addition, we are developing a 2D model of a cylindrical Hall thruster. The results of these simulations will contribute to improve the performance of plasma thrusters to be used in Cubesats satellites currenty in development at the Plasma Laboratory at University of Brasília.

  6. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of transport in a magnetized electronegative plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, E.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Lieberman, M. A.

    2010-11-15

    Particle transport in a uniformly magnetized electronegative plasma is studied in two-dimensional (2D) geometry with insulating (dielectric) boundaries. A 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) code is employed, with the results compared to analytic one-dimensional models that approximate the end losses as volume losses. A modified oxygen reaction set is used to scale to the low densities used in PIC codes and also to approximately model other gases. The principal study is the limiting of the transverse electron flow due to strong electron magnetization. The plasma in the PIC calculation is maintained by axial currents that vary across the transverse dimension. For a cosine current profile nearly uniform electron temperature is obtained, which at the B-fields studied (600-1200 G) give a small but significant fraction (0.25 or less) of electron to negative ion transverse loss. For a more transverse-confined current, and approximating the higher mass and attachment reaction rate of iodine, the fraction of electron to negative ion transverse loss can be made very small. The models which have been constructed reasonably approximate the PIC results and indicate that the cross-field transport is nearly classical.

  7. Multidimensional, fully implicit, exactly conserving electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We discuss a new, conservative, fully implicit 2D-3V particle-in-cell algorithm for non-radiative, electromagnetic kinetic plasma simulations, based on the Vlasov-Darwin model. Unlike earlier linearly implicit PIC schemes and standard explicit PIC schemes, fully implicit PIC algorithms are unconditionally stable and allow exact discrete energy and charge conservation. This has been demonstrated in 1D electrostatic and electromagnetic contexts. In this study, we build on these recent algorithms to develop an implicit, orbit-averaged, time-space-centered finite difference scheme for the Darwin field and particle orbit equations for multiple species in multiple dimensions. The Vlasov-Darwin model is very attractive for PIC simulations because it avoids radiative noise issues in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes. The algorithm conserves global energy, local charge, and particle canonical-momentum exactly, even with grid packing. The nonlinear iteration is effectively accelerated with a fluid preconditioner, which allows efficient use of large timesteps, O(√{mi/me}c/veT) larger than the explicit CFL. In this presentation, we will introduce the main algorithmic components of the approach, and demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 1D and 2D. Support from the LANL LDRD program and the DOE-SC ASCR office.

  8. Modeling Laser Wake Field Acceleration with the Quasi-Static PIC Code QuickPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, J.; Antonsen, T. Jr.; Cooley, J.; Silva, L. O.

    2006-11-27

    We use the Quasi-static Particle-In-Cell code QuickPIC to model laser wake field acceleration, in both uniform and parabolic plasma channels within current state of the art experimental laser and plasma parameters. QuickPIC uses the quasi-static approximation, which allows the separation of the plasma and laser evolution, as they respond in different time scales. The laser is evolved with a larger time step, that correctly resolves distances of the order of the Rayleigh length, according to the ponderomotive guiding center approximation, while the plasma response is calculated through a quasi-static field solver for each transverse 2d slice. We have performed simulations that show very good agreement between QuickPIC and three dimensional simulations using the full PIC code OSIRIS. We have scanned laser intensities from those for which linear plasma waves are excited to those for which the plasma response is highly nonlinear. For these simulations, QuickPIC was 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than OSIRIS.

  9. Particle-In-Cell simulation of laser irradiated two-component microspheres in 2 and 3 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauw, Viktoria; Ostermayr, Tobias M.; Bamberg, Karl-Ulrich; Böhl, Patrick; Deutschmann, Fabian; Kiefer, Daniel; Klier, Constantin; Moschüring, Nils; Ruhl, Hartmut

    2016-09-01

    We examine proton acceleration from spherical carbon-hydrogen targets irradiated by a relativistic laser pulse. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are carried out in 2 and 3 dimensions (2D and 3D) to compare fast proton spectra. We find very different final kinetic energies in 2D and 3D simulations. We show that they are caused by the different Coulomb fields in 2D and 3D. We propose a correction scheme for the proton energies to test this hypothesis. In the case of sub-focus diameter targets comparison of corrected 2D energies with 3D results show good agreement. This demonstrates that caution is required when modeling experiments with simulations of reduced dimensionality.

  10. Concurrent Algorithm For Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, Paulett C.; Decyk, Viktor K.

    1990-01-01

    Separate decompositions used for particle-motion and field calculations. General Concurrent Particle-in-Cell (GCPIC) algorithm used to implement motions of individual plasma particles (ions and electrons) under influence of particle-in-cell (PIC) computer codes on concurrent processors. Simulates motions of individual plasma particles under influence of electromagnetic fields generated by particles themselves. Performed to study variety of nonlinear problems in plasma physics, including magnetic and inertial fusion, plasmas in outer space, propagation of electron and ion beams, free-electron lasers, and particle accelerators.

  11. Propagation of numerical noise in particle-in-cell tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesting, Frederik; Franchetti, Giuliano

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) is the most used algorithm to perform self-consistent tracking of intense charged particle beams. It is based on depositing macroparticles on a grid, and subsequently solving on it the Poisson equation. It is well known that PIC algorithms occupy intrinsic limitations as they introduce numerical noise. Although not significant for short-term tracking, this becomes important in simulations for circular machines over millions of turns as it may induce artificial diffusion of the beam. In this work, we present a modeling of numerical noise induced by PIC algorithms, and discuss its influence on particle dynamics. The combined effect of particle tracking and noise created by PIC algorithms leads to correlated or decorrelated numerical noise. For decorrelated numerical noise we derive a scaling law for the simulation parameters, allowing an estimate of artificial emittance growth. Lastly, the effect of correlated numerical noise is discussed, and a mitigation strategy is proposed.

  12. Particle-in-cell simulations with charge-conserving current deposition on graphic processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Chuang; Kong, Xianglong; Huang, Michael; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2011-10-01

    Recently using CUDA, we have developed an electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code with charge-conserving current deposition for Nvidia graphic processing units (GPU's) (Kong et al., Journal of Computational Physics 230, 1676 (2011). On a Tesla M2050 (Fermi) card, the GPU PIC code can achieve a one-particle-step process time of 1.2 - 3.2 ns in 2D and 2.3 - 7.2 ns in 3D, depending on plasma temperatures. In this talk we will discuss novel algorithms for GPU-PIC including charge-conserving current deposition scheme with few branching and parallel particle sorting. These algorithms have made efficient use of the GPU shared memory. We will also discuss how to replace the computation kernels of existing parallel CPU codes while keeping their parallel structures. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Grant Nos. DE-FG02-06ER54879 and DE-FC02-04ER54789 and by NSF under Grant Nos. PHY-0903797 and CCF-0747324.

  13. Electromagnetic direct implicit PIC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, A.B.

    1983-03-29

    Interesting modelling of intense electron flow has been done with implicit particle-in-cell simulation codes. In this report, the direct implicit PIC simulation approach is applied to simulations that include full electromagnetic fields. The resulting algorithm offers advantages relative to moment implicit electromagnetic algorithms and may help in our quest for robust and simpler implicit codes.

  14. Analysis of the beam halo in negative ion sources by using 3D3V PIC code.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Nishioka, S; Goto, I; Hatayama, A; Hanada, M; Kojima, A; Hiratsuka, J

    2016-02-01

    The physical mechanism of the formation of the negative ion beam halo and the heat loads of the multi-stage acceleration grids are investigated with the 3D PIC (particle in cell) simulation. The following physical mechanism of the beam halo formation is verified: The beam core and the halo consist of the negative ions extracted from the center and the periphery of the meniscus, respectively. This difference of negative ion extraction location results in a geometrical aberration. Furthermore, it is shown that the heat loads on the first acceleration grid and the second acceleration grid are quantitatively improved compared with those for the 2D PIC simulation result.

  15. Analysis of the beam halo in negative ion sources by using 3D3V PIC code.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Nishioka, S; Goto, I; Hatayama, A; Hanada, M; Kojima, A; Hiratsuka, J

    2016-02-01

    The physical mechanism of the formation of the negative ion beam halo and the heat loads of the multi-stage acceleration grids are investigated with the 3D PIC (particle in cell) simulation. The following physical mechanism of the beam halo formation is verified: The beam core and the halo consist of the negative ions extracted from the center and the periphery of the meniscus, respectively. This difference of negative ion extraction location results in a geometrical aberration. Furthermore, it is shown that the heat loads on the first acceleration grid and the second acceleration grid are quantitatively improved compared with those for the 2D PIC simulation result. PMID:26932006

  16. A multi-dimensional, energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic Vlasov-Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.

    2015-12-01

    For decades, the Vlasov-Darwin model has been recognized to be attractive for particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic plasma simulations in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes, to avoid radiative noise issues and gain computational efficiency. However, the Darwin model results in an elliptic set of field equations that renders conventional explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. Here, we explore a fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov-Darwin model in multiple dimensions, which overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. The finite-difference scheme for Darwin field equations and particle equations of motion is space-time-centered, employing particle sub-cycling and orbit-averaging. The algorithm conserves total energy, local charge, canonical-momentum in the ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge exactly. An asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy considerations, not stability, and can be orders of magnitude larger than required in a standard explicit electromagnetic PIC simulation. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 2D-3V.

  17. Thrust calculation of electric solar wind sail by particle-in-cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Kento; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Muranaka, Takanobu; Yamakawa, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    In this study, thrust characteristics of an electric solar wind sail were numerically evaluated using full three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The thrust obtained from the PIC simulation was lower than the thrust estimations obtained in previous studies. The PIC simulation indicated that ambient electrons strongly shield the electrostatic potential of the tether of the sail, and the strong shield effect causes a greater thrust reduction than has been obtained in previous studies. Additionally, previous expressions of the thrust estimation were modified by using the shielded potential structure derived from the present simulation results. The modified thrust estimation agreed very well with the thrust obtained from the PIC simulation.

  18. Particle-in-cell modeling for MJ scale dense plasma focus with varied anode shape

    SciTech Connect

    Link, A. Halvorson, C. Schmidt, A.; Hagen, E. C.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2014-12-15

    Megajoule scale dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches with deuterium gas fill are compact devices capable of producing 10{sup 12} neutrons per shot but past predictive models of large-scale DPF have not included kinetic effects such as ion beam formation or anomalous resistivity. We report on progress of developing a predictive DPF model by extending our 2D axisymmetric collisional kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations from the 4 kJ, 200 kA LLNL DPF to 1 MJ, 2 MA Gemini DPF using the PIC code LSP. These new simulations incorporate electrodes, an external pulsed-power driver circuit, and model the plasma from insulator lift-off through the pinch phase. To accommodate the vast range of relevant spatial and temporal scales involved in the Gemini DPF within the available computational resources, the simulations were performed using a new hybrid fluid-to-kinetic model. This new approach allows single simulations to begin in an electron/ion fluid mode from insulator lift-off through the 5-6 μs run-down of the 50+ cm anode, then transition to a fully kinetic PIC description during the run-in phase, when the current sheath is 2-3 mm from the central axis of the anode. Simulations are advanced through the final pinch phase using an adaptive variable time-step to capture the fs and sub-mm scales of the kinetic instabilities involved in the ion beam formation and neutron production. Validation assessments are being performed using a variety of different anode shapes, comparing against experimental measurements of neutron yield, neutron anisotropy and ion beam production.

  19. Particle-in-cell modeling for MJ scale dense plasma focus with varied anode shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, A.; Halvorson, C.; Hagen, E. C.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.; Schmidt, A.

    2014-12-01

    Megajoule scale dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches with deuterium gas fill are compact devices capable of producing 1012 neutrons per shot but past predictive models of large-scale DPF have not included kinetic effects such as ion beam formation or anomalous resistivity. We report on progress of developing a predictive DPF model by extending our 2D axisymmetric collisional kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations from the 4 kJ, 200 kA LLNL DPF to 1 MJ, 2 MA Gemini DPF using the PIC code LSP. These new simulations incorporate electrodes, an external pulsed-power driver circuit, and model the plasma from insulator lift-off through the pinch phase. To accommodate the vast range of relevant spatial and temporal scales involved in the Gemini DPF within the available computational resources, the simulations were performed using a new hybrid fluid-to-kinetic model. This new approach allows single simulations to begin in an electron/ion fluid mode from insulator lift-off through the 5-6 μs run-down of the 50+ cm anode, then transition to a fully kinetic PIC description during the run-in phase, when the current sheath is 2-3 mm from the central axis of the anode. Simulations are advanced through the final pinch phase using an adaptive variable time-step to capture the fs and sub-mm scales of the kinetic instabilities involved in the ion beam formation and neutron production. Validation assessments are being performed using a variety of different anode shapes, comparing against experimental measurements of neutron yield, neutron anisotropy and ion beam production.

  20. Particle-In-Cell Modeling For MJ Dense Plasma Focus with Varied Anode Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, A.; Halvorson, C.; Schmidt, A.; Hagen, E. C.; Rose, D.; Welch, D.

    2014-10-01

    Megajoule scale dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches with deuterium gas fill are compact devices capable of producing 1012 neutrons per shot but past predictive models of large-scale DPF have not included kinetic effects such as ion beam formation or anomalous resistivity. We report on progress of developing a predictive DPF model by extending our 2D axisymmetric collisional kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to the 1 MJ, 2 MA Gemini DPF using the PIC code LSP. These new simulations incorporate electrodes, an external pulsed-power driver circuit, and model the plasma from insulator lift-off through the pinch phase. The simulations were performed using a new hybrid fluid-to-kinetic model transitioning from a fluid description to a fully kinetic PIC description during the run-in phase. Simulations are advanced through the final pinch phase using an adaptive variable time-step to capture the fs and sub-mm scales of the kinetic instabilities involved in the ion beam formation and neutron production. Results will be present on the predicted effects of different anode configurations. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (11-ERD-063) and the Computing Grand Challenge program at LLNL. This work supported by Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development within U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

  1. Accelerating particle-in-cell simulations using multilevel Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketson, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have been an important tool in understanding plasmas since the dawn of the digital computer. Much more recently, the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method has accelerated particle-based simulations of a variety of systems described by stochastic differential equations (SDEs), from financial portfolios to porous media flow. The fundamental idea of MLMC is to perform correlated particle simulations using a hierarchy of different time steps, and to use these correlations for variance reduction on the fine-step result. This framework is directly applicable to the Langevin formulation of Coulomb collisions, as demonstrated in previous work, but in order to apply to PIC simulations of realistic scenarios, MLMC must be generalized to incorporate self-consistent evolution of the electromagnetic fields. We present such a generalization, with rigorous results concerning its accuracy and efficiency. We present examples of the method in the collisionless, electrostatic context, and discuss applications and extensions for the future.

  2. Wavenumber spectrum of whistler turbulence: Particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, S.; Gary, S. Peter; Narita, Y.

    2010-12-15

    The forward cascade of decaying whistler turbulence is studied in low beta plasma to understand essential properties of the energy spectrum at electron scales, by using a two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. This simulation demonstrates turbulence in which the energy cascade rate is greater than the dissipation rate at the electron inertial length. The PIC simulation shows that the magnetic energy spectrum of forward-cascaded whistler turbulence at electron inertial scales is anisotropic and develops a very steep power-law spectrum which is consistent with recent solar wind observations. A comparison of the simulated spectrum with that predicted by a phenomenological turbulence scaling model suggests that the energy cascade at the electron inertial scale depends on both magnetic fluctuations and electron velocity fluctuations, as well as on the whistler dispersion relation. Thus, not only kinetic Alfven turbulence but also whistler turbulence may explain recent solar wind observations of very steep magnetic spectra at short scales.

  3. Classical radiation reaction in particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranic, M.; Martins, J. L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    Under the presence of ultra high intensity lasers or other intense electromagnetic fields the motion of particles in the ultrarelativistic regime can be severely affected by radiation reaction. The standard particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithms do not include radiation reaction effects. Even though this is a well known mechanism, there is not yet a definite algorithm nor a standard technique to include radiation reaction in PIC codes. We have compared several models for the calculation of the radiation reaction force, with the goal of implementing an algorithm for classical radiation reaction in the Osiris framework, a state-of-the-art PIC code. The results of the different models are compared with standard analytical results, and the relevance/advantages of each model are discussed. Numerical issues relevant to PIC codes such as resolution requirements, application of radiation reaction to macro particles and computational cost are also addressed. For parameters of interest where the classical description of the electron motion is applicable, all the models considered are shown to give comparable results. The Landau and Lifshitz reduced model is chosen for implementation as one of the candidates with the minimal overhead and no additional memory requirements.

  4. Modeling femtosecond pulse laser damage using particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Schumacher, Douglass; Chowdhury, Enam

    2014-12-01

    We present, to our knowledge, the first adaptation of the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation method for use in the study of femtosecond pulse laser damage, including the first implementation of the Morse pair-potential for PIC codes. We compare the PIC method to a wide variety of currently used modeling schemes, ranging from purely ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to semi-empirical models with many fitting parameters and show how PIC simulations can provide a complementary approach by filling the gap in theoretical methodology between the two cases. We detail the necessity and implementation of an interatomic pair-potential in PIC studies of laser damage. Finally, we use our model to treat the full laser damage process of a copper target and show that our results compare well to simple scaling laws for crater size.

  5. Modeling femtosecond pulse laser damage on conductors using Particle-In-Cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Schumacher, Douglass; Chowdhury, Enam

    2013-11-01

    We present, to our knowledge, the first adaptation of the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation method for use in the study of femtosecond pulse laser damage, including the first implementation of the Morse potential for PIC codes. We compare the PIC method to a wide variety of currently used modeling schemes, ranging from purely ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations to semi-empirical models with many fitting parameters, and show how PIC simulations can provide a complementary approach by filling the gap in theoretical methodology between the two cases. We detail the necessity and implementation of an inter-atomic pair-potential in PIC studies of laser damage. Lastly, we use our model to treat the full laser damage process of a copper target, and show that our results compare well to simple scaling laws for crater size.

  6. Parallel Higher-order Finite Element Method for Accurate Field Computations in Wakefield and PIC Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg, C.; Ng, C.; Prudencio, E.; Schussman, G.; Uplenchwar, R.; Ko, K.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Over the past years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD), under SciDAC sponsorship, has developed a suite of 3D (2D) parallel higher-order finite element (FE) codes, T3P (T2P) and Pic3P (Pic2P), aimed at accurate, large-scale simulation of wakefields and particle-field interactions in radio-frequency (RF) cavities of complex shape. The codes are built on the FE infrastructure that supports SLAC's frequency domain codes, Omega3P and S3P, to utilize conformal tetrahedral (triangular)meshes, higher-order basis functions and quadratic geometry approximation. For time integration, they adopt an unconditionally stable implicit scheme. Pic3P (Pic2P) extends T3P (T2P) to treat charged-particle dynamics self-consistently using the PIC (particle-in-cell) approach, the first such implementation on a conformal, unstructured grid using Whitney basis functions. Examples from applications to the International Linear Collider (ILC), Positron Electron Project-II (PEP-II), Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and other accelerators will be presented to compare the accuracy and computational efficiency of these codes versus their counterparts using structured grids.

  7. Effects of variations in electron thermal velocity on the whistler anisotropy instability: Particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. Scott; Wang, Joseph; Decyk, Viktor K.; Gary, S. Peter

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates how the physics of the whistler anisotropy instability (WAI) is affected by variations in the electron thermal velocity vte, referred to here in terms of the ratio v̂ t e=vt e/c , where c is the speed of light. The WAI is driven by the electron condition RT>1 , where RT=Te ⊥/Te ∥ is the temperature anisotropy ratio and ⊥/∥ signify directions perpendicular/parallel to the background magnetic field B0 . While a typical value of v̂ t e in the solar wind is ˜0.005 , electromagnetic (EM) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations often use a value near 0.1 in order to maximize the computational time step. In this study, a two-dimensional (2D) Darwin particle-in-cell (DPIC) code, MDPIC2, is used. The time step in the DPIC model is not affected by the choice of v̂ t e , making DPIC suited for this study. A series of simulations are carried out under the condition that the electron βe is held fixed, while v̂ t e is varied over the range 0.1 ≥v̂ t e≥0.025 . The results show that, with βe held fixed, the linear dispersion properties and the nonlinear saturation amplitude and pitch angle scattering rates associated with the WAI are insensitive to the value of v̂ t e . A supplementary investigation is conducted which characterizes how the WAI model is affected at various values of v̂ t e by noise associated with the limited number of particles in a typical PIC simulation. It is found that the evolution of the WAI is more strongly influenced by electrostatic noise as v̂ t e is decreased. The electrostatic noise level is inversely proportional to the number of particles per computational cell ( Nc ); this implies that the number of particles required to remove nonphysical effects from the PIC simulation increases as v̂ t e decreases. It is concluded that PIC simulations of this instability which use an artificially large value of v̂ t e accurately reproduce the response of a cooler plasma as long as a realistic value of βe is used

  8. GPU acceleration of particle-in-cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Benjamin; Cary, John; Meiser, Dominic

    2015-11-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) have become key components in many supercomputing systems, as they can provide more computations relative to their cost and power consumption than conventional processors. However, to take full advantage of this capability, they require a strict programming model which involves single-instruction multiple-data execution as well as significant constraints on memory accesses. To bring the full power of GPUs to bear on plasma physics problems, we must adapt the computational methods to this new programming model. We have developed a GPU implementation of the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, one of the mainstays of plasma physics simulation. This framework is highly general and enables advanced PIC features such as high order particles and absorbing boundary conditions. The main elements of the PIC loop, including field interpolation and particle deposition, are designed to optimize memory access. We describe the performance of these algorithms and discuss some of the methods used. Work supported by DARPA contract W31P4Q-15-C-0061 (SBIR).

  9. A general concurrent algorithm for plasma particle-in-cell simulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, Paulett C.; Decyk, Viktor K.

    1989-01-01

    The general concurrent particle-in-cell (GCPIC) algorithm has been used to implement an electrostatic particle-in-cell code on a 32-node hypercube parallel computer. The GCPIC algorithm decomposes the PIC code by dividing the particle simulation physical domain into subdomains that are equal in number to the number of processors; all subdomains will accordingly possess approximately equal numbers of particles. The portion of the code which updates particle positions and velocities is nearly 100 percent efficient when the number of particles increases linearly with that of hypercube processors.

  10. Fully implicit Particle-in-cell algorithms for multiscale plasma simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon, Luis

    2015-07-16

    The outline of the paper is as follows: Particle-in-cell (PIC) methods for fully ionized collisionless plasmas, explicit vs. implicit PIC, 1D ES implicit PIC (charge and energy conservation, moment-based acceleration), and generalization to Multi-D EM PIC: Vlasov-Darwin model (review and motivation for Darwin model, conservation properties (energy, charge, and canonical momenta), and numerical benchmarks). The author demonstrates a fully implicit, fully nonlinear, multidimensional PIC formulation that features exact local charge conservation (via a novel particle mover strategy), exact global energy conservation (no particle self-heating or self-cooling), adaptive particle orbit integrator to control errors in momentum conservation, and canonical momenta (EM-PIC only, reduced dimensionality). The approach is free of numerical instabilities: ωpeΔt >> 1, and Δx >> λD. It requires many fewer dofs (vs. explicit PIC) for comparable accuracy in challenging problems. Significant CPU gains (vs explicit PIC) have been demonstrated. The method has much potential for efficiency gains vs. explicit in long-time-scale applications. Moment-based acceleration is effective in minimizing NFE, leading to an optimal algorithm.

  11. Finite grid instability and spectral fidelity of the electrostatic Particle-In-Cell algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-K.; Zeng, Y.; Wang, Y.; Meyers, M. D.; Yi, S.; Albright, B. J.

    2016-10-01

    The origin of the Finite Grid Instability (FGI) is studied by resolving the dynamics in the 1D electrostatic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) model in the spectral domain at the single particle level and at the collective motion level. The spectral fidelity of the PIC model is contrasted with the underlying physical system or the gridless model. The systematic spectral phase and amplitude errors from the charge deposition and field interpolation are quantified for common particle shapes used in the PIC models. It is shown through such analysis and in simulations that the lack of spectral fidelity relative to the physical system due to the existence of aliased spatial modes is the major cause of the FGI in the PIC model.

  12. Particle-In-Cell simulations of high pressure plasmas using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Markus; Atteln, Frank; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Mertmann, Philipp; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are widely used to understand the fundamental phenomena in low-temperature plasmas. Particularly plasmas at very low gas pressures are studied using PIC methods. The inherent drawback of these methods is that they are very time consuming -- certain stability conditions has to be satisfied. This holds even more for the PIC simulation of high pressure plasmas due to the very high collision rates. The simulations take up to very much time to run on standard computers and require the help of computer clusters or super computers. Recent advances in the field of graphics processing units (GPUs) provides every personal computer with a highly parallel multi processor architecture for very little money. This architecture is freely programmable and can be used to implement a wide class of problems. In this paper we present the concepts of a fully parallel PIC simulation of high pressure plasmas using the benefits of GPU programming.

  13. Finite grid instability and spectral fidelity of the electrostatic Particle-In-Cell algorithm

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, C. -K.; Zeng, Y.; Wang, Y.; Meyers, M. D.; Yi, S.; Albright, B. J.

    2016-06-07

    The origin of the Finite Grid Instability (FGI) is studied by resolving the dynamics in the 1D electrostatic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) model in the spectral domain at the single particle level and at the collective motion level. The spectral fidelity of the PIC model is contrasted with the underlying physical system or the gridless model. The systematic spectral phase and amplitude errors from the charge deposition and field interpolation are quantified for common particle shapes used in the PIC models. Lastly, it is shown through such analysis and in simulations that the lack of spectral fidelity relative to the physical systemmore » due to the existence of aliased spatial modes is the major cause of the FGI in the PIC model.« less

  14. Laser-plasma interactions with a Fourier-Bessel particle-in-cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyash, Igor A.; Lehe, Remi; Lifschitz, Agustin

    2016-03-01

    A new spectral particle-in-cell (PIC) method for plasma modeling is presented and discussed. In the proposed scheme, the Fourier-Bessel transform is used to translate the Maxwell equations to the quasi-cylindrical spectral domain. In this domain, the equations are solved analytically in time, and the spatial derivatives are approximated with high accuracy. In contrast to the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) methods, that are used commonly in PIC, the developed method does not produce numerical dispersion and does not involve grid staggering for the electric and magnetic fields. These features are especially valuable in modeling the wakefield acceleration of particles in plasmas. The proposed algorithm is implemented in the code PLARES-PIC, and the test simulations of laser plasma interactions are compared to the ones done with the quasi-cylindrical FDTD PIC code CALDER-CIRC.

  15. Physical Fidelity in Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Small Debye-Length Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B. A.; Schroeder, C. B.

    2009-01-22

    The connection between macro-particle shape functions and non-physical phase-space 'heating' in the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm is examined. The development of fine-scale phase-space structures starting from a cold initial condition is shown to be related to spatial correlations in the interpolated fields used in the Lorentz force. It is shown that the plasma evolution via the PIC algorithm from a cold initial condition leads to a state that is not consistent with that of a thermal plasma.

  16. Physical Fidelity in Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Small Debye-Length Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Schroeder, C.B.

    2008-08-01

    The connection between macro-particle shape functions and non-physical phase-space"heating" in the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm is examined. The development of fine-scale phasespace structures starting from a cold initial condition is shown to be related to spatial correlations in the interpolated fields used in the Lorentz force. It is shown that the plasma evolution via the PIC algorithm from a cold initial condition leads to a state that is not consistent with that of a thermal plasma.

  17. A new charge conservation method in electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, T.; Omura, Y.; Tominaga, T.; Matsumoto, H.

    2003-12-01

    We developed a fast algorithm for solving the current density satisfying the continuity equation of charge in electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In PIC simulations of the charge conservation, a particle trajectory over one time step is conventionally assumed to be a straight line. In the present new scheme we assume that a particle trajectory is a zigzag line. Compared with the Villasenor-Buneman method and Esirkepov's method, the present scheme has an advantage in computation speed without any substantial distortion of physics.

  18. Nonequilibrium Gyrokinetic Fluctuation Theory and Sampling Noise in Gyrokinetic Particle-in-cell Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Krommes

    2007-10-09

    The present state of the theory of fluctuations in gyrokinetic GK plasmas and especially its application to sampling noise in GK particle-in-cell PIC simulations is reviewed. Topics addressed include the Δf method, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem for both classical and GK many-body plasmas, the Klimontovich formalism, sampling noise in PIC simulations, statistical closure for partial differential equations, the theoretical foundations of spectral balance in the presence of arbitrary noise sources, and the derivation of Kadomtsev-type equations from the general formalism.

  19. Accuracy Analysis of the PIC Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verboncoeur, J. P.; Cartwright, K. L.

    2000-10-01

    The discretization errors for many steps of the classical Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model have been well-studied (C. K. Birdsall and A. B. Langdon, Plasma Physics via Computer Simulation, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY (1985).) (R. W. Hockney and J. W. Eastwood, Computer Simulation Using Particles, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY (1981).). In this work, the errors in the interpolation algorithms, which provide the connection between continuum particles and discrete fields, are described in greater detail. In addition, the coupling of errors between steps in the method is derived. The analysis is carried out for both electrostatic and electromagnetic PIC models, and the results are demonstrated using a bounded one-dimensional electrostatic PIC code (J. P. Verboncoeur et al., J. Comput. Phys. 104, 321-328 (1993).), as well as a bounded two-dimensional electromagnetic PIC code (J. P. Verboncoeur et al., Comp. Phys. Comm. 87, 199-211 (1995).).

  20. Particle-In-Cell Modeling for MegaJoule Dense Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    Megajoule scale dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches with deuterium gas fill are compact devices capable of producing 1012 neutrons per shot but past predictive models of large-scale DPF have not included kinetic effects such as ion beam formation or anomalous resistivity. We report on progress of developing a predictive DPF model by extending our 2D axisymmetric collisional kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations from the 4 kJ, 200 kA LLNL DPF to 1 MJ, 2 MA Gemini DPF using the PIC code LSP. These new simulations are by far the most detailed and computationally intensive DPF simulations run to date. They incorporate electrodes, an external pulsed-power driver circuit, and model the plasma from insulator lift-off through the pinch phase. To accommodate the vast range of relevant spatial and temporal scales involved in the Gemini DPF within the available computational resources, the simulations were performed using a new hybrid fluid-to-kinetic model. This new approach allows single simulations to begin in an electron/ion fluid mode from insulator lift-off through the 5-6 μs run-down of the 50 + cm anode, then transition to a fully kinetic PIC description during the run-in phase, when the current sheath is 2-3 mm from the central axis of the anode. Simulations are advanced through the final pinch phase using an adaptive variable time-step to capture the fs and sub-mm scales of the kinetic instabilities involved in the ion beam formation and neutron production. An anode shape scan as well as a scan in stored energy/charging voltage has been performed. A comparison of MJ performance for different drivers will be presented. Validation assessments are being performed, comparing against experimental measurements of neutron yield, neutron anisotropy and plasma density. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Computing support for this work came from the LLNL

  1. Extended Magnetohydrodynamics with Embedded Particle-in-Cell (XMHD-EPIC) Simulations of Magnetospheric Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas; Jia, Xianzhe; Welling, Daniel; Chen, Yuxi; Haiducek, John; Jordanova, Vania; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    We have recently developed a new modeling capability to embed the implicit Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model iPIC3D into the BATS-R-US extended magnetohydrodynamic model. The PIC domain can cover the regions where kinetic effects are most important, such as reconnection sites. The BATS-R-US code with its block-adaptive grid can efficiently handle the rest of the computational domain where the MHD or Hall MHD description is sufficient. The current implementation of the MHD-EPIC model allows two-way coupled simulations in two and three dimensions with multiple embedded PIC regions. The MHD and PIC grids can have different grid resolutions and grid structures. The MHD variables and the moments of the PIC distribution functions are interpolated and message passed in an efficient manner through the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). Both BATS-R-US and iPIC3D are massively parallel codes fully integrated into, run by and coupled through the SWMF. We have successfully applied the MHD-EPIC code to model Ganymede's and Mercury's magnetospheres. We compared our results with Galileo and MESSENGER magnetic observations, respectively, and found good overall agreement. We will report our progress on modeling the Earth magnetosphere with MHD-EPIC with the goal of providing direct comparison with and global context for the MMS observations.

  2. Turbulence dissipation challenge: particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y.; Germaschewski, K.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss application of three particle in cell (PIC) codes to the problems relevant to turbulence dissipation challenge. VPIC is a fully kinetic code extensively used to study a variety of diverse problems ranging from laboratory plasmas to astrophysics. PSC is a flexible fully kinetic code offering a variety of algorithms that can be advantageous to turbulence simulations, including high order particle shapes, dynamic load balancing, and ability to efficiently run on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Finally, HYPERS is a novel hybrid (kinetic ions+fluid electrons) code, which utilizes asynchronous time advance and a number of other advanced algorithms. We present examples drawn both from large-scale turbulence simulations and from the test problems outlined by the turbulence dissipation challenge. Special attention is paid to such issues as the small-scale intermittency of inertial range turbulence, mode content of the sub-proton range of scales, the formation of electron-scale current sheets and the role of magnetic reconnection, as well as numerical challenges of applying PIC codes to simulations of astrophysical turbulence.

  3. Multirate Particle-in-Cell Time Integration Techniques of Vlasov-Maxwell Equations for Collisionless Kinetic Plasma Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guangye; Chacon, Luis; Knoll, Dana Alan; Barnes, Daniel C

    2015-07-31

    A multi-rate PIC formulation was developed that employs large timesteps for slow field evolution, and small (adaptive) timesteps for particle orbit integrations. Implementation is based on a JFNK solver with nonlinear elimination and moment preconditioning. The approach is free of numerical instabilities (ωpeΔt >>1, and Δx >> λD), and requires many fewer dofs (vs. explicit PIC) for comparable accuracy in challenging problems. Significant gains (vs. conventional explicit PIC) may be possible for large scale simulations. The paper is organized as follows: Vlasov-Maxwell Particle-in-cell (PIC) methods for plasmas; Explicit, semi-implicit, and implicit time integrations; Implicit PIC formulation (Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) with nonlinear elimination allows different treatments of disparate scales, discrete conservation properties (energy, charge, canonical momentum, etc.)); Some numerical examples; and Summary.

  4. Numerical thermalization in particle-in-cell simulations with Monte-Carlo collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, P. Y.; Lin, T. Y.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-15

    Numerical thermalization in collisional one-dimensional (1D) electrostatic (ES) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations was investigated. Two collision models, the pitch-angle scattering of electrons by the stationary ion background and large-angle collisions between the electrons and the neutral background, were included in the PIC simulation using Monte-Carlo methods. The numerical results show that the thermalization times in both models were considerably reduced by the additional Monte-Carlo collisions as demonstrated by comparisons with Turner's previous simulation results based on a head-on collision model [M. M. Turner, Phys. Plasmas 13, 033506 (2006)]. However, the breakdown of Dawson's scaling law in the collisional 1D ES PIC simulation is more complicated than that was observed by Turner, and the revised scaling law of the numerical thermalization time with numerical parameters are derived on the basis of the simulation results obtained in this study.

  5. The use of electromagnetic particle-in-cell codes in accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.

    1988-12-01

    The techniques developed for the numerical simulation of plasmas have numerous applications relevant to accelerators. The operation of many accelerator components involves transients, interactions between beams and rf fields, and internal plasma oscillations. These effects produce non-linear behavior which can be represented accurately by particle in cell (PIC) simulations. We will give a very brief overview of the algorithms used in PIC Codes. We will examine the range of parameters over which they are useful. We will discuss the factors which determine whether a two or three dimensional simulation is most appropriate. PIC codes have been applied to a wide variety of diverse problems, spanning many of the systems in a linear accelerator. We will present a number of practical examples of the application of these codes to areas such as guns, bunchers, rf sources, beam transport, emittance growth and final focus. 8 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Numerical thermalization in particle-in-cell simulations with Monte-Carlo collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P. Y.; Lin, T. Y.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical thermalization in collisional one-dimensional (1D) electrostatic (ES) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations was investigated. Two collision models, the pitch-angle scattering of electrons by the stationary ion background and large-angle collisions between the electrons and the neutral background, were included in the PIC simulation using Monte-Carlo methods. The numerical results show that the thermalization times in both models were considerably reduced by the additional Monte-Carlo collisions as demonstrated by comparisons with Turner's previous simulation results based on a head-on collision model [M. M. Turner, Phys. Plasmas 13, 033506 (2006)]. However, the breakdown of Dawson's scaling law in the collisional 1D ES PIC simulation is more complicated than that was observed by Turner, and the revised scaling law of the numerical thermalization time with numerical parameters are derived on the basis of the simulation results obtained in this study.

  7. Extended particle-in-cell schemes for physics in ultrastrong laser fields: Review and developments.

    PubMed

    Gonoskov, A; Bastrakov, S; Efimenko, E; Ilderton, A; Marklund, M; Meyerov, I; Muraviev, A; Sergeev, A; Surmin, I; Wallin, E

    2015-08-01

    We review common extensions of particle-in-cell (PIC) schemes which account for strong field phenomena in laser-plasma interactions. After describing the physical processes of interest and their numerical implementation, we provide solutions for several associated methodological and algorithmic problems. We propose a modified event generator that precisely models the entire spectrum of incoherent particle emission without any low-energy cutoff, and which imposes close to the weakest possible demands on the numerical time step. Based on this, we also develop an adaptive event generator that subdivides the time step for locally resolving QED events, allowing for efficient simulation of cascades. Further, we present a unified technical interface for including the processes of interest in different PIC implementations. Two PIC codes which support this interface, PICADOR and ELMIS, are also briefly reviewed.

  8. Electrostatic PIC with adaptive Cartesian mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, Vladimir; Arslanbekov, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We describe an initial implementation of an electrostatic Particle-in-Cell (ES-PIC) module with adaptive Cartesian mesh in our Unified Flow Solver framework. Challenges of PIC method with cell-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) are related to a decrease of the particle-per-cell number in the refined cells with a corresponding increase of the numerical noise. The developed ES-PIC solver is validated for capacitively coupled plasma, its AMR capabilities are demonstrated for simulations of streamer development during high-pressure gas breakdown. It is shown that cell-based AMR provides a convenient particle management algorithm for exponential multiplications of electrons and ions in the ionization events.

  9. Discrete Particle Noise in Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Plasma Microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W M; Dimits, A; Hammett, G

    2005-05-24

    Recent gyrokinetic simulations of electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence with flux-tube continuum codes vs. the global particle-in-cell (PIC) code GTC yielded different results despite similar plasma parameters. Differences between the simulations results were attributed to insufficient phase-space resolution and novel physics associated with toroidicity and/or global simulations. We have reproduced the results of the global PIC code using the flux-tube PIC code PG3EQ, thereby eliminating global effects as the cause of the discrepancy. We show that the late-time decay of ETG turbulence and the steady-state heat transport observed in these PIC simulations results from discrete particle noise. Discrete particle noise is a numerical artifact, so both these PG3EQ simulations and the previous GTC simulations have nothing to say about steady-state ETG turbulence and the associated anomalous heat transport. In the course of this work we develop three diagnostics which can help to determine if a particular PIC simulation has become dominated by discrete particle noise.

  10. On the Numerical Dispersion of Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell Code : Finite Grid Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Michael David; Huang, Chengkun; Zeng, Yong; Yi, Sunghwan; Albright, Brian James

    2014-07-15

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the electromagnetic PIC algorithm to analyze the origin of these instabilities. We rigorously derive the faithful 3D numerical dispersion of the PIC algorithm, and then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we account for the manner in which the PIC algorithm updates and samples the fields and distribution function. Temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme are also explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical 1D modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction.

  11. Particle-in-cell Simulations of the Lunar Photoelectron Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Horanyi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Previous observations have identified a number phenomena on the lunar surface, which are best explained as results of duty plasma processes leading to dust charging, levitation and horizontal transport. These observations include Surveyor images of Horizon Glow (HG), astronaut sketches of dust “streamers” and in-situ measurements made by the Lunar Ejecta and Meteorite (LEAM) experiment. Recent laboratory experiments that approximately reproduced the near surface lunar plasma environment showed that charging can lead to the levitation and transport of dust grains in a tenuous electron sheath. A critical ingredient to the observed phenomena is the presence of a photoelectron sheath, formed when solar ultraviolet radiation causes the lunar regolith to emit electrons. In order to understand the dynamics and underlying physics of dust particles on the surface of the Moon, the lunar photoelectron sheath has been modeled via a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code. In order to validate this code, the results are compared with analytical solutions of the electron density, electric field and sheath thickness for three standard electron velocity distributions. Post-validation, initial simulations have focused on the dependence of the lunar photoelectric sheath on non-standard electron velocity distributions and an incoming solar wind flux. Further additions to the model will include the temporal evolution of the solar UV flux and the presence of dust particles, especially their role as sources and sinks of plasma.

  12. Properties of lower-hybrid range wave activity at reconnection jet edge: 3D PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divin, Andrey; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Vaivads, Andris; Andre, Mats; Lapenta, Giovanni; Markidis, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Reconnection fronts are areas of intense currents and enhanced wave activity, since magnetic flux and plasma are piled up there when the accelerated flow encounters denser ambient current sheet. Observations and numerical simulations show that the fronts generate a variety of waves ranging from MHD frequencies up to lower hybrid frequency and above. In the present study we use 2D and 3D Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to investigate the properties of the lower hybrid range waves developing at hot reconnected plasma - current sheet interface. Calculations are performed using implicit parallel code iPIC3D starting from conventional Harris current sheet. Initial evolution of the jet is simulated using 2D approach to save computational time, but 3D calculations are implemented at later stages in order to observe instability linear stage, saturation and transition to turbulence. Properties of the linear stage match closely theoretical predictions for the lower hybrid drift instability. During saturation, the mode produces intense electric fields (several Alfvén in electric fields normalized unit) that can provide an additional mechanism of electron heating at reconnection jet fronts.

  13. PICsar: Particle in cell pulsar magnetosphere simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.

    2016-07-01

    PICsar simulates the magnetosphere of an aligned axisymmetric pulsar and can be used to simulate other arbitrary electromagnetics problems in axisymmetry. Written in Fortran, this special relativistic, electromagnetic, charge conservative particle in cell code features stretchable body-fitted coordinates that follow the surface of a sphere, simplifying the application of boundary conditions in the case of the aligned pulsar; a radiation absorbing outer boundary, which allows a steady state to be set up dynamically and maintained indefinitely from transient initial conditions; and algorithms for injection of charged particles into the simulation domain. PICsar is parallelized using MPI and has been used on research problems with ~1000 CPUs.

  14. Wavelet-based Poisson Solver for use in Particle-In-CellSimulations

    SciTech Connect

    Terzic, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Bohn, C.L.; Pogorelov, I.V.

    2005-05-13

    We report on a successful implementation of a wavelet based Poisson solver for use in 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. One new aspect of our algorithm is its ability to treat the general(inhomogeneous) Dirichlet boundary conditions (BCs). The solver harnesses advantages afforded by the wavelet formulation, such as sparsity of operators and data sets, existence of effective preconditioners, and the ability simultaneously to remove numerical noise and further compress relevant data sets. Having tested our method as a stand-alone solver on two model problems, we merged it into IMPACT-T to obtain a fully functional serial PIC code. We present and discuss preliminary results of application of the new code to the modeling of the Fermilab/NICADD and AES/JLab photoinjectors.

  15. Model and particle-in-cell simulation of ion energy distribution in collisionless sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhuwen; Kong, Bo; Luo, Yuee; Chen, Deliang; Wang, Yuansheng

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we propose a self-consistent theoretical model, which is described by the ion energy distributions (IEDs) in collisionless sheaths, and the analytical results for different combined dc/radio frequency (rf) capacitive coupled plasma discharge cases, including sheath voltage errors analysis, are compared with the results of numerical simulations using a one-dimensional plane-parallel particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The IEDs in collisionless sheaths are performed on combination of dc/rf voltage sources electrodes discharge using argon as the process gas. The incident ions on the grounded electrode are separated, according to their different radio frequencies, and dc voltages on a separated electrode, the IEDs, and widths of energy in sheath and the plasma sheath thickness are discussed. The IEDs, the IED widths, and sheath voltages by the theoretical model are investigated and show good agreement with PIC simulations.

  16. Particle in cell simulation of a radiofrequency plasma jet expanding in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, C. Hawkins, R.; Boswell, R. W.

    2015-03-02

    The effect of a pressure gradient (∼133 Pa–0.133 Pa) on electron and ion energy distributions in a radiofrequency (rf at 13.56 MHz) argon plasma jet is studied using a 1D-3v Particle In Cell (PIC) simulation. The PIC domain is three times that of the 0.018 m long plasma cavity and the total simulation time is 1 ms. Ion heating and acceleration up to a drift velocity about 2000 m s{sup −1} are measured along the jet's main expansion axis. Elastic and charge exchange ion-neutral collisions histograms computed at equilibrium during 0.74 ms show that charge exchange collisions act as the main neutral heating mechanism.

  17. Observation of transient electric fields in particle-in-cell simulation of capacitively coupled discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S. Mishra, S. K.; Kaw, Predhiman K.

    2014-07-15

    The analytical prediction of the presence of transient electric field regions between the bulk plasma and sheath edge in radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma (RF-CCP) discharges has been reported by Kaganovich [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 265006 (2002)]. In this paper, we have used the semi-infinite particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation technique to verify the theoretical prediction for the existence of transient electric field in the linear regime; it is shown that the PIC simulation results are in good agreement with the results predicted by analytical model in this regime. It is also demonstrated that the linear theory overestimates the transient electric field as one moves from linear to weakly nonlinear regime. The effect of applied RF current density and electron temperature on evolution of transition field and phase mixing regime has been explored.

  18. Load management strategy for Particle-In-Cell simulations in high energy particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Dérouillat, J.

    2016-09-01

    In the wake of the intense effort made for the experimental CILEX project, numerical simulation campaigns have been carried out in order to finalize the design of the facility and to identify optimal laser and plasma parameters. These simulations bring, of course, important insight into the fundamental physics at play. As a by-product, they also characterize the quality of our theoretical and numerical models. In this paper, we compare the results given by different codes and point out algorithmic limitations both in terms of physical accuracy and computational performances. These limitations are illustrated in the context of electron laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). The main limitation we identify in state-of-the-art Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes is computational load imbalance. We propose an innovative algorithm to deal with this specific issue as well as milestones towards a modern, accurate high-performance PIC code for high energy particle acceleration.

  19. Fluid preconditioning for Newton–Krylov-based, fully implicit, electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.; Leibs, C.A.; Knoll, D.A.; Taitano, W.

    2014-02-01

    A recent proof-of-principle study proposes an energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in one dimension [9]. The algorithm in the reference employs an unpreconditioned Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method, which ensures nonlinear convergence at every timestep (resolving the dynamical timescale of interest). Kinetic enslavement, which is one key component of the algorithm, not only enables fully implicit PIC as a practical approach, but also allows preconditioning the kinetic solver with a fluid approximation. This study proposes such a preconditioner, in which the linearized moment equations are closed with moments computed from particles. Effective acceleration of the linear GMRES solve is demonstrated, on both uniform and non-uniform meshes. The algorithm performance is largely insensitive to the electron–ion mass ratio. Numerical experiments are performed on a 1D multi-scale ion acoustic wave test problem.

  20. Particle-In-Cell modeling of Fast Ignition experiments on the Titan Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Anthony; Akli, K. U.; Beg, F.; Chen, C. D.; Davies, J. R.; Freeman, R. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Li, K.; McLean, H. S.; Morace, A.; Patel, P. K.; Schumacher, D. W.; Sorokovikova, A. V.; Stephens, R.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Wertepny, D.; Westhover, B.

    2012-10-01

    We report on particle-in-cell-modeling (PIC) of fast ignition experiments conducted on the Titan laser. The Titan laser was used to irradiate multilayer planar targets at intensities greater than 10^20 Wcm-2 to diagnose the laser to electron coupling, electron beam divergence, and energy spectrum of the hot electrons at relativistic intensities. Hot electron beam properties were inferred through buried fluors, escaping electrons and bremsstrahlung measurements. The PIC simulations of the experiment were conducted in two stages: a high resolution laser plasma interaction (LPI) simulation using measured on shot laser parameters but with a subscale target; and a lower resolution transport simulation containing the full scale multilayer target. The transport simulation utilized the electron source based on the output of the LPI simulation and included necessary models to simulate the experimental diagnostics. Comparison of the predicted electron source properties and the experimental data will be presented.

  1. The First Half Century of the Particle-in-Cell Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackbill, J. U.

    2002-08-01

    While this talk is mainly about new results for magnetic reconnection, we will discuss the state of Harlow's particle-in-cell method (PIC) after its first half century. PIC is a remarkably versatile method. It was the first method to model high-speed and free-surface flow in two dimensions, and the first to model collisionless plasmas in two space dimensions. The versatility can be explained by PIC's use of Lagrangian and Eulerian descriptions in a complementary way, which, for example, allows one to model granular material in all its complexity, including history-dependent material response, Coulomb friction, and bonding. Recently, an implicit granular flow method confimed an old conjecture about the connection beween the finite grid instability, nonlinear stability, and energy conservation in PIC plasma simulation. New techniques, including Newton Krylov solvers for the field equations and a new understanding of the correct boundary conditions, result in accurate and robust implicit plasma simulations with the ability to simulate more realistic electron-ion mass ratios. Results from magnetic reconnection studies illustrate why this is important, the role of the lower-hybrid drift instability in symmetry breaking, and magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail, even with a perpendicular field.

  2. Numerical simulation of quantum systems using the Particle-In-Cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirkmann, Sven; Youssef, Ziad; Hemke, Torben; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is a very powerful method for studying the dynamics of plasmas. It has been primarily developed for tracking the charged particle trajectories subject to selfconsistent and external electromagnetic fields. Exploiting the power of modern computers, one is able to track the classical paths of tens of millions of particles at the same time. In the late 1980th, it was Dawson (and later Dauger) who had the idea to apply the PIC method to the classical part in the semiclassical approach to quantum systems via path integral methods. One could estimate that if a thousands of classical paths are sufficient to describe the dynamics of one quantum particle, then millions classical paths could describe the dynamics of a quantum particle system. A PIC code in the frame of a semiclassical approach would therefore enable the investigation of a number of quantum phenomena, e.g., optical properties, electrical properties, and, ultimately, chemical reactions. In this contribution we explain the use of the PIC code yapic (developed by the authors) in the frame of the path integral method and discuss the numerical results for simple quantum phenomena, i.e., the quantum harmonic oscillator and quantum tunneling. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of FOR 2093.

  3. On the numerical dispersion of electromagnetic particle-in-cell code: Finite grid instability

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, M.D.; Huang, C.-K.; Zeng, Y.; Yi, S.A.; Albright, B.J.

    2015-09-15

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the Electromagnetic PIC model. We rigorously derive the faithful 3-D numerical dispersion relation of the PIC model, for a simple, direct current deposition scheme, which does not conserve electric charge exactly. We then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we clarify the presence of alias modes in an eigenmode analysis of the PIC model, which combines both discrete and continuous variables. The manner in which the PIC model updates and samples the fields and distribution function, together with the temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme, is explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1-D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction, which is then verified by simulation. We demonstrate that our analysis is readily extendable to charge conserving models.

  4. Benchmarking the codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC with Laser Wakefield Acceleration Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Kevin; Huang, C.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Mori, W.B.; Tsung, F.S.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cowan, B.; Cary, J.R.; Esarey, E.; Fonseca, R.A.; Martins, S.F.; Silva, L.O.

    2008-09-08

    Three-dimensional laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulations have recently been performed to benchmark the commonly used particle-in-cell (PIC) codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC. The simulations were run in parallel on over 100 processors, using parameters relevant to LWFA with ultra-short Ti-Sapphire laser pulses propagating in hydrogen gas. Both first-order and second-order particle shapes were employed. We present the results of this benchmarking exercise, and show that accelerating gradients from full PIC agree for all values of a0 and that full and reduced PIC agree well for values of a0 approaching 4.

  5. Benchmarking the codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC with Laser Wakefield Acceleration Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Cowan, B.; Cary, J. R.; Huang, C.; Mori, W. B.; Tsung, F. S.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Fonseca, R. A.; Martins, S. F.; Silva, L. O.

    2009-01-22

    Three-dimensional laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulations have recently been performed to benchmark the commonly used particle-in-cell (PIC) codes VORPAL, OSIRIS, and QuickPIC. The simulations were run in parallel on over 100 processors, using parameters relevant to LWFA with ultra-short Ti-Sapphire laser pulses propagating in hydrogen gas. Both first-order and second-order particle shapes were employed. We present the results of this benchmarking exercise, and show that accelerating gradients from full PIC agree for all values of a{sub 0} and that full and reduced PIC agree well for values of a{sub 0} approaching 4.

  6. Magnetospheric Simulations With the Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamics With Embedded Particle-in-Cell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; Jia, X.; Chen, Y.; Markidis, S.; Peng, B.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Tenishev, V.; Borovikov, D.; Haiducek, J. D.; Gombosi, T. I.; Glocer, A.; Dorelli, J.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    We have recently developed a new modeling capability to embed the implicit Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model iPIC3D into the BATS-R-US magnetohydrodynamic model. The PIC domain can cover the regions where kinetic effects are most important, such as reconnection sites. The BATS-R-US code, on the other hand, can efficiently handle the rest of the computational domain where the MHD or Hall MHD description is sufficient with its block-adaptive grid. The current implementation of the MHD-EPIC model allows two-way coupled simulations in two and three dimensions with multiple embedded PIC regions. The MHD and PIC grids can have different grid resolutions. The MHD variables and the moments of the PIC distribution functions are interpolated and message passed in an efficient manner through the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). Both BATS-R-US and iPIC3D are massively parallel codes fully integrated into, run by and coupled through the SWMF. We have successfully applied the MHD-EPIC code to model Ganymede's magnetosphere. Using four PIC regions we have in effect performed a fully kinetic simulation of the moon's mini-magnetosphere with a grid resolution that is about 5 times finer than the ion inertial length. The Hall MHD model provides proper boundary conditions for the four PIC regions and connects them with each other and with the inner and outer outer boundary conditions of the much larger MHD domain. We compare our results with Galileo magnetic observations and find good overall agreement with both Hall MHD and MHD-EPIC simulations. The power spectrum for the small scale fluctuations, however, agrees with the data much better for the MHD-EPIC simulation than for Hall MHD. In the MHD-EPIC simulation, unlike in the pure Hall MHD results, we also find signatures of flux transfer events (FTEs) that agree very well with the observed FTE signatures both in terms of shape and amplitudes. We will also highlight our ongoing efforts to model the magnetospheres of Mercury and

  7. Adaptation of Block-Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement to Particle-In-Cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Colella, Phillip; McCorquodale, Peter; Friedman, Alex; Grote, Dave

    2001-10-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods which solve the Maxwell equations (or a simplification) on a regular Cartesian grid are routinely used to simulate plasma and particle beam systems. Several techniques have been developed to accommodate irregular boundaries and scale variations. We describe here an ongoing effort to adapt the block-structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) algorithm (http://seesar.lbl.gov/AMR/) to the Particle-In-Cell method. The AMR technique connects grids having different resolutions, using interpolation. Special care has to be taken to avoid the introduction of spurious forces close to the boundary of the inner, high-resolution grid, or at least to reduce such forces to an acceptable level. The Berkeley AMR library CHOMBO has been modified and coupled to WARP3d (D.P. Grote et al., Fusion Engineering and Design), 32-33 (1996), 193-200, a PIC code which is used for the development of high current accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion. The methods and preliminary results will be presented.

  8. A variational multi-symplectic particle-in-cell algorithm with smoothing functions for the Vlasov-Maxwell system

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi

    2013-10-15

    Smoothing functions are commonly used to reduce numerical noise arising from coarse sampling of particles in particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations. When applying smoothing functions to symplectic algorithms, the conservation of symplectic structure should be guaranteed to preserve good conservation properties. In this paper, we show how to construct a variational multi-symplectic PIC algorithm with smoothing functions for the Vlasov-Maxwell system. The conservation of the multi-symplectic structure and the reduction of numerical noise make this algorithm specifically suitable for simulating long-term dynamics of plasmas, such as those in the steady-state operation or long-pulse discharge of a super-conducting tokamak. The algorithm has been implemented in a 6D large scale PIC code. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the good conservation properties of the multi-symplectic algorithm and the reduction of the noise due to the application of smoothing function.

  9. Self-consistent particle-in-cell modelling of short pulse absorption and transport for high energy density physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, M. G.; Arber, T. D.; Sircombe, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    In order for detailed, solid density particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to run within a reasonable time frame, novel approaches to modelling high density material must be employed. For the purposes of modelling high intensity, short pulse laser-plasma interactions, however, these approaches must be consistent with retaining a full PIC model in the low-density laser interaction region. By replacing the standard Maxwell field solver with an electric field update based on a simplified Ohm's law in regions of high electron density, it is possible to access densities at and above solid without being subject to the standard grid and time step constraints. Such a model has recently been implemented in the PIC code EPOCH. We present the initial results of a detailed two-dimensional simulation performed to compare the adapted version of the code with recent experimental results from the Orion laser facility.

  10. Simulation of Magnetic Reconnection in Magnetotail by Interlocking Particle-in-Cell and Magnetohydrodynamics on Hierarchical Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, T.; Usami, S.; Horiuchi, R.; Den, M.; Yamashita, K.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a multi-scale phenomenon. Both macroscopic plasma dynamics and microscopic particle kinetics are important there. Numerically, particle methods can deal with micro-scale kinetics, but they generally need much computational resources if one tries to calculate macro-scale by them. On the other hand, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) can solve macro-scale dynamics efficiently, but it cannot reproduce the phenomenon without an appropriate extension. Usami et al. (2008, 2014) developed a code that uses both Particle-in-Cell (PIC) method and MHD. They divided a computational box into three domains; a PIC domain, a MHD domain and an interaction domain. Both PIC and MHD are calculated in the interaction domain and interlocked. They localized the PIC domain and enabled efficient implementation of simulations. In our previous study, we extended Usami's MHD domain to a hierarchical mesh that is controlled by Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) technique (Ogawa et al. 2014), aiming to connect the local PIC calculation with a global MHD simulation.In this study, we apply the code to a simulation of magnetic reconnection in magnetotail. Outer boundary of the MHD domain is decided by data of another global MHD simulation of Earth's magnetosphere, and it leads to magnetic reconnection in the PIC domain. We will describe our method and show results in our poster.This work was supported by JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) 23340182.

  11. Fast 2D fluid-analytical simulation of ion energy distributions and electromagnetic effects in multi-frequency capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Graves, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    A fast 2D axisymmetric fluid-analytical plasma reactor model using the finite elements simulation tool COMSOL is interfaced with a 1D particle-in-cell (PIC) code to study ion energy distributions (IEDs) in multi-frequency capacitive argon discharges. A bulk fluid plasma model, which solves the time-dependent plasma fluid equations for the ion continuity and electron energy balance, is coupled with an analytical sheath model, which solves for the sheath parameters. The time-independent Helmholtz equation is used to solve for the fields and a gas flow model solves for the steady-state pressure, temperature and velocity of the neutrals. The results of the fluid-analytical model are used as inputs to a PIC simulation of the sheath region of the discharge to obtain the IEDs at the target electrode. Each 2D fluid-analytical-PIC simulation on a moderate 2.2 GHz CPU workstation with 8 GB of memory took about 15-20 min. The multi-frequency 2D fluid-analytical model was compared to 1D PIC simulations of a symmetric parallel-plate discharge, showing good agreement. We also conducted fluid-analytical simulations of a multi-frequency argon capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) with a typical asymmetric reactor geometry at 2/60/162 MHz. The low frequency 2 MHz power controlled the sheath width and sheath voltage while the high frequencies controlled the plasma production. A standing wave was observable at the highest frequency of 162 MHz. We noticed that adding 2 MHz power to a 60 MHz discharge or 162 MHz to a dual frequency 2 MHz/60 MHz discharge can enhance the plasma uniformity. We found that multiple frequencies were not only useful for controlling IEDs but also plasma uniformity in CCP reactors.

  12. Accuracy of momentum and gyrodensity transport in global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, B. F.; Villard, L.

    2014-05-01

    Gyrokinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations based on conservative Lagrangian formalisms admit transport equations for conserved quantities such as gyrodensity and toroidal momentum, and these can be derived for arbitrary wavelength, even though previous applications have used the long-wavelength approximation. In control-variate PIC simulations, a consequence of the different treatment of the background (f0) and perturbed parts (δf), when a splitting f = f0 + δf is performed, is that analytical transport relations for the relevant fluxes and moments are only reproduced in the large marker number limit. The transport equations for f can be used to write the inconsistency in the perturbed quantities explicitly in terms of the sampling of the background distribution f0. This immediately allows estimates of the error in consistency of momentum transport in control-variate PIC simulations. This inconsistency tends to accumulate secularly and is not directly affected by the sources and noise control in the system. Although physical tokamaks often rotate quite strongly, the standard gyrokinetic formalism assumes weak perpendicular flows, comparable to the drift speed. For systems with such weak flows, maintaining acceptably small relative errors requires that a number of markers scale with the fourth power of the linear system size to consistently resolve long-wavelength evolution. To avoid this unfavourable scaling, an algorithm for exact gyrodensity transport has been developed, and this is shown to allow accurate simulations with an order of magnitude fewer markers.

  13. Accuracy of momentum and gyrodensity transport in global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, B. F.; Villard, L.

    2014-05-15

    Gyrokinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations based on conservative Lagrangian formalisms admit transport equations for conserved quantities such as gyrodensity and toroidal momentum, and these can be derived for arbitrary wavelength, even though previous applications have used the long-wavelength approximation. In control-variate PIC simulations, a consequence of the different treatment of the background (f{sub 0}) and perturbed parts (δf), when a splitting f = f{sub 0} + δf is performed, is that analytical transport relations for the relevant fluxes and moments are only reproduced in the large marker number limit. The transport equations for f can be used to write the inconsistency in the perturbed quantities explicitly in terms of the sampling of the background distribution f{sub 0}. This immediately allows estimates of the error in consistency of momentum transport in control-variate PIC simulations. This inconsistency tends to accumulate secularly and is not directly affected by the sources and noise control in the system. Although physical tokamaks often rotate quite strongly, the standard gyrokinetic formalism assumes weak perpendicular flows, comparable to the drift speed. For systems with such weak flows, maintaining acceptably small relative errors requires that a number of markers scale with the fourth power of the linear system size to consistently resolve long-wavelength evolution. To avoid this unfavourable scaling, an algorithm for exact gyrodensity transport has been developed, and this is shown to allow accurate simulations with an order of magnitude fewer markers.

  14. Recent advances in the modeling of plasmas with the Particle-In-Cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Lehe, Remi; Vincenti, Henri; Godfrey, Brendan; Lee, Patrick; Haber, Irv

    2015-11-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations of plasmas from first principles. The fundamentals of the PIC method were established decades ago but improvements or variations are continuously being proposed. We report on several recent advances in PIC related algorithms, including: (a) detailed analysis of the numerical Cherenkov instability and its remediation, (b) analytic pseudo-spectral electromagnetic solvers in Cartesian and cylindrical (with azimuthal modes decomposition) geometries, (c) arbitrary-order finite-difference and generalized pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers, (d) novel analysis of Maxwell's solvers' stencil variation and truncation, in application to domain decomposition strategies and implementation of Perfectly Matched Layers in high-order and pseudo-spectral solvers. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231 and the US-DOE SciDAC program ComPASS. Used resources of NERSC, supported by US-DOE Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamics with Embedded Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Toth, G.; Jia, X.; Gombosi, T. I.; Markidis, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury's magnetosphere is much more dynamic than other planetary magnetospheres because of Mercury's weak intrinsic magnetic field and its proximity to the Sun. Magnetic reconnection and Kelvin-Helmholtz phenomena occur in Mercury's magnetopause and magnetotail at higher frequencies than in other planetary magnetosphere. For instance, chains of flux transfer events (FTEs) on the magnetopause, have been frequentlyobserved by the the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft (Slavin et al., 2012). Because ion Larmor radius is comparable to typical spatial scales in Mercury's magnetosphere, finite Larmor radius effects need to be accounted for. In addition, it is important to take in account non-ideal dissipation mechanisms to accurately describe magnetic reconnection. A kinetic approach allows us to model these phenomena accurately. However, kinetic global simulations, even for small-size magnetospheres like Mercury's, are currently unfeasible because of the high computational cost. In this work, we carry out global simulations of Mercury's magnetosphere with the recently developed MHD-EPIC model, which is a two-way coupling of the extended magnetohydrodynamic (XMHD) code BATS-R-US with the implicit Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model iPIC3D. The PIC model can cover the regions where kinetic effects are most important, such as reconnection sites. The BATS-R-US code, on the other hand, can efficiently handle the rest of the computational domain where the MHD or Hall MHD description is sufficient. We will present our preliminary results and comparison with MESSENGER observations.

  16. Particle-in-Cell Modeling of Magnetized Argon Plasma Flow Through Small Mechanical Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Adam B. Sefkow and Samuel A. Cohen

    2009-04-09

    Motivated by observations of supersonic argon-ion flow generated by linear helicon-heated plasma devices, a three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to study whether stationary electrostatic layers form near mechanical apertures intersecting the flow of magnetized plasma. By self-consistently evaluating the temporal evolution of the plasma in the vicinity of the aperture, the PIC simulations characterize the roles of the imposed aperture and applied magnetic field on ion acceleration. The PIC model includes ionization of a background neutral-argon population by thermal and superthermal electrons, the latter found upstream of the aperture. Near the aperture, a transition from a collisional to a collisionless regime occurs. Perturbations of density and potential, with mm wavelengths and consistent with ion acoustic waves, propagate axially. An ion acceleration region of length ~ 200-300 λD,e forms at the location of the aperture and is found to be an electrostatic double layer, with axially-separated regions of net positive and negative charge. Reducing the aperture diameter or increasing its length increases the double layer strength.

  17. Simulation of the Radiative Emission from Plasmas Based on LSP Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, Joseph; Golovkin, Igor; Woodruff, Pamela; Welch, Dale; Thoma, Carston; Witherspoon, Douglas

    2009-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation codes are valuable tools in simulating the physical properties of plasmas in a wide variety of high energy density laboratory plasma experiments. Two examples of this are short-pulse laser experiments, which are used to study the fast ignition concept for inertial fusion, and plasma jet experiments, which are of interest to magnetic fusion and mageto-inertial fusion studies. The LSP code is a widely-used PIC simulation code that computes the detailed characteristics of electron and ion particle distributions in such experiments. To compute the radiative emission characteristics of plasmas based on PIC simulation predictions, we use the SPECT3D multi-dimensional collisional-radiative package to generate high-resolution spectra and images which can be compared with experimental measurements. SPECT3D includes the effects of energetic particles (including relativistic electrons) in computing non-LTE atomic level populations, emergent spectra, and images for the target plasma. We will present results for the radiative characteristics of plasmas created in short-pulse laser and plasma jet experiments.

  18. Performance of particle in cell methods on highly concurrent computational architectures

    SciTech Connect

    M.F. Adams; S. Ethier; N. Wichmann

    2007-08-01

    Particle in cell (PIC) methods are effective in computing Vlasov-Poisson system of equations used in simulations of magnetic fusion plasmas. PIC methods use grid based computations, for solving Poisson’s equation or more generally Maxwell’s equations, as well as Monte-Carlo type methods to sample the Vlasov equation. The presence of two types of discretizations, deterministic field solves and Monte-Carlo methods for the Vlasov equation, pose challenges in understanding and optimizing performance on today large scale computers which require high levels of concurrency. These challenges arises from the need to optimize two very different types of processes and the interactions between them. Modern cache based high-end computers have very deep memory hierarchies and high degrees of concurrency which must be utilized effectively to achieve good performance. The effective use of these machines requires maximizing concurrency by eliminating serial or redundant work and minimizing global communication. A related issue is minimizing the memory traffic between levels of the memory hierarchy because performance is often limited by the bandwidths and latencies of the memory system. This paper discusses some of the performance issues, particularly in regard to parallelism, of PIC methods. The gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) is used for these studies and a new radial grid decomposition is presented and evaluated. Scaling of the code is demonstrated on ITER sized plasmas with up to 16K Cray XT3/4 cores.

  19. Performance of particle in cell methods on highly concurrent computational architectures

    SciTech Connect

    M.F.Adams; S. Ethier; N. Wichmann

    2009-09-23

    Particle in cell (PIC) methods are effective in computing Vlasov-Poisson system of equations used in simulations of magnetic fusion plasmas. PIC methods use grid based computations, for solving Poisson’s equation or more generally Maxwell’s equations, as well as Monte-Carlo type methods to sample the Vlasov equation. The presence of two types of discretizations, deterministic field solves and Monte-Carlo methods for the Vlasov equation, pose challenges in understanding and optimizing performance on today large scale computers which require high levels of concurrency. These challenges arises from the need to optimize two very different types of processes and the interactions between them. Modern cache based high-end computers have very deep memory hierarchies and high degrees of concurrency which must be utilized effectively to achieve good performance. The effective use of these machines requires maximizing concurrency by eliminating serial or redundant work and minimizing global communication. A related issue is minimizing the memory traffic between levels of the memory hierarchy because performance is often limited by the bandwidths and latencies of the memory system. This paper discusses some of the performance issues, particularly in regard to parallelism, of PIC methods. The gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) is used for these studies and a new radial grid decomposition is presented and evaluated. Scaling of the code is demonstrated on ITER sized plasmas with up to 16K Cray XT3/4 cores.

  20. On energy and momentum conservation in particle-in-cell plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackbill, J. U.

    2016-07-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations are a productive and valued tool for the study of nonlinear plasma phenomena, yet there are basic questions about the simulation methods themselves that remain unanswered. Here we study energy and momentum conservation by PIC. We employ both analysis and simulations of one-dimensional, electrostatic plasmas to understand why PIC simulations are either energy or momentum conserving but not both, what role a numerical stability plays in non-conservation, and how errors in conservation scale with the numerical parameters. Conserving both momentum and energy make it possible to model problems such as Jeans'-type equilibria. Avoiding numerical instability is useful, but so is being able to identify when its effect on the results may be important. Designing simulations to achieve the best possible accuracy with the least expenditure of effort requires results on the scaling of error with the numerical parameters. Our results identify the central role of Gauss' law in conservation of both momentum and energy, and the significant differences in numerical stability and error scaling between energy-conserving and momentum-conserving simulations.

  1. Use of particle-in-cell simulations to improve the actinometry technique for determination of absolute atomic oxygen density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, J.; Kechkar, S.; O'Connor, N.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M.; Daniels, S.

    2013-08-01

    Actinometry is a non-invasive optical technique that can be used to quantitatively monitor atomic oxygen number densities [O] in gas discharges under certain operating conditions. However, careless application of the technique can lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the behaviour of atomic oxygen in plasma. One limitation on this technique is an accurate knowledge of the various rate constants required, which in turn is hampered by an insufficiently precise knowledge of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in the plasma. In this work, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are used to generate theoretical EEDFs. To validate a simulation the electron density ne produced by the PIC code is compared with experimental ne values measured using a hairpin probe. The PIC input parameters are adjusted to optimize agreement between the PIC and experimental ne results. This approach should in principle yield an EEDF that more accurately reflects the true EEDF in the plasma. The PIC EEDF is then used to generate rate constants for the actinometry model which should improve the accuracy of the quantitative [O] result for that particular set of plasma conditions. The actinometry [O] results are then compared with [O] results obtained using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) to validate the approach.

  2. Extended magnetohydrodynamics with embedded particle-in-cell simulation of Ganymede's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; Jia, Xianzhe; Markidis, Stefano; Peng, Ivy Bo; Chen, Yuxi; Daldorff, Lars K. S.; Tenishev, Valeriy M.; Borovikov, Dmitry; Haiducek, John D.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Glocer, Alex; Dorelli, John C.

    2016-02-01

    We have recently developed a new modeling capability to embed the implicit particle-in-cell (PIC) model iPIC3D into the Block-Adaptive-Tree-Solarwind-Roe-Upwind-Scheme magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The MHD with embedded PIC domains (MHD-EPIC) algorithm is a two-way coupled kinetic-fluid model. As one of the very first applications of the MHD-EPIC algorithm, we simulate the interaction between Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma and Ganymede's magnetosphere. We compare the MHD-EPIC simulations with pure Hall MHD simulations and compare both model results with Galileo observations to assess the importance of kinetic effects in controlling the configuration and dynamics of Ganymede's magnetosphere. We find that the Hall MHD and MHD-EPIC solutions are qualitatively similar, but there are significant quantitative differences. In particular, the density and pressure inside the magnetosphere show different distributions. For our baseline grid resolution the PIC solution is more dynamic than the Hall MHD simulation and it compares significantly better with the Galileo magnetic measurements than the Hall MHD solution. The power spectra of the observed and simulated magnetic field fluctuations agree extremely well for the MHD-EPIC model. The MHD-EPIC simulation also produced a few flux transfer events (FTEs) that have magnetic signatures very similar to an observed event. The simulation shows that the FTEs often exhibit complex 3-D structures with their orientations changing substantially between the equatorial plane and the Galileo trajectory, which explains the magnetic signatures observed during the magnetopause crossings. The computational cost of the MHD-EPIC simulation was only about 4 times more than that of the Hall MHD simulation.

  3. An energy- and charge-conserving, implicit, electrostatic particle-in-cell algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.; Barnes, D. C.

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses a novel fully implicit formulation for a one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation approach. Unlike earlier implicit electrostatic PIC approaches (which are based on a linearized Vlasov-Poisson formulation), ours is based on a nonlinearly converged Vlasov-Ampére (VA) model. By iterating particles and fields to a tight nonlinear convergence tolerance, the approach features superior stability and accuracy properties, avoiding most of the accuracy pitfalls in earlier implicit PIC implementations. In particular, the formulation is stable against temporal (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) and spatial (aliasing) instabilities. It is charge- and energy-conserving to numerical round-off for arbitrary implicit time steps (unlike the earlier "energy-conserving" explicit PIC formulation, which only conserves energy in the limit of arbitrarily small time steps). While momentum is not exactly conserved, errors are kept small by an adaptive particle sub-stepping orbit integrator, which is instrumental to prevent particle tunneling (a deleterious effect for long-term accuracy). The VA model is orbit-averaged along particle orbits to enforce an energy conservation theorem with particle sub-stepping. As a result, very large time steps, constrained only by the dynamical time scale of interest, are possible without accuracy loss. Algorithmically, the approach features a Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov solver. A main development in this study is the nonlinear elimination of the new-time particle variables (positions and velocities). Such nonlinear elimination, which we term particle enslavement, results in a nonlinear formulation with memory requirements comparable to those of a fluid computation, and affords us substantial freedom in regards to the particle orbit integrator. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the advertised properties of the scheme. In particular, long-time ion acoustic wave simulations show that numerical

  4. Lorentz boosted frame simulation technique in Particle-in-cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng

    In this dissertation, we systematically explore the use of a simulation method for modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, called the Lorentz boosted frame technique. In the lab frame the plasma length is typically four orders of magnitude larger than the laser pulse length. Using this technique, simulations are performed in a Lorentz boosted frame in which the plasma length, which is Lorentz contracted, and the laser length, which is Lorentz expanded, are now comparable. This technique has the potential to reduce the computational needs of a LWFA simulation by more than four orders of magnitude, and is useful if there is no or negligible reflection of the laser in the lab frame. To realize the potential of Lorentz boosted frame simulations for LWFA, the first obstacle to overcome is a robust and violent numerical instability, called the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI), that leads to unphysical energy exchange between relativistically drifting particles and their radiation. This leads to unphysical noise that dwarfs the real physical processes. In this dissertation, we first present a theoretical analysis of this instability, and show that the NCI comes from the unphysical coupling of the electromagnetic (EM) modes and Langmuir modes (both main and aliasing) of the relativistically drifting plasma. We then discuss the methods to eliminate them. However, the use of FFTs can lead to parallel scalability issues when there are many more cells along the drifting direction than in the transverse direction(s). We then describe an algorithm that has the potential to address this issue by using a higher order finite difference operator for the derivative in the plasma drifting direction, while using the standard second order operators in the transverse direction(s). The NCI for this algorithm is analyzed, and it is shown that the NCI can be eliminated using the same strategies that were used for the hybrid FFT

  5. Lorentz boosted frame simulation technique in Particle-in-cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng

    In this dissertation, we systematically explore the use of a simulation method for modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, called the Lorentz boosted frame technique. In the lab frame the plasma length is typically four orders of magnitude larger than the laser pulse length. Using this technique, simulations are performed in a Lorentz boosted frame in which the plasma length, which is Lorentz contracted, and the laser length, which is Lorentz expanded, are now comparable. This technique has the potential to reduce the computational needs of a LWFA simulation by more than four orders of magnitude, and is useful if there is no or negligible reflection of the laser in the lab frame. To realize the potential of Lorentz boosted frame simulations for LWFA, the first obstacle to overcome is a robust and violent numerical instability, called the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI), that leads to unphysical energy exchange between relativistically drifting particles and their radiation. This leads to unphysical noise that dwarfs the real physical processes. In this dissertation, we first present a theoretical analysis of this instability, and show that the NCI comes from the unphysical coupling of the electromagnetic (EM) modes and Langmuir modes (both main and aliasing) of the relativistically drifting plasma. We then discuss the methods to eliminate them. However, the use of FFTs can lead to parallel scalability issues when there are many more cells along the drifting direction than in the transverse direction(s). We then describe an algorithm that has the potential to address this issue by using a higher order finite difference operator for the derivative in the plasma drifting direction, while using the standard second order operators in the transverse direction(s). The NCI for this algorithm is analyzed, and it is shown that the NCI can be eliminated using the same strategies that were used for the hybrid FFT

  6. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  7. A Particle-in-cell scheme of the RFQ in the SSC-Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chen; He, Yuan; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Yuri, Batygin; Yin, Ling; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Yuan, You-Jin; Liu, Yong; Chang, Wei; Du, Xiao-Nan; Wang, Zhi; Xia, Jia-Wen

    2010-11-01

    A 52 MHz Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator (linac) is designed to serve as an initial structure for the SSC-Linac system (injector into Separated Sector Cyclotron). The designed injection and output energy are 3.5 keV/u and 143 keV/u, respectively. The beam dynamics in this RFQ have been studied using a three-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code BEAMPATH. Simulation results show that this RFQ structure is characterized by stable values of beam transmission efficiency (at least 95%) for both zero-current mode and the space charge dominated regime. The beam accelerated in the RFQ has good quality in both transverse and longitudinal directions, and could easily be accepted by Drift Tube Linac (DTL). The effect of the vane error and that of the space charge on the beam parameters have been studied as well to define the engineering tolerance for RFQ vane machining and alignment.

  8. A GeneralizedWeight-Based Particle-In-Cell Simulation Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    W.W. Lee, T.G. Jenkins and S. Ethier

    2010-02-02

    A generalized weight-based particle simulation scheme suitable for simulating magnetized plasmas, where the zeroth-order inhomogeneity is important, is presented. The scheme is an extension of the perturbative simulation schemes developed earlier for particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The new scheme is designed to simulate both the perturbed distribution (δf) and the full distribution (full-F) within the same code. The development is based on the concept of multiscale expansion, which separates the scale lengths of the background inhomogeneity from those associated with the perturbed distributions. The potential advantage for such an arrangement is to minimize the particle noise by using δf in the linear stage stage of the simulation, while retaining the flexibility of a full-F capability in the fully nonlinear stage of the development when signals associated with plasma turbulence are at a much higher level than those from the intrinsic particle noise.

  9. Recent results and future challenges for large scale Particle-In-Cell simulations of plasma-based accelerator concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; An, W.; Decyk, V.K.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Tsung, F.S.; Tzoufras, M.; Morshed, S.; Antomsen, T.; Feng, B.; Katsouleas, T; Fonseca, R.A.; Martins, S.F.; Vieira, J.; Silva, L.O.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E; Vay, J.-L.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Cowan, B.; Cary, J.R.; Paul, K.

    2009-05-01

    The concept and designs of plasma-based advanced accelerators for high energy physics and photon science are modeled in the SciDAC COMPASS project with a suite of Particle-In-Cell codes and simulation techniques including the full electromagnetic model, the envelope model, the boosted frame approach and the quasi-static model. In this paper, we report the progress of the development of these models and techniques and present recent results achieved with large-scale parallel PIC simulations. The simulation needs for modeling the plasma-based advanced accelerator at the energy frontier is discussed and a path towards this goal is outlined.

  10. Metadata, PICS and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses PICS (Platform for Internet Content Selection), the Centre for Information Quality Management (CIQM), and metadata. Highlights include filtering networked information; the quality of information; and standardizing search engines. (LRW)

  11. First principles simulation of laser-induced periodic surface structure using the particle-in-cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Chowdhury, Enam A.

    2015-11-01

    We present our results of a fundamental simulation of a periodic grating structure formation on a copper target during the femtosecond-pulse laser damage process, and compare our results to recent experiment. The particle-in-cell (PIC) method is used to model the initial laser heating of the electrons, a two-temperature model (TTM) is used to model the thermalization of the material, and a modified PIC method is employed to model the atomic transport leading to a damage crater morphology consistent with experimental grating structure formation. This laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is shown to be directly related to the formation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and their interference with the incident laser pulse.

  12. An energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic particle-in-cell algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangye; Chacon, Luis; Knoll, Dana; Daughton, William; CoCoMans (LANL) Team

    2013-10-01

    A recent proof-of-principle study proposes a nonlinear electrostatic implicit particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in one dimension. The algorithm employs a kinetically enslaved Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method, and conserves energy and charge to numerical round-off. In this study, we generalize the method to electromagnetic simulations in 1D using the Darwin approximation of Maxwell's equations. An implicit, orbit-averaged central finite difference scheme is applied to both the Darwin field equations and the particle orbit equations to produce a discrete system that remains exactly charge-and energy-conserving. Furthermore, the canonical momentum in any ignorable direction is exactly conserved per particle by appropriate interpolations of the magnetic field. A fluid preconditioner targeting the stiffest electron waves has been developed to accelerate the linear GMRES solver of JFNK. We present 1D numerical experiments (e.g. the Weibel instability, kinetic Alfven wave ion-ion streaming instability, etc.) to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the implicit Darwin PIC algorithm, and the performance of the fluid preconditioner.

  13. Electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Deca, J; Divin, A; Lapenta, G; Lembège, B; Markidis, S; Horányi, M

    2014-04-18

    We present the first three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier magnetohydrodynamics and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows us to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe for the first time the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under plasma conditions such that only the electron population is magnetized. The fully kinetic treatment identifies electromagnetic modes that alter the magnetic field at scales determined by the electron physics. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Future human exploration as well as lunar science in general therefore hinges on a better understanding of LMAs. PMID:24785022

  14. Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Atmospheric Pressure He/2%H2O Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Graves, D. B.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure micro-discharges in contact with liquid surfaces are of increasing interest, especially in the bio-medical field. We conduct 1D3v particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a voltage-driven 1 mm width atmospheric pressure He/2% H2O plasma discharge in series with an 0.5 mm width liquid H2O layer and a 1mm width quartz dielectric layer. A previously developed two-temperature hybrid global model of atmospheric pressure He/H2O discharges was used to determine the most important species and collisional reactions to use in the PIC simulations. We found that H13O6+, H5O3-, and electrons were the most prominent charged species, while most of the metastable helium He* was quenched via Penning ionization. The ion-induced secondary emission coefficient γi was assumed to be 0.15 at all surfaces. A series of simulations were conducted at 27.12 MHz with Jrf ~ 800-2200 A/m2. The H2O rotational and vibrational excitation losses were so high that electrons reached the walls at thermal temperatures. We also simulated a much lower frequency case of 50 kHz with Vrf = 10 kV. In this case, the discharge ran in a pure time-varying γ-mode. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Science Contract DE-SC0001939.

  15. Second-order, exact charge conservation for electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation in complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pointon, T. D.

    2008-10-01

    A second-order, exact charge-conserving algorithm for accumulating charge and current on the spatial grid for electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) simulation in bounded geometry is presented. The algorithm supports standard EM-PIC exterior boundary conditions and complex internal conductors on non-uniform grids. Boundary surfaces are handled by smoothly transitioning from second to first-order weighting within half a cell of the boundary. When a particle is exactly on the boundary surface (either about to be killed, or just created), the weighting is fully first-order. This means that particle creation and particle/surface interaction models developed for first-order weighting do not need to be modified. An additional feature is the use of an energy-conserving interpolation scheme from the electric field on the grid to the particles. Results show that high-density, cold plasmas with ωΔt˜1, and Δx/λ≫1, can be modeled with reasonable accuracy and good energy conservation. This opens up a significant new capability for explicit simulation of high-density plasmas in high-power devices.

  16. Low-noise electromagnetic δf particle-in-cell simulation of electron Bernstein waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Nong; Cary, John R.; Barnes, Daniel C.; Carlsson, John

    2006-06-01

    The conversion of the extraordinary (X) mode to an electron Bernstein wave (EBW) is one way to get rf energy into an overdense plasma. Analysis of this is complex, as the EBW is a fully kinetic wave, and so its linear propagation is described by an intractable integro-differential equation. Nonlinear effects cannot be calculated within this rubric at all. Full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations cannot be used for these analyses, as the noise levels for reasonable simulation parameters are much greater than the typical rf amplitudes. It is shown that the delta-f computations are effective for this analysis. In particular, the accuracy of those computations has been verified by comparison with full PIC, cold plasma theory, and small gyroradius theory. This computational method is then used to analyze mode conversion in different frequency regimes. In particular, reasonable agreement with the theoretical predictions of Ram and Schultz [Phys. Plasmas 7, 4084 (2000)] in the linear regime is found, where 100% X -B mode conversion has been obtained when the driving frequency is less than twice the electron gyrofrequency. The results show that cold-plasma theory well predicts the mode conversion efficiency, as is consistent with the phase-space picture of mode conversion. From this it can be shown that nearly 100% X -B mode conversion cannot be obtained when the frequency is higher than the electron second harmonic cyclotron frequency.

  17. An incompressible two-dimensional multiphase particle-in-cell model for dense particle flows

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, D.M.; O`Rourke, P.J.; Andrews, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    A two-dimensional, incompressible, multiphase particle-in-cell (MP-PIC) method is presented for dense particle flows. The numerical technique solves the governing equations of the fluid phase using a continuum model and those of the particle phase using a Lagrangian model. Difficulties associated with calculating interparticle interactions for dense particle flows with volume fractions above 5% have been eliminated by mapping particle properties to a Eulerian grid and then mapping back computed stress tensors to particle positions. This approach utilizes the best of Eulerian/Eulerian continuum models and Eulerian/Lagrangian discrete models. The solution scheme allows for distributions of types, sizes, and density of particles, with no numerical diffusion from the Lagrangian particle calculations. The computational method is implicit with respect to pressure, velocity, and volume fraction in the continuum solution thus avoiding courant limits on computational time advancement. MP-PIC simulations are compared with one-dimensional problems that have analytical solutions and with two-dimensional problems for which there are experimental data.

  18. Novel methods in the Particle-In-Cell accelerator Code-Framework Warp

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J-L; Grote, D. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.

    2012-12-26

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) Code-Framework Warp is being developed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) to guide the development of accelerators that can deliver beams suitable for high-energy density experiments and implosion of inertial fusion capsules. It is also applied in various areas outside the Heavy Ion Fusion program to the study and design of existing and next-generation high-energy accelerators, including the study of electron cloud effects and laser wakefield acceleration for example. This study presents an overview of Warp's capabilities, summarizing recent original numerical methods that were developed by the HIFS-VNL (including PIC with adaptive mesh refinement, a large-timestep 'drift-Lorentz' mover for arbitrarily magnetized species, a relativistic Lorentz invariant leapfrog particle pusher, simulations in Lorentz-boosted frames, an electromagnetic solver with tunable numerical dispersion and efficient stride-based digital filtering), with special emphasis on the description of the mesh refinement capability. In addition, selected examples of the applications of the methods to the abovementioned fields are given.

  19. Electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Deca, J; Divin, A; Lapenta, G; Lembège, B; Markidis, S; Horányi, M

    2014-04-18

    We present the first three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier magnetohydrodynamics and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows us to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe for the first time the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under plasma conditions such that only the electron population is magnetized. The fully kinetic treatment identifies electromagnetic modes that alter the magnetic field at scales determined by the electron physics. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Future human exploration as well as lunar science in general therefore hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.

  20. Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A.; Lapenta, G.; Lembège, B.; Markidis, S.; Horányi, M.

    2014-04-01

    We present the first three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier magnetohydrodynamics and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows us to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe for the first time the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under plasma conditions such that only the electron population is magnetized. The fully kinetic treatment identifies electromagnetic modes that alter the magnetic field at scales determined by the electron physics. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Future human exploration as well as lunar science in general therefore hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.

  1. Development and testing of cut-cell boundaries for electromagnetic particle-in-cell codes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieter, Chet; Smithe, David N.; Stoltz, Peter H.; Cary, John R.

    2007-03-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) approach for electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) is a proven method for many problems involving interactions of charged particles with electromagnetic fields. However accurately modeling fields and particle process at complex boundaries with such methods is still an active research topic. A variety of methods have been developed for this purpose but the testing and application of these methods to real world problems in fairly limited. We have recently implemented the Dey-Mittra boundary algorithm into our EM-PIC code VORPAL. Convergence tests comparing how the frequency of cavity oscillations converge to the physical values for simulations run with stair-step and Dey-Mittra algorithms will be presented. These tests demonstrate how the Dey-Mittra algorithm provides considerable improvements over stair step boundaries. A method to correct for the image charge accumulation from removing particles at complex surfaces will also be presented. Applications to superconducting RF cavities and high-powered microwave devices will be presented.

  2. A multi-dimensional, energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic Vlasov–Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.

    2015-08-11

    For decades, the Vlasov–Darwin model has been recognized to be attractive for particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic plasma simulations in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes, to avoid radiative noise issues and gain computational efficiency. However, the Darwin model results in an elliptic set of field equations that renders conventional explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. We explore a fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov–Darwin model in multiple dimensions, which overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. The finite-difference scheme for Darwin field equations and particle equations of motion is space–time-centered, employing particle sub-cycling and orbit-averaging. This algorithm conserves total energy, local charge,more » canonical-momentum in the ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge exactly. An asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy considerations, not stability, and can be orders of magnitude larger than required in a standard explicit electromagnetic PIC simulation. Finally, we demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 2D–3V.« less

  3. Particle-in-cell simulation of the head-on collision between two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xin; Xu, Yan-xia; Duan, Wen-shan E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn; Zhang, Ling-yu; Yang, Lei E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn

    2014-08-15

    The head-on collision of two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas composed of hot electrons and cold ions has been studied by using the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) perturbation method and one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation. Then the phase lags of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) obtained from the two approaches have been compared and discussed. It has been found that: if the amplitudes of both the colliding IASWs are small enough, the phase lags obtained from PLK method are in good agreement with those obtained from PIC simulation. As the amplitudes of IASWs increase, the phase lags from PIC simulation become smaller than the analytical ones from PLK method. Besides, the PIC simulation shows the phase lag of an IASW involved in collision depends not only on the characteristics of the wave it collides with but also on itself, which disagrees with the prediction of the PLK method. Finally, the application scopes of the PLK method in studying both the single IASW and the head-on collisions of IASWs have been studied and discussed, and the latter turns out to be more strict.

  4. Particle-in-cell simulation of the head-on collision between two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xin; Xu, Yan-xia; Duan, Wen-shan; Zhang, Ling-yu; Yang, Lei

    2014-08-01

    The head-on collision of two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas composed of hot electrons and cold ions has been studied by using the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) perturbation method and one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation. Then the phase lags of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) obtained from the two approaches have been compared and discussed. It has been found that: if the amplitudes of both the colliding IASWs are small enough, the phase lags obtained from PLK method are in good agreement with those obtained from PIC simulation. As the amplitudes of IASWs increase, the phase lags from PIC simulation become smaller than the analytical ones from PLK method. Besides, the PIC simulation shows the phase lag of an IASW involved in collision depends not only on the characteristics of the wave it collides with but also on itself, which disagrees with the prediction of the PLK method. Finally, the application scopes of the PLK method in studying both the single IASW and the head-on collisions of IASWs have been studied and discussed, and the latter turns out to be more strict.

  5. Numerical Approach of Interactions of Proton Beams and Dense Plasmas with Quantum-Hydrodynamic/Particle-in-Cell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya; Li, Lian; Jiang, Wei; Yi, Lin

    2016-07-01

    A one dimensional quantum-hydrodynamic/particle-in-cell (QHD/PIC) model is used to study the interaction process of an intense proton beam (injection density of 1017 cm‑3) with a dense plasma (initial density of ~ 1021 cm‑3), with the PIC method for simulating the beam particle dynamics and the QHD model for considering the quantum effects including the quantum statistical and quantum diffraction effects. By means of the QHD theory, the wake electron density and wakefields are calculated, while the proton beam density is calculated by the PIC method and compared to hydrodynamic results to justify that the PIC method is a more suitable way to simulate the beam particle dynamics. The calculation results show that the incident continuous proton beam when propagating in the plasma generates electron perturbations as well as wakefields oscillations with negative valleys and positive peaks where the proton beams are repelled by the positive wakefields and accelerated by the negative wakefields. Moreover, the quantum correction obviously hinders the electron perturbations as well as the wakefields. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the quantum effects in the interaction of a proton beam with cold dense plasmas, such as in the metal films. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405067, 11105057, 11275007)

  6. A multi-dimensional, energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic Vlasov–Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.

    2015-08-11

    For decades, the Vlasov–Darwin model has been recognized to be attractive for particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic plasma simulations in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes, to avoid radiative noise issues and gain computational efficiency. However, the Darwin model results in an elliptic set of field equations that renders conventional explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. We explore a fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov–Darwin model in multiple dimensions, which overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. The finite-difference scheme for Darwin field equations and particle equations of motion is space–time-centered, employing particle sub-cycling and orbit-averaging. This algorithm conserves total energy, local charge, canonical-momentum in the ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge exactly. An asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy considerations, not stability, and can be orders of magnitude larger than required in a standard explicit electromagnetic PIC simulation. Finally, we demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 2D–3V.

  7. Gyrokinetic and kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of guide-field reconnection. I. Macroscopic effects of the electron flows

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz, P. A. Kilian, P.; Büchner, J.; Told, D.; Jenko, F.

    2015-08-15

    In this work, we compare gyrokinetic (GK) with fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations of magnetic reconnection in the limit of strong guide field. In particular, we analyze the limits of applicability of the GK plasma model compared to a fully kinetic description of force free current sheets for finite guide fields (b{sub g}). Here, we report the first part of an extended comparison, focusing on the macroscopic effects of the electron flows. For a low beta plasma (β{sub i} = 0.01), it is shown that both plasma models develop magnetic reconnection with similar features in the secondary magnetic islands if a sufficiently high guide field (b{sub g} ≳ 30) is imposed in the kinetic PIC simulations. Outside of these regions, in the separatrices close to the X points, the convergence between both plasma descriptions is less restrictive (b{sub g} ≳ 5). Kinetic PIC simulations using guide fields b{sub g} ≲ 30 reveal secondary magnetic islands with a core magnetic field and less energetic flows inside of them in comparison to the GK or kinetic PIC runs with stronger guide fields. We find that these processes are mostly due to an initial shear flow absent in the GK initialization and negligible in the kinetic PIC high guide field regime, in addition to fast outflows on the order of the ion thermal speed that violate the GK ordering. Since secondary magnetic islands appear after the reconnection peak time, a kinetic PIC/GK comparison is more accurate in the linear phase of magnetic reconnection. For a high beta plasma (β{sub i} = 1.0) where reconnection rates and fluctuations levels are reduced, similar processes happen in the secondary magnetic islands in the fully kinetic description, but requiring much lower guide fields (b{sub g} ≲ 3)

  8. CPIC: a curvilinear Particle-In-Cell code for plasma-material interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delzanno, G.; Camporeale, E.; Moulton, J. D.; Borovsky, J. E.; MacDonald, E.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    We present a recently developed Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code in curvilinear geometry called CPIC (Curvilinear PIC) [1], where the standard PIC algorithm is coupled with a grid generation/adaptation strategy. Through the grid generator, which maps the physical domain to a logical domain where the grid is uniform and Cartesian, the code can simulate domains of arbitrary complexity, including the interaction of complex objects with a plasma. At present the code is electrostatic. Poisson's equation (in logical space) can be solved with either an iterative method based on the Conjugate Gradient (CG) or the Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) coupled with a multigrid solver used as a preconditioner, or directly with multigrid. The multigrid strategy is critical for the solver to perform optimally or nearly optimally as the dimension of the problem increases. CPIC also features a hybrid particle mover, where the computational particles are characterized by position in logical space and velocity in physical space. The advantage of a hybrid mover, as opposed to more conventional movers that move particles directly in the physical space, is that the interpolation of the particles in logical space is straightforward and computationally inexpensive, since one does not have to track the position of the particle. We will present our latest progress on the development of the code and document the code performance on standard plasma-physics tests. Then we will present the (preliminary) application of the code to a basic dynamic-charging problem, namely the charging and shielding of a spherical spacecraft in a magnetized plasma for various level of magnetization and including the pulsed emission of an electron beam from the spacecraft. The dynamical evolution of the sheath and the time-dependent current collection will be described. This study is in support of the ConnEx mission concept to use an electron beam from a magnetospheric spacecraft to trace magnetic field lines from the

  9. The Convergence of Particle-in-Cell Schemes for Cosmological Dark Matter Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Andrew; Colella, Phillip; Van Straalen, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Particle methods are a ubiquitous tool for solving the Vlasov-Poisson equation in comoving coordinates, which is used to model the gravitational evolution of dark matter (DM) in an expanding universe. However, these methods are known to produce poor results on idealized test problems, particularly at late times, after the particle trajectories have crossed. To investigate this, we have performed a series of one- and two-dimensional “Zel’dovich pancake” calculations using the popular particle-in-cell (PIC) method. We find that PIC can indeed converge on these problems provided that the following modifications are made. The first modification is to regularize the singular initial distribution function by introducing a small but finite artificial velocity dispersion. This process is analogous to artificial viscosity in compressible gas dynamics, and, as with artificial viscosity, the amount of regularization can be tailored so that its effect outside of a well-defined region—in this case, the high-density caustics—is small. The second modification is the introduction of a particle remapping procedure that periodically reexpresses the DM distribution function using a new set of particles. We describe a remapping algorithm that is third-order accurate and adaptive in phase space. This procedure prevents the accumulation of numerical errors in integrating the particle trajectories from growing large enough to significantly degrade the solution. Once both of these changes are made, PIC converges at second order on the Zel’dovich pancake problem, even at late times, after many caustics have formed. Furthermore, the resulting scheme does not suffer from the unphysical, small-scale “clumping” phenomenon known to occur on the pancake problem when the perturbation wavevector is not aligned with one of the Cartesian coordinate axes.

  10. Canonical symplectic particle-in-cell method for long-term large-scale simulations of the Vlasov–Maxwell equations

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Jianyuan; Zhang, Ruili; He, Yang; Wang, Yulei; Sun, Yajuan; Burby, Joshua W.; Ellison, Leland; Zhou, Yao

    2015-12-14

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is the most important numerical tool in plasma physics. However, its long-term accuracy has not been established. To overcome this difficulty, we developed a canonical symplectic PIC method for the Vlasov-Maxwell system by discretising its canonical Poisson bracket. A fast local algorithm to solve the symplectic implicit time advance is discovered without root searching or global matrix inversion, enabling applications of the proposed method to very large-scale plasma simulations with many, e.g. 10(9), degrees of freedom. The long-term accuracy and fidelity of the algorithm enables us to numerically confirm Mouhot and Villani's theory and conjecture on nonlinear Landau damping over several orders of magnitude using the PIC method, and to calculate the nonlinear evolution of the reflectivity during the mode conversion process from extraordinary waves to Bernstein waves.

  11. [PIC Program Evaluation Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, N. J.

    These 4 questionnaires are designed to elicit teacher and parent evaluations of the Prescriptive Instruction Center (PIC) program. Included are Teacher Evaluation of Program Effectiveness (14 items), M & M Evaluation of Program Implementation (methods and materials specialists; 11 items), Teacher Evaluation of Program Effectiveness--Case Study…

  12. What Makes a PIC Tick?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, H. Wynn

    1988-01-01

    The author discusses the establishment and objectives of private industry councils (PICs). Such topics as local decision making, private sector representation, on-site evaluations, and summer jobs programs are covered. Emphasis is on the Atlanta, Georgia PIC. (CH)

  13. New Particle-in-Cell Code for Numerical Simulation of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Balsa Terzic, Rui Li

    2010-05-01

    We present a first look at the new code for self-consistent, 2D simulations of beam dynamics affected by the coherent synchrotron radiation. The code is of the particle-in-cell variety: the beam bunch is sampled by point-charge particles, which are deposited on the grid; the corresponding forces on the grid are then computed using retarded potentials according to causality, and interpolated so as to advance the particles in time. The retarded potentials are evaluated by integrating over the 2D path history of the bunch, with the charge and current density at the retarded time obtained from interpolation of the particle distributions recorded at discrete timesteps. The code is benchmarked against analytical results obtained for a rigid-line bunch. We also outline the features and applications which are currently being developed.

  14. Particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless shock formation via head-on merging of two laboratory supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Hsu, S. C.

    2013-08-15

    We describe numerical simulations, using the particle-in-cell (PIC) and hybrid-PIC code lsp[T. P. Hughes et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 110401 (1999)], of the head-on merging of two laboratory supersonic plasma jets. The goals of these experiments are to form and study astrophysically relevant collisionless shocks in the laboratory. Using the plasma jet initial conditions (density ∼10{sup 14}–10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}, temperature ∼ few eV, and propagation speed ∼20–150 km/s), large-scale simulations of jet propagation demonstrate that interactions between the two jets are essentially collisionless at the merge region. In highly resolved one- and two-dimensional simulations, we show that collisionless shocks are generated by the merging jets when immersed in applied magnetic fields (B∼0.1–1 T). At expected plasma jet speeds of up to 150 km/s, our simulations do not give rise to unmagnetized collisionless shocks, which require much higher velocities. The orientation of the magnetic field and the axial and transverse density gradients of the jets have a strong effect on the nature of the interaction. We compare some of our simulation results with those of previously published PIC simulation studies of collisionless shock formation.

  15. Particle-in-cell and global simulations of α to γ transition in atmospheric pressure Penning-dominated capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Chabert, P.; Lazzaroni, C.

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure radio-frequency (rf) capacitive micro-discharges are of interest due to emerging applications, especially in the bio-medical field. A previous global model did not consider high-power phenomena such as sheath multiplication, thus limiting its applicability to the lower power range. To overcome this, we use one-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of atmospheric He/0.1% N2 capacitive discharges over a wide range of currents and frequencies to guide the development of a more general global model which is also valid at higher powers. The new model includes sheath multiplication and two classes of electrons: the higher temperature ‘hot’ electrons associated with the sheaths, and the cooler ‘warm’ electrons associated with the bulk. The electric field and the electron power balance are solved analytically to determine the time-varying hot and warm temperatures and the effective rate coefficients. The particle balance equations are integrated numerically to determine the species densities. The model and PIC results are compared, showing reasonable agreement over the range of currents and frequencies studied. They indicate a transition from an α mode at low power characterized by relatively high electron temperature Te with a near uniform profile to a γ mode at high power with a Te profile strongly depressed in the bulk plasma. The transition is accompanied by an increase in density and a decrease in sheath widths. The current and frequency scalings of the model are confirmed by the PIC simulations.

  16. Wave-Particle Interactions with Whistlers: Comparison Between Particle-in-Cell and Quasi-Linear Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporeale, E.; Zimbardo, G.

    2015-12-01

    We study the wave-particle interactions between lower band chorus whistlers and an anisotropic tenuous population of relativistic electrons. We present the first direct comparison of first-principle particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with a quasi-linear diffusion code. In the PIC approach, the waves are self-consistently generated by the temperature anisotropy instability that quickly saturates and relaxes the system toward marginal stability. We show that the quasi-linear diffusion and PIC results have significant quantitative mismatch in regions of energy/pitch angle where the resonance condition is not satisfied. Moreover, for pitch angles close to the loss cone the diffusion code overestimates the scattering, particularly at low energies. This suggests that higher-order nonlinear theories should be taken in consideration in order to capture non-resonant interactions, resonance broadening, and to account for scattering at angles close to 90 degree. Finally, we show that pitch angle diffusion is enhanced during the linear wave growth phase, and it rapidly saturates well before a single bounce period. We discuss how the saturation is related to the fact that the domain in which the particles pitch angle diffuse is bounded, and to the well-known problem of 90 degree diffusion barrier.

  17. A study of the discharge characteristics and energy balance of a Ne/Xe pulsed planar dielectric barrier: simulation via the one-dimensional particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collision method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benstâali, W.; Harrache, Z.; Belasri, A.

    2012-06-01

    Plasma display panels (PDPs) are one of the leading technologies in the flat panels market. However, they are facing intense competition. Different fluid models, both one-dimensional (1D) and 2D, have been used to analyze the energy balance in PDP cells in order to find out how the xenon excitation part can be improved to optimize the luminous efficiency. The aim of this work is to present a 1D particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model for PDPs. The discharge takes place in a Xe10-Ne gas mixture at 560 Torr. The applied voltage is 381 V. We show at first that this model reproduces the electric characteristics of a single PDP discharge pulse. Then, we calculate the energy deposited by charged particles in each collision. The total energy is about 19 μJ cm-2, and the energy used in xenon excitation is of the order of 12.5% compared to the total energy deposited in the discharge. The effect of xenon content in a Xe-Ne mixture is also analyzed. The energies deposited in xenon excitation and ionization are more important when the xenon percentage has been increased from 1 to 30%. The applied voltage increases the energy deposited in xenon excitation.

  18. Particle-in-cell simulation using parallel techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzlikova, N.; Leggate, H.; Turner, M. M.

    2011-10-01

    Particle-in-cell simulation is an accurate but computationally expensive approach to modelling low-temperature plasma. Consequently, implementations of this method should preferably make efficient use of computer resources. In modern hardware, such resources typically include a high degree of parallelism, using facilities such as vectorisation and multi-threading. Capabilities of this kind appear in both general purpose processors and in more specialised hardware such as graphical processing units. In principle, very large improvements in performance can be achieved by exploiting such hardware. This paper discusses particle-in-cell implementation using features of this kind. We will show that accelerations in excess of an order of magnitude are quite easily achieved, and that considerably greater performance is likely to be achieved with specialized hardware.

  19. Vectorizing the interpolation routines of particle-in-cell codes

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of the interpolation routines in particle-in-cell codes is presented indicating the problems in vectorizing them. Solutions to these problems are then discussed with the timing results indicating the effectiveness of the solutions. A comparison of our methods to those of Nishiguchi et al. (J. Comput. Phys. 61, 519 (1985)) is presented. Finally, multitasking is briefly addressed. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc.

  20. photon-plasma: A modern high-order particle-in-cell code

    SciTech Connect

    Haugbølle, Troels; Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Nordlund, Åke

    2013-06-15

    We present the photon-plasma code, a modern high order charge conserving particle-in-cell code for simulating relativistic plasmas. The code is using a high order implicit field solver and a novel high order charge conserving interpolation scheme for particle-to-cell interpolation and charge deposition. It includes powerful diagnostics tools with on-the-fly particle tracking, synthetic spectra integration, 2D volume slicing, and a new method to correctly account for radiative cooling in the simulations. A robust technique for imposing (time-dependent) particle and field fluxes on the boundaries is also presented. Using a hybrid OpenMP and MPI approach, the code scales efficiently from 8 to more than 250.000 cores with almost linear weak scaling on a range of architectures. The code is tested with the classical benchmarks particle heating, cold beam instability, and two-stream instability. We also present particle-in-cell simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and new results on radiative collisionless shocks.

  1. Enhanced stopping of macro-particles in particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    May, J.; Tonge, J.; Ellis, I.; Mori, W. B.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-05-15

    We derive an equation for energy transfer from relativistic charged particles to a cold background plasma appropriate for finite-size particles that are used in particle-in-cell simulation codes. Expressions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional particles are presented, with special attention given to the two-dimensional case. This energy transfer is due to the electric field of the wake set up in the background plasma by the relativistic particle. The enhanced stopping is dependent on the q{sup 2}/m, where q is the charge and m is the mass of the relativistic particle, and therefore simulation macro-particles with large charge but identical q/m will stop more rapidly. The stopping power also depends on the effective particle shape of the macro-particle. These conclusions are verified in particle-in-cell simulations. We present 2D simulations of test particles, relaxation of high-energy tails, and integrated fast ignition simulations showing that the enhanced drag on macro-particles may adversely affect the results of these simulations in a wide range of high-energy density plasma scenarios. We also describe a particle splitting algorithm which can potentially overcome this problem and show its effect in controlling the stopping of macro-particles.

  2. Comparing the O+ and H+ Escape Fluxes from Fluid and Particle-in-Cell Solutions of the Polar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eccles, J. V.; Schunk, R. W.; Barakat, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    There are different theoretical descriptions of the terrestrial polar wind. Fluid models of mass, momentum, and energy equations can be used to solve the field-aligned flow of H+ and O+ ions from the ionosphere into the earth's magnetosphere. Particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, which include kinetic processes, have also treated polar wind flow between an active ionospheric boundary condition and the outflow boundary into the magnetosphere. In study, we compare the O+ and H+ escape fluxes from the USU Ionosphere-Plasmasphere Model (IPM) [Schunk et al., 2003] with the escape fluxes from the macroscopic PIC solution of the Generalized Polar Wind (GPW) Model of Barakat and Schunk [2006]. The IPM model results at 1500km are used to supply the time-varying boundary conditions to the GPW model. The escape flux comparisons will be made at the 2.5 Re, which is a typical boundary condition radius for fluxes into MHD magnetosphere models. Classical fluid codes generate escape fluxes driven by the pressure gradients in the ionosphere, while the PIC code has additional energization processes for the polar wind fluxes. Differencing the two escape flux solutions at 2.5 Re will quantify the importance of the additional energization processes within the PIC GPW model. We will make the comparisons of escape fluxes using the model results of 4 different storm periods: an idealized storm period, April 5-8, 2000, 2002 September 27 to October 4, and 2002 October 22-29. These storm periods were chosen for the collaborative studies of the Outflow Measuring Modeling, and Merging GEM focus group. Barakat, A. R. and R. W. Schunk (2006), A three-dimensional model of the generalized polar wind, J. Geophys. Res., 111, A12314, doi:10.1029/2006JA011662. Schunk, R. W., J. V. Eccles, J. J. Sojka, D. C. Thompson, and L. Zhu (2003), Assimilation Ionosphere Model (AIM), Final report, Space Environment Corporation, Providence, Utah.

  3. Particle-in-Cell Simulation of a Micro ECR Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Keisuke; Mori, Daisuke; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2015-09-01

    Downsizing spacecrafts has recently been focused on to decrease mission costs and to increase launch rates, and missions with small satellites would bring a great advantage of reducing their risks. Such a concept supports a new approach to developing precise, reliable, and low-cost micropropulsion systems. We have developed a new type of electromagnetic micro plasma thruster using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharges. The microthruster consists of a microwave antenna and a quartz microplasma chamber 4.15 mm in inner diameter surrounded by two permanent magnet rings. The plasma is generated by 4-GHz microwaves of < 10 W with a propellant gas of Xe, where the ions are accelerated through divergent magnetic fields and the resulting ambipolar electric fields generated. To investigate plasma characteristics of the thruster, we simulated the plasma density, electrostatic potential, and ion velocity in the exhaust area by the particle-in-cell (PIC) method with a Monte Carlo calculation for particle collisions, where the electrostatic field and the ion velocity were obtained by solving the Poisson equation and the equation of motion, respectively. The numerical results showed that the ions generated in the plasma are well confined by the applied magnetic fields and diffuse out of the discharge tube, then being accelerated by a potential drop of ~7 V through divergent magnetic fields from < 1000 to > 3000 m/s (< 0 . 7 to > 6 eV) in the axial direction.

  4. Gyrokinetic and kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of guide-field reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio Alejandro; Büchner, Jörg; Kilian, Patrick; Told, Daniel; Jenko, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations of (strong) guide-field reconnection can be computationally very demanding, due to the intrinsic stability and accuracy conditions required by this numerical method. One convenient approach to circumvent this issue is using gyrokinetic theory, an approximation of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations for strongly magnetized plasmas that eliminates the fast gyromotion, and thus reduces the computational cost. Although previous works have started to compare the features of reconnection between both approaches, a complete understanding of the differences is far from being complete. This knowledge is essential to discern the limitations of the gyrokinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection when applied to scenarios with moderate guide fields, such as the Solar corona, in contrast to most of the fusion/laboratory plasmas. We extend a previous work by our group, focused in the differences in the macroscopic flows, by analyzing the heating processes and non-thermal features developed by reconnection between both plasma approximations. We relate these processes by identifying some high-frequency cross-streaming instabilities appearing only in the fully kinetic approach. We characterize the effects of these phenonema such as anisotropic electron heating, beam formation and turbulence under different parameter regimes. And finally, we identify the conditions under which these instabilities tends to become negligible in the fully kinetic model, and thus a comparison with gyrokinetic theory becomes more reliable.

  5. Particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation of capacitively coupled chlorine plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Kenji; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2011-10-01

    A better understanding of capacitively coupled plasmas (CCP) is still important, because of the development of dual-frequency CCP discharges, and also of the CCP mode that occurs in inductively coupled plasma discharges at low rf powers. This paper presents a two-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo (PIC/MC) simulation of CCP chlorine discharges in an asymmetric parallel-plate rf plasma reactor. The model includes an external electrical circuit with a blocking capacitor and an rf power supply, which gives self-consistently the dc self-bias voltages on the powered electrode. Four charged species (e-, Cl2+, Cl+, Cl-) are taken into account in uniformly distributed Cl2 neutral backgrounds, together with electron-neutral elastic collision and ionization, dissociative attachment, positive ion-neutral elastic collision and charge transfer, and electron-ion and ion-ion recombination. The results indicated that the population of negative ions dominates that of electrons, which governs the plasma discharge and sheath dynamics, and thus the dynamics of incoming ion fluxes onto the powered electrode.

  6. Particle-in-cell study of the ion-to-electron sheath transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2016-08-01

    The form of a sheath near a small electrode, with bias changing from below to above the plasma potential, is studied using 2D particle-in-cell simulations. When the electrode is biased within Te/2 e below the plasma potential, the electron velocity distribution functions (EVDFs) exhibit a loss-cone type truncation due to fast electrons overcoming the small potential difference between the electrode and plasma. No sheath is present in this regime, and the plasma remains quasineutral up to the electrode. The EVDF truncation leads to a presheath-like density and flow velocity gradients. Once the bias exceeds the plasma potential, an electron sheath is present. In this case, the truncation driven behavior persists, but is accompanied by a shift in the maximum value of the EVDF that is not present in the negative bias cases. The flow moment has significant contributions from both the flow shift of the EVDF maximum, and the loss-cone truncation.

  7. 3D PIC Modeling of Microcavity Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald; Moore, Christopher; Yee, Benjamin; Moorman, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We present a number of techniques and challenges in simulating the transient behavior of a microcavity discharge. Our microcavities are typically cylindrical with diameters approximately 50 - 100 μm, heights of 50 - 200 μm, pressure near atmospheric, and operate at a few hundred volts. We employ a fully kinetic simulation methodology, the Particle-in-Cell (PIC) method, with interparticle collisions handled via methods based on direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). In particular, we explicitly include kinetic electrons. Some of the challenges we encounter include variations in number densities, external circuit coupling, and time step resolution constraints. By employing dynamic particle weighting (particle weights vary over time by species and location) we can mitigate some of the challenges modeling systems with 107 variations in number densities. Smoothing mechanisms have been used to attempt to mitigate external circuit response. We perform our simulations on hundreds or thousands of processing cores to accommodate the computational work inherent in using relatively small time step sizes (e.g., 50 fs for a 100 ns calculation). In addition, particle weighting issues inherent to three-dimensional low temperature plasma systems will be mentioned. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Multiphase and multiphysics particle in cell simulation of soot deposition inside a diesel particulate filter single channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccaro, G.; Lapenta, G.; Ferrero, F.; Maizza, G.

    2011-02-01

    In the diesel particulate filters technology a key aspect is represented by the properties of the particulate matter that is collected inside their structure. The work presented is focused on the development of an innovative mathematical tool based on the particle-in-cell method (PIC) for the simulation of the soot distribution inside a single channel of a diesel particulate filter. The basic fluid dynamic equations are solved for the gas phase inside the channel using a novel technique based on the solution of the same set of equations everywhere in the system including the porous medium. This approach is presented as alternative to the more conventional methods of matching conditions across the boundary of the porous region where a Darcy-like flow is developed. The motion of the soot solid particles is instead described through a particle-by-particle approach based on Newton's equations of motion. The coupling between the dynamics of the gas and that of the soot particles, i.e. between these two sub-models, is performed through the implementation of the particle-in-cell technique. This model allows the detailed simulation of the deposition and compaction of the soot inside the filter channels and its characterization in terms of density, permeability and thickness. The model then represents a unique tool for the optimization of the design of diesel particulate filters. The details of the technique implementation and some paradigmatic examples will be shown.

  9. Numerical studies and optimization of magnetron with diffraction output (MDO) using particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzoobi, Alireza

    The first magnetron as a vacuum-tube device, capable of generating microwaves, was invented in 1913. This thesis research focuses on numerical simulation-based analysis of magnetron performance. The particle-in-cell (PIC) based MAGIC software tool has been utilized to study the A6 and the Rising-Sun magnetron structures, and to obtain the optimized geometry for optimizing the device performance. The A6 magnetron is the more traditional structure and has been studied more often. The Rising-Sun geometry, consists of two alternating groups of short and long vanes in angular orientation, and was created to achieve mode stability. The effect of endcaps, changes in lengths of the cathode, the location of cathodes with respect to the anode block, and use of transparent cathodes have been probed to gauge the performance of the A6 magnetron with diffraction output. The simulations have been carried out with different types of endcaps. The results of this thesis research demonstrate peak output power in excess of 1GW, with efficiencies on the order of 66% for magnetic (B)-fields in the range of 0.4T - 0.42T. In addition, particle-in-cell simulations have been performed to provide a numerical evaluation of the efficiency, output power and leakage currents for a 12-cavitiy, Rising-Sun magnetron with diffraction output with transparent cathodes. The results demonstrate peak output power in excess of 2GW, with efficiencies on the order of 68% for B-fields in the 0.42T - 0.46T range. While slightly better performance for longer cathode length has been recorded. The results show the efficiency in excess of 70% and peak output power on the order of 2.1GW for an 18 cm cathode length at 0.45T magnetic field and 400 kV applied voltage. All results of this thesis conform to the definite advantage of having endcaps. Furthermore, the role of secondary electron emission (SEE) on the output performance of the12-cavity, 12-cathodes Rising-Sun magnetron has been probed. The results indicate

  10. Towards robust algorithms for current deposition and dynamic load-balancing in a GPU particle in cell code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesco; Londrillo, Pasquale; Sgattoni, Andrea; Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    We present `jasmine', an implementation of a fully relativistic, 3D, electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code, capable of running simulations in various laser plasma acceleration regimes on Graphics-Processing-Units (GPUs) HPC clusters. Standard energy/charge preserving FDTD-based algorithms have been implemented using double precision and quadratic (or arbitrary sized) shape functions for the particle weighting. When porting a PIC scheme to the GPU architecture (or, in general, a shared memory environment), the particle-to-grid operations (e.g. the evaluation of the current density) require special care to avoid memory inconsistencies and conflicts. Here we present a robust implementation of this operation that is efficient for any number of particles per cell and particle shape function order. Our algorithm exploits the exposed GPU memory hierarchy and avoids the use of atomic operations, which can hurt performance especially when many particles lay on the same cell. We show the code multi-GPU scalability results and present a dynamic load-balancing algorithm. The code is written using a python-based C++ meta-programming technique which translates in a high level of modularity and allows for easy performance tuning and simple extension of the core algorithms to various simulation schemes.

  11. Efficient particle-in-cell simulation of auroral plasma phenomena using a CUDA enabled graphics processing unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Stephen

    This thesis introduces a software framework that effectively utilizes low-cost commercially available Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) to simulate complex scientific plasma phenomena that are modeled using the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) paradigm. The software framework that was developed conforms to the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), a standard for general purpose graphic processing that was introduced by NVIDIA Corporation. This framework has been verified for correctness and applied to advance the state of understanding of the electromagnetic aspects of the development of the Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis. For each phase of the PIC methodology, this research has identified one or more methods to exploit the problem's natural parallelism and effectively map it for execution on the graphic processing unit and its host processor. The sources of overhead that can reduce the effectiveness of parallelization for each of these methods have also been identified. One of the novel aspects of this research was the utilization of particle sorting during the grid interpolation phase. The final representation resulted in simulations that executed about 38 times faster than simulations that were run on a single-core general-purpose processing system. The scalability of this framework to larger problem sizes and future generation systems has also been investigated.

  12. Comparison of multi-fluid moment models with particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Hakim, Ammar H.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an extensible multi-fluid moment model in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection. This model evolves full Maxwell equations and simultaneously moments of the Vlasov-Maxwell equation for each species in the plasma. Effects like electron inertia and pressure gradient are self-consistently embedded in the resulting multi-fluid moment equations, without the need to explicitly solving a generalized Ohm's law. Two limits of the multi-fluid moment model are discussed, namely, the five-moment limit that evolves a scalar pressures for each species and the ten-moment limit that evolves the full anisotropic, non-gyrotropic pressure tensor for each species. We first demonstrate analytically and numerically that the five-moment model reduces to the widely used Hall magnetohydrodynamics (Hall MHD) model under the assumptions of vanishing electron inertia, infinite speed of light, and quasi-neutrality. Then, we compare ten-moment and fully kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a large scale Harris sheet reconnection problem, where the ten-moment equations are closed with a local linear collisionless approximation for the heat flux. The ten-moment simulation gives reasonable agreement with the PIC results regarding the structures and magnitudes of the electron flows, the polarities and magnitudes of elements of the electron pressure tensor, and the decomposition of the generalized Ohm's law. Possible ways to improve the simple local closure towards a nonlocal fully three-dimensional closure are also discussed.

  13. Comparison of multi-fluid moment models with particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liang Germaschewski, K.; Hakim, Ammar H.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-01-15

    We introduce an extensible multi-fluid moment model in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection. This model evolves full Maxwell equations and simultaneously moments of the Vlasov-Maxwell equation for each species in the plasma. Effects like electron inertia and pressure gradient are self-consistently embedded in the resulting multi-fluid moment equations, without the need to explicitly solving a generalized Ohm's law. Two limits of the multi-fluid moment model are discussed, namely, the five-moment limit that evolves a scalar pressures for each species and the ten-moment limit that evolves the full anisotropic, non-gyrotropic pressure tensor for each species. We first demonstrate analytically and numerically that the five-moment model reduces to the widely used Hall magnetohydrodynamics (Hall MHD) model under the assumptions of vanishing electron inertia, infinite speed of light, and quasi-neutrality. Then, we compare ten-moment and fully kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a large scale Harris sheet reconnection problem, where the ten-moment equations are closed with a local linear collisionless approximation for the heat flux. The ten-moment simulation gives reasonable agreement with the PIC results regarding the structures and magnitudes of the electron flows, the polarities and magnitudes of elements of the electron pressure tensor, and the decomposition of the generalized Ohm's law. Possible ways to improve the simple local closure towards a nonlocal fully three-dimensional closure are also discussed.

  14. Three-dimensional simple conformal symplectic particle-in-cell methods for simulations of high power microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Wang, Jianguo; Chen, Zaigao; Cheng, Guoxin; Wang, Pan

    2016-08-01

    To overcome the staircase error in the traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) method, a three dimensional (3D) simple conformal (SC) symplectic PIC method is presented in this paper. The SC symplectic finite integration technique (FIT) scheme is used to advance the electromagnetic fields without reduction of the time step. Particles are emitted from conformal boundaries with the charge conserving emission scheme and moved by using the relativistic Newton-Lorentz force equation. The symplectic formulas of auxiliary-differential equation, complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer (ADE-CFS-PML) are given for truncating the open boundaries, numerical results show that the maximum relative error of truncation is less than 90 dB. Based on the surface equivalence theorem, the computing algorithms of conformal signals' injection are given, numerical results show that the algorithms can give the right mode patterns and the errors of cutoff frequencies could be as low as 0.1%. To verify the conformal algorithms, a magnetically insulated line oscillator is simulated, and the results are compared to those provided by using the 2.5D UNIPIC code, which show that they agree well. The results also show that the high order symplectic integration method can suppress the numerical Cherenkov radiation.

  15. Particle-in-cell method for parallel dynamics in magnetized electron plasmas: Study of high-amplitude BGK modes

    SciTech Connect

    Peinetti, F.; Peano, F.; Coppa, G. . E-mail: gianni.coppa@polito.it; Wurtele, J.

    2006-10-10

    The present paper describes the numerical technique that has been developed, in the framework of the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, to study the dynamics of a nonneutral plasma along the magnetic field lines. In particular, the technique has been employed to simulate the formation and long-term evolution of large-amplitude electrostatic waves experimentally observed in electron plasmas confined in a Penning trap [W. Bertsche, J. Fajans, L. Friedland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 265003]. Due to the peculiar features of the physical system, namely the existence of different time scales and the presence of a perturbative oscillating potential, ad hoc numerical techniques have been developed. In particular, with a suitable radial decomposition all important two-dimensional phenomena are fully taken into account while keeping the computational effort to that of a standard one-dimensional PIC codes. Moreover, a novel particle loading technique (ergodic loading) has been developed, which ensures a significant reduction of numerical noise. The results obtained with the present technique are in excellent agreement with the experiments [F. Peinetti, W. Bertsche, J. Fajans, J. Wurtele, L. Friedland, Phys. Plasmas 12 (2005) 062112]. Moreover, results presented here furnish clear evidences of the close relationship between the observed nonlinear structures and the Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes.

  16. Low frequency, electrodynamic simulation of kinetic plasmas with the DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-In-Cell (DADIPIC) method

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, M.R.

    1995-06-01

    This dissertation describes a new algorithm for simulating low frequency, kinetic phenomena in plasmas. DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-in-Cell (DADIPIC), as its name implies, is a combination of the Darwin and direct implicit methods. One of the difficulties in simulating plasmas lies in the enormous disparity between the fundamental scale lengths of a plasma and the scale lengths of the phenomena of interest. The objective is to create models which can ignore the fundamental constraints without eliminating relevant plasma properties. Over the past twenty years several PIC methods have been investigated for overcoming the constraints on explicit electrodynamic PIC. These models eliminate selected high frequency plasma phenomena while retaining kinetic phenomena at low frequency. This dissertation shows that the combination of Darwin and Direct Implicit allows them to operate better than they have been shown to operate in the past. Through the Darwin method the hyperbolic Maxwell`s equations are reformulated into a set of elliptic equations. Propagating light waves do not exist in the formulation so the Courant constraint on the time step is eliminated. The Direct Implicit method is applied only to the electrostatic field with the result that electrostatic plasma oscillations do not have to be resolved for stability. With the elimination of these constraints spatial and temporal discretization can be much larger than that possible with explicit, electrodynamic PIC. The code functions in a two dimensional Cartesian region and has been implemented with all components of the particle velocities, the E-field, and the B-field. Internal structures, conductors or dielectrics, may be placed in the simulation region, can be set at desired potentials, and driven with specified currents.

  17. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic radio plasma emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.; Thurgood, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    first co-author Jonathan O. Thurgood (QMUL) The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, an underlying mechanism for type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some authors report that no such processes occur and others draw conflicting conclusions, by using 2D, fully kinetic, particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams. Here we present the results of particle-in-cell simulations which for different physical parameters permit or prohibit the plasma emission. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to the frequency beat requirements. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses the emission. Comparison of our results indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, a plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability, which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that evidence of plasma emission in simulations must disentangle the two contributions and not simply interpret changes in total electromagnetic energy as the evidence of plasma emission. In summary, we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. Pre-print can be found at http://astro.qmul.ac.uk/~tsiklauri/jtdt1

  18. Particle-in-cell simulations on graphic processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, C.; Zhou, X.; Li, J.; Huang, M. C.; Zhao, Y.

    2014-10-01

    We will show our recent progress in using GPU's to accelerate the PIC code OSIRIS [Fonseca et al. LNCS 2331, 342 (2002)]. The OISRIS parallel structure is retained and the computation-intensive kernels are shipped to GPU's. Algorithms for the kernels are adapted for the GPU, including high-order charge-conserving current deposition schemes with few branching and parallel particle sorting [Kong et al., JCP 230, 1676 (2011)]. These algorithms make efficient use of the GPU shared memory. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER54789 and by NSF under Grant No. PHY-1314734.

  19. Lagrangian MHD Particle-in-Cell simulations of coronal interplanetary shocks driven by observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Bacchini, Fabio; Bemporad, Alessandro; Susino, Roberto; Olshevskyi, Vyacheslav

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we compare the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters along the June 11, 1999 CME-driven shock front with the results obtained from a CME-like event simulated with the FLIPMHD3D code, based on the FLIP-MHD Particle-in-Cell (PiC) method. The observational data are retrieved from the combination of white-light (WL) coronagraphic data (for the upstream values) and the application of the Rankine-Hugoniot (RH) equations (for the downstream values). The comparison shows a higher compression ratio X and Alfvénic Mach number MA at the shock nose, and a stronger magnetic field deflection d towards the flanks, in agreement with observations. Then, we compare the spatial distribution of MA with the profiles obtained from the solutions of the shock adiabatic equation relating MA, X, and the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock front normal for the special cases of parallel and perpendicular shock, and with a semi-empirical expression for a generically oblique shock. The semi-empirical curve approximates the actual values of MA very well, if the effects of a non-negligible shock thickness and plasma-to magnetic pressure ratio are taken into account throughout the computation. Moreover, the simulated shock turns out to be supercritical at the nose and sub-critical at the flanks. Finally, we develop a new 1D Lagrangian ideal MHD method based on the GrAALE code, to simulate the ion-electron temperature decoupling due to the shock transit. Two models are used, a simple solar wind model and a variable-gamma model. Both produce results in agreement with observations, the second one being capable of introducing the physics responsible for the additional electron heating due to secondary effects (collisions, Alfvén waves, etc.). Work supported by the European Commission under the SWIFF project (swiff.eu)

  20. Colliding Two Shocks: 1-D full Particle-in-Cell Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Hada, T.; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Mazelle, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Shock-shock interactions occur on various places in space and the interaction can produce high energy particles. A coronal mass ejection driven shock can collide with the Earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011]. This study reported that ions are accelerated by the first Fermi acceleration between the two shocks before the collision. An electron acceleration through an interplanetary shock-Earth's bow shock interaction was also reported [Terasawa et al., 1997]. Shock-shock interactions can occur in astrophysical phenomena as well as in the heliosphere. For example, a young supernova shock can collide with the wind termination shock of a massive star if they are close to each other [Bykov et al., 2013]. Although hybrid simulations (ions and electrons treated as super-particles and mass-less fluid, respectively) were carried out to understand the kinetic nature of a shock-shock interaction [Cargill et al., 1986], hybrid simulations cannot resolve electron dynamics and non-thermal electrons. We, therefore, use one-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to investigate a shock-shock interaction in which two shocks collide head-on. In a case of quasi-perpendicular shocks, electrons are accelerated by the mirror reflection between the two shocks before the collision (Fermi acceleration). On the other hand, because ions cannot go back upstream, the electron acceleration mechanism does not occur for ions. In a case of quasi-parallel shocks, ions can go back upstream and are accelerated at the shocks. The accelerated ions have great effect on the shock structure.

  1. ASPEN: A Fully Kinetic, Reduced-Description Particle-in-Cell Model for Modeling Parametric Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, H. X.; Bezzerides, B.; Dubois, D. F.

    1998-11-01

    A fully kinetic, reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) model is presented in which deviations from quasineutrality, electron and ion kinetic effects, and nonlinear interactions between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities are modeled correctly. The model is based on a reduced description where the electromagnetic field is represented by three separate temporal WKB envelopes in order to model low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities. Because temporal WKB approximations are invoked, the simulation can be performed on the electron time scale instead of the time scale of the light waves. The electrons and ions are represented by discrete finite-size particles, permitting electron and ion kinetic effects to be modeled properly. The Poisson equation is utilized to ensure that space-charge effects are included. Although RPIC is fully three dimensional, it has been implemented in only two dimensions on a CRAY-T3D with 512 processors and on the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) parallel computer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the resulting simulation code has been named ASPEN. Given the current computers available to the authors, one and two dimensional simulations are feasible to, and have been, performed. Three dimensional simulations are much more expensive, and are not feasible at this time. However, with rapidly advancing computer technologies, three dimensional simulations may be feasible in the near future. We believe this code is the first PIC code capable of simulating the interaction between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilites in multiple dimensions. Test simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), and Langmuir decay instability (LDI), are presented.

  2. PIC Simulations of Hypersonic Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehoff, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Niemann, C.; Decyk, V.; Schriver, D.; Clark, E.

    2013-12-01

    The plasma sheaths formed around hypersonic aircraft (Mach number, M > 10) are relatively unexplored and of interest today to both further the development of new technologies and solve long-standing engineering problems. Both laboratory experiments and analytical/numerical modeling are required to advance the understanding of these systems; it is advantageous to perform these tasks in tandem. There has already been some work done to study these plasmas by experiments that create a rapidly expanding plasma through ablation of a target with a laser. In combination with a preformed magnetic field, this configuration leads to a magnetic "bubble" formed behind the front as particles travel at about Mach 30 away from the target. Furthermore, the experiment was able to show the generation of fast electrons which could be due to instabilities on electron scales. To explore this, future experiments will have more accurate diagnostics capable of observing time- and length-scales below typical ion scales, but simulations are a useful tool to explore these plasma conditions theoretically. Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations are necessary when phenomena are expected to be observed at these scales, and also have the advantage of being fully kinetic with no fluid approximations. However, if the scales of the problem are not significantly below the ion scales, then the initialization of the PIC simulation must be very carefully engineered to avoid unnecessary computation and to select the minimum window where structures of interest can be studied. One method of doing this is to seed the simulation with either experiment or ion-scale simulation results. Previous experiments suggest that a useful configuration for studying hypersonic plasma configurations is a ring of particles rapidly expanding transverse to an external magnetic field, which has been simulated on the ion scale with an ion-hybrid code. This suggests that the PIC simulation should have an equivalent configuration

  3. FLIP MHD - A particle-in-cell method for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, J. U.

    1991-01-01

    The fluid-implicit-particle, or 'FLIP' method presently extended to 2D and 3D MHD flow incorporates a Lagrangian field representation and yields a grid magnetic Reynolds number of up to 16 while preserving contact continuities that retain the Galilean invariance of the MHD flow equations. Analytical arguments and numerical examples demonstrate the conservation of mass, momentum, magnetic flux, and energy; 2D calculation results for the illustrative cases of contact discontinuity convection, Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flow.

  4. Forced Reconnection in the Near Magnetotail: Onset and Energy Conversion in PIC and MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) together with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Q1 simulations of magnetotail dynamics, we investigate the evolution toward onset of reconnection and the subsequent energy transfer and conversion. In either case, reconnection onset is preceded by a driven phase, during which magnetic flux is added to the tail at the high-latitude boundaries, followed by a relaxation phase, during which the configuration continues to respond to the driving. The boundary deformation leads to the formation of thin embedded current sheets, which are bifurcated in the near tail, converging to a single sheet farther out in the MHD simulations. The thin current sheets in the PIC simulation are carried by electrons and are associated with a strong perpendicular electrostatic field, which may provide a connection to parallel potentials and auroral arcs and an ionospheric signal even prior to the onset of reconnection. The PIC simulation very well satisfies integral entropy conservation (intrinsic to ideal MHD) during this phase, supporting ideal ballooning stability. Eventually, the current intensification leads to the onset of reconnection, the formation and ejection of a plasmoid, and a collapse of the inner tail. The earthward flow shows the characteristics of a dipolarization front: enhancement of Bz, associated with a thin vertical electron current sheet in the PIC simulation. Both MHD and PIC simulations show a dominance of energy conversion from incoming Poynting flux to outgoing enthalpy flux, resulting in heating of the inner tail. Localized Joule dissipation plays only a minor role.

  5. A portable platform for accelerated PIC codes and its application to GPUs using OpenACC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, F.; Tran, T. M.; Jocksch, A.; Lanti, E.; Progsch, J.; Messmer, P.; Brunner, S.; Gheller, C.; Villard, L.

    2016-10-01

    We present a portable platform, called PIC_ENGINE, for accelerating Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes on heterogeneous many-core architectures such as Graphic Processing Units (GPUs). The aim of this development is efficient simulations on future exascale systems by allowing different parallelization strategies depending on the application problem and the specific architecture. To this end, this platform contains the basic steps of the PIC algorithm and has been designed as a test bed for different algorithmic options and data structures. Among the architectures that this engine can explore, particular attention is given here to systems equipped with GPUs. The study demonstrates that our portable PIC implementation based on the OpenACC programming model can achieve performance closely matching theoretical predictions. Using the Cray XC30 system, Piz Daint, at the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS), we show that PIC_ENGINE running on an NVIDIA Kepler K20X GPU can outperform the one on an Intel Sandy bridge 8-core CPU by a factor of 3.4.

  6. PlasmaPIC: A tool for modeling low-temperature plasma discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehlich, Nina Sarah; Becker, Michael; Henrich, Robert; Heiliger, Christian

    2015-09-01

    PlasmaPIC is a three-dimensional particle in cell (PIC) code. It consists of an electrostatic part for modeling dc and rf-ccp discharges as well as an electrodynamic part for modeling inductively coupled discharges. The three-dimensional description enables the modeling of discharges in arbitrary geometries without limitations to any symmetry. These geometries can be easily imported from common CAD tools. A main feature of PlasmaPIC is the ability of an excellent massive parallelization of the computation, which scales linearly up to a few hundred cpu cores. This is achieved by using a multigrid algorithm for the field solver as well as an effective load balancing of the particles. Moreover, PlasmaPIC includes the interaction of the neutral gas and the plasma discharge. Because the neutral gas and the plasma simulation are acting on different time scales we perform the simulation of both separately in a self-consistent treatment, whereas the neutral gas distribution is calculated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). The merge of these features turns PlasmaPIC into a powerful simulation tool for a wide range of plasma discharges and introduces a new way of understanding and optimizing low-temperature plasma applications. This work has been supported by the ``Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Energie.'' Grant 50RS1507.

  7. Second order gyrokinetic theory for particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronko, Natalia; Bottino, Alberto; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The main idea of the gyrokinetic dynamical reduction consists in a systematical removal of the fast scale motion (the gyromotion) from the dynamics of the plasma, resulting in a considerable simplification and a significant gain of computational time. The gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations are nowadays implemented in for modeling (both laboratory and astrophysical) strongly magnetized plasmas. Different versions of the reduced set of equations exist, depending on the construction of the gyrokinetic reduction procedure and the approximations performed in the derivation. The purpose of this article is to explicitly show the connection between the general second order gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov system issued from the modern gyrokinetic theory and the model currently implemented in the global electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code ORB5. Necessary information about the modern gyrokinetic formalism is given together with the consistent derivation of the gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations from first principles. The variational formulation of the dynamics is used to obtain the corresponding energy conservation law, which in turn is used for the verification of energy conservation diagnostics currently implemented in ORB5. This work fits within the context of the code verification project VeriGyro currently run at IPP Max-Planck Institut in collaboration with others European institutions.

  8. Particle-in-cell simulations of the lasertron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. E.; Peter, W. K.

    1985-05-01

    The lasertron is a device for producing intense, very short, pulsed ectron beams. The current is not space-charge limited and follows the laser intensity. The electron pulse is then accelerated out of the device by a constant voltage. In the RF lasertron, the diode becomes an RF cavity. This improves the breakdown characteristics of the device, allowing higher voltages to be applied and hence higher currents to be obtained. The calculations are aimed at producing a 10 nC electron beam with an emittance of less than 40 mm-mrad or use in free-electron laser experiments. A class of electrode shapes was obtained which in the absence of space charge produces no emittance growth. These shapes were studied with the particle-in-cell simulation model ISIS, and the electrodes which produce minimum emittance including the effect of space charge were determined. Unique emittance problems associated with the time dependence of the beam pulse are studied and conditions for reducing these effects are discussed.

  9. Particle in cell/Monte Carlo collision analysis of the problem of identification of impurities in the gas by the plasma electron spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusoglu Sarikaya, C.; Rafatov, I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The work deals with the Particle in Cell/Monte Carlo Collision (PIC/MCC) analysis of the problem of detection and identification of impurities in the nonlocal plasma of gas discharge using the Plasma Electron Spectroscopy (PLES) method. For this purpose, 1d3v PIC/MCC code for numerical simulation of glow discharge with nonlocal electron energy distribution function is developed. The elastic, excitation, and ionization collisions between electron-neutral pairs and isotropic scattering and charge exchange collisions between ion-neutral pairs and Penning ionizations are taken into account. Applicability of the numerical code is verified under the Radio-Frequency capacitively coupled discharge conditions. The efficiency of the code is increased by its parallelization using Open Message Passing Interface. As a demonstration of the PLES method, parallel PIC/MCC code is applied to the direct current glow discharge in helium doped with a small amount of argon. Numerical results are consistent with the theoretical analysis of formation of nonlocal EEDF and existing experimental data.

  10. Particle-in-cell study of the ion-to-electron sheath transition

    DOE PAGES

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2016-08-09

    The form of a sheath near a small electrode, with bias changing from below to above the plasma potential, is studied using 2D particle-in-cell simulations. When the electrode is biased within Te/2e below the plasma potential, the electron velocity distribution functions (EVDFs) exhibit a loss-cone type truncation due to fast electrons overcoming the small potential difference between the electrode and plasma. No sheath is present in this regime, and the plasma remains quasineutral up to the electrode. The EVDF truncation leads to a presheath-like density and flow velocity gradients. Once the bias exceeds the plasma potential, an electron sheath ismore » present. In this case, the truncation driven behavior persists, but is accompanied by a shift in the maximum value of the EVDF that is not present in the negative bias cases. In conclusion, the flow moment has significant contributions from both the flow shift of the EVDF maximum, and the loss-cone truncation.« less

  11. Open Boundary Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Dipolarization Front Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, Alex; Hwang, Kyoung-Joo; Vinas, Adolfo F.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2014-01-01

    First results are presented from an ongoing open boundary 2-1/2D particle-in-cell simulation study of dipolarization front (DF) propagation in Earth's magnetotail. At this stage, this study is focused on the compression, or pileup, region preceding the DF current sheet. We find that the earthward acceleration of the plasma in this region is in general agreement with a recent DF force balance model. A gyrophase bunched reflected ion population at the leading edge of the pileup region is reflected by a normal electric field in the pileup region itself, rather than through an interaction with the current sheet. We discuss plasma wave activity at the leading edge of the pileup region that may be driven by gradients, or by reflected ions, or both; the mode has not been identified. The waves oscillate near but above the ion cyclotron frequency with wavelength several ion inertial lengths. We show that the waves oscillate primarily in the perpendicular magnetic field components, do not propagate along the background magnetic field, are right handed elliptically (close to circularly) polarized, exist in a region of high electron and ion beta, and are stationary in the plasma frame moving earthward. We discuss the possibility that the waves are present in plasma sheet data, but have not, thus far, been discovered.

  12. Boltzmann electron PIC simulation of the E-sail effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janhunen, P.

    2015-12-01

    The solar wind electric sail (E-sail) is a planned in-space propulsion device that uses the natural solar wind momentum flux for spacecraft propulsion with the help of long, charged, centrifugally stretched tethers. The problem of accurately predicting the E-sail thrust is still somewhat open, however, due to a possible electron population trapped by the tether. Here we develop a new type of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation for predicting E-sail thrust. In the new simulation, electrons are modelled as a fluid, hence resembling hybrid simulation, but in contrast to normal hybrid simulation, the Poisson equation is used as in normal PIC to calculate the self-consistent electrostatic field. For electron-repulsive parts of the potential, the Boltzmann relation is used. For electron-attractive parts of the potential we employ a power law which contains a parameter that can be used to control the number of trapped electrons. We perform a set of runs varying the parameter and select the one with the smallest number of trapped electrons which still behaves in a physically meaningful way in the sense of producing not more than one solar wind ion deflection shock upstream of the tether. By this prescription we obtain thrust per tether length values that are in line with earlier estimates, although somewhat smaller. We conclude that the Boltzmann PIC simulation is a new tool for simulating the E-sail thrust. This tool enables us to calculate solutions rapidly and allows to easily study different scenarios for trapped electrons.

  13. PIC Reading Readiness Test Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, N. J.

    This rating form concerns the measurement of basic skills in connection with assessing reading readiness. Motor skills, ability to adjust to learning situations, familiarity with the alphabet, and general knowledge are assessed. See TM 001 111 for details of the Regional PIC program in which it is used. (DLG)

  14. Particle in Cell Simulations of the Pulsar Y-Point -- Nature of the Accelerating Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decade, satellite observations have yielded a wealth of data on pulsed high-energy emission from pulsars. Several different models have been advanced to fit this data, all of which “paint” the emitting region onto a different portion of the magnetosphere.In the last few years, particle in cell simulations of pulsar magnetospheres have reached the point where they are able to self-consistently model particle acceleration and dissipation. One of the key findings of these simulations is that the region of the current sheet in and around the Y-point provides the highest rate of dissipation of Poynting flux (Belyaev 2015a). On the basis of this physical evidence, it is quite plausible that this region should be associated with the pulsed high energy emission from pulsars. We present high resolution PIC simulations of an axisymmetric pulsar magnetosphere, which are run using PICsar (Belyaev 2015b). These simulations focus on the particle dynamics and electric fields in and around the Y-point region. We run two types of simulations -- first, a force-free magnetosphere and second, a magnetosphere with a gap between the return current layer and the outflowing plasma in the polar wind zone. The latter setup is motivated by studies of pair production with general relativity (Philippov et al. 2015, Belyaev & Parfrey (in preparation)). In both cases, we find that the Y-point and the current sheet in its direct vicinity act like an “electric particle filter” outwardly accelerating particles of one sign of charge while returning the other sign of charge back to the pulsar. We argue that this is a natural behavior of the plasma as it tries to adjust to a solution that is as close to force-free as possible. As a consequence, a large E dot J develops in the vicinity of the Y-point leading to dissipation of Poynting flux. Our work is relevant for explaining the plasma physical mechanisms underlying pulsed high energy emission from pulsars.

  15. Recent advances in high-performance modeling of plasma-based acceleration using the full PIC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Lehe, R.; Vincenti, H.; Godfrey, B. B.; Haber, I.; Lee, P.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical simulations have been critical in the recent rapid developments of plasma-based acceleration concepts. Among the various available numerical techniques, the particle-in-cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations from first principles. The fundamentals of the PIC method were established decades ago, but improvements or variations are continuously being proposed. We report on several recent advances in PIC-related algorithms that are of interest for application to plasma-based accelerators, including (a) detailed analysis of the numerical Cherenkov instability and its remediation for the modeling of plasma accelerators in laboratory and Lorentz boosted frames, (b) analytic pseudo-spectral electromagnetic solvers in Cartesian and cylindrical (with azimuthal modes decomposition) geometries, and (c) novel analysis of Maxwell's solvers' stencil variation and truncation, in application to domain decomposition strategies and implementation of perfectly matched layers in high-order and pseudo-spectral solvers.

  16. Hybrid-PIC Algorithms for Simulation of Merging Plasma Jets in the Plasma Liner Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale; Clark, Robert; Macfarlane, Joseph; Golovkin, Igor; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2010-11-01

    In the upcoming Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory a spherical array of 30-60 jets generated by plasma guns will be merged to form imploding plasma liners. We describe the Hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) methods implemented in the code LSP for plasma jet simulation and present results of simulations of merging Ar jets. Electron macroparticles are treated as fluid elements which carry an intrinsic temperature while ion macroparticles are treated kinetically. The effective charge state is obtained from EOS tables as a function of the local plasma parameters under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The effect of radiation cooling on the electrons is also included self-consistently into the Hybrid PIC formalism. The LSP results of jet merging simulations will be post-processed using the SPECT3D code to generate simulated radiation flux levels, spectra and images (MacFarlane et al., this meeting).

  17. Pseudo-3D PIC modeling of drift-induced spatial inhomogeneities in planar magnetron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, A.; Minea, T.; Tsikata, S.

    2016-10-01

    A pseudo-3D modeling approach, based on a particle-in-cell (PIC)-Monte Carlo collisions algorithm, has been developed for the study of large- and short-scale organization of the plasma in a planar magnetron. This extension of conventional PIC modeling permits the observation of spontaneous organization of the magnetron plasma, under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields, into the well-known, large-scale regions of enhanced ionization and density known as spokes. The nature of complex three-dimensional electron trajectories around such structures, and non-uniform ionization within them, is revealed. This modeling provides direct numerical evidence for the existence of high-amplitude internal spoke electric fields, proposed in earlier works. A 3D phenomenological model, consistent with numerical results, is proposed. Electron density fluctuations in the megahertz range, with characteristics similar to the electron cyclotron drift instability experimentally identified in a recent Letter, are also found.

  18. Enhanced quasi-static PIC simulation with pipelining algorithm for e-cloud instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bing; Huang, Chengkun; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren; Muggli, Patric; Katsouleas, Tom

    2008-11-01

    Simulating the electron cloud effect on a beam that circulates thousands of turns in circular machines is highly computationally demanding. A novel algorithm, the pipelining algorithm is applied to the fully parallelized quasi-static particle-in-cell code QuickPIC to overcome the limit of the maximum number of processors can be used for each time step. The pipelining algorithm divides the processors into subgroups and each subgroup focuses on different partition of the beam and performs the calculation in series. With this novel algorithm, the accuracy of the simulation is preserved; the speed of the simulation is improved by one order of magnitude with more than 10^2 processors are used. The long term simulation results of the CERN-LHC and the Main Injector at FNAL from the QuickPIC with pipelining algorithm are presented. This work is supported by SiDAC and US Department of Energy

  19. MP-Pic simulation of CFB riser with EMMS-based drag model

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.; Song, F.; Benyahia, S.; Wang, W.; Li, J.

    2012-01-01

    MP-PIC (multi-phase particle in cell) method combined with the EMMS (energy minimization multi- scale) drag force model was implemented with the open source program MFIX to simulate the gas–solid flows in CFB (circulatingfluidizedbed) risers. Calculated solid flux by the EMMS drag agrees well with the experimental value; while the traditional homogeneous drag over-predicts this value. EMMS drag force model can also predict the macro-and meso-scale structures. Quantitative comparison of the results by the EMMS drag force model and the experimental measurements show high accuracy of the model. The effects of the number of particles per parcel and wall conditions on the simulation results have also been investigated in the paper. This work proved that MP-PIC combined with the EMMS drag model can successfully simulate the fluidized flows in CFB risers and it serves as a candidate to realize real-time simulation of industrial processes in the future.

  20. BOA, Beam Optics Analyzer A Particle-In-Cell Code

    SciTech Connect

    Thuc Bui

    2007-12-06

    The program was tasked with implementing time dependent analysis of charges particles into an existing finite element code with adaptive meshing, called Beam Optics Analyzer (BOA). BOA was initially funded by a DOE Phase II program to use the finite element method with adaptive meshing to track particles in unstructured meshes. It uses modern programming techniques, state-of-the-art data structures, so that new methods, features and capabilities are easily added and maintained. This Phase II program was funded to implement plasma simulations in BOA and extend its capabilities to model thermal electrons, secondary emissions, self magnetic field and implement a more comprehensive post-processing and feature-rich GUI. The program was successful in implementing thermal electrons, secondary emissions, and self magnetic field calculations. The BOA GUI was also upgraded significantly, and CCR is receiving interest from the microwave tube and semiconductor equipment industry for the code. Implementation of PIC analysis was partially successful. Computational resource requirements for modeling more than 2000 particles begin to exceed the capability of most readily available computers. Modern plasma analysis typically requires modeling of approximately 2 million particles or more. The problem is that tracking many particles in an unstructured mesh that is adapting becomes inefficient. In particular memory requirements become excessive. This probably makes particle tracking in unstructured meshes currently unfeasible with commonly available computer resources. Consequently, Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. is exploring hybrid codes where the electromagnetic fields are solved on the unstructured, adaptive mesh while particles are tracked on a fixed mesh. Efficient interpolation routines should be able to transfer information between nodes of the two meshes. If successfully developed, this could provide high accuracy and reasonable computational efficiency.

  1. Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Control of Electron Energy Distribution of Dielectric Barrier Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyo Won; Yel Lee, Jung; Lee, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2011-10-01

    Recently, atmospheric pressure plasmas attract lots of interests for the useful applications such as surface modification and bio-medical treatment. In this study, a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulation was adopted to investigate the discharge characteristics of a planar micro dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a driving frequency from 1 MHz to 50 MHz and with a gap distance from 60 to 500 micrometers. The variation of control parameters such as the gap distance, the driving wave form, and the applied voltage results in the change in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). Through the relation between the ionization mean free path and the gap size, a significant change of EEDFs is achievable with the decrease of gap distance. Therefore, it is possible to categorize the operation range of DBDs for its applications by controlling the interactions between plasmas and neutral gas for the generation of preferable radicals. This work was supported by the Human Resources Development of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 20104010100670).

  2. 3D Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Divin, A. V.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Unlike the Earth and Mercury, our Moon has no global magnetic field and is therefore not shielded from the impinging solar wind by a magnetosphere. However, lunar magnetic field measurements made by the Apollo missions provided direct evidence that the Moon has regions of small-scale crustal magnetic fields, ranging up to a few 100km in scale size with surface magnetic field strengths up to hundreds of nanoTeslas. More recently, the Lunar Prospector spacecraft has provided high-resolution observations allowing to construct magnetic field maps of the entire Moon, confirming the earlier results from Apollo, but also showing that the lunar plasma environment is much richer than earlier believed. Typically the small-scale magnetic fields are non-dipolar and rather tiny compared to the lunar radius and mainly clustered on the far side of the moon. Using iPic3D we present the first 3D fully kinetic and electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies. We study the behaviour of a dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD and hybrid simulations and spacecraft observations. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Second, the ability of iPic3D to resolve all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) allows to discuss in detail the electron physics leading to the highly non-adiabatic interactions expected as well as the implications for solar wind shielding of the lunar surface, depending on the scale size (solar wind protons

  3. PIC Detector for Piano Chords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbancho, Ana M.; Tardón, Lorenzo J.; Barbancho, Isabel

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, a piano chords detector based on parallel interference cancellation (PIC) is presented. The proposed system makes use of the novel idea of modeling a segment of music as a third generation mobile communications signal, specifically, as a CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access) signal. The proposed model considers each piano note as a CDMA user in which the spreading code is replaced by a representative note pattern. The lack of orthogonality between the note patterns will make necessary to design a specific thresholding matrix to decide whether the PIC outputs correspond to the actual notes composing the chord or not. An additional stage that performs an octave test and a fifth test has been included that improves the error rate in the detection of these intervals that are specially difficult to detect. The proposed system attains very good results in both the detection of the notes that compose a chord and the estimation of the polyphony number.

  4. Simulations of atmospheric pressure discharge in a high-voltage nanosecond pulse using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Dezhen; Ren, Chunsheng

    2008-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharge nonequilibrium plasmas have been applied to plasma processing with modern technology. Simulations of discharge in pure Ar and pure He gases at one atmospheric pressure by a high voltage trapezoidal nanosecond pulse have been performed using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model coupled with a renormalization and weighting procedure (mapping algorithm). Numerical results show that the characteristics of discharge in both inert gases are very similar. There exist the effects of local reverse field and double-peak distributions of charged particles' density. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are also observed, and the discharge is concluded in the view of ionization avalanche in number. Furthermore, the independence of total current density is a function of time, but not of position.

  5. Wave-particle interactions with parallel whistler waves: Nonlinear and time-dependent effects revealed by particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Camporeale, Enrico; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2015-09-15

    We present a self-consistent Particle-in-Cell simulation of the resonant interactions between anisotropic energetic electrons and a population of whistler waves, with parameters relevant to the Earth's radiation belt. By tracking PIC particles and comparing with test-particle simulations, we emphasize the importance of including nonlinear effects and time evolution in the modeling of wave-particle interactions, which are excluded in the resonant limit of quasi-linear theory routinely used in radiation belt studies. In particular, we show that pitch angle diffusion is enhanced during the linear growth phase, and it rapidly saturates well before a single bounce period. This calls into question the widely used bounce average performed in most radiation belt diffusion calculations. Furthermore, we discuss how the saturation is related to the fact that the domain in which the particles pitch angle diffuses is bounded, and to the well-known problem of 90° diffusion barrier.

  6. Improved Field Emission Algorithms for Modeling Field Emission Devices Using a Conformal Finite-Difference Time-Domain Particle-in-Cell Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Loverich, J.; Stoltz, P. H.; Nieter, C.

    2013-10-01

    This work introduces a conformal finite difference time domain (CFDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) method with an improved field emission algorithm to accurately and efficiently study field emission devices. The CFDTD method is based on the Dey-Mittra algorithm or cut-cell algorithm, as implemented in the Vorpal code. For the field emission algorithm, we employ the elliptic function v(y) found by Forbes and a new fitting function t(y)2 for the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) equation. With these improved correction factors, field emission of electrons from a cathode surface is much closer to the prediction of the exact FN formula derived by Murphy and Good. This work was supported in part by both the U.S. Department of Defense under Grant No. FA9451-07-C-0025 and the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-SC0004436.

  7. Modeling Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Afterburner Parameters Using QuickPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, M.; Clayton, C.E.; Decyk, V.K.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Tsung, F.S.; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; Decker, F.-J.; Iverson, R.; O'Connel, C.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2006-01-25

    For the parameters envisaged in possible afterburner stages[1] of a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA), the self-fields of the particle beam can be intense enough to tunnel ionize some neutral gases. Tunnel ionization has been investigated as a way for the beam itself to create the plasma, and the wakes generated may differ from those generated in pre-ionized plasmas[2],[3]. However, it is not practical to model the whole stage of PWFA with afterburner parameters using the models described in [2] and [3]. Here we describe the addition of a tunnel ionization package using the ADK model into QuickPIC, a highly efficient quasi-static particle in cell (PIC) code which can model a PWFA with afterburner parameters. Comparison between results from OSIRIS (a full PIC code with ionization) and from QuickPIC with the ionization package shows good agreement. Preliminary results using parameters relevant to the E164X experiment and the upcoming E167 experiment at SLAC are shown.

  8. Particle-in-cell simulation of two-dimensional electron velocity shear driven instability in relativistic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-08-01

    We carry out particle-in-cell simulations to study the instabilities associated with a 2-D sheared electron flow configuration against a neutralizing background of ions. Both weak and strong relativistic flow velocities are considered. In the weakly relativistic case, we observe the development of electromagnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with similar characteristics as that predicted by the electron Magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model. On the contrary, in a strong relativistic case, the compressibility effects of electron fluid dominate and introduce upper hybrid electrostatic oscillations transverse to the flow which are very distinct from EMHD fluid behavior. In the nonlinear regime, both weak and strong relativistic cases lead to turbulence with broad power law spectrum.

  9. Progress on a particle-in-cell model of a W-band klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardahl, Peter J.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Birdsall, C. K.

    1999-11-01

    Design and initial implementation of an extension from two to three dimensions (x-y-z and r-θ-z) is described for the XOOPIC( J. P. Verboncoeur, A. B. Langdon, and N. T. Gladd, ``An object-oriented electromagnetic PIC code.'' Computer Physics Communications 87) (1995) 199-211. code. The klystron ( G. Caryotakis, E. Jongewaard, G. Schietrum, A. Vlieks, R.L. Kustom, N.C. Luhmann, M.I. Petelin, ``W-Band Micro-fabricated Modular Klystrons.'' --Private communication) of interest is to operate at 91GHz, with a 125kW peak power, 120kV, 2.5A, 1us pulse, and 0.8mm drift tube diameter. This klystron uses periodic permanent magnetic focussing to contain the beam within the drift tube. Initially, the device will be modelled in 2d, and this will be extended to a 3d model. A 3d model is preferred because the drift tube is circular, while the cavities are rectangular. The circular drift tube will be modelled using stair-stepped boundaries.

  10. Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion source—Insights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model

    SciTech Connect

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2013-11-15

    Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%)

  11. Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion source--Insights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%).

  12. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic plasma radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, J. O.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, thought to be the underlying mechanism for Type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some studies indicate that no such processes occur. Methods: We self-consistently simulate three-wave based plasma emission through all stages by using 2D, fully kinetic, electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams using the EPOCH2D code. Results: Here we present the results of two simulations; Run 1 (nb/n0 = 0.0057, vb/ Δvb = vb/Ve = 16) and Run 2 (nb/n0 = 0.05, vb/ Δvb = vb/Ve = 8), which we find to permit and prohibit plasma emission respectively. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to frequency conservation requirements. In resolving this apparent contradiction through a comprehensive analysis, in this paper we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses emission. Comparison of our results also indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, an alternative plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in an astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that

  13. Young gamma-ray pulsar: from modeling the gamma-ray emission to the particle-in-cell simulations of the global magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Gabriele; Kalapotharakos, Constantions; Timokhin, Andrey; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2016-04-01

    Accelerated charged particles flowing in the magnetosphere produce pulsar gamma-ray emission. Pair creation processes produce an electron-positron plasma that populates the magnetosphere, in which the plasma is very close to force-free. However, it is unknown how and where the plasma departs from the ideal force-free condition, which consequently inhibits the understanding of the emission generation. We found that a dissipative magnetosphere outside the light cylinder effectively reproduces many aspects of the young gamma-ray pulsar emission as seen by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and through particle-in-cell simulations (PIC), we started explaining this configuration self-consistently. These findings show that, together, a magnetic field structure close to force-free and the assumption of gamma-ray curvature radiation as the emission mechanism are strongly compatible with the observations. Two main issues from the previously used models that our work addresses are the inability to explain luminosity, spectra, and light curve features at the same time and the inconsistency of the electrodynamics. Moreover, using the PIC simulations, we explore the effects of different pair multiplicities on the magnetosphere configurations and the locations of the accelerating regions. Our work aims for a self-consistent modeling of the magnetosphere, connecting the microphysics of the pair-plasma to the global magnetosphere macroscopic quantities. This direction will lead to a greater understanding of pulsar emission at all wavelengths, as well as to concrete insights into the physics of the magnetosphere.

  14. A 3D immersed finite element method with non-homogeneous interface flux jump for applications in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma-lunar surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Daoru; Wang, Pu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao; Wang, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the need to handle complex boundary conditions efficiently and accurately in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, this paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) linear immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions for solving electrostatic field involving complex boundary conditions using structured meshes independent of the interface. This method treats an object boundary as part of the simulation domain and solves the electric field at the boundary as an interface problem. In order to resolve charging on a dielectric surface, a new 3D linear IFE basis function is designed for each interface element to capture the electric field jump on the interface. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the optimal convergence rates in L2 and H1 norms of the IFE solution. This new IFE method is integrated into a PIC method for simulations involving charging of a complex dielectric surface in a plasma. A numerical study of plasma-surface interactions at the lunar terminator is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the new method.

  15. Particle-in-cell simulations of an alpha channeling scenario: electron current drive arising from lower hybrid drift instability of fusion-born ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, James; Chapman, Sandra; Dendy, Richard

    2010-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of fusion-born protons in deuterium plasmas demonstrate a key alpha channeling phenomenon for tokamak fusion plasmas. We focus on obliquely propagating modes at the plasma edge, excited by centrally born fusion products on banana orbits, known to be responsible for observations of ion cyclotron emission in JET and TFTR. A fully self-consistent electromagnetic 1D3V PIC code evolves a ring-beam distribution of 3MeV protons in a 10keV thermal deuterium-electron plasma with realistic mass ratio. A collective instability occurs, giving rise to electromagnetic field activity in the lower hybrid range of frequencies. Waves spontaneously excited by this lower hybrid drift instability undergo Landau damping on resonant electrons, drawing out an asymmetric tail in the distribution of electron parallel velocities, which constitutes a net current. These simulations demonstrate a key building block of some alpha channeling scenarios: the direct collisionless coupling of fusion product energy into a form which can help sustain the equilibrium of the tokamak.

  16. Nonlinear PIC Simulations for Nonneutral Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Luca Delzanno, Gian; Finn, John M.

    2002-11-01

    We present nonlinear simulations of the low frequency dynamics of electrons in a Malmberg-Penning trap, including compressional and thermal effects [1,2]. First, we consider a 2D model where we assume the effective plasma length constant in time. In this framework, we further neglect the thermal effect on the velocity field, and show with the PIC code KANDINSKY that Penning traps could be used to perform geophysical fluid dynamics experiments [3]. We also observe that, due to the presence of the nonlinear m=1 instability, the initially hollow density profile becomes peaked, as in the experiments. Then, we show 2D results including thermal effects. In this case, the development of the m=1 instability is slowed since the equilibrium plasma length profile is closer to the integrable profile, namely the length profile for which there are no discrete unstable modes [4]. Finally, we present simulations of the 3D fluiddynamics model of Ref. [2]. In particular, we investigate the evolution of a m=1 perturbation for different electron temperatures, when compressional and thermal effects are included. [1] J.M. Finn, D. del-Castillo-Negrete, D.C. Barnes,Phys. Plasmas, 6, 3744, 1999. [2] G.G.M. Coppa, A. D'Angola, G.L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, Phys. Plasmas, 8, 1133, 2001. [3] G.L. Delzanno, J.M. Finn, G. Lapenta, "Nonlinear Phase of the Compressional m=1 Diocotron Instability: Saturation and Analogy with Geophysical Fluid Dynamics", submitted to Phys. Plasmas. [4] G.L. Delzanno, V.I. Pariev, J.M. Finn, G. Lapenta, "Stability Analysis of Hollow Electron Columns Including Compression and Thermal Effects: Integrability Condition and Numerical Simulations", submitted to Phys. Plasmas.

  17. [Accession to the PIC/S and pharmaceutical quality system in Japan].

    PubMed

    Katori, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    In March, 2012, Japan made the application for membership of the Pharmaceutical Inspection convention and Pharmaceutical Inspection Co-operation scheme (PIC/S) which is an international body of a GMP inspection. The globalization of pharmaceutical manufacturing and sales has been a driving force behind the decision to become a PIC/S member. For the application for membership, Japan's GMP inspectorate needs to fulfill PIC/S requirements, for example, the inspection organization has to have a quality system as a global standard. One of the other requirements is that the GMP inspectorate can access Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCL) having high analytical skills and also have a quality system based on ISO 17025. I would like to describe the process to make up a quality system in the National Institute of Health Sciences and also the circumstances around the PIC/S application in Japan.

  18. [Accession to the PIC/S and pharmaceutical quality system in Japan].

    PubMed

    Katori, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    In March, 2012, Japan made the application for membership of the Pharmaceutical Inspection convention and Pharmaceutical Inspection Co-operation scheme (PIC/S) which is an international body of a GMP inspection. The globalization of pharmaceutical manufacturing and sales has been a driving force behind the decision to become a PIC/S member. For the application for membership, Japan's GMP inspectorate needs to fulfill PIC/S requirements, for example, the inspection organization has to have a quality system as a global standard. One of the other requirements is that the GMP inspectorate can access Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCL) having high analytical skills and also have a quality system based on ISO 17025. I would like to describe the process to make up a quality system in the National Institute of Health Sciences and also the circumstances around the PIC/S application in Japan. PMID:25707200

  19. Enabling Lorentz boosted frame particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Li, Fei; Meyers, Michael D.; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2016-07-01

    When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at βb c towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of ∼ γb2 = (1 - βb2)-1. Meanwhile, when LWFA is modeled in the quasi-3D geometry in which the electromagnetic fields and current are decomposed into a limited number of azimuthal harmonics, speedups are achieved by modeling three dimensional (3D) problems with the computational loads on the order of two dimensional r - z simulations. Here, we describe a method to combine the speedups from the Lorentz boosted frame and quasi-3D algorithms. The key to the combination is the use of a hybrid Yee-FFT solver in the quasi-3D geometry that significantly mitigates the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) which inevitably arises in a Lorentz boosted frame due to the unphysical coupling of Langmuir modes and EM modes of the relativistically drifting plasma in these simulations. In addition, based on the space-time distribution of the LWFA data in the lab and boosted frame, we propose to use a moving window to follow the drifting plasma, instead of following the laser driver as is done in the LWFA lab frame simulations, in order to further reduce the computational loads. We describe the details of how the NCI is mitigated for the quasi-3D geometry, the setups for simulations which combine the Lorentz boosted frame, quasi-3D geometry, and the use of a moving window, and compare the results from these simulations against their corresponding lab frame cases. Good agreement is obtained among these sample simulations, particularly when there is no self-trapping, which demonstrates it is possible to combine the Lorentz boosted frame and the quasi-3D algorithms when modeling LWFA. We also discuss the preliminary speedups achieved in these sample simulations.

  20. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of a plasma jet/cloud streaming across a transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitcu, Gabriel; Echim, Marius

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of collisionless plasma jets/clouds in magnetic field configurations typical for the terrestrial magnetotail and frontside magnetosheath is a topic of interest for understanding the physics of the magnetosphere and its interaction with the solar wind. The presence of high-speed jets in the frontside magnetosheath has been recently proved experimentally by Cluster and THEMIS spacecrafts. There is increasing evidence that the bursty bulk flows in the magnetotail have jet-like features. In the present paper we use fully electromagnetic 3D explicit particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to investigate the interaction of a localized three-dimensional plasma element/jet/cloud with a transverse magnetic field. We consider a plasma jet/cloud that moves in vacuum and perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field. Ampère and Faraday's laws are used to compute the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields on a three-dimensional spatial grid having a step-size of the order of the Debye length and using a time-step that resolves the plasma frequency. The initial magnetic field inside the simulation domain is uniform and the plasma bulk velocity at the beginning of the simulation is normal to the magnetic field direction. The total time scale of the simulation is of the order of few ion Larmor periods. Space and time variations of the plasma parameters and of the electromagnetic field are analyzed and discussed. We emphasize non-MHD effects like the energy-dispersion signatures at the edges of the plasma element, similar to results previously reported by Voitcu and Echim (2012) using test-kinetic simulations. Acknowledgments: Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no. 313038/STORM, and a grant of the Romanian Ministry of National Education, CNCS - UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2012-4-0418.

  1. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Monte Carlo Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Critical Ionization Velocity Experiments in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Biasca, R.; Liewer, P. C.

    1996-01-01

    Although the existence of the critical ionization velocity (CIV) is known from laboratory experiments, no agreement has been reached as to whether CIV exists in the natural space environment. In this paper we move towards more realistic models of CIV and present the first fully three-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulations of typical space-based CIV experiments. In our model, the released neutral gas is taken to be a spherical cloud traveling across a magnetized ambient plasma. Simulations are performed for neutral clouds with various sizes and densities. The effects of the cloud parameters on ionization yield, wave energy growth, electron heating, momentum coupling, and the three-dimensional structure of the newly ionized plasma are discussed. The simulations suggest that the quantitative characteristics of momentum transfers among the ion beam, neutral cloud, and plasma waves is the key indicator of whether CIV can occur in space. The missing factors in space-based CIV experiments may be the conditions necessary for a continuous enhancement of the beam ion momentum. For a typical shaped charge release experiment, favorable CIV conditions may exist only in a very narrow, intermediate spatial region some distance from the release point due to the effects of the cloud density and size. When CIV does occur, the newly ionized plasma from the cloud forms a very complex structure due to the combined forces from the geomagnetic field, the motion induced emf, and the polarization. Hence the detection of CIV also critically depends on the sensor location.

  2. Particle-in-cell simulation for different magnetic mirror effects on the plasma distribution in a cusped field thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Chen, Peng-Bo; Zhao, Yin-Jian; Yu, Da-Ren

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic mirror used as an efficient tool to confine plasma has been widely adopted in many different areas especially in recent cusped field thrusters. In order to check the influence of magnetic mirror effect on the plasma distribution in a cusped field thruster, three different radii of the discharge channel (6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm) in a cusped field thruster are investigated by using Particle-in-Cell Plus Monte Carlo (PIC-MCC) simulated method, under the condition of a fixed axial length of the discharge channel and the same operating parameters. It is found that magnetic cusps inside the small radius discharge channel cannot confine electrons very well. Thus, the electric field is hard to establish. With the reduction of the discharge channel’s diameter, more electrons will escape from cusps to the centerline area near the anode due to a lower magnetic mirror ratio. Meanwhile, the leak width of the cusped magnetic field will increase at the cusp. By increasing the magnetic field strength in a small radius model of a cusped field thruster, the negative effect caused by the weak magnetic mirror effect can be partially compensated. Therefore, according to engineering design, the increase of magnetic field strength can contribute to obtaining a good performance, when the radial distance between the magnets and the inner surface of the discharge channel is relatively big. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51006028) and the Foundation for Innovative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51121004).

  3. User-configurable MAGIC for electromagnetic PIC calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goplen, Bruce; Ludeking, Larry; Smith, David; Warren, Gary

    1995-05-01

    MAGIC is a user-configurable code that solves Maxwell's equations together with Lorentz particle motion. A variety of 2D, finite-difference electromagnetic algorithms and 3D particle-in-cell algorithms may be combined in problem-specific ways to provide fast, accurate, steady-state and transient calculations for many research and design needs. Default configurations provide good speed and accuracy for most applications, and a library of templates offers optimized algorithm configurations for specific devices. A programmable processor named POSTER provides advanced post-analysis of the field and particle solutions. Coordinate systems, boundary conditions, geometry, and materials are specified by the user, and grid generation can be manual, user-assisted, or fully automatic. MAGIC has a fully 3D counterpart called SOS. Programs exist to connect these analysis tools to parametric and CAD input from an integrated design environment.

  4. Dynamic load balancing in a concurrent plasma PIC code on the JPL/Caltech Mark III hypercube

    SciTech Connect

    Liewer, P.C.; Leaver, E.W.; Decyk, V.K.; Dawson, J.M.

    1990-12-31

    Dynamic load balancing has been implemented in a concurrent one-dimensional electromagnetic plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code using a method which adds very little overhead to the parallel code. In PIC codes, the orbits of many interacting plasma electrons and ions are followed as an initial value problem as the particles move in electromagnetic fields calculated self-consistently from the particle motions. The code was implemented using the GCPIC algorithm in which the particles are divided among processors by partitioning the spatial domain of the simulation. The problem is load-balanced by partitioning the spatial domain so that each partition has approximately the same number of particles. During the simulation, the partitions are dynamically recreated as the spatial distribution of the particles changes in order to maintain processor load balance.

  5. Implementation and Characterization of Three-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Codes on Multiple-Instruction-Multiple-Data Massively Parallel Supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyster, P. M.; Liewer, P. C.; Decyk, V. K.; Ferraro, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation code has been developed on coarse-grain distributed-memory massively parallel computers with message passing communications. Our implementation is the generalization to three-dimensions of the general concurrent particle-in-cell (GCPIC) algorithm. In the GCPIC algorithm, the particle computation is divided among the processors using a domain decomposition of the simulation domain. In a three-dimensional simulation, the domain can be partitioned into one-, two-, or three-dimensional subdomains ("slabs," "rods," or "cubes") and we investigate the efficiency of the parallel implementation of the push for all three choices. The present implementation runs on the Intel Touchstone Delta machine at Caltech; a multiple-instruction-multiple-data (MIMD) parallel computer with 512 nodes. We find that the parallel efficiency of the push is very high, with the ratio of communication to computation time in the range 0.3%-10.0%. The highest efficiency (> 99%) occurs for a large, scaled problem with 64(sup 3) particles per processing node (approximately 134 million particles of 512 nodes) which has a push time of about 250 ns per particle per time step. We have also developed expressions for the timing of the code which are a function of both code parameters (number of grid points, particles, etc.) and machine-dependent parameters (effective FLOP rate, and the effective interprocessor bandwidths for the communication of particles and grid points). These expressions can be used to estimate the performance of scaled problems--including those with inhomogeneous plasmas--to other parallel machines once the machine-dependent parameters are known.

  6. PIC codes for plasma accelerators on emerging computer architectures (GPUS, Multicore/Manycore CPUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, Henri

    2016-03-01

    The advent of exascale computers will enable 3D simulations of a new laser-plasma interaction regimes that were previously out of reach of current Petasale computers. However, the paradigm used to write current PIC codes will have to change in order to fully exploit the potentialities of these new computing architectures. Indeed, achieving Exascale computing facilities in the next decade will be a great challenge in terms of energy consumption and will imply hardware developments directly impacting our way of implementing PIC codes. As data movement (from die to network) is by far the most energy consuming part of an algorithm future computers will tend to increase memory locality at the hardware level and reduce energy consumption related to data movement by using more and more cores on each compute nodes (''fat nodes'') that will have a reduced clock speed to allow for efficient cooling. To compensate for frequency decrease, CPU machine vendors are making use of long SIMD instruction registers that are able to process multiple data with one arithmetic operator in one clock cycle. SIMD register length is expected to double every four years. GPU's also have a reduced clock speed per core and can process Multiple Instructions on Multiple Datas (MIMD). At the software level Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes will thus have to achieve both good memory locality and vectorization (for Multicore/Manycore CPU) to fully take advantage of these upcoming architectures. In this talk, we present the portable solutions we implemented in our high performance skeleton PIC code PICSAR to both achieve good memory locality and cache reuse as well as good vectorization on SIMD architectures. We also present the portable solutions used to parallelize the Pseudo-sepctral quasi-cylindrical code FBPIC on GPUs using the Numba python compiler.

  7. WiPics: wireless and beyond.

    PubMed

    Revankar, Ameet V; Gandedkar, Narayan H; Ganeshkar, Sanjay V

    2010-01-01

    A WiPics transmitter allows wireless tranfer of images from the camera to the computer as the photos are being shot. This article describes this novel technological approach and its application in orthodontic imaging. PMID:20122442

  8. Particle-in-cell simulations of magnetic reconnection in laser-plasma experiments on Shenguang-II facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui; Dong, Quanli; Zhu, Jianqiang; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2013-11-15

    Recently, magnetic reconnection has been realized in high-energy-density laser-produced plasmas. Plasma bubbles with self-generated magnetic fields are created by focusing laser beams to small-scale spots on a foil. The bubbles expand into each other, which may then drive magnetic reconnection. The reconnection experiment in laser-produced plasmas has also been conducted at Shenguang-II (SG-II) laser facility, and the existence of a plasmoid was identified in the experiment [Dong et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215001 (2012)]. In this paper, by performing two-dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate such a process of magnetic reconnection based on the experiment on SG-II facility, and a possible explanation for the formation of the plasmoid is proposed. The results show that before magnetic reconnection occurs, the bubbles squeeze strongly each other and a very thin current sheet is formed. The current sheet is unstable to the tearing mode instability, and we can then observe the formation of plasmoid(s) in such a multiple X-lines reconnection.

  9. Modeling of the Plasma Electrode Bias in the Negative Ion Sources with 1D PIC Method

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, D.; Kuppel, S.; Hatayama, A.; Fukano, A.; Bacal, M.

    2009-03-12

    The effect of the plasma electrode bias voltage in the negative ion sources is modeled and investigated with one-dimensional plasma simulation. A particle-in-cell (PIC) method is applied to simulate the motion of charged particles in their self-consistent electric field. In the simulation, the electron current density is fixed to produce the bias voltage. The tendency of current-voltage characteristics obtained in the simulation show agreement with the one obtained from a simple probe theory. In addition, the H{sup -} ion density peak appears at the bias voltage close to the plasma potential as observed in the experiment. The physical mechanism of this peak H{sup -} ion density is discussed.

  10. Multi-dimensional PIC-simulations of parametric instabilities for shock-ignition conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riconda, C.; Weber, S.; Klimo, O.; Héron, A.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2013-11-01

    Laser-plasma interaction is investigated for conditions relevant for the shock-ignition (SI) scheme of inertial confinement fusion using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of an intense laser beam propagating in a hot, large-scale, non-uniform plasma. The temporal evolution and interdependence of Raman- (SRS), and Brillouin- (SBS), side/backscattering as well as Two-Plasmon-Decay (TPD) are studied. TPD is developing in concomitance with SRS creating a broad spectrum of plasma waves near the quarter-critical density. They are rapidly saturated due to plasma cavitation within a few picoseconds. The hot electron spectrum created by SRS and TPD is relatively soft, limited to energies below one hundred keV.

  11. Numerical stability analysis of the pseudo-spectral analytical time-domain PIC algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Brendan B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2014-02-01

    The pseudo-spectral analytical time-domain (PSATD) particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm solves the vacuum Maxwell's equations exactly, has no Courant time-step limit (as conventionally defined), and offers substantial flexibility in plasma and particle beam simulations. It is, however, not free of the usual numerical instabilities, including the numerical Cherenkov instability, when applied to relativistic beam simulations. This paper derives and solves the numerical dispersion relation for the PSATD algorithm and compares the results with corresponding behavior of the more conventional pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) and finite difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithms. In general, PSATD offers superior stability properties over a reasonable range of time steps. More importantly, one version of the PSATD algorithm, when combined with digital filtering, is almost completely free of the numerical Cherenkov instability for time steps (scaled to the speed of light) comparable to or smaller than the axial cell size.

  12. Development and Test of 2.5-Dimensional Electromagnetic PIC Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Lee, Ensang; Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Seon, Jongho; Lee, Dong-Hun; Ryu, Kwang-Sun

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a 2.5-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulation code using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method to investigate electromagnetic phenomena that occur in space plasmas. Our code is based on the leap-frog method and the centered difference method for integration and differentiation of the governing equations. We adopted the relativistic Buneman-Boris method to solve the Lorentz force equation and the Esirkepov method to calculate the current density while maintaining charge conservation. Using the developed code, we performed test simulations for electron two-stream instability and electron temperature anisotropy induced instability with the same initial parameters as used in previously reported studies. The test simulation results are almost identical with those of the previous papers.

  13. The IBEX Ribbon and the Pickup Ion Ring Stability in the Outer Heliosheath II. Monte-Carlo and Particle-in-cell Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemiec, J.; Florinski, V.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2016-08-01

    The nearly circular ribbon of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emission discovered by NASA’s Interplanetary Boundary EXplorer satellite (IBEX), is most commonly attributed to the effect of charge exchange of secondary pickup ions (PUIs) gyrating about the magnetic field in the outer heliosheath (OHS) and the interstellar space beyond. The first paper in the series (Paper I) presented a theoretical analysis of the pickup process in the OHS and hybrid-kinetic simulations, revealing that the kinetic properties of freshly injected proton rings depend sensitively on the details of their velocity distribution. It was demonstrated that only rings that are not too narrow (parallel thermal spread above a few km s‑1) and not too wide (parallel temperature smaller than the core plasma temperature) could remain stable for a period of time long enough to generate ribbon ENAs. This paper investigates the role of electron dynamics and the extra spatial degree of freedom in the ring ion scattering process with the help of two-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic simulations. A good agreement is observed between ring evolution under unstable conditions in hybrid and PIC models, and the dominant modes are found to propagate parallel to the magnetic field. We also present more realistic ribbon PUI distributions generated using Monte Carlo simulations of atomic hydrogen in the global heliosphere and examine the effect of both the cold ring-like and the hot “halo” PUIs produced from heliosheath ENAs on the ring stability. It is shown that the second PUI population enhances the fluctuation growth rate, leading to faster isotropization of the solar-wind-derived ring ions.

  14. The IBEX Ribbon and the Pickup Ion Ring Stability in the Outer Heliosheath II. Monte-Carlo and Particle-in-cell Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemiec, J.; Florinski, V.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2016-08-01

    The nearly circular ribbon of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emission discovered by NASA’s Interplanetary Boundary EXplorer satellite (IBEX), is most commonly attributed to the effect of charge exchange of secondary pickup ions (PUIs) gyrating about the magnetic field in the outer heliosheath (OHS) and the interstellar space beyond. The first paper in the series (Paper I) presented a theoretical analysis of the pickup process in the OHS and hybrid-kinetic simulations, revealing that the kinetic properties of freshly injected proton rings depend sensitively on the details of their velocity distribution. It was demonstrated that only rings that are not too narrow (parallel thermal spread above a few km s-1) and not too wide (parallel temperature smaller than the core plasma temperature) could remain stable for a period of time long enough to generate ribbon ENAs. This paper investigates the role of electron dynamics and the extra spatial degree of freedom in the ring ion scattering process with the help of two-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic simulations. A good agreement is observed between ring evolution under unstable conditions in hybrid and PIC models, and the dominant modes are found to propagate parallel to the magnetic field. We also present more realistic ribbon PUI distributions generated using Monte Carlo simulations of atomic hydrogen in the global heliosphere and examine the effect of both the cold ring-like and the hot “halo” PUIs produced from heliosheath ENAs on the ring stability. It is shown that the second PUI population enhances the fluctuation growth rate, leading to faster isotropization of the solar-wind-derived ring ions.

  15. Numerical studies of petawatt laser-driven proton generation from two-species targets using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domański, J.; Badziak, J.; Jabloński, S.

    2016-04-01

    Laser-driven generation of high-energy ion beams has recently attracted considerable interest due to a variety of potential applications including proton radiography, ICF fast ignition, nuclear physics or hadron therapy. The ion beam parameters depend on both laser pulse and target parameters, and in order to produce the ion beam of properties required for a particular application the laser and target parameters must be carefully selected, and the mechanism of the ion beam generation should be well understood and controlled. Convenient and commonly used tools for studies of the ion acceleration process are particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. Using two-dimensional PIC simulations, the properties of a proton beam generated from a thin erbium hydride (ErH3) target irradiated by a 25fs laser pulse of linear or circular polarization and of intensity ranging from 1020 to 1021 W/cm2 are investigated and compared with the features of a proton beam produced from a hydrocarbon (CH) target. It has been found that using erbium hydride targets instead of hydrocarbon ones creates an opportunity to generate more compact proton beams of higher mean energy, intensity and of better collimation. This is especially true for the linear polarization of the laser beam, for which the mean proton energy, the amount of high energy protons and the intensity of the proton beam generated from the hydride target is by an order of magnitude higher than for the hydrocarbon target. For the circular polarization, the proton beam parameters are lower than those for the linear one, and the effect of target composition on the acceleration process is weaker.

  16. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  17. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  18. Application of adaptive mesh refinement to particle-in-cell simulations of plasmas and beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Colella, P.; Kwan, J.W.; McCorquodale, P.; Serafini, D.B.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Westenskow, G.; Adam, J.-C.; Heron, A.; Haber, I.

    2003-11-04

    Plasma simulations are often rendered challenging by the disparity of scales in time and in space which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation domain, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g. fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. We briefly discuss the challenges posed by coupling this technique with plasma Particle-In-Cell simulations, and present examples of application in Heavy Ion Fusion and related fields which illustrate the effectiveness of the approach. We also report on the status of a collaboration under way at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory between the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG) and the Heavy Ion Fusion group to upgrade ANAG's mesh refinement library Chombo to include the tools needed by Particle-In-Cell simulation codes.

  19. Electromagnetic particle in cell modeling of the plasma focus: Current sheath formation and lift off

    SciTech Connect

    Seng, Y. S.; Lee, P.; Rawat, R. S.

    2014-02-15

    The shaping and formation of the current sheath takes place in the breakdown phase of a plasma focus device and critically controls the device performance. Electrostatic particle in cell codes, with magnetic effects ignored, have been used to model the breakdown phase. This Letter reports the successful development and implementation of an electromagnetic particle in cell (EMPIC) code, including magnetic effects self-consistently, to simulate the breakdown phase; from the ionization, localization and gliding discharge along the insulator to the time instant of current sheath lift off. The magnetic field was found to be appreciable from the time the current sheath came into contact with the anode with increased local current, initiating the voltage breakdown of the device as a result.

  20. Decaying Whistler Turbulence at Ion Scales: Particle-In-Cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Nariyuki, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation in magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless electron-ion plasma has been done to demonstrate the forward cascade of decaying whistler turbulence at ion scales. Fluctuations with right-handed polarization at scales larger than ion inertial length are applied as an initial condition of the simulation, which satisfy a dispersion relation of whistler waves in cold-magnetized plasma. The particle-in-cell simulation, which includes full kinetic properties of electrons and ions in collisionless plasma, demonstrates turbulent cascade and dissipation of fluctuation energy self-consistently. Discussion will focus on properties of decaying whistler turbulence at ion scales, such as the power-law index, wavenumber anisotropy, and plasma heating. Comparison of properties of whistler turbulence at ion scales with electron scales will also be discussed.

  1. Performance evaluation of relativistic electromagnetic particle in cell algorithms in CPU and GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Ricardo; Abreu, Paulo; Decyk, Viktor

    2010-11-01

    The complexity of the phenomena involved in several relevante plasma physics scenarios, where highly nonlinear and kinetic processes dominate, makes purely theoretical descriptions impossible. Further understanding of these scenarios requires detailed numerical modelling, but fully relativistic particle-in-cell codes such as OSIRIS [1] are computationally intensive. Recently graphics processing units (GPUs), offering peak theoretical performances of ˜ 1 TFlop/s for general purpose calculations, have received significant attention as an atractive alternative to CPUs for plasma modeling. In this work we perform a detailed performance evaluation of an electromagnetic fully relativistic particle in cell code in both GPUs and CPUs for production runs, focusing on the relative strengths and weaknesses of both architectures for all major algorithm sections, including particle push, current deposition, field solver, and also diagnostics. [4pt] [1] R. A. Fonseca et al., LNCS 2331, 342, (2002)

  2. Leap frog integrator modifications in highly collisional particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzlikova, N.; Turner, M. M.

    2014-07-01

    Leap frog integration method is a standard, simple, fast, and accurate way to implement velocity and position integration in particle-in-cell codes. Due to the direct solution of kinetics of particles in phase space central to the particle-in-cell procedure, important information can be obtained on particle velocity distributions, and consequently on transport and heating processes. This approach is commonly associated with physical situations where collisional effects are weak, but can also be profitably applied in some highly collisional cases, such as occur in semiconductor devices and gaseous discharges at atmospheric pressure. In this paper, we show that the implementation of the leap frog integration method in these circumstances can violate some of the assumptions central to the accuracy of this scheme. Indeed, without adaptation, the method gives incorrect results. We show here how the method must be modified to deal correctly with highly collisional cases.

  3. A portable approach for PIC on emerging architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decyk, Viktor

    2016-03-01

    A portable approach for designing Particle-in-Cell (PIC) algorithms on emerging exascale computers, is based on the recognition that 3 distinct programming paradigms are needed. They are: low level vector (SIMD) processing, middle level shared memory parallel programing, and high level distributed memory programming. In addition, there is a memory hierarchy associated with each level. Such algorithms can be initially developed using vectorizing compilers, OpenMP, and MPI. This is the approach recommended by Intel for the Phi processor. These algorithms can then be translated and possibly specialized to other programming models and languages, as needed. For example, the vector processing and shared memory programming might be done with CUDA instead of vectorizing compilers and OpenMP, but generally the algorithm itself is not greatly changed. The UCLA PICKSC web site at http://www.idre.ucla.edu/ contains example open source skeleton codes (mini-apps) illustrating each of these three programming models, individually and in combination. Fortran2003 now supports abstract data types, and design patterns can be used to support a variety of implementations within the same code base. Fortran2003 also supports interoperability with C so that implementations in C languages are also easy to use. Finally, main codes can be translated into dynamic environments such as Python, while still taking advantage of high performing compiled languages. Parallel languages are still evolving with interesting developments in co-Array Fortran, UPC, and OpenACC, among others, and these can also be supported within the same software architecture. Work supported by NSF and DOE Grants.

  4. Measurements And Particle In Cell vs. Fluid Simulations Of A New Time Domain Impedance Probe For Ionospheric Plasma Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, E. A.; Russ, S.; Kerrigan, B.; Leggett, K.; Mullins, J.; Clark, D. C.; Mizell, J.; Gollapalli, R.; Vassiliadis, D.; Lusk, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    A plasma impedance probe is used to obtain plasma parameters in the ionosphere by measuring the magnitude, shape and location of resonances in the frequency spectrum when a probe structure is driven with RF excitation. The measured magnitude and phase response with respect to frequency can be analyzed via analytical and simulational means. We have designed and developed a new Time Domain Impedance Probe capable of making measurements of absolute electron density and electron neutral collision frequency at temporal and spatial resolutions not previously attained. A single measurement can be made in a time as short as 50 microseconds, which yields a spatial resolution of 0.35 meters for a satellite orbital velocity of 7 km/s. The method essentially consists of applying a small amplitude time limited voltage signal into a probe and measuring the resulting current response. The frequency bandwidth of the voltage signal is selected in order that the electron plasma resonances are observable. A prototype of the instrument will be flown in October 2015 on a NASA Undergraduate Student Instrument Progam (USIP) sounding rocket launched out of Wallops Flight Facility. To analyze the measurements, we use a Particle In Cell (PIC) kinetic simulation to calculate the impedance of a dipole antenna immersed in a plasma. The electromagnetic solver utilizes the Finite Difference Time Domain method, while the particle to grid and grid to particle interpolation schemes are standard. The plasma sheath formation electron flux into the dipole surface is not included. The bulk velocity of the plasma around the dipole is assumed to be zero. For completeness, the hot plasma and nonlinear effects of probe plasma interaction are explored, including the appearance of cyclotron harmonics. In this work the electron neutral collisions are simulated via a Poisson process approximation. Our results are compared to sounding rocket data from the NASA Tropical Storms mission in 2007, as well as the

  5. PIC simulations of SMLWFA for 35fs class lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J. C.; Tsung, F. S.; Ren, Chuang; Mori, W. B.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2001-10-01

    In the self-modulated laser wakefield regime a laser pulse several to many 2 π c/ ωp long breaks up via Raman scattering type instabilities producing large wakes. In some cases these wakes can trap background electrons generating a beam of accelerated electrons with a large energy spread. PIC simulations have shown that this process is highly sensitive to the laser intensity, pulse length, and plasma density [K-C.Tzeng et al., PRL 76, 3332 (1996), K-C.Tzeng et al., PRL 79, 5258 (1997)]. There have been some recent experimental results in which 35fs laser pulses have been used. In this case the pulses are at most only a few 2 π c/ ωp long even for the highest densities 10**20 cm-3. We report here on 1D, 2D, and 3D PIC simulations using OSIRIS for parameters closely related to the LULI/LOA results [V.Malka et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2605 (2001)].

  6. Geometric integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell system with a variational particle-in-cell scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Tang, W. M.; Qin, H.

    2012-08-15

    A fully variational, unstructured, electromagnetic particle-in-cell integrator is developed for integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. Using the formalism of discrete exterior calculus [Desbrun et al., e-print arXiv:math/0508341 (2005)], the field solver, interpolation scheme, and particle advance algorithm are derived through minimization of a single discrete field theory action. As a consequence of ensuring that the action is invariant under discrete electromagnetic gauge transformations, the integrator exactly conserves Gauss's law.

  7. Rescaling of microwave breakdown theory for monatomic gases by particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huihui; Meng, Lin; Liu, Dagang; Liu, Laqun

    2013-12-15

    A particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo code is developed to rescale the microwave breakdown theory which is put forward by Vyskrebentsev and Raizer. The results of simulations show that there is a distinct error in this theory when the high energy tail of electron energy distribution function increases. A rescaling factor is proposed to modify this theory, and the change rule of the rescaling factor is presented.

  8. Geometric integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell system with a variational particle-in-cell scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, J.; Qin, H.; Tang, W. M.

    2012-08-01

    A fully variational, unstructured, electromagnetic particle-in-cell integrator is developed for integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. Using the formalism of discrete exterior calculus [Desbrun et al., e-print arXiv:math/0508341 (2005)], the field solver, interpolation scheme, and particle advance algorithm are derived through minimization of a single discrete field theory action. As a consequence of ensuring that the action is invariant under discrete electromagnetic gauge transformations, the integrator exactly conserves Gauss's law.

  9. Improved Conservation Properties for Particle-in-cell Simulations with Kinetic Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-06-19

    It is shown that a simple algorithm which exactly segregates between adiabatic and non-adiabatic electrons in particle-in-cell simulations of drift modes yields excellent conservation properties (e.g. particle number, energy) compared to the conventional df scheme. The removal of the free streaming term in the evolution of the marker weight is shown to be responsible for the improved linear and nonlinear properties of the simulated plasma.

  10. Implementations of mesh refinement schemes for particle-in-cell plasma simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Colella, P.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; McCorquodale, P.; Serafini, D.B.

    2003-10-20

    Plasma simulations are often rendered challenging by the disparity of scales in time and in space which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation region, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g. fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. We briefly discuss the challenges posed by coupling this technique with plasma Particle-In-Cell simulations and present two implementations in more detail, with examples.

  11. Geometric Integration Of The Vlasov-Maxwell System With A Variational Particle-in-cell Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    J. Squire, H. Qin and W.M. Tang

    2012-03-27

    A fully variational, unstructured, electromagnetic particle-in-cell integrator is developed for integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. Using the formalism of Discrete Exterior Calculus [1], the field solver, interpolation scheme and particle advance algorithm are derived through minimization of a single discrete field theory action. As a consequence of ensuring that the action is invariant under discrete electromagnetic gauge transformations, the integrator exactly conserves Gauss's law.

  12. First experience with particle-in-cell plasma physics code on ARM-based HPC systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Xavier; Soba, Alejandro; Sánchez, Edilberto; Mantsinen, Mervi; Mateo, Sergi; Cela, José M.; Castejón, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we will explore the feasibility of porting a Particle-in-cell code (EUTERPE) to an ARM multi-core platform from the Mont-Blanc project. The used prototype is based on a system-on-chip Samsung Exynos 5 with an integrated GPU. It is the first prototype that could be used for High-Performance Computing (HPC), since it supports double precision and parallel programming languages.

  13. Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Back Bombardment in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Corlett, John; Staples, John

    2009-03-02

    In this paper, we report on studies of ion back bombardment in high average current dc and rf photoinjectors using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo method. Using H{sub 2} ion as an example, we observed that the ion density and energy deposition on the photocathode in rf guns are order of magnitude lower than that in a dc gun. A higher rf frequency helps mitigate the ion back bombardment of the cathode in rf guns.

  14. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  15. PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF PARTICLE ENERGIZATION VIA SHOCK DRIFT ACCELERATION FROM LOW MACH NUMBER QUASI-PERPENDICULAR SHOCKS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaehong; Ren Chuang; Workman, Jared C.; Blackman, Eric G.

    2013-03-10

    Low Mach number, high beta fast mode shocks can occur in the magnetic reconnection outflows of solar flares. These shocks, which occur above flare loop tops, may provide the electron energization responsible for some of the observed hard X-rays and contemporaneous radio emission. Here we present new two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of low Mach number/high beta quasi-perpendicular shocks. The simulations show that electrons above a certain energy threshold experience shock-drift-acceleration. The transition energy between the thermal and non-thermal spectrum and the spectral index from the simulations are consistent with some of the X-ray spectra from RHESSI in the energy regime of E {approx}< 40 {approx} 100 keV. Plasma instabilities associated with the shock structure such as the modified-two-stream and the electron whistler instabilities are identified using numerical solutions of the kinetic dispersion relations. We also show that the results from PIC simulations with reduced ion/electron mass ratio can be scaled to those with the realistic mass ratio.

  16. Progress in the study of mesh refinement for particle-in-cell plasma simulations and its application to heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    2002-09-15

    The numerical simulation of the driving beams in a heavy ion fusion power plant is a challenging task, and, despite rapid progress in computer power, one must consider the use of the most advanced numerical techniques. One of the difficulties of these simulations resides in the disparity of scales in time and in space which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation region, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g. fluid dynamics simulations) is the Adaptive-Mesh-Refinement (AMR) technique. We follow in this article the progress accomplished in the last few months in the merging of the AMR technique with Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method. This includes a detailed modeling of the Lampel-Tiefenback solution for the one-dimensional diode using novel techniques to suppress undesirable numerical oscillations and an AMR patch to follow the head of the particle distribution. We also report new results concerning the modeling of ion sources using the axisymmetric WARPRZ-AMR prototype showing the utility of an AMR patch resolving the emitter vicinity and the beam edge.

  17. Particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo collision simulations of the cathode sheath in an atmospheric direct-current arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Guo, Heng; Jiang, Wei; Li, He-Ping; Li, Zeng-Yao; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    A sheath is the transition region from plasma to a solid surface, which also plays a critical role in determining the behaviors of many lab and industrial plasmas. However, the cathode sheath properties in arc discharges are not well understood yet due to its multi-scale and kinetic features. In this letter, we have adopted an implicit particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) method to study the cathode sheath in an atmospheric arc discharge plasma. The cathode sheath thickness, number densities and averaged energies of electrons and ions, the electric field distribution, as well as the spatially averaged electron energy probability function (EEPF), are predicted self-consistently by using this newly developed kinetic model. It is also shown that the thermionic emission at the hot cathode surface is the dominant electron emission process to sustain the arc discharges, while the effects from secondary and field electron emissions are negligible. The present results verify the previous conjectures and experimental observations.

  18. PIC simulations of whistler wave generation using plasma conditions from the RAM-SCB model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yiqun; Zhao, Lei; Peng, Bo; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Jordanova, Vania; Markidis, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    Wave-particle interactions play an important role in the Earth's inner magnetospheric dynamics. We study the whistler wave generation with an implicit particle-in-cell code (iPIC3D) within unstable equatorial regions identified by the kinetic ring current model RAM-SCB. During storm time, RAM-SCB shows that hot electrons on the dayside demonstrate high temperature anisotropy and are unstable to whistler wave excitation. By using plasma parameters from RAM-SCB, we carry out iPIC3D simulations assuming a bi-Maxwellian distribution for electrons. We find that with an electron temperature anisotropy of 4, electron density of 6 cm-3, and parallel temperature of 1 keV on the dayside around L ~ 5 . 5 , whistler waves are rapidly excited and propagate along the background magnetic field. Comparisons with linear theory show good agreement. The electron velocity distribution is significantly changed after wave generation, with smaller anisotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering. Furthermore, test particles are tracked in the whistler wave environment and the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient is extracted. The coefficient generally agrees with quasi-linear theory prediction with slight deviation even when the wave amplitude is as large as 5 % of the background magnetic field.

  19. Analysis of instability growth and collisionless relaxation in thermionic converters using 1-D PIC simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kreh, B.B.

    1994-12-01

    This work investigates the role that the beam-plasma instability may play in a thermionic converter. The traditional assumption of collisionally dominated relaxation is questioned, and the beam-plasma instability is proposed as a possible dominant relaxation mechanism. Theory is developed to describe the beam-plasma instability in the cold-plasma approximation, and the theory is tested with two common Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. The theory is first confirmed using an unbounded plasma PIC simulation employing periodic boundary conditions, ES1. The theoretically predicted growth rates are on the order of the plasma frequencies, and ES1 simulations verify these predictions within the order of 1%. For typical conditions encountered in thermionic converters, the resulting growth period is on the order of 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} seconds. The bounded plasma simulation PDP1 was used to evaluate the influence of finite geometry and the electrode boundaries. For this bounded plasma, a two-stream interaction was supported and resulting in nearly complete thermalization in approximately 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} seconds. Since the electron-electron collision rate of 10{sup 9} Hz and the electron atom collision rate of 10{sup 7} Hz are significantly slower than the rate of development of these instabilities, the instabilities appear to be an important relaxation mechanism.

  20. Multi-scale simulations of space problems with iPIC3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Bettarini, Lapo; Markidis, Stefano

    The implicit Particle-in-Cell method for the computer simulation of space plasma, and its im-plementation in a three-dimensional parallel code, called iPIC3D, are presented. The implicit integration in time of the Vlasov-Maxwell system removes the numerical stability constraints and enables kinetic plasma simulations at magnetohydrodynamics scales. Simulations of mag-netic reconnection in plasma are presented to show the effectiveness of the algorithm. In particular we will show a number of simulations done for large scale 3D systems using the physical mass ratio for Hydrogen. Most notably one simulation treats kinetically a box of tens of Earth radii in each direction and was conducted using about 16000 processors of the Pleiades NASA computer. The work is conducted in collaboration with the MMS-IDS theory team from University of Colorado (M. Goldman, D. Newman and L. Andersson). Reference: Stefano Markidis, Giovanni Lapenta, Rizwan-uddin Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Available online 17 October 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038

  1. Generalized SIMD algorithm for efficient EM-PIC simulations on modern CPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Ricardo; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren; Silva, Luis

    2012-10-01

    There are several relevant plasma physics scenarios where highly nonlinear and kinetic processes dominate. Further understanding of these scenarios is generally explored through relativistic particle-in-cell codes such as OSIRIS [1], but this algorithm is computationally intensive, and efficient use high end parallel HPC systems, exploring all levels of parallelism available, is required. In particular, most modern CPUs include a single-instruction-multiple-data (SIMD) vector unit that can significantly speed up the calculations. In this work we present a generalized PIC-SIMD algorithm that is shown to work efficiently with different CPU (AMD, Intel, IBM) and vector unit types (2-8 way, single/double). Details on the algorithm will be given, including the vectorization strategy and memory access. We will also present performance results for the various hardware variants analyzed, focusing on floating point efficiency. Finally, we will discuss the applicability of this type of algorithm for EM-PIC simulations on GPGPU architectures [2]. [4pt] [1] R. A. Fonseca et al., LNCS 2331, 342, (2002)[0pt] [2] V. K. Decyk, T. V. Singh; Comput. Phys. Commun. 182, 641-648 (2011)

  2. Particle-in-cell simulation of multipactor discharge on a dielectric in a parallel-plate waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakharov, A. S.; Ivanov, V. A.; Konyzhev, M. E.

    2016-06-01

    An original 2D3V (two-dimensional in coordinate space and three-dimensional in velocity space) particle-in-cell code has been developed for simulation of multipactor discharge on a dielectric in a parallelplate metal waveguide with allowance for secondary electron emission (SEE) from the dielectric surface and waveguide walls, finite temperature of secondary electrons, electron space charge, and elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons from the dielectric and metal surfaces. The code allows one to simulate all stages of the multipactor discharge, from the onset of the electron avalanche to saturation. It is shown that the threshold for the excitation of a single-surface multipactor on a dielectric placed in a low-profile waveguide with absorbing walls increases as compared to that in the case of an unbounded dielectric surface due to escape of electrons onto the waveguide walls. It is found that, depending on the microwave field amplitude and the SEE characteristics of the waveguide walls, the multipactor may operate in two modes. In the first mode, which takes place at relatively low microwave amplitudes, a single-surface multipactor develops only on the dielectric, the surface of which acquires a positively potential with respect to the waveguide walls. In the second mode, which occurs at sufficiently high microwave intensities, a single-surface multipactor on the dielectric and a two-surface multipactor between the waveguide walls operate simultaneously. In this case, both the dielectric surface and the interwall space acquire a negative potential. It is shown that electron scattering from the dielectric surface and waveguide walls results in the appearance of high-energy tails in the electron distribution function.

  3. Field-based DGTD/PIC technique for general and stable simulation of interaction between light and electron bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallahi, Arya; Kärtner, Franz

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a hybrid technique based on the discontinuous Galerkin time domain (DGTD) and the particle in cell (PIC) simulation methods for the analysis of interaction between light and charged particles. The DGTD algorithm is a three-dimensional, dual-field and fully explicit method for efficiently solving Maxwell equations in the time domain on unstructured grids. On the other hand, the PIC algorithm is a versatile technique for the simulation of charged particles in an electromagnetic field. This paper introduces a novel strategy for combining both methods to solve for the electron motion and field distribution when an optical beam interacts with an electron bunch in a very general geometry. The developed software offers a complete and stable numerical solution of the problem for arbitrary charge and field distributions in the time domain on unstructured grids. For this purpose, an advanced search algorithm is developed for fast calculation of field data at charge points and for later importing to the PIC simulations. In addition, we propose a field-based coupling between the two methods resulting in a stable and precise time marching scheme for both fields and charged particle motion. To benchmark the solver, some examples are numerically solved and compared with analytical solutions. Eventually, the developed software is utilized to simulate the field emission from a flat metal plate and a silicon nano-tip. In the future, we will use this technique for the simulation and design of ultrafast compact x-ray sources.

  4. Wavelet-based Poisson solver for use in particle-in-cell simulations.

    PubMed

    Terzić, Balsa; Pogorelov, Ilya V

    2005-06-01

    We report on a successful implementation of a wavelet-based Poisson solver for use in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Our method harnesses advantages afforded by the wavelet formulation, such as sparsity of operators and data sets, existence of effective preconditioners, and the ability simultaneously to remove numerical noise and additional compression of relevant data sets. We present and discuss preliminary results relating to the application of the new solver to test problems in accelerator physics and astrophysics. PMID:15980304

  5. Sheath and presheath in ion-ion plasmas via particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Meige, A.; Leray, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Chabert, P.

    2008-02-11

    A full particle-in-cell simulation is developed to investigate electron-free plasmas constituted of positive and negative ions under the influence of a dc bias voltage. It is shown that high-voltage sheaths following the classical Child-law sheaths form within a few microseconds (which corresponds to the ion transit time) after the dc voltage is applied. It is also shown that there exists the equivalent of a Bohm criterion where a presheath accelerates the ions collected at one of the electrodes up to the sound speed before they enter the sheath. From an applied perspective, this leads to smaller sheaths than one would expect.

  6. Particle-in-cell simulations of hot electron generation using defocused laser light in cone targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Pasley, John

    2016-08-01

    The effects of defocusing a high intensity pulse of laser light on the generation of hot electrons in a cone are investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. The results indicate that defocused laser light can soften the electron energy spectrum and increase the coupling efficiency compared to the use of a laser in tight focus. It is shown that this is a consequence of the density profile of plasma produced by the laser prepulse, which is less dense in the case of the defocused laser. The relevance of this result to fast ignition inertial confinement fusion is discussed.

  7. Geometric integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell system with a variational particle-in-cell scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Jonathan; Qin, Hong; Tang, William

    2012-10-01

    A fully variational, unstructured, electromagnetic particle-in-cell integrator is developed for integration of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. Using the formalism of Discrete Exterior Calculus [1], the field solver, interpolation scheme and particle advance algorithm are derived through minimization of a single discrete field theory action. As a consequence of ensuring that the action is invariant under discrete electromagnetic gauge transformations, the integrator exactly conserves Gauss's law. This work was supported by USDOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.[4pt] [1] M. Desbrun, A. N. Hirani, M. Leok, and J. E. Marsden, (2005), arXiv:math/0508341

  8. Quasilinear theory and particle-in-cell simulation of proton cyclotron instability

    SciTech Connect

    Seough, Jungjoon E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu; Yoon, Peter H. E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu; Hwang, Junga E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu

    2014-06-15

    The electromagnetic ion (proton) cyclotron instability is important for regulating the excessive development of perpendicular temperature anisotropy in the solar wind, for instance, when it is compressed in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosheath environment. A recent letter [Seough et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 071103 (2013)] successfully employed the quasilinear kinetic theory to explain the observed temperature anisotropy upper bound. The present paper rigorously examines the reliability of the quasilinear theory by making a direct comparison against results from the particle-in-cell simulation method. It is found that the quasilinear approach is indeed a valid first-cut theoretical tool in the study of proton cyclotron instability.

  9. Particle-in-cell modeling of gas-confined barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-01

    Gas-confined barrier discharge is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model for the conditions reported by Guerra-Garcia and Martinez-Sanchez [Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 041601 (2015)]. Depending on the applied voltage, two modes of discharge are observed. In the first mode, the discharge develops in the entire interelectrode gap. In the second mode, the discharge is ignited and develops only in the gas layer having smaller breakdown voltage. The one-dimensional model shows that for the conditions considered, there is no streamer stage of breakdown as is typical for a traditional dielectric barrier discharge.

  10. AB INITIO PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE: THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF AXISYMMETRIC PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2014-04-20

    We perform ''first-principles'' relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of aligned pulsar magnetosphere. We allow free escape of particles from the surface of a neutron star and continuously populate the magnetosphere with neutral pair plasma to imitate pair production. As pair plasma supply increases, we observe the transition from a charge-separated ''electrosphere'' solution with trapped plasma and no spin-down to a solution close to the ideal force-free magnetosphere with electromagnetically dominated pulsar wind. We calculate the magnetospheric structure, current distribution, and spin-down power of the neutron star. We also discuss particle acceleration in the equatorial current sheet.

  11. Locally conformal finite-difference time-domain techniques for particle-in-cell plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Miller, C. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Price, D. W.; Martin, P. N.; Short, D. J.; Jones, A. W. P.; Threadgold, J. R.

    2011-02-01

    The Dey-Mittra [S. Dey, R. Mitra, A locally conformal finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for modeling three-dimensional perfectly conducting objects, IEEE Microwave Guided Wave Lett. 7 (273) 1997] finite-difference time-domain partial cell method enables the modeling of irregularly shaped conducting surfaces while retaining second-order accuracy. We present an algorithm to extend this method to include charged particle emission and absorption in particle-in-cell codes. Several examples are presented that illustrate the possible improvements that can be realized using the new algorithm for problems relevant to plasma simulation.

  12. Velocity-Shear Driven Magnetic Reconnection in Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Carrie; Antiochos, Spiro; DeVore, Rick; Karpen, Judy; Germaschewski, Kai

    2012-10-01

    In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the event resides in the strongly sheared magnetic field of a filament channel. The pre-eruption force balance consists of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field balanced by a downward tension due to overlying un-sheared field. Magnetic reconnection is widely believed to be the mechanism that disrupts this force balance, leading to explosive eruption. For understanding CME/flare initiation, therefore, it is critical to model the onset of reconnection that is driven by the buildup of magnetic shear. In MHD simulations, the application of a magnetic field shear is a trivial matter. However, kinetic effects are important in the diffusion region and thus, it is important to examine this process with PIC simulations as well. The implementation of such a driver in PIC methods is nontrivial: it must be done in a self-consistent manner that avoids the generation of waves that destroy the applied shear. In this work, we discuss methods for applying a velocity shear perpendicular to the plane of reconnection within a 2.5D, aperiodic, PIC system. We also discuss the implementation of boundary conditions that allow a net electric current to flow through the walls.

  13. ASPEN: A Fully Kinetic, Reduced-Description Particle-in-Cell Model for Simulating Parametric Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, H. X.; Bezzerides, B.; DuBois, D. F.

    1999-11-01

    A fully kinetic, reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) model is presented in which deviations from quasineutrality, electron and ion kinetic effects, and nonlinear interactions between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities are modeled correctly. The model is based on a reduced description where the electromagnetic field is represented by three separate temporal envelopes in order to model parametric instabilities with low-frequency and high-frequency daughter waves. Because temporal envelope approximations are invoked, the simulation can be performed on the electron time scale instead of the time scale of the light waves. The electrons and ions are represented by discrete finite-size particles, permitting electron and ion kinetic effects to be modeled properly. The Poisson equation is utilized to ensure that space-charge effects are included. The RPIC model is fully three dimensional and has been implemented in two dimensions on the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) parallel computer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the resulting simulation code has been named ASPEN. We believe this code is the first particle-in-cell code capable of simulating the interaction between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilites in multiple dimensions. Test simulations of stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and Langmuir decay instability are presented.

  14. Computing quasi-linear diffusion coefficients using the delta-f particle-in-cell method

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, T. M.; Smithe, D. N.; Ranjbar, V.

    2009-11-26

    Linear wave codes AORSA and TORIC couple to the bounce-averaged nonlinear Fokker-Planck code CQL3D through quasi-linear diffusion coefficients. Both linear wave codes rely on the quasi-local approximation that includes only first-order parallel and perpendicular gradient variations of cyclotron frequency and ignores field line curvature along with temperature and density gradient effects. The delta-f particle-in-cell (DFPIC) method has been successfully used for simulating ion-cyclotron fast wave behavior. This method also permits particle behavior such as multiple pass resonance, banana orbits, and superadiabaticity. We present new work on generating quasi-linear diffusion coefficients using the DFPIC method that will permit the electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EMPIC) code, VORPAL, to couple to CQL3D and to compare to AORSA and TORIC. A new multiple weight delta-f approach will be presented that converts velocity derivatives to action derivatives and yields a full tensor quasi-linear diffusion coefficient.

  15. Particle-in-Cell laser-plasma simulation on Xeon Phi coprocessors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmin, I. A.; Bastrakov, S. I.; Efimenko, E. S.; Gonoskov, A. A.; Korzhimanov, A. V.; Meyerov, I. B.

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns the development of a high-performance implementation of the Particle-in-Cell method for plasma simulation on Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. We discuss the suitability of the method for Xeon Phi architecture and present our experience in the porting and optimization of the existing parallel Particle-in-Cell code PICADOR. Direct porting without code modification gives performance on Xeon Phi close to that of an 8-core CPU on a benchmark problem with 50 particles per cell. We demonstrate step-by-step optimization techniques, such as improving data locality, enhancing parallelization efficiency and vectorization leading to an overall 4.2 × speedup on CPU and 7.5 × on Xeon Phi compared to the baseline version. The optimized version achieves 16.9 ns per particle update on an Intel Xeon E5-2660 CPU and 9.3 ns per particle update on an Intel Xeon Phi 5110P. For a real problem of laser ion acceleration in targets with surface grating, where a large number of macroparticles per cell is required, the speedup of Xeon Phi compared to CPU is 1.6 ×.

  16. Load-balancing techniques for a parallel electromagnetic particle-in-cell code

    SciTech Connect

    PLIMPTON,STEVEN J.; SEIDEL,DAVID B.; PASIK,MICHAEL F.; COATS,REBECCA S.

    2000-01-01

    QUICKSILVER is a 3-d electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation code developed and used at Sandia to model relativistic charged particle transport. It models the time-response of electromagnetic fields and low-density-plasmas in a self-consistent manner: the fields push the plasma particles and the plasma current modifies the fields. Through an LDRD project a new parallel version of QUICKSILVER was created to enable large-scale plasma simulations to be run on massively-parallel distributed-memory supercomputers with thousands of processors, such as the Intel Tflops and DEC CPlant machines at Sandia. The new parallel code implements nearly all the features of the original serial QUICKSILVER and can be run on any platform which supports the message-passing interface (MPI) standard as well as on single-processor workstations. This report describes basic strategies useful for parallelizing and load-balancing particle-in-cell codes, outlines the parallel algorithms used in this implementation, and provides a summary of the modifications made to QUICKSILVER. It also highlights a series of benchmark simulations which have been run with the new code that illustrate its performance and parallel efficiency. These calculations have up to a billion grid cells and particles and were run on thousands of processors. This report also serves as a user manual for people wishing to run parallel QUICKSILVER.

  17. A three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell methodology on unstructured Delaunay-Voronoi grids

    SciTech Connect

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos A. Spirkin, Anton

    2009-06-01

    The mathematical formulation and computational implementation of a three-dimensional particle-in-cell methodology on unstructured Delaunay-Voronoi tetrahedral grids is presented. The method allows simulation of plasmas in complex domains and incorporates the duality of the Delaunay-Voronoi in all aspects of the particle-in-cell cycle. Charge assignment and field interpolation weighting schemes of zero- and first-order are formulated based on the theory of long-range constraints. Electric potential and fields are derived from a finite-volume formulation of Gauss' law using the Voronoi-Delaunay dual. Boundary conditions and the algorithms for injection, particle loading, particle motion, and particle tracking are implemented for unstructured Delaunay grids. Error and sensitivity analysis examines the effects of particles/cell, grid scaling, and timestep on the numerical heating, the slowing-down time, and the deflection times. The problem of current collection by cylindrical Langmuir probes in collisionless plasmas is used for validation. Numerical results compare favorably with previous numerical and analytical solutions for a wide range of probe radius to Debye length ratios, probe potentials, and electron to ion temperature ratios. The versatility of the methodology is demonstrated with the simulation of a complex plasma microsensor, a directional micro-retarding potential analyzer that includes a low transparency micro-grid.

  18. Mars' 1995 opposition from PIC du Midi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erard, S.

    1997-03-01

    The last Martian apparition was observed from Pic du Midi between October 1994 and March 1995. Earth-based observation remains the only practicable way to perform continuous surveys of the planets, as opposed to orbital (HST) or space-borne observation. A good planetary site with limited demand for observational time like the 1-m telescope at Pic du Midi provides the optimal opportunity to monitor planetary activity, including atmospheric phenomena, surface variations, and polar caps recession. For instance, HST observations of Mars during this period, though yielding a much better spatial resolution, are limited to very few sessions and do not make it possible to monitor quick processes along a whole Martian season.

  19. PIC simulations on the termination shock: Microstructure and electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukiyo, S.; Scholer, M.

    2013-05-01

    The ability of the termination shock as a particle accelerator is totally unknown. Voyager data and recent kinetic numerical simulations revealed that the compression ratio of the termination shock is rather low due to the presence of pickup ions, i.e., the termination shock appears to be a weak shock. Nevertheless, two Voyager spacecraft observed not only high energy ions called termination shock particles, which are non-thermal but less energetic compared to the so-called anomalous cosmic rays, but also high energy electrons. In this study we focus especially on microstructure of the termination shock and the associated electron acceleration process by performing one-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for a variety of parameters. For typical solar wind parameters at the termination shock, a shock potential has no sharp ramp with the spatial scale of the order of electron inertial length which is suitable for the injection of anomalous cosmic ray acceleration. Solar wind ions are not so much heated, which is consistent with Voyager spacecraft data. If a shock angle is close to 90 deg., a shock is almost time stationary or weakly breathing when a relative pickup ion density is 30%, while it becomes non-stationary if the relative pickup ion density is 20%. When the shock angle becomes oblique, a self-reformation occurs due to the interaction of solar wind ions and whistler precursors. Here, the shock angle is defined as the angle between upstream magnetic field and shock normal. For the case with relatively low beta solar wind plasma (electron beta is 0.1 and solar wind ion temperature equals to electron temperature), modified two-stream instability (MTSI) gets excited in the extended foot sustained by reflected pickup ions, and both solar wind electrons and ions are heated. If the solar wind plasma temperature gets five times higher, on the other hand, the MTSI is weakened and the pre-heating of the solar wind plasma in the extended foot is

  20. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the interaction between a relativistically moving leptonic micro-cloud and ambient electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Sarri, G.; Markoff, S.; Borghesi, M.; Zepf, M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The jets of compact accreting objects are composed of electrons and a mixture of positrons and ions. These outflows impinge on the interstellar or intergalactic medium and both plasmas interact via collisionless processes. Filamentation (beam-Weibel) instabilities give rise to the growth of strong electromagnetic fields. These fields thermalize the interpenetrating plasmas. Aims: Hitherto, the effects imposed by a spatial non-uniformity on filamentation instabilities have remained unexplored. We examine the interaction between spatially uniform background electrons and a minuscule cloud of electrons and positrons. The cloud size is comparable to that created in recent laboratory experiments and such clouds may exist close to internal and external shocks of leptonic jets. The purpose of our study is to determine the prevalent instabilities, their ability to generate electromagnetic fields and the mechanism, by which the lepton micro-cloud transfers energy to the background plasma. Methods: A square micro-cloud of equally dense electrons and positrons impinges in our particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation on a spatially uniform plasma at rest. The latter consists of electrons with a temperature of 1 keV and immobile ions. The initially charge- and current neutral micro-cloud has a temperature of 100 keV and a side length of 2.5 plasma skin depths of the micro-cloud. The side length is given in the reference frame of the background plasma. The mean speed of the micro-cloud corresponds to a relativistic factor of 15, which is relevant for laboratory experiments and for relativistic astrophysical outflows. The spatial distributions of the leptons and of the electromagnetic fields are examined at several times. Results: A filamentation instability develops between the magnetic field carried by the micro-cloud and the background electrons. The electromagnetic fields, which grow from noise levels, redistribute the electrons and positrons within the cloud, which boosts

  1. Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Interaction Mechanisms Under Varying Solar Wind Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Lapenta, Giovanni; Lembège, Bertrand; Markidis, Stefano; Horányi, Mihály

    2015-04-01

    We present three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general picture of the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under various solar wind and plasma conditions, and focus afterwards on the ion and electron kinetic behavior of the system. It is shown that the configuration is dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyroradius of the solar wind ions. We identify a population of backstreaming ions, the deflection of magnetized electrons via the ExB-drift motion and the subsequent formation of a halo region of elevated density around the dipole source. Finally, it is shown that the presence and efficiency of the latter mechanisms are heavily impacted by the upstream plasma conditions and, on their turn, influence the overall structure and evolution of the LMA system. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs. This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement SWIFF (project 2633430, swiff.eu) and EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The

  2. Continuation of the Application of Parallel PIC Simulations to Laser and Electron Transport Through Plasmas Under Conditions Relevant to ICF and SBSS

    SciTech Connect

    Warren B. Mori

    2007-04-20

    One of the important research questions in high energy density science (HEDS) is how intense laser and electron beams penetrate into and interact with matter. At high beam intensities the self-fields of the laser and particle beams can fully ionize matter so that beam -matter interactions become beam-plasma interactions. These interactions involve a disparity of length and time scales, and they involve interactions between particles, between particles and waves, and between waves and waves. In a plasma what happens in one region can significantly impact another because the particles are free to move and many types of waves can be excited. Therefore, simulating these interactions requires tools that include wave particle interactions and that include wave nonlinearities. One methodology for studying such interactions is particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. While PIC codes include most of the relevant physics they are also the most computer intensive. However, with the development of sophisticated software and the use of massively parallel computers, PIC codes can now be used to accurately study a wide range of problems in HEDS. The research in this project involved building, maintaining, and using the UCLA parallel computing infrastructure. This infrastructure includes the codes OSIRIS and UPIC which have been improved or developed during this grant period. Specifically, we used this PIC infrastructure to study laser-plasma interactions relevant to future NIF experiments and high-intensity laser and beam plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition fusion. The research has led to fundamental knowledge in how to write parallel PIC codes and use parallel PIC simulations, as well as increased the fundamental knowledge of HEDS. This fundamental knowledge will not only impact Inertial Confinement Fusion but other fields such as plasma-based acceleration and astrophysics.

  3. PIC Simulation Models of Hypersonic Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehoff, Dustin; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Niemann, Chris; Decyk, Viktor; Schriver, David; Clark, S. Eric; Sotnikov, Vladimir

    2013-10-01

    The plasma sheaths formed around hypersonic aircraft (Mach number over 10) are relatively unexplored and of interest today to both further the development of new technologies and solve long-standing engineering problems. PIC simulations are necessary when phenomena are expected to be observed below typical ion scales; however, if the scales of the problem are not significantly below this, then the initialization of the PIC simulation must be very carefully engineered to avoid unnecessary computation while still retaining structures of interest. In order to avoid excess computational expense, we use a radial density profile from hybrid simulation results to seed the distribution of a self-consistent PIC simulation in one direction, transverse to an external magnetic field. To further reduce the expense, we also use a Darwin approximation which neglects retardation, but effects from lower frequency modes are unchanged, allowing us to feasibly simulate over the required distances and durations. The simulation will be run in two spatial dimensions but retain three velocity dimensions, and the results will be used to explore the growth of micro-instabilities present in hypersonic plasmas in the high-density region as it moves through the simulation box. Work supported by the AFRL.

  4. Large Scale Earth's Bow Shock with Northern IMF as Simulated by PIC Code in Parallel with MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraka, Suleiman

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a 3D kinetic model (particle-in-cell, PIC) for the description of the large scale Earth's bow shock. The proposed version is stable and does not require huge or extensive computer resources. Because PIC simulations work with scaled plasma and field parameters, we also propose to validate our code by comparing its results with the available MHD simulations under same scaled solar wind (SW) and (IMF) conditions. We report new results from the two models. In both codes the Earth's bow shock position is found to be ≈14.8 R E along the Sun-Earth line, and ≈29 R E on the dusk side. Those findings are consistent with past in situ observations. Both simulations reproduce the theoretical jump conditions at the shock. However, the PIC code density and temperature distributions are inflated and slightly shifted sunward when compared to the MHD results. Kinetic electron motions and reflected ions upstream may cause this sunward shift. Species distributions in the foreshock region are depicted within the transition of the shock (measured ≈2 c/ ω pi for Θ Bn = 90° and M MS = 4.7) and in the downstream. The size of the foot jump in the magnetic field at the shock is measured to be (1.7 c/ ω pi ). In the foreshocked region, the thermal velocity is found equal to 213 km s-1 at 15 R E and is equal to 63 km s -1 at 12 R E (magnetosheath region). Despite the large cell size of the current version of the PIC code, it is powerful to retain macrostructure of planets magnetospheres in very short time, thus it can be used for pedagogical test purposes. It is also likely complementary with MHD to deepen our understanding of the large scale magnetosphere.

  5. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron energization in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Guo, Fan; Sheng, Zhengming; Wang, Huanyu; Wang, Shui

    2016-01-25

    Electrons can be energized during laser-driven magnetic reconnection, and the energized electrons form three super-Alfvénic electron jets in the outflow region (Lu et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 083021). In this paper, by performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the electrons can also be significantly energized before magnetic reconnection occurs. When two plasma bubbles with toroidal magnetic fields expand and squeeze each other, the electrons in the magnetic ribbons are energized through betatron acceleration due to the enhancement of the magnetic field, and an electron temperature anisotropymore » $${T}_{{\\rm{e}}\\perp }\\gt {T}_{{\\rm{e}}| | }$$ develops. Meanwhile, some electrons are trapped and bounced repeatedly between the two expanding/approaching bubbles and get energized through a Fermi-like process. Furthermore, the energization before magnetic reconnection is more significant (or important) than that during magnetic reconnection.« less

  6. Fast electron energy deposition in a magnetized plasma: Kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.-M.; Bonnaud, G.; Gremillet, L.

    2010-03-15

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron jet in a magnetized plasma are investigated within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing slowing down, pitch angle scattering, and cyclotron rotation is derived and solved. Based on the solution of this Fokker-Planck equation, an analytical formula for the root mean square spot size transverse to the magnetic field is derived and this result predicts a reduction in radial transport. Some comparisons with particle-in-cell simulation are made and confirm striking agreement between the theory and the simulation. For fast electron with 1 MeV typical kinetic energy interacting with a solid density hydrogen plasma, the energy deposition density in the transverse direction increases by a factor 2 for magnetic field of the order of 1 T. Along the magnetic field, the energy deposition profile is unaltered compared with the field-free case.

  7. Half-Cell RF Gun Simulations with the Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Code VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Dimitrov, D. A.; Busby, R.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Smithe, D.; Cary, J. R.; Kewisch, J.; Kayran, D.; Calaga, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2009-01-22

    We have simulated Brookhaven National Laboratory's half-cell superconducting RF gun design for a proposed high-current ERL using the three-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell code VORPAL. VORPAL computes the fully self-consistent electromagnetic fields produced by the electron bunches, meaning that it accurately models space-charge effects as well as bunch-to-bunch beam loading effects and the effects of higher-order cavity modes, though these are beyond the scope of this paper. We compare results from VORPAL to the well-established space-charge code PARMELA, using RF fields produced by SUPERFISH, as a benchmarking exercise in which the two codes should agree well.

  8. Particle-in-cell simulations of ion-acoustic waves with application to Saturn's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, Etienne J.; Collier, Andrew B.; Hellberg, Manfred A.; Maharaj, Shimul K.

    2014-07-15

    Using a particle-in-cell simulation, the dispersion and growth rate of the ion-acoustic mode are investigated for a plasma containing two ion and two electron components. The electron velocities are modelled by a combination of two kappa distributions, as found in Saturn's magnetosphere. The ion components consist of adiabatic ions and an ultra-low density ion beam to drive a very weak instability, thereby ensuring observable waves. The ion-acoustic mode is explored for a range of parameter values such as κ, temperature ratio, and density ratio of the two electron components. The phase speed, frequency range, and growth rate of the mode are investigated. Simulations of double-kappa two-temperature plasmas typical of the three regions of Saturn's magnetosphere are also presented and analysed.

  9. A particle-in-cell approach to obliquely propagating electrostatic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, Etienne J.; Collier, Andrew B.; Maharaj, Shimul K.

    2014-09-15

    The electron-acoustic and beam-driven modes associated with electron beams have previously been identified and studied numerically. These modes are associated with Broadband Electrostatic Noise found in the Earth's auroral and polar cusp regions. Using a 1-D spatial Particle-in-Cell simulation, the electron-acoustic instability is studied for a magnetized plasma, which includes cool ions, cool electrons and a hot, drifting electron beam. Both the weakly and strongly magnetized regimes with varying wave propagation angle, θ, with respect to the magnetic field are studied. The amplitude and frequency of the electron-acoustic mode are found to decrease with increasing θ. The amplitude of the electron-acoustic mode is found to significantly grow at intermediate wavenumber ranges. It reaches a saturation level at the point, where a plateau forms in the hot electron velocity distribution after which the amplitude of the electron-acoustic mode decays.

  10. Plasma electron hole kinematics. II. Hole tracking Particle-In-Cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Hutchinson, I. H.

    2016-08-01

    The kinematics of a 1-D electron hole is studied using a novel Particle-In-Cell simulation code. A hole tracking technique enables us to follow the trajectory of a fast-moving solitary hole and study quantitatively hole acceleration and coupling to ions. We observe a transient at the initial stage of hole formation when the hole accelerates to several times the cold-ion sound speed. Artificially imposing slow ion speed changes on a fully formed hole causes its velocity to change even when the ion stream speed in the hole frame greatly exceeds the ion thermal speed, so there are no reflected ions. The behavior that we observe in numerical simulations agrees very well with our analytic theory of hole momentum conservation and the effects of "jetting."

  11. Verification of particle-in-cell simulations with Monte Carlo collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    Widespread recent interest in techniques for demonstrating that computer simulation programs are correct (‘verification’) has been motivated by evidence that traditional development and testing procedures are disturbingly ineffective. Reproducing an exact solution of the relevant model equations is generally accepted as the strongest available verification procedure, but this technique depends on the availability of suitable exact solutions. In this paper we consider verification of a particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions. We know of no exact solutions that simultaneously exercise all of the functions of this code. However, we show here that there can be found in the literature a number of non-trivial exact solutions, each of which exercises a substantial subset of these functions, and which in combination exercise all of the functions of the code. That the code is able to reproduce these solutions is correctness evidence of a stronger kind than has hitherto been elucidated.

  12. Electron-Anode Interactions in Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Applied-B Ion Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.E.; Cuneo, M.D.; Johnson, D.J.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Pointon, T.D.; Renk, T.J.; Stygar, W.A.; Vesey, R.A.

    1998-11-12

    Particle-in-cell simulations of applied-B ion diodes using the QUICKSILVER code have been augmented with Monte Carlo calculations of electron-anode interactions (reflection and energy deposition). Extraction diode simulations demonstrate a link between the instability evolution and increased electron loss and anode heating. Simulations of radial and extraction ion diodes show spatial non-uniformity in the predicted electron loss profile leading to hot spots on the anode that rapidly exceed the 350-450 {degree}C range, known to be sufficient for plasma formation on electron-bombarded surfaces. Thermal resorption calculations indicate complete resorption of contaminants with 15-20 kcal/mole binding energies in high-dose regions of the anode during the power pulse. Comparisons of parasitic ion emission simulations and experiment show agreement in some aspects; but also highlight the need for better ion source, plasma, and neutral gas models.

  13. Whistler turbulence forward vs. inverse cascade. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, Ouliang; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2015-02-12

    In this study, we present the results of the first fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma in which both forward cascades to shorter wavelengths, and inverse cascades to longer wavelengths are allowed to proceed. For the electron beta βe = 0.10 initial value considered here, the early-time rate of inverse cascade is very much smaller than the rate of forward cascade, so that at late times the fluctuation energy in the regime of the inverse cascade is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime. Similarly, the wavevector anisotropy in themore » inverse cascade regime is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime.« less

  14. WHISTLER TURBULENCE FORWARD CASCADE VERSUS INVERSE CASCADE: THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ouliang; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph E-mail: pgary@lanl.gov

    2015-02-20

    We present the results of the first fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma in which both forward cascades to shorter wavelengths, and inverse cascades to longer wavelengths are allowed to proceed. For the electron beta β {sub e} = 0.10 initial value considered here, the early-time rate of inverse cascade is very much smaller than the rate of forward cascade, so that at late times the fluctuation energy in the regime of the inverse cascade is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime. Similarly, the wavevector anisotropy in the inverse cascade regime is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime.

  15. Hamiltonian particle-in-cell methods for Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Sun, Yajuan; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the Vlasov-Maxwell equations based on the Morrison-Marsden-Weinstein bracket. We develop Hamiltonian particle-in-cell methods for this system by employing finite element methods in space and splitting methods in time. In order to derive the semi-discrete system that possesses a discrete non-canonical Poisson structure, we present a criterion for choosing the appropriate finite element spaces. It is confirmed that some conforming elements, e.g., Nédélec's mixed elements, satisfy this requirement. When the Hamiltonian splitting method is used to discretize this semi-discrete system in time, the resulting algorithm is explicit and preserves the discrete Poisson structure. The structure-preserving nature of the algorithm ensures accuracy and fidelity of the numerical simulations over long time.

  16. Balancing Particle and Mesh Computation in a Particle-In-Cell Code

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Patrick H; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Hager, Robert; Ku, Seung-Hoe; Yoon, Eisung; Chang, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The XGC1 plasma microturbulence particle-in-cell simulation code has both particle-based and mesh-based computational kernels that dominate performance. Both of these are subject to load imbalances that can degrade performance and that evolve during a simulation. Each separately can be addressed adequately, but optimizing just for one can introduce significant load imbalances in the other, degrading overall performance. A technique has been developed based on Golden Section Search that minimizes wallclock time given prior information on wallclock time, and on current particle distribution and mesh cost per cell, and also adapts to evolution in load imbalance in both particle and mesh work. In problems of interest this doubled the performance on full system runs on the XK7 at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility compared to load balancing only one of the kernels.

  17. ELECTRON TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY IN AN EXPANDING PLASMA: PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Camporeale, E.; Burgess, D.

    2010-02-20

    We perform fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of a hot plasma that expands radially in a cylindrical geometry. The aim of the paper is to study the consequent development of the electron temperature anisotropy in an expanding plasma flow as found in a collisionless stellar wind. Kinetic plasma theory and simulations have shown that the electron temperature anisotropy is controlled by fluctuations driven by electromagnetic kinetic instabilities. In this study, the temperature anisotropy is driven self-consistently by the expansion. While the expansion favors an increase of parallel anisotropy (T{sub ||} > T{sub perpendicular}), the onset of the fire-hose instability will tend to decrease it. We show the results for supersonic, subsonic, and static expansion flows and suggest possible applications of the results for the solar wind and other stellar winds.

  18. The Fluid-Kinetic Particle-in-Cell method for plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markidis, Stefano; Henri, Pierre; Lapenta, Giovanni; Rönnmark, Kjell; Hamrin, Maria; Meliani, Zakaria; Laure, Erwin

    2014-08-01

    A method that solves concurrently the multi-fluid and Maxwell's equations has been developed for plasma simulations. By calculating the stress tensor in the multi-fluid momentum equation by means of computational particles moving in a self-consistent electromagnetic field, the kinetic effects are retained while solving the multi-fluid equations. The Maxwell's and multi-fluid equations are discretized implicitly in time enabling kinetic simulations over time scales typical of the fluid simulations. The Fluid-Kinetic Particle-in-Cell method has been implemented in a three-dimensional electromagnetic code, and tested against the two-stream instability, the Weibel instability, the ion cyclotron resonance and magnetic reconnection problems. The method is a promising approach for coupling fluid and kinetic methods in a unified framework.

  19. Macroscopic quasi-linear theory and particle-in-cell simulation of helium ion anisotropy instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Seough, Jungjoon; Hwang, Junga; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro

    2015-08-01

    The protons and helium ions in the solar wind are observed to possess anisotropic temperature profiles. The anisotropy appears to be limited by various marginal instability conditions. One of the efficient methods to investigate the global dynamics and distribution of various temperature anisotropies in the large-scale solar wind models may be that based upon the macroscopic quasi-linear approach. The present paper investigates the proton and helium ion anisotropy instabilities on the basis of the quasi-linear theory versus particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that the overall dynamical development of the particle temperatures is quite accurately reproduced by the macroscopic quasi-linear scheme. The wave energy development in time, however, shows somewhat less restrictive comparisons, indicating that while the quasi-linear method is acceptable for the particle dynamics, the wave analysis probably requires higher-order physics, such as wave-wave coupling or nonlinear wave-particle interaction.

  20. Beam Dynamics in an Electron Lens with the Warp Particle-in-cell Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Moens, Vince; Redaelli, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are a mature technique for beam manipulation in colliders and storage rings. In an electron lens, a pulsed, magnetically confined electron beam with a given current-density profile interacts with the circulating beam to obtain the desired effect. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for beam-beam compensation, for abort-gap clearing, and for halo scraping. They will be used in RHIC at BNL for head-on beam-beam compensation, and their application to the Large Hadron Collider for halo control is under development. At Fermilab, electron lenses will be implemented as lattice elements for nonlinear integrable optics. The design of electron lenses requires tools to calculate the kicks and wakefields experienced by the circulating beam. We use the Warp particle-in-cell code to study generation, transport, and evolution of the electron beam. For the first time, a fully 3-dimensional code is used for this purpose.

  1. Whistler turbulence forward vs. inverse cascade. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ouliang; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2015-02-12

    In this study, we present the results of the first fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma in which both forward cascades to shorter wavelengths, and inverse cascades to longer wavelengths are allowed to proceed. For the electron beta βe = 0.10 initial value considered here, the early-time rate of inverse cascade is very much smaller than the rate of forward cascade, so that at late times the fluctuation energy in the regime of the inverse cascade is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime. Similarly, the wavevector anisotropy in the inverse cascade regime is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime.

  2. Two Dimensional Particle-In-Cell Code for Simulation of Quantum Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decyk, V. K.; Tonge, J.; Dauger, D. E.

    2002-11-01

    We have developed a two dimensional code for simulating quantum plasmas (1). This unique code propagates many quantum particles forward in time self-consistently using the semi-classical approximation. Because of this it can model the statistical properties of interacting quantum particles. We are currently testing this code using small numbers of particles with model problems which we can use to verify the accuracy of the code. The goal is to model from first principles the statistical properties of plasmas where quantum mechanics plays a role such as hot high density plasmas found in stellar interiors (2). (1) D. Dauger, Semiclassical Modeling of Quantum-Mechanical Multiparticle Systems using Parallel Particle-In-Cell Methods, PHD Thesis (2) M. Opher et. al. , Nuclear reaction rates and energy in stellar plasmas: The effect of highly damped modes, Physics of Plasma, 8, No. 5, p. 2454 Sponsored by NSF

  3. Three-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Laser WakefieldExperiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tsung, F.S.; Antonsen, T.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Cary, J.R.; Decyk,V.K.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Huang, C.; Hakim, A.; Katsouleas, T.; Lu, W.; Messmer, P.; Mori, W.B.; Tzoufras, M.; Vieira, J.

    2007-06-01

    Plasma accelerator methods offer the potential to reduce thesize of moderate and high energy accelerators by factors of 1000. In thepast few years great advances have been made in the production of lowemittance, high quality (i.e., monoenergetic) electron beams withenergies between .1 and 1 GeV using ultra-fast (<50 femtoseconds),high power (>10TW) lasers. The most noticeable of these advances werethe experimental results presented in the "Dream Beam" issue of Natureand in a recent issues of Physical Review Letters, Nature, and NaturePhysics. The experimental progress have been made due to advances inlasers, diagnostics, plasma sources, and the knowledge of how to controlof this highly nonlinear acceleration process. And this experimentalprogress has occurred simultaneously with and been in part due toadvances in modeling capabilities. Using a hierarchy of particlein-cell(PIC) codes OSIRIS, VORPAL, and QuickPIC, we have performed numerous fullscale 3D simulations using parameters quoted from the Nature and NaturePhysics articles. Our simulations have predicted results, providedagreement between simulations and experiments (within the shot-to-shotvariations of the experiments), and provided insight into the complicatedphysics of the experiments. Most importantly, as our confidence in thefidelity of our methods increases we can now guide the planning of newexperiments, and probe parameters that are not yet available. Therebyproviding a "road map" for generating high quality, high-charge 10 to 100GeV electron beams for use in high-energy physics and lightsources.

  4. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  5. The Plasma Simulation Code: A modern particle-in-cell code with patch-based load-balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaschewski, Kai; Fox, William; Abbott, Stephen; Ahmadi, Narges; Maynard, Kristofor; Wang, Liang; Ruhl, Hartmut; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-08-01

    This work describes the Plasma Simulation Code (PSC), an explicit, electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with support for different order particle shape functions. We review the basic components of the particle-in-cell method as well as the computational architecture of the PSC code that allows support for modular algorithms and data structure in the code. We then describe and analyze in detail a distinguishing feature of PSC: patch-based load balancing using space-filling curves which is shown to lead to major efficiency gains over unbalanced methods and a previously used simpler balancing method.

  6. PIC Simulations of the Effect of Velocity Space Instabilities on Electron Viscosity and Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    In low-collisionality plasmas, velocity-space instabilities are a key mechanism providing an effective collisionality for the plasma. We use particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to study the interplay between electron- and ion-scale velocity-space instabilities and their effect on electron pressure anisotropy, viscous heating, and thermal conduction. The adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment in low-collisionality plasmas leads to pressure anisotropy, {{Δ }}{p}j\\equiv {p}\\perp ,j-{p}\\parallel ,j\\gt 0, if the magnetic field {\\boldsymbol{B}} is amplified ({p}\\perp ,j and {p}\\parallel ,j denote the pressure of species j (electron, ion) perpendicular and parallel to {\\boldsymbol{B}}). If the resulting anisotropy is large enough, it can in turn trigger small-scale plasma instabilities. Our PIC simulations explore the nonlinear regime of the mirror, IC, and electron whistler instabilities, through continuous amplification of the magnetic field | {\\boldsymbol{B}}| by an imposed shear in the plasma. In the regime 1≲ {β }j≲ 20 ({β }j\\equiv 8π {p}j/| {\\boldsymbol{B}}{| }2), the saturated electron pressure anisotropy, {{Δ }}{p}{{e}}/{p}\\parallel ,{{e}}, is determined mainly by the (electron-lengthscale) whistler marginal stability condition, with a modest factor of ˜1.5-2 decrease due to the trapping of electrons into ion-lengthscale mirrors. We explicitly calculate the mean free path of the electrons and ions along the mean magnetic field and provide a simple physical prescription for the mean free path and thermal conductivity in low-collisionality β j ≳ 1 plasmas. Our results imply that velocity-space instabilities likely decrease the thermal conductivity of plasma in the outer parts of massive, hot, galaxy clusters. We also discuss the implications of our results for electron heating and thermal conduction in low-collisionality accretion flows onto black holes, including Sgr A* in the Galactic Center.

  7. Nonstationary dynamics of the heliospheric termination shock in presence of pick up ions: PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongwei; Lembege, Bertrand; Lu, Quanming

    2014-05-01

    The nonstationary dynamic of the heliospheric termination shock in presence of pick up ions (PUI) is analyzed with the help of a one-dimensional PIC (particle-in-cell) simulation code. This work is initially stimulated by Voyager 2 data which evidenced the nonstationary behavior of the termination shock (TS) [Burlaga et al., 2008]. Recent hybrid and PIC simulation [Wu et al., 2010; Scholer and Matsukyio, 2011] have clarified the strong contribution of PUI in the global energy partition at the TS. Present work focusses on the nonstationary behavior of the shock front in presence of PUI (with different percentages) and its impact on the global energy partition (between protons and PUI) in the downstream region. Solar wind (SW) protons and PUI are described respectively as Maxwellian and a shell distributions. Present results (i) evidence that the TS front is still nonstationary (selfreformation of the shock front driven by the accumulation of SW ions) even in presence of 25% of PUI and even for a moderate supercritical Ma regime, (ii) confirm in average that 15% and 85% of the upstream SW energy is respectively transferred to protons and to PUI in the downstream region for a shock profile at a given time, (iii) analyzes the energy partition between reflected (R) and directly transmitted (DT) ions separately for SWI and PUI, and (iv) quantifies the impact of the nonstationarity of the shock front on local ion distribution. Moreover, present results show also quantitatively how the energy partition may vary between the SW protons and PUI in the heliosheath because of the front selfreformation. These results provide quantitative inputs on the strongly turbulent state (both in space and in time) of the heliosheath before it interacts with the heliopause.

  8. PIC-MCC/Fluid Hybrid Model for Low Pressure Capacitively Coupled O{sub 2} Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, Kallol; Rauf, Shahid; Collins, Ken

    2011-05-20

    Low pressure capacitively coupled plasmas are extensively used for advanced microelectronic device fabrication. Due to long electron mean free path and large bias voltages in this regime, kinetic effects play an important role in the dynamics of low pressure discharges. To take account of the kinetic effects, a one-dimensional hybrid plasma model has been developed that couples the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) technique for charged species and a fluid method for neutral species. The PIC model uses the Monte Carlo Collision (MCC) method to account for collision processes. The fluid model for neutral species takes into account species transport in the plasma, chemical reactions, and surface processes. An electronegative O{sub 2} plasma is simulated for a range of pressures (10-300 mTorr) and rf voltages (200-600 V) at 60 MHz. Our model for the O{sub 2} plasma considers electrons, O{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup -}, O, and O*. The reaction mechanism includes electron impact dissociation, ionization, dissociative attachment and ion-ion recombination. Computational results are compared to our previous simulations for an electropositive Ar discharge. The electrons primarily absorb power from the external power supply at the sheath edge during sheath expansion. Energetic beam electrons are generated at the sheath edge during electron heating, which are responsible for plasma production and sustenance through collisions. The negative ions are found to be confined in the bulk plasma due to the potential well. The ratio of negative ions to electrons increases with increase in pressure and decrease in rf voltage. The spatial profiles of charged and neutral species in the plasma are found to primarily depend on species sources due to collisional processes.

  9. Ion acceleration in quasi-perpendicular PIC simulations of a reforming heliospheric termination shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2003-12-01

    Recent Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have revealed time-dependent shock solutions for parameters relevant to astrophysical and heliospheric shocks [1,2,3]. These solutions are characterised by a shock which cyclically reforms on the spatio-temporal scales of the incoming protons. Whether a shock solution is stationary or reforming depends not only upon the correct treatment of the electrons, but also on the plasma parameters, the upstream β in particular. In the case of the heliospheric termination shock these parameters are not well determined, however, some estimates suggest that the termination shock may be in a parameter regime such that it is time-dependent. It has been pointed out [3] that this will switch off some acceleration mechanisms, for example shock surfing, which has been proposed previously for time-stationary shock solutions. The introduction of time-dependent electromagnetic fields intrinsic to the shock does however introduce the possibility of new mechanisms for the acceleration of protons. Here we present for the first time one such process as revealed by high phase space resolution 1.5D PIC simulations in which all vector quantities are three dimensional, the solution then varying with the spatial coordinate and time. We find that a subset of the protons that reflect off the reforming shock front are accelerated by subsequent interaction with the shock to form a suprathermal population which then propagates into the downstream region with energies of order six times the upstream inflow energy. These may provide an injection population for further acceleration to cosmic ray energies. [1] Shimada, N., and M. Hoshino, Astrophys. J, 543, L67, 2000. [2] Schmitz, H., S.C. Chapman and R.O. Dendy, Astrophys. J, 570, 637, 2002 [3] Scholer, M., I. Shinohara and S. Matsukiyo, J. Geophys. Res., 108, 1014, 2003

  10. PIC Simulations of the Omega-EP Magnetic Reconnection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenda; Blackman, Eric; Yan, Rui; Ren, Chuang

    2014-10-01

    In an Omega EP experiment on magnetic reconnection, two laser beams with peak intensity of 7 × 1018 W/cm2 are focused on a Cu-target. Here we report 2D PIC simulation results with parameters derived from the experiment including a realistic ion-electron mass ratio. We find that 1) toroidal and mega-gauss-scale magnetic fields are generated and a bubble of high-energy-density plasma is produced from single beam-target interactions and 2) the magnetic topology changes as two such bubbles expand and interact with each other indicating the occurrence of magnetic reconnection. The reconnection can occur even when the bubble expansion velocity is subsonic. Flux pileup is observed when the expansion velocity is supersonic. Energetic Cu-ions with energy up to 12 MeV are also observed in the outflow. This work was supported by NNSA under Corporate Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302 and Grant No. DE-NA0002205; by DOE under Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER54789; and by NSF under Grant No. PHY-1314734.

  11. The Pic du Midi solar survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koechlin, L.

    2015-12-01

    We carry a long term survey of the solar activity with our coronagraphic system at Pic du Midi de Bigorre in the French Pyrenees (CLIMSO). It is a set of two solar telescopes and two coronagraphs, taking one frame per minute for each of the four channels : Solar disk in H-α (656.28 nm), prominences in H-α, disk in Ca II (393.3 nm), prominences in He I (1083 nm), all year long, weather permitting. Since 2015 we also take images of the FeXIII corona (1074.7 nm) at the rate of one every 10 minutes. These images cover a large field: 1.25 solar diameter, 2k*2K pixels, and are freely downloadable form a database. The improvements made since 2015 concern an autoguiding system for better centering of the solar disk behind the coronagraphic masks, and a new Fe XIII channel at λ=1074.7 nm. In the near future we plan to provide radial velocity maps of the disc and polarimetry maps of the disk and corona. This survey took its present form in 2007 and we plan to maintain image acquisition in the same or better experimental conditions for a long period: one or several solar cycles if possible. During the partial solar eclipse of March 20, 2015, the CLIMSO instruments and the staff at Pic du Midi operating it have provided several millions internet users with real time images of the Sun and Moon during all the phenomenon.

  12. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma source ion implantation of a prolate spheroid target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Sen; Han, Hong-Ying; Peng, Xiao-Qing; Chang, Ye; Wang, De-Zhen

    2010-03-01

    A two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to study the time-dependent evolution of the sheath surrounding a prolate spheroid target during a high voltage pulse in plasma source ion implantation. Our study shows that the potential contour lines pack more closely in the plasma sheath near the vertex of the major axis, i.e. where a thinner sheath is formed, and a non-uniform total ion dose distribution is incident along the surface of the prolate spheroid target due to the focusing of ions by the potential structure. Ion focusing takes place not only at the vertex of the major axis, where dense potential contour lines exist, but also at the vertex of the minor axis, where sparse contour lines exist. This results in two peaks of the received ion dose, locating at the vertices of the major and minor axes of the prolate spheroid target, and an ion dose valley, staying always between the vertices, rather than at the vertex of the minor axis.

  13. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    DOE PAGES

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-18

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam’s return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)] A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1) while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib=I1+I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total forcemore » on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. For a fixed central post, the beam trajectory is controlled by varying the outer conductor radius which changes the inductance in the return-current path. The simulations show that the beam emittance is approximately constant as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. As a result, independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate return-current geometry.« less

  14. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-18

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam’s return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)] A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1) while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib=I1+I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. For a fixed central post, the beam trajectory is controlled by varying the outer conductor radius which changes the inductance in the return-current path. The simulations show that the beam emittance is approximately constant as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. As a result, independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate return-current geometry.

  15. Electron and ion heating by whistler turbulence: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Hughes, R. Scott; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2014-12-17

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence are carried out on a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized, electron-ion plasma model. In addition, the simulations use an initial ensemble of relatively long wavelength whistler modes with a broad range of initial propagation directions with an initial electron beta βe = 0.05. The computations follow the temporal evolution of the fluctuations as they cascade into broadband turbulent spectra at shorter wavelengths. Three simulations correspond to successively larger simulation boxes and successively longer wavelengths of the initial fluctuations. The computations confirm previous results showing electron heating is preferentially parallel to the background magnetic field Bo,more » and ion heating is preferentially perpendicular to Bo. The new results here are that larger simulation boxes and longer initial whistler wavelengths yield weaker overall dissipation, consistent with linear dispersion theory predictions of decreased damping, stronger ion heating, consistent with a stronger ion Landau resonance, and weaker electron heating.« less

  16. Particle-in-cell δf gyrokinetic simulations of the microtearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, J.; Chen, Yang; Wan, Weigang; Parker, Scott E.; Guttenfelder, W.; Canik, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The linear stability properties of the microtearing mode are investigated in the edge and core regimes of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) using the particle-in-cell method based gyrokinetic code GEM. The dependence of the mode on various equilibrium quantities in both regions is compared. While the microtearing mode in the core depends upon the electron-ion collisions, in the edge region, it is found to be weakly dependent on the collisions and exists even when the collision frequency is zero. The electrostatic potential is non-negligible in each of the cases. It plays opposite roles in the core and edge of NSTX. While the microtearing mode is partially stabilized by the electrostatic potential in the core, it has substantial destabilizing effect in the edge. In addition to the spherical tokamak, we also study the microtearing mode for parameters relevant to the core of a standard tokamak. The fundamental characteristics of the mode remain the same; however, the electrostatic potential in this case is destabilizing as opposed to the core of NSTX. The velocity dependence of the collision frequency, which is crucial for the mode to grow in slab calculations, is not required to destabilize the mode in toroidal devices.

  17. Kinetic structures of quasi-perpendicular shocks in global particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ivy Bo Markidis, Stefano; Laure, Erwin; Johlander, Andreas; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Henri, Pierre; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-09-15

    We carried out global Particle-in-Cell simulations of the interaction between the solar wind and a magnetosphere to study the kinetic collisionless physics in super-critical quasi-perpendicular shocks. After an initial simulation transient, a collisionless bow shock forms as a result of the interaction of the solar wind and a planet magnetic dipole. The shock ramp has a thickness of approximately one ion skin depth and is followed by a trailing wave train in the shock downstream. At the downstream edge of the bow shock, whistler waves propagate along the magnetic field lines and the presence of electron cyclotron waves has been identified. A small part of the solar wind ion population is specularly reflected by the shock while a larger part is deflected and heated by the shock. Solar wind ions and electrons are heated in the perpendicular directions. Ions are accelerated in the perpendicular direction in the trailing wave train region. This work is an initial effort to study the electron and ion kinetic effects developed near the bow shock in a realistic magnetic field configuration.

  18. QUICKPIC: A highly efficient particle-in-cell code for modeling wakefield acceleration in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C. . E-mail: huangck@ee.ucla.edu; Decyk, V.K.; Ren, C.; Zhou, M.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Cooley, J.H.; Antonsen, T.M.; Katsouleas, T.

    2006-09-20

    A highly efficient, fully parallelized, fully relativistic, three-dimensional particle-in-cell model for simulating plasma and laser wakefield acceleration is described. The model is based on the quasi-static or frozen field approximation, which reduces a fully three-dimensional electromagnetic field solve and particle push to a two-dimensional field solve and particle push. This is done by calculating the plasma wake assuming that the drive beam and/or laser does not evolve during the time it takes for it to pass a plasma particle. The complete electromagnetic fields of the plasma wake and its associated index of refraction are then used to evolve the drive beam and/or laser using very large time steps. This algorithm reduces the computational time by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Comparison between the new algorithm and conventional fully explicit models (OSIRIS) is presented. The agreement is excellent for problems of interest. Direction for future work is also presented.

  19. Energy dissipation by whistler turbulence: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ouliang; Peter Gary, S.; Wang, Joseph

    2014-05-15

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of whistler turbulence are carried out on a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized plasma model. The simulations use an initial ensemble of relatively long wavelength whistler modes and follow the temporal evolution of the fluctuations as they cascade into a broadband, anisotropic, turbulent spectrum at shorter wavelengths. For relatively small levels of the initial fluctuation energy ϵ{sub e}, linear collisionless damping provides most of the dissipation of the turbulence. But as ϵ{sub e} and the total dissipation increase, linear damping becomes less important and, especially at β{sub e} ≪ 1, nonlinear processes become stronger. The PDFs and kurtoses of the magnetic field increments in the simulations suggest that intermittency in whistler turbulence generally increases with increasing ϵ{sub e} and β{sub e}. Correlation coefficient calculations imply that the current structure dissipation also increases with increasing ϵ{sub e} and β{sub e}, and that the nonlinear dissipation processes in these simulations are primarily associated with regions of localized current structures.

  20. Global Explicit Particle-in-cell Simulations of the Nonstationary Bow Shock and Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongwei; Huang, Can; Liu, Ying D.; Parks, George K.; Wang, Rui; Lu, Quanming; Hu, Huidong

    2016-07-01

    We carry out two-dimensional global particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction between the solar wind and a dipole field to study the formation of the bow shock and magnetosphere. A self-reforming bow shock ahead of a dipole field is presented by using relatively high temporal-spatial resolutions. We find that (1) the bow shock and the magnetosphere are formed and reach a quasi-stable state after several ion cyclotron periods, and (2) under the B z southward solar wind condition, the bow shock undergoes a self-reformation for low β i and high M A . Simultaneously, a magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail is found. For high β i and low M A , the shock becomes quasi-stationary, and the magnetotail reconnection disappears. In addition, (3) the magnetopause deflects the magnetosheath plasmas. The sheath particles injected at the quasi-perpendicular region of the bow shock can be convected downstream of an oblique shock region. A fraction of these sheath particles can leak out from the magnetosheath at the wings of the bow shock. Hence, the downstream situation is more complicated than that for a planar shock produced in local simulations.

  1. Beta dependence of electron heating in decaying whistler turbulence: Particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, S.; Peter Gary, S.

    2012-01-15

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have been carried out to study electron beta dependence of decaying whistler turbulence and electron heating in a homogeneous, collisionless magnetized plasma. Initially, applied whistler fluctuations at relatively long wavelengths cascade their energy into shorter wavelengths. This cascade leads to whistler turbulence with anisotropic wavenumber spectra which are broader in directions perpendicular to the background magnetic field than in the parallel direction. Comparing the development of whistler turbulence at different electron beta values, it is found that both the wavenumber spectrum anisotropy and electron heating anisotropy decrease with increasing electron beta. This indicates that higher electron beta reduces the perpendicular energy cascade of whistler turbulence. Fluctuation energy dissipation by electron Landau damping responsible for the electron parallel heating becomes weaker at higher electron beta, which leads to more isotropic heating. It suggests that electron kinetic processes are important in determining the properties of whistler turbulence. This kinetic property is applied to discuss the generation of suprathermal strahl electron distributions in the solar wind.

  2. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Raman Laser Amplification in Preformed Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Clark; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2003-06-27

    Two critical issues in the amplification of laser pulses by backward Raman scattering in plasma slabs are the saturation mechanism of the amplification effect (which determines the maximum attainable output intensity of a Raman amplifier) and the optimal plasma density for amplification. Previous investigations [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 82 (22):4448-4451, 1999] identified forward Raman scattering and modulational instabilities of the amplifying seed as the likely saturation mechanisms and lead to an estimated unfocused output intensities of 10{sup 17}W/cm{sup 2}. The optimal density for amplification is determined by the competing constraints of minimizing the plasma density so as to minimize the growth rate of the instabilities leading to saturation but also maintaining the plasma sufficiently dense that the driven Langmuir wave responsible for backscattering does not break prematurely. Here, particle-in-cell code are simulations presented which verify that saturation of backward Raman amplification does occur at intensities of {approx}10{sup 17}W/cm{sup 2} by forward Raman scattering and modulational instabilities. The optimal density for amplification in a plasma with the representative temperature of T(sub)e = 200 eV is also shown in these simulations to be intermediate between the cold plasma wave-breaking density and the density limit found by assuming a water bag electron distribution function.

  3. Electron and ion heating by whistler turbulence: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R. Scott; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2014-12-17

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence are carried out on a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized, electron-ion plasma model. In addition, the simulations use an initial ensemble of relatively long wavelength whistler modes with a broad range of initial propagation directions with an initial electron beta βe = 0.05. The computations follow the temporal evolution of the fluctuations as they cascade into broadband turbulent spectra at shorter wavelengths. Three simulations correspond to successively larger simulation boxes and successively longer wavelengths of the initial fluctuations. The computations confirm previous results showing electron heating is preferentially parallel to the background magnetic field Bo, and ion heating is preferentially perpendicular to Bo. The new results here are that larger simulation boxes and longer initial whistler wavelengths yield weaker overall dissipation, consistent with linear dispersion theory predictions of decreased damping, stronger ion heating, consistent with a stronger ion Landau resonance, and weaker electron heating.

  4. Electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities associated with electrostatic shocks: Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsunehiko N.; Takabe, Hideaki

    2010-03-15

    A two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation with the realistic ion-to-electron mass ratio of 1836 is carried out to investigate the electrostatic collisionless shocks in relatively high-speed (approx3000 km s{sup -1}) plasma flows and also the influence of both electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities, which can develop around the shocks, on the shock dynamics. It is shown that the electrostatic ion-ion instability can develop in front of the shocks, where the plasma is under counterstreaming condition, with highly oblique wave vectors as was shown previously. The electrostatic potential generated by the electrostatic ion-ion instability propagating obliquely to the shock surface becomes comparable with the shock potential and finally the shock structure is destroyed. It is also shown that in front of the shock the beam-Weibel instability gradually grows as well, consequently suggesting that the magnetic field generated by the beam-Weibel instability becomes important in long-term evolution of the shock and the Weibel-mediated shock forms long after the electrostatic shock vanished. It is also observed that the secondary electrostatic shock forms in the reflected ions in front of the primary electrostatic shock.

  5. Particle-in-cell simulation study of a lower-hybrid shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Sarri, G.; Doria, D.; Ynnerman, A.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-06-01

    The expansion of a magnetized high-pressure plasma into a low-pressure ambient medium is examined with particle-in-cell simulations. The magnetic field points perpendicular to the plasma's expansion direction and binary collisions between particles are absent. The expanding plasma steepens into a quasi-electrostatic shock that is sustained by the lower-hybrid (LH) wave. The ambipolar electric field points in the expansion direction and it induces together with the background magnetic field a fast E cross B drift of electrons. The drifting electrons modify the background magnetic field, resulting in its pile-up by the LH shock. The magnetic pressure gradient force accelerates the ambient ions ahead of the LH shock, reducing the relative velocity between the ambient plasma and the LH shock to about the phase speed of the shocked LH wave, transforming the LH shock into a nonlinear LH wave. The oscillations of the electrostatic potential have a larger amplitude and wavelength in the magnetized plasma than in an unmagnetized one with otherwise identical conditions. The energy loss to the drifting electrons leads to a noticeable slowdown of the LH shock compared to that in an unmagnetized plasma.

  6. Particle-in-cell simulation of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sarveshwar Sengupta, Sudip; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-02-15

    The propagation of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons is studied in the laboratory frame (x, t) using a 1-D particle-in-cell code that evolves the ion dynamics by treating them as particles but assumes the electrons to follow the usual Boltzmann distribution. It is observed that for very low Mach numbers the simulation results closely match the Korteweg-de Vries soliton solutions, obtained in the wave frame, and which propagate without distortion. The collision of two such profiles is observed to exhibit the usual solitonic behaviour. As the Mach number is increased, the given profile initially evolves and then settles down to the exact solution of the full non-linear Poisson equation, which then subsequently propagates without distortion. The fractional change in amplitude is found to increase linearly with Mach number. It is further observed that initial profiles satisfying k{sup 2}λ{sub de}{sup 2}<1 break up into a series of solitons.

  7. Particle-In-Cell Simulation on the Characteristics of a Receiving Antenna in Space Plasma Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2008-12-31

    We applied the electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell simulation to the analysis of receiving antenna characteristics in space plasma environment. In the analysis, we set up external waves in a simulation region and receive them with a numerical antenna model placed in the simulation region. Using this method, we evaluated the effective length of electric field antennas used for plasma wave investigations conducted by scientific spacecraft. We particularly focused on the effective length of an electric field instrument called MEFISTO for a future mission to Mercury: BepiColombo. We first confirmed that the effective length of the MEFISTO-type antenna is basically longer than that of a simple dipole antenna for both electrostatic and electromagnetic plasma waves. By applying the principle of a voltmeter, the effective length of the MEFISTO-type antenna is predicted to become identical to the separation between two sensor-conductor's midpoints. However, the numerical result revealed that the actual effective length becomes shorter than the prediction, which is caused by the shorting-out effect due to the presence of a center boom conductor between the two sensor conductors. Since the above effect is difficult to treat theoretically, the present numerical method is a powerful tool for further quantitative evaluation of the antenna characteristics.

  8. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of 300 GHz reflex klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, S. G.; Jin, Y. S.; Kim, J. I.; Kim, G. J.; Shon, C. H.

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations of 300 GHz reflex klystrons are presented. 300 GHz electromagnetic wave generation in a resonant cavity is analyzed by using a 3D simulation model in which all the geometric parameters (such as the grid thickness, repeller shape, beam radius, etc.) are described. When an electron beam of an energy of 1.0 keV and a net current of 8.9 mA is used, the maximum electronic efficiency of energy transfer is observed when the gap transit angle is 0.7{pi} rad, and the efficiency saturates when the beam current is over 10 mA. Space charge forces produce a shift in the optimum repeller voltage. It is also shown that the effect of the beam temperature is not critical, even though the bunching wavelength of the electron beam is several times smaller than that in conventional vacuum electron devices. Our simulation results show that a microfabricated 300 GHz reflex klystron can directly generate electromagnetic waves with output power levels of several tens of milliwatts.

  9. Electron Debye scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: Electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Lee, Ensang; Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Lee, Dong-Hun; Seon, Jongho; Jin, Ho

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we investigated the electron Debye scale Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability using two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. We introduced a velocity shear layer with a thickness comparable to the electron Debye length and examined the generation of the KH instability. The KH instability occurs in a similar manner as observed in the KH instabilities in fluid or ion scales producing surface waves and rolled-up vortices. The strength and growth rate of the electron Debye scale KH instability is affected by the structure of the velocity shear layer. The strength depends on the magnitude of the velocity and the growth rate on the velocity gradient of the shear layer. However, the development of the electron Debye scale KH instability is mainly determined by the electric field generated by charge separation. Significant mixing of electrons occurs across the shear layer, and a fraction of electrons can penetrate deeply into the opposite side fairly far from the vortices across the shear layer.

  10. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on gain saturation effect of microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Yuan, Zheng; Cao, Zhurong; Deng, Bo; Chen, Tao; Deng, Keli

    2016-07-01

    We present here the results of the simulation work, using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell method, on the performance of the lead glass microchannel plate under saturated state. We calculated the electron cascade process with different DC bias voltages under both self-consistent condition and non-self-consistent condition. The comparative results have demonstrated that the strong self-consistent field can suppress the cascade process and make the microchannel plate saturated. The simulation results were also compared to the experimental data and good agreement was obtained. The simulation results also show that the electron multiplication process in the channel is accompanied by the buildup process of positive charges in the channel wall. Though the interactions among the secondary electron cloud in the channel, the positive charges in the channel wall, and the external acceleration field can make the electron-surface collision more frequent, the collision energy will be inevitably reduced, thus the electron gain will also be reduced.

  11. External circuit integration with electromagnetic particle in cell modeling of plasma focus devices

    SciTech Connect

    Seng, Y. S.; Lee, P.; Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-15

    The pinch performance of a plasma focus (PF) device is sensitive to the physical conditions of the breakdown phase. It is therefore essential to model and study the initial phase in order to optimize device performance. An external circuit is self consistently coupled to the electromagnetic particle in cell code to model the breakdown and initial lift phase of the United Nations University/International Centre for Theoretical Physics (UNU-ICTP) plasma focus device. Gas breakdown during the breakdown phase is simulated successfully, following a drop in the applied voltage across the device and a concurrent substantial rise in the circuit current. As a result, the plasma becomes magnetized, with the growing value of the magnetic field over time leading to the gradual lift off of the well formed current sheath into the axial acceleration phase. This lifting off, with simultaneous outward sheath motion along the anode and vertical cathode, and the strong magnetic fields in the current sheath region, was demonstrated in this work, and hence validates our method of coupling the external circuit to PF devices. Our method produces voltage waveforms that are qualitatively similar to the observed experimental voltage profiles of the UNU-ICTP device. Values of the mean electron energy before and after voltage breakdown turned out to be different, with the values after breakdown being much lower. In both cases, the electron energy density function turned out to be non-Maxwellian.

  12. Electron Debye scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: Electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Lee, Ensang Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Lee, Dong-Hun; Seon, Jongho; Jin, Ho

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we investigated the electron Debye scale Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability using two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. We introduced a velocity shear layer with a thickness comparable to the electron Debye length and examined the generation of the KH instability. The KH instability occurs in a similar manner as observed in the KH instabilities in fluid or ion scales producing surface waves and rolled-up vortices. The strength and growth rate of the electron Debye scale KH instability is affected by the structure of the velocity shear layer. The strength depends on the magnitude of the velocity and the growth rate on the velocity gradient of the shear layer. However, the development of the electron Debye scale KH instability is mainly determined by the electric field generated by charge separation. Significant mixing of electrons occurs across the shear layer, and a fraction of electrons can penetrate deeply into the opposite side fairly far from the vortices across the shear layer.

  13. Particle-In-Cell Simulation on the Characteristics of a Receiving Antenna in Space Plasma Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2008-12-01

    We applied the electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell simulation to the analysis of receiving antenna characteristics in space plasma environment. In the analysis, we set up external waves in a simulation region and receive them with a numerical antenna model placed in the simulation region. Using this method, we evaluated the effective length of electric field antennas used for plasma wave investigations conducted by scientific spacecraft. We particularly focused on the effective length of an electric field instrument called MEFISTO for a future mission to Mercury: BepiColombo. We first confirmed that the effective length of the MEFISTO-type antenna is basically longer than that of a simple dipole antenna for both electrostatic and electromagnetic plasma waves. By applying the principle of a voltmeter, the effective length of the MEFISTO-type antenna is predicted to become identical to the separation between two sensor-conductor's midpoints. However, the numerical result revealed that the actual effective length becomes shorter than the prediction, which is caused by the shorting-out effect due to the presence of a center boom conductor between the two sensor conductors. Since the above effect is difficult to treat theoretically, the present numerical method is a powerful tool for further quantitative evaluation of the antenna characteristics.

  14. Kinetic Structures of Quasi-Perpendicular Shocks in Global Particle-in-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, I. B.; Markidis, S.; Laure, E.; Johlander, A.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Pierre, H.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    We carried out global Particle-in-Cell simulations of the interaction between the solar wind and a magnetosphere to study the kinetic collisionless physics in super-critical quasi-perpendicular shocks. After an initial simulation transient, a collisionless bow shock forms as a result of the interaction of the solar wind and a planet magnetic dipole. The shock ramp has a thickness of approximately one ion skin depth and is followed by a trailing wave train in the shock downstream. At the downstream edge of the bow shock, whistler waves propagate along the magnetic field lines and the presence of electron cyclotron waves has been identified. A small part of the solar wind ion population is specularly reflected by the shock while a larger part is deflected and heated by the shock. Solar wind ions and electrons are heated in the perpendicular directions. Ions are accelerated in the perpendicular direction in the trailing wave train region. This work is an initial effort to study the electron and ion kinetic effects developed near the bow shock in a realistic magnetic field configuration.

  15. Nonlinear kinetic effects in inductively coupled plasmas via particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froese, Aaron; Smolyakov, Andrei; Sydorenko, Dmytro

    2007-11-01

    Kinetic effects in inductively coupled plasmas due to thermal motion of particles modified by self-consistent magnetic fields are studied using a particle-in-cell code. In the low pressure, low frequency regime, electron mean free paths are large relative to device size and the trajectories are strongly curved by the induced rf magnetic field. Analytic linear theories are unable to recover effects accumulated along each nonlinear path. Therefore, the simulated ICP is made progressively more complex to find the source of observed plasma behaviours. With only thermal motion modifying the wave-particle interaction, nonlocal behaviour becomes dominant at low frequencies, causing an anomalous skin effect with increased skin depth and power absorption and decreased ponderomotive force. However, when influenced by magnetic fields, the nonlocal effects are suppressed at large wave amplitudes due to nonlinear trapping. A mechanism is proposed for this low frequency restoration of local behaviour. Finally, a low rate of electron-neutral collisions is found to counteract the nonlinear behaviour, and hence reinforces nonlocal behaviour.

  16. Particle-in-cell modeling of Dual Segmented Langmuir Probe on PROBA2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imtiaz, Nadia; Marchand, Richard

    2015-11-01

    We model the current characteristics of the Dual Segmented Langmuir Probe (DSLP), which is a part of the scientific payload of the ESA satellite PROBA2. It is used for the directional measurement of plasma parameters in the ionosphere at an altitude of approximately 725 km. The DSLP consists of two independent segmented Langmuir probes. Each probe is partitioned into eight collectors: seven electrically insulated spherical segments and a Guard electrode (the rest of the sphere and a small post). The current characteristics of the DSLP are computed by using the 3D particle-in-cell code PTetra. The model is electrostatic and it accounts for a uniform background magnetic field. The computed characteristics of different probe segments exhibit significant variation which depends on their orientation with respect to the ram direction. The floating potential and ion current branch of the I-V curves of each segment illustrate the directional sensitivity of the DSLP. It is found that the magnetic field also affects the electron current branch of the I-V curves of certain segments on the DSLP. The I-V curves computed with and without the ambient magnetic field are then used to estimate the electron temperature. This study will be helpful to understand the floating potential and electron temperature anisotropies measured by the DSLP.

  17. Semiclassical modeling of quantum-mechanical multiparticle systems using parallel particle-in-cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauger, Dean Edward

    2001-08-01

    We are successful in building a code that models many particle dynamic quantum systems by combining a semiclassical approximation of Feynman path integrals with parallel computing techniques (particle-in-cell) and numerical methods developed for simulating plasmas, establishing this approach as a viable technique for multiparticle time-dependent quantum mechanics. Run on high-performance parallel computers, this code applies semiclassical methods to simulate the time evolution of wavefunctions of many particles. We describe the analytical derivation and computational implementation of these techniques in detail. We present a study to thoroughly demonstrate the code's fidelity to quantum mechanics, resulting in innovative visualization and analysis techniques. We introduce and exhibit a method to address fermion particle statistics. We present studies of two quantum-mechanical problems: a two-electron, one- dimensional atom, resulting in high-quality extractions of one- and two-electron eigenstates, and electrostatic quasi-modes due to quantum effects in a hot electron plasma, relevant for predictions about stellar evolution. We supply discussions of alternative derivations, alternative implementations of the derivations, and an exploration of their consequences. Source code is shown throughout this dissertation. Finally, we present an extensive discussion of applications and extrapolations of this work, with suggestions for future direction.

  18. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Raman Laser Amplification in Ionizing Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Clark; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2003-06-27

    By using the amplifying laser pulse in a plasma-based backward Raman laser amplifier to generate the plasma by photo-ionization of a gas simultaneous with the amplification process, possible instabilities of the pumping laser pulse can be avoided. Particle-in-cell simulations are used to study this amplification mechanism, and earlier results using more elementary models of the Raman interaction are verified [D.S. Clark and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas, 9 (6): 2772-2780, 2002]. The effects (unique to amplification in ionizing plasmas and not included in previous simulations) of blue-shifting of the pump and seed laser pulses and the generation of a wake are observed not significantly to impact the amplification process. As expected theoretically, the peak output intensity is found to be limited to I {approx} 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} by forward Raman scattering of the amplifying seed. The integrity of the ionization front of the seed pulse against the development of a possible transverse modulation instability is also demonstrated.

  19. A two-dimensional (azimuthal-axial) particle-in-cell model of a Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coche, P.; Garrigues, L.

    2014-02-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional Particle-In-Cell model in the azimuthal and axial directions of the Hall thruster. A scaling method that consists to work at a lower plasma density to overcome constraints on time-step and grid-spacing is used. Calculations are able to reproduce the breathing mode due to a periodic depletion of neutral atoms without the introduction of a supplementary anomalous mechanism, as in fluid and hybrid models. Results show that during the increase of the discharge current, an electron-cyclotron drift instability (frequency in the range of MHz and wave number on the order of 3000 rad s-1) is formed in the region of the negative gradient of magnetic field. During the current decrease, an axial electric wave propagates from the channel toward the exhaust (whose frequency is on the order of 400 kHz) leading to a broadening of the ion energy distribution function. A discussion about the influence of the scaling method on the calculation results is also proposed.

  20. Comparison of dust charging between orbital-motion-limited theory and particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2015-11-15

    The Orbital-Motion-Limited (OML) theory has been modified to predict the dust charge and the results were contrasted with the Whipple approximation [X. Z. Tang and G. L. Delzanno, Phys. Plasmas 21, 123708 (2014)]. To further establish its regime of applicability, in this paper, the OML predictions (for a non-electron-emitting, spherical dust grain at rest in a collisionless, unmagnetized plasma) are compared with particle-in-cell simulations that retain the absorption radius effect. It is found that for large dust grain radius r{sub d} relative to the plasma Debye length λ{sub D}, the revised OML theory remains a very good approximation as, for the parameters considered (r{sub d}/λ{sub D} ≤ 10, equal electron and ion temperatures), it yields the dust charge to within 20% accuracy. This is a substantial improvement over the Whipple approximation. The dust collected currents and energy fluxes, which remain the same in the revised and standard OML theories, are accurate to within 15%–30%.

  1. Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Collisionless Driven Reconnection with Open Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimas, Alex; Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2010-01-01

    First results are discussed from an ongoing study of driven collisionless reconnection using a 2 1/2-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation model with open inflow and outflow boundaries. An extended electron diffusion region (EEDR) is defined as that region surrounding a reconnecting neutral line in which the out-of-plane nonideal electric field is positive. It is shown that the boundaries of this region in the directions of the outflow jets are at the positions where the electrons make the transition from unfrozen meandering motion in the current sheet to outward drifting with the magnetic field in the outflow jets; a turning length scale is defined to mark these positions, The initial width of the EEDR in the inflow directions is comparable to the electron bounce width. Later. as shoulders develop to form a two-scale structure. thc EEDR width expands to the ion bounce width scale. The inner portion of the EEDR or the electron diffusion region proper remains at the electron bounce width. Two methods are introduced for predicting the reconnection electric field using the dimensions of the EEDR. These results are interpreted as further evidence that the EEDR is the region that is relevant to understanding the electron role in the neutral line vicinity.

  2. A curvilinear, fully implicit, conservative electromagnetic PIC algorithm in multiple dimensions

    DOE PAGES

    Chacon, L.; Chen, G.

    2016-04-19

    Here, we extend a recently proposed fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov–Darwin model in multiple dimensions (Chen and Chacón (2015) [1]) to curvilinear geometry. As in the Cartesian case, the approach is based on a potential formulation (Φ, A), and overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. Conservation theorems for local charge and global energy are derived in curvilinear representation, and then enforced discretely by a careful choice of the discretization of field and particle equations. Additionally, the algorithm conserves canonical-momentum in any ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge ∇ • A = 0 exactly. Anmore » asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy considerations, not stability, and can be orders of magnitude larger than required in a standard explicit electromagnetic PIC simulation. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with numerical experiments in mapped meshes in 1D-3V and 2D-3V.« less

  3. A curvilinear, fully implicit, conservative electromagnetic PIC algorithm in multiple dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, L.; Chen, G.

    2016-07-01

    We extend a recently proposed fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov-Darwin model in multiple dimensions (Chen and Chacón (2015) [1]) to curvilinear geometry. As in the Cartesian case, the approach is based on a potential formulation (ϕ, A), and overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. Conservation theorems for local charge and global energy are derived in curvilinear representation, and then enforced discretely by a careful choice of the discretization of field and particle equations. Additionally, the algorithm conserves canonical-momentum in any ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge ∇ ṡ A = 0 exactly. An asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy considerations, not stability, and can be orders of magnitude larger than required in a standard explicit electromagnetic PIC simulation. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with numerical experiments in mapped meshes in 1D-3V and 2D-3V.

  4. 3D Hot Test Simulations of a 220 GHz Folded Waveguide Traveling Wave Tube Using a CFDTD PIC Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Chieh; Song, Heather

    2015-11-01

    Millimeter or sub-THz wave sources centered at 220 GHz is of interest due to the potential for its commercial and military applications including high resolution radar, remote sensing, and high-data-rate communications. It has been demonstrated via 3D cold test finite element method (FEM) simulations that a folded waveguide traveling wave tube (FWTWT) can be designed and optimized at this frequency range with a small signal gain of 18 dB over a comparatively broad (-3 dB) bandwidth of ~ 10%. On the other hand, 3D hot test simulations of a V-band ladder TWT have been successfully demonstrated using a conformal finite-difference time-domain (CFDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) method for center frequency of 50 GHz. In the present work, the 220 GHz FWTWT designs have been reviewed and studied. 3D Cold test simulations using both the CFDTD and FEM methods have been carried out and compared with each other as basis for 3D hot test CFDTD PIC simulations. The preliminary simulation result shows that the gain-bandwidth features at 220 GHz are achievable while carefully avoiding beam interceptions. Our study shows that the interaction characteristics are very sensitive to the operating beam parameters. Detail simulation results and discussions will be presented.

  5. PIC simulations of reforming perpendicular shocks- implications for ion acceleration at SNRs and the heliospheric termination shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2004-12-01

    Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have revealed time-dependent shock solutions for parameters relevant to astrophysical and heliospheric shocks [e.g. 1,2,3]. These solutions are characterised by a shock which cyclically reforms on the spatio-temporal scales of the incoming protons. Whether a shock solution is stationary or reforming depends not only upon the model adopted for electron dynamics, but also on the plasma parameters, notably the upstream beta. For the heliospheric termination shock, these parameters are not well determined: some estimates suggest that the termination shock may be in a parameter regime such that it is time-dependent. It has been pointed out [3] that this may terminate some acceleration processes, for example shock surfing, which have been proposed for time-stationary shock solutions. The introduction of time-dependent electromagnetic fields intrinsic to the shock does however introduce the possibility of new mechanisms for the acceleration of protons. We will discuss the prospects for local ion acceleration at reforming quasiperpendicular shocks, in the presence of pickup ions as seen in selfconsistent PIC simulations with parameters relevant to both SNRs and the heliospheric termination shock. [1] Shimada, N., and M. Hoshino, Astrophys. J, 543, L67, 2000. [2] Schmitz, H., S.C. Chapman and R.O. Dendy, Astrophys. J, 570, 637, 2002 [3] Scholer, M., I. Shinohara and S. Matsukiyo, J. Geophys. Res., 108, 1014, 2003

  6. Numerical parameter constraints for accurate PIC-DSMC simulation of breakdown from arc initiation to stable arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher; Hopkins, Matthew; Moore, Stan; Boerner, Jeremiah; Cartwright, Keith

    2015-09-01

    Simulation of breakdown is important for understanding and designing a variety of applications such as mitigating undesirable discharge events. Such simulations need to be accurate through early time arc initiation to late time stable arc behavior. Here we examine constraints on the timestep and mesh size required for arc simulations using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DMSC) collisions. Accurate simulation of electron avalanche across a fixed voltage drop and constant neutral density (reduced field of 1000 Td) was found to require a timestep ~ 1/100 of the mean time between collisions and a mesh size ~ 1/25 the mean free path. These constraints are much smaller than the typical PIC-DSMC requirements for timestep and mesh size. Both constraints are related to the fact that charged particles are accelerated by the external field. Thus gradients in the electron energy distribution function can exist at scales smaller than the mean free path and these must be resolved by the mesh size for accurate collision rates. Additionally, the timestep must be small enough that the particle energy change due to the fields be small in order to capture gradients in the cross sections versus energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  8. PIC simulations of microturbulence in the presence of a magnetic island

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, E.; Bottino, A.; Peeters, A. G.; Sauter, O.

    2006-11-30

    In tokamak experiments, magnetic islands destroy the axial symmetry of the plasma through a helical magnetic-field perturbation. In the reconnected region the confinement is rather poor, due to the fast parallel transport along the field lines. The behaviour of the plasma turbulence in such a situation needs to be investigated, since it has a significant impact on both the transport in the island region and the stability of the island itself.A first attempt to study this rather rich area is presented in this paper. A (static) island structure is included in the particle-in-cell (PIC) global nonlinear gyrokinetic code ORB5. The perturbed magnetic field due to the island changes the orbits of the ions and influences the structure of the fluctuating potential. The equations of motion and the equation for the distribution-function perturbation are modified accordingly. The first simulations of the perturbed electric potential, heat flux and mode spectrum due to ITG turbulence (without zonal flows) are presented.

  9. Plasma analysis for the plasma immersion ion implantation processing by a PIC-MCC simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagawa, Y.; Ikeyama, M.; Miyagawa, S.; Tanaka, M.; Nakadate, H.

    2007-07-01

    In order to analyze the plasma behavior during PIII processing, a computer simulation has been carried out using the simulation software "PEGASUS". The software uses a Particle-in-Cell (PIC) method for the movement of charged particles in the electromagnetic field and a Monte Carlo method for collisions of ions, electrons, and neutrals in the plasma and also a Monte Carlo method to analyze the background gas behavior for a low density gas system. This approach is based on the weighting collision simulation scheme allowing for disparate number densities of different species. The spatial distributions of potential and densities of ions, electrons and radicals in the coating system were calculated together with the flux of ions and electrons on the surface of the object. The gas pressure was 0.01 to 50 Pa and a negative and/or a positive pulse voltage ( V=0.1 to 20 kV) was applied to the object. The calculation is fully self-consistent. A two-dimensional Cartesian and a cylindrical coordinate system were used. The effects of gas pressure, applied voltage, and secondary electron emission coefficient by ion impact ( γ) on the sheath thickness, the spatial distribution of densities of electron, ion, and neutral atoms, the ion flux and its spatial distribution, etc. were studied for PIII processing of a trench shaped object, inner wall of a pipe and a PET bottle.

  10. Hybrid-PIC Computer Simulation of the Plasma and Erosion Processes in Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Gamero-Castano, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    HPHall software simulates and tracks the time-dependent evolution of the plasma and erosion processes in the discharge chamber and near-field plume of Hall thrusters. HPHall is an axisymmetric solver that employs a hybrid fluid/particle-in-cell (Hybrid-PIC) numerical approach. HPHall, originally developed by MIT in 1998, was upgraded to HPHall-2 by the Polytechnic University of Madrid in 2006. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has continued the development of HPHall-2 through upgrades to the physical models employed in the code, and the addition of entirely new ones. Primary among these are the inclusion of a three-region electron mobility model that more accurately depicts the cross-field electron transport, and the development of an erosion sub-model that allows for the tracking of the erosion of the discharge chamber wall. The code is being developed to provide NASA science missions with a predictive tool of Hall thruster performance and lifetime that can be used to validate Hall thrusters for missions.

  11. PIC simulation of a thermal anisotropy-driven Weibel instability in a circular rarefaction wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Sarri, G.; Murphy, G. C.; Bret, A.; Romagnani, L.; Kourakis, I.; Borghesi, M.; Ynnerman, A.; O'C Drury, L.

    2012-02-01

    The expansion of an initially unmagnetized planar rarefaction wave has recently been shown to trigger a thermal anisotropy-driven Weibel instability (TAWI), which can generate magnetic fields from noise levels. It is examined here whether the TAWI can also grow in a curved rarefaction wave. The expansion of an initially unmagnetized circular plasma cloud, which consists of protons and hot electrons, into a vacuum is modelled for this purpose with a two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is shown that the momentum transfer from the electrons to the radially accelerating protons can indeed trigger a TAWI. Radial current channels form and the aperiodic growth of a magnetowave is observed, which has a magnetic field that is oriented orthogonal to the simulation plane. The induced electric field implies that the electron density gradient is no longer parallel to the electric field. Evidence is presented here that this electric field modification triggers a second magnetic instability, which results in a rotational low-frequency magnetowave. The relevance of the TAWI is discussed for the growth of small-scale magnetic fields in astrophysical environments, which are needed to explain the electromagnetic emissions by astrophysical jets. It is outlined how this instability could be examined experimentally.

  12. It's about Time: The Literacy TopPics Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Swafford, Jeanne

    1997-01-01

    Examines the last five years of articles in this journal to show what topics were most often written about (the "Top Picks" or "TopPics"). Discusses these results and makes recommendations that deserve considerable attention in the future. Notes that integrated language arts was a perennial TopPic. (SR)

  13. PIC simulations of Whistler Wave Generation and Electron Scattering Initialized by Plasma Conditions from the RAM-SCB Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Delzanno, G. L.; Jordanova, V.; Zhao, L.; Peng, B.; Markidis, S.

    2014-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions play an important role in influencing the Earth's inner magnetosphere dynamics. We study the whistler wave generation with an implicit particle-in-cell code (iPIC3D) within unstable equatorial regions identified by the kinetic ring current model RAM-SCB. During storm time, RAM-SCB shows that hot electrons on the dayside demonstrate high temperature anisotropy, implying that it is unstable to whistler wave excitation. By using plasma parameters from RAM-SCB results, we carry out iPIC3D simulations assuming a bi-Maxwellian distribution for electrons. We found that with an electron temperature anisotropy of 4, electron density of 6 cm-3 , and parallel temperature T|| of 1keV on the dayside around L of 5.5, whistler waves are rapidly excited and propagate along the background magnetic field line. Comparisons with linear theory show good agreements on the wave mode and frequency at which the whistler waves are excited, as well as on the linear growth rate of the maximum wave mode. The electron velocity distribution is significantly changed after the wave generation, towards a smaller anisotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering transport process. Furthermore, test particles are tracked in the whistler wave environment developed during the linear growth phase (with an amplitude of 0.05 B0) to examine the pitch angle diffusion. The diffusion coefficient is calculated and found to be one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the quasi-linear theory, which implies that the quasi-linear theory may predict a much faster loss of the radiation belts. In addition, in contrast to the quasi-linear theory that shows monotonic dependence on the electron pitch angle, the coefficient calculated from iPIC simulations are rather insensitive to the pitch angle.

  14. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  15. Nonlinear PIC simulation in a Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, G.; Delzanno, G. L.; Finn, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of a Penning trap plasma, including the effect of the finite length and end curvature of the plasma column. A new cylindrical PIC code, called KANDINSKY, has been implemented by using a new interpolation scheme. The principal idea is to calculate the volume of each cell from a particle volume, in the same manner as it is done for the cell charge. With this new method, the density is conserved along streamlines and artificial sources of compressibility are avoided. The code has been validated with a reference Eulerian fluid code. We compare the dynamics of three different models: a model with compression effects, the standard Euler model and a geophysical fluid dynamics model. The results of our investigation prove that Penning traps can really be used to simulate geophysical fluids.

  16. Whistler turbulence heating of electrons and ions: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simuations

    DOE PAGES

    Gary, S. Peter; Hughes, R. Scott; Wang, Joseph

    2016-01-14

    In this study, the decay of whistler turbulence in a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized plasma is studied using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations are initialized with a narrowband, relatively isotropic distribution of long wavelength whistler modes. A first ensemble of simulations at electron betamore » $${\\beta }_{{\\rm{e}}}$$ = 0.25 and ion-to-electron mass ratio $${m}_{{\\rm{i}}}$$/$${m}_{{\\rm{e}}}$$ = 400 is carried out on a domain cube of dimension $$L{\\omega }_{\\mathrm{pi}}$$/c = 5.12 where $${\\omega }_{\\mathrm{pi}}$$ is the ion plasma frequency. The simulations begin with a range of dimensionless fluctuating field energy densities, $${\\epsilon }_{{\\rm{o}}}$$, and follow the fluctuations as they cascade to broadband, anisotropic turbulence which dissipates at shorter wavelengths, heating both electrons and ions. The electron heating is stronger and preferentially parallel/antiparallel to the background magnetic field $${{\\boldsymbol{B}}}_{{\\rm{o}}};$$ the ion energy gain is weaker and is preferentially in directions perpendicular to $${{\\boldsymbol{B}}}_{{\\rm{o}}}$$. The important new results here are that, over 0.01 < $${\\epsilon }_{{\\rm{o}}}$$ < 0.25, the maximum rate of electron heating scales approximately as $${\\epsilon }_{{\\rm{o}}}$$, and the maximum rate of ion heating scales approximately as $${\\epsilon }_{{\\rm{o}}}^{1.5}$$. A second ensemble of simulations at $${\\epsilon }_{{\\rm{o}}}$$ = 0.10 and $${\\beta }_{{\\rm{e}}}$$ = 0.25 shows that, over 25 < $${m}_{{\\rm{i}}}$$/$${m}_{{\\rm{e}}}\\;$$< 1836, the ratio of the maximum ion heating rate to the maximum electron heating rate scales approximately as $${m}_{{\\rm{e}}}$$/$${m}_{{\\rm{i}}}$$.« less

  17. Revealing the sub-structures of the magnetic reconnection separatrix via particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, M.; Deng, X. H.; Pang, Y.; Xu, X. J.; Yao, M.; Huang, S. Y.; Yuan, Z. G.; Li, H. M.; Wang, D. D.; Wang, Y. H.

    2012-07-15

    Magnetic separatrix is an important boundary layer separating the inflow and outflow regions in magnetic reconnection. In this article, we investigate the sub-structures of the separatrix region by using two-and-half dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation. The separatrix region can be divided into two sub-regions in terms of the ion and electron frozen-in conditions. Far from the neutral sheet, ions and electrons are magnetized in magnetic fields. Approaching the neutral sheet, ion frozen-in condition is broken in a narrow region ({approx}c/{omega}{sub pi}) at the edge of a density cavity, while electrons are frozen-in to magnetic fields. In this region, electric field E{sub z} is around zero, and the convective term -(v{sub i} Multiplication-Sign B) is balanced by the Hall term in the generalized Ohm's law because ions carry the perpendicular current. Inside the density cavity, both ion and electron frozen-in conditions are broken. The region consists of two sub-ion or electron-scale layers, which contain intense electric fields. Formation of the two sub-layers is due to the complex electron flow pattern around the separatrix region. In the layer, E{sub z} is balanced by a combination of Hall term and the divergence of electron pressure tensor, with the Hall term being dominant. Our preliminary simulation result shows that the separatrix region in guide field reconnection also contains two sub-regions: the inner region and the outer region. However, the inner region contains only one current layer in contrast with the case without guide field.

  18. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-15

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Swanekamp et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)]. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}) with the injected beam current given by I{sub b} = I{sub 1} + I{sub 2}. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I{sub 2}−I{sub 1}) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to I{sub b}. Independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate current-divider geometry. The root-mean-square (RMS) beam emittance (ε{sub RMS}) varies as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. For applications where control of the beam trajectory is desired and the current density at the target is similar to the current density at the entrance foil, there is a modest 20% increase in ε{sub RMS} at the target. For other applications where the beam is pinched to a current density ∼5 times larger at the target, ε{sub RMS} is 2–3 times larger at the target.

  19. LOCAL TWO-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF THE COLLISIONLESS MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Sharma, Prateek; Spitkovsky, Anatoly E-mail: eliot@astro.berkeley.edu E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.edu

    2012-08-10

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is a crucial mechanism of angular momentum transport in a variety of astrophysical accretion disks. In systems accreting at well below the Eddington rate, such as the central black hole in the Milky Way (Sgr A*), the plasma in the disk is essentially collisionless. We present a nonlinear study of the collisionless MRI using first-principles particle-in-cell plasma simulations. We focus on local two-dimensional (axisymmetric) simulations, deferring more realistic three-dimensional simulations to future work. For simulations with net vertical magnetic flux, the MRI continuously amplifies the magnetic field, B, until the Alfven velocity, v{sub A} , is comparable to the speed of light, c (independent of the initial value of v{sub A} /c). This is consistent with the lack of saturation of MRI channel modes in analogous axisymmetric MHD simulations. The amplification of the magnetic field by the MRI generates a significant pressure anisotropy in the plasma (with the pressure perpendicular to B being larger than the parallel pressure). We find that this pressure anisotropy in turn excites mirror modes and that the volume-averaged pressure anisotropy remains near the threshold for mirror mode excitation. Particle energization is due to both reconnection and viscous heating associated with the pressure anisotropy. Reconnection produces a distinctive power-law component in the energy distribution function of the particles, indicating the likelihood of non-thermal ion and electron acceleration in collisionless accretion disks. This has important implications for interpreting the observed emission-from the radio to the gamma-rays-of systems such as Sgr A*.

  20. Particle-In-Cell Analysis of an Electric Antenna for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    The BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft is planned to provide a first electric field measurement in Mercury's magnetosphere by mounting two types of the electric antennas: WPT and MEFISTO. The sophisticated calibration of such measurements should be performed based on precise knowledge of the antenna characteristics in space plasma. However, it is difficult to know prac-tical antenna characteristics considering the plasma kinetics and spacecraft-plasma interactions by means of theoretical approaches. Furthermore, some modern antenna designing techniques such as a "hockey puck" principle is applied to MEFISTO, which introduces much complexity in its overall configuration. Thus a strong demand arises regarding the establishment of a nu-merical method that can solve the complex configuration and plasma dynamics for evaluating the electric properties of the modern instrument. For the self-consistent antenna analysis, we have developed a particle simulation code named EMSES based on the particle-in-cell technique including a treatment antenna conductive sur-faces. In this paper, we mainly focus on electrostatic (ES) features and photoelectron distri-bution in the vicinity of MEFISTO. Our simulation model includes (1) a photoelectron guard electrode, (2) a bias current provided from the spacecraft body to the sensing element, (3) a floating potential treatment for the spacecraft body, and (4) photoelectron emission from sunlit surfaces of the conductive bodies. Of these, the photoelectron guard electrode is a key technol-ogy for producing an optimal condition of plasma environment around MEFISTO. Specifically, we introduced a pre-amplifier housing called puck located between the conductive boom and the sensor wire. The photoelectron guard is then simulated by forcibly fixing the potential difference between the puck surface and the spacecraft body. For the modeling, we use the Capacity Matrix technique in order to assure the conservation condition of total charge owned by the

  1. Final Report for "Gyrotron Design and Evaluation using New Particle-in-Cell Capability"

    SciTech Connect

    David N Smithe

    2008-05-28

    ITER will depend on high power CW gyrotrons to deliver power to the plasma at ECR frequencies. However, gyrotrons can suffer from undesirable low frequency oscillations (LFO’s) which are known to interfere with the gun-region diagnostics and data collection, and are also expected to produce undesirable energy and velocity spread in the beam. The origins and processes leading to these oscillations are poorly understood, and existing gyrotron R&D tools, such as static gun solvers and interaction region models, are not designed to look at time-dependant oscillatory behavior. We have applied a time-domain particle-in-cell method to investigate the LFO phenomenon. Our company is at the forefront of smooth-curved-boundary treatment of the electromagnetic fields and particle emission surfaces, and such methods are necessary to simulate the adiabatically trapped and reflected electrons thought to be driving the oscillations. This approach provides the means for understanding, in microscopic detail, the underlying physical processes driving the low-frequency oscillations. In the Phase I project, an electron gun region from an existing gyrotron, known to observe LFO’s, was selected as a proof-of-principle geometry, and was modeled with the curved-geometry time-domain simulation tool, in order to establish the feasibility of simulating LFO physics with this tool on office-scale, and larger, parallel cluster computers. Generally, it was found to be feasible to model the simulation geometry, emission, and magnetic features of the electron gun. Ultimately, the tool will be used to investigate the origins and life cycle within the trapped particle population. This tool also provides the foundations and validation for potential application of the software to numerous other time-dependant beam and rf source problems in the commercial arena.

  2. Delta-f particle-in-cell simulation of X-B mode conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, N.; Cary, J. R.; Barnes, D. C.; Carlsson, J.

    2006-04-01

    Low-noise, delta-f particle-in-cell algorithm has been implemented in VORPAL, a massive parallel, hybrid plasma modeling code (Chet Nieter and John. R. Cary, J. Comp. Physics 196, 448 (2004)). This computation method allows us to simulate the mode conversion between the extraordinary wave (X) and electron Bernstein wave (EBW) in both linear and nonlinear regimes. In the linear regime, it is found that a full X-B mode conversion can be obtained for optimized parameters as φ/φce<2 (φ is the driving frequency and φce is the electron cyclotron frequency). No 100% conversion is found for φ/φce moderately larger than 2. The simulation results agree with the predictions of Ram's theory (Ram & Schultz, Phys. Plasma 4084 (2000)). The agreement indicates that X-B mode conversion can be well described by the quadratic wave equation based on cold plasma approximation, and this is consistent with the phase-space picture of mode conversion. It is also shown that the conversion efficiency is significantly affected by the gradient of magnetic fields. When the amplitude of the incident X wave increases, it is shown that the nonlinear self-interaction of the electron converted EBW gives rise to the second harmonic generation at a pump power as low as three orders smaller than the electron thermal energy. If the fundamental EBW is sufficiently large, the non-propagating third and fourth harmonic modes are also generated. *The work was supported by DOE Contract No.DE-FG02-04ER54735.

  3. AB INITIO PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE: THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF OBLIQUE PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Cerutti, Benoit

    2015-03-01

    We present “first-principles” relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of the oblique pulsar magnetosphere with pair formation. The magnetosphere starts to form with particles extracted from the surface of the neutron star. These particles are accelerated by surface electric fields and emit photons capable of producing electron–positron pairs. We inject secondary pairs at the locations of primary energetic particles whose energy exceeds the threshold for pair formation. We find solutions that are close to the ideal force-free magnetosphere with the Y-point and current sheet. Solutions with obliquities ≤40° do not show pair production in the open field line region because the local current density along the magnetic field is below the Goldreich–Julian value. The bulk outflow in these solutions is charge-separated, and pair formation happens in the current sheet and return current layer only. Solutions with higher inclinations show pair production in the open field line region, with high multiplicity of the bulk flow and the size of the pair-producing region increasing with inclination. We observe the spin-down of the star to be comparable to MHD model predictions. The magnetic dissipation in the current sheet ranges between 20% for the aligned rotator and 3% for the orthogonal rotator. Our results suggest that for low obliquity neutron stars with suppressed pair formation at the light cylinder, the presence of phenomena related to pair activity in the bulk of the polar region, e.g., radio emission, may crucially depend on the physics beyond our simplified model, such as the effects of curved spacetime or multipolar surface fields.

  4. An efficient mixed-precision, hybrid CPU-GPU implementation of a nonlinearly implicit one-dimensional particle-in-cell algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guangye; Chacon, Luis; Barnes, Daniel C

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a fully implicit, energy- and charge-conserving particle-in-cell method has been developed for multi-scale, full-f kinetic simulations [G. Chen, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 230, 18 (2011)]. The method employs a Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) solver and is capable of using very large timesteps without loss of numerical stability or accuracy. A fundamental feature of the method is the segregation of particle orbit integrations from the field solver, while remaining fully self-consistent. This provides great flexibility, and dramatically improves the solver efficiency by reducing the degrees of freedom of the associated nonlinear system. However, it requires a particle push per nonlinear residual evaluation, which makes the particle push the most time-consuming operation in the algorithm. This paper describes a very efficient mixed-precision, hybrid CPU-GPU implementation of the implicit PIC algorithm. The JFNK solver is kept on the CPU (in double precision), while the inherent data parallelism of the particle mover is exploited by implementing it in single-precision on a graphics processing unit (GPU) using CUDA. Performance-oriented optimizations, with the aid of an analytical performance model, the roofline model, are employed. Despite being highly dynamic, the adaptive, charge-conserving particle mover algorithm achieves up to 300 400 GOp/s (including single-precision floating-point, integer, and logic operations) on a Nvidia GeForce GTX580, corresponding to 20 25% absolute GPU efficiency (against the peak theoretical performance) and 50-70% intrinsic efficiency (against the algorithm s maximum operational throughput, which neglects all latencies). This is about 200-300 times faster than an equivalent serial CPU implementation. When the single-precision GPU particle mover is combined with a double-precision CPU JFNK field solver, overall performance gains 100 vs. the double-precision CPU-only serial version are obtained, with no apparent loss of

  5. Gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of Alfvén eigenmodes in presence of continuum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Mishchenko, Alexey Könies, Axel; Hatzky, Roman

    2014-05-15

    First-principle gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of a global Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmode (TAE) are undertaken in the presence of a strong coupling with the continuum. Effects of the bulk plasma temperature on the interplay between the TAE and Kinetic Alfvén Waves (KAWs) are investigated. A global TAE-KAW structure is identified which appears to be more unstable with respect to the fast ions than a simple (fluid-like) TAE mode.

  6. 2D Optical Streaking for Ultra-Short Electron Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.T.; Huang, Z.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    field ionization, which occurs in plasma case, gases species with high field ionization threshold should be considered. For a linear polarized laser, the kick to the ionized electrons depends on the phase of the laser when the electrons are born and the unknown timing jitter between the electron beam and laser beam makes the data analysis very difficult. Here we propose to use a circular polarized laser to do a 2-dimensional (2D) streaking (both x and y) and measure the bunch length from the angular distribution on the screen, where the phase jitter causes only a rotation of the image on the screen without changing of the relative angular distribution. Also we only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration. A similar circular RF deflecting mode was used to measure long bunches. We developed a numerical particle-in-Cell (PIC) code to study the dynamics of ionization electrons with the high energy beam and the laser beam.

  7. Particle-in-cell simulation of collisionless undriven reconnection with open boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, Alex; Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji

    2012-04-01

    The results are discussed of a 2½ dimensional, undriven, fully open-boundary particle-in-cell simulation of symmetric, anti-parallel reconnection. It is shown that the reconnection rate as measured by the strength of the out-of-plane electric field component at the dominant x-line is fast and unrelated to the emergence of magnetic islands. In contrast, it is shown that this reconnection rate normalized by the inflowing VAlf,inBin at the x-line does show a striking relationship to island emergence in a majority of cases. A detailed study of an outflow jet is discussed. It is shown that for this example the concept of an outer electron diffusion region is a misnomer. In this jet, the electrons are tied to the magnetic field motion in the local Hall plane. The extended electron diffusion region (E2DR) surrounding a reconnection site, where the out-of-plane non-ideal electric field is greater than zero, is discussed. The width d of this region is shown to remain between the ion and electron bounce length scales, in contrast, to the behavior in driven reconnection simulations in which d evolves from the electron bounce width to the ion bounce width, where it remains. The boundaries of the E2DR in the outflow directions are shown to mark the positions at which the electrons are magnetized and begin their drift with the field in the local Hall plane. It is shown that the aspect ratio d /L, in which L is the length of the E2DR, yields an excellent approximation to the normalized reconnection rate while the expression Ti/L, in which Ti is the ion temperature at the x-line, yields an excellent approximation to the un-normalized rate. It is concluded that the dynamics of the electrons in the E2DR is intimately related to the reconnection rate and it is suggested that in two dimensional, anti parallel, symmetric simulations, this region is the correct choice for the controversial electron diffusion region.

  8. Magnetic Reconnection during Collisionless, Stressed, X-point Collapse using Particle-in-cell Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.; Haruki, T.

    2008-09-01

    Dungey's (1953) work on X-point collapse is the earliest analysis done on magnetic reconnection and predates the tearing mode, Sweet-Parker and Petcheck reconnection models. X-point collapse soon fell out of favour because in the collisional (MHD) regime, for the plausible space plasma parameters, it was found to be inefficient. We however show [Tsiklauri D. and T. Haruki, Phys. of Plasmas, 14, 112905, (2007)] that in the collisionless regime, which is indeed more applicable to space plasmas, the reconnection is efficient. We study magnetic reconnection during collisionless, stressed, X-point collapse using kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic Particle-in-Cell numerical code. Two cases of weakly and strongly stressed X-point collapse were considered. Here descriptors weakly and strongly refer to 20% and 124% unidirectional spatial compression of the X-point, respectively. We found that within about one Alfven time, 2% and 20% of the initial magnetic energy is converted into heat and accelerated particle energy in the case of weak and strong stress, respectively. In the both cases, during the peak of the reconnection, the quadruple out-of-plane magnetic field is generated. These results strongly suggest the importance of the collisionless, stressed X-point collapse as an efficient mechanism of converting magnetic energy into heat and super-thermal particle energy. In the weakly stressed case, the reconnection rate, defined as the out-of-plane electric field in the X-point normalized by the product of external magnetic field and Alfven speeds, peaks at 0.11, with its average over 1.25 Alfven times being 0.04. Electron energy distribution in the current sheet, at the high-energy end of the spectrum, shows a power-law distribution with the index varying in time, attaining a maximal value of -4.1 at the final simulation time step (1.25 Alfven times). In the strongly stressed case, magnetic reconnection peak occurs 3.4 times faster and is more efficient

  9. A revision of the genus Macrolygistopterus Pic, 1929 (Coleoptera, Lycidae, Calochromini).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vinicius S

    2016-04-21

    A taxonomic review of the Lycid genus Macrolygistopterus Pic, 1929 with illustrations of diagnostic characters, geographic distribution maps and an identification key to the species is presented. Also, a key to the world Calochromini is given. Of the 12 species of the genus, 9 were studied: M. succinctus (Latreille, 1811), M. quadricostatus (Buquet, 1842), M. caeruleus (Gorham, 1884), M. germaini Pic, 1930, M. grandjeani Pic, 1930, M. subparallelus Pic, 1930, M. testaceirostris Pic, 1930, M. simoni Pic, 1930 and M. kirschi Pic, 1931 were redescribed and their status as valid species is confirmed. The lectotypes and paralectotypes were designated for all those examined species. M. bilineatus (Pic, 1923), M. diversicornis Pic, 1930 and M. bipartitus Pic, 1933 remain as valid species since these specimens were not available for this study. M. succinctus var. scutelaris Pic, 1930 is proposed here as new junior synonym of M. succinctus (Latreille, 1811).

  10. DYNA2D96. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    DYNA2D is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  11. Particle-in-cell simulations of the critical ionization velocity effect in finite size clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Lu, G.; Goertz, C. K.; Nishikawa, K. - I.

    1994-01-01

    The critical ionization velocity (CIV) mechanism in a finite size cloud is studied with a series of electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. It is observed that an initial seed ionization, produced by non-CIV mechanisms, generates a cross-field ion beam which excites a modified beam-plasma instability (MBPI) with frequency in the range of the lower hybrid frequency. The excited waves accelerate electrons along the magnetic field up to the ion drift energy that exceeds the ionization energy of the neutral atoms. The heated electrons in turn enhance the ion beam by electron-neutral impact ionization, which establishes a positive feedback loop in maintaining the CIV process. It is also found that the efficiency of the CIV mechanism depends on the finite size of the gas cloud in the following ways: (1) Along the ambient magnetic field the finite size of the cloud, L (sub parallel), restricts the growth of the fastest growing mode, with a wavelength lambda (sub m parallel), of the MBPI. The parallel electron heating at wave saturation scales approximately as (L (sub parallel)/lambda (sub m parallel)) (exp 1/2); (2) Momentum coupling between the cloud and the ambient plasma via the Alfven waves occurs as a result of the finite size of the cloud in the direction perpendicular to both the ambient magnetic field and the neutral drift. This reduces exponentially with time the relative drift between the ambient plasma and the neutrals. The timescale is inversely proportional to the Alfven velocity. (3) The transvers e charge separation field across the cloud was found to result in the modulation of the beam velocity which reduces the parallel heating of electrons and increases the transverse acceleration of electrons. (4) Some energetic electrons are lost from the cloud along the magnetic field at a rate characterized by the acoustic velocity, instead of the electron thermal velocity. The loss of energetic electrons from the cloud seems to be larger in the direction of

  12. Advanced 3D Poisson solvers and particle-in-cell methods for accelerator modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, David B.; McCorquodale, Peter; Colella, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    We seek to improve on the conventional FFT-based algorithms for solving the Poisson equation with infinite-domain (open) boundary conditions for large problems in accelerator modeling and related areas. In particular, improvements in both accuracy and performance are possible by combining several technologies: the method of local corrections (MLC); the James algorithm; and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The MLC enables the parallelization (by domain decomposition) of problems with large domains and many grid points. This improves on the FFT-based Poisson solvers typically used as it doesn't require the all-to-all communication pattern that parallel 3d FFT algorithms require, which tends to be a performance bottleneck on current (and foreseeable) parallel computers. In initial tests, good scalability up to 1000 processors has been demonstrated for our new MLC solver. An essential component of our approach is a new version of the James algorithm for infinite-domain boundary conditions for the case of three dimensions. By using a simplified version of the fast multipole method in the boundary-to-boundary potential calculation, we improve on the performance of the Hockney algorithm typically used by reducing the number of grid points by a factor of 8, and the CPU costs by a factor of 3. This is particularly important for large problems where computer memory limits are a consideration. The MLC allows for the use of adaptive mesh refinement, which reduces the number of grid points and increases the accuracy in the Poisson solution. This improves on the uniform grid methods typically used in PIC codes, particularly in beam problems where the halo is large. Also, the number of particles per cell can be controlled more closely with adaptivity than with a uniform grid. To use AMR with particles is more complicated than using uniform grids. It affects depositing particles on the non-uniform grid, reassigning particles when the adaptive grid changes and maintaining the load

  13. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  14. Plasma density enhancement in atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier discharges by high-voltage nanosecond pulse in the pulse-on period: a PIC simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Chaofeng; Sun, Jizhong; Wang, Dezhen

    2010-02-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) plus Monte Carlo collision simulation is employed to investigate how a sustainable atmospheric pressure single dielectric-barrier discharge responds to a high-voltage nanosecond pulse (HVNP) further applied to the metal electrode. The results show that the HVNP can significantly increase the plasma density in the pulse-on period. The ion-induced secondary electrons can give rise to avalanche ionization in the positive sheath, which widens the discharge region and enhances the plasma density drastically. However, the plasma density stops increasing as the applied pulse lasts over certain time; therefore, lengthening the pulse duration alone cannot improve the discharge efficiency further. Physical reasons for these phenomena are then discussed.

  15. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell modeling of terahertz gyrotrons with cylindrical and planar configurations of the interaction space

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Zheleznov, I. V.; Zotova, I. V.

    2013-04-15

    We perform 3D particle-in-cell simulations of terahertz gyrotrons with two different configurations of the interaction space. For a gyrotron with conventional cylindrical configuration of the interaction cavity, we demonstrate reasonable agreement between simulations and experimental results, including output frequency, structure of the higher-order operating mode (TE{sub 17,4}), output power, and ohmic losses. For a novel planar gyrotron scheme with transverse energy extraction, a possibility of further increasing the oversized factor with the single-mode operation regime retained is shown. Frequency detuning by mechanical variation of the gap between waveguide plates is also demonstrated.

  16. Study of strong enhancement of synchrotron radiation via surface plasma waves excitation by particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, K. Q.; Zheng, C. Y. Cao, L. H.; He, X. T.; Wu, Dong; Liu, Z. J.

    2015-11-02

    Synchrotron radiation is strongly enhanced by the resonant excitation of surface plasma waves (SPWs). Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that energy conversion efficiency from laser to radiation in the case of SPWs excitation is about 18.7%, which is improved by more than 2 orders of magnitude compared with that of no SPWs excitation. Besides the high energy conversion efficiency, the frequency spectrum and the angular distribution of the radiation are also improved in the case of SPWs excitation because of the quasi-static magnet field induced by surface plasma waves excitation.

  17. The hierarchical spatial decomposition of three-dimensional particle- in-cell plasma simulations on MIMD distributed memory multiprocessors

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.W.

    1992-07-01

    The hierarchical spatial decomposition method is a promising approach to decomposing the particles and computational grid in parallel particle-in-cell application codes, since it is able to maintain approximate dynamic load balance while keeping communication costs low. In this paper we investigate issues in implementing a hierarchical spatial decomposition on a hypercube multiprocessor. Particular attention is focused on the communication needed to update guard ring data, and on the load balancing method. The hierarchical approach is compared with other dynamic load balancing schemes.

  18. Self consistent particles dynamics in/out of the cusp region by using back tracking technics; a global 3D PIC simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, A.; Cai, D.; Lembege, B.; Nishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    Large scale three dimensionbal PIC (particle in cell) simulations are presently used in order to analyze the global solar wind-terrestrial magnetosphere intreraction within a full self-consistent approach, and where both electrons and ions are treated as an assembly of individual particles. This 3D kinetic approach allows us to analyze in particular the dynamics and the fine structures of the cusp region when including self consistently not only its whole neighborhood (in the terrestrial magnetosphere) but also the impact of the solar wind and the interplanetary field (IMF) features. Herein, we focuss our attention on the cusp region and in particular on the acceleration and precipitation of particles (both ions and electrons) within the cusp. In present simulations, the IMF is chosen northward, (i.e. where the X -reconnection region is just above the cusp, in the meridian plane). Back-trackings of self-consistent particles are analyzed in details in order to determine (i) which particles (just above the cusp) are precipitated deeply into the cusp, (ii) which populations are injected from the cusp into the nearby tail, (iii) where the particles suffer the largest energisation along their self-consistent trajectories, (iv) where these populations accumulate, and (v) where the most energetic particles are originally coming from. This approach allows to make a traking of particles within the scenario "solar wind-magnetosheath- cusp -nearbytail"; moreover it strongly differs from the standard test particles technics and allows to provide informations not accessible when using full MHD approach. Keywords: Tracing Particles, Particle In Cell (PIC) simulation, double cusp, test particles method, IMF, Solar wind, Magnetosphere

  19. Ion velocity distribution at the termination shock: 1-D PIC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Quanming; Yang Zhongwei; Lembege, Bertrand

    2012-11-20

    The Voyager 2 (V2) plasma observations of the proton temperature downstream of the quasi-perpendicular heliospheric termination shock (TS) showed that upstream thermal solar wind ions played little role in the shock dissipation mechanism and their downstream temperature is an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by MHD Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. While pickup ions (PUI) are generally expected to play an important role in energy dissipation at the shock, the details remain unclear. Here, one-dimensional (1-D) Particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to examine kinetic properties and downstream velocity distribution functions of pickup ions (the hot supra-thermal component) and solar wind protons (SWs, the cold component) at the perpendicular heliospheric termination shock. The code treats the pickup ions self-consistently as a third component. Present results show that: (1) both of the incident SWs and PUIs can be separated into two parts: reflected (R) ions and directly transmitted (DT) ions, the energy gain of the R ions at the shock front is much larger than that of the DT ions; (2) the fraction of reflected SWs and their downstream temperature decrease with the relative percentage PUI%; (3) no matter how large the PUI% is, the downstream ion velocity distribution function always can be separated into three parts: 1. a high energy tail (i.e. the wings) dominated by the reflected PUIs, 2. a low energy core mainly contributed by the directly transmitted SWs, and 3. a middle energy part which is a complicated superposition of reflected SWs and directly transmitted PUIs. The significance of the presence of pickup ions on shock front micro-structure and nonstationarity is also discussed.

  20. Ion velocity distribution at the termination shock: 1-D PIC simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Quanming; Yang, Zhongwei; Lembège, Bertrand

    2012-11-01

    The Voyager 2 (V2) plasma observations of the proton temperature downstream of the quasi-perpendicular heliospheric termination shock (TS) showed that upstream thermal solar wind ions played little role in the shock dissipation mechanism and their downstream temperature is an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by MHD Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. While pickup ions (PUI) are generally expected to play an important role in energy dissipation at the shock, the details remain unclear. Here, one-dimensional (1-D) Particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to examine kinetic properties and downstream velocity distribution functions of pickup ions (the hot supra-thermal component) and solar wind protons (SWs, the cold component) at the perpendicular heliospheric termination shock. The code treats the pickup ions self-consistently as a third component. Present results show that: (1) both of the incident SWs and PUIs can be separated into two parts: reflected (R) ions and directly transmitted (DT) ions, the energy gain of the R ions at the shock front is much larger than that of the DT ions; (2) the fraction of reflected SWs and their downstream temperature decrease with the relative percentage PUI%; (3) no matter how large the PUI% is, the downstream ion velocity distribution function always can be separated into three parts: 1. a high energy tail (i.e. the wings) dominated by the reflected PUIs, 2. a low energy core mainly contributed by the directly transmitted SWs, and 3. a middle energy part which is a complicated superposition of reflected SWs and directly transmitted PUIs. The significance of the presence of pickup ions on shock front micro-structure and nonstationarity is also discussed.

  1. Preliminary Study of Electron Emission for Use in the PIC Portion of MAFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.

    2001-01-01

    This memorandum summarizes a study undertaken to apply the program MAFIA to the modeling of an electron gun in a traveling wave tube (TWT). The basic problem is to emit particles from the cathode in the proper manner. The electrons are emitted with the classical Maxwell-Boltzmann (M-B) energy distribution; and for a small patch of emitting surface; the distribution with angle obeys Lambert's law. This states that the current density drops off as the cosine of the angle from the normal. The motivation for the work is to extend the analysis beyond that which has been done using older codes. Some existing programs use the Child-Langmuir, or 3/2 power law, for the description of the gun. This means the current varies as the 3/2 power of the anode voltage. The proportionality constant is termed the perveance of the gun. This is limited, however, since the 3/2 variation is only an approximation. Also, if the cathode is near saturation, the 3/2 law definitely will not hold. In most of the older codes, the electron beam is decomposed into current tubes, which imply laminar flow in the beam; even though experiments show the flow to be turbulent. Also, the proper inclusion of noise in the beam is not possible. These older methods of calculation do, however, give reasonable values for parameters of the electron beam and the overall gun, and these values will be used as the starting point for a more precise particle-in-cell (PIC) calculation. To minimize the time needed for a given computer run, all beams will use the same number of particles in a simulation. This is accomplished by varying the mass and charge of the emitted particles (macroparticles) in a certain manner, to be consistent with the desired beam current.

  2. Influence of the parallel nonlinearity on zonal flows and heat transport in global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jolliet, S.; McMillan, B. F.; Vernay, T.; Villard, L.; Hatzky, R.; Bottino, A.; Angelino, P.

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, the influence of the parallel nonlinearity on zonal flows and heat transport in global particle-in-cell ion-temperature-gradient simulations is studied. Although this term is in theory orders of magnitude smaller than the others, several authors [L. Villard, P. Angelino, A. Bottino et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 46, B51 (2004); L. Villard, S. J. Allfrey, A. Bottino et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 172 (2004); J. C. Kniep, J. N. G. Leboeuf, and V. C. Decyck, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 98 (2004); J. Candy, R. E. Waltz, S. E. Parker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 074501 (2006)] found different results on its role. The study is performed using the global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes TORB (theta-pinch) [R. Hatzky, T. M. Tran, A. Koenies et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 898 (2002)] and ORB5 (tokamak geometry) [S. Jolliet, A. Bottino, P. Angelino et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 177, 409 (2007)]. In particular, it is demonstrated that the parallel nonlinearity, while important for energy conservation, affects the zonal electric field only if the simulation is noise dominated. When a proper convergence is reached, the influence of parallel nonlinearity on the zonal electric field, if any, is shown to be small for both the cases of decaying and driven turbulence.

  3. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  4. Numerical modeling of the Linac4 negative ion source extraction region by 3D PIC-MCC code ONIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Lettry, J.; Minea, T.; Lifschitz, A. F.; Schmitzer, C.; Midttun, O.; Steyaert, D.

    2013-02-01

    At CERN, a high performance negative ion (NI) source is required for the 160 MeV H- linear accelerator Linac4. The source is planned to produce 80 mA of H- with an emittance of 0.25 mm mradN-RMS which is technically and scientifically very challenging. The optimization of the NI source requires a deep understanding of the underling physics concerning the production and extraction of the negative ions. The extraction mechanism from the negative ion source is complex involving a magnetic filter in order to cool down electrons' temperature. The ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction) code is used to address this problem. The ONIX is a selfconsistent 3D electrostatic code using Particles-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC-MCC) approach. It was written to handle the complex boundary conditions between plasma, source walls, and beam formation at the extraction hole. Both, the positive extraction potential (25kV) and the magnetic field map are taken from the experimental set-up, in construction at CERN. This contribution focuses on the modeling of two different extractors (IS01, IS02) of the Linac4 ion sources. The most efficient extraction system is analyzed via numerical parametric studies. The influence of aperture's geometry and the strength of the magnetic filter field on the extracted electron and NI current will be discussed. The NI production of sources based on volume extraction and cesiated surface are also compared.

  5. 3D PIC-MCC simulations of discharge inception around a sharp anode in nitrogen/oxygen mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teunissen, Jannis; Ebert, Ute

    2016-08-01

    We investigate how photoionization, electron avalanches and space charge affect the inception of nanosecond pulsed discharges. Simulations are performed with a 3D PIC-MCC (particle-in-cell, Monte Carlo collision) model with adaptive mesh refinement for the field solver. This model, whose source code is available online, is described in the first part of the paper. Then we present simulation results in a needle-to-plane geometry, using different nitrogen/oxygen mixtures at atmospheric pressure. In these mixtures non-local photoionization is important for the discharge growth. The typical length scale for this process depends on the oxygen concentration. With 0.2% oxygen the discharges grow quite irregularly, due to the limited supply of free electrons around them. With 2% or more oxygen the development is much smoother. An almost spherical ionized region can form around the electrode tip, which increases in size with the electrode voltage. Eventually this inception cloud destabilizes into streamer channels. In our simulations, discharge velocities are almost independent of the oxygen concentration. We discuss the physical mechanisms behind these phenomena and compare our simulations with experimental observations.

  6. Dynamics of positive probes in underdense, strongly magnetized, E×B drifting plasma: Particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, Jonathon R.; Cooke, David L.

    2013-09-15

    Electron trapping, electron heating, space-charge wings, wake eddies, and current collection by a positive probe in E×B drifting plasma were studied in three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations. In these simulations, electrons and ions were magnetized with respect to the probe and the plasma was underdense (ω{sub pe}<ω{sub ce}). A large drift velocity (Mach 4.5 with respect to the ion acoustic speed) between the plasma and probe was created with background electric and magnetic fields. Four distinct regions developed in the presences of the positive probe: a quasi-trapped electron region, an electron-depletion wing, an ion-rich wing, and a wake region. We report on the observations of strong electron heating mechanisms, space-charge wings, ion cyclotron charge-density eddies in the wake, electron acceleration due to a magnetic presheath, and the current-voltage relationship.

  7. Variational symplectic particle-in-cell simulation of nonlinear mode conversion from extraordinary waves to Bernstein waves

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi; Xiang, Nong

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the nonlinear mode conversion of extraordinary waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied using the variational symplectic particle-in-cell simulation. The accuracy of the nonlinear simulation is guaranteed by the long-term accuracy and conservativeness of the symplectic algorithm. The spectra of the electromagnetic wave, the evolution of the wave reflectivity, the energy deposition profile, and the parameter-dependent properties of radio-frequency waves during the nonlinear mode conversion are investigated. It is illustrated that nonlinear effects significantly modify the physics of the radio-frequency injection in magnetized plasmas. The evolutions of the radio-frequency wave reflectivity and the energy deposition are observed, as well as the self-interaction of the Bernstein waves and mode excitations. Even for waves with small magnitude, nonlinear effects can also become important after continuous wave injections, which are common in the realistic radio-frequency wave heating and current drive experiments.

  8. Propagation of localized structures in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas using particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    López, Rodrigo A.; Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, Juan A.

    2015-09-15

    We use a particle-in-cell simulation to study the propagation of localized structures in a magnetized electron-positron plasma with relativistic finite temperature. We use as initial condition for the simulation an envelope soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, derived from the relativistic two fluid equations in the strongly magnetized limit. This envelope soliton turns out not to be a stable solution for the simulation and splits in two localized structures propagating in opposite directions. However, these two localized structures exhibit a soliton-like behavior, as they keep their profile after they collide with each other due to the periodic boundary conditions. We also observe the formation of localized structures in the evolution of a spatially uniform circularly polarized Alfvén wave. In both cases, the localized structures propagate with an amplitude independent velocity.

  9. Particle-in-cell based parameter study of 12-cavity, 12-cathode rising-sun relativistic magnetrons for improved performance

    SciTech Connect

    Majzoobi, A.; Joshi, R. P. Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.

    2015-10-15

    Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to analyze the efficiency, output power and leakage currents in a 12-Cavity, 12-Cathode rising-sun magnetron with diffraction output (MDO). The central goal is to conduct a parameter study of a rising-sun magnetron that comprehensively incorporates performance enhancing features such as transparent cathodes, axial extraction, the use of endcaps, and cathode extensions. Our optimum results demonstrate peak output power of about 2.1 GW, with efficiencies of ∼70% and low leakage currents at a magnetic field of 0.45 Tesla, a 400 kV bias with a single endcap, for a range of cathode extensions between 3 and 6 centimeters.

  10. LPIC++ a parallel one-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell code for simulating laser-plasma-interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfund, R. E. W.; Lichters, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.

    1998-02-01

    We report on a recently developed electromagnetic relativistic 1D3V (one spatial, three velocity dimensions) Particle-In-Cell code for simulating laser-plasma interaction at normal and oblique incidence. The code is written in C++ and easy to extend. The data structure is characterized by the use of chained lists for the grid cells as well as particles belonging to one cell. The parallel version of the code is based on PVM. It splits the grid into several spatial domains each belonging to one processor. Since particles can cross boundaries of cells as well as domains, the processor loads will generally change in time. This is counteracted by adjusting the domain sizes dynamically, for which the use of chained lists has proven to be very convenient. Moreover, an option for restarting the simulation from intermediate stages of the time evolution has been implemented even in the parallel version. The code will be published and distributed freely.

  11. Particle in cell simulations of Buneman instability of a current-driven plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R. Roozbahani, H.; Komaizi, D.; Hashemzadeh, M.

    2014-09-15

    The nonlinear evolution of low frequency Buneman instability in an unmagnetized current-driven plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution is investigated using particle in cell simulation. Simulation results show that the generation of electron phase space holes and the counter-streaming current induced in the plasma strongly depend on the q-parameter. It is found that by increasing the nonextensive parameter, the distribution of electron density becomes highly peaked. This density steepening or grating-like pattern occurs at the saturation time. In addition, a generalized dispersion relation is obtained using the kinetic theory. Analysis of the dispersion relation and the temporal evolution of the electric field energy density reveal that the growth rate of instability increases by increasing the q-parameter. Finally, the results of Maxwellian and q-nonextensive velocity distributions have been compared and discussed.

  12. The characterization and optimization of NIO1 ion source extraction aperture using a 3D particle-in-cell code.

    PubMed

    Taccogna, F; Minelli, P; Cavenago, M; Veltri, P; Ippolito, N

    2016-02-01

    The geometry of a single aperture in the extraction grid plays a relevant role for the optimization of negative ion transport and extraction probability in a hybrid negative ion source. For this reason, a three-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision model of the extraction region around the single aperture including part of the source and part of the acceleration (up to the extraction grid (EG) middle) regions has been developed for the new aperture design prepared for negative ion optimization 1 source. Results have shown that the dimension of the flat and chamfered parts and the slope of the latter in front of the source region maximize the product of production rate and extraction probability (allowing the best EG field penetration) of surface-produced negative ions. The negative ion density in the plane yz has been reported. PMID:26932027

  13. Particle-in-cell simulations of planar and cylindrical Langmuir probes: Floating potential and ion saturation current

    SciTech Connect

    Iza, Felipe; Lee, Jae Koo

    2006-07-15

    Particle-in-cell and hybrid electron-Boltzmann simulations of planar and cylindrical Langmuir probes are compared with various probe theories. Floating potentials for planar and cylindrical probes are calculated and significant deviations from the typical approximation used for argon discharges of {approx}5T{sub e} are shown. The interpretation of simulated ion saturation currents by the orbital motion limited and the Laframboise theories result in an overestimation of the ion density. On the other hand, the cold-ion theory underestimates the ion density. These deviations are related to the overestimation and underestimation, respectively, of the ion orbital motion around cylindrical probes. The best agreement is obtained when the probe theory suggested by Tichy et al. is used. This theory incorporates ion orbital motion as in the Laframboise theory, collisional orbital motion destruction as suggested by Zakrzewski and Kopiczynski, and ion scattering as given by Chouet al.

  14. Particle-in-cell based parameter study of 12-cavity, 12-cathode rising-sun relativistic magnetrons for improved performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzoobi, A.; Joshi, R. P.; Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to analyze the efficiency, output power and leakage currents in a 12-Cavity, 12-Cathode rising-sun magnetron with diffraction output (MDO). The central goal is to conduct a parameter study of a rising-sun magnetron that comprehensively incorporates performance enhancing features such as transparent cathodes, axial extraction, the use of endcaps, and cathode extensions. Our optimum results demonstrate peak output power of about 2.1 GW, with efficiencies of ˜70% and low leakage currents at a magnetic field of 0.45 Tesla, a 400 kV bias with a single endcap, for a range of cathode extensions between 3 and 6 centimeters.

  15. Electromagnetic particle-in-cell verification of improving high-power microwave window breakdown thresholds by resonant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guoxin; Liu, Lie

    2013-06-01

    High-power microwave driven vacuum dielectric window breakdown is found to be suppressed by external magnetic field with gyrofrequency Ω = eB/m close to angular frequency ω of rf electric field. This letter gives a particle-in-cell demonstration of the increasing of breakdown thresholds by such magnetic field. It is found that magnetic field with Ω ˜ ω mitigates the multipactor effect. Its saturation process occurs at upper boundary of the susceptibility diagram instead of the lower one. This decreases the dc electric field built on dielectric surface. The electron-dielectric interaction rate is lowered, especially in the half rf period with Erf × B force pointing out of the dielectric surface. The resulting flashover time delay is prolonged. Thereby, the power handling capability of the dielectric window is enhanced.

  16. TWO-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF THE NONRESONANT, COSMIC-RAY-DRIVEN INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio; Reville, Brian; Kirk, John G.

    2009-06-10

    In supernova remnants, the nonlinear amplification of magnetic fields upstream of collisionless shocks is essential for the acceleration of cosmic rays to the energy of the 'knee' at 10{sup 15.5} eV. A nonresonant instability driven by the cosmic ray current is thought to be responsible for this effect. We perform two-dimensional, particle-in-cell simulations of this instability. We observe an initial growth of circularly polarized nonpropagating magnetic waves as predicted in linear theory. It is demonstrated that in some cases the magnetic energy density in the growing waves can grow to at least 10 times its initial value. We find no evidence of competing modes, nor of significant modification by thermal effects. At late times, we observe saturation of the instability in the simulation, but the mechanism responsible is an artifact of the periodic boundary conditions and has no counterpart in the supernova-shock scenario.

  17. The PIC [Process Individualization Curriculum] Model: Structure with Humanistic Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gow, Doris T.

    This paper describes a curriculum design model to train research and development personnel under USOE-NIE funding. This design model, called PIC (Process Individualization Curriculum), was chosen for coverting on-campus courses to extra-mural self-instructional courses. The curriculum specialists who work with professors to individualize their…

  18. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF PIC FORMATION IN CFC-12 INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of experiments to determine the effect of flame zone temperature on gas-phase flame formation and destruction of products of incomplete combustion (PICS) during dichlorodi-fluoromethane (CFC-12) incineration. The effect of water injection into the flame ...

  19. The PIC Youth Primer: Improving JTPA Programs for Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snedeker, Bonnie; And Others

    This guide for Private Industry Council (PIC) officers, members, and staff is written to assist in planning and overseeing effective programs for youth at risk in the local labor market using resources allocated under the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA). Section I takes a broad view of the problem of building effective employability…

  20. The first Pic du Midi photographs of Mars, 1909

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollfus, A.

    2010-08-01

    This short paper comprises an English translation of the article '1909; Premieres photographies de Mars au Pic du Midi', by Audouin Dollfus, published in l'Astronomie, 2009 November, pp. 27-30, and printed here with the assistance of the Director of the BAA Mars Section, Dr Richard McKim.

  1. Functional design criteria for pumping and instrumentation control (PIC) skids

    SciTech Connect

    BOETTGER, J.S.

    1999-08-25

    Radioactive liquid and semisolid waste from operation of Hanford's nuclear fuel processing plants is stored in 177 underground storage tanks located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford site. 28 of these tanks are of double-shell construction. The remaining 149 tanks are of single-shell construction. Only the newer, double-shell tanks (DST) can meet current requirements for containment of dangerous waste. Therefore, the single-shell tanks (SST) are being ''interim stabilized,'' which is the process of removing liquid from the waste through the use of a jet pump installed in a saltwell which penetrates the waste. Lockheed Martin Hanford Company has decided to purchase additional Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skids to monitor and control the operation of saltwell jet pumps in SSTs. Similar PIC skids are already in use at several locations. The PIC skids will shut off all power to equipment/instruments if preset limits are exceeded for such conditions as flammable gas, leak detection, pressure and flow, as well as provide air and water necessary for saltwell pumping activities. This document outlines the functional design criteria for pumping and instrumentation control (PIC) skids to support the interim stabilization effort for saltwell pumping.

  2. Mediator coordinates PIC assembly with recruitment of CHD1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Justin J; Lehmann, Lynn W; Bonora, Giancarlo; Sridharan, Rupa; Vashisht, Ajay A; Tran, Nancy; Plath, Kathrin; Wohlschlegel, James A; Carey, Michael

    2011-10-15

    Murine Chd1 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 1), a chromodomain-containing chromatin remodeling protein, is necessary for embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency. Chd1 binds to nucleosomes trimethylated at histone 3 Lys 4 (H3K4me3) near the beginning of active genes but not to bivalent domains also containing H3K27me3. To address the mechanism of this specificity, we reproduced H3K4me3- and CHD1-stimulated gene activation in HeLa extracts. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MuDPIT) and immunoblot analyses of purified preinitiation complexes (PICs) revealed the recruitment of CHD1 to naive chromatin but enhancement on H3K4me3 chromatin. Studies in depleted extracts showed that the Mediator coactivator complex, which controls PIC assembly, is also necessary for CHD1 recruitment. MuDPIT analyses of CHD1-associated proteins support the recruitment data and reveal numerous components of the PIC, including Mediator. In vivo, CHD1 and Mediator are recruited to an inducible gene, and genome-wide binding of the two proteins correlates well with active gene transcription in mouse ES cells. Finally, coimmunoprecipitation of CHD1 and Mediator from cell extracts can be ablated by shRNA knockdown of a specific Mediator subunit. Our data support a model in which the Mediator coordinates PIC assembly along with the recruitment of CHD1. The combined action of the PIC and H3K4me3 provides specificity in targeting CHD1 to active genes.

  3. 46 CFR 13.301 - Original application for “Tankerman-PIC (Barge)” endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Original application for âTankerman-PIC (Barge)â... OFFICERS AND SEAMEN CERTIFICATION OF TANKERMEN Requirements for âTankerman-PIC (Barge)â Endorsement § 13.301 Original application for “Tankerman-PIC (Barge)” endorsement. Each applicant for a...

  4. Australian Validation of the Hierarchical Personality Inventory for Children (HiPIC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkinson, Laura; Watt, Dianne; Roodenburg, John

    2014-01-01

    The Hierarchical Personality Inventory for Children (HiPIC) is a developmentally appropriate parent-report measure of the Five Factor Model (FFM) that has been validated in several European languages but only recently in English. The English translation of the HiPIC was evaluated in an Australian context. Parent-rated HiPIC scores were obtained…

  5. EM-PIC Simulations of Beat-Wave Excited KEEN Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.; Tsung, F. S.; Winjum, B. J.; Mori, W. B.

    2004-11-01

    Evidence for self-sustained, undamped modes at or near the electron thermal velocity have been observed in experiments (D. S. Montgomery et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 87, 155001 (2001)). Such modes have also been excited in 1D Vlasov simulations (B. B. Afeyan et al, Paper MO3.4, Proceedings of the 2003 IFSA conference (2003).). The main features of this mode are that their fundamental frequency is significantly below the plasma frequency, that their phase velocity is near the thermal velocity, and that the modes include features in phase space that correspond to trapped particles so that the self-consistent distribution function is not a Maxwellian. Using two counter-propagating lasers to set up a slow moving ponderomotive potential, we have been able to set up phase-space modifications similar to those observed by Afeyan et al. We will present 1D and 2D results using the particle-in-cell code OSIRIS, and we will discuss the connection between these simulation results to experiments done on the MARS and NEPTUNE lasers.

  6. The Serine Protease Autotransporter Pic Modulates Citrobacter rodentium Pathogenesis and Its Innate Recognition by the Host.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Kirandeep; Zarepour, Maryam; Yu, Hongbing; Yang, Hong; Croxen, Matthew; Stahl, Martin; Finlay, B Brett; Turvey, Stuart E; Vallance, Bruce A

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial pathogens produce a number of autotransporters that possess diverse functions. These include the family of serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) produced by enteric pathogens such as Shigella flexneri and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli. Of these SPATEs, one termed "protein involved in colonization," or Pic, has been shown to possess mucinase activity in vitro, but to date, its role in in vivo enteric pathogenesis is unknown. Testing a pic null (ΔpicC) mutant in Citrobacter rodentium, a natural mouse pathogen, found that the C. rodentium ΔpicC strain was impaired in its ability to degrade mucin in vitro compared to the wild type. Upon infection of mice, the ΔpicC mutant exhibited a hypervirulent phenotype with dramatically heavier pathogen burdens found in intestinal crypts. ΔpicC mutant-infected mice suffered greater barrier disruption and more severe colitis and weight loss, necessitating their euthanization between 10 and 14 days postinfection. Notably, the virulence of the ΔpicC mutant was normalized when the picC gene was restored; however, a PicC point mutant causing loss of mucinase activity did not replicate the ΔpicC phenotype. Exploring other aspects of PicC function, the ΔpicC mutant was found to aggregate to higher levels in vivo than wild-type C. rodentium. Moreover, unlike the wild type, the C. rodentium ΔpicC mutant had a red, dry, and rough (RDAR) morphology in vitro and showed increased activation of the innate receptor Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Interestingly, the C. rodentium ΔpicC mutant caused a degree of pathology similar to that of wild-type C. rodentium when infecting TLR2-deficient mice, showing that despite its mucinase activity, PicC's major role in vivo may be to limit C. rodentium's stimulation of the host's innate immune system.

  7. PIC Simulation of Laser Plasma Interactions with Temporal Bandwidths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsung, Frank; Weaver, J.; Lehmberg, R.

    2015-11-01

    We are performing particle-in-cell simulations using the code OSIRIS to study the effects of laser plasma interactions in the presence of temperal bandwidths under conditions relevant to current and future shock ignition experiments on the NIKE laser. Our simulations show that, for sufficiently large bandwidth, the saturation level, and the distribution of hot electrons, can be effected by the addition of temporal bandwidths (which can be accomplished in experiments using smoothing techniques such as SSD or ISI). We will show that temporal bandwidth along play an important role in the control of LPI's in these lasers and discuss future directions. This work is conducted under the auspices of NRL.

  8. An electromagnetic PIC code on the MasPar

    SciTech Connect

    MacNeice, P.

    1993-12-31

    A 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code has been rewritten to run on the MasPar. The original code; known as TRISTAN which was written by Oscar Buneman was rewritten in MPL and its data structure altered to suit the MasPar architecture and exploit the fully local property of the algorithm. We discuss the significant issues associated with porting the code and present a comparative analysis of the code run times on the MasPar and on the CRAY YMP and C90. Results of a simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with the earth`s magnetosphere are shown.

  9. First Results of PIC Modeling of Kinetic Alfven Wave Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulaki, Anna; Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    We present first results of an investigation of the kinetic damping of Alfven wave turbulence. The methodology is based on a fully electromagnetic, three-dimensional, particle in cell code. The calculation is initialized by an Alfven wave spectrum. Subsequently, a cascade develops, and damping by coupling to both ions and electrons is observed. We discuss results of these calculations, and present first estimates of damping rates and of the effects of energy transfer on ion and electron distributions. The results pertain to solar wind heating and acceleration.

  10. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  11. A Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC) for Fusion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chap, Andrew; Tarditi, Alfonso G.; Scott, John H.

    2013-01-01

    A Particle-in-cell simulation model has been developed to study the physics of the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC) applied to the conversion of charged fusion products into electricity. In this model the availability of a beam of collimated fusion products is assumed; the simulation is focused on the conversion of the beam kinetic energy into alternating current (AC) electric power. The model is electrostatic, as the electro-dynamics of the relatively slow ions can be treated in the quasistatic approximation. A two-dimensional, axisymmetric (radial-axial coordinates) geometry is considered. Ion beam particles are injected on one end and travel along the axis through ring-shaped electrodes with externally applied time-varying voltages, thus modulating the beam by forming a sinusoidal pattern in the beam density. Further downstream, the modulated beam passes through another set of ring electrodes, now electrically oating. The modulated beam induces a time alternating potential di erence between adjacent electrodes. Power can be drawn from the electrodes by connecting a resistive load. As energy is dissipated in the load, a corresponding drop in beam energy is measured. The simulation encapsulates the TWDEC process by reproducing the time-dependent transfer of energy and the particle deceleration due to the electric eld phase time variations.

  12. Particle-In-Cell Simulations of a Nonlinear Transverse Electromagnetic Wave in a Pulsar Wind Termination Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Skjaeraasen, Olaf; Melatos, A.; Spitkovsky, A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-08-15

    A 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell code is used to investigate the propagation of a large-amplitude, superluminal, nearly transverse electromagnetic (TEM) wave in a relativistically streaming electron-positron plasma with and without a shock. In the freestreaming, unshocked case, the analytic TEM dispersion relation is verified, and the streaming is shown to stabilize the wave against parametric instabilities. In the confined, shocked case, the wave induces strong, coherent particle oscillations, heats the plasma, and modifies the shock density profile via ponderomotive effects. The wave decays over {approx}> 10{sup 2} skin depths; the decay length scale depends primarily on the ratio between the wave frequency and the effective plasma frequency, and on the wave amplitude. The results are applied to the termination shock of the Crab pulsar wind, where the decay length-scale ({approx}> 0.05''?) might be comparable to the thickness of filamentary, variable substructure observed in the optical and X-ray wisps and knots.

  13. A Comparison of ARTEMIS Observations and Particle-in-cell Modeling of the Lunar Photoelectron Sheath in the Terrestrial Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Ergun, R. E.

    2012-01-01

    As an airless body in space with no global magnetic field, the Moon is exposed to both solar ultraviolet radiation and ambient plasmas. Photoemission from solar UV radiation and collection of ambient plasma are typically opposing charging currents and simple charging current balance predicts that the lunar dayside surface should charge positively; however, the two ARTEMIS probes have observed energydependent loss cones and high-energy, surface-originating electron beams above the dayside lunar surface for extended periods in the magnetosphere, which are indicative of negative surface potentials. In this paper, we compare observations by the ARTEMIS P1 spacecraft with a one dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and show that the energy-dependent loss cones and electron beams are due to the presence of stable, non-monotonic, negative potentials above the lunar surface. The simulations also show that while the magnitude of the non-monotonic potential is mainly driven by the incoming electron temperature, the incoming ion temperature can alter this magnitude, especially for periods in the plasma sheet when the ion temperature is more than twenty times the electron temperature. Finally, we note several other plasma phenomena associated with these non-monotonic potentials, such as broadband electrostatic noise and electron cyclotron harmonic emissions, and offer possible generation mechanisms for these phenomena.

  14. A particle-in-cell mode beam dynamics simulation of medium energy beam transport for the SSC-Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chen; He, Yuan; Yuan, You-Jin; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Liu, Yong; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Du, Xiao-Nan; Yao, Qing-Gao; Liu, Ge; Xu, Meng-Xin; He, Shou-Bo; Xia, Jia-Wen

    2012-01-01

    A new linear accelerator system, called the SSC-Linac injector, is being designed at HIRFL (the heavy ion research facility of Lanzhou). As part of the SSC-Linac, the medium energy beam transport (MEBT) consists of seven magnetic quadrupoles, a re-buncher and a diagnose box. The total length of this segment is about 1.75 m. The beam dynamics simulation in MEBT has been studied using the TRACK 3D particle-in-cell code, and the simulation result shows that the beam accelerated from the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) matches well with the acceptance of the following drift tube linac (DTL) in both the transverse and longitudinal phase spaces, and that most of the particles can be captured by the final sector focusing cyclotron for further acceleration. The longitudinal emittance of the RFQ and the longitudinal acceptance of the DTL was calculated in detail, and a multi-particle beam dynamics simulation from the ion source to the end of the DTL was done to verify the original design.

  15. Mesh refinement for particle-in-cell plasma simulations: Applications to - and benefits for - heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.L.; Colella, P.; McCorquodale, P.; Van Straalen, B.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    2002-05-24

    The numerical simulation of the driving beams in a heavy ion fusion power plant is a challenging task, and simulation of the power plant as a whole, or even of the driver, is not yet possible. Despite the rapid progress in computer power, past and anticipated, one must consider the use of the most advanced numerical techniques, if they are to reach the goal expeditiously. One of the difficulties of these simulations resides in the disparity of scales, in time and in space, which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation region, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g., fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. They discuss the challenges posed by the implementation of this technique into plasma simulations (due to the presence of particles and electromagnetic waves). They present the prospects for and projected benefits of its application to heavy ion fusion, in particular to the simulation of the ion source and the final beam propagation in the chamber. A Collaboration project is under way at LBNL between the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG) and the HIF group to couple the Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) library CHOMBO developed by the ANAG group to the Particle-In-Cell accelerator code (WARP) developed by the HIF-VNL. They describe their progress and present their initial findings.

  16. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M; Friedel, Reinhard H; Funsten, Herbert O; Gary, S Peter; Hospodarsky, George B; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A; Min, Kyungguk; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Skoug, Ruth M; Winske, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr<Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr≃Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ∼Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties. PMID:26167433

  17. Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for Vlasov-Maxwell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; He, Yang; Zhang, Ruili; Sun, Yajuan

    2015-11-01

    Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for classical particle-field systems governed by the Vlasov-Maxwell equations are developed. The algorithms conserve a discrete non-canonical symplectic structure derived from the Lagrangian of the particle-field system, which is naturally discrete in particles. The electromagnetic field is spatially discretized using the method of discrete exterior calculus with high-order interpolating differential forms for a cubic grid. The resulting time-domain Lagrangian assumes a non-canonical symplectic structure. It is also gauge invariant and conserves charge. The system is then solved using a structure-preserving splitting method discovered by He et al. [preprint arXiv: 1505.06076 (2015)], which produces five exactly soluble sub-systems, and high-order structure-preserving algorithms follow by combinations. The explicit, high-order, and conservative nature of the algorithms is especially suitable for long-term simulations of particle-field systems with extremely large number of degrees of freedom on massively parallel supercomputers. The algorithms have been tested and verified by the two physics problems, i.e., the nonlinear Landau damping and the electron Bernstein wave. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  18. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of plasma cavitation and bursty Brillouin backscattering for nonrelativistic laser intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Riconda, C.; Weber, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Adam, J.-C.; Heron, A.

    2006-08-15

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of laser-plasma interaction using a plane-wave geometry show strong bursty stimulated Brillouin backscattering, rapid filamentation, and subsequent plasma cavitation. It is shown that the cavitation is not induced by self-focusing. The electromagnetic fields below the plasma frequency that are excited are related to transient soliton-like structures. At the origin of these solitons is a three-wave decay process exciting new modes in the plasma. The cavitation is responsible for a strong local reduction of the reflectivity and goes along with an efficient but transient heating of the electrons. Once heating ceases, transmission starts to increase. Local as well as global average reflectivities attain a very low value due to strong plasma density variations brought about by the cavitation process. On the one hand, the simulations confirm the existence of a new mechanism of cavity and soliton formation in nonrelativistic laser-plasma interaction in two dimensions, which was shown to exist in one-dimensional simulations [S. Weber, C. Riconda, and V. T. Tikhonchuk, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 055005 (2005)]. On the other hand, new aspects are introduced inherently related to the additional degree of freedom.

  19. Modeling a thermionic energy converter using finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, F. S.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, P. S.; Ragan-Kelley, B.; Minnich, A.; Lin, M. C.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2014-02-15

    A thermionic energy converter (TEC) is a static device that converts heat directly into electricity by boiling electrons off a hot emitter surface across a small inter-electrode gap to a cooler collector surface. The main challenge in TECs is overcoming the space charge limit, which limits the current transmitted across a gap of a given voltage and width. We have verified the feasibility of studying and developing a TEC using a bounded finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell plasma simulation code, OOPD1, developed by Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, formerly at UC Berkeley and now at Michigan State University. In this preliminary work, a TEC has been modeled kinetically using OOPD1, and the accuracy has been verified by comparing with an analytically solvable case, giving good agreement. With further improvement of the code, one will be able to quickly and cheaply analyze space charge effects, and seek designs that mitigate the space charge effect, allowing TECs to become more efficient and cost-effective.

  20. Particle-In-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Crustal Magnetic Anomalies: Magnetic Cusp Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.

    2012-01-01

    As the solar wind is incident upon the lunar surface, it will occasionally encounter lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields. These magnetic fields are small-scale, highly non-dipolar, have strengths up to hundreds of nanotesla, and typically interact with the solar wind in a kinetic fashion. Simulations, theoretical analyses, and spacecraft observations have shown that crustal fields can reflect solar wind protons via a combination of magnetic and electrostatic reflection; however, analyses of surface properties have suggested that protons may still access the lunar surface in the cusp regions of crustal magnetic fields. In this first report from a planned series of studies, we use a 1 1/2-dimensional, electrostatic particle-in-cell code to model the self-consistent interaction between the solar wind, the cusp regions of lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields, and the lunar surface. We describe the self-consistent electrostatic environment within crustal cusp regions and discuss the implications of this work for the role that crustal fields may play regulating space weathering of the lunar surface via proton bombardment.

  1. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. I. Insights from particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-01

    Using a 1D particle-in-cell simulation with perpendicular electric, E0, and magnetic, B0, fields, and modelling the azimuthal direction (i.e., the E0 × B0 direction), we study the cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs). For low plasma densities, the electron transport is found to be well described by classical electron-neutral collision theory, but at sufficiently high densities (representative of typical HETs), a strong instability is observed to significantly enhance the electron mobility, even in the absence of electron-neutral collisions. This instability is associated with correlated high-frequency (of the order of MHz) and short-wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the electric field and the plasma density, which are shown to be the cause of the anomalous transport. Saturation of the instability is observed to occur due to a combination of ion-wave trapping in the E0 × B0 direction, and convection in the E0 direction.

  2. Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for Vlasov-Maxwell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; He, Yang; Zhang, Ruili; Sun, Yajuan

    2015-11-01

    Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for classical particle-field systems governed by the Vlasov-Maxwell equations are developed. The algorithms conserve a discrete non-canonical symplectic structure derived from the Lagrangian of the particle-field system, which is naturally discrete in particles. The electromagnetic field is spatially discretized using the method of discrete exterior calculus with high-order interpolating differential forms for a cubic grid. The resulting time-domain Lagrangian assumes a non-canonical symplectic structure. It is also gauge invariant and conserves charge. The system is then solved using a structure-preserving splitting method discovered by He et al. [preprint arXiv:1505.06076 (2015)], which produces five exactly soluble sub-systems, and high-order structure-preserving algorithms follow by combinations. The explicit, high-order, and conservative nature of the algorithms is especially suitable for long-term simulations of particle-field systems with extremely large number of degrees of freedom on massively parallel supercomputers. The algorithms have been tested and verified by the two physics problems, i.e., the nonlinear Landau damping and the electron Bernstein wave.

  3. A comparison of weak-turbulence and particle-in-cell simulations of weak electron-beam plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliffe, H.; Brady, C. S.; Che Rozenan, M. B.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2014-12-01

    Quasilinear theory has long been used to treat the problem of a weak electron beam interacting with plasma and generating Langmuir waves. Its extension to weak-turbulence theory treats resonant interactions of these Langmuir waves with other plasma wave modes, in particular, ion-sound waves. These are strongly damped in plasma of equal ion and electron temperatures, as sometimes seen in, for example, the solar corona and wind. Weak turbulence theory is derived in the weak damping limit, with a term describing ion-sound wave damping then added. In this paper, we use the EPOCH particle-in-cell code to numerically test weak turbulence theory for a range of electron-ion temperature ratios. We find that in the cold ion limit, the results agree well, but for increasing ion temperature the three-wave resonance becomes broadened in proportion to the ion-sound wave damping rate. Additionally, we establish lower limits on the number of simulation particles needed to accurately reproduce the electron and wave distributions in their saturated states and to reproduce their intermediate states and time evolution. These results should be taken into consideration in, for example, simulations of plasma wave generation in the solar corona of Type III solar radio bursts from the corona to the solar wind and in weak turbulence investigations of ion-acoustic lines in the ionosphere.

  4. A comparison of weak-turbulence and particle-in-cell simulations of weak electron-beam plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, H. Brady, C. S.; Che Rozenan, M. B.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2014-12-15

    Quasilinear theory has long been used to treat the problem of a weak electron beam interacting with plasma and generating Langmuir waves. Its extension to weak-turbulence theory treats resonant interactions of these Langmuir waves with other plasma wave modes, in particular, ion-sound waves. These are strongly damped in plasma of equal ion and electron temperatures, as sometimes seen in, for example, the solar corona and wind. Weak turbulence theory is derived in the weak damping limit, with a term describing ion-sound wave damping then added. In this paper, we use the EPOCH particle-in-cell code to numerically test weak turbulence theory for a range of electron-ion temperature ratios. We find that in the cold ion limit, the results agree well, but for increasing ion temperature the three-wave resonance becomes broadened in proportion to the ion-sound wave damping rate. Additionally, we establish lower limits on the number of simulation particles needed to accurately reproduce the electron and wave distributions in their saturated states and to reproduce their intermediate states and time evolution. These results should be taken into consideration in, for example, simulations of plasma wave generation in the solar corona of Type III solar radio bursts from the corona to the solar wind and in weak turbulence investigations of ion-acoustic lines in the ionosphere.

  5. Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for Vlasov-Maxwell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Liu, Jian; He, Yang; Zhang, Ruili; Qin, Hong; Sun, Yajuan

    2015-11-15

    Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for classical particle-field systems governed by the Vlasov-Maxwell equations are developed. The algorithms conserve a discrete non-canonical symplectic structure derived from the Lagrangian of the particle-field system, which is naturally discrete in particles. The electromagnetic field is spatially discretized using the method of discrete exterior calculus with high-order interpolating differential forms for a cubic grid. The resulting time-domain Lagrangian assumes a non-canonical symplectic structure. It is also gauge invariant and conserves charge. The system is then solved using a structure-preserving splitting method discovered by He et al. [preprint http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1505.06076 (2015)], which produces five exactly soluble sub-systems, and high-order structure-preserving algorithms follow by combinations. The explicit, high-order, and conservative nature of the algorithms is especially suitable for long-term simulations of particle-field systems with extremely large number of degrees of freedom on massively parallel supercomputers. The algorithms have been tested and verified by the two physics problems, i.e., the nonlinear Landau damping and the electron Bernstein wave.

  6. Study of self-consistent particle flows in a plasma blob with particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Hiroki Ishiguro, Seiji

    2015-10-15

    The self-consistent particle flows in a filamentary coherent structure along the magnetic field line in scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma (plasma blob) have been investigated by means of a three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code. The presence of the spiral current system composed of the diamagnetic and parallel currents in a blob is confirmed by the particle simulation without any assumed sheath boundary models. Furthermore, the observation of the electron and ion parallel velocity distributions in a blob shows that those distributions are far from Maxwellian due to modification with the sheath formation and that the electron temperature on the higher potential side in a blob is higher than that on the lower potential side. Also, it is found that the ions on the higher potential side are accelerated more intensively along the magnetic field line than those on the lower potential side near the edge. This study indicates that particle simulations are able to provide an exact current closure to analysis of blob dynamics and will bring more accurate prediction of plasma transport in the SOL without any empirical assumptions.

  7. Comparison of particle-in-cell simulation with experiment for thetransport system of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ionsource VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, DamonS.; Leitner, Daniela; Leitner, Matthaeus; Lyneis,Claude M.; Qiang, Ji; Grote, Dave P.

    2005-09-19

    The three-dimensional, particle-in-cell code WARP has been enhanced to allow end-to-end beam dynamics simulations of the VENUS beam transport system from the extraction region, through a mass-analyzing magnet, and up to a two-axis emittance scanner. This paper presents first results of comparisons between simulation and experimental data. A helium beam (He+, He2+) is chosen as an initial comparison beam due to its simple mass spectrum. Although a number of simplifications are made for the initial extracted beam, aberration characteristics appear in simulations that are also present in experimental phase space current density measurements. Further, measurements of phase space tilt indicate that simulations must have little or no space charge neutralization along the transport system to best agree with experiment. In addition, recent measurements of triangular beam structure immediately after the source are presented. This beam structure is related to the source magnetic confinement fields and will need to be taken into account as the initial beam approximations are lifted.

  8. Particle-in-cell simulation of an electronegative plasma under direct current bias studied in a large range of electronegativity

    SciTech Connect

    Oudini, N.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Chabert, P.; Aanesland, A.; Meige, A.

    2013-04-15

    A one-dimensional electronegative plasma situated between two symmetrical parallel electrodes under DC bias is studied by Particle-In-Cell simulation with Monte Carlo Collisions. By varying the electronegativity {alpha}{identical_to}n{sub -}/n{sub e} from the limit of electron-ion plasmas (negative ion free) to ion-ion plasmas (electron free), the sheaths formation, the negative ion flux flowing towards the electrodes, and the particle velocities at the sheath edges are investigated. Depending on {alpha}, it is shown that the electronegative plasma behavior can be described by four regimes. In the lowest regime of {alpha}, i.e., {alpha} < 50, negative ions are confined by two positive sheaths within the plasma, while in the higher regimes of {alpha}, a negative sheath is formed and the negative ion flux can be extracted from the bulk plasma. In the two intermediate regimes of {alpha}, i.e., 50 < {alpha} < 10{sup 5}, both the electron and the negative ion fluxes are involved in the neutralization of the positive ions flux that leaves the plasma. In particular, we show that the velocity of the negative ions entering the negative sheath is affected by the presence of the electrons, and is not given by the modified Bohm velocity generally accepted for electronegative plasmas. For extremely high electronegativity, i.e., {alpha} > 10{sup 5}, the presence of electrons in the plasma is marginal and the electronegative plasma can be considered as an ion-ion plasma (electron free).

  9. Particle-in-cell simulations of the excitation mechanism for fusion-product-driven ion cyclotron emission from tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard; Cook, James; Chapman, Sandra

    2009-11-01

    Suprathermal ion cyclotron emission (ICE) was the first collective radiative instability, driven by fusion products, observed on JET and TFTR. Strong emission occurs at sequential cyclotron harmonics of the energetic ion population at the outer mid-plane. Its intensity scales linearly with fusion reactivity, including its time evolution during a discharge. The emission mechanism is probably the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI), involving resonance between: fast Alfv'en waves; cyclotron harmonic waves supported by the energetic particle population and by the background thermal plasma; and a subset of the centrally born fusion products, just inside the trapped-passing boundary, whose drift orbits make large radial excursions. The linear growth rate of the MCI has been intensively studied analytically, and yields good agreement with several key observational features of ICE. To address outstanding issues in the nonlinear ICE regime, we have developed a particle-in-cell code which self-consistently evolves electron and multi-species ion macroparticles and the electromagnetic field. We focus on the growth rate of the MCI, as it evolves from the linear into the nonlinear regime for JET-like parameters.

  10. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with in-plane flow shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, C. E.; Cassak, P. A.; Swisdak, M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in systems simultaneously containing asymmetric (anti-parallel) magnetic fields, asymmetric plasma densities and temperatures, and arbitrary in-plane bulk flow of plasma in the upstream regions. Such configurations are common in the high-latitudes of Earth's magnetopause and in tokamaks. We investigate the convection speed of the X-line, the scaling of the reconnection rate, and the condition for which the flow suppresses reconnection as a function of upstream flow speeds. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to capture the mixing of plasma in the outflow regions better than is possible in fluid modeling. We perform simulations with asymmetric magnetic fields, simulations with asymmetric densities, and simulations with magnetopause-like parameters where both are asymmetric. For flow speeds below the predicted cutoff velocity, we find good scaling agreement with the theory presented in Doss et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 120, 7748 (2015)]. Applications to planetary magnetospheres, tokamaks, and the solar wind are discussed.

  11. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  12. Wavelet characterization of 2D turbulence and intermittency in magnetized electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Maero, G.

    2016-06-01

    A study of the free relaxation of turbulence in a two-dimensional (2D) flow is presented, with a focus on the role of the initial vorticity conditions. Exploiting a well-known analogy with 2D inviscid incompressible fluids, the system investigated here is a magnetized pure electron plasma. The dynamics of this system are simulated by means of a 2D particle-in-cell code, starting from different spiral density (vorticity) distributions. A wavelet multiresolution analysis is adopted, which allows the coherent and incoherent parts of the flow to be separated. Comparison of the turbulent evolution in the different cases is based on the investigation of the time evolution of statistical properties, including the probability distribution functions and structure functions of the vorticity increments. It is also based on an analysis of the enstrophy evolution and its spectrum for the two components. In particular, while the statistical features assess the degree of flow intermittency, spectral analysis allows us not only to estimate the time required to reach a state of fully developed turbulence, but also estimate its dependence on the thickness of the initial spiral density distribution, accurately tracking the dynamics of both the coherent structures and the turbulent background. The results are compared with those relevant to annular initial vorticity distributions (Chen et al 2015 J. Plasma Phys. 81 495810511).

  13. Phototriggered sulfoxide isomerization in [Ru(pic)2(dmso)2].

    PubMed

    Rachford, Aaron A; Petersen, Jeffrey L; Rack, Jeffrey J

    2007-08-14

    We report the characterization and photochemistry of a simple ruthenium coordination complex containing only picolinate (pic) and dmso, which exhibits a large isomerization quantum yield (Phi(SS-->OO) = 0.50) in various solvents. The picolinate ligands of [Ru(pic)(2)(dmso)(2)] are in a cis arrangement so that the carboxylate oxygen of one pic ligand (O1) is trans to the pyridine of the second picolinate (N2). One dmso ligand (S1) is trans to a pyridine nitrogen (N1), while the second dmso (S2) is trans to a carboxylate oxygen (O3). The cyclic voltammetry, (1)H NMR, IR, and UV-vis spectroscopy data suggest that while both dmso ligands isomerize photochemically, only one dmso ligand isomerizes electrochemically. Isomerization quantum yields for each dmso ligand differ by an order of magnitude (Phi(SS-->SO) = 0.46 and Phi(SO-->OO) = 0.036). In agreement with previous results, the isomerization quantum yield for each dmso is dependent on the ligand that is trans to the dmso.

  14. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  15. Exact charge-conserving scatter-gather algorithm for particle-in-cell simulations on unstructured grids: A geometric perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Haksu; Teixeira, Fernando L.; Omelchenko, Yuri A.

    2015-09-01

    We describe a charge-conserving scatter-gather algorithm for particle-in-cell simulations on unstructured grids. Charge conservation is obtained from first principles, i.e., without the need for any post-processing or correction steps. This algorithm recovers, at a fundamental level, the scatter-gather algorithms presented recently by Campos-Pinto et al. (2014) (to first-order) and by Squire et al. (2012), but it is derived here in a streamlined fashion from a geometric viewpoint. Some ingredients reflecting this viewpoint are (1) the use of (discrete) differential forms of various degrees to represent fields, currents, and charged particles and provide localization rules for the degrees of freedom thereof on the various grid elements (nodes, edges, facets), (2) use of Whitney forms as basic interpolants from discrete differential forms to continuum space, and (3) use of a Galerkin formula for the discrete Hodge star operators (i.e., "mass matrices" incorporating the metric datum of the grid) applicable to generally irregular, unstructured grids. The expressions obtained for the scatter charges and scatter currents are very concise and do not involve numerical quadrature rules. Appropriate fractional areas within each grid element are identified that represent scatter charges and scatter currents within the element, and a simple geometric representation for the (exact) charge conservation mechanism is obtained by such identification. The field update is based on the coupled first-order Maxwell's curl equations to avoid spurious modes with secular growth (otherwise present in formulations that discretize the second-order wave equation). Examples are provided to verify preservation of discrete Gauss' law for all times.

  16. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; et al

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a bandedmore » chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.« less

  17. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of electrostatic Bernstein waves in plasmas with kappa velocity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul, R. F.; Mace, R. L.

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatic Bernstein waves that propagate exactly perpendicularly to a static magnetic field in an electron-ion plasma are investigated using one-and-two-halves dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An ion-to-electron mass ratio of mi/me = 100 is used, allowing sufficient separation of the electron and ion time scales while still accounting for the ion dynamics without resorting to exceptionally long simulation run times. As a consequence of the mass ratio used, both the high frequency electron Bernstein wave and the lower frequency ion Bernstein wave are resolved within a single simulation run. The simulations presented here use isotropic three-dimensional kappa velocity distributions as well as the widely used Maxwellian velocity distribution, and the results from using each of these velocity distributions are analysed and compared. The behaviour of the Bernstein waves is found to be significantly dependent on the spectral index, κ, of the kappa distribution in all frequency domains of the Bernstein waves. In both the Maxwellian and kappa cases, spectral analysis of the electric field (wave) intensities, as a function of ω and k, show very good agreement between the simulation results and the linear dispersion relation for Bernstein waves. This agreement serves to validate the simulation techniques used, as well as the theory of Bernstein waves in plasmas with a kappa velocity distribution. The intensity of the field fluctuations in the simulations containing an abundance of superthermal particles, i.e., where the plasma has a kappa velocity distribution with a low kappa index, is slightly higher compared to the simulations of plasmas with higher kappa values. The plasmas with low kappa values also exhibit a broader region in frequency space of high intensity field fluctuations.

  18. Method of the Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Y-Point in the Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umizaki, Mitsuhiro; Shibata, Shinpei

    2010-02-01

    Recent observations in the X-ray and Gamma-ray suggest that the emission region of the pulsar magnetosphere can be multifold. In particular, the open-close boundary of the magnetic field, so-called the Y-point, can be a new candidate place where magnetic field energy converts into plasma heat and/or flow energy. Here, we present a new Particle-in-Cell code, which can be applied to the Y-point of the pulsar magnetosphere in axisymmetric geometry. The electromagnetic solver is used in two-dimensional grid points with cylindrical coordinates (R, z), while the particle solver operates in three-dimensional Cartesian coordinates (x, y, z), where the Buneman-Boris method is used. The particle motion is treated in special relativity. The inner boundary conditions are set up to generate rotation of the magnetosphere by use of the force-free semi-analytic solution given by Uzdensky (2003, ApJ, 598, 446). The code has been verified by dispersion relations of all wave modes in electron-positron plasmas. The initial test run is also presented to demonstrate the Y-shaped structure at the top of the dead zone on the light cylinder. We suggest that the structure is variable with quasi-periodicity with magnetic reconnection, and that plasma will be accelerated and/or heated. In a time-averaged point of view, the break up of the ideal-MHD (magneto-hydrodynamics) condition takes place in the vicinity of the Y-point.

  19. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of electrostatic Bernstein waves in plasmas with kappa velocity distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul, R. F. Mace, R. L.

    2015-10-15

    Electrostatic Bernstein waves that propagate exactly perpendicularly to a static magnetic field in an electron-ion plasma are investigated using one-and-two-halves dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An ion-to-electron mass ratio of m{sub i}/m{sub e} = 100 is used, allowing sufficient separation of the electron and ion time scales while still accounting for the ion dynamics without resorting to exceptionally long simulation run times. As a consequence of the mass ratio used, both the high frequency electron Bernstein wave and the lower frequency ion Bernstein wave are resolved within a single simulation run. The simulations presented here use isotropic three-dimensional kappa velocity distributions as well as the widely used Maxwellian velocity distribution, and the results from using each of these velocity distributions are analysed and compared. The behaviour of the Bernstein waves is found to be significantly dependent on the spectral index, κ, of the kappa distribution in all frequency domains of the Bernstein waves. In both the Maxwellian and kappa cases, spectral analysis of the electric field (wave) intensities, as a function of ω and k, show very good agreement between the simulation results and the linear dispersion relation for Bernstein waves. This agreement serves to validate the simulation techniques used, as well as the theory of Bernstein waves in plasmas with a kappa velocity distribution. The intensity of the field fluctuations in the simulations containing an abundance of superthermal particles, i.e., where the plasma has a kappa velocity distribution with a low kappa index, is slightly higher compared to the simulations of plasmas with higher kappa values. The plasmas with low kappa values also exhibit a broader region in frequency space of high intensity field fluctuations.

  20. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  1. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND WAVE EXCITATION IN QUASI-PARALLEL HIGH-MACH-NUMBER COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS: PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsunehiko N.

    2015-04-01

    We herein investigate shock formation and particle acceleration processes for both protons and electrons in a quasi-parallel high-Mach-number collisionless shock through a long-term, large-scale, particle-in-cell simulation. We show that both protons and electrons are accelerated in the shock and that these accelerated particles generate large-amplitude Alfvénic waves in the upstream region of the shock. After the upstream waves have grown sufficiently, the local structure of the collisionless shock becomes substantially similar to that of a quasi-perpendicular shock due to the large transverse magnetic field of the waves. A fraction of protons are accelerated in the shock with a power-law-like energy distribution. The rate of proton injection to the acceleration process is approximately constant, and in the injection process, the phase-trapping mechanism for the protons by the upstream waves can play an important role. The dominant acceleration process is a Fermi-like process through repeated shock crossings of the protons. This process is a “fast” process in the sense that the time required for most of the accelerated protons to complete one cycle of the acceleration process is much shorter than the diffusion time. A fraction of the electrons are also accelerated by the same mechanism, and have a power-law-like energy distribution. However, the injection does not enter a steady state during the simulation, which may be related to the intermittent activity of the upstream waves. Upstream of the shock, a fraction of the electrons are pre-accelerated before reaching the shock, which may contribute to steady electron injection at a later time.

  2. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  3. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  4. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Electromagnetic Wave Scattering From Numerically Generated Flute-type Density Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, D. S.; Caplinger, J.; Kim, T. C.; Sotnikov, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves can be influenced by the presence of plasma turbulence. It is known that Flute-type density irregularities can develop during the nonlinear stage of an interchange instability in Earth's ionosphere and can affect radio communication channels. These density structures play an important role in the refraction and scattering of EM waves in Earth's ionosphere and also in laser diagnostic scattering experiments. To generate Flute-type density irregularities, we will use previously obtained numerical solution of nonlinear fluid equations involving the electrostatic potential and density. The solutions to these fluid equations govern the development of an interchange instability and results in the spatial dependence of density irregularities which can be used to analyze scattering of high frequency EM waves. This solution contains both large scale vortex density structures coexisting with short scale density perturbations. Next we will initialize a PIC simulation with the density structure from the fluid simulation to calculate the scattering cross-section and compare the results with an analytic solution obtained using numerically calculated density spectra. Because the linear and non-linear stages are well separated in time, we will compare the effect of scattering from density irregularities which form in both the linear and non-linear stages.

  5. 2D materials: to graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2011-01-01

    This review is an attempt to illustrate the different alternatives in the field of 2D materials. Graphene seems to be just the tip of the iceberg and we show how the discovery of alternative 2D materials is starting to show the rest of this iceberg. The review comprises the current state-of-the-art of the vast literature in concepts and methods already known for isolation and characterization of graphene, and rationalizes the quite disperse literature in other 2D materials such as metal oxides, hydroxides and chalcogenides, and metal-organic frameworks.

  6. PicSafe Medi: a clinical photography app review.

    PubMed

    Lo, Michelle Chin I; Brinkworth, Simon; Knights, Christina; Mackie, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Medical photographs are used in many clinical settings; however, there are significant risks associated with using the camera feature on mobile devices, namely, breaches of security. PicSafe Medi is an app that allows healthcare professionals to take clinical photographs using smart devices whilst addressing the concerns of patient confidentiality. We review the app to assess its functionality in a UK clinical setting, taking into account UK guidelines such as those offered by the General Medical Council, UK legislation, the Institute of Medical Illustrators and the Department of Health. PMID:26828558

  7. Ion and Electron Dynamics in Nonlinear PIC Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jolliet, S.; Angelino, P.; Tran, T. M.; McMillan, B. F.; Sauter, O.; Villard, L.; Bottino, A.; Peeters, A. G.; Poli, E.; Hatzky, R.

    2006-11-30

    ITG and ETG turbulence is investigated with the nonlinear global PIC code ORB5. The large variety of numerical schemes and simulations domains used has sometimes lead to important discrepancies in the transport predictions. In order to discuss these disagreements, emphasis must be put on ways to check the numerical accuracy, such as energy conservation and numerical noise measurement. This paper therefore presents benchmarks, new algorithms and a noise diagnostic. After having demonstrated the numerical quality of our simulations, 2 topics are visited: the unclear role of the parallel nonlinearity and the transport level in ETG turbulence, for which predictions differing by one order of magnitude had been made elsewhere.

  8. PicSafe Medi: a clinical photography app review.

    PubMed

    Lo, Michelle Chin I; Brinkworth, Simon; Knights, Christina; Mackie, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Medical photographs are used in many clinical settings; however, there are significant risks associated with using the camera feature on mobile devices, namely, breaches of security. PicSafe Medi is an app that allows healthcare professionals to take clinical photographs using smart devices whilst addressing the concerns of patient confidentiality. We review the app to assess its functionality in a UK clinical setting, taking into account UK guidelines such as those offered by the General Medical Council, UK legislation, the Institute of Medical Illustrators and the Department of Health.

  9. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  10. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  11. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  12. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  13. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  14. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  15. A new species of Pseudopyrochroa Pic, 1906 (Coleoptera: Pyrochroidae: Pyrochroinae) from the Mae Chaem District, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Young, Daniel K

    2014-04-02

    A new species of the fire-colored beetle genus Pseudopyrochroa Pic, 1906, is described from the Mae Chaem District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. The new species, Pseudopyrochroa inthanonensis sp. nov., is superficially similar to Pseudopyrochroa basalis (Pic), Pseudopyrochroa cardoni (Fairmaire) and Pseudopyrochroa fainanensis (Pic) by virtue of body color, antennal form and prothoracic shape. It is the second species of the genus known from Thailand, the other being Pseudopyrochroa diversicornis (Blair).

  16. PIC simulations of the trapped electron filamentation instability in finite-width electron plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winjum, B. J.; Banks, J. W.; Berger, R. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Chapman, T.; Hittinger, J. A. F.; Rozmus, W.; Strozzi, D. J.; Brunner, S.

    2012-10-01

    We present results on the kinetic filamentation of finite-width nonlinear electron plasma waves (EPW). Using 2D simulations with the PIC code BEPS, we excite a traveling EPW with a Gaussian transverse profile and a wavenumber k0λDe= 1/3. The transverse wavenumber spectrum broadens during transverse EPW localization for small width (but sufficiently large amplitude) waves, while the spectrum narrows to a dominant k as the initial EPW width increases to the plane-wave limit. For large EPW widths, filaments can grow and destroy the wave coherence before transverse localization destroys the wave; the filaments in turn evolve individually as self-focusing EPWs. Additionally, a transverse electric field develops that affects trapped electrons, and a beam-like distribution of untrapped electrons develops between filaments and on the sides of a localizing EPW. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-061. Supported also under Grants DE-FG52-09NA29552 and NSF-Phy-0904039. Simulations were performed on UCLA's Hoffman2 and NERSC's Hopper.

  17. PIC modeling of material dependence on fast electron generation and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R.; Wei, M. S.; Chawla, S.; Sentoku, Y.; Stephens, R. B.; Beg, F. N.

    2011-10-01

    2D collisional PIC simulations, using PICLS code that includes dynamic ionization and radiation cooling, are performed to model a recent experiment on the Titan laser using multi-foil targets, where 2x reduction in total fast electron flux and a smaller spot size through high-Z layer were observed. Modeling show that a thin high-Z transport layer (e.g., Au) near lower Z source layer introduces a collimating effect on fast electron transport. Strong self-generated resistive B-fields are produced inside Au layer and at the interface (Al/Au), which confine the fast electron propagation and can also trap electrons in wing region to inhibit their propagation. In addition, effects of the surface material on LPI produced fast electron source characteristics are examined in both planar and buried cone geometries. Supported by US DOE under contracts DE-AC52 07NA27344(ACE) and DE-FC02-04ER54789 (FSC).

  18. Glitter in a 2D monolayer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-10-21

    We predict a highly stable and robust atomically thin gold monolayer with a hexagonal close packed lattice stabilized by metallic bonding with contributions from strong relativistic effects and aurophilic interactions. We have shown that the framework of the Au monolayer can survive 10 ps MD annealing simulations up to 1400 K. The framework is also able to survive large motions out of the plane. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk we observe significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.94 vs. 0.52 eV per bond). This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. It is a non-magnetic metal, and was found to be the global minima in the 2D space. Phonon dispersion calculations demonstrate high kinetic stability with no negative modes. This 2D gold monolayer corresponds to the top monolayer of the bulk Au(111) face-centered cubic lattice. The close-packed lattice maximizes the aurophilic interactions. We find that the electrons are completely delocalized in the plane and behave as 2D nearly free electron gas. We hope that the present work can inspire the experimental fabrication of novel free standing 2D metal systems.

  19. 2d index and surface operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadde, Abhijit; Gukov, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we compute the superconformal index of 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theories. The 2d superconformal index, a.k.a. flavored elliptic genus, is computed by a unitary matrix integral much like the matrix integral that computes the 4d superconformal index. We compute the 2d index explicitly for a number of examples. In the case of abelian gauge theories we see that the index is invariant under flop transition and under CY-LG correspondence. The index also provides a powerful check of the Seiberg-type duality for non-abelian gauge theories discovered by Hori and Tong. In the later half of the paper, we study half-BPS surface operators in = 2 super-conformal gauge theories. They are engineered by coupling the 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theory living on the support of the surface operator to the 4d = 2 theory, so that different realizations of the same surface operator with a given Levi type are related by a 2d analogue of the Seiberg duality. The index of this coupled system is computed by using the tools developed in the first half of the paper. The superconformal index in the presence of surface defect is expected to be invariant under generalized S-duality. We demonstrate that it is indeed the case. In doing so the Seiberg-type duality of the 2d theory plays an important role.

  20. Particle-In-Cell Modeling and Analysis of an Electric Antenna for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    2010-05-01

    The sophisticated calibration of a space-based electric antenna should be performed based on precise knowledge of electric antenna characteristics in space plasma environment. However, it is often difficult to know practical antenna characteristics considering the effects of plasma kinetics and spacecraft-plasma interactions by means of only theoretical approaches. Furthermore, some modern electric field instruments, such as the Cluster EFW instrument and MEFISTO for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft, are designed based on a ``hockey puck'' principle, which introduces much complexity in their overall configurations. Thus a strong demand arises regarding the establishment of a numerical method that can solve the complex configuration and plasma dynamics for evaluating the electric properties of such modern instruments. For the self-consistent antenna analysis, we have newly developed an electromagnetic (EM) particle simulation code named EMSES. The code is based on the particle-in-cell technique and also supports a treatment of inner boundaries describing spacecraft conductive surfaces. This enables us to naturally include the effects of the inhomogeneous plasma environment such as a plasma and photoelectron sheaths created around the antenna. The support of the full EM treatment is also important to apply our tool to antenna properties for not only electrostatic (ES) but also EM plasma waves. In the current study, we mainly focus on ES features and photoelectron distribution in the vicinity of the electric field instrument MEFISTO. Our simulation model includes (1) a photoelectron guard electrode, (2) a bias current provided from the spacecraft body to the sensing element, (3) a floating potential treatment for the spacecraft body, and (4) photoelectron emission from sunlit surfaces of the conductive bodies. Of these, the photoelectron guard electrode is a key technology for producing an optimal condition of plasma environment around MEFISTO. Specifically, we

  1. PARTICLE DYNAMICS IN THE RECONNECTING HELIOSPHERIC CURRENT SHEET: SOLAR WIND DATA VERSUS THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zharkova, Valentina V.; Khabarova, Olga V. E-mail: habarova@izmiran.ru

    2012-06-10

    In this paper, we apply an assumption of the reconnecting heliospheric current sheet (HCS) for explanation of some contradictory results in the experimental detection of the sector boundaries (SBs) from the interplanetary magnetic field and electron pitch-angle measurements. Trajectories, densities, velocity, and pitch-angle distributions of particles accelerated by a super-Dreicer electric field are investigated with 2.5D full kinetic particle-in-cell approach in the HCS assumed to undergo a slow magnetic reconnection process with magnetic field configurations deduced from the solar wind observations. This approach reveals that during motion in a current sheet both kinds of particles, electrons and protons, are to be separated, either fully or partially, with respect to its midplane that can lead to their ejection to the opposite semiplanes that was also observed during the HCS crossings. This separation is found to form Hall's currents and polarization electric field across the current sheet, which distribution over the current sheets allows us to reproduce the magnitudes and temporal profiles of proton and ion velocities measured across the SB (current sheet midplane). This separation process, in turn, divides both kinds of particles on 'transit' and 'bounced' ones depending on a side of the current sheet where they enter it and where they are supposed to be ejected. The transit and bounced protons reproduce rather closely the measured distributions of proton/ion densities about the current sheet midplane with a larger maximum occurring at the heliospheric SB to be formed by the bounced protons and the other two smaller maximums on both sides from the central one to be formed by 'transit' protons. The observed electron distributions of density and energy before and after sector boundary crossings are found to fit the simulated ones for electrons accelerated in a current sheet revealing a sharp increase of density from one side from the HCS boundary and a

  2. Evidence of magnetic field switch-off in Particle In Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    The long term evolution of large domain Particle In Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated following observations that show two possible outcomes for collisionless reconnection: towards a Petschek-like configuration (Gosling 2007) or towards multiple X points (Eriksson et al. 2014). In the simulations presented here and described in [Innocenti2015*], a mixed scenario develops. At earlier time, plasmoids are emitted, disrupting the formation of Petschek-like structures. Later, an almost stationary monster plasmoid forms, preventing the emission of other plasmoids. A situation reminding of Petschek's switch-off then ensues. Switch-off is obtained through a slow shock / rotational discontinuity (SS/RD) compound structure, with the rotation discontinuity downstreamthe slow shock. Two external slow shocks located in correspondence of the separatrices reduce the in plane tangential component of the magnetic field, but not to zero. Two transitions reminding of rotational discontinuities in the internal part of the exhausts then perform the final switch-off. Both the slow shocks and the rotational discontinuities are characterized as such through the analysis of their Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. A moderate guide field is used to suppress the development of the firehose instability in the exhaust that prevented switch off in [Liu2012]. Compound SS/RD structures, with the RD located downstream the SS, have been observed in both the solar wind and the magnetosphere in Wind and Geotail data respectively [Whang1998, Whang2004]. Ion trajectiories across the SS/RD structure are followed and the kinetic origin of the SS/RD structure is investigated. * Innocenti, Goldman, Newman, Markidis, Lapenta, Evidence of magnetic field switch-off in collisionless magnetic reconnection, accepted in Astrophysical Journal Letters, 2015 Acknowledgements: NERSC, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of

  3. Temperature and Light Control of Three phase Induction Motor Speed Drive by PIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsoum, Nader

    2010-06-01

    PIC is a family of Harvard architecture microcontrollers made by Microchip Technology, derived from the PIC1640 originally developed by General Instrument's Microelectronics Division. The name PIC initially referred to "Peripheral Interface Controller". PICs are popular with the developers and the hobbyists due to their low cost, wide availability, large user base, extensive collection of application notes, free development tools, and serial programming (and re-programming with flash memory) capability. In modern days, PIC microcontrollers are used in the industrial world to control many types of equipment, ranging from consumer to specialized devices. They have replaced older types of controllers, including microprocessors. Also, there is a growing need for off-line support of a computer's main processor. The demand is going to grow with more equipment uses more intelligence. In the engineering field for instance, PIC has brought a very positive impact in designing an automation control system and controlling industrial machineries. Accordingly, this paper shows the change in the motor speed by the use of PIC in accordance to the light and level of temperature. The project focuses on programming the PIC by embedded software that detects the temperature and light signals and send it to 3 phase induction motor of 240 volt. A theoretical analysis and the practical approach in achieving this work goal have proved that PIC plays an important role in the field of electronics control.

  4. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  5. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  6. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  7. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  8. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  9. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  10. Assessment of PIC and MMPI Scales in Adolescent Psychosis: A Caution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Allison; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigated sensitivity of Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) in assessing psychotic states in adolescents. Results from comparison of 29 psychotic and 58 nonpsychotic adolescent psychiatric inpatients suggest the need for a profile-analytic approach to PIC and MMPI interpretation in…

  11. Evaluation of Age, Sex, and Race Bias in the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Rex B.; Lachar, David

    1992-01-01

    Whether the external validity of the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) was moderated by age, sex, or race was studied using 1,333 children and adolescents referred for mental health services. Race and sex generally did not moderate the relation of PIC scales to symptom checklists. Some relationships were age modified. (SLD)

  12. Preparation of PLLA/bpV(pic) microspheres and their effect on nerve cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; Chen, Hai-yun; Li, Hao-shen; Cai, Yang-ting

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we prepared PLLA/bpV(pic) microspheres, a bpV(pic) controlled release system and examined their ability to protect nerve cells and promote axonal growth. PLLA microspheres were prepared by employing the o/w single emulsification-evaporation technique. Neural stem cells and dorsal root ganglia were divided into 3 groups in terms of the treatment they received: a routine medium group (cultured in DMEM), a PLLA microsphere group (DMEM containing PLLA microspheres alone) and a PLLA/bpV(pic) group [DMEM containing PLLA/bpV(pic) microspheres]. The effects of PLLA/bpV(pic) microspheres were evaluated by the live-dead test and measurement of axonal length. Our results showed that PLLA/bpV(pic) granulation rate was (88.2±5.6)%; particle size was (16.8±3.1)%, drug loading was (4.05±0.3)%; encapsulation efficiency was (48.5±1.8)%. The release time lasted for 30 days. In PLLA/bpV(pic) microsphere group, the cell survival rate was (95.2 ±4.77)%, and the length of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was 718±95 μm, which were all significantly greater than those in ordinary routine medium group and PLLA microsphere group. This preliminary test results showed the PLLA/bpV(pic) microspheres were successfully prepared and they could promote the survival and growth of neural cells in DRG.

  13. Planning, Management and Evaluation: Realizing PIC Potential. Private Industry Council Guide. Working Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This Planning, Management, and Evaluation (PME) guide was developed by the National Alliance of Business as part of its program of management assistance for Private Industry Councils (PICs). The guide is a tool which PICs can use to improve their capability to plan, manage, and evaluate the programs which they administer, and to establish locally…

  14. Micro-PIC. A Simple Form of the Profile of Interaction in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Joan

    The Profile of Interaction in the Classroom (PIC) is a feedback method of interaction analysis, based on the Flanders System, created for supervisors of pre-service and in-service teacher education. The Micro-PIC is an abbreviated simplified form for analysis of shorter periods of interaction, particularly in microteaching. The Micro-PIC…

  15. PIC. Profile of Interaction in the Classroom. A Quick Feedback of Interaction Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Ellen

    The Profile of Interaction in the Classroom (PIC) is a short-cut method of interaction analysis that can provide the quick feedback essential to effective supervision of instruction. And because the PIC contains a record of all the behaviors that occurred in the classroom, as well as the sequence, the data may be used to build a traditional…

  16. Screening Preschoolers with Special Problems: Use of the Personality Inventory for Children (PIC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, P. A.; Lachar, David

    The Personality Inventory for Children (PIC) is an objectively scored, multidimensional measure of child and adolescent behavior, affect, and cognitive ability and can be completed by parents. The overall goal of this project was to evaluate the psychometric characteristics of the PIC as a screening device for use with preschool populations. The…

  17. The serine protease Pic as a virulence factor of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Afonso G; Abe, Cecilia M; Nunes, Kamila O; Moraes, Claudia T P; Chavez-Dueñas, Lucia; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Barbosa, Angela S; Piazza, Roxane M F; Elias, Waldir P

    2016-01-01

    Autotransporter proteins (AT) are associated with bacterial virulence attributes. Originally identified in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), Shigella flexneri 2a and uropathogenic E. coli, the serine protease Pic is one of these AT. We have previously detected one atypical enteropathogenic E. coli strain (BA589) carrying the pic gene. In the present study, we characterized the biological activities of Pic produced by BA589 both in vitro and in vivo. Contrarily to other Pic-producers bacteria, pic in BA589 is located on a high molecular weight plasmid. PicBA589 was able to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes, cleave mucin and degrade complement system molecules. BA589 was able to colonize mice intestines, and an intense mucus production was observed. The BA589Δpic mutant lost the capacity to colonize as well as the above-mentioned in vitro activities. Thus, Pic represents an additional virulence factor in aEPEC strain BA589, associated with adherence, colonization and evasion from the innate immune system.

  18. Non-linear PIC simulation in a penning trap

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, G. L.; Lapenta, G. M.; Finn, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We study the non-linear dynamics of a Penning trap plasma, including the effect of the finite length and end curvature of the plasma column. A new cylindrical PIC code, called KANDINSKY, has been implemented by using a new interpolation scheme. The principal idea is to calculate the volume of each cell from a particle volume, in the same manner as it is done for the cell charge. With this new method, the density is conserved along streamlines and artificial sources of compressibility are avoided. The code has been validated with a reference Eulerian fluid code. We compare the dynamics of three different models: a model with compression effects, the standard Euler model and a geophysical fluid dynamics model. The results of our investigation prove that Penning traps can really be used to simulate geophysical fluids.

  19. Modeling of Ionization Physics with the PIC Code OSIRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Tsung, F.; Lee, S.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; O'Connell, C.; Dodd, E.; Decker, F.J.; Huang, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Hemker, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Joshi, C.; Ren, C.; Raimondi, P.; Wang, S.; Walz, D.; /Southern California U. /UCLA /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    When considering intense particle or laser beams propagating in dense plasma or gas, ionization plays an important role. Impact ionization and tunnel ionization may create new plasma electrons, altering the physics of wakefield accelerators, causing blue shifts in laser spectra, creating and modifying instabilities, etc. Here we describe the addition of an impact ionization package into the 3-D, object-oriented, fully parallel PIC code OSIRIS. We apply the simulation tool to simulate the parameters of the upcoming E164 Plasma Wakefield Accelerator experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). We find that impact ionization is dominated by the plasma electrons moving in the wake rather than the 30 GeV drive beam electrons. Impact ionization leads to a significant number of trapped electrons accelerated from rest in the wake.

  20. PICS: Simulations of Strong Gravitational Lensing in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Gladders, Michael D.; Rangel, Esteban M.; Florian, Michael K.; Bleem, Lindsey E.; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Fasel, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    Gravitational lensing has become one of the most powerful tools available for investigating the “dark side” of the universe. Cosmological strong gravitational lensing, in particular, probes the properties of the dense cores of dark matter halos over decades in mass and offers the opportunity to study the distant universe at flux levels and spatial resolutions otherwise unavailable. Studies of strongly lensed variable sources offer even further scientific opportunities. One of the challenges in realizing the potential of strong lensing is to understand the statistical context of both the individual systems that receive extensive follow-up study, as well as that of the larger samples of strong lenses that are now emerging from survey efforts. Motivated by these challenges, we have developed an image simulation pipeline, Pipeline for Images of Cosmological Strong lensing (PICS), to generate realistic strong gravitational lensing signals from group- and cluster-scale lenses. PICS uses a low-noise and unbiased density estimator based on (resampled) Delaunay Tessellations to calculate the density field; lensed images are produced by ray-tracing images of actual galaxies from deep Hubble Space Telescope observations. Other galaxies, similarly sampled, are added to fill in the light cone. The pipeline further adds cluster member galaxies and foreground stars into the lensed images. The entire image ensemble is then observed using a realistic point-spread function that includes appropriate detector artifacts for bright stars. Noise is further added, including such non-Gaussian elements as noise window-paning from mosaiced observations, residual bad pixels, and cosmic rays. The aim is to produce simulated images that appear identical—to the eye (expert or otherwise)—to real observations in various imaging surveys.

  1. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  2. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  3. High temperature decreases the PIC / POC ratio and increases phosphorus requirements in Coccolithus pelagicus (Haptophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerecht, A. C.; Šupraha, L.; Edvardsen, B.; Probert, I.; Henderiks, J.

    2014-01-01

    Rising ocean temperatures will likely increase stratification of the water column and reduce nutrient input into the photic zone. This will increase the likelihood of nutrient limitation in marine microalgae, leading to changes in the abundance and composition of phytoplankton communities, which in turn will affect global biogeochemical cycles. Calcifying algae, such as coccolithophores, influence the carbon cycle by fixing CO2 into particulate organic carbon (POC) through photosynthesis and into particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) through calcification. As calcification produces a net release of CO2, the ratio of PIC / POC determines whether coccolithophores act as a source (PIC / POC > 1) or a sink (PIC / POC < 1) of atmospheric CO2. We studied the effect of phosphorus (P-) limitation and temperature stress on the physiology and PIC / POC ratios of two subspecies of Coccolithus pelagicus. This large and heavily calcified species (PIC / POC generally > 1.5) is a major contributor to calcite export from the photic zone into deep-sea reservoirs. Phosphorus limitation did not influence exponential growth rates in either subspecies, but P-limited cells had significantly lower cellular P-content. A 5 °C temperature increase did not affect exponential growth rates either, but nearly doubled cellular P-content under both high and low phosphate availability. The PIC / POC ratios did not differ between P-limited and nutrient-replete cultures, but at elevated temperature (from 10 to 15 °C) PIC / POC ratios decreased by 40-60%. Our results suggest that elevated temperature may intensify P-limitation due to a higher P-requirement to maintain growth and POC production rates, possibly reducing abundances in a warmer ocean. Under such a scenario C. pelagicus may decrease its calcification rate relative to photosynthesis, resulting in PIC / POC ratios < 1 and favouring CO2-sequestration over release. Phosphorus limitation by itself is unlikely to cause changes in the PIC / POC

  4. One dimensional PIC simulation of relativistic Buneman instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajawat, Roopendra Singh; Sengupta, Sudip

    2016-10-01

    Spatio-temporal evolution of the relativistic Buneman instability has been investigated in one dimension using an in-house developed particle-in-cell simulation code. Starting from the excitation of the instability, its evolution has been followed numerically till its quenching and beyond. The simulation results have been quantitatively compared with the fluid theory and are found to be in conformity with the well known fact that the maximum growth rate (γmax) reduces due to relativistic effects and varies with γ e 0 and m/M as γ m a x ˜ /√{ 3 } 2 √{ γ e 0 } ( /m 2 M ) 1 / 3 , where γ e 0 is the Lorentz factor associated with the initial electron drift velocity (v0) and (m/M) is the electron to ion mass ratio. Further it is observed that in contrast to the non-relativistic results [A. Hirose, Plasma Phys. 20, 481 (1978)] at the saturation point, the ratio of electrostatic field energy density ( ∑ k | E k | 2 / 8 π ) to initial drift kinetic energy density (W0) scales with γ e 0 as ˜ 1 / γe 0 2 . This novel result on the scaling of energy densities has been found to be in quantitative agreement with the scalings derived using fluid theory.

  5. Improved intra-species collision models for PIC simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Lemons, D.S.; Winske, D.

    1998-07-01

    In recent years, the authors have investigated methods to improve the effectiveness of modeling collisional processes in particle-in-cell codes. Through the use of generalized collision models, plasma dynamics can be followed both in the regime of nearly collisionless plasmas as well as in the hydrodynamic limit of collisional plasmas. They have developed a collision-field method to treat both the case of collisions between unlike plasma species (inter-species collisions), through the use of a deterministic, grid-based force, and between particles of the same species (intra-species collisions), through the use of a Langevin equation. While the approach used for inter-species collisions is noise-free in that the collision experienced by a particle does not require any random numbers, such random numbers are used for intra-species collisions. This gives rise to a stochastic cooling effect inherent in the Langevin approach. In this paper, the authors concentrate on intra-species collisions and describe how the accuracy of the model can be improved by appropriate corrections to velocity and spatial moments.

  6. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  7. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  8. Porting the 3D Gyrokinetic Particle-in-cell Code GTC to the CRAY/NEC SX-6 Vector Architecture: Perspectives and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ethier; Z. Lin

    2003-09-15

    Several years of optimization on the super-scalar architecture has made it more difficult to port the current version of the 3D particle-in-cell code GTC to the CRAY/NEC SX-6 vector architecture. This paper explains the initial work that has been done to port this code to the SX-6 computer and to optimize the most time consuming parts. Early performance results are shown and compared to the same test done on the IBM SP Power 3 and Power 4 machines.

  9. Three-dimensional gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation of plasmas on a massively parallel computer: Final report on LDRD Core Competency Project, FY 1991--FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, J.A.; Williams, T.J.; Cohen, B.I.; Dimits, A.M.

    1994-04-27

    One of the programs of the Magnetic fusion Energy (MFE) Theory and computations Program is studying the anomalous transport of thermal energy across the field lines in the core of a tokamak. We use the method of gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation in this study. For this LDRD project we employed massively parallel processing, new algorithms, and new algorithms, and new formal techniques to improve this research. Specifically, we sought to take steps toward: researching experimentally-relevant parameters in our simulations, learning parallel computing to have as a resource for our group, and achieving a 100 {times} speedup over our starting-point Cray2 simulation code`s performance.

  10. Generation of Helical and Axial Magnetic Fields by the Relativistic Laser Pulses in Under-dense Plasma: Three-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chun-Yang; Zhu, Shao-Ping; He, Xian-Tu

    2002-07-01

    The quasi-static magnetic fields created in the interaction of relativistic laser pulses with under-dense plasmas have been investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The relativistic ponderomotive force can drive an intense electron current in the laser propagation direction, which is responsible for the generation of a helical magnetic field. The axial magnetic field results from a difference beat of wave-wave, which drives a solenoidal current. In particular, the physical significance of the kinetic model for the generation of the axial magnetic field is discussed.

  11. 46 CFR 13.305 - Proof of service for “Tankerman-PIC (Barge)” endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Proof of service for âTankerman-PIC (Barge)â endorsement... AND SEAMEN CERTIFICATION OF TANKERMEN Requirements for âTankerman-PIC (Barge)â Endorsement § 13.305 Proof of service for “Tankerman-PIC (Barge)” endorsement. Service must be proved by a letter on...

  12. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  13. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  14. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  15. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  16. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  17. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  18. 2D photonic-crystal optomechanical nanoresonator.

    PubMed

    Makles, K; Antoni, T; Kuhn, A G; Deléglise, S; Briant, T; Cohadon, P-F; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Pinard, L; Michel, C; Dolique, V; Flaminio, R; Cagnoli, G; Robert-Philip, I; Heidmann, A

    2015-01-15

    We present the optical optimization of an optomechanical device based on a suspended InP membrane patterned with a 2D near-wavelength grating (NWG) based on a 2D photonic-crystal geometry. We first identify by numerical simulation a set of geometrical parameters providing a reflectivity higher than 99.8% over a 50-nm span. We then study the limitations induced by the finite value of the optical waist and lateral size of the NWG pattern using different numerical approaches. The NWG grating, pierced in a suspended InP 265-nm thick membrane, is used to form a compact microcavity involving the suspended nanomembrane as an end mirror. The resulting cavity has a waist size smaller than 10 μm and a finesse in the 200 range. It is used to probe the Brownian motion of the mechanical modes of the nanomembrane. PMID:25679837

  19. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  20. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  1. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  2. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  3. 2D Spinodal Decomposition in Forced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, Patrick; Chacon, Luis; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a second order phase transition for binary fluid mixture, from one thermodynamic phase to form two coexisting phases. The governing equation for this coarsening process below critical temperature, Cahn-Hilliard Equation, is very similar to 2D MHD Equation, especially the conserved quantities have a close correspondence between each other, so theories for MHD turbulence are used to study spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence. Domain size is increased with time along with the inverse cascade, and the length scale can be arrested by a forced turbulence with direct cascade. The two competing mechanisms lead to a stabilized domain size length scale, which can be characterized by Hinze Scale. The 2D spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence is studied by both theory and simulation with ``pixie2d.'' This work focuses on the relation between Hinze scale and spectra and cascades. Similarities and differences between spinodal decomposition and MHD are investigated. Also some transport properties are studied following MHD theories. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  4. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  6. Nuclear import of the pre-integration complex (PIC): the Achilles heel of HIV?

    PubMed

    Piller, S C; Caly, L; Jans, D A

    2003-07-01

    Current treatments against the Aquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are reasonably effective in reducing the amount of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) present in infected patients, but their side-effects, and the emergence of drug-resistant HIV strains have intensified the renewed search for novel anti-HIV therapies. An essential step in HIV infection is the integration of the viral genome into the host cell chromosomes within the nucleus. Unlike other retroviruses, HIV can transport its genetic material, in the form of the large nucleoprotein pre-integration complex (PIC), into the nucleus through the intact nuclear envelope (NE). This enables HIV to infect non-dividing cells such as macrophages and microglial cells. Detailed knowledge of the signal-dependent pathways by which cellular proteins and RNAs cross the NE has accumulated in the past decade, but although several different components of the PIC have been implicated in its nuclear import, the mechanism of nuclear entry remains unclear. Since specifically inhibiting PIC nuclear import would undoubtedly block HIV infection in non-dividing cells, this critical step of HIV replication is of great interest as a drug target. This review examines the complex and controversial literature regarding three PIC components--the HIV proteins matrix, integrase and Vpr--proposed to facilitate PIC nuclear import, and existing models of HIV PIC nuclear import. It also suggests approaches to move towards a better understanding of PIC nuclear import, through examining the role of individual PIC components in the context of the intact PIC by direct visualisation, in order to develop new anti-HIV therapeutics.

  7. A Fokker-Planck-Landau collision equation solver on two-dimensional velocity grid and its application to particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, E. S.; Chang, C. S.

    2014-03-15

    An approximate two-dimensional solver of the nonlinear Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operator has been developed using the assumption that the particle probability distribution function is independent of gyroangle in the limit of strong magnetic field. The isotropic one-dimensional scheme developed for nonlinear Fokker-Planck-Landau equation by Buet and Cordier [J. Comput. Phys. 179, 43 (2002)] and for linear Fokker-Planck-Landau equation by Chang and Cooper [J. Comput. Phys. 6, 1 (1970)] have been modified and extended to two-dimensional nonlinear equation. In addition, a method is suggested to apply the new velocity-grid based collision solver to Lagrangian particle-in-cell simulation by adjusting the weights of marker particles and is applied to a five dimensional particle-in-cell code to calculate the neoclassical ion thermal conductivity in a tokamak plasma. Error verifications show practical aspects of the present scheme for both grid-based and particle-based kinetic codes.

  8. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Ryne, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV. For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  9. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.S.; Ryne, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV.For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  10. Taxonomy of Fissocantharis Pic (Coleoptera, Cantharidae) from Guangxi, China, with descriptions of six new species.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuxia; Li, Limei; Guan, Kaile; Yang, Xingke

    2015-01-01

    A total of 17 species of Fissocantharis Pic is recorded from Guangxi, China. Six species are described new to science, Fissocantharissinensomima sp. n., Fissocantharissexcostata sp. n., Fissocantharisbasilaris sp. n., Fissocanthariseschara sp. n., Fissocantharislatipalpa sp. n. and Fissocantharisbiprojicientis sp. n., and two previously known species are redescribed, Fissocantharisgracilipes (Pic, 1927) and Fissocantharissinensis (Wittmer, 1988). These species are presented with habitus of males, abdominal sternites VIII of females and genitalia of both sexes. Fissocantharisflavofacialis (Pic, 1926) is synonymized with Fissocantharisangusta (Fairmaire, 1900); both were originally described in the genus Podabrus Westwood. Additionally, a key and a checklist of all the species of Fissocantharis from Guangxi are provided.

  11. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  12. Emulsification through surfactant hydration: the PIC process revisited.

    PubMed

    Roger, Kevin; Cabane, Bernard; Olsson, Ulf

    2011-01-18

    We have performed sudden composition changes on a (surfactant + oil + water) system by adding water to a (surfactant + oil) solution. This composition change quenches the system into a metastable oil-in-water emulsion with a population in the 100 nm range. The conditions for a successful quench are as follows: the initial water content should be below a boundary called the "clearing boundary" (CB), the final water content should be sufficiently beyond CB, and the quench should be fast. We have used high purity components to avoid the complex phase separation patterns that occur with low purity ingredients: the surfactant is octaethylenehexadecyl ether (C(16)E(8)) and the oil is hexadecane (C(16)). Under these conditions, we show that the pathway for this type of quench proceeds through the swelling of the reverse micellar phase by the added water and the formation of a sponge phase. Then, further water addition causes the nucleation of oil droplets in this sponge phase, with a size that matches the spontaneous curvature of the sponge phase. Part of the surfactant remains adsorbed on these droplets, and the rest is expelled as micelles that coexist with the droplets. It is concluded that a PIC emulsification will always lead to a bimodal size distribution with surfactant "wasted" in small micelles. This is in contrast with the more efficient PIT emulsification.

  13. Some features of auroral electric fields as seen in 2D numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemann, H.; Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Results of 2D plasma simulations are presented and related to auroral observations. The formation of V-shaped potentials is studied with a 2 1/2 dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell code for a magnetized plasma. It is shown that amplitudes for perpendicular electric fields are larger than for parallel electric fields, and for Te less than 100 eV, the amplitudes are comparable to the electric fields associated with the electrostatic shocks observed from the S3-3 satellite. The excitation of electrostatic ion-cyclotron EIC waves which occurs in the region below the parallel potential drop is discussed. In auroral plasmas EIC waves are observed above the V-shaped double layers in association with ion beams and field-aligned currents. The results also show that oppositely directed electric fields in the center and at the edges of the simulation region produce oppositely directed currents. Precipitating auroral ions in association with electron inverted-V events are seen by the DMSP-F6 satellite.

  14. Genetic and molecular analyses of picA, a plant-inducible locus on the Agrobacterium tumefaciens chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Rong, L J; Karcher, S J; Gelvin, S B

    1991-01-01

    picA is an Agrobacterium tumefaciens chromosomal locus, identified by Mu d11681 mutagenesis, that is inducible by certain acidic polysaccharides found in carrot root extract. Cloning and genetic analysis of a picA::lacZ fusion defined a region of the picA promoter that is responsible for the induction of this locus. Furthermore, we identified a possible negative regulator of picA expression upstream of the picA locus. This sequence, denoted pgl, has extensive homology to polygalacturonase genes from several organisms and inhibited the induction of the picA promoter when present in multiple copies in A. tumefaciens. DNA sequence analysis indicated at least two long open reading frames (ORFs) in the picA region. S1 nuclease mapping was used to identify the transcription initiation site of picA. Mutation of ORF1, but not ORF2, of the picA locus was responsible for an increased aggregation of A. tumefaciens, forming "ropes" in the presence of pea root cap cells. In addition, a potato tuber disk virulence assay indicated that a preinduced picA mutant was more virulent than was the wild-type control, a further indication that the picA locus regulates the surface properties of the bacterium in the presence of plant cells or plant cell extracts. Images PMID:1860822

  15. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  16. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  17. A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) from Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Seunghwan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic, 1922 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae, Callidiopini) from Korea is described. Habitus and genitalia of male and female of the new species are illustrated. PMID:27563272

  18. A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Seunghwan

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic, 1922 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae, Callidiopini) from Korea is described. Habitus and genitalia of male and female of the new species are illustrated.

  19. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  20. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.