Science.gov

Sample records for 2-d photonic crystals

  1. 2D photonic crystal and its angular reflective azimuthal spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senderakova, Dagmar; Drzik, Milan; Tomekova, Juliana

    2016-12-01

    Contemporary, attention is paid to photonic crystals, which can strongly modify light propagation through them and enable a controllable light manipulation. The contribution is focused on a sub-wavelength 2D structure formed by Al2O3 layer on silicon substrate, patterned with periodic hexagonal lattice of deep air holes. Using various laser sources of light at single wavelength, azimuthal angle dependence of the mirror-like reflected light intensity was recorded photo-electrically. The results obtained can be used to sample the band-structure of leaky modes of the photonic crystal more reliably and help us to map the photonic dispersion diagram.

  2. Asymmetric 2D spatial beam filtering by photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, D.; Purlys, V.; Maigyte, L.; Gaizauskas, E.; Peckus, M.; Gadonas, R.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-04-01

    Spatial filtering techniques are important for improving the spatial quality of light beams. Photonic crystals (PhCs) with a selective spatial (angular) transmittance can also provide spatial filtering with the added benefit transversal symmetries, submillimeter dimensions and monolithic integration in other devices, such as micro-lasers or semiconductor lasers. Workable bandgap PhC configurations require a modulated refractive index with period lengths that are approximately less than the wavelength of radiation. This imposes technical limitations, whereby the available direct laser write (DLW) fabrication techniques are limited in resolution and refractive index depth. If, however, a deflection mechanism is chosen instead, a functional filter PhC can be produced that is operational in the visible wavelength regime. For deflection based PhCs glass is an attractive choice as it is highly stable medium. 2D and 3D PhC filter variations have already been produced on soda-lime glass. However, little is known about how to control the scattering of PhCs when approaching the smallest period values. Here we look into the internal structure of the initially symmetric geometry 2D PhCs and associating it with the resulting transmittance spectra. By varying the DLW fabrication beam parameters and scanning algorithms, we show that such PhCs contain layers that are comprised of semi-tilted structure voxels. We show the appearance of asymmetry can be compensated in order to circumvent some negative effects at the cost of potentially maximum scattering efficiency.

  3. Microscopic theory of Smith-Purcell radiation from 2D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, D. Yu.; Tishchenko, A. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2017-07-01

    The theory of Smith-Purcell effect for a 2D photonic crystal is constructed from the first principles proceeding from Maxwell's equations and microscopic characteristics of particles the crystal consists of. Two-dimensionality 2D is thought in two ways: i) the photonic crystal is an arranged system of particles disposed in a monolayer, ii) the periodicity is in two different directions. We derive the expression for the spectral and angular distribution of arising Smith-Purcell radiation. We analyse the features distinctive for the 2D photonic crystal and show that its spatial distribution differs drastically from the distribution of the radiation from conventional diffraction gratings.

  4. 2D Plasma Photonic Crystals in resonantly pumped Cesium Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetti, Fabio; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Plasma photonic crystals (PCs) afford the opportunity for dynamic reconfigurability. In this presentation we describe the conditions required for constructing an all-plasma PC that can interact with sub mm-wavelength radiation. Conditions required for this interaction are high plasma densities (>1014 cm-3) and small lattice constant (<1 mm). We describe the construction of a two-dimensional photonic crystal composed of several sub-millimeter plasma filaments in a 1 Torr heated cesium vapor cell. The cesium is ionized by 1 W continuous-wave laser excitation with the wavelength centered around the 852 nm resonance line. The filaments are produced by focusing the laser through a microlens array with a 500 µm pitch. Small departures from line center are found to produce a strong variation in the plasma filament structure and density. Stark broadening measurements of the cesium 9F-5D transition at 647.4 nm yield plasma density. We present preliminary terahertz transmission spectrum of the two-dimensional plasma photonic crystal structure. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations which predict the presence of bandgaps in regions of both negative and positive plasma dielectric constant.

  5. Microwave plasma formation within a 2D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Stephen; Gregório, José; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    Experiments demonstrate that an electromagnetic wave incident on a photonic crystal (PhC) containing a single point-defect causes gas breakdown. After breakdown we report the formation of a stable microwave plasma within this free-space vacancy. We show that gas breakdown is possible in low-pressure argon (10 Torr) using as little as 1.4 W of microwave power if the frequency of the incident wave is equal to the resonance of the vacancy (8.614 GHz). During formation, the plasma-filled defect decreases the transmission of energy through the photonic crystal by approximately two orders of magnitude. Plasma formation time is measured to be as fast as 100 ns at relatively high power (9 W). Using the transmission of energy through the PhC as a diagnostic tool, we report that the electron density of the microwave plasma is 1016-1017 m-3 for argon pressures between 10 and 50 Torr. Finally, we consider the application of the self-initiated plasma within the PhC as a simple power limiter.

  6. Cavity optomechanics with 2D photonic crystal membrane reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingaraju, Navin B.; Shuai, Yichen; Lawall, John

    2016-03-01

    Membranes made from silicon nitride have significantly higher mechanical Q-factors under tensile stress than those made of other dielectric materials. This makes them ideal candidates for membrane reflectors that provide high finesse in Fabry-Perot cavities or membrane-in-the-middle optomechanical systems. Building on our previous work with one-dimensional gratings on suspended membranes, we patterned two-dimensional photonic crystal gratings on monolithic, suspended membranes made from silicon nitride. These high-Q membranes exhibited high reflectivity, upwards of 99%, over several nanometers in the telecom band. To probe their optical response in a cavity environment, we used these membrane reflectors as the moving mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity. We were able to realize cavities with a finesse of over 4,500.

  7. Design and analysis of dual ring resonator based 2D-photonic crystal WDDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, K.; Robinson, S.; Kumar, D. Sriram

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, four channel 2D Photonic Crystal (PC) based Wavelength Division Demultiplexer (WDDM) using 2D-Photonic Crystal is proposed and designed. The important functional parameters of the proposed demultiplexer such as transmission efficiency, Q factor and resonant wavelength are analyzed. The Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) method and Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method are employed to calculate the photonic band gap and normalized output spectrum of the proposed demultiplexer. The average transmission efficiency and Q factor of this proposed device is about 93% and 781, respectively. The overall size of the demultiplexer is around 681 µm2 which will be suitable for integrated optics for future all optical networks.

  8. THz quantum cascade lasers operating on the radiative modes of a 2D photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Halioua, Y; Xu, G; Moumdji, S; Li, L H; Davies, A G; Linfield, E H; Colombelli, R

    2014-07-01

    Photonic-crystal lasers operating on Γ-point band-edge states of a photonic structure naturally exploit the so-called "nonradiative" modes. As the surface output coupling efficiency of these modes is low, they have relatively high Q factors, which favor lasing. We propose a new 2D photonic-crystal design that is capable of reversing this mode competition and achieving lasing on the radiative modes instead. Previously, this has only been shown in 1D structures, where the central idea is to introduce anisotropy into the system, both at unit-cell and resonator scales. By applying this concept to 2D photonic-crystal patterned terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers, surface-emitting devices with diffraction-limited beams are demonstrated, with 17 mW peak output power.

  9. Multi-resonant optical parametric oscillator based on 2D-PPLT nonlinear photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Lazoul, Mohamed; Boudrioua, Azzedine; Simohamed, Lotfy-Mokhtar; Peng, Lung-Han

    2015-04-15

    The aim of this work is to achieve an optical parametric oscillator based on two-dimensional periodically poled lithium tantalate (2D-PPLT) crystals that are designed to allow multiple reciprocal lattice-vector contribution to the quasi-phase matching scheme. We are particularly interested in the effect of the multi-wavelength parametric generation performed by the 2D nonlinear photonic crystal to achieve a multi-resonant optical parametric oscillator. The performances are studied in terms of generation efficiency and multi-wavelength generation.

  10. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maskaly, Karlene Rosera

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with

  11. 1×3 power splitter based on 2D slab photonic crystal multiple line defect waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Rajat; Sabarinathan, Jayshri

    2011-08-01

    2-D slab photonic crystal multiple line defect waveguides have been designed for optical power splitting application which has numerous applications in photonic integrated circuit. The operation of the device is based on multimode interference effects and self-imaging phenomenon. The proposed structure consists of multiple photonic crystal line defect waveguides which are formed in the Γ-K direction by removing several entire rows of air-holes. The adjacent photonic crystal waveguides are separated by a row of air-holes. In this scheme a 1×3 power splitter is designed which involves three photonic crystal line defect waveguides multimode region, five photonic crystal line defect waveguides multimode region and one separation region. The entire structure is verified by 3-D finite difference time domain method. The transmitted power achieved at each output channel i.e. CH1, CH2 and CH3 are about 26.3%, 26.8% and 26.3% respectively. The total transmitted output power of 1×3 power splitter is 79.4% at target wavelength of 1.55μm.

  12. Absolute photonic band gap in 2D honeycomb annular photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Gao, Yihua; Tong, Aihong; Hu, Sen

    2015-01-01

    Using the plane wave expansion method, we investigate the effects of structural parameters on absolute photonic band gap (PBG) in two-dimensional honeycomb annular photonic crystals (PCs). The results reveal that the annular PCs possess absolute PBGs that are larger than those of the conventional air-hole PCs only when the refractive index of the material from which the PC is made is equal to 4.5 or larger. If the refractive index is smaller than 4.5, utilization of anisotropic inner rods in honeycomb annular PCs can lead to the formation of larger PBGs. The optimal structural parameters that yield the largest absolute PBGs are obtained.

  13. Responsive ionic liquid-polymer 2D photonic crystal gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Natasha L; Hong, Zhenmin; Asher, Sanford A

    2014-12-21

    We developed novel air-stable 2D polymerized photonic crystal (2DPC) sensing materials for visual detection of gas phase analytes such as water and ammonia by utilizing a new ionic liquid, ethylguanidine perchlorate (EGP) as the mobile phase. Because of the negligible ionic liquid vapor pressure these 2DPC sensors are indefinitely air stable and, therefore, can be used to sense atmospheric analytes. 2D arrays of ~640 nm polystyrene nanospheres were attached to the surface of crosslinked poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA)-based polymer networks dispersed in EGP. The wavelength of the bright 2D photonic crystal diffraction depends sensitively on the 2D array particle spacing. The volume phase transition response of the EGP-pHEMA system to water vapor or gaseous ammonia changes the 2DPC particle spacing, enabling the visual determination of the analyte concentration. Water absorbed by EGP increases the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, which shrinks the polymer network and causes a blue shift in the diffracted light. Ammonia absorbed by the EGP deprotonates the pHEMA-co-acrylic acid carboxyl groups, swelling the polymer which red shifts the diffracted light.

  14. Tight-Binding Approximations in 1D and 2D Coupled-Cavity Photonic Crystal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Nicole C. L.

    Light confinement and controlling an optical field has numerous applications in the field of telecommunications for optical signals processing. When the wavelength of the electromagnetic field is on the order of the period of a photonic microstructure, the field undergoes reflection, refraction, and coherent scattering. This produces photonic bandgaps, forbidden frequency regions or spectral stop bands where light cannot exist. Dielectric perturbations that break the perfect periodicity of these structures produce what is analogous to an impurity state in the bandgap of a semiconductor. The defect modes that exist at discrete frequencies within the photonic bandgap are spatially localized about the cavity-defects in the photonic crystal. In this thesis the properties of two tight-binding approximations (TBAs) are investigated in one-dimensional and two-dimensional coupled-cavity photonic crystal structures. We require an efficient and simple approach that ensures the continuity of the electromagnetic field across dielectric interfaces in complex structures. In this thesis we develop E- and D-TBAs to calculate the modes in finite 1D and 2D two-defect coupled-cavity photonic crystal structures. In the E- and D-TBAs we expand the coupled-cavity [vector electron]-modes in terms of the individual [vector electron]- and [vector D meson]-modes, respectively. We investigate the dependence of the defect modes, their frequencies and quality factors on the relative placement of the defects in the photonic crystal structures. We then elucidate the differences between the two TBA formulations, and describe the conditions under which these formulations may be more robust when encountering a dielectric perturbation. Our 1D analysis showed that the 1D modes were sensitive to the structure geometry. The antisymmetric D mode amplitudes show that the D. TBA did not capture the correct (tangential [vector electron]-field) boundary conditions. However, the D-TBA did not yield

  15. All optical active high decoder using integrated 2D square lattice photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniem, Tamer A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper introduces a novel all optical active high 2 × 4 decoder based on 2D photonic crystals (PhC) of silicon rods with permittivity of ε = 10.1 × 10-11 farad/m. The main structure of optical decoder is designed using a combination of five nonlinear photonic crystal ring resonator, set of T-type waveguide, and line defect of Y and T branch splitters. The proposed structure has two logic input ports, four output ports, and one bias input port. The total size of the proposed 2 × 4 decoder is equal to 40 μm × 38 μm. The PhC structure has a square lattice of silicon rod with refractive index of 3.39 in air. The overall design and the results are discussed through the realization and the numerically simulation to confirm its operation and feasibility.

  16. Enhanced detection limit by dark mode perturbation in 2D photonic crystal slab refractive index sensors.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Costa; Lau, Wah Tung; Gad, Raanan; Akhavan, Hooman; Schilling, Ryan; Levi, Ofer

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate for the first time a 300nm thick, 300μm × 300μm 2D dielectric photonic crystal slab membrane with a quality factor of 10,600 by coupling light to slightly perturbed dark modes through alternating nano-hole sizes. The newly created fundamental guided resonances greatly reduce nano-fabrication accuracy requirements. Moreover, we created a new layer architecture resulting in electric field enhancement at the interface between the slab and sensing regions, and spectral sensitivity of >800 nm/RIU, that is, >0.8 of the single-mode theoretical upper limit of spectral sensitivity.

  17. 2D photonic crystal complete band gap search using a cyclic cellular automaton refination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, R.; Castañón, G.; Hernández-Figueroa, H. E.

    2014-11-01

    We present a refination method based on a cyclic cellular automaton (CCA) that simulates a crystallization-like process, aided with a heuristic evolutionary method called differential evolution (DE) used to perform an ordered search of full photonic band gaps (FPBGs) in a 2D photonic crystal (PC). The solution is proposed as a combinatorial optimization of the elements in a binary array. These elements represent the existence or absence of a dielectric material surrounded by air, thus representing a general geometry whose search space is defined by the number of elements in such array. A block-iterative frequency-domain method was used to compute the FPBGs on a PC, when present. DE has proved to be useful in combinatorial problems and we also present an implementation feature that takes advantage of the periodic nature of PCs to enhance the convergence of this algorithm. Finally, we used this methodology to find a PC structure with a 19% bandgap-to-midgap ratio without requiring previous information of suboptimal configurations and we made a statistical study of how it is affected by disorder in the borders of the structure compared with a previous work that uses a genetic algorithm.

  18. 2D photonic crystals on the Archimedean lattices (tribute to Johannes Kepler (1571 1630))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajić, R.; class="cross-out">D. Jovanović,

    2008-03-01

    Results of our research on 2D Archemedean lattice photonic crystals are presented. This involves the calculations of the band structures, band-gap maps, equifrequency contours and FDTD simulations of electromagnetic propagation through the structures as well as an experimental verification of negative refraction at microwaves. The band-gap dependence on dielectric contrast is established both for dielectric rods in air and air-holes in dielectric materials. A special emphasis is placed on possibilities of negative refraction and left-handedness in these structures. Together with the familiar Archimedean lattices like square, triangular, honeycomb and Kagome' ones, we consider also, the less known, (3 2, 4, 3, 4) (ladybug) and (3, 4, 6, 4) (honeycomb-ring) structures.

  19. Vertically magnetic-controlled THz modulator based on 2-D magnetized plasma photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Chen, He-ming; Ji, Ke; Zhuang, Yuyang

    2017-02-01

    A novel magnetized plasma modulator for THz range is proposed. The structure is based on 2-D photonic crystal (PC) constructed by triangular lattice of Si rods in air with line defects and an InSb rod as a point defect. Based on the magneto-optic effect, the resonant frequency can be tuned by the external magnetic field and the radius of point defect. The transfer and disappearance of the PC-based mode can be realized by utilizing a waveguide and a plasma cavity. The simulation results show that PC-based mode disappearance modulator has the potential for THz wireless broadband communication system with a good performance of high contrast ratio (<33.61 dB), low insertion loss (<0.36 dB) and high modulation rate (∼4 GHz).

  20. Nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction of femtosecond laser pulses in a 2D nonlinear photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Vyunishev, A M; Arkhipkin, V G; Slabko, V V; Baturin, I S; Akhmatkhanov, A R; Shur, V Ya; Chirkin, A S

    2015-09-01

    We study second-harmonic generation (SHG) of femtosecond laser pulses in a rectangular two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal (NLPC). Multiple SH beams were observed in the vicinity of the propagation direction of the fundamental beam. It has been verified that the angular positions of these beams obey the conditions of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction (NRND). The measured SH spectra of specific NRND orders consist of narrow peaks that experience a high-frequency spectral shift as the order grows. We derive an analytical expression for the process studied and find the theoretical results to be in good agreement with the experimental data. We estimate the enhancement factor of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction in 2D NLPC to be 70.

  1. Enhanced Absorption in 2D Materials Via Fano- Resonant Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenyi; Klotz, Andrey; Yang, Yuanmu; Li, Wei; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Bolotin, Kirill; Valentine, Jason

    2015-05-01

    The use of two-dimensional (2D) materials in optoelectronics has attracted much attention due to their fascinating optical and electrical properties. For instance, graphenebased devices have been employed for applications such as ultrafast and broadband photodetectors and modulators while transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) based photodetectors can be used for ultrasensitive photodetection. However, the low optical absorption of 2D materials arising from their atomic thickness limits the maximum attainable external quantum efficiency. For example, in the visible and NIR regimes monolayer MoS2 and graphene absorb only ~10% and 2.3% of incoming light, respectively. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the use of Fano-resonant photonic crystals to significantly boost absorption in atomically thin materials. Using graphene as a test bed, we demonstrate that absorption in the monolayer thick material can be enhanced to 77% within the telecommunications band, the highest value reported to date. We also show that the absorption in the Fano-resonant structure is non-local, with light propagating up to 16 μm within the structure. This property is particularly beneficial in harvesting light from large areas in field-effect-transistor based graphene photodetectors in which separation of photo-generated carriers only occurs ~0.2 μm adjacent to the graphene/electrode interface.

  2. AFM-Patterned 2-D Thin-Film Photonic Crystal Analyzed by Complete Angle Scatter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Scatter Distribution Function of Photonic Crystals,” Air Force Institute of Technology, Dayton, OH, Thesis 2009. [5] I. Prieto , B. Galiana, P. A... Francisco : Addison Wesley, 2002. 76 [38] Bahaa E. A. Saleh and Malvin Carl Teich, Fundamentals of Photonics, 2nd ed. Hoboken: Wiley, 2007. [39

  3. Fabrication of an Omnidirectional 2D Photonic Crystal Emitter for Thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmakh, V.; Chan, W. R.; Ghebrebrhan, M.; Soljacic, M.; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Celanovic, I.

    2016-11-01

    In a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system, a heat source brings an emitter to incandescence and the spectrally confined thermal radiation is converted to electricity by a low-bandgap photovoltaic (PV) cell. Efficiency is dominated by the emitter's ratio of in-band emissivity (convertible by the PV cell) to out-of-band emissivity (inconvertible). Two-dimensional photonic crystals (PhCs) offer high in-band emissivity and low out-of-band emissivity at normal incidence, but have reduced in-band emissivity off-normal. According to Lambert's law, most thermal radiation occurs off-normal. An omnidirectional PhC capable of high in-band emissivity at all angles would increase total in-band power by 55% at 1200°C. In this work, we present the first experimental demonstration an omnidirectional hafnia-filled 2D tantalum PhC emitter suitable for TPV applications such as combustion, radioisotope, and solar TPV. Dielectric filling improved the hemispherical performance without sacrificing stability or ease of fabrication. The numerical simulations, fabrication processes, and optical and thermal characterizations of the PhC are presented in this paper.

  4. All-optical XNOR gate based on 2D photonic-crystal ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniem, Tamer A.

    2017-02-01

    A novel all-optical XNOR gate is proposed, which combines the nonlinear Kerr effect with photonic-crystal ring resonators (PCRRs). The total size of the proposed optical XNOR gate based on photonic crystals with a square lattice of silicon rods is equal to 35 × 21 μm. The proposed structure has a bandgap in the range from 0.32 to 0.44. To confirm the operation and feasibility of the overall system use is made of analytical and numerical simulation using the dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) and plane wave expansion (PWE) methods.

  5. Investigation of 2D photonic crystal structure based channel drop filter using quad shaped photonic crystal ring resonator for CWDM system

    SciTech Connect

    Chhipa, Mayur Kumar Dusad, Lalit Kumar

    2016-05-06

    In this paper, the design & performance of two dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal structure based channel drop filter is investigated using quad shaped photonic crystal ring resonator. In this paper, Photonic Crystal (PhC) based on square lattice periodic arrays of Gallium Indium Phosphide (GaInP) rods in air structure have been investigated using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and photonic band gap is being calculated using Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) method. The PhC designs have been optimized for telecommunication wavelength λ= 1571 nm by varying the rods lattice constant. The number of rods in Z and X directions is 21 and 20, with lattice constant 0.540 nm it illustrates that the arrangement of Gallium Indium Phosphide (GaInP) rods in the structure which gives the overall size of the device around 11.4 µm × 10.8 µm. The designed filter gives good dropping efficiency using 3.298, refractive index. The designed structure is useful for CWDM systems. This device may serve as a key component in photonic integrated circuits. The device is ultra compact with the overall size around 123 µm{sup 2}.

  6. Formation of 2D photonic crystal bars by simultaneous photoelectrochemical etching of trenches and macropores in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Astrova, E. V. Fedulova, G. V.; Guschina, E. V.

    2010-12-15

    Joint electrochemical etching of deep macropores and trenches in n-Si (100) has been studied. After the substrate was removed, regions of a sample, bounded on all sides by a closed contour of through trenches, were extracted from the sample, with narrow bars of a 2D photonic crystal remaining. The influence exerted by the distance between pores and a trench and by the modes of etching and subsequent oxidation on the roughness of the side walls of the structures and also on the size and shape of pores near the trench is analyzed for the example of a photonic crystal with a square lattice of macropores. Conditions are found in which the lattice distortion of the photonic crystal is at a minimum and the side walls of the structure are the smoothest (root-mean-square roughness height {approx}60 nm).

  7. A 2D Rods-in-Air Square-Lattice Photonic Crystal Optical Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    bistable switching in nonlinear photonic crystals, Phys. Rev. E. 66 (5) (2002) 055601(R). [14] Mehmet Fatih Yanik , Shanhui Fan, Marin Soljačić, High...1855–1857. [19] Mehmet Fatih Yanik , Shanhui Fan, Marin Soljačić, J.D. Joannopoulos, All- optical transistor action with bistable switching in a

  8. Terahertz all-optical NOR and AND logic gates based on 2D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parandin, Fariborz; Karkhanehchi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Usually, photonic crystals are used in designing optical logic gates. This study focuses on the design and simulation of an all optical NOR and AND logic gates based on two dimensional photonic crystals. The simplicity of the proposed structure is a characteristic feature of this designation. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) as well as Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) methods have been used for this structural analysis. The simulation results revealed an increase in the interval between "zero" and "one" logic levels. Also, the simple structure and its small size demonstrate the usefulness of this structure in optical integrated circuits. The proposed optical gates can operate with a bit rate of about 1.54 Tbit/s.

  9. Novel high-Q modes in thick 2D photonic crystal slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, J. R.; Ho, Y.-L. D.; Engin, E.; Railton, C.; Rarity, J. G.; Cryan, M. J.

    2013-03-01

    The periodic nature of photonic crystals (PCs) (Yablonovitch 1987 Phys. Rev. Lett. 58 2059-62 John 1987 Phys. Rev. Lett. 58 2486-9) has been extensively exploited for the past quarter of a century using photonic bandgap (PBG) effects to manipulate photons in engineered electromagnetic structures. Structures such as photonic crystal nanocavities are widely considered to be key in realizing future nanoscale optoelectronic devices. These cavities are capable of creating resonant modes with high-quality factor (Q) and small mode volume, in other words a large Purcell factor (Purcell 1946 Phys. Rev. 69 681), and have been widely researched in the two-dimensional photonic crystal slab (PCS) defect cavity configuration (Painter et al 1999 J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 16 275-85). Here, we demonstrate for the first time how three confinement mechanisms are thought to coincide to give rise to a high-Q resonance for a slab containing a modified L3 defect where the slab thickness is such that the guiding in the slab is no longer single moded (Tandaechanurat et al 2008 Opt. Express 16 448-55). This is in contrast to the conventional design approach, where the PCS thickness is chosen to be of the order of half a lattice constant to ensure that a PBG exists to confine cavity modes strongly within the slab (Painter et al 1999 J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 16 275-85 Johnson et al 1999 Phys. Rev. B 60 5751-8 Khankhoje et al 2010 Nanotechnology 21 065202). These newly identified high-Q modes can be important in terms of the fabrication of slabs and other devices such as vertical pillars since they allow high-Q factors in thicker and more fabrication tolerant geometries.

  10. Characterization of the bistable wideband optical filter on the basis of nonlinear 2D photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Guryev, I. V. Sukhoivanov, I. A. Andrade Lucio, J. A. Manzano, O. Ibarra Rodriguez, E. Vargaz Gonzales, D. Claudio Chavez, R. I. Mata Gurieva, N. S.

    2014-05-15

    In our work, we investigated the wideband optical filter on the basis of nonlinear photonic crystal. The all-optical flip-flop using ultra-short pulses with duration lower than 200 fs is obtained in such filters. Here we pay special attention to the stability problem of the nonlinear element. To investigate this problem, the temporal response demonstrating the flip-flop have been computed within the certain range of the wavelengths as well as at different input power.

  11. 2D and 3D photonic crystal materials for photocatalysis and electrochemical energy storage and conversion

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Gillian; Armstrong, Eileen; McNulty, David; O’Hanlon, Sally; Geaney, Hugh; O’Dwyer, Colm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This perspective reviews recent advances in inverse opal structures, how they have been developed, studied and applied as catalysts, catalyst support materials, as electrode materials for batteries, water splitting applications, solar-to-fuel conversion and electrochromics, and finally as photonic photocatalysts and photoelectrocatalysts. Throughout, we detail some of the salient optical characteristics that underpin recent results and form the basis for light-matter interactions that span electrochemical energy conversion systems as well as photocatalytic systems. Strategies for using 2D as well as 3D structures, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opals are summarized and recent work on plasmonic–photonic coupling in metal nanoparticle-infiltrated wide band gap inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemistry are provided. PMID:27877904

  12. 2D and 3D photonic crystal materials for photocatalysis and electrochemical energy storage and conversion.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Armstrong, Eileen; McNulty, David; O'Hanlon, Sally; Geaney, Hugh; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2016-01-01

    This perspective reviews recent advances in inverse opal structures, how they have been developed, studied and applied as catalysts, catalyst support materials, as electrode materials for batteries, water splitting applications, solar-to-fuel conversion and electrochromics, and finally as photonic photocatalysts and photoelectrocatalysts. Throughout, we detail some of the salient optical characteristics that underpin recent results and form the basis for light-matter interactions that span electrochemical energy conversion systems as well as photocatalytic systems. Strategies for using 2D as well as 3D structures, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opals are summarized and recent work on plasmonic-photonic coupling in metal nanoparticle-infiltrated wide band gap inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemistry are provided.

  13. Optical properties of GaAs 2D hexagonal and cubic photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, F. Assali, A.; Grain, R.; Kanouni, F.

    2015-03-30

    In this paper we present our theoretical study of 2D hexagonal and cubic rods GaAs in air, with plan wave expansion (PWE) and finite difference time domain (FDTD) by using BandSOLVE and FullWAVE of Rsoft photonic CAD package. In order to investigate the effect of symmetry and radius, we performed calculations of the band structures for both TM and TE polarization, contour and electromagnetic propagation and transmission spectra. Our calculations show that the hexagonal structure gives a largest band gaps compare to cubic one for a same filling factor.

  14. Fano Resonance in GaAs 2D Photonic Crystal Nanocavities

    SciTech Connect

    Valentim, P. T.; Guimaraes, P.S. S.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Szymanski, D.; Whittaker, D. M.; Fox, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Vasco, J. P.; Vinck-Posada, H.

    2011-12-23

    We report the results of polarization resolved reflectivity experiments in GaAs air-bridge photonic crystals with L3 cavities. We show that the fundamental L3 cavity mode changes, in a controlled way, from a Lorentzian symmetrical lineshape to an asymmetrical form when the linear polarization of the incident light is rotated in the plane of the crystal. The different lineshapes are well fitted by the Fano asymmetric equation, implying that a Fano resonance is present in the reflectivity. We use the scattering matrix method to model the Fano interference between a localized discrete state (the cavity fundamental mode) and a background of continuum states (the light reflected from the crystal slab in the vicinity of the cavity) with very good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Tuning the Structural Color of a 2D Photonic Crystal Using a Bowl-like Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Umh, Ha Nee; Yu, Sungju; Kim, Yong Hwa; Lee, Su Young; Yi, Jongheop

    2016-06-22

    Structural colors of the ordered photonic nanostructures are widely used as an effective platform for manipulating the propagation of light. Although several approaches have been explored in attempts to mimic the structural colors, improving the reproducibility, mechanical stability, and the economic feasibility of sophisticated photonic crystals prepared by complicated processes continues to pose a challenge. In this study, we report on an alternative, simple method for fabricating a tunable photonic crystal at room temperature. A bowl-like nanostructure of TiO2 was periodically arranged on a thin Ti sheet through a two-step anodization process where its diameters were systemically controlled by changing the applied voltage. Consequently, they displayed a broad color distribution, ranging from red to indigo, and the principal reason for color generation followed the Bragg diffraction theory. This noncolorant method was capable of reproducing a Mondrian painting on a centimeter scale without the need to employ complex architectures, where the generated structural colors were highly stable under mechanical or chemical influence. Such a color printing technique represents a potentially promising platform for practical applications for anticounterfeit trademarks, wearable sensors, and displays.

  16. Efficient Design Tool for 2D and 3D NIMS Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-28

    Nationality    Year of  Birth   China  Singapore  N.A.  1961  Country of Origin/ Birth   Country of Citizenship  Singapore  Permanent  Resident? (Yes/No... lithography   and  reactive  ion  etching processes. The photonic  crystal patterns were written by  the  electron beam writing, followed by a lift‐off

  17. Studies on spatial modes and the correlation anisotropy of entangled photons generated from 2D quadratic nonlinear photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X. W.; Xu, P.; Sun, C. W.; Jin, H.; Hou, R. J.; Leng, H. Y.; Zhu, S. N.

    2017-06-01

    Concurrent spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) processes have proved to be an appealing approach for engineering the path-entangled photonic state with designable and tunable spatial modes. In this work, we propose a general scheme to construct high-dimensional path entanglement and demonstrate the basic properties of concurrent SPDC processes from domain-engineered quadratic nonlinear photonic crystals, including the spatial modes and the photon flux, as well as the anisotropy of spatial correlation under noncollinear quasi-phase-matching geometry. The overall understanding about the performance of concurrent SPDC processes will give valuable references to the construction of compact path entanglement and the development of new types of photonic quantum technologies.

  18. FDTD analysis of 2D triangular-lattice photonic crystals with arbitrary-shape inclusions based on unit cell transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zetao; Ogusu, Kazuhiko

    2009-04-01

    A finite-difference time-domain method based on Yee's orthogonal cell is utilized to calculate the band structures of 2D triangular-lattice-based photonic crystals through a simple modification to properly shifting the boundaries of the original unit cell. A strategy is proposed for transforming the triangular unit cell into an orthogonal one, which can be used to calculate the band structures of 2D PhCs with various shapes of inclusions, such as triangular, quadrangular, and hexagonal shapes, to overcome the shortage of plane-wave expansion method for circular one. The band structures of 2D triangular-lattice-based PhCs with hexagonal air-holes are calculated and discussed for different values of its radius and rotation angle. The obtained results provide an insight to manipulate the band structures of PhCs.

  19. Enhanced Absorption in 2D Materials Via Fano- Resonant Photonic Crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Wenyi; Klotz, Andrey; Yang, Yuanmu; ...

    2015-05-01

    The use of two-dimensional (2D) materials in optoelectronics has attracted much attention due to their fascinating optical and electrical properties. For instance, graphenebased devices have been employed for applications such as ultrafast and broadband photodetectors and modulators while transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) based photodetectors can be used for ultrasensitive photodetection. However, the low optical absorption of 2D materials arising from their atomic thickness limits the maximum attainable external quantum efficiency. For example, in the visible and NIR regimes monolayer MoS2 and graphene absorb only ~10% and 2.3% of incoming light, respectively. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the use of Fano-resonant photonicmore » crystals to significantly boost absorption in atomically thin materials. Using graphene as a test bed, we demonstrate that absorption in the monolayer thick material can be enhanced to 77% within the telecommunications band, the highest value reported to date. We also show that the absorption in the Fano-resonant structure is non-local, with light propagating up to 16 μm within the structure. This property is particularly beneficial in harvesting light from large areas in field-effect-transistor based graphene photodetectors in which separation of photo-generated carriers only occurs ~0.2 μm adjacent to the graphene/electrode interface.« less

  20. 2-D photonic crystals microcavity filters based on hexagonal lattice structures embedded in ridge waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugessur, A. S.; Pottier, P.; De La Rue, R. M.; Kirk, A. G.

    2005-09-01

    Compact photonic crystal (PhC) microcavity filters in a ridge waveguide format could play a useful role for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) and de-multiplexing functionality in dense integrated photonic circuits. The microcavity filters are embedded in ridge waveguides with high lateral refractive-index contrast because good lateral confinement and efficient coupling of light into the device can be achieved using this established waveguide technology. However, this configuration leads to significant modal mismatch at the interfaces between the PhC and waveguide sections, contributing to reflection losses and reduced transmission over much of the useful spectrum. By the same token, mode-matching features consisting of two rows of PhC holes with a different filling factor and displaced to mirror-image positions with respect to the outer two rows of the main PhC mirrors have been implemented to enhance the optical transmission by more than a factor of two. Furthermore, an increase in Q-factor (more than 100 %) is achieved by the addition of two further rows of PhC holes on either side of the microcavity. Moreover, Bragg-grating concepts have been applied in several other filter designs using the same hexagonal PhC lattice configuration, in an attempt to control the filter response. This work involves the design, fabrication (using electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching) and characterization of such hexagonal-lattice PhC microcavity filters embedded in ridge waveguides.

  1. A super narrow band filter based on silicon 2D photonic crystal resonator and reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Deyuan; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Juebin; Tao, Shangbin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a novel structure of super narrow band filter based on two-dimensional square lattice photonic crystals of silicon rods in air for 1.5 um communication is proposed and studied. COMSOL Multiphysics4.3b software is used to simulate the optical behavior of the filter. The filter consists of one point-defect-based resonator and two line-defect-based reflectors. The resonance frequency, transmission coefficient and quality factor are investigated by varying the parameters of the structure. In design, a silicon rod is removed to form the resonator; for the rows of rods above and below the resonator, a part of the rods are removed to form the reflectors. By optimizing the parameters of the filter, the quality factor and transmission coefficient of the filter at the resonance frequency of 2e14 Hz can reach 1330 and 0.953, respectively. The super narrow band filter can be integrated into optical circuit for its micron size. Also, it can be used for wavelength selection and noise filtering of optical amplifier in future communication application.

  2. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model. PMID:23209871

  3. 2D quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christina; Kobiela, Georg; Giessen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonic structures with irregular symmetry, such as quasiperiodic plasmonic crystals, have gained an increasing amount of attention, in particular as potential candidates to enhance the absorption of solar cells in an angular insensitive fashion. To examine the photonic bandstructure of such systems that determines their optical properties, it is necessary to measure and model normal and oblique light interaction with plasmonic crystals. We determine the different propagation vectors and consider the interaction of all possible waveguide modes and particle plasmons in a 2D metallic photonic quasicrystal, in conjunction with the dispersion relations of a slab waveguide. Using a Fano model, we calculate the optical properties for normal and inclined light incidence. Comparing measurements of a quasiperiodic lattice to the modelled spectra for angle of incidence variation in both azimuthal and polar direction of the sample gives excellent agreement and confirms the predictive power of our model.

  4. Design of Three-mode Multi/Demultiplexer Based on 2-D Photonic Crystals for Mode-Division Multiplexing Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, PeiDong; Chen, Heming

    2017-06-01

    A three mode division multiplexer and demultiplexer (MMUX/DEMMUX) base on 2-D photonic crystal at 1550 nm was designed. Two asymmetrical directional couplers are included in this MMUX/DEMMUX, which can achieve modes conversion function of TE0, TE1 and TE2 modes. In order to avoid phase mismatching in bus waveguide, taper directional is applied at waveguide junction which can reduce the insertion loss effectively. Plane waves method (PWM) and finite difference time domain (FDTD) methods were used to simulating the performance of MMUX/DEMMUX. Numerical simulations show that the designed device has the potential for high-capacity MDM optical communication systems with a low insertion loss (<0.27dB) and a low mode crosstalk (< -25.4 dB).

  5. Synthesis of green emitting and transparent zn2siO4:mn2+ thin film phosphors on 2D photonic crystal patterned quartz substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyuk; Han, Ji Yeon; Jeon, Duk Young

    2012-02-01

    Zn2SiO4:Mn2+ thin film phosphors (TFPs) have been synthesized by RF magnetron sputtering, using a single multicomponent stoichiometric target. And 2D photonic crystal patterns were introduced on a quartz substrate to enhance the light extraction efficiency. In order to introduce 2D photonic crystal patterns on a quartz substrate, nanosphere lithography was used. Polystyrene spheres, with diameter of 330 nm, were transferred on the quartz substrate and subsequently were served as an etch mask. Quartz substrates were patterned by CF4 gas-based reactive ion etching. Zn2SiO4:Mn2+ were deposited on that 2D photonic crystal patterned quartz substrate and the effect of height of photonic crystal layers were investigated. The light extraction efficiency of Zn2SiO4:Mn2+ thin film phosphors deposited on the photonic crystal patterned quartz substrate was enhanced three times to compared with that of flat Zn2SiO4:Mn2+ thin film phosphors due to the Bragg diffraction and leaky mode caused by PCLs. Transmittance of Zn2SiO4:Mn2+ TFPs deposited on the photonic crystal patterned substrate was high enough, above 70% in the visible light region with respect to that of quartz substrate.

  6. Large Area 2D and 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals Fabricated by a Roll-to-Roll Langmuir-Blodgett Method.

    PubMed

    Parchine, Mikhail; McGrath, Joe; Bardosova, Maria; Pemble, Martyn E

    2016-06-14

    We present our results on the fabrication of large area colloidal photonic crystals on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film using a roll-to-roll Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) colloidal photonic crystals from silica nanospheres (250 and 550 nm diameter) with a total area of up to 340 cm(2) have been fabricated in a continuous manner compatible with high volume manufacturing. In addition, the antireflective properties and structural integrity of the films have been enhanced via the use of a second roll-to-roll process, employing a slot-die coating of an optical adhesive over the photonic crystal films. Scanning electron microscopy images, atomic force microscopy images, and UV-vis optical transmission and reflection spectra of the fabricated photonic crystals are analyzed. This analysis confirms the high quality of the 2D and 3D photonic crystals fabricated by the roll-to-roll LB technique. Potential device applications of the large area 2D and 3D colloidal photonic crystals on flexible PET film are briefly reviewed.

  7. Mapping the broadband polarization properties of linear 2D SOI photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Canning, John; Skivesen, Nina; Kristensen, Martin; Frandsen, Lars H; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Martelli, Cicero; Tetu, A

    2007-11-12

    Both quasi-TE and TM polarisation spectra for a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide are recorded over (1100-1700)nm using a broadband supercontinuum source. By studying both the input and output polarisation eigenstates we observe narrowband resonant cross coupling near the lowest quasi-TE mode cut-off. We also observe relatively broadband mixing between the two eigenstates to generate a complete photonic bandgap. By careful analysis of the output polarisation state we report on an inherent non-reciprocity between quasi TE and TM fundamental mode cross coupling. The nature of polarisation distinction in such bandgap structures is discussed in the context of polarisation scattering at an interface.

  8. A non-enzymatic urine glucose sensor with 2-D photonic crystal hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zequn; Xue, Min; He, Qian; Lu, Wei; Meng, Zihui; Yan, Dan; Qiu, Lili; Zhou, Lijun; Yu, Yingjie

    2016-11-01

    A novel polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) sensing material for the detection of urine glucose was developed by embedding a two-dimensional (2-D) polystyrene crystalline colloidal array (CCA) in 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid (3-APBA)-functionalized hydrogel. After adjusting the cross-linker concentration, this material showed significant sensitivity for glucose under lab conditions, the particle spacing of the PCCA changed from 917 to 824 nm (93 nm) within 3 min as the glucose concentration increased from 0 to 10 mM, and the structural color of the PCCA changed from red through orange, to green, and finally, to cyan. In further experiments, this material was used to semi-quantitatively detect glucose in 20 human urine (HU) samples. Compared with the traditional dry-chemistry method, which was applied widely in clinical diagnosis, the PCCA method was more accurate and cost-effective. Moreover, this method can efficiently avoid the errors induced by most of the urine-interfering elements like vitamin C and ketone body. With a homemade portable optical detector, this low-cost intelligent sensing material can provide a more convenient and efficient strategy for the urine glucose detection in clinical diagnosis and point-of-care monitoring.

  9. Numerical investigation of the flat band Bloch modes in a 2D photonic crystal with Dirac cones

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Peng; Fietz, Chris; Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2015-04-14

    A numerical method combining complex-k band calculations and absorbing boundary conditions for Bloch waves is presented. We use this method to study photonic crystals with Dirac cones. We demonstrate that the photonic crystal behaves as a zero-index medium when excited at normal incidence, but that the zero-index behavior is lost at oblique incidence due to excitation of modes on the flat band. We also investigate the formation of monomodal and multimodal cavity resonances inside the photonic crystals, and the physical origins of their different line-shape features.

  10. Numerical investigation of the flat band Bloch modes in a 2D photonic crystal with Dirac cones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Fietz, Chris; Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2015-04-20

    A numerical method combining complex-k band calculations and absorbing boundary conditions for Bloch waves is presented. We use this method to study photonic crystals with Dirac cones. We demonstrate that the photonic crystal behaves as a zero-index medium when excited at normal incidence, but that the zero-index behavior is lost at oblique incidence due to excitation of modes on the flat band. We also investigate the formation of monomodal and multimodal cavity resonances inside the photonic crystals, and the physical origins of their different line-shape features.

  11. Negative refraction and flat-lens focusing in a 2D square-lattice photonic crystal at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Meisels, R; Gajic, R; Kuchar, F; Hingerl, K

    2006-07-24

    We report on a study of the wave propagation and refraction in a 2D square-lattice photonic crystal for the first two photonic bands as well as the coupling of the external waves and criteria for flat-lens focusing. Microwave experiments and numerical simulations are performed. Main results concern the transition from positive to negative refraction below the first band gap, the flat-lens focusing using a novel criterion, viz. the constancy of the ratio of the tangents of the incident and refracted angle. Focusing results for medium ( approximately 10) and ultra-large dielectric contrast ( approximately 100) are presented. In the latter case focusing with a spot size below one wavelength at distances several wavelengths behind the photonic crystal is achieved.

  12. Functional 2D nanoparticle/polymer array: Interfacial assembly, transfer, characterization, and coupling to photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shisheng

    We developed a universal, facile and robust method to prepare free-standing, ordered and patternable nanoparticle/polymer monolayer arrays by evaporation-induced self-assembly at a fluid interface. The ultra-thin monolayer nanoparticle/polymer arrays are sufficiently robust that they can be transferred to arbitrary substrates, even with complex topographies. More importantly, the Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in the system serves as a photoresist enabling two modes of electron beam (e-beam) nanoparticle patterning. These ultra-thin films of monolayer nanoparticle arrays are of fundamental interest as 2D artificial solids for electronic, magnetic and optical properties and are also of technological interest for a diverse range of applications in micro- and macro-scale devices including photovoltaics, sensors, catalysis, and magnetic storage. By co-assembly with block co-polymers, the nanoparticles were selectively positioned in one specific phase, representing a high throughput route for creating nanoparticle patterns. The self-assembly process was investigated by combined in-situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and numerical simulation. By e-beam irradiation of free-standing 2D NP/polymer arrays, anisotropic nanowire arrays have been fabricated. Additionally, preliminary investigation on assembly of binary nanoparticle arrays has also been introduced, serving as promising future directions of interfacial assembly. Controlling the rate of spontaneous emission and thus promoting the photon generation efficiency is a key step toward fabrication of Quantum dot based single-photon sources, and harnessing of light energy from emitters with a broad emitting spectrum. Coupling of photo emitters to photonic cavities without perturbing the optical performance of cavities remains as a challenge in study of Purcell effect based on quantum electrodynamics. Taking advantage of interfacial assembly and transfer, we have achieved controlled deposition

  13. Influence of elliptical shaped holes on the sensitivity and Q factor in 2D photonic crystals sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmerkhi, A.; Bouchemat, M.; Bouchemat, T.

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the refractive index sensor based on L2 photonic crystal cavity where neighboring holes are locally infiltrated with polymers. The photonic crystal is composed of periodic triangular hole array patterned perpendicularly to an InP-based confining heterostructure. The number of the holes surrounding a L2 cavity and their shape were modified in order to optimize the sensitivity and quality factor. From this study we have selected two structures that have good results. The first one is called locally which has a very high Q factor and a good sensitivity. Their values are 6.03 × 106 and 163 nm/RIU, respectively. The second optimized structure is called design B, which has a high sensitivity toward 227.78 nm/RIU with a Q factor of 5 × 105. The calculated detect limit for the two designs are lower than 1.59 × 10-6 and 1.4 × 10-5 RIU, respectively.

  14. Band structure of a 2D photonic crystal based on ferrofluids of Co(1-x)Znx Fe2O4 nanoparticles under perpendicular applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Javier; Gonzalez, Luz Esther; Quinonez, Mario; Porras, Nelson; Zambrano, Gustavo; Gomez, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Using a ferrfluid of cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles Co(1 - x)ZnxFe2O4 coated with oleic acid and suspended in ethanol, we have fabricated a 2D photonic crystal (PC) by the application of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the ferrofluid. The 2D PC is made by rods of nanoparticles organized in a hexagonal structure. By means of the plane-wave expansion method, we study its photonic band structure (PBS) which depends on the effective permittivity and on the area ratio of the liquid phase. Additionaly, taking into account the Maxwell-Garnett theory we calculated the effective permittivity of the rods. We have found that the effective refractive index of the ferrofluid increases with its magnetization. Using these results we calculate the band structure of the photonic crystal at different applied magnetic fields, finding that the increase of the applied magnetic field shifts the band structure to lower frequencies with the appearance of more band gaps. Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali, Colombia

  15. Label-free optical detection of C-reactive protein by nanoimprint lithography-based 2D-photonic crystal film.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tatsuro; Kajita, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Yukio; Kosaka, Terumasa; Himi, Toshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    The development of high-sensitive, and cost-effective novel biosensors have been strongly desired for future medical diagnostics. To develop novel biosensor, the authors focused on the specific optical characteristics of photonic crystal. In this study, a label-free optical biosensor, polymer-based two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D-PhC) film fabricated using nanoimprint lithography (NIL), was developed for detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human serum. The nano-hole array constructed NIL-based 2D-PhC (hole diameter: 230 nm, distance: 230, depth: 200 nm) was fabricated on a cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) film (100 µm) using thermal NIL and required surface modifications to reduce nonspecific adsorption of target proteins. Antigen-antibody reactions on the NIL-based 2D-PhC caused changes to the surrounding refractive index, which was monitored as reflection spectrum changes in the visible region. By using surface modified 2D-PhC, the calculated detection limit for CRP was 12.24 pg/mL at an extremely short reaction time (5 min) without the need for additional labeling procedures and secondary antibody. Furthermore, using the dual-functional random copolymer, CRP could be detected in a pooled blood serum diluted 100× with dramatic reduction of nonspecific adsorption. From these results, the NIL-based 2D-PhC film has great potential for development of an on-site, high-sensitivity, cost-effective, label-free biosensor for medical diagnostics applications.

  16. Multiple generations of high-order orbital angular momentum modes through cascaded third-harmonic generation in a 2D nonlinear photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dan; Guo, Jiale; Fang, Xinyuan; Wei, Dunzhao; Ni, Rui; Chen, Peng; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Wei; Lu, Y Q; Zhu, S N; Xiao, Min

    2017-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate multiple generations of high-order orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes through third-harmonic generation in a 2D nonlinear photonic crystal. Such third-harmonic generation process is achieved by cascading second-harmonic generation and sum-frequency generation using the non-collinear quasi-phase-matching technique. This technique allows multiple OAM modes with different colors to be simultaneously generated. Moreover, the OAM conservation law guarantees that the topological charge is tripled in the cascaded third-harmonic generation process. Our method is effective for obtaining multiple high-order OAM modes for optical imaging, manipulation, and communications.

  17. Integration of 100 GHz and 50 GHz spectral bandwidth wavelength demultiplexer using 2D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, V. R.; Murugan, M.; Robinson, S.

    2017-06-01

    The paper deals with the photonic crystal based demultiplexer that has been designed to separate the 100 GHz and 50 GHz channels in a single device. The proposed demultiplexer is designed to drop four unique wavelengths. The demultiplexer is consisted of bus waveguide, rectangular resonant cavity (RRC) and four dropping waveguide; the transmission of 100 GHz and 50 GHz channels are dropped separately. The operating wavelength range of the device lies between 1551nm to 1552nm for 0.4 nm channel spacing and 1554nm to 1559 for 0.8 nm channel spacing. This new methodology is expected to be applied in the future for the dual systems and the footprint and cost of the networking will also be significantly reduced.

  18. 2D SiNx photonic crystal coated Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ ceramic plate phosphor for high-power white light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Park, Hoo Keun; Oh, Jeong Rok; Do, Young Rag

    2011-12-05

    This paper reports the optical effects of a two-dimensional (2D) SiNx photonic crystal layer (PCL) on Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ (YAG:Ce) yellow ceramic plate phosphor (CPP) in order to enhance the forward emission of YAG:Ce CPP-capped high-power white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). By adding the 2D SiNx PCL with a 580 nm lattice constant, integrated yellow emission was improved by a factor of 1.72 compared to that of a conventional YAG:Ce CPP capped on a blue LED cup. This enhanced forward yellow emission is attributed to increased extraction of yellow emission light and improved absorption of blue excitation light through Bragg scattering and/or the leaky modes produced by the 2D PCLs. The introduction of 2D PCL can also reduce the wide variation of optical properties as a function of both ambient temperature and applied current, compared to those of a high-power YAG:Ce CPP-capped LED.

  19. Giant Field Localization in 2-D Photonic Crystal Cavities with Defect Resonances: Bringing Nonlinear Optics to the W/cm2 Level

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    AIP Advances 2, 032112 (2012) 3 S. Nakamura, M. Senoh, N. Iwasa, and S. Nagahama, “High-Brightness InGaN Blue, Green and Yellow Light- Emitting Diodes...Needle-like focus generation by radially polarized halo beams emitted by photonic-crystal ring-cavity laser Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 221103 (2012

  20. Photonic crystals as optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevi, P.; Krokhin, A. A.; Arriaga, J.

    1999-11-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have already found numerous applications associated with the photonic band gap. We point out that PCs could be also employed as custom-made optical components in the linear region well below the photonic gap. As an example, we discuss a birefringent PC lens that acts as a polarizing beam splitter. This idea is supported by a precise method of calculation of the optical constants of a transparent two-dimensional (2D) PC. Such a process of homogenization is performed for hexagonal arrays of polymer-based PCs and also for the mammalian cornea. Finally, 2D PCs are classified as optically uniaxial or biaxial.

  1. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  2. Bulletlike light pulses in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanhong; Gong, Qian; Yao, Peijun; Zhao, Deyin; Jiang, Xunya

    2008-08-01

    We report the bulletlike propagation of light pulse in a particularly designed two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal. Unlike traditional light bullet supported by nonlinear materials, this bulletlike propagation is achieved only by 2D photonic crystal, where the diffraction and the group velocity dispersion of a light pulse are eliminated naturally by combining two distinct properties of photonic crystal, i.e., self-collimation and zero group velocity dispersion. Moreover, we studied the influence of third order dispersion on the propagation of light bullet and found that it can be greatly suppressed by an improved structure of photonic crystal.

  3. Mechanically tunable photonic crystal lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Tamma, V. A.; Lee, J.-B.; Park, W.

    2010-08-01

    We designed, fabricated and characterized MEMS-enabled mechanically-tunable photonic crystal lens comprised of 2D photonic crystal and symmetrical electro-thermal actuators. The 2D photonic crystal was made of a honeycomb-lattice of 340 nm thick, 260 nm diameter high-index silicon rods embedded in low-index 10 μm thick SU-8 cladding. Silicon input waveguide and deflection block were also fabricated for light in-coupling and monitoring of focused spot size, respectively. When actuated, the electro-thermal actuators induced mechanical strain which changed the lattice constant of the photonic crystal and consequently modified the photonic band structure. This in turn modified the focal-length of the photonic crystal lens. The fabricated device was characterized using a tunable laser (1400~1602 nm) and an infrared camera during actuation. At the wavelength of 1450 nm, the lateral light spot size observed at the deflection block gradually decreased 40%, as applied current increased from 0 to 0.7 A, indicating changes in focal length in response to the mechanical stretching.

  4. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    passive and active versions of each fiber designed under this task. Crystal Fibre shall provide characteristics of the fiber fabricated to include core...passive version of multicore fiber iteration 2. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Laser physics, Fibre Lasers, Photonic Crystal, Multicore, Fiber Laser 16...9 00* 0 " CRYSTAL FIBRE INT ODUCTION This report describes the photonic crystal fibers developed under agreement No FA8655-o5-a- 3046. All

  5. Brillouin light scattering studies of 2D magnonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacchi, S.; Gubbiotti, G.; Madami, M.; Carlotti, G.

    2017-02-01

    Magnonic crystals, materials with periodic modulation of their magnetic properties, represent the magnetic counterpart of photonic, phononic and plasmonic crystals, and have been largely investigated in recent years because of the possibility of using spin waves as a new means for carrying and processing information over a very large frequency bandwidth. Here, we review recent Brillouin light scattering studies of 2D magnonic crystals consisting of single- and bi-component arrays of interacting magnetic dots or antidot lattices. In particular, we discuss the principal properties of the magnonic band diagram of such systems, with emphasis given to its dependence on both magnetic and the geometrical parameters. Thanks to the possibility of tailoring their band structure by means of several degrees of freedom, planar magnonic crystals offer a good opportunity to design an innovative class of nanoscale microwave devices.

  6. Brillouin light scattering studies of 2D magnonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Tacchi, S; Gubbiotti, G; Madami, M; Carlotti, G

    2017-02-22

    Magnonic crystals, materials with periodic modulation of their magnetic properties, represent the magnetic counterpart of photonic, phononic and plasmonic crystals, and have been largely investigated in recent years because of the possibility of using spin waves as a new means for carrying and processing information over a very large frequency bandwidth. Here, we review recent Brillouin light scattering studies of 2D magnonic crystals consisting of single- and bi-component arrays of interacting magnetic dots or antidot lattices. In particular, we discuss the principal properties of the magnonic band diagram of such systems, with emphasis given to its dependence on both magnetic and the geometrical parameters. Thanks to the possibility of tailoring their band structure by means of several degrees of freedom, planar magnonic crystals offer a good opportunity to design an innovative class of nanoscale microwave devices.

  7. Two-dimensional photonic crystal surfactant detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Smith, Natasha; Asher, Sanford A

    2012-08-07

    We developed a novel two-dimensional (2-D) crystalline colloidal array photonic crystal sensing material for the visual detection of amphiphilic molecules in water. A close-packed polystyrene 2-D array monolayer was embedded in a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogel film. These 2-D photonic crystals placed on a mirror show intense diffraction that enables them to be used for visual determination of analytes. Binding of surfactant molecules attaches ions to the sensor that swells the PNIPAAm-based hydrogel. The resulting increase in particle spacing red shifts the 2-D diffracted light. Incorporation of more hydrophobic monomers increases the sensitivity to surfactants.

  8. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  9. Absorption in photonic crystals: from order to disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seassal, Christian; Lalouat, LoÑ--c.; Ding, He; Drouard, Emmanuel; Gomard, Guillaume; Peretti, Romain; Deschamp, Thierry; Mandorlo, Fabien; Orobtchouk, Régis; Fave, Alain

    2014-09-01

    In this communication, we present the potentialities offered by 2D photonic crystals to trap and absorb photons in thin silicon layers. We will specifically focus on the impact of the photonic crystal unit cells symmetry, and the possibility to increase light absorption and generated photocurrent using multi-periodic and pseudo-disordered photonic nanostructures.

  10. Microfabricated Optical Cavities and Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lončar, Marko; Scherer, Axel

    Microfabricated periodic structures with a high refractive index contrast have recently become very interesting geometries for the manipulation of light. The existence of a photonic bandgap, a frequency range within which propagation of light is prevented in all directions, is very useful where spatial localization of light is required. Ideally, by constructing three-dimensional confinement geometries, light propagation can be controlled in all three dimensions. However, since the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals is difficult, a more manufacturable approach is based on the use of one- or two-dimensional geometries. Here we describe the evolution of microcavities from 1D Bragg reflectors to 2D photonic crystals. The 1D microcavity laser (VCSEL) has already found widespread commercial use in data communications, and the equivalent 2D geometry has recently attracted a lot of research attention. 2D photonic crystal lasers, fabricated within a thin dielectric membrane and perforated with a two-dimensional lattice of holes, are very appealing for dense integration of photonic devices in telecommunications and optical sensing systems. In this chapter, we describe theory and experiments of planar photonic crystals as well as their applications towards lasers and super-dispersive elements. Low-threshold 2D photonic crystal lasers were recently demonstrated both in air and in different chemical solutions and can now be used to perform spectroscopic tests on ultra-small volumes of analyte.

  11. Hybrid 2D photonic crystal-assisted Lu3Al5O12:Ce ceramic-plate phosphor and free-standing red film phosphor for white LEDs with high color-rendering index.

    PubMed

    Park, Hoo Keun; Oh, Ji Hye; Kang, Heejoon; Zhang, Jian; Do, Young Rag

    2015-03-04

    This paper reports the combined optical effects of a two-dimensional (2D) SiNx photonic crystal layer (PCL)-assisted Lu3Al5O12:Ce (LuAG:Ce) green ceramic-plate phosphor (CPP) and a free-standing (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu red film phosphor to enhance luminous efficacy, color rendering index (CRI), and special CRI (R9) of LuAG:Ce CPP-capped white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for high-power white LEDs at 350 mA. By introducing the 2D SiNx PCL, the luminous efficacy was improved by a factor of 1.25 and 1.15 compared to that of the conventional flat CPP-capped LED and the thickness-increased CPP-capped LED (with a thickness of 0.15 mm), respectively, while maintaining low color-rendering properties. The combining of the free-standing red film phosphor in the flat CPP-capped, the 2D PCL-assisted CPP-capped, and the thickness-increased CPP-capped LEDs led to enhancement of the CRI and the special CRI (R9); it also led to a decrease of the correlated color temperature (CCT) due to broad wavelength coverage via the addition of red emission. High CRI (94), natural white CCT (4450 K), and acceptable luminous efficacy (71.1 lm/W) were attained from the 2D PCL-assisted LuAG:Ce CPP/free-standing red film phosphor-based LED using a red phosphor concentration of 7.5 wt %. It is expected that the combination of the 2D PCL and the free-standing red film phosphor will be a good candidate for achieving a high-power white CPP-capped LED with excellent CRI.

  12. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  13. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    PubMed Central

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation. PMID:27683066

  14. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser.

    PubMed

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-29

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M(2) reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the "photonic crystal microchip laser", a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  15. Photonic crystal microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, D.; Koliadenko, V.; Purlys, V.; Peckus, M.; Taranenko, V.; Staliunas, K.

    2017-02-01

    The microchip lasers, being sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam, strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here we propose that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. We experimentally show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by factor of 2, and thus increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 4. This comprises a new kind of laser, the "photonic crystal microchip laser", a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial high brightness radiation.

  16. 2D materials for photon conversion and nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.

    2015-09-01

    The field of two-dimensional (2D) materials has the potential to enable unique applications across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. While 2D-layered materials hold promise for next-generation photon-conversion intrinsic limitations and challenges exist that shall be overcome. Here we discuss the intrinsic limitations as well as application opportunities of this new class of materials, and is sponsored by the NSF program Designing Materials to Revolutionize and Engineer our Future (DMREF) program, which links to the President's Materials Genome Initiative. We present general material-related details for photon conversion, and show that taking advantage of the mechanical flexibility of 2D materials by rolling MoS2/graphene/hexagonal boron nitride stack to a spiral solar cell allows for solar absorption up to 90%.

  17. 2D and 3D heterogeneous photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    2014-03-01

    Exponential increases in the amount of data that need to be sensed, communicated, and processed are continuing to drive the complexity of our computing, networking, and sensing systems. High degrees of integration is essential in scalable, practical, and cost-effective microsystems. In electronics, high-density 2D integration has naturally evolved towards 3D integration by stacking of memory and processor chips with through-silicon-vias. In photonics, too, we anticipate highdegrees of 3D integration of photonic components to become a prevailing method in realizing future microsystems for information and communication technologies. However, compared to electronics, photonic 3D integration face a number of challenges. This paper will review two methods of 3D photonic integration --- fs laser inscription and layer stacking, and discuss applications and future prospects.

  18. The analyzation of 2D complicated regular polygon photonic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jing; Gao, Yuanmei

    2017-06-01

    We have numerically simulated the light intensity distribution, phase distribution, far-field diffraction of the two dimensional (2D) regular octagon and regular dodecagon lattices in detail. In addition, using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, we numerically calculate the energy band of the two lattices. Both of the photonic lattices have the band gap. And the regular octagon lattice possesses the wide complete band gap while the regular dodecagon lattice has the incomplete gap. Moreover, we simulated the preliminary transmission image of photonic lattices. It may inspire the academic research both in light control and soliton.

  19. Chalcogenide Photonic Crystal Filters For Optical Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Suthar, B.; Bhargava, A.

    2011-12-12

    A proper arrangement of photonic crystal waveguide and a point defect cavity gives an important application of photonic filter device in optical communications. We have studied a narrow band filter and a channel drop filter device using 2-D photonic crystal with square lattice structure. A narrow band filter is applied to select a narrow frequency band signal from incoming light, while a channel drop filter is used to drop a particular frequency signal from incoming light. Chalcogenide As{sub 2}S{sub 3} is compared with conventional Si material regarding applications as feasible material for optical devices.

  20. Cooperative dynamics in ultrasoft 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprakel, Joris; van der Meer, Berend; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2015-03-01

    The creation, annihilation, and diffusion of defects in crystal lattices play an important role during crystal melting and deformation. Although it is well understood how defects form and react when crystals are subjected to external stresses, it remains unclear how crystals cope with internal stresses. We report a study in which we create a highly localized internal stress, by means of optical tweezing, in a crystal formed from micrometer-sized colloidal spheres and directly observe how the solid reacts using microscopy. We find that, even though the excitation is highly localized, a collective dance of colloidal particles results; these collective modes take the form of closed rings or open-ended strings, depending on the sequence of events which nucleate the rearrangements. Surprisingly, we find from Brownian Dynamics simulations that these cooperative dynamics are thermally-activated modes inherent to the crystal, and can even occur through a single, sufficiently large thermal fluctuation, resulting in the irreversible displacement of 100s of particles from their lattice sites.

  1. Weyl Points and Line Nodes in Gyroid Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Weyl points and line nodes in gyroid photonic crystals Ling Lu*, Liang Fu, John D...are predicted to be topologically non-trivial. However, Weyl points are yet to be discovered in nature. Here, we report photonic crystals based on...2D periodic systems. For example, most of the remarkable properties of graphene are tied to the Dirac points at its Fermi level1,2. In photonics , 2D

  2. New generation transistor technologies enabled by 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of graphene opened the door to 2D crystal materials. The lack of a bandgap in 2D graphene makes it unsuitable for electronic switching transistors in the conventional field-effect sense, though possible techniques exploiting the unique bandstructure and nanostructures are being explored. The transition metal dichalcogenides have 2D crystal semiconductors, which are well-suited for electronic switching. We experimentally demonstrate field effect transistors with current saturation and carrier inversion made from layered 2D crystal semiconductors such as MoS2, WS2, and the related family. We also evaluate the feasibility of such semiconducting 2D crystals for tunneling field effect transistors for low-power digital logic. The article summarizes the current state of new generation transistor technologies either proposed, or demonstrated, with a commentary on the challenges and prospects moving forward.

  3. Slotted photonic crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, Mark Gerard

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them result in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This thesis presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which engender higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the peak of optical mode within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. High sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than most competing devices in the literature. Initial tests with cellular material for real applications was also performed, and shown to be of promise. In addition, groundwork to make an integrated device that includes the spectrometer function was also carried out showing that slotted photonic crystals themselves can be used for on-chip wavelength specific filtering and spectroscopy, whilst gas-free microvalves for automation were also developed. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  4. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  5. An automated pipeline to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changki; Vink, Martin; Hu, Minghui; Love, James; Stokes, David L.; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban

    2011-01-01

    Electron crystallography relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals and is particularly well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. To obtain 2D crystals from purified membrane proteins, the detergent in a protein-lipid-detergent ternary mixture must be removed, generally by dialysis, under conditions favoring reconstitution into proteoliposomes and formation of well-ordered lattices. To identify these conditions a wide range of parameters such as pH, lipid composition, lipid-to-protein ratio, ionic strength and ligands must be screened in a procedure involving four steps: crystallization, specimen preparation for electron microscopy, image acquisition, and evaluation. Traditionally, these steps have been carried out manually and, as a result, the scope of 2D crystallization trials has been limited. We have therefore developed an automated pipeline to screen the formation of 2D crystals. We employed a 96-well dialysis block for reconstitution of the target protein over a wide range of conditions designed to promote crystallization. A 96-position magnetic platform and a liquid handling robot were used to prepare negatively stained specimens in parallel. Robotic grid insertion into the electron microscope and computerized image acquisition ensures rapid evaluation of the crystallization screen. To date, 38 2D crystallization screens have been conducted for 15 different membrane proteins, totaling over 3000 individual crystallization experiments. Three of these proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals. Our automated pipeline outperforms traditional 2D crystallization methods in terms of throughput and reproducibility. PMID:20349145

  6. Creating bio-inspired hierarchical 3D-2D photonic stacks via planar lithography on self-assembled inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ian B; Aizenberg, Joanna; Lončar, Marko

    2013-12-01

    Structural hierarchy and complex 3D architecture are characteristics of biological photonic designs that are challenging to reproduce in synthetic materials. Top-down lithography allows for designer patterning of arbitrary shapes, but is largely restricted to planar 2D structures. Self-assembly techniques facilitate easy fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, but controllable defect-integration is difficult. In this paper we combine the advantages of top-down and bottom-up fabrication, developing two techniques to deposit 2D-lithographically-patterned planar layers on top of or in between inverse-opal 3D photonic crystals and creating hierarchical structures that resemble the architecture of the bright green wing scales of the butterfly, Parides sesostris. These fabrication procedures, combining advantages of both top-down and bottom-up fabrication, may prove useful in the development of omnidirectional coloration elements and 3D-2D photonic crystal devices.

  7. Nano-scale electronic and optoelectronic devices based on 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenjuan

    In the last few years, the research community has been rapidly growing interests in two-dimensional (2D) crystals and their applications. The properties of these 2D crystals are diverse -- ranging from semi-metal such as graphene, semiconductors such as MoS2, to insulator such as boron nitride. These 2D crystals have many unique properties as compared to their bulk counterparts due to their reduced dimensionality and symmetry. A key difference is the band structures, which lead to distinct electronic and photonic properties. The 2D nature of the material also plays an important role in defining their exceptional properties of mechanical strength, surface sensitivity, thermal conductivity, tunable band-gap and their interaction with light. These unique properties of 2D crystals open up a broad territory of applications in computing, communication, energy, and medicine. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the electrical properties of graphene and MoS2, in particular current transport and band-gap engineering in graphene, interface between gate dielectrics and graphene, and gap states in MoS2. I will also present our work on the nano-scale electronic devices (RF and logic devices) and photonic devices (plasmonic devices and photo-detectors) based on these 2D crystals.

  8. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  9. Natural photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-10-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  10. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  11. Photonic crystal optofluidic biolaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari, Mohammad Hazhir; Ebnali-Heidari, Majid; Abaeiani, Gholamreza; Moravvej-Farshi, Mohammad Kazem

    2017-09-01

    Optofluidic biolasers are recently being considered in bioanalytical applications due to their advantages over the conventional biosensing methods Exploiting a photonic crystal slab with selectively dye-infiltrated air holes, we propose a new optofluidic heterostructure biolaser, with a power conversion efficiency of 25% and the spectral linewidth of 0.24 nm. Simulations show that in addition to these satisfactory lasing characteristics, the proposed lab-on-a-chip biolaser is highly sensitive to the minute biological changes that may occur in its cavity and can detect a single virus with a radius as small as 13 nm.

  12. Photonic crystal microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, A. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Sukhinina, N. S.; Matveev, D. V.; Dolganov, P. V.; Dolganov, V. K.; Emelchenko, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spherical samples of photonic crystals formed by colloidal SiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized. Synthesis of microspheres from 160 nm, 200 nm and 430 nm diameter colloidal nanoparticles was performed over a wide size range, from 5 μm to 50 μm. The mechanism of formation of void microparticles exceeding 50 μm is discussed. The spectral measurements verified the association of the spectra with the peaks of selective reflection from the cubic lattice planes. The microparticle morphology is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  13. Fabrication of 2D and 3D photonic structures using laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaso, P.; Jandura, D.; Pudis, D.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we demonstrate possibilities of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology based on two photon polymerization. We used three-dimensional dip-in direct-laser-writing (DLW) optical lithography to fabricate 2D and 3D optical structures for optoelectronics and for optical sensing applications. DLW lithography allows us use a non conventional way how to couple light into the waveguide structure. We prepared ring resonator and we investigated its transmission spectral characteristic. We present 3D inverse opal structure from its design to printing and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. Finally, SEM images of some prepared photonic crystal structures were performed.

  14. Theory of 2D crystals: graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Rafael; Chirolli, Luca; Prada, Elsa; Silva-Guillén, Jose Angel; San-Jose, Pablo; Guinea, Francisco

    2017-07-31

    This tutorial review presents an overview of the basic theoretical aspects of two-dimensional (2D) crystals. We revise essential aspects of graphene and the new families of semiconducting 2D materials, like transition metal dichalcogenides or black phosphorus. Minimal theoretical models for various materials are presented. Some of the exciting new possibilities offered by 2D crystals are discussed, such as manipulation and control of quantum degrees of freedom (spin and pseudospin), confinement of excitons, control of the electronic and optical properties with strain engineering, or unconventional superconducting phases.

  15. Better photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. C.

    2008-11-01

    The development of optical fibers with two-dimensional patterns of air holes running down their length has reinvigorated research in the field of fiber optics. It has greatly - and fundamentally - broadened the range of specialty optical fibers, by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more 'special" than previously thought. Applications of such special fibers have not been hard to find. Fibers with air cores have made it possible to deliver energetic femtosecond-scale optical pulses, transform limited, as solitons, using single-mode fiber. Other fibers with anomalous dispersion at visible wavelengths have spawned a new generation of single-mode optical supercontinuum sources, spanning visible and near-infrared wavelengths and based on compact pump sources. A third example is in the field of fiber lasers, where the use of photonic crystal fiber concepts has led to a new hybrid laser technology, in which the very high numerical aperture available using air holes have enabled fibers so short they are more naturally held straight than bent. However, commercial success demands more than just a fiber and an application. The useful properties of the fibers need to be optimized for the specific application. This tutorial will describe some of the basic physics and technology behind these photonic crystal fibers (PCF's), illustrated with some of the impressive demonstrations of the past 18 months.

  16. Design and characterization of low-loss 2D grating couplers for silicon photonics integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacava, C.; Carrol, L.; Bozzola, A.; Marchetti, R.; Minzioni, P.; Cristiani, I.; Fournier, M.; Bernabe, S.; Gerace, D.; Andreani, L. C.

    2016-03-01

    We present the characterization of Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic-crystal based 2D grating-couplers (2D-GCs) fabricated by CEA-Leti in the frame of the FP7 Fabulous project, which is dedicated to the realization of devices and systems for low-cost and high-performance passives-optical-networks. On the analyzed samples different test structures are present, including 2D-GC connected to another 2D-GC by different waveguides (in a Mach-Zehnder like configuration), and 2D-GC connected to two separate 2D-GCs, so as to allow a complete assessment of different parameters. Measurements were carried out using a tunable laser source operating in the extended telecom bandwidth and a fiber-based polarization controlling system at the input of device-under-test. The measured data yielded an overall fiber-to-fiber loss of 7.5 dB for the structure composed by an input 2D-GC connected to two identical 2D-GCs. This value was obtained at the peak wavelength of the grating, and the 3-dB bandwidth of the 2D-GC was assessed to be 43 nm. Assuming that the waveguide losses are negligible, so as to make a worst-case analysis, the coupling efficiency of the single 2D-GC results to be equal to -3.75 dB, constituting, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest value ever reported for a fully CMOS compatible 2D-GC. It is worth noting that both the obtained values are in good agreement with those expected by the numerical simulations performed using full 3D analysis by Lumerical FDTD-solutions.

  17. Polymeric photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Yoel

    Two novel and practical methods for controlling the propagation of light are presented: First, a design criterion that permits truly omnidirectional reflectivity for all polarizations of incident light over a wide selectable range of frequencies is derived and used in fabricating an alldielectric omnidirectional reflector consisting of multilayer films. Because the omnidirectionality criterion is general, it can be used to design omnidirectional reflectors in many frequency ranges of interest. Potential uses depend on the geometry of the system. For example, coating of an enclosure will result in an optical cavity. A hollow tube will produce a low-loss, broadband waveguide, planar film could be used as an efficient radiative heat barrier or collector in thermoelectric devices. A comprehensive framework for creating one-, two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals out of self- assembling block copolymers has been formulated. In order to form useful band gaps in the visible regime, periodic dielectric structures made of typical block copolymers need to be modified to obtain appropriate characteristic distances and dielectric constants. Moreover, the absorption and defect concentration must also be controlled. This affords the opportunity to tap into the large structural repertoire, the flexibility and intrinsic tunability that these self-assembled block copolymer systems offer. A block copolymer was used to achieve a self assembled photonic band gap in the visible regime. By swelling the diblock copolymer with lower molecular weight constituents control over the location of the stop band across the visible regime is achieved. One and three- dimensional crystals have been formed by changing the volume fraction of the swelling media. Methods for incorporating defects of prescribed dimensions into the self-assembled structures have been explored leading to the construction of a self assembled microcavity light- emitting device. (Copies available exclusively from MIT

  18. Metallic photonic crystals for thermophotovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Timothy A.

    Since the idea of a photonic bandgap was proposed over two decades ago, photonic crystals have been the subject of significant interest due to their novel optical properties which enable new and varied applications. In this research, the photonic bandgap effect is exploited to tailor the thermal radiation spectrum to a narrow range of wavelengths determined by the lattice symmetry and dimensions of the photonic crystal structure. This sharp emission peak can be matched to the electronic bandgap energy of a p-n junction photovoltaic cell for high efficiency thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. This thesis explores aspects of photonic crystal design, materials considerations, and manufacture for thermophotovoltaic applications. Photonic crystal structures come in many forms, exhibiting various types of 1D, 2D, and 3D lattice symmetry. In this work, the "woodpile" 3D photonic crystal is studied. One advantage of the woodpile lattice is that it can be readily fabricated on a large scale using common integrated circuit manufacturing techniques. Additionally this structure lends itself to efficient and accurate modeling with the use of a plane-wave expansion based transfer matrix method to calculate the scattering properties and band structure of the photonic crystal. This method is used to explore the geometric design parameters of the woodpile structure. Optimal geometric proportions for the structure are found which yield the highest narrowband absorption peak possible. By Kirchoffs law of thermal emission, this strong and sharp absorptance will yield high power and narrowband thermal radiation. The photonic crystal thermal emission spectrum is then evaluated in a TPV system model to evaluate the electrical power density and system efficiency achievable. The results produced by the photonic crystal emitter are compared with the results assuming a blackbody thermal radiation spectrum. The blackbody represents a universal standard against which any selective emitter

  19. Photonic quasi-crystal terahertz lasers

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Miriam Serena; Nobile, Michele; Ronzani, Alberto; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Castellano, Fabrizio; Talora, Valerio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-crystal structures do not present a full spatial periodicity but are nevertheless constructed starting from deterministic generation rules. When made of different dielectric materials, they often possess fascinating optical properties, which lie between those of periodic photonic crystals and those of a random arrangement of scatterers. Indeed, they can support extended band-like states with pseudogaps in the energy spectrum, but lacking translational invariance, they also intrinsically feature a pattern of ‘defects’, which can give rise to critically localized modes confined in space, similar to Anderson modes in random structures. If used as laser resonators, photonic quasi-crystals open up design possibilities that are simply not possible in a conventional periodic photonic crystal. In this letter, we exploit the concept of a 2D photonic quasi crystal in an electrically injected laser; specifically, we pattern the top surface of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser with a Penrose tiling of pentagonal rotational symmetry, reaching 0.1–0.2% wall-plug efficiencies and 65 mW peak output powers with characteristic surface-emitting conical beam profiles, result of the rich quasi-crystal Fourier spectrum. PMID:25523102

  20. Photonic quasi-crystal terahertz lasers.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Miriam Serena; Nobile, Michele; Ronzani, Alberto; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Castellano, Fabrizio; Talora, Valerio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles

    2014-12-19

    Quasi-crystal structures do not present a full spatial periodicity but are nevertheless constructed starting from deterministic generation rules. When made of different dielectric materials, they often possess fascinating optical properties, which lie between those of periodic photonic crystals and those of a random arrangement of scatterers. Indeed, they can support extended band-like states with pseudogaps in the energy spectrum, but lacking translational invariance, they also intrinsically feature a pattern of 'defects', which can give rise to critically localized modes confined in space, similar to Anderson modes in random structures. If used as laser resonators, photonic quasi-crystals open up design possibilities that are simply not possible in a conventional periodic photonic crystal. In this letter, we exploit the concept of a 2D photonic quasi crystal in an electrically injected laser; specifically, we pattern the top surface of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser with a Penrose tiling of pentagonal rotational symmetry, reaching 0.1-0.2% wall-plug efficiencies and 65 mW peak output powers with characteristic surface-emitting conical beam profiles, result of the rich quasi-crystal Fourier spectrum.

  1. Photonic crystal enhanced cytokine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Cunningham, Brian T

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces are demonstrated as a means for enhancing the detection sensitivity and resolution for assays that use a fluorescent tag to quantify the concentration of an analyte protein molecule in a liquid test sample. Computer modeling of the spatial distribution of resonantly coupled electromagnetic fields on the photonic crystal surface are used to estimate the magnitude of enhancement factor compared to performing the same fluorescent assay on a plain glass surface, and the photonic crystal structure is fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the performance using a sandwich immunoassay for the protein Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The demonstrated photonic crystal fabrication method utilizes a nanoreplica molding technique that allows for large-area inexpensive fabrication of the structure in a format that is compatible with confocal microarray laser scanners. The signal-to-noise ratio for fluorescent spots on the photonic crystal is increased by at least five-fold relative to the glass slide, allowing a TNF-alpha concentration of 1.6 pg/ml to be distinguished from noise on a photonic crystal surface. In addition, the minimum quantitative limit of detection on the photonic crystal surface is one-third the limit on the glass slide - a decrease from 18 pg/ml to 6 pg/ml. The increased performance of the immunoassay allows for more accurate quantitation of physiologically relevant concentrations of TNF-alpha in a protein microarray format that can be expanded to multiple cytokines.

  2. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  3. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  4. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.

  5. Tuning photonic bands in plasma metallic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Mayank Kumar; Chaudhari, Sachin

    2016-11-01

    Introducing plasma in the background provides additional degrees of freedom for tuning dispersion curves of photonic crystals. 2D photonic crystals in triangular lattice arrangements offer more global bandgap regions and thus are of more interest for various applications. The dispersion characteristics of a two-dimensional plasma metallic photonic crystal (PMPC) in square as well as triangular lattice arrangements have been analyzed in this paper using the orthogonal finite difference time domain method. The dispersion characteristics of PMPCs for the range of r/a ratios and plasma frequencies for triangular lattice configuration have been analyzed. On introducing plasma in the background, the photonic bands of PMPC are shifted towards higher normalized frequencies. This shift is more for lower bands and increases with plasma frequency. The cut-off frequency was observed for both TE and TM polarizations in PMPC and showed strong dependence on r/a ratio as well as plasma frequency. Photonic bandgaps of PMPC may be tuned by controlling plasma parameters, giving opportunity for utilizing these PMPC structures for various applications such as fine-tuning cavities for enhanced light-matter interaction, plasmonic waveguides, and Gyrotron cavities.

  6. Vorticity cutoff in nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Albert; Zacarés, Mario; García-March, Miguel-Angel

    2005-07-22

    Using group-theory arguments, we demonstrate that, unlike in homogeneous media, no symmetric vortices of arbitrary order can be generated in two-dimensional (2D) nonlinear systems possessing a discrete-point symmetry. The only condition needed is that the nonlinearity term exclusively depends on the modulus of the field. In the particular case of 2D periodic systems, such as nonlinear photonic crystals or Bose-Einstein condensates in periodic potentials, it is shown that the realization of discrete symmetry forbids the existence of symmetric vortex solutions with vorticity higher than two.

  7. Spatial filtering with photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maigyte, Lina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-03-15

    Photonic crystals are well known for their celebrated photonic band-gaps—the forbidden frequency ranges, for which the light waves cannot propagate through the structure. The frequency (or chromatic) band-gaps of photonic crystals can be utilized for frequency filtering. In analogy to the chromatic band-gaps and the frequency filtering, the angular band-gaps and the angular (spatial) filtering are also possible in photonic crystals. In this article, we review the recent advances of the spatial filtering using the photonic crystals in different propagation regimes and for different geometries. We review the most evident configuration of filtering in Bragg regime (with the back-reflection—i.e., in the configuration with band-gaps) as well as in Laue regime (with forward deflection—i.e., in the configuration without band-gaps). We explore the spatial filtering in crystals with different symmetries, including axisymmetric crystals; we discuss the role of chirping, i.e., the dependence of the longitudinal period along the structure. We also review the experimental techniques to fabricate the photonic crystals and numerical techniques to explore the spatial filtering. Finally, we discuss several implementations of such filters for intracavity spatial filtering.

  8. Patterned Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jue; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2017-09-11

    Colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) have been well developed because they are easy-to-prepare, cost-effective, and versatile to be modified and functionalized. Patterned colloidal PCs contributes a novel approach to constructing high-performance PC devices with unique structures and specific functions. In this review, an overview of the strategies for fabricating patterned colloidal PCs, including patterned substrate induced assembly, inkjet printing, and selective immobilization and modification is presented. The advantages of patterned PC devices are also discussed in detail, for example, the detection sensitivity and response speed of sensors can be improved; the flow direction and wicking rate of the microfluidic channel can be well controlled; cross-reactive molecules can be recognized through array patterned microchip; the display devices with tunable pattern, well-arranged RGB unit, and wide viewing-angle can be fabricated; and several anti-counterfeiting devices with different security strategies can be constructed. Finally, the perspective of future developments and challenges is presented and widely exhibited. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Photonic crystal fiber nanospectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimlinger, Mark; Battinelli, Emily; Wynne, Rosalind

    2012-04-01

    A silica-based steering wheel core photonic crystal fiber (SW-PCF) with a nano-featured spectrometer chemical agent detection configuration is presented. The spectrometer chip acquired from Nano-Optic DevicesTM can reduce the size of the spectrometer down to a coin. Results are provided for PCF structures filled with sample materials for spectroscopic identification. Portable and compact spectroscopic detectors with long interaction lengths (> few mm) specially outfitted for extreme environmental conditions are of interest to both military and civil institutions who wish to monitor air/water composition. The featured PCF spectrometer has the potential to measure optical absorption spectra in order to detect trace amounts of contaminants in gaseous or aqueous samples. The absorption spectrum of the SW-PCF detection system was measured as a function of the fiber interaction length and material volume. The SW-PCF measured spectra agreed with reference spectra. The SW-PCF has a core diameter of 3.9μm, outer diameter of 132.5μm. A nearly 5 cm length of the SW-PCF was coupled to the surface of a thin nanofeatured chip. The remaining end of the SW-PCF section is coupled to a laser light source centered at λ=635nm. The diffraction pattern produced by the nano-featured chip is captured by an objective lens and CCD camera for image analysis. The position of the intensity pattern extracted from the analyzed image indicates the spectral components of the absorption characteristics for the detected sample. This nano-featured spectrometer offers spectral resolution down to 0.1nm that makes it possible to detect substances with very detailed spectral features.

  10. Manufacturing method of photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Tae Ho; Ahn, Jin Ho; Biswas, Rana; Constant, Kristen P.; Ho, Kai-Ming; Lee, Jae-Hwang

    2013-01-29

    A manufacturing method of a photonic crystal is provided. In the method, a high-refractive-index material is conformally deposited on an exposed portion of a periodic template composed of a low-refractive-index material by an atomic layer deposition process so that a difference in refractive indices or dielectric constants between the template and adjacent air becomes greater, which makes it possible to form a three-dimensional photonic crystal having a superior photonic bandgap. Herein, the three-dimensional structure may be prepared by a layer-by-layer method.

  11. From optical MEMS to photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sukhan; Kim, Jideog; Lee, Hong-Seok; Moon, Il-Kwon; Won, JongHwa; Ku, Janam; Choi, Hyung; Shin, Hyungjae

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents the emergence of photonic crystals as significant optomechatronics components, following optical MEMS. It is predicted that, in the coming years, optical MEMS and photonic crystals may go through dynamic interactions leading to synergy as well as competition. First, we present the Structured Defect Photonic Crystal (SDPCTM) devised by the authors for providing the freedom of designing photonic bandgap structures, such that the application of photonic crystals be greatly extended. Then, we present the applications of optical MEMS and photonic crystals to displays and telecommunications. It is shown that many of the applications that optical MEMS can contribute to telecommunications and displays may be implemented by photonic crystals.

  12. Radiating dipoles in photonic crystals

    PubMed

    Busch; Vats; John; Sanders

    2000-09-01

    The radiation dynamics of a dipole antenna embedded in a photonic crystal are modeled by an initially excited harmonic oscillator coupled to a non-Markovian bath of harmonic oscillators representing the colored electromagnetic vacuum within the crystal. Realistic coupling constants based on the natural modes of the photonic crystal, i.e., Bloch waves and their associated dispersion relation, are derived. For simple model systems, well-known results such as decay times and emission spectra are reproduced. This approach enables direct incorporation of realistic band structure computations into studies of radiative emission from atoms and molecules within photonic crystals. We therefore provide a predictive and interpretative tool for experiments in both the microwave and optical regimes.

  13. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, G; Spatschek, K H

    2016-06-03

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible.

  14. D2-D1 phase transition of columnar liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. F.; Swift, J.

    1986-04-01

    The D2-D1 phase transition in columnar liquid crystals of the HAT series [e.g., HAT11 (triphenelene hexa-n-dodecanoate)] is discussed within the framework of Landau theory. The order parameters which describe the transition are abstracted from a tensor density function, and are associated with two irreducible representations of the symmetry group of the high-temperature D2 phase. A mechanism for a first-order transition is then suggested in accordance with both theoretical considerations and the experimental result for the D2-D1 transition. Two possible arrangements of the herringbone structure of the D1 phase are obtained, each of which gives six orientational states in the low-temperature D1 phase.

  15. Graphene, other 2D atomic crystals and their heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya S.

    2014-03-01

    Probably the most important ``property'' of graphene is that it has opened a floodgate of experiments on many other 2D atomic crystals: BN, NbSe2, TaS2, MoS2, etc. One can use similar strategies to those applied to graphene and obtain new materials by mechanical or liquid phase exfoliation of layered materials or CVD growth. An alternative strategy to create new 2D crystals is to start with an existing one (like graphene) and use it as an atomic scaffolding to modify it by chemical means (graphane and fluorographene are good examples). The resulting pool of 2D crystals is huge, and they cover a massive range of properties: from the most insulating to the most conductive, from the strongest to the softest. If 2D materials provide a large range of different properties, sandwich structures made up of 2, 3, 4 ...different layers of such materials can offer even greater scope. Since these 2D-based heterostructures can be tailored with atomic precision and individual layers of very different character can be combined together, - the properties of these structures can be tuned to study novel physical phenomena (Coulomb drag, Hostadter butterfly, metal-insulator transition, etc) or to fit an enormous range of possible applications, with the functionality of heterostructure stacks is ``embedded'' in their design (tunnelling or hot-electron transistors, photovoltaic devices). Of particular interest are the tunnelling structures. Being able to control the thickness with atomic precision and having a variety of different material in disposal allows us to modify both the height and the width of the tunnelling barrier in the wide range. The use of graphene as electrodes and utilising insulating (BN) or semiconducting (MoS2, WS2) materials as the tunnelling barrier led to the creation of tunnelling transistors and tunnelling photovoltaic devices and the observation of the resonance tunnelling associated with momentum conservation. We will also consider tunnelling in magnetic

  16. Observation of Vortex Crystals in Freely Relaxing 2D Turbulence.*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, C. Fred

    1998-03-01

    Magnetically confined electron columns evolve as near-ideal incompressible 2D fluids, allowing quantitative study of vortices and self-organization in freely relaxing turbulence. The electron density is proportional to the vorticity ζ (r,θ , t) of the flow, and can be accurately measured at any given time using a phosphor screen and a high-resolution camera. Initially turbulent states are observed to relax through the processes of vortex advection, merger, and filamentation. Initial conditions with Nv = 50 - 100 vortices typically relax as Nv ∝ t^- ξ, with 0.4 <= ξ <= 1.1, in general agreement with dynamic scaling theories. However, for some initial conditions, we observe this turbulent relaxation to be halted by the formation of ordered patterns of vortices (``vortex crystals'') rotating as a rigid pattern within a weaker background of vorticity.^1 After a crystal forms, the random vortex motions damp with time, and we measure ``cooling'' of the crystal pattern. Although vortex crystals have been observed in dissipative systems such as rotating liquid helium, here the flow is essentially inviscid on the cooling timescale. We find that total circulation, angular momentum, and energy are conserved to within a few percent during the initial relaxation. The vortex crystal state persists until weak diffusive or viscous processes dissipate the vortices after thousands of turnover times. Recent 2D vortex-in-cell simulations have reproduced the vortex crystal states and cooling rates; this supports the belief that the cooling occurs in incompressible, inviscid fluid flow. Other experiments and theory have studied the dynamics of various types of vortex patches moving through a background of vorticity: enhanced vorticity ``clumps'' move up a background vorticity gradient, whereas decreased vorticity ``holes'' move down a gradient. Surprisingly, many characteristics of the final vortex crystal states can be predicted by maximization of entropy subject to integral

  17. Photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, Song Liang; Lu, Ling; Soljacic, Marin

    2015-06-23

    A photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) includes a gain medium electromagnetically coupled to a photonic crystal whose energy band structure exhibits a Dirac cone of linear dispersion at the center of the photonic crystal's Brillouin zone. This Dirac cone's vertex is called a Dirac point; because it is at the Brillouin zone center, it is called an accidental Dirac point. Tuning the photonic crystal's band structure (e.g., by changing the photonic crystal's dimensions or refractive index) to exhibit an accidental Dirac point increases the photonic crystal's mode spacing by orders of magnitudes and reduces or eliminates the photonic crystal's distributed in-plane feedback. Thus, the photonic crystal can act as a resonator that supports single-mode output from the PCSEL over a larger area than is possible with conventional PCSELs, which have quadratic band edge dispersion. Because output power generally scales with output area, this increase in output area results in higher possible output powers.

  18. Defect formation and coarsening in hexagonal 2D curved crystals.

    PubMed

    García, Nicolás A; Pezzutti, Aldo D; Register, Richard A; Vega, Daniel A; Gómez, Leopoldo R

    2015-02-07

    In this work we study the processes of defect formation and coarsening of two-dimensional (2D) curved crystal structures. These processes are found to strongly deviate from their counterparts in flat systems. In curved backgrounds the process of defect formation is deeply affected by the curvature, and at the onset of a phase transition the early density of defects becomes highly inhomogeneous. We observe that even a single growing crystal can produce varying densities of defects depending on its initial position and local orientation with regard to the substrate. This process is completely different from flat space, where grain boundaries are formed due to the impingement of different propagating crystals. Quenching the liquid into the crystal phase leads to the formation of a curved polycrystalline structure, characterized by complex arrays of defects. During annealing, mechanisms of geodesic curvature-driven grain boundary motion and defect annihilation lead to increasing crystalline order. Linear arrays of defects diffuse to regions of high curvature, where they are absorbed by disclinations. At the early stage of coarsening the density of dislocations is insensitive to the geometry while the population of isolated disclinations is deeply affected by curvature. The regions with high curvature act as traps for the diffusion of different structures of defects, including disclinations and domain walls.

  19. Dispersion compensation in slot photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plastun, Alexander; Konyukhov, Andrey

    2015-03-01

    Dispersion tailoring using photonic crystal cladding for slot waveguide is proposed. Numerical modeling based on the Maxwell equation for Te and TM modes of the photonic crystal is performed. Slot waveguide provide high intencity at the central area. Photonic crystal cladding of the slot waveguide allow us to compensate high values of the host glass dispersion.

  20. Photonic Crystal Emitters for Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmakh, Veronika; Chan, Walker R.; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Soljacic, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Celanovic, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of 2D photonic crystal (PhC) thermal emitters for a millimeter-scale hydrocarbon TPV microgenerator as a possible replacement for batteries in portable microelectronics, robotics, etc. In our TPV system, combustion heats a PhC emitter to incandescence and the resulting radiation is converted by a low-bandgap TPV cell. The PhC tailors the photonic density of states to produce spectrally confined thermal emission that matches the bandgap of the TPV cell, enabling high heat-to-electricity conversion efficiency. The work builds on a previously developed fabrication process to produce a square array of cylindrical cavities in a metal substrate. We will present ongoing incremental improvements in the optical and thermo-mechanical properties, the fabrication process, and the system integration, as recently combined with fabrication using novel materials, such as sputtered coatings, to enable a monolithic system.

  1. Photonic quantum well composed of photonic crystal and quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaohui; Zhu, Yiping; Wang, Lianwei; Yang, Pingxiong; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-02-01

    A photonic quantum well structure composed of photonic crystal and Fibonacci quasicrystal is investigated by analyzing the transmission spectra and electric field distributions. The defect band in the photonic well can form confined quantized photonic states that can change in the band-gap of the photonic barriers by varying the thickness ratio of the two stacking layers. The number of confined states can be tuned by adjusting the period of the photonic well. The photons traverse the photonic quantum well by resonance tunneling and the coupling effect leads to the high transmission intensity of the confined photonic states.

  2. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states.

  3. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals

    PubMed Central

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states. PMID:27877676

  4. Electromagnetic waves: Negative refraction by photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    2004-03-01

    Recently left-handed materials (LHM) attracted great attention since these materials exhibit negative effective index, which is due to simultaneously negative permeability and permittivity. Pendry proposed that negative effective index in left-handed materials can be used for constructing a perfect lens, which is not limited by diffraction(J. B. Pendry, Negative refraction makes a perfect lens, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 85, 3966 (2000)). Negative refraction is also achievable in a dielectric photonic crystal (PC) that has a periodically modulated positive permittivity and a permeability of unity. Luo et al. has studied negative refraction and subwavelength imaging in photonic crystals(C. Luo, S. G. Johnson, J. D. Joannopoulos, J. B. Pendry, Subwavelength Imaging in Photonic Crystals Phys. Rev. B 68, 045115 (2003)). In this presentation, we report our experimental and theoretical investigation of negative refraction and subwavelength focusing of electromagnetic waves in a 2D PC. Our structure consists of a square array of dielectric rods in air. Transmission measurements are performed for experimentally verifying the predicted negative refraction behavior in our structure. Negative index of refraction determined from the experiment is -1.94 which is very close to the theoretical value of -2.06. Negative refraction is observed for the incidence angles of > 20°(Ertugrul Cubukcu, Koray Aydin, Ekmel Ozbay, S. Foteinopolou, and Costas Soukoulis, Negative Refraction by Photonic Crystals, Nature, vol. 423, 604 (2003)). Since we know the optimum frequency for a broad angle negative refraction, we can use our crystal to test the superlensing effect that was predicted for negative refractive materials. Scanning transmission measurement technique is used to measure the spatial power distribution of the focused electromagnetic waves that radiate from a point source. Full width at half maximum of the focused beam is measured to be 0.21λ, which is in good agreement with the finite

  5. Optical Magnetometer Incorporating Photonic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikov, Igor; Florescu, Lucia

    2007-01-01

    According to a proposal, photonic crystals would be used to greatly increase the sensitivities of optical magnetometers that are already regarded as ultrasensitive. The proposal applies, more specifically, to a state-of-the-art type of quantum coherent magnetometer that exploits the electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) method for determining a small change in a magnetic field indirectly via measurement of the shift, induced by that change, in the hyperfine levels of resonant atoms exposed to the field.

  6. Hybrid colloidal plasmonic-photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Sergei G; Korovin, Alexander V; Regensburger, Alois; Peschel, Ulf

    2011-06-17

    We review the recently emerged class of hybrid metal-dielectric colloidal photonic crystals. The hybrid approach is understood as the combination of a dielectric photonic crystal with a continuous metal film. It allows to achieve a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering at electronic excitations in the metal component into moulding of the light flow in series to the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystal. We consider different realizations of hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystals based on two- and three-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals in association with flat and corrugated metal films. In agreement with model calculations, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tuneable functionality of these crystals.

  7. The crystal nucleation theory revisited: The case of 2D colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, A. E.; Ixtlilco-Cortés, L.

    2011-03-01

    Most of the theories and studies of crystallization and crystal nucleation consider the boundaries between the crystallites and the fluid as smooth. The crystallites are the small clusters of atoms, molecules and/or particles with the symmetry of the crystal lattice that, with a slight chance of success, would grow to form the crystal grains. In fact, in the classical nucleation theory, the crystallites are assumed to have a spherical shape (circular in 2D). As far are we are aware, there is only one experimental work [1] on colloidal crystals that founds rough surfaces for the crystallites and for the crystal grains. Motivated by this work, we performed large Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations in 2D, that would follow the eventual growing of a few crystallites to form the crystal grains. The used potential has, besides the impenetrable hard core, a soft core followed by a potential well. We found that indeed the crystallites have a fractal boundary, whose value we were able to obtain. See the figure below of a typical isolated crystallite. We were also able to obtain the critical crystallite size, measured by its number of particles, Nc, and not by any critical radius. The boundaries of the crystals above Nc also have a fractal structure but of a lower value, closer to one. Finally, we also obtained the line tension between the crystallites and the surrounding fluid, as function of temperature and particle diameter, as well as the chemical potential difference between these two phases. In the URL: www.fis.unam.mx˜˜agus˜ there are posted two movies that can be downloaded: (1) 2D_crystal_nucleation.mp4, and (2) 2D_crystal_growth.mp4, that illustrate the crystal nucleation and its further growth.

  8. Extreme narrow photonic bands and strong photonic localization produced by 2D defect two-segment-connected quadrangular waveguide networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Yang, Xiangbo; Timon Liu, Chengyi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of optical transmission and photonic localization of two-dimensional (2D) defect two-segment-connected quadrangular waveguide networks (DTSCQWNs) and find that many groups of extreme narrow photonic bands are created in the middle of the transmission spectra. The electromagnetic (EM) waves in DTSCQWNs with the frequencies of extreme narrow photonic bands can produce strong photonic localizations by adjusting defect broken degree. On the other hand, we obtain the formula of extreme narrow photonic bands' frequencies dependent on defect broken degree and the formula of the largest intensity of photonic localization dependent on defect broken degree, respectively. It may possess potential application for designing all-optical devices based on strong photonic localizations. Additionally, we propose a so-called defecton mode to study the splitting rules of extreme narrow photonic bands, where decomposition-decimation method is expanded from the field of electronic energy spectra to that of optical transmission spectra.

  9. Simultaneous inhibition and redistribution of spontaneous light emission in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masayuki; Takahashi, Shigeki; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2005-05-27

    Inhibiting spontaneous light emission and redistributing the energy into useful forms are desirable objectives for advances in various fields, including photonics, illuminations, displays, solar cells, and even quantum-information systems. We demonstrate both the "inhibition" and "redistribution" of spontaneous light emission by using two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals, in which the refractive index is changed two-dimensionally. The overall spontaneous emission rate is found to be reduced by a factor of 5 as a result of the 2D photonic bandgap effect. Simultaneously, the light energy is redistributed from the 2D plane to the direction normal to the photonic crystal.

  10. Resonant photonic States in coupled heterostructure photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jd; Sabarinathan, J; Singh, Mr

    2010-02-09

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  11. Resonant Photonic States in Coupled Heterostructure Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors. PMID:20672066

  12. Two-dimensional photonic crystal sensors for visual detection of lectin concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Cai, Zhongyu; Kwak, Daniel H; Liu, Xinyu; Asher, Sanford A

    2014-09-16

    We fabricated a two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal lectin sensing material that utilizes light diffraction from a 2-D colloidal array attached to the surface of a hydrogel that contains mannose carbohydrate groups. Lectin-carbohydrate interactions create hydrogel cross-links that shrink the hydrogel volume and decrease the 2-D particle spacing. This mannose containing 2-D photonic crystal sensor detects Concanavalin A (Con A) through shifts in the 2-D diffraction wavelength. Con A concentrations can be determined by measuring the diffracted wavelength or visually determined from the change in the sensor diffraction color. The concentrations are easily monitored by measuring the 2-D array Debye ring diameter. Our observed detection limit for Con A is 0.02 mg/mL (0.7 μM). The 2-D photonic crystal sensors are completely reversible and can monitor Con A solution concentration changes.

  13. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Ma, Ji; Zhang, Si-Qi; Li, Hong; Wu, Xiang-Yao; Wu, Yi-Heng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied two-dimensional function photonic crystals, in which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates , that can become true easily by electro-optical effect and optical kerr effect. We calculated the band gap structures of TE and TM waves, and found the TE (TM) wave band gaps of function photonic crystals are wider (narrower) than the conventional photonic crystals. For the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, when the dielectric constant functions change, the band gaps numbers, width and position should be changed, and the band gap structures of two-dimensional function photonic crystals can be adjusted flexibly, the needed band gap structures can be designed by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, and it can be of help to design optical devices.

  14. Three-dimensional control of light in a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab.

    PubMed

    Chow, E; Lin, S Y; Johnson, S G; Villeneuve, P R; Joannopoulos, J D; Wendt, J R; Vawter, G A; Zubrzycki, W; Hou, H; Alleman, A

    2000-10-26

    Optoelectronic devices are increasingly important in communication and information technology. To achieve the necessary manipulation of light (which carries information in optoelectronic devices), considerable efforts are directed at the development of photonic crystals--periodic dielectric materials that have so-called photonic bandgaps, which prohibit the propagation of photons having energies within the bandgap region. Straightforward application of the bandgap concept is generally thought to require three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals; their two-dimensional (2D) counterparts confine light in the crystal plane, but not in the perpendicular z direction, which inevitably leads to diffraction losses. Nonetheless, 2D photonic crystals still attract interest because they are potentially more amenable to fabrication by existing techniques and diffraction losses need not seriously impair utility. Here we report the fabrication of a waveguide-coupled photonic crystal slab (essentially a free-standing 2D photonic crystal) with a strong 2D bandgap at wavelengths of about 1.5 microm, yet which is capable of fully controlling light in all three dimensions. These features confirm theoretical calculations on the possibility of achieving 3D light control using 2D bandgaps, with index guiding providing control in the third dimension, and raise the prospect of being able to realize unusual photonic-crystal devices, such as thresholdless lasers.

  15. Higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Gansch, Roman; Kalchmair, Stefan; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron M; Klang, Pavel; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2011-08-15

    We present a detailed investigation of higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs. In such structures the resonances exhibit a blue-shift compared to an ideal two-dimensional photonic crystal, which depends on the order of the slab mode and the polarization. By fabricating a series of photonic crystal slab photo detecting devices, with varying ratios of slab thickness to photonic crystal lattice constant, we are able to distinguish between 0th and 1st order slab modes as well as the polarization from the shift of resonances in the photocurrent spectra. This method complements the photonic band structure mapping technique for characterization of photonic crystal slabs. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  16. Photonic Crystal Devices for Quantum and Nanoscale Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    2005-03-01

    Photonic crystal structures can be built to operate in two opposite regimes: one is a suppression of photon states inside the photonic band gap, and the other is a large enhancement of the density of photon states. Both regimes are of consequence to a number of applications in nanoscale and nonlinear optics, as well as to photonic quantum information technologies. Our work on the employment of photonic crystals to build hardware of solid-state photonic quantum information systems, as well as to construct miniaturized optical devices will be reviewed in this talk. We have demonstrated sources of single photons on demand based on quantum dots in micropost microcavities that exhibit a large spontaneous emission rate enhancement (Purcell factor of five) together with a small multi-photon probability (2% compared to a Poisson-distributed source of the same intensity). We have also tested the indistinguishability of emitted single photons from such a source through a Hong-Ou-Mandel-type two-photon interference experiment, and found that consecutive photons exhibit a mean wave-packet overlap as large as 0.81, making this source useful in a variety of experiments in quantum optics and quantum information. The applications of such a device include secure quantum cryptography and linear optical quantum computation. We have also developed two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavities of finite depth with embedded quantum dots that exhibit large quality factors (˜3000) together with small mode volumes (˜0.5(λ/n)^3) and with a maximum field intensity in the high-index region, which is of importance for enhanced interaction with quantum dot excitons. We have performed spectroscopy on a single quantum dot coupled to such a cavity, and demonstrated a very strong modification of its radiative properties, as well as a single-photon generation on demand. A strong interaction between a quantum dot exciton and the field enabled by such a microcavity is of importance for

  17. Silicon-based photonic crystals fabricated using proton beam writing combined with electrochemical etching method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A method for fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) silicon nanostructures based on selective formation of porous silicon using ion beam irradiation of bulk p-type silicon followed by electrochemical etching is shown. It opens a route towards the fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) and 3D silicon-based photonic crystals with high flexibility and industrial compatibility. In this work, we present the fabrication of 2D photonic lattice and photonic slab structures and propose a process for the fabrication of 3D woodpile photonic crystals based on this approach. Simulated results of photonic band structures for the fabricated 2D photonic crystals show the presence of TE or TM gap in mid-infrared range. PMID:22824206

  18. Silicon-based photonic crystals fabricated using proton beam writing combined with electrochemical etching method.

    PubMed

    Dang, Zhiya; Breese, Mark Bh; Recio-Sánchez, Gonzalo; Azimi, Sara; Song, Jiao; Liang, Haidong; Banas, Agnieszka; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Martín-Palma, Raúl José

    2012-07-23

    A method for fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) silicon nanostructures based on selective formation of porous silicon using ion beam irradiation of bulk p-type silicon followed by electrochemical etching is shown. It opens a route towards the fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) and 3D silicon-based photonic crystals with high flexibility and industrial compatibility. In this work, we present the fabrication of 2D photonic lattice and photonic slab structures and propose a process for the fabrication of 3D woodpile photonic crystals based on this approach. Simulated results of photonic band structures for the fabricated 2D photonic crystals show the presence of TE or TM gap in mid-infrared range.

  19. Photonic crystal fibers for food quality analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinin, A. V.; Zanishevskaja, A. A.; Tuchin, V. V.; Skibina, Yu. S.; Silokhin, I. Y.

    2012-06-01

    The aspects of application of the hollow core photonic crystal waveguides for spectroscopic analysis of liquid medium were considered. The possibility of using these structures for analysis of a fruit juice was evaluated. The principles of processing of photonic crystal waveguide transmission spectra, which is sensitive to quality of juice, its composition, and main component concentration, were revealed.

  20. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  1. Chalcogenide glass photonic crystals: progress and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillet, Christian; Lee, Michael W.; Gai, Xin; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; Monat, Christelle; Mägi, Eric; Moss, David J.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Madden, Steve; Choi, Duk-Yong; Bulla, Douglas; Luther-Davies, Barry

    2010-02-01

    In this review, we discuss the progress and prospects offered by chalcogenide glass photonic crystals. We show that by making photonic crystals from a highly-nonlinear chalcogenide glass, we have the potential to integrate a variety of active devices into a photonic chip. We describe the testing of two-dimensional Ge33As12Se55 chalcogenide glass photonic crystal membrane devices (waveguides and microcavities). We then demonstrate the ability to not only post-tune the devices properties but also create high Q cavities by using the material photosensitivity.

  2. Integrated photonic crystals and quantum well infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Tsui, D. C.; Choi, K. K.

    2004-03-01

    GaAs/AlGaAs based quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIP) are becoming very reliable technologies that are widely used to detect mid-infrared light. Photonic crystals, on the other hand, are very powerful tools to manipulate light and thus are very crucial elements in future optical integration circuits. have fabricated a series of devices that incorporate QWIP and 2d photonic crystals together on a single GaAs based chip. These devices work at the 7-13 μ m range. Compared with the conventional photonic crystals designed for fiber communication, these devices have the advantage that they only require photolithography instead of e-beam lithography. The fabrication of such devices is thus far less costly and time-consuming.

  3. Photonic Paint Developed with Metallic Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Po; Williams, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This work details the design and simulation of an inconspicuous photonic paint that can be applied onto an object for anticounterfeit and tag, track, and locate (TTL) applications. The paint consists of three-dimensional metallic tilted woodpile photonic crystals embedded into a visible and infrared transparent polymer film, which can be applied to almost any surface. The tilted woodpile photonic crystals are designed with a specific pass band detectable at nearly all incident angles of light. When painted onto a surface, these crystals provide a unique reflective infra-red optical signature that can be easily observed and recorded to verify the location or contents of a package.

  4. Luminescence spectra of a cholesteric photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolganov, P. V.

    2017-05-01

    The transmission and luminescence spectra of a cholesteric photonic crystal doped with an organic dye are measured. The density of photon states is calculated using the material parameters obtained from the comparison of the experimental and theoretical spectra. The shape of the luminescence spectra is modified with respect to the density of photon states owing to the difference in the structure of the normal modes of the photonic crystal near the short-wavelength and long-wavelength edges of the photonic quasi-band gap upon the "pushing" of the photon states from the gap and to the nonvanishing orientation ordering of the luminescent molecules. The luminescence spectrum calculated taking into account the chiral structure of the photonic crystal agrees with the experimental spectrum.

  5. Photonic crystal technology for terahertz system integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Masayuki; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2016-04-01

    Developing terahertz integration technology is essential for practical use of terahertz electromagnetic waves (0.1-10 THz) in various applications including broadband wireless communication, spectroscopic sensing, and nondestructive imaging. In this paper, we present our recent challenges towards terahertz system integration based on photonic crystal technology such as the development of terahertz transceivers. We use photonic-crystal slabs consisting of a twodimensional lattice of air holes formed in a silicon slab to develop low loss compact terahertz components in planar structures. The demonstration of ultralow loss (< 0.1 dB/cm) waveguides and integrated transceiver devices in the 0.3 THz band shows the potential for the application of photonic crystals to terahertz integration technology. Improving the coupling efficiency between the photonic crystal waveguide and resonant tunneling diode is important to take full advantage of the ultralow loss photonic crystal waveguides.

  6. Current trends on 2D materials for photonics devices: an NSF perspective (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallahi, Mahmoud

    2017-05-01

    Recent advancements in two-dimensional (2D) materials have opened significant research opportunities in optics and photonics. While the initial focus on 2D materials was on Graphene, new generation of 2D materials such as hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), monolayer black phosphorous (BP) and other monolayer structures have shown unique electrical and optical properties. For example, h-BN is an insulator, while monolayers of some TMDCs such as MoS2 and WSe2 are direct band-gap semiconductors. Depending on the choice of material compositional and layer variations their optical properties can be engineered, making them particularly attractive as novel light sources, photodetectors, modulators and photovoltaic components, in particular for few photon applications. Plasmonic properties of 2D materials make them suitable for nanophotonics and monolithic integration with other conventional materials. The National Science Foundation (NSF) is a US federal agency dedicated to promote progress of science and engineering. NSF is the funding source for approximately 24 percent of all federally supported basic research conducted by America's colleges and universities. NSF has recently supported several initiatives related to novel 2D material and device research. In this talk, I will first give an overview of the NSF programs and funding opportunities. The second part of the talk will be focused on the programs related to 2D materials for photonic devices and program specific initiatives. Several highlights of the recent achievements and awards in the field of 2D materials for photonic devices will be presented.

  7. Fractional relaxations in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldi, Filippo; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    A quantum dot interacting with the radiation field of a photonic crystal is considered. An analytical description of the dynamics and the coherence between the two states of the quantum dot is provided. Besides the well-known trapping, a fractional nature of the dynamics appears via relaxations of the Mittag-Leffler type. Furthermore, coherence exhibits a transition from the decay {{t}-3/2} to {{t}-1/2} if the transition frequency of the quantum dot is exactly in the middle of the band gap. Similarly, the population of the excited level undergoes a transition from the relaxation 1/{{t}3} to 1/t. These resonances and transitions belong also to the context of matter-wave emissions in optical lattices.

  8. Photonic crystal negative refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toshihiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Asatsuma, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) are multi-dimensional periodic gratings, in which the light propagation is dominated by Bragg diffraction that appears to be refraction at the flat surfaces of the PC. The refraction angle from positive to negative, perfectly or only partially obeying Snell's law, can be tailored using photonic band theory. The negative refraction enables novel prism, collimation, and lens effects. Because PCs usually consist of two transparent media, these effects occur at absorption-free frequencies, affording significant design flexibility for free-space optics. The PC slab, a high-index membrane with a two-dimensional airhole array, must be carefully designed to avoid reflection and diffraction losses. Light focusing based on negative refraction forms a parallel image of a light source, facilitating optical couplers and condenser lenses for wavelength demultiplexing. A compact wavelength demultiplexer can be designed by combining the prism and lens effects. The collimation effect is obtainable not only inside but also outside of the PC by optimizing negative refractive condition.

  9. Optimization of photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Smajic, Jasmin; Hafner, Christian; Erni, Daniel

    2004-11-01

    We report on the numerical structural optimization of two-dimensional photonic crystal (PhC) power dividers by using two different classes of optimization algorithms, namely, a modified truncated Newton (TN) gradient search as deterministic local optimization scheme and an evolutionary optimization representing the probabilistic global search strategies. Because of the severe accuracy requirements during optimization, the proper PhC device has been simulated by using the multiple-multipole program that is contained in the MaX-1 software package. With both optimizer classes, we found reliable and promising solutions that provide vanishing power reflection and perfect power balance at any specified frequency within the photonic bandgap. This outcome is astonishing in light of the discrete nature inherent in the underlying PhC structure, especially when the optimizer is allowed to intervene only within a very small volume of the device. Even under such limiting constraints structural optimization is not only feasible but has proven to be highly successful.

  10. Photonic crystals with topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Knitter, Sebastian; Xiong, Wen; Cao, Hui

    2015-02-01

    We introduce topological defects to a square lattice of elliptical cylinders. Despite the broken translational symmetry, the long-range positional order of the cylinders leads to a residual photonic band gap in the local density of optical states. However, the band-edge modes are strongly modified by the spatial variation of the ellipse orientation. The Γ -X band-edge mode splits into four regions of high intensity and the output flux becomes asymmetric due to the formation of crystalline domains with different orientation. The Γ -M band-edge mode has the energy flux circulating around the topological defect center, creating an optical vortex. By removing the elliptical cylinders at the center, we create localized defect states, which are dominated by either clockwise or counterclockwise circulating waves. The flow direction can be switched by changing the ellipse orientation. The deterministic aperiodic variation of the unit cell orientation adds another dimension to the control of light in photonic crystals, enabling the creation of a diversified field pattern and energy flow landscape.

  11. Red-green-blue 2 D tuneable liquid crystal laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, H. J.; Morris, S. M.; Ford, A. D.; Hands, P. J. W.; Wilkinson, T. D.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we review our recent experimental work on coherent and blue phase liquid crystal lasers.We will present results on thin-film photonic band edge lasing devices using dye-doped low molar mass liquid crystals in self-organised chiral nematic and blue phases. We show that high Q-factor lasers can be achieved in these materials and demonstrate that a single mode output with a very narrow line width can be readily achievable in well-aligned mono-domain samples. Further, we have found that the performance of the laser, i.e. the slope efficiency and the excitation threshold, are dependent upon the physical parameters of the low molar mass chiral nematic liquid crystals. Specifically, slope efficiencies greater than 60% could be achieved depending upon the materials used and the device geometry employed. We will discuss the important parameters of the liquid crystal host/dye guest materials and device configuration that are needed to achieve such high slope efficiencies. Further we demonstrate how the wavelength of the laser can be tuned using an in-plane electric field in a direction perpendicular to the helix axis via a flexoelectric mechanism as well as thermally using thermochromic effects. We will then briefly outline data on room temperature blue phase lasers and further show how liquid crystal/lenslet arrays have been used to demonstrate 2D laser emission of any desired wavelength. Finally, we present preliminary data on LED/incoherent pumping of RG liquid crystal lasers leading to a continuous wave output.

  12. Butterfly wing color: A photonic crystal demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically modeled the optical behavior of a natural occurring photonic crystal, as defined by the geometrical characteristics of the Teinopalpus Imperialis butterfly. In particular, following a genetic algorithm approach, we demonstrate how its wings follow a triclinic crystal geometry with a tetrahedron unit base. By performing both photonic band analysis and transmission/reflection simulations, we are able to explain the characteristic colors emerging by the butterfly wings, thus confirming their crystal form.

  13. Photonic Crystal Fiber Based Entangled Photon Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    shifted-fiber ( DSF ) and a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) can be cooled at the liquid nitrogen temperature (77K). The advantage of the HNLF is a larger......signal for one of the photon-pair generated in four-wave mixing process. χ : the Kerr nonlinearity. k : wave vector. DSF : dispersion shifted fiber

  14. Sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Lasala, R.; Coudray, N.; Abdine, A.; Zhang, Z.; Lopez-Redondo, M.; Kirshenbaum, R.; Alexopoulos, J.; Zolnai, Z.; Stokes, D.L.; Ubarretxena-Belandia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Electron crystallography is well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. This technique relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, grown generally by reconstitution of purified membrane proteins into proteoliposomes under conditions favoring the formation of well-ordered lattices. Growing these crystals presents one of the major hurdles in the application of this technique. To identify conditions favoring crystallization a wide range of factors that can lead to a vast matrix of possible reagent combinations must be screened. However, in 2D crystallization these factors have traditionally been surveyed in a relatively limited fashion. To address this problem we carried out a detailed analysis of published 2D crystallization conditions for 12 β-barrel and 138 α-helical membrane proteins. From this analysis we identified the most successful conditions and applied them in the design of new sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization. Using these matrices we have run 19 crystallization screens for 16 different membrane proteins totaling over 1,300 individual crystallization conditions. Six membrane proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals suitable for structure determination, indicating that these new matrices show promise to accelerate the success rate of membrane protein 2D crystallization. PMID:25478971

  15. Sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization.

    PubMed

    Lasala, R; Coudray, N; Abdine, A; Zhang, Z; Lopez-Redondo, M; Kirshenbaum, R; Alexopoulos, J; Zolnai, Z; Stokes, D L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, I

    2015-02-01

    Electron crystallography is well suited for studying the structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid bilayer environment. This technique relies on electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, grown generally by reconstitution of purified membrane proteins into proteoliposomes under conditions favoring the formation of well-ordered lattices. Growing these crystals presents one of the major hurdles in the application of this technique. To identify conditions favoring crystallization a wide range of factors that can lead to a vast matrix of possible reagent combinations must be screened. However, in 2D crystallization these factors have traditionally been surveyed in a relatively limited fashion. To address this problem we carried out a detailed analysis of published 2D crystallization conditions for 12 β-barrel and 138 α-helical membrane proteins. From this analysis we identified the most successful conditions and applied them in the design of new sparse and incomplete factorial matrices to screen membrane protein 2D crystallization. Using these matrices we have run 19 crystallization screens for 16 different membrane proteins totaling over 1300 individual crystallization conditions. Six membrane proteins have yielded diffracting 2D crystals suitable for structure determination, indicating that these new matrices show promise to accelerate the success rate of membrane protein 2D crystallization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Recent advances and progress in photonic crystal-based gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Amit Kumar; Sankar Dutta, Hemant; Pal, Suchandan

    2017-05-01

    This review covers the recent progress made in the photonic crystal-based sensing technology for gas sensing applications. Photonic crystal-based sensing has tremendous potential because of its obvious advantages in sensitivity, stability, miniaturisation, portability, online use, remote monitoring etc. Several 1D and 2D photonic crystal structures including photonic crystal waveguides and cavities for gas sensing applications have been discussed in this review. For each kind of photonic crystal structure, the novelty, measurement principle and their respective gas sensing properties are presented. The reported works and the corresponding results predict the possibility to realize a commercially viable miniaturized and highly sensitive photonic crystal-based optical gas sensor having flexibility in the structure of ultra-compact size with excellent sensing properties.

  17. Photonic crystal slab quantum well infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchmair, S.; Detz, H.; Cole, G. D.; Andrews, A. M.; Klang, P.; Nobile, M.; Gansch, R.; Ostermaier, C.; Schrenk, W.; Strasser, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this letter we present a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), which is fabricated as a photonic crystal slab (PCS). With the PCS it is possible to enhance the absorption efficiency by increasing photon lifetime in the detector active region. To understand the optical properties of the device we simulate the PCS photonic band structure, which differs significantly from a real two-dimensional photonic crystal. By fabricating a PCS-QWIP with 100x less quantum well doping, compared to a standard QWIP, we are able to see strong absorption enhancement and sharp resonance peaks up to temperatures of 170 K.

  18. Novel photonic crystal cavities and related structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    The key accomplishment of this project is to achieve a much more in-depth understanding of the thermal emission physics of metallic photonic crystal through theoretical modeling and experimental measurements. An improved transfer matrix technique was developed to enable incorporation of complex dielectric function. Together with microscopic theory describing emitter radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics, a non-equilibrium thermal emission model is developed. Finally, experimental methodology was developed to measure absolute emissivity of photonic crystal at high temperatures with accuracy of +/-2%. Accurate emissivity measurements allow us to validate the procedure to treat the effect of the photonic crystal substrate.

  19. Stretchable photonic crystal cavity with wide frequency tunability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun L; Kim, Hyunwoo; de Leon, Nathalie; Frank, Ian W; Robinson, Jacob T; McCutcheon, Murray; Liu, Mingzhao; Lukin, Mikhail D; Loncar, Marko; Park, Hongkun

    2013-01-09

    We report a new approach for realizing a flexible photonic crystal (PC) cavity that enables wide-range tuning of its resonance frequency. Our PC cavity consists of a regular array of silicon nanowires embedded in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix and exhibits a cavity resonance in the telecommunication band that can be reversibly tuned over 60 nm via mechanical stretching-a record for two-dimensional (2D) PC structures. These mechanically reconfigurable devices could find potential applications in integrated photonics, sensing in biological systems, and smart materials.

  20. Photonic crystals and optical mode engineering for thin film photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Gomard, Guillaume; Peretti, Romain; Drouard, Emmanuel; Meng, Xianqin; Seassal, Christian

    2013-05-06

    In this paper, we present the design, analysis, and experimental results on the integration of 2D photonic crystals in thin film photovoltaic solar cells based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon. We introduce an analytical approach based on time domain coupled mode theory to investigate the impact of the photon lifetime and anisotropy of the optical resonances on the absorption efficiency. Specific design rules are derived from this analysis. We also show that, due to the specific properties of the photonic crystal resonances, the angular acceptance of such solar cells is particularly high. Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis simulations show that the absorption in the a-Si:H active layers, integrated from 300 to 750 nm, is only decreased from 65.7% to 60% while the incidence angle is increased from 0 to 55°. Experimental results confirm the stability of the incident light absorption in the patterned stack, for angles of incidence up to 50°.

  1. Etched distributed Bragg reflectors as three-dimensional photonic crystals: photonic bands and density of states.

    PubMed

    Pavarini, E; Andreani, L C

    2002-09-01

    The photonic band dispersion and density of states (DOS) are calculated for the three-dimensional (3D) hexagonal structure corresponding to a distributed Bragg reflector patterned with a 2D triangular lattice of circular holes. Results for the Si/SiO(2) and GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As systems determine the optimal parameters for which a gap in the 2D plane occurs and overlaps the 1D gap of the multilayer. The DOS is considerably reduced in correspondence with the overlap of 2D and 1D gaps. Also, the local density of states (i.e., the DOS weighted with the squared electric field at a given point) has strong variations depending on the position. Both results imply substantial changes of spontaneous emission rates and patterns for a local emitter embedded in the structure and make this system attractive for the fabrication of a 3D photonic crystal with controlled radiative properties.

  2. Photonic crystal ring resonator based optical filters for photonic integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, a two Dimensional (2D) Photonic Crystal Ring Resonator (PCRR) based optical Filters namely Add Drop Filter, Bandpass Filter, and Bandstop Filter are designed for Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs). The normalized output response of the filters is obtained using 2D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and the band diagram of periodic and non-periodic structure is attained by Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) method. The size of the device is minimized from a scale of few tens of millimeters to the order of micrometers. The overall size of the filters is around 11.4 μm × 11.4 μm which is highly suitable of photonic integrated circuits.

  3. Photonics crystal fiber Raman sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuan; Bond, Tiziana C.; Zhang, Jin Z.; Li, Yat; Gu, Claire

    2012-11-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) employs a guiding mechanism fundamentally different from that in conventional index guiding fibers. In an HCPCF, periodic air channels in a glass matrix act as reflectors to confine light in an empty core. As a result, the interaction between light and glass can be very small. Therefore, HCPCF has been used in applications that require extremely low non-linearity, high breakdown threshold, and zero dispersion. However, their applications in optical sensing, especially in chemical and biological sensing, have only been extensively explored recently. Besides their well-recognized optical properties the hollow cores of the fibers can be easily filled with liquid or gas, providing an ideal sampling mechanism in sensors. Recently, we have demonstrated that by filling up a HCPCF with gas or liquid samples, it is possible to significantly increase the sensitivity of the sensors in either regular Raman or surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. This is because the confinement of both light and sample inside the hollow core enables direct interaction between the propagating wave and the analyte. In this paper, we report our recent work on using HCPCF as a platform for Raman or SERS in the detection of low concentration greenhouse gas (ambient CO2), biomedically significant molecules (e.g., glucose), and bacteria. We have demonstrated that by filling up a HCPCF with gas or liquid samples, it is possible to significantly increase the sensitivity of the sensors in either regular Raman or SERS applications.

  4. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres.

    PubMed

    Russell, P St J; Beravat, R; Wong, G K L

    2017-02-28

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic 'space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of 'numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    PubMed Central

    Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic ‘space’, cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of ‘numerical experiments’ based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069771

  6. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, P. St. J.; Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic `space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of `numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  7. Coupled External Cavity Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Ge, Chun; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    We report a fundamentally new approach to enhance fluorescence in which surface adsorbed fluorophore-tagged biomolecules are excited on a photonic crystal surface that functions as a narrow bandwidth and tunable mirror of an external cavity laser. This scheme leads to ~10× increase in the electromagnetic enhancement factor compared to ordinary photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence. In our experiments, the cavity automatically tunes its lasing wavelength to the resonance wavelength of the photonic crystal, ensuring optimal on-resonance coupling even in the presence of variable device parameters and variations in the density of surface-adsorbed capture molecules. We achieve ~105× improvement in the limit of detection of a fluorophore-tagged protein compared to its detection on an unpatterned glass substrate. The enhanced fluorescence signal and easy optical alignment make cavity-coupled photonic crystals a viable approach for further reducing detection limits of optically-excited light emitters that are used in biological assays. PMID:23129575

  8. Coupled external cavity photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Ge, Chun; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-05-01

    We report a fundamentally new approach to enhance fluorescence in which surface adsorbed fluorophore-tagged biomolecules are excited on a photonic crystal surface that functions as a narrow bandwidth and tunable mirror of an external cavity laser. This scheme leads to ∼10× increase in the electromagnetic enhancement factor compared to ordinary photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence. In our experiments, the cavity automatically tunes its lasing wavelength to the resonance wavelength of the photonic crystal, ensuring optimal on-resonance coupling even in the presence of variable device parameters and variations in the density of surface-adsorbed capture molecules. We achieve ∼10(5) × improvement in the limit of detection of a fluorophore-tagged protein compared to its detection on an unpatterned glass substrate. The enhanced fluorescence signal and easy optical alignment make cavity-coupled photonic crystals a viable approach for further reducing detection limits of optically-excited light emitters that are used in biological assays.

  9. Photonic crystal: energy-related applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zhuo; Park, Joong-Mok; Constant, Kristen; Kim, Tae-Geun; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-06-08

    We review recent work on photonic-crystal fabrication using soft-lithography techniques. We consider applications of the resulting structures in energy-related areas such as lighting and solar-energy harvesting. In general, our aim is to introduce the reader to the concepts of photonic crystals, describe their history, development, and fabrication techniques and discuss a selection of energy-related applications.

  10. Electrically Driven Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Brown-Goebeler, J. L. Jewell, and J. V. Hove, “Top- surface-emitting GaAs four- quantum - well lasers emitting at 0.85 μm,” Electorn. Lett., vol. 26, pp...modulation, lasers , light-emitting diodes, modulation, photodetectors, photonic bandgap materials, quantum dots (QDs). I. INTRODUCTION PHOTONIC...improved versus similar quantum well (QW) systems [32]. Fig. 2 shows a simplified schematic diagram of the lateral junction photonic crystal fabrication

  11. Photonic crystal waveguide created by selective infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas Bedoya, A.; Domachuk, P.; Grillet, C.; Monat, C.; Mägi, E. C.; Li, E.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2012-06-01

    The marriage of photonics and microfluidics ("optofluidics") uses the inherent mobility of fluids to reversibly tune photonic structures beyond traditional fabrication methods by infiltrating voids in said structures. Photonic crystals (PhCs) strongly control light on the wavelength scale and are well suited to optofluidic tuning because their periodic airhole microstructure is a natural candidate for housing liquids. The infiltration of a single row of holes in the PhC matrix modifies the effective refractive index allowing optical modes to be guided by the PhC bandgap. In this work we present the first experimental demonstration of a reconfigurable single mode W1 photonic crystal defect waveguide created by selective liquid infiltration. We modified a hexagonal silicon planar photonic crystal membrane by selectively filling a single row of air holes with ~300nm resolution, using high refractive index ionic liquid. The modification creates optical confinement in the infiltrated region and allows propagation of a single optical waveguide mode. We describe the challenges arising from the infiltration process and the liquid/solid surface interaction in the photonic crystal. We include a detailed comparison between analytic and numerical modeling and experimental results, and introduce a new approach to create an offset photonic crystal cavity by varying the nature of the selective infiltration process.

  12. 2D modeling of the regeneration surface growth on crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, V. G.; Gavryushkin, P. N.; Fursenko, D. A.

    2012-11-01

    A physical model is proposed to describe the growth of regeneration surfaces (flat crystal surfaces that are not parallel to any possible faces). According to this model, the change in the growth rate of a regeneration surface during its evolution and the decrease in the number of subindividuals forming the growth front can be explained by the implementation of two types of geometric selection: within each subindividual (the absorption of rapidly growing faces by slowly growing ones) and between subindividuals (when subindividuals absorb each other). A numerical modeling of the growth of the regeneration surface (30.30.19) of potassium alum crystals showed quantitative agreement between the model proposed and the experimental data.

  13. Optical trapping apparatus, methods and applications using photonic crystal resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, David; Chen, Yih-Fan

    2015-06-16

    A plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses and a plurality optical trapping methods using the plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses include located and formed over a substrate a photonic waveguide that is coupled (i.e., either separately coupled or integrally coupled) with a photonic crystal resonator. In a particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a monocrystalline silicon (or other) photonic material absent any chemical functionalization. In another particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a silicon nitride material which when actuating the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus with a 1064 nanometer resonant photonic radiation wavelength (or other resonant photonic radiation wavelength in a range from about 700 to about 1200 nanometers) provides no appreciable heating of an aqueous sample fluid that is analyzed by the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus.

  14. Wafer-scale plasmonic and photonic crystal sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, M. C.; Liu, J.-N.; Farhang, A.; Williamson, B.; Black, M.; Wangensteen, T.; Fraser, J.; Petrova, R.; Cunningham, B. T.

    2015-08-01

    200 mm diameter wafer-scale fabrication, metrology, and optical modeling results are reviewed for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors based on 2-D metallic nano-dome and nano-hole arrays (NHA's) as well as 1-D photonic crystal sensors based on a leaky-waveguide mode resonance effect, with potential applications in label free sensing, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and surface-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SEFS). Potential markets include micro-arrays for medical diagnostics, forensic testing, environmental monitoring, and food safety. 1-D and 2-D nanostructures were fabricated on glass, fused silica, and silicon wafers using optical lithography and semiconductor processing techniques. Wafer-scale optical metrology results are compared to FDTD modeling and presented along with application-based performance results, including label-free plasmonic and photonic crystal sensing of both surface binding kinetics and bulk refractive index changes. In addition, SEFS and SERS results are presented for 1-D photonic crystal and 2-D metallic nano-array structures. Normal incidence transmittance results for a 550 nm pitch NHA showed good bulk refractive index sensitivity, however an intensity-based design with 665 nm pitch was chosen for use as a compact, label-free sensor at both 650 and 632.8 nm wavelengths. The optimized NHA sensor gives an SPR shift of about 480 nm per refractive index unit when detecting a series of 0-40% glucose solutions, but according to modeling shows about 10 times greater surface sensitivity when operating at 532 nm. Narrow-band photonic crystal resonance sensors showed quality factors over 200, with reasonable wafer-uniformity in terms of both resonance position and peak height.

  15. Photonic crystal biosensors towards on-chip integration.

    PubMed

    Threm, Daniela; Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Gerken, Martina

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal technology has attracted large interest in the last years. The possibility to generate highly sensitive sensor elements with photonic crystal structures is very promising for medical or environmental applications. The low-cost fabrication on the mass scale is as advantageous as the compactness and reliability of photonic crystal biosensors. The possibility to integrate microfluidic channels together with photonic crystal structures allows for highly compact devices. This article reviews different types of photonic crystal sensors including 1D photonic crystal biosensors, biosensors with photonic crystal slabs, photonic crystal waveguide biosensors and biosensors with photonic crystal microcavities. Their applications in biomolecular and pathogen detection are highlighted. The sensitivities and the detection limits of the different biosensors are compared. The focus is on the possibilities to integrate photonic crystal biosensors on-chip. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Controlling spontaneous emission in bioreplica photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Matthew R.; Butler, Elizabeth S.; Bartl, Michael H.

    2012-04-01

    Sophisticated methods have been created by nature to produce structure-based colors as a way to address the need of a wide variety of organisms. This pallet of available structures presents a unique opportunity for the investigation of new photonic crystal designs. Low-temperature sol-gel biotemplating methods were used to transform a single biotemplate into a variety of inorganic oxide structures. The density of optical states was calculated for a diamond-based natural photonic crystal, as well as several structures templated from it. Calculations were experimentally probed by spontaneous emission studies using time correlated single photon counting measurements.

  17. Enhancement of nonlinear effects using photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Soljacić, Marin; Joannopoulos, J D

    2004-04-01

    The quest for all-optical signal processing is generally deemed to be impractical because optical nonlinearities are usually weak. The emerging field of nonlinear photonic crystals seems destined to change this view dramatically. Theoretical considerations show that all-optical devices using photonic crystal designs promise to be smaller than the wavelength of light, and to operate with bandwidths that are very difficult to achieve electronically. When created in commonly used materials, these devices could operate at powers of only a few milliwatts. Moreover, if these designs are combined with materials and systems that support electromagnetically induced transparency, operation at single-photon power levels could be feasible.

  18. Controllable liquid crystal gratings for an adaptive 2D/3D auto-stereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. A.; Jin, T.; He, L. C.; Chu, Z. H.; Guo, T. L.; Zhou, X. T.; Lin, Z. X.

    2017-02-01

    2D/3D switchable, viewpoint controllable and 2D/3D localizable auto-stereoscopic displays based on controllable liquid crystal gratings are proposed in this work. Using the dual-layer staggered structure on the top substrate and bottom substrate as driven electrodes within a liquid crystal cell, the ratio between transmitting region and shielding region can be selectively controlled by the corresponding driving circuit, which indicates that 2D/3D switch and 3D video sources with different disparity images can reveal in the same auto-stereoscopic display system. Furthermore, the controlled region in the liquid crystal gratings presents 3D model while other regions maintain 2D model in the same auto-stereoscopic display by the corresponding driving circuit. This work demonstrates that the controllable liquid crystal gratings have potential applications in the field of auto-stereoscopic display.

  19. Global regularity and uniqueness of weak solution for the 2-D liquid crystal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Zhifei

    We prove the global existence and regularity of weak solution for the 2-D liquid crystal flows with the large initial velocity. The uniqueness of weak solution is also proved by using the Littlewood-Paley analysis.

  20. Large-area high-quality 2D ultrathin Mo2C superconducting crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chuan; Wang, Libin; Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Long; Guo, Jingkun; Kang, Ning; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2015-11-01

    Transition metal carbides (TMCs) are a large family of materials with many intriguing properties and applications, and high-quality 2D TMCs are essential for investigating new physics and properties in the 2D limit. However, the 2D TMCs obtained so far are chemically functionalized, defective nanosheets having maximum lateral dimensions of ~10 μm. Here we report the fabrication of large-area high-quality 2D ultrathin α-Mo2C crystals by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The crystals are a few nanometres thick, over 100 μm in size, and very stable under ambient conditions. They show 2D characteristics of superconducting transitions that are consistent with Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless behaviour and show strong anisotropy with magnetic field orientation; moreover, the superconductivity is also strongly dependent on the crystal thickness. Our versatile CVD process allows the fabrication of other high-quality 2D TMC crystals, such as ultrathin WC and TaC crystals, which further expand the large family of 2D materials.

  1. Large-area high-quality 2D ultrathin Mo2C superconducting crystals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuan; Wang, Libin; Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Long; Guo, Jingkun; Kang, Ning; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2015-11-01

    Transition metal carbides (TMCs) are a large family of materials with many intriguing properties and applications, and high-quality 2D TMCs are essential for investigating new physics and properties in the 2D limit. However, the 2D TMCs obtained so far are chemically functionalized, defective nanosheets having maximum lateral dimensions of ∼10 μm. Here we report the fabrication of large-area high-quality 2D ultrathin α-Mo2C crystals by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The crystals are a few nanometres thick, over 100 μm in size, and very stable under ambient conditions. They show 2D characteristics of superconducting transitions that are consistent with Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless behaviour and show strong anisotropy with magnetic field orientation; moreover, the superconductivity is also strongly dependent on the crystal thickness. Our versatile CVD process allows the fabrication of other high-quality 2D TMC crystals, such as ultrathin WC and TaC crystals, which further expand the large family of 2D materials.

  2. Amplified Photon Upconversion by Photonic Shell of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2017-04-26

    As an effective platform to exploit triplet-triplet-annihilation-based photon upconversion (TTA-UC), microcapsules composed of a fluidic UC core and photonic shell are microfluidically prepared using a triple emulsion as the template. The photonic shell consists of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) with a periodic helical structure, exhibiting a photonic band gap. Combined with planar anchoring at the boundaries, the shell serves as a resonance cavity for TTA-UC emission and enables spectral tuning of the UC under low-power-density excitation. The CLC shell can be stabilized by introducing a polymerizable mesogen in the LC host. Because of the microcapsule spherical symmetry, spontaneous emission of the delayed fluorescence is omnidirectionally amplified at the edge of the stop band. These results demonstrate the range of opportunities provided by TTA-UC systems for the future design of low-threshold photonic devices.

  3. Enhanced photon absorption in spiral nanostructured solar cells using layered 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Tahersima, Mohammad H; Sorger, Volker J

    2015-08-28

    Recent investigations of semiconducting two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides have provided evidence for strong light absorption relative to its thickness attributed to high density of states. Stacking a combination of metallic, insulating, and semiconducting 2D materials enables functional devices with atomic thicknesses. While photovoltaic cells based on 2D materials have been demonstrated, the reported absorption is still just a few percent of the incident light due to their sub-wavelength thickness leading to low cell efficiencies. Here we show that taking advantage of the mechanical flexibility of 2D materials by rolling a molybdenum disulfide (MoS(2))/graphene (Gr)/hexagonal boron nitride stack to a spiral solar cell allows for optical absorption up to 90%. The optical absorption of a 1 μm long hetero-material spiral cell consisting of the aforementioned hetero stack is about 50% stronger compared to a planar MoS(2) cell of the same thickness; although the volumetric absorbing material ratio is only 6%. A core-shell structure exhibits enhanced absorption and pronounced absorption peaks with respect to a spiral structure without metallic contacts. We anticipate these results to provide guidance for photonic structures that take advantage of the unique properties of 2D materials in solar energy conversion applications.

  4. Enhanced photon absorption in spiral nanostructured solar cells using layered 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.

    2015-08-01

    Recent investigations of semiconducting two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides have provided evidence for strong light absorption relative to its thickness attributed to high density of states. Stacking a combination of metallic, insulating, and semiconducting 2D materials enables functional devices with atomic thicknesses. While photovoltaic cells based on 2D materials have been demonstrated, the reported absorption is still just a few percent of the incident light due to their sub-wavelength thickness leading to low cell efficiencies. Here we show that taking advantage of the mechanical flexibility of 2D materials by rolling a molybdenum disulfide (MoS2)/graphene (Gr)/hexagonal boron nitride stack to a spiral solar cell allows for optical absorption up to 90%. The optical absorption of a 1 μm long hetero-material spiral cell consisting of the aforementioned hetero stack is about 50% stronger compared to a planar MoS2 cell of the same thickness; although the volumetric absorbing material ratio is only 6%. A core-shell structure exhibits enhanced absorption and pronounced absorption peaks with respect to a spiral structure without metallic contacts. We anticipate these results to provide guidance for photonic structures that take advantage of the unique properties of 2D materials in solar energy conversion applications.

  5. Optically switchable liquid crystal photonic structures.

    PubMed

    Urbas, Augustine; Tondiglia, Vincent; Natarajan, Lalgudi; Sutherland, Richard; Yu, Haiping; Li, J-H; Bunning, Timothy

    2004-10-27

    Photo-optic materials offer the possibility of light controlled photonic devices, intelligent and environmentally adaptive optical materials. One strategy for creating these materials is the combination of structure formation through holographic photopolymerization and the variable optical properties of liquid crystals. Holographically patterned, polymer stabilized liquid crystals (HPSLCs) have proven to be useful optical materials. By incorporating photo-optic, azobenzene-derived liquid crystal blends into such material systems, we have generated practical photoresponsive optical materials.

  6. Thermal tunability of photonic bandgaps in liquid crystal filled polymer photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Doudou; Chen, Guoxiang; Wang, Lili

    2016-05-01

    A highly tunable bandgap-guiding polymer photonic crystal fiber is designed by infiltrating the cladding air holes with liquid crystal 5CB. Structural parameter dependence and thermal tunability of the photonic bandgaps, mode properties and confinement losses of the designed fiber are investigated. Bandgaps red shift as the temperature goes up. Average thermal tuning sensitivity of 30.9 nm/°C and 20.6 nm/°C is achieved around room temperature for the first and second photonic bandgap, respectively. Our results provide theoretical references for applications of polymer photonic crystal fiber in sensing and tunable fiber-optic devices.

  7. Finite element method analysis of band gap and transmission of two-dimensional metallic photonic crystals at terahertz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Degirmenci, Elif; Landais, Pascal

    2013-10-20

    Photonic band gap and transmission characteristics of 2D metallic photonic crystals at THz frequencies have been investigated using finite element method (FEM). Photonic crystals composed of metallic rods in air, in square and triangular lattice arrangements, are considered for transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. The modes and band gap characteristics of metallic photonic crystal structure are investigated by solving the eigenvalue problem over a unit cell of the lattice using periodic boundary conditions. A photonic band gap diagram of dielectric photonic crystal in square lattice array is also considered and compared with well-known plane wave expansion results verifying our FEM approach. The photonic band gap designs for both dielectric and metallic photonic crystals are consistent with previous studies obtained by different methods. Perfect match is obtained between photonic band gap diagrams and transmission spectra of corresponding lattice structure.

  8. Liquid crystal devices for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2007-11-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) devices for Photonics applications is a hot topic of research. Such elements begin to appear in Photonics market. Passive elements for fiber optical communication systems (DWDM components) based on LC cells can successfully compete with the other elements used for the purpose, such as micro electromechanical (MEM), thermo-optical, opto-mechanical or acousto-optical devices. Application of nematic and ferroelectric LC for high speed communication systems, producing elements that are extremely fast, stable, durable, of low loss, operable over a wide temperature range, and that require small operating voltages and extremely low power consumption. The known LC applications in fiber optics enable to produce switches, filters, attenuators, equalizers, polarization controllers, phase emulators and other fiber optical components. Good robustness due to the absence of moving parts and compatibility with VLSI technology, excellent parameters in a large photonic wavelength range, whereas the complexity of the design and the cost of the device are equivalent to regular passive matrix LC displays makes LC fiber optical devices very attractive for mass production. We have already successfully fabricated certain prototypes of the optical switches based on ferroelectric and nematic LC materials. The electrooptical modes used for the purpose included the light polarization rotation, voltage controllable diffraction and fast switching of the LC refractive index. We used the powerful software to optimize the LC modulation characteristics. Use of photo-alignment technique pioneered by us makes it possible to develop new LC fiber components. Almost all the criteria of perfect LC alignment are met in case of azo-dye layers. We have already used azo-dye materials to align LC in superthin photonic holes, curved and 3D surfaces and as cladding layers in microring silicon based resonators. The prototypes of new LC efficient Photonics devices are envisaged. Controllable

  9. Slot antenna on a photonic crystal substrate: Green's function study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caloz, Christophe; Curcio, Domenico; Alvarez-Melcon, Alejandro; Skrivervik, Anja K.; Gardiol, Fred E.

    1999-11-01

    A magnetic field Green's function expressed as an eigenmodes expansion and based on the plane wave method is formulated first for an infinite magnetic current line embedded in an unbounded 2D photonic crystal (PC) and then for a magnetic dipole embedded in a 2D PC truncated by two metallic plates. The underlying idea of analyzing a slot antenna printed on a 2D PC with a standard method of moment through the principle of equivalence is shown to motivate the present investigation. A complete solution for the line problem is derived, whereas the inadequacy of the method in nits present form for the dipole problem is demonstrated rigorously. Numerical results of the Green's function for the first problem are shown for different positions of the source, and a discussion about radiation patterns, asymptotic behaviors and convergence problems of the Green's function is proposed.

  10. Switching of Photonic Crystal Lasers by Graphene.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Min-Soo; Kim, Ha-Reem; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Jeong, Kwang-Yong; Park, Jin-Sung; Choi, Jae-Hyuck; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Lee, Jung Min; Park, Won Il; Song, Jung-Hwan; Seo, Min-Kyo; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2017-03-08

    Unique features of graphene have motivated the development of graphene-integrated photonic devices. In particular, the electrical tunability of graphene loss enables high-speed modulation of light and tuning of cavity resonances in graphene-integrated waveguides and cavities. However, efficient control of light emission such as lasing, using graphene, remains a challenge. In this work, we demonstrate on/off switching of single- and double-cavity photonic crystal lasers by electrical gating of a monolayer graphene sheet on top of photonic crystal cavities. The optical loss of graphene was controlled by varying the gate voltage Vg, with the ion gel atop the graphene sheet. First, the fundamental properties of graphene were investigated through the transmittance measurement and numerical simulations. Next, optically pumped lasing was demonstrated for a graphene-integrated single photonic crystal cavity at Vg below -0.6 V, exhibiting a low lasing threshold of ∼480 μW, whereas lasing was not observed at Vg above -0.6 V owing to the intrinsic optical loss of graphene. Changing quality factor of the graphene-integrated photonic crystal cavity enables or disables the lasing operation. Moreover, in the double-cavity photonic crystal lasers with graphene, switching of individual cavities with separate graphene sheets was achieved, and these two lasing actions were controlled independently despite the close distance of ∼2.2 μm between adjacent cavities. We believe that our simple and practical approach for switching in graphene-integrated active photonic devices will pave the way toward designing high-contrast and ultracompact photonic integrated circuits.

  11. Ultrafast optical switching using photonic molecules in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanhui; Qian, Chenjiang; Qiu, Kangsheng; Gao, Yunan; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-04-06

    We study the coupling between photonic molecules and waveguides in photonic crystal slab structures using finite-difference time-domain method and coupled mode theory. In a photonic molecule with two cavities, the coupling of cavity modes results in two super-modes with symmetric and anti-symmetric field distributions. When two super-modes are excited simultaneously, the energy of electric field oscillates between the two cavities. To excite and probe the energy oscillation, we integrate photonic molecule with two photonic crystal waveguides. In coupled structure, we find that the quality factors of two super-modes might be different because of different field distributions of super-modes. After optimizing the radii of air holes between two cavities of photonic molecule, nearly equal quality factors of two super-modes are achieved, and coupling strengths between the waveguide modes and two super-modes are almost the same. In this case, complete energy oscillations between two cavities can be obtained with a pumping source in one waveguide, which can be read out by another waveguide. Finally, we demonstrate that the designed structure can be used for ultrafast optical switching with a time scale of a few picoseconds.

  12. Liquid crystals for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniewicz, A.; Gniewek, A.; Parka, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe application of liquid crystals in optical imaging and processing. Electrically and optically addressed liquid crystal spatial light modulators are key elements in real-time holographic devices. Their implementation for beam steering and hologram formation is briefly discussed. The Joint Fourier transform optical correlator for pattern recognition is presented as well as the use of liquid crystals for the adaptive optics purposes is discussed.

  13. Numerical study on characteristic of two-dimensional metal/dielectric photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Yi-Xin; Xia, Jian-Bai; Wu, Hai-Bin

    2017-04-01

    An improved plan-wave expansion method is adopted to theoretically study the photonic band diagrams of two-dimensional (2D) metal/dielectric photonic crystals. Based on the photonic band structures, the dependence of flat bands and photonic bandgaps on two parameters (dielectric constant and filling factor) are investigated for two types of 2D metal/dielectric (M/D) photonic crystals, hole and cylinder photonic crystals. The simulation results show that band structures are affected greatly by these two parameters. Flat bands and bandgaps can be easily obtained by tuning these parameters and the bandgap width may reach to the maximum at certain parameters. It is worth noting that the hole-type photonic crystals show more bandgaps than the corresponding cylinder ones, and the frequency ranges of bandgaps also depend strongly on these parameters. Besides, the photonic crystals containing metallic medium can obtain more modulation of photonic bands, band gaps, and large effective refractive index, etc. than the dielectric/dielectric ones. According to the numerical results, the needs of optical devices for flat bands and bandgaps can be met by selecting the suitable geometry and material parameters. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB922200) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 605210010).

  14. Topological photonics: From crystals to particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siroki, Gleb; Huidobro, Paloma A.; Giannini, Vincenzo

    2017-07-01

    Photonic crystal topological insulators host protected states at their edges. In the band structure these edge states appear as continuous bands crossing the photonic band gap. They allow light to propagate unidirectionally and without scattering. In practice it is essential to make devices relying on these effects as miniature as possible. Here we study photonic topological insulator particles (finite crystals). In such particles the edge state frequencies are discrete. Nevertheless, the discrete states support pseudospin-dependent unidirectional propagation. They allow light to bend around sharp corners similarly to the continuous edge states and act as topologically protected whispering gallery modes, which can store and filter light as well as manipulate its angular momentum. Though we consider a particular all-dielectric realization that does not require a magnetic field, the results in the findings are general, explaining multiple experimental observations of discrete transmission peaks in photonic topological insulators.

  15. Optomechanics of two- and three-dimensional soft photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Dwarak

    Soft photonic crystals are a class of periodic dielectric structures that undergo highly nonlinear deformation due to strain or other external stimulus such as temperature, pH etc. This can in turn dramatically affect optical properties such as light transmittance. Moreover certain classes of lithographically fabricated structures undergo some structural distortion due to the effects of processing, eventually affecting the optical properties of the final photonic crystal. In this work, we study the deformation mechanics of soft photonic crystal structures using realistic physics-based models and leverage that understanding to explain the optomechanics of actual 2-D and 3-D soft photonic crystals undergoing similar symmetry breaking nonlinear deformations. We first study the optomechanics of two classes of 3-D soft photonic crystals: (1) hydrogel and (2) elastomer based material systems. The hydrogel based inverse face-centered-cubic structure undergoes swelling with change in pH of the surrounding fluid. The inverse structure is a network of bulky domains with thin ligament-like connections, and it undergoes a pattern transformation from FCC to L11 as a result of swelling. A continuum scale poroelasticity based coupled fluid-diffusion FEM model is developed to accurately predict this mechanical behavior. Light transmittance simulation results qualitatively explain the experimentally observed trends in the optical behavior with pH change. The elastomer based, lithographically fabricated material experiences shrinkage induced distortion upon processing. This behavior is modeled using FEM with the material represented by a neo-Hookean constitutive law. The light transmittance calculations for normal incidence are carried out using the transfer matrix method and a good comparison is obtained for the positions of first and second order reflectance peaks. A unit cell based approach is taken to compute the photonic bandstructure to estimate light propagation through the

  16. One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical calculations indicate that it should be possible for one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystals (see figure) to exhibit giant dispersions known as the superprism effect. Previously, three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal superprisms have demonstrated strong wavelength dispersion - about 500 times that of conventional prisms and diffraction gratings. Unlike diffraction gratings, superprisms do not exhibit zero-order transmission or higher-order diffraction, thereby eliminating cross-talk problems. However, the fabrication of these 3D photonic crystals requires complex electron-beam substrate patterning and multilayer thin-film sputtering processes. The proposed 1D superprism is much simpler in structural complexity and, therefore, easier to design and fabricate. Like their 3D counterparts, the 1D superprisms can exhibit giant dispersions over small spectral bands that can be tailored by judicious structure design and tuned by varying incident beam direction. Potential applications include miniature gas-sensing devices.

  17. Generation of Wannier functions for photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Christian; Mack, Patrick; Busch, Kurt

    2013-08-01

    We present an approach for the efficient generation of Wannier functions for Photonic Crystal computations that is based on a combination of group-theoretical analysis and efficient minimization strategies. In particular, we describe the symmetry properties that allow for exponential localization of Wannier functions and how they are related to the underlying Bloch mode symmetries of the photonic band structure and we show that no exponentially localized Wannier functions can be created from the physical modes of a three-dimensional crystal. Moreover, we comment on the use of conjugate gradient and randomized minimization algorithms that—together with the group theoretical considerations—facilitate the efficient numerical determination of maximally localized Wannier functions for many bands. This is a requirement for the accurate computation of Photonic Crystal functional elements and devices.

  18. Veselago lens by photonic hyper-crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zun Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-07-21

    Based on the recent concept of the photonic hyper-crystal—an artificial optical medium that combines the properties of hyperbolic materials and photonic crystals, we present the imaging system functioning as a Veselago lens. This planar lens shows a nearly constant negative refractive index with substantially reduced image aberrations, and can find potential applications in photolithography and hot-spots detection of silicon-based integrated circuits.

  19. Natural photonic crystals: formation, structure, function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Michael H.; Dahlby, Michael R.; Barrows, Frank P.; Richens, Zachary J.; Terooatea, Tommy; Jorgensen, Matthew R.

    2012-03-01

    The structure and properties of natural photonic crystals are discussed using the colored scales of the beetle Lamprocyphus augustus as an example. While the exact mechanism behind the formation of these biopolymeric photonic structures has yet to be fully explored, similarities of these structures to intracellular cubic membrane architectures are introduced. Some crucial parameters behind the formation of cubic membranes are discussed. Using these insights, intracellular cubic membrane structures are transformed into an extracellular environment.

  20. Ultra compact spectrometer apparatus and method using photonic crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of photonic crystal formation, and to methods and apparatus for using such photonic crystals, particularly in conjunction with detector arrays. Photonic crystal parameters and detector array parameters are compared to optimize the selection and orientation of a photonic crystal shape. A photonic crystal is operatively positioned relative to a plurality of light sensors. The light sensors can be separated by a pitch distance and positioned within one half of the pitch distance of an exit surface of the photonic crystals.

  1. Efficient beaming of self-collimated light from photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Moon; Lee, Sun-Goo; Park, Hae Yong; Kim, Jae-Eun

    2008-12-08

    We propose a novel structure for achieving highly efficient beaming of self-collimated light from two-dimensional photonic crystals. The finite-difference time-domain simulations show that both enhanced transmission and highly directional emission of self-collimated beams from photonic crystals are achieved by using the bending and splitting of self-collimated beams in photonic crystals, and also by introducing an antireflection coating-like photonic crystal collimator to the exit surface of the structure. This structure is potentially important for highly efficient coupling of self-collimated beams from photonic crystals into conventional optical fibers and photonic crystal waveguides.

  2. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  3. High Quality Factor Metallodielectric Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xindi; Shi, Lei; Han, Dezhuan; Zi, Jian; Braun, Paul V.

    2010-05-11

    A 2D polystyrene colloidal crystal self-assembled on a flat gold surface supports multiple photonic and plasmonic propagating resonance modes. For both classes of modes, the quality factors can exceed 100, higher than the quality factor of surface plasmons (SP) at a polymer–gold interface. The spatial energy distribution of those resonance modes are carefully studied by measuring the optical response of the hybrid plasmonic–photonic crystal after coating with dielectric materials under different coating profiles. Computer simulations with results closely matching those of experiments provide a clear picture of the field distribution of each resonance mode. For the SP modes, there is strong confinement of electromagnetic energy near the metal surface, while for optical modes, the field is confined inside the spherical particles, far away from the metal. Coating of dielectric material on the crystal results in a large shift in optical features. A surface sensor based on the hybrid plasmonic–photonic crystal is proposed, and it is shown to have atomic layer sensitivity. An example of ethanol vapor sensing based on physisorption of ethanol onto the sensor surface is demonstrated.

  4. Giant lamb shift in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Hua; Kivshar, Yuri S; Gu, Ben-Yuan

    2004-08-13

    We obtain a general result for the Lamb shift of excited states of multilevel atoms in inhomogeneous electromagnetic structures and apply it to study atomic hydrogen in inverse-opal photonic crystals. We find that the photonic-crystal environment can lead to very large values of the Lamb shift, as compared to the case of vacuum. We also suggest that the position-dependent Lamb shift should extend from a single level to a miniband for an assembly of atoms with random distribution in space, similar to the velocity-dependent Doppler effect in atomic/molecular gases.

  5. Optical amplification enhancement in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, R.; Leonetti, M.; Froufe-Perez, L. S.; Galisteo-Lopez, J. F.; Lopez, C.; Conti, C.

    2011-02-15

    Improving and controlling the efficiency of a gain medium is one of the most challenging problems of laser research. By measuring the gain length in an opal-based photonic crystal doped with laser dye, we demonstrate that optical amplification is more than twenty-fold enhanced along the {Gamma}-K symmetry directions of the face-centered-cubic photonic crystal. These results are theoretically explained by directional variations of the density of states, providing a quantitative connection between density of the states and light amplification.

  6. Optofluidic Fano resonance photonic crystal refractometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuling; Liu, Yonghao; Zhao, Deyin; Yang, Hongjun; Zhou, Weidong; Sun, Yuze

    2017-02-01

    We report an ultra-compact surface-normal optofluidic refractometric sensor based on a two-dimensional silicon photonic crystal on insulator. In contrast to the conventional symmetric Lorentzian resonance that is prevalently used in the label-free sensors, the asymmetric lineshape and steep peak-to-dip transition of a Fano resonance enable the enhanced detection sensitivity. The detection limit of 1.3 × 10-6 refractive index units is achieved, which is among the lowest reported experimentally in the defect-free photonic crystal sensors.

  7. Extraordinary wavelength reduction in terahertz graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Ian A D; Mousavi, S Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2016-05-04

    Photonic crystal slabs have been widely used in nanophotonics for light confinement, dispersion engineering, nonlinearity enhancement, and other unusual effects arising from their structural periodicity. Sub-micron device sizes and mode volumes are routine for silicon-based photonic crystal slabs, however spectrally they are limited to operate in the near infrared. Here, we show that two single-layer graphene sheets allow silicon photonic crystal slabs with submicron periodicity to operate in the terahertz regime, with an extreme 100× wavelength reduction from graphene's large kinetic inductance. The atomically thin graphene further leads to excellent out-of-plane confinement, and consequently photonic-crystal-slab band structures that closely resemble those of ideal two-dimensional photonic crystals, with broad band gaps even when the slab thickness approaches zero. The overall photonic band structure not only scales with the graphene Fermi level, but more importantly scales to lower frequencies with reduced slab thickness. Just like ideal 2D photonic crystals, graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs confine light along line defects, forming waveguides with the propagation lengths on the order of tens of lattice constants. The proposed structure opens up the possibility to dramatically reduce the size of terahertz photonic systems by orders of magnitude.

  8. Extraordinary wavelength reduction in terahertz graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Ian A. D.; Mousavi, S. Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal slabs have been widely used in nanophotonics for light confinement, dispersion engineering, nonlinearity enhancement, and other unusual effects arising from their structural periodicity. Sub-micron device sizes and mode volumes are routine for silicon-based photonic crystal slabs, however spectrally they are limited to operate in the near infrared. Here, we show that two single-layer graphene sheets allow silicon photonic crystal slabs with submicron periodicity to operate in the terahertz regime, with an extreme 100× wavelength reduction from graphene’s large kinetic inductance. The atomically thin graphene further leads to excellent out-of-plane confinement, and consequently photonic-crystal-slab band structures that closely resemble those of ideal two-dimensional photonic crystals, with broad band gaps even when the slab thickness approaches zero. The overall photonic band structure not only scales with the graphene Fermi level, but more importantly scales to lower frequencies with reduced slab thickness. Just like ideal 2D photonic crystals, graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs confine light along line defects, forming waveguides with the propagation lengths on the order of tens of lattice constants. The proposed structure opens up the possibility to dramatically reduce the size of terahertz photonic systems by orders of magnitude. PMID:27143314

  9. Fiber based photonic-crystal acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Onur

    Photonic-crystal slabs are two-dimensional photonic crystals etched into a dielectric layer such as silicon. Standard micro fabrication techniques can be employed to manufacture these structures, which makes it feasible to produce them in large areas, usually an important criterion for practical applications. An appealing feature of these structures is that they can be employed as free-space optical devices such as broadband reflectors. The small thickness of the slab (usually in the vicinity of half a micron) also makes it deflectable. These combined optical and mechanical properties make it possible to employ photonic-crystal slabs in a range of practical applications, including displacement sensors, which in turn can be used for example to detect acoustic waves. An additional benefit of employing a photonic-crystal slab is that it is possible to tailor its optical and mechanical properties by adjusting the geometrical parameters of the structure such as hole radius or shape, pitch, and the slab thickness. By altering the hole radius and pitch, it is possible to make broadband reflectors or sharp transmission filters out of these structures. Adjusting the thickness also affects its deformability, making it possible to make broadband mirrors compliant to acoustic waves. Altering the hole shape, for example by introducing an asymmetry, extends the functionalities of photonic-crystal slabs even further. Breaking the symmetry by introducing asymmetric holes enables polarization-sensitive devices such as retarders, polarization beam splitters, and photonic crystals with additional non-degenerate resonances useful for increased sensitivity in sensors. All these practical advantages of photonic-crystal slabs makes them suitable as key components in micromachined sensor applications. We report one such example of an application of photonic-crystal slabs in the form of a micromachined acoustic sensor. It consists of a Fabry-Perot interferometer made of a photonic-crystal

  10. One-dimensional opal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitonov, A. M.

    2008-12-01

    One-dimensional opals are 1D self-assembled close packed colloidal crystals consisting of monodisperse colloidal globules. Polystyrene globules with sizes in the 1.9-10 μm range sit on a flat substrate and touch two neighbors in diametrally opposite contact points. These opals are quasi-1D photonic crystals. Optical modes, including whispering gallery modes of individual globules, coupled collective modes, and nanojet-induced modes, are visualized in 1D opals.

  11. Tunable diffraction-free array in nonlinear photonic crystal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongmei; Wei, Dunzhao; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Zhenhua; Ni, Rui; Yang, Bo; Hu, Xiaopeng; Qin, Y. Q.; Zhu, S. N.; Xiao, Min

    2017-01-01

    Diffraction-free beams have attracted increasing research interests because of their unique performances and broad applications in various fields. Although many methods have been developed to produce such beams, it is still challenging to realize a tunable non-diffracting beam. Here, we report the generation of a tunable diffraction-free array through second-harmonic generation in a nonlinear photonic crystal, i.e., a 2D periodically-poled LiTaO3 crystal. In such a crystal, the second-harmonic wave is engineered by properly designing the domain structure based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle. The characteristics of the generated diffraction-free array including its period, propagation length, and wavelength can be tuned by simply changing the input wavelength. Our observation not only enriches the diffraction-free optics, but also has potential applications for photolithography and imaging. PMID:28098213

  12. Tunable diffraction-free array in nonlinear photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongmei; Wei, Dunzhao; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Zhenhua; Ni, Rui; Yang, Bo; Hu, Xiaopeng; Qin, Y. Q.; Zhu, S. N.; Xiao, Min

    2017-01-01

    Diffraction-free beams have attracted increasing research interests because of their unique performances and broad applications in various fields. Although many methods have been developed to produce such beams, it is still challenging to realize a tunable non-diffracting beam. Here, we report the generation of a tunable diffraction-free array through second-harmonic generation in a nonlinear photonic crystal, i.e., a 2D periodically-poled LiTaO3 crystal. In such a crystal, the second-harmonic wave is engineered by properly designing the domain structure based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle. The characteristics of the generated diffraction-free array including its period, propagation length, and wavelength can be tuned by simply changing the input wavelength. Our observation not only enriches the diffraction-free optics, but also has potential applications for photolithography and imaging.

  13. Optical properties of two-dimensional metamaterial photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mejía-Salazar, J. R.

    2013-12-14

    In the present work, we theoretically study a 2D photonic crystal (PC) comprised by double negative (DNG) metamaterial cylinders, showing that such a system presents a superior light-matter interaction when compared with their single negative (SNG) plasmonic PC counterparts, suggesting a route to enhance the performance of sensors and photovoltaic cells. On the other hand, we have observed that depending on the frequency, the mode symmetry resembles either the case of SNG electric (SNG-E) or SNG magnetic (SNG-M) PC, suggesting that either the electric or magnetic character of the DNG metamaterial dominates in each case.

  14. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals.

    PubMed

    Smolyaninova, Vera N; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Smolyaninov, Igor I

    2014-07-16

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the "photonic hyper-crystal", which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing.

  15. Photonic crystal microcapsules for label-free multiplex detection.

    PubMed

    Ye, Baofen; Ding, Haibo; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Hongcheng; Zhao, Yuanjin; Xie, Zhuoying; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-05-28

    A novel suspension array, which possesses the joint advantages of photonic crystal encoded technology, bioresponsive hydrogels, and photonic crystal sensors with capability of full multiplexing label-free detection is developed.

  16. Fabrication and Analysis of Photonic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Korte, Kylee E.; Xia, Younan

    2007-01-01

    These laboratory experiments are designed to explore aspects of nanoscale chemistry by constructing and spectroscopically analyzing thin films of photonic crystals. Films comprised of colloidal spheres and polydimethylsiloxane exhibit diffraction-based stop bands that shift reversibly upon exposure to some common solvents. Topics covered in these…

  17. Test-Paper-Like Photonic Crystal Viscometer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqi; Fu, Qianqian; Ge, Jianping

    2017-04-01

    A test-paper-like photonic crystal (PC) viscometer is fabricated based on the positive correlation between viscosity and the infiltration time for viscous liquid to entirely soak the PC film. It can be broadly used in different occasions to quickly determine the viscosity for many liquids, considering its portable and disposable characteristics and the requirement of little samples.

  18. Fabrication and Analysis of Photonic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Korte, Kylee E.; Xia, Younan

    2007-01-01

    These laboratory experiments are designed to explore aspects of nanoscale chemistry by constructing and spectroscopically analyzing thin films of photonic crystals. Films comprised of colloidal spheres and polydimethylsiloxane exhibit diffraction-based stop bands that shift reversibly upon exposure to some common solvents. Topics covered in these…

  19. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Pacholski, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential. PMID:23571671

  20. Photonic crystal sensors based on porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Pacholski, Claudia

    2013-04-09

    Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential.

  1. Investigation on the properties of omnidirectional photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Li, Bing-Xiang

    2016-01-15

    The properties of omnidirectional photonic band gaps (OBGs) in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (2D PPCs) are theoretically investigated by the modified plane wave expansion method. In the simulation, we consider the off-plane incident wave vector. The configuration of 2D PPCs is the triangular lattices filled with the nonmagnetized plasma cylinders in the homogeneous and isotropic dielectric background. The calculated results show that the proposed 2D PPCs possess a flatbands region and the OBGs. Compared with the OBGs in the conventional 2D dielectric-air PCs, it can be obtained more easily and enlarged in the 2D PPCs with a similar structure. The effects of configurational parameters of the PPCs on the OBGs also are studied. The simulated results demonstrate that the locations of OBGs can be tuned easily by manipulating those parameters except for changing plasma collision frequency. The achieved OBGs can be enlarged by optimizations. The OBGs of two novel configurations of PPCs with different cross sections are computed for a comparison. Both configurations have the advantages of obtaining the larger OBGs compared with the conventional configuration, since the symmetry of 2D PPCs is broken by different sizes of periodically inserted plasma cylinders or connected by the embedded plasma cylinders with thin veins. The analysis of the results shows that the bandwidths of OBGs can be tuned by changing geometric and physical parameters of such two PPCs structures. The theoretical results may open a new scope for designing the omnidirectional reflectors or mirrors based on the 2D PPCs.

  2. Inverse-problem approach to designing photonic crystals for cavity QED experiments.

    PubMed

    Geremia, J M; Williams, Jon; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2002-12-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) materials are attractive for cavity QED experiments because they provide extremely small mode volumes and are monolithic, integratable structures. As such, PBG cavities are a promising alternative to Fabry-Perot resonators. However, the cavity requirements imposed by QED experiments, such as the need for high Q (low cavity damping) and small mode volumes, present significant design challenges for photonic band gap materials. Here, we pose the PBG design problem as a mathematical inversion and provide an analytical solution for a two-dimensional (2D) crystal. We then address a planar (2D crystal with finite thickness) structure using numerical techniques.

  3. Total internal reflection photonic crystal prism.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Abashin, Maxim; Blair, John; Wu, Qi; Park, Wounjhang; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Summers, Christopher J

    2007-06-25

    An integrated total internal reflection prism is demonstrated that generates a transversely localized evanescent wave along the boundary between a photonic crystal and an etched out trench. The reflection can be described by either the odd symmetry of the Bloch wave or a tangential momentum matching condition. In addition, the Bloch wave propagates through the photonic crystal in a negative refraction regime, which manages diffraction within the prism. A device with three input channels has been fabricated and tested that illuminates different regions of the reflection interface. The reflected wave is then sampled by a photonic wire array, where the individual channels are resolved. Heterodyne near field scanning optical microscopy is used to characterize the spatial phase variation of the evanescent wave and its decay constant.

  4. Photon statistics in scintillation crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Vaibhav Joga Singh

    Scintillation based gamma-ray detectors are widely used in medical imaging, high-energy physics, astronomy and national security. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors are eld-tested, relatively inexpensive, and have good detection eciency. Semi-conductor detectors are gaining popularity because of their superior capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. However, they are relatively hard to manufacture and therefore, at this time, not available in as large formats and much more expensive than scintillation gamma-ray detectors. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors consist of: a scintillator, a material that emits optical (scintillation) photons when it interacts with ionization radiation, and an optical detector that detects the emitted scintillation photons and converts them into an electrical signal. Compared to semiconductor gamma-ray detectors, scintillation gamma-ray detectors have relatively poor capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. This is in large part attributed to the "statistical limit" on the number of scintillation photons. The origin of this statistical limit is the assumption that scintillation photons are either Poisson distributed or super-Poisson distributed. This statistical limit is often dened by the Fano factor. The Fano factor of an integer-valued random process is dened as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Therefore, a Poisson process has a Fano factor of one. The classical theory of light limits the Fano factor of the number of photons to a value greater than or equal to one (Poisson case). However, the quantum theory of light allows for Fano factors to be less than one. We used two methods to look at the correlations between two detectors looking at same scintillation pulse to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons. The relationship between the Fano factor and the correlation between the integral of the two signals detected was analytically derived, and the Fano factor was estimated using the measurements for SrI2:Eu, YAP

  5. Epitaxial Growth of Ternary Topological Insulator Bi2 Te2 Se 2D Crystals on Mica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yujing; Tang, Min; Meng, Mengmeng; Wang, Mingzhan; Wu, Jinxiong; Yin, Jianbo; Zhou, Yubing; Guo, Yunfan; Tan, Congwei; Dang, Wenhui; Huang, Shaoyun; Xu, H Q; Wang, Yong; Peng, Hailin

    2017-05-01

    Nanostructures of ternary topological insulator (TI) Bi2 Te2 Se are, in principle, advantageous to the manifestation of topologically nontrivial surface states, due to significantly enhanced surface-to-volume ratio compared with its bulk crystals counterparts. Herein, the synthesis of 2D Bi2 Te2 Se crystals on mica via the van der Waals epitaxy method is explored and systematically the growth behaviors during the synthesis process are investigated. Accordingly, 2D Bi2 Te2 Se crystals with domain size up to 50 µm large and thickness down to 2 nm are obtained. A pronounced weak antilocalization effect is clearly observed in the 2D Bi2 Te2 Se crystals at 2 K. The method for epitaxial growth of 2D ternary Bi2 Te2 Se crystals may inspire materials engineering toward enhanced manifestation of the subtle surface states of TIs and thereby facilitate their potential applications in next-generation spintronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Dynamically tunable graphene/dielectric photonic crystal transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Ian; Mousavi, S. Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    It is well known that graphene supports plasmonic modes with high field confinement and lower losses when compared to conventional metals. Additionally, graphene features a highly tunable conductivity through which the plasmon dispersion can be modulated. Over the years these qualities have inspired a wide range of applications for graphene in the THz and infrared regimes. In this presentation we theoretically demonstrate a graphene parallel plate waveguide (PPWG) that sandwiches a 2D photonic crystal slab. The marriage of these two geometries offers a large two dimensional band gap that can be dynamically tuned over a very broad bandwidth. Our device operates in the low-THz band where the graphene PPWG supports a quasi-TEM mode with a relatively flat attenuation. Unlike conventional photonic crystal slabs, the quasi-TEM nature of the graphene PPWG mode allows the slab thickness to be less than 1/10 of the photonic crystal lattice constant. These features offer up a wealth of opportunities, including tunable metamaterials with a possible platform for large band gaps in 3D structures through tiling and stacking. Additionally, the geometry provides a platform for tunable defect cavities without needing three dimensional periodicity.

  7. Quasicompactons in inverted nonlinear photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yongyao; Malomed, Boris A.; Wu Jianxiong; Pang Wei; Wang Sicong; Zhou Jianying

    2011-10-15

    We study large-amplitude one-dimensional solitary waves in photonic crystals featuring competition between linear and nonlinear lattices, with minima of the linear potential coinciding with maxima of the nonlinear pseudopotential, and vice versa (inverted nonlinear photonic crystals, INPCs), in the case of the saturable self-focusing nonlinearity. Such crystals were recently fabricated using a mixture of SU-8 and Rhodamine-B optical materials. By means of numerical methods and analytical approximations, we find that large-amplitude solitons are broad sharply localized stable pulses (quasicompactons, QCs). With the increase of the total power, P, the QC's centroid performs multiple switchings between minima and maxima of the linear potential. Unlike cubic INPCs, the large-amplitude solitons are mobile in the medium with the saturable nonlinearity. The threshold value of the kick necessary to set the soliton in motion is found as a function of P. Collisions between moving QCs are considered too.

  8. Modeling of Photonic Band Gap Crystals and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kady, Ihab Fathy

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the authors have undertaken a theoretical approach to the complex problem of modeling the flow of electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals. The focus is to address the feasibility of using the exciting phenomena of photonic gaps (PBG) in actual applications. The authors start by providing analytical derivations of the computational electromagnetic methods used in their work. They also present a detailed explanation of the physics underlying each approach, as well as a comparative study of the strengths and weaknesses of each method. The Plane Wave expansion, Transfer Matrix, and Finite Difference time Domain Methods are addressed. They also introduce a new theoretical approach, the Modal Expansion Method. They then shift the attention to actual applications. They begin with a discussion of 2D photonic crystal wave guides. The structure addressed consists of a 2D hexagonal structure of air cylinders in a layered dielectric background. Comparison with the performance of a conventional guide is made, as well as suggestions for enhancing it. The studies provide an upper theoretical limit on the performance of such guides, as they assumed no crystal imperfections and non-absorbing media. Next, they study 3D metallic PBG materials at near infrared and optical wavelengths. The main objective is to study the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in such structures. They study simple cubic structures where the metallic scatters are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several metals are studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). The effect of topology is addressed and isolated metallic cubes are found to be less lossy than the connected rod structures. The results reveal that the best performance is obtained by choosing metals with a large negative real part of the dielectric function, together with a relatively small imaginary part. Finally, they point out a new direction in photonic crystal

  9. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals

    PubMed Central

    Smolyaninova, Vera N.; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E.; Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the “photonic hyper-crystal”, which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing. PMID:25027947

  10. Strong transmittance above the light line in mid-infrared two-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kraeh, Christian; Martinez-Hurtado, J. L.; Zeitlmair, Martin; Finley, Jonathan J.; Popescu, Alexandru; Hedler, Harry

    2015-06-14

    The mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum between 3 and 8 μm hosts absorption lines of gases relevant for chemical and biological sensing. 2D photonic crystal structures capable of guiding light in this region of the spectrum have been widely studied, and their implementation into miniaturized sensors has been proposed. However, light guiding in conventional 2D photonic crystals is usually restricted to a frequency range below the light line, which is the dispersion relation of light in the media surrounding the structures. These structures rely on total internal reflection for confinement of the light in z-direction normal to the lattice plane. In this work, 2D mid-infrared photonic crystals consisting of microtube arrays that mitigate these limitations have been developed. Due to their high aspect ratios of ∼1:30, they are perceived as semi-infinite in the z-direction. Light transmission experiments in the 5–8 μm range reveal attenuations as low as 0.27 dB/100 μm, surpassing the limitations for light guiding above the light line in conventional 2D photonic crystals. Fair agreement is obtained between these experiments, 2D band structure and transmission simulations.

  11. Structural noise tolerance of photonic crystal optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odontsengel, Nyam-Erdene; Cai, DongSheng; Cole, James B.

    2016-12-01

    Using nonstandard (NS) finite difference time domain (FDTD) scheme to perform 2D electromagnetic (EM) simulations, we investigate how the optical properties of 2D photonic crystals (PCs) are affected by various different kinds of structural noises in the PC lattice. While the transmission spectrum is strongly affected by noises, the position and the depth of the band gap in the transmission spectrum are remarkably robust. It is shown that rather coarse numerical grids can be used to evaluate various PC structures in NS-FDTD EM simulations. The combination of noises affects transmission spectrum in the same way as the most influential individual noise. It is shown that reducing the most influential individual noise is a very efficient method to make PC more accurate.

  12. Dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator based channel drop filter using two-dimensional photonic crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Chhipa, Mayur Kumar; Dusad, Lalit Kumar

    2016-05-06

    In this paper channel drop filter (CDF) is designed using dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR). The photonic band gap (PBG) is calculated by plane wave expansion (PWE) method and the photonic crystal (PhC) based on two dimensional (2D) square lattice periodic arrays of silicon (Si) rods in air structure have been investigated using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The number of rods in Z and X directions is 21 and 20 respectively with lattice constant 0.540 nm and rod radius r = 0.1 µm. The channel drop filter has been optimized for telecommunication wavelengths λ = 1.591 µm with refractive indices 3.533. In the designed structure further analysis is also done by changing whole rods refractive index and it has been observed that this filter may be used for filtering several other channels also. The designed structure is useful for CWDM systems. This device may serve as a key component in photonic integrated circuits. The device is ultra compact with the overall size around 123 µm{sup 2}.

  13. Review on photonic crystal coatings for scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapitsch, Arno; Lecoq, Paul

    2014-11-01

    The amount of light and its time distribution are key factors determining the performance of scintillators when used as radiation detectors. However most inorganic scintillators are made of heavy materials and suffer from a high index of refraction which limits light extraction efficiency. This increases the path length of the photons in the material with the consequence of higher absorption and tails in the time distribution of the extracted light. Photonic crystals are a relatively new way of conquering this light extraction problem. Basically they are a way to produce a smooth and controllable index matching between the scintillator and the output medium through the nanostructuration of a thin layer of optically transparent high index material deposited at the coupling face of the scintillator. Our review paper discusses the theory behind this approach as well as the simulation details. Furthermore the different lithography steps of the production of an actual photonic crystal sample will be explained. Measurement results of LSO scintillator pixels covered with a nanolithography machined photonic crystal surface are presented together with practical tips for the further development and improvement of this technique.

  14. Flexible single-crystal silicon nanomembrane photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaochuan; Subbaraman, Harish; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Hosseini, Amir; Covey, John; Yu, Yalin; Kwong, David; Zhang, Yang; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Lu, Nanshu; Chen, Ray T

    2014-12-23

    Flexible inorganic electronic devices promise numerous applications, especially in fields that could not be covered satisfactorily by conventional rigid devices. Benefits on a similar scale are also foreseeable for silicon photonic components. However, the difficulty in transferring intricate silicon photonic devices has deterred widespread development. In this paper, we demonstrate a flexible single-crystal silicon nanomembrane photonic crystal microcavity through a bonding and substrate removal approach. The transferred cavity shows a quality factor of 2.2×10(4) and could be bent to a curvature of 5 mm radius without deteriorating the performance compared to its counterparts on rigid substrates. A thorough characterization of the device reveals that the resonant wavelength is a linear function of the bending-induced strain. The device also shows a curvature-independent sensitivity to the ambient index variation.

  15. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Lugo, J. E.; Doti, R.; Sanchez, N.; de la Mora, M. B.; del Rio, J. A.; Faubert, J.

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power. PMID:24423985

  16. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator.

    PubMed

    Lugo, J E; Doti, R; Sanchez, N; de la Mora, M B; del Rio, J A; Faubert, J

    2014-01-15

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power.

  17. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, J. E.; Doti, R.; Sanchez, N.; de La Mora, M. B.; Del Rio, J. A.; Faubert, J.

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power.

  18. Atom-light interactions in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Goban, A; Hung, C-L; Yu, S-P; Hood, J D; Muniz, J A; Lee, J H; Martin, M J; McClung, A C; Choi, K S; Chang, D E; Painter, O; Kimble, H J

    2014-05-08

    The integration of nanophotonics and atomic physics has been a long-sought goal that would open new frontiers for optical physics, including novel quantum transport and many-body phenomena with photon-mediated atomic interactions. Reaching this goal requires surmounting diverse challenges in nanofabrication and atomic manipulation. Here we report the development of a novel integrated optical circuit with a photonic crystal capable of both localizing and interfacing atoms with guided photons. Optical bands of a photonic crystal waveguide are aligned with selected atomic transitions. From reflection spectra measured with average atom number N=1.1+/-0.4, we infer that atoms are localized within the waveguide by optical dipole forces. The fraction of single-atom radiative decay into the waveguide is Γ1D/Γ'≃(0.32±0.08), where Γ1D is the rate of emission into the guided mode and Γ' is the decay rate into all other channels. Γ1D/Γ' is unprecedented in all current atom-photon interfaces.

  19. Processable 2D materials beyond graphene: MoS2 liquid crystals and fibres.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Rouhollah; Aminorroaya-Yamini, Sima; Benedetti, Tania M; Aboutalebi, Seyed Hamed; Chao, Yunfeng; Wallace, Gordon G; Officer, David L

    2016-09-29

    Herein, we show properly engineered MoS2 crystals can readily form liquid crystalline dispersions in water making them ideal candidates for large-scale manufacturing processes. The guideline provided here can serve as the basis to develop practical protocols to address the long-standing goal of large-scale manufacturing of 2D materials.

  20. The microstrip filters based on electromagnetic crystal of resonators 2d disposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, B. A.; Khodenkov, S. A.; Balva, Ya F.; Aplesnin, S. S.; Bandurina, O. N.

    2016-11-01

    Filters of the 6th order, based on 2D electromagnetic crystals were developed. Application in structures of resonators with convolved and earthed on its base with strip conductors enables the implementation of filters having high frequency-selective properties and demanded in the aerospace equipment.

  1. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed. PMID:25822135

  2. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein distribution in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-03-30

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed.

  3. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-03-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed.

  4. Polarization-selective resonant photonic crystal photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin-Kyu; Seo, Min-Kyo; Hwang, In-Kag; Kim, Sung-Bock; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2008-11-01

    Resonance-assisted photonic crystal (PhC) slab photodetectors are demonstrated by utilizing six 7-nm-thick InGaAsP quantum wells. In order to encourage efficient photon coupling into the slab from the vertical direction, a coupled-dipole-cavity-array PhC structure is employed. Inheriting the characteristics of the dipole mode, this resonant detector is highly polarization selective and shows a 22-nm-wide spectral width. The maximum responsivity of 0.28A/W, which is >20 times larger than that of the identical detector without the pattern, is observed near 1.56μm.

  5. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, Peter Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-12-09

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  6. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Peter; Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  7. Combining 2D synchrosqueezed wave packet transform with optimization for crystal image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Wirth, Benedikt; Yang, Haizhao

    2016-04-01

    We develop a variational optimization method for crystal analysis in atomic resolution images, which uses information from a 2D synchrosqueezed transform (SST) as input. The synchrosqueezed transform is applied to extract initial information from atomic crystal images: crystal defects, rotations and the gradient of elastic deformation. The deformation gradient estimate is then improved outside the identified defect region via a variational approach, to obtain more robust results agreeing better with the physical constraints. The variational model is optimized by a nonlinear projected conjugate gradient method. Both examples of images from computer simulations and imaging experiments are analyzed, with results demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Maximizing Photoluminescence Extraction in Silicon Photonic Crystal Slabs

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Ali; Sarau, George; Xavier, Jolly; Paraïso, Taofiq K.; Christiansen, Silke; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal modes can be tailored for increasing light matter interactions and light extraction efficiencies. These PhC properties have been explored for improving the device performance of LEDs, solar cells and precision biosensors. Tuning the extended band structure of 2D PhC provides a means for increasing light extraction throughout a planar device. This requires careful design and fabrication of PhC with a desirable mode structure overlapping with the spectral region of emission. We show a method for predicting and maximizing light extraction from 2D photonic crystal slabs, exemplified by maximizing silicon photoluminescence (PL). Systematically varying the lattice constant and filling factor, we predict the increases in PL intensity from band structure calculations and confirm predictions in micro-PL experiments. With the near optimal design parameters of PhC, we demonstrate more than 500-fold increase in PL intensity, measured near band edge of silicon at room temperature, an enhancement by an order of magnitude more than what has been reported. PMID:27113674

  9. Maximizing Photoluminescence Extraction in Silicon Photonic Crystal Slabs.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Ali; Sarau, George; Xavier, Jolly; Paraïso, Taofiq K; Christiansen, Silke; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-04-26

    Photonic crystal modes can be tailored for increasing light matter interactions and light extraction efficiencies. These PhC properties have been explored for improving the device performance of LEDs, solar cells and precision biosensors. Tuning the extended band structure of 2D PhC provides a means for increasing light extraction throughout a planar device. This requires careful design and fabrication of PhC with a desirable mode structure overlapping with the spectral region of emission. We show a method for predicting and maximizing light extraction from 2D photonic crystal slabs, exemplified by maximizing silicon photoluminescence (PL). Systematically varying the lattice constant and filling factor, we predict the increases in PL intensity from band structure calculations and confirm predictions in micro-PL experiments. With the near optimal design parameters of PhC, we demonstrate more than 500-fold increase in PL intensity, measured near band edge of silicon at room temperature, an enhancement by an order of magnitude more than what has been reported.

  10. Maximizing Photoluminescence Extraction in Silicon Photonic Crystal Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Ali; Sarau, George; Xavier, Jolly; Paraïso, Taofiq K.; Christiansen, Silke; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Photonic crystal modes can be tailored for increasing light matter interactions and light extraction efficiencies. These PhC properties have been explored for improving the device performance of LEDs, solar cells and precision biosensors. Tuning the extended band structure of 2D PhC provides a means for increasing light extraction throughout a planar device. This requires careful design and fabrication of PhC with a desirable mode structure overlapping with the spectral region of emission. We show a method for predicting and maximizing light extraction from 2D photonic crystal slabs, exemplified by maximizing silicon photoluminescence (PL). Systematically varying the lattice constant and filling factor, we predict the increases in PL intensity from band structure calculations and confirm predictions in micro-PL experiments. With the near optimal design parameters of PhC, we demonstrate more than 500-fold increase in PL intensity, measured near band edge of silicon at room temperature, an enhancement by an order of magnitude more than what has been reported.

  11. Integration of 2D materials on a silicon photonics platform for optoelectronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngblood, Nathan; Li, Mo

    2016-12-01

    Owing to enormous growth in both data storage and the demand for high-performance computing, there has been a major effort to integrate telecom networks on-chip. Silicon photonics is an ideal candidate, thanks to the maturity and economics of current CMOS processes in addition to the desirable optical properties of silicon in the near IR. The basics of optical communication require the ability to generate, modulate, and detect light, which is not currently possible with silicon alone. Growing germanium or III/V materials on silicon is technically challenging due to the mismatch between lattice constants and thermal properties. One proposed solution is to use two-dimensional materials, which have covalent bonds in-plane, but are held together by van der Waals forces out of plane. These materials have many unique electrical and optical properties and can be transferred to an arbitrary substrate without lattice matching requirements. This article reviews recent progress toward the integration of 2D materials on a silicon photonics platform for optoelectronic applications.

  12. Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olausson, Christina B.; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei; Noordegraaf, Danny; Weirich, Johannes; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.; Hansen, Kim P.; Bjarklev, Anders

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate an all-spliced laser cavity based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber mounted on a silicon assembly, a pump/signal combiner with single-mode signal feed-through and an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. The laser cavity produces a single-mode output and is tuned in the range 1040- 1065 nm by applying an electric field to the silicon assembly.

  13. Systematic Approach to Electrostatically Induced 2D Crystallization of Nanoparticles at Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuto, M.; Kewalramani, S.; Wang, S.; Lin, Y.; Nguyen, G.; Wang, Q.; Yang, L.

    2011-02-07

    We report an experimental demonstration of a strategy for inducing two-dimensional (2D) crystallization of charged nanoparticles on oppositely charged fluid interfaces. This strategy aims to maximize the interfacial adsorption of nanoparticles, and hence their lateral packing density, by utilizing a combination of weakly charged particles and a high surface charge density on the planar interface. In order to test this approach, we investigated the assembly of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) on positively charged lipid monolayers at the aqueous solution surface, by means of in situ X-ray scattering measurements at the liquid-vapor interface. The assembly was studied as a function of the solution pH, which was used to vary the charge on CPMV, and of the mole fraction of the cationic lipid in the binary lipid monolayer, which set the interface charge density. The 2D crystallization of CPMV occurred in a narrow pH range just above the particle's isoelectric point, where the particle charge was weakly negative, and only when the cationic-lipid fraction in the monolayer exceeded a threshold. The observed 2D crystals exhibited nearly the same packing density as the densest lattice plane within the known 3D crystals of CPMV. The above electrostatic approach of maximizing interfacial adsorption may provide an efficient route to the crystallization of nanoparticles at aqueous interfaces.

  14. The 2D Selfassembly of Benzimidazole and its Co-crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Paulo; Teeter, Jacob; Kunkel, Donna; Sinitskii, Alexander; Enders, Axel

    Benzimidazoles (BI) are organic molecules that form ferroelectric crystals. Key to their ferroelectric behavior are the switchable N . . . HN type bonds and how they couple to the electron system of the molecules. We attempted to crystallize BI on various metal surfaces and studied them using STM. We observed that on Au and Ag, BI joins into zipper chains characteristic of its bulk structure that can pack into a continuous 2D layer. Because the dipole of BI lies in the direction of its switchable hydrogen bond, these zippers should in principle have reversible polarizations that point along the direction they run. BI's crystallization is reminiscent to how croconic acid (CA) crystallizes in 2D using O . . . HO bonding, suggesting that these molecules may be able to co-crystallize through OH . . . N bonds. This would present the opportunity to modify BI's properties, such as the energy needed to switch a hydrogen from a donor to acceptor site. When co-deposited, CA and BI successfully combine into a co-crystal formed by building blocks consisting of 2 CA and 2 BI molecules. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of using STM as a preliminary check to verify if two molecules are compatible with each other without having to attempt crystallization with multiple solvents and mixing methods.

  15. Graphene and Other 2D Colloids: Liquid Crystals and Macroscopic Fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingjun; Xu, Zhen; Gao, Weiwei; Cheng, Zhengdong; Gao, Chao

    2017-02-24

    Two-dimensional colloidal nanomaterials are running into renaissance after the enlightening researches of graphene. Macroscopic one-dimensional fiber is an optimal ordered structural form to express the in-plane merits of 2D nanomaterials, and the formation of liquid crystals (LCs) allows the creation of continuous fibers. In the correlated system from LCs to fibers, understanding their macroscopic organizing behavior and transforming them into new solid fibers is greatly significant for applications. Herein, we retrospect the history of 2D colloids and discuss about the concept of 2D nanomaterial fibers in the context of LCs, elaborating the motivation, principle and possible strategies of fabrication. Then we highlight the creation, development and typical applications of graphene fibers. Additionally, the latest advances of other 2D nanomaterial fibers are also summarized. Finally, conclusions, challenges and perspectives are provided to show great expectations of better and more fibrous materials of 2D nanomaterials. This review gives a comprehensive retrospect of the past century-long effort about the whole development of 2D colloids, and plots a clear roadmap - "lamellar solid - LCs - macroscopic fibers - flexible devices", which will certainly open a new era of structural-multifunctional application for the conventional 2D colloids.

  16. A plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2016-04-18

    A fully tunable plasma photonic crystal is used to control the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X bands of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes forms a simple square crystal structure with the individual plasma dielectric constant tuned through variation in the plasma density. We show, through simulations and experiments, that transverse electric mode bandgaps exist, arising from the positive and negative dielectric constant regimes of the plasma, and that the respective bandgap frequencies can be shifted through changing the dielectric constant by varying discharge current density.

  17. Ray chaos in a photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Emmanuel; Felbacq, Didier

    2017-01-01

    The ray dynamics in a photonic crystal was investigated. Chaos occurs for perfectly periodic crystals, the rays dynamics being very sensitive to the initial conditions. Depending on the filling factor, the ray dynamics can exhibit stable paths near (fully) chaotic motion. The degree of chaoticity is quantified through the computation of Lyapunov exponents. As a result, the more diluted is the geometry, the more chaotic is the dynamic. Therefore, despite the perfect periodicity of the geometry, light transport is a diffusive process which can be tuned from normal diffusion (Brownian motion) to anomalous diffusion because of the existence of Lévy flights.

  18. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  19. Effective medium theory of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W. T.; Zhang, S.; Huang, Y. J.; Sridhar, S.

    2008-03-01

    We develop an effective medium theory for photonic crystals including negative index metamaterials. This theory is based on field summation within the unit cell. The unit cell is determined by the surface termination. The orientation of the surface breaks the field summation symmetry. This theory is self-consistent. The effective permittivity and permeability tensors will give the exact dispersion relation obtained from the band structure calculation. For waves incident into multilayered structures, our theory gives exact transmittance and reflectance for any wavelengths. For interface with periodic surface structures, our theory gives very accurate results for wavelength down to being comparable with the lattice spacing. By properly taking into account the multiple Bloch modes inside the photonic crystal, our theory can be made to give exact Bragg coefficients.

  20. Electrical Control of Silicon Photonic Crystal Cavity by Graphene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Electrical Control of Silicon Photonic Crystal Cavity by Graphene Arka Majumdar,†,‡,∥ Jonghwan Kim,†,∥ Jelena Vuckovic,‡ and Feng Wang...of electronics and photonics . The combination of graphene with photonic crystals is promising for electro-optic modulation. In this paper, we...demonstrate that by electrostatic gating a single layer of graphene on top of a photonic crystal cavity, the cavity resonance can be changed significantly. A

  1. Nonreciprocal photonic crystal add-drop filter

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Keyu; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Yin, Xiaobo

    2014-11-24

    We present a versatile add-drop integrated photonic filter (ADF) consisting of nonreciprocal waveguides in which the propagation of light is restricted in one predetermined direction. With the bus and add/drop waveguides symmetrically coupled through a cavity, the four-port device allows each individual port to add and/or drop a signal of the same frequency. The scheme is general and we demonstrate the nonreciprocal ADF with magneto-optical photonic crystals. The filter is immune to waveguide defects, allowing straightforward implementation of multi-channel ADFs by cascading the four-port designs. The results should find applications in wavelength-division multiplexing and related integrated photonic techniques.

  2. Photonic Crystal Microcavities for Quantum Information Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemeier, Jenna Nicole

    Quantum information science and technology is a broad and fascinating field, encompassing diverse research areas such as materials science, atomic physics, superconductors, solid-state physics, and photonics. A goal of this field is to demonstrate the basic functions of information initialization, manipulation, and read-out in systems that take advantage of quantum physics to greatly enhance computing performance capabilities. In a hybrid quantum information network, different systems are used to perform different functions, to best exploit the advantageous properties of each system. For example, matter quantum bits (qubits) can be used for local data storage and manipulation while photonic qubits can be used for long-distance communication between storage points of the network. Our research focuses on the following two solid-state realizations of a matter qubit for the purpose of building such a hybrid quantum network: the electronic spin of a self-assembled indium arsenide quantum dot and the electronic spin of a nitrogen-vacancy defect center in diamond. Light--matter interactions are necessary to transfer the information from the matter qubit to the photonic qubit, and this interaction can be enhanced by embedding the spin system in an optical cavity. We focus on photonic crystal microcavities for this purpose, and we study interactions between the optical cavity modes and incorporated spin systems. To improve the performance of this spin--photon interface, it is important to maximize the coupling strength between the spin and photonic systems and to increase the read-out efficiency of information stored in the cavity. In this thesis, we present our work to deterministically couple a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond to a photonic crystal microcavity in gallium phosphide. This is achieved by nanopositioning a pre-selected diamond nanocrystal in the intensity maximum of the optical cavity mode. We also present an optimized design of a photonic crystal

  3. Nonlinear photonic crystal microdevices for optical integration.

    PubMed

    Soljacić, Marin; Luo, Chiyan; Joannopoulos, J D; Fan, Shanhui

    2003-04-15

    A four-port nonlinear photonic crystal system is discussed that exhibits optical bistability with negligible backscattering to the inputs, making it particularly suitable for integration with other active devices on the same chip. Devices based on this system can be made to be small [O(lambda3)] in volume, have a nearly instantaneous response, and consume only a few milliwatts of power. Among many possible applications, we focus on an all-optical transistor and integrated optical isolation.

  4. Long period gratings in photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jian; Jin, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The authors review the recent advances in fabricating long-period gratings (LPGs) in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). The novel light-guiding properties of the PCFs allow the demonstration of novel sensors and devices based on such LPGs. The sensitivity of these PCF LPGs to temperature, strain and refractive index is discussed and compared with LPGs made on conventional single-mode fibers. In-fiber devices such as tunable band rejection filters, Mach-Zehnder interferometers are discussed.

  5. Photonic drop splitters based on silicon photonic crystal cascaded self-collimation ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Xi-Yao; Jiang, Jun-Zhen; Fu, Ping; Chen, Biao; Yang, Li-Hui; Liu, Jing-Ping; Lin, Bao-Cheng

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the 1×5 optical splitters (OSs) based on 2D rod-type silicon photonic crystal embed cascaded self-collimation (SC) ring resonators (CSCRR) was proposed. The 1×5 OSs consist of eight beam splitters, which are formed by varying the radii of the rod. With self-collimation effect, we can manipulate the light's propagation in the OSs. Here we consider TM modes. Utilizing multiple-beam interference theory, the theoretical transmission spectra at different outputs were analysed. These transmission spectra can help us to set the radii of eight slitters properly, for we can control the light coming out from five ports with the light-intensity ratio we need. Meanwhile these outputs' transmission spectra were investigated by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The simulative results have an agreement with the theoretical prediction. The 1×5 OSs will have practical applications in photonic integrated circuits.

  6. Intravitreal properties of porous silicon photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L; Anglin, E; Cunin, F; Kim, D; Sailor, M J; Falkenstein, I; Tammewar, A; Freeman, W R

    2009-01-01

    Aim To determine the suitability of porous silicon photonic crystals for intraocular drug-delivery. Methods A rugate structure was electrochemically etched into a highly doped p-type silicon substrate to create a porous silicon film that was subsequently removed and ultrasonically fractured into particles. To stabilise the particles in aqueous media, the silicon particles were modified by surface alkylation (using thermal hydrosilylation) or by thermal oxidation. Unmodified particles, hydrosilylated particles and oxidised particles were injected into rabbit vitreous. The stability and toxicity of each type of particle were studied by indirect ophthalmoscopy, biomicroscopy, tonometry, electroretinography (ERG) and histology. Results No toxicity was observed with any type of the particles during a period of >4 months. Surface alkylation led to dramatically increased intravitreal stability and slow degradation. The estimated vitreous half-life increased from 1 week (fresh particles) to 5 weeks (oxidised particles) and to 16 weeks (hydrosilylated particles). Conclusion The porous silicon photonic crystals showed good biocompatibility and may be used as an intraocular drug-delivery system. The intravitreal injectable porous silicon photonic crystals may be engineered to host a variety of therapeutics and achieve controlled drug release over long periods of time to treat chronic vitreoretinal diseases. PMID:18441177

  7. Parametric wavelength conversion in photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sigang; Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Yi; Chen, Minghua; Xie, Shizhong

    2016-11-01

    Nonlinear wavelength conversion provides flexible solutions for generating wideband tunable radiation in novel wavelength band. Parametric process in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) has attracted comprehensive interests since it can act as broadband tunable light sources in non-conventional wavelength bands. The current state-of-the-art photonic crystal fibers can provide more freedom for customizing the dispersion and nonlinearity which is critical to the nonlinear process, such as four wave mixing (FWM), compared with the traditional fibers fabricated with doping techniques. Here we demonstrate broadband parametric wavelength conversion in our homemade photonic crystal fibers. The zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of PCFs is critical for the requirement of phase matching condition in the parametric four wave mixing process. Firstly a procedure of the theoretical design of PCF with the ZDW at 1060 nm is proposed through our homemade simulation software. A group of PCF samples with gradually variable parameters are fabricated according to the theoretical design. The broadband parametric gain around 1060 nm band is demonstrated pumped with our homemade mode locked fiber laser in the anomalous dispersion region. Also a narrow gain band with very large wavelength detune with the pump wavelength in the normal dispersion region is realized. Wavelength conversion with a span of 194 nm is realized. Furthermore a fiber optical parametric oscillator based on the fabricated PCF is built up. A wavelength tunable range as high as 340 nm is obtained. This report demonstrates a systematic procedure to realize wide band wavelength conversion based on PCFs.

  8. Slotted photonic crystals for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, M. G.; Krauss, T. F.; Di Falco, A.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss the properties and potential of slotted photonic crystals devices as small optical, label-free biosensors. This approach combines slot waveguides, which guide light in a narrow air slot, with photonic crystals in which cavities and slow light behaviour can be engineered. We use cavities based upon the heterostructure approach, demonstrating experimental quality factors of up to 50,000 in air and 4,000 in water. As the peak of the cavity mode interacts with the contents of the slot, small changes in refractive index can be inferred from the cavity resonant wavelength with high sensitivity (~500 nm/RIU). We also integrate microfluidic channels, which when combined with the small footprint of each sensor, allows potential for dense multiplexing with only micro-litres of analyte. As the dispersive properties of the fundamental mode of a standard and slotted photonic crystal differ greatly, a suitable interface for coupling into the device must be found. We here utilise a resonant defect approach, which preferentially couples into the slot mode. Functionalising the surface of the device with antibodies allows us to detect specific binding of a target protein on the sensor surface. As a proof of principle demonstration we show detection of dissolved avidin concentrations as low as 15 nM using biotin functionalised devices.

  9. Polymer photonic crystal fibre for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David J.

    2010-04-01

    Polymer photonic crystal fibres combine two relatively recent developments in fibre technology. On the one hand, polymer optical fibre has very different physical and chemical properties to silica. In particular, polymer fibre has a much smaller Young's modulus than silica, can survive higher strains, is amenable to organic chemical processing and, depending on the constituent polymer, may absorb water. All of these features can be utilised to extend the range of applications of optical fibre sensors. On the other hand, the photonic crystal - or microstructured - geometry also offers advantages: flexibility in the fibre design including control of the dispersion properties of core and cladding modes, the possibility of introducing minute quantities of analyte directly into the electric field of the guided light and enhanced pressure sensitivity. When brought together these two technologies provide interesting possibilities for fibre sensors, particularly when combined with fibre Bragg or long period gratings. This paper discusses the features of polymer photonic crystal fibre relevant to sensing and provides examples of the applications demonstrated to date.

  10. Propagation of acoustic waves in 2D periodic and quasiperiodic phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Nagaty, Ahmed; Khalifa, Z.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we have investigated theoretically the propagation of longitudinal sonic waves in 2D periodic and aperiodic (quasiperiodic) phononic crystals. Fibonacci sequence has been used to generate the aperiodic structure. The effect of transformation from 2D periodic to aperiodic structure has been elucidated by calculating the transmission coefficient. The consequences of inserting a circular solid cylinder inside a host water matrix have been repeated at the same calculating conditions. Changing filling fraction has been used to tune the stop band width.

  11. The 2DX robot: a membrane protein 2D crystallization Swiss Army knife.

    PubMed

    Iacovache, Ioan; Biasini, Marco; Kowal, Julia; Kukulski, Wanda; Chami, Mohamed; van der Goot, F Gisou; Engel, Andreas; Rémigy, Hervé-W

    2010-03-01

    Among the state-of-the-art techniques that provide experimental information at atomic scale for membrane proteins, electron crystallography, atomic force microscopy and solid state NMR make use of two-dimensional crystals. We present a cyclodextrin-driven method for detergent removal implemented in a fully automated robot. The kinetics of the reconstitution processes is precisely controlled, because the detergent complexation by cyclodextrin is of stoichiometric nature. The method requires smaller volumes and lower protein concentrations than established 2D crystallization methods, making it possible to explore more conditions with the same amount of protein. The method yielded highly ordered 2D crystals diffracting to high resolution from the pore-forming toxin Aeromonas hydrophila aerolysin (2.9A), the plant aquaporin SoPIP2;1 (3.1A) and the human aquaporin-8 (hAQP8; 3.3A). This new method outperforms traditional 2D crystallization approaches in terms of accuracy, flexibility, throughput, and allows the usage of detergents having low critical micelle concentration (CMC), which stabilize the structure of membrane proteins in solution.

  12. Lighten the Olympia of the Flatland: Probing and Manipulating the Photonic Properties of 2D Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kai-Ge; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2015-07-15

    Following the adventures of graphene, 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have recently seized part of the territory in the flatland. Branched by different components of metals and chalcogenides, the families of 2D TMDs have grown rapidly, in which the semiconductive ones have shown colorful photonic properties. By tuning the atomic components and reducing the thickness or planar size of the layers, one can manipulate the optical performance of 2D TMDs, e.g., the intensity, angular momentum, and frequency of the emitted light, or toward ultrafast nonlinear absorption. As a powerful optical method, the Raman characteristics of 2D TMDs have been successfully used to explore their lattices and electronic structures. Along with the maturing of 2D TMDs, their hybrids play an important role. The unique photonic properties of 2D van der Waals heterostructures and 2D alloys are introduced here. Apart from the group VI TMDs, future prospects are identified to harness the optical properties of other 2D TMDs and the related investigations of their hybrids are underway.

  13. A Spin Qubit Coupled to a Photonic Crystal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Timothy; Carter, Samuel; Kim, Mijin; Kim, Chul Soo; Solenov, Dmitry; Economou, Sophia; Reineke, Thomas; Yang, Lily; Bracker, Allan; Gammon, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The development of a scalable light-matter quantum interface is an important goal of quantum information research. Photonic crystal (PC) membranes provide an architecture in which the interaction of photons with an optically active matter qubit can be controlled through the introduction of optical cavities and waveguides. Charge neutral quantum dots are commonly integrated into PC architectures and are useful for sources and switches, but do not demonstrate long-lived coherences. A charged quantum dot in a PC environment could lead to a spin-photon quantum interface, where it is the long-lived spin of the electron, not the exciton that serves as a qubit. We demonstrate optical spin initialization and coherent control of an electron in a quantum dot that is embedded in and coupled to a 2D PC membrane cavity. The PC membrane is incorporated into an asymmetric NIP diode that allows for charging of an InAs quantum dot via an applied bias. Resonant laser spectroscopy performed in a transverse magnetic field enables the optical measurement and initialization of the electron spin. Furthermore, with the introduction of detuned control pulses, we perform coherent rotations of the electron spin state. These studies demonstrate several essential accomplishments toward a spin-photon interface.

  14. Formation of Photonic Structures in Photorefractive Lithium Niobate by 1D and 2D Bessel-like Optical Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inyushov, A.; Safronova, P.; Trushnikov, I.; Sarkyt, A.; Shandarov, V.

    2017-06-01

    Both, one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Bessel-like beams with different topology of 2D beam cross-sections are formed from Gaussian laser beams using the amplitude masks and Fresnel biprisms. These almost diffraction-free light fields with wavelengths of 532 and 633 nm can change the refractive indices of photorefractive lithium niobate samples and form within them the nonlinear photonic diffraction structures. The characteristics of photonic structures induced in this way are studied by diffraction of monochromatic light with wavelengths of 633 and 532 nm.

  15. Amorphous photonic crystals with only short-range order.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Yafeng; Dong, Biqin; Zhan, Tianrong; Liu, Xiaohan; Zi, Jian

    2013-10-04

    Distinct from conventional photonic crystals with both short- and long-range order, amorphous photonic crystals that possess only short-range order show interesting optical responses owing to their unique structural features. Amorphous photonic crystals exhibit unique light scattering and transport, which lead to a variety of interesting phenomena such as isotropic photonic bandgaps or pseudogaps, noniridescent structural colors, and light localization. Recent experimental and theoretical advances in the study of amorphous photonic crystals are summarized, focusing on their unique optical properties, artificial fabrication, bionspiration, and potential applications. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Facile Assembly of Large-Area 2D Microgel Colloidal Crystals Using Charge-Reversible Substrates.

    PubMed

    Weng, Junying; Li, Xiaoyun; Guan, Ying; Zhu, X X; Zhang, Yongjun

    2016-12-06

    2D colloidal crystals (CCs) have important applications; however, the fabrication of large-area, high-quality 2D CCs is still far from being trivial, and the fabrication of 2D microgel CCs is even harder. Here, we have demonstrated that they can be facilely fabricated using charge-reversible substrates. The charge-reversible substrates were prepared by modification with amino groups. The amino groups were then protected by amidation with 2,2-dimethylsuccinic anhydride. At acidic pH, the surface charge of the modified substrate will change from negative to positive as a result of the hydrolysis of the amide bonds and the regeneration of the amino groups. 2D microgel CCs can be simply fabricated by applying a concentrated microgel dispersion on the modified substrate. The negatively charged surface of the substrate allows the negatively charged microgel spheres, especially those close to the substrate, to self-assemble into 3D CCs. With the gradual hydrolysis of the amide bonds and the charge reversal of the substrate, the first 111 plane of the 3D assembly is fixed in situ on the substrate. The resulting 2D CC has a high degree of ordering because of the high quality of the parent 3D microgel CC. Because large-area 3D microgel CCs can be facilely fabricated, this method allows for the fabrication of 2D CCs of any size. Nonplanar substrates can also be used. In addition, the interparticle distance of the 2D array can be tuned by the concentration of the microgel dispersion. Besides rigid substrates (such as glass slides, quartz slides, and silicon wafers), flexible polymer films, including polyethylene terephthalate and poly(vinyl chloride) films, were also successfully used as substrates for the fabrication of 2D microgel CCs.

  17. Photonic band gaps structure properties of two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Si-Qi; Liang, Yu; Wu, Xiang-Yao

    2017-05-01

    The tunable two-dimensional photonic crystals band gap, absolute photonic band gap and semi-Dirac point are beneficial to designing the novel optical devices. In this paper, tunable photonic band gaps structure was realized by a new type two-dimensional function photonic crystals, which dielectric constants of medium columns are functions of space coordinates. However for the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals the dielectric constant does not change with space coordinates. As the parameter adjustment, we found that the photonic band gaps structures are dielectric constant function coefficient, medium columns radius, dielectric constant function form period number and pump light intensity dependent, namely, the photonic band gaps position and width can be tuned. we also obtained absolute photonic band gaps and semi-Dirac point in the photonic band gaps structures of two-dimensional function photonic crystals. These results provide an important theoretical foundation for design novel optical devices.

  18. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all <1%. The results validate the accuracy of the new code, which is a useful tool in scintillation detector optimization. PMID:24600168

  19. FEM modeling of 3D photonic crystals and photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Sven; Klose, Roland; Schaedle, Achim; Schmidt, Frank; Zschiedrich, Lin W.

    2005-03-01

    We present a finite-element simulation tool for calculating light fields in 3D nano-optical devices. This allows to solve challenging problems on a standard personal computer. We present solutions to eigenvalue problems, like Bloch-type eigenvalues in photonic crystals and photonic crystal waveguides, and to scattering problems, like the transmission through finite photonic crystals. The discretization is based on unstructured tetrahedral grids with an adaptive grid refinement controlled and steered by an error-estimator. As ansatz functions we use higher order, vectorial elements (Nedelec, edge elements). For a fast convergence of the solution we make use of advanced multi-grid algorithms adapted for the vectorial Maxwell's equations.

  20. Realization of hydrodynamic experiments on quasi-2D liquid crystal films in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Noel A.; Eremin, Alexey; Glaser, Matthew A.; Hall, Nancy; Harth, Kirsten; Klopp, Christoph; Maclennan, Joseph E.; Park, Cheol S.; Stannarius, Ralf; Tin, Padetha; Thurmes, William N.; Trittel, Torsten

    2017-08-01

    Freely suspended films of smectic liquid crystals are unique examples of quasi two-dimensional fluids. Mechanically stable and with quantized thickness of the order of only a few molecular layers, smectic films are ideal systems for studying fundamental fluid physics, such as collective molecular ordering, defect and fluctuation phenomena, hydrodynamics, and nonequilibrium behavior in two dimensions (2D), including serving as models of complex biological membranes. Smectic films can be drawn across openings in planar supports resulting in thin, meniscus-bounded membranes, and can also be prepared as bubbles, either supported on an inflation tube or floating freely. The quantized layering renders smectic films uniquely useful in 2D fluid physics. The OASIS team has pursued a variety of ground-based and microgravity applications of thin liquid crystal films to fluid structure and hydrodynamic problems in 2D and quasi-2D systems. Parabolic flights and sounding rocket experiments were carried out in order to explore the shape evolution of free floating smectic bubbles, and to probe Marangoni effects in flat films. The dynamics of emulsions of smectic islands (thicker regions on thin background films) and of microdroplet inclusions in spherical films, as well as thermocapillary effects, were studied over extended periods within the OASIS (Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space) project on the International Space Station. We summarize the technical details of the OASIS hardware and give preliminary examples of key observations.

  1. Two-dimensional treatment of the level shift and decay rate in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Fussell, D.P.; McPhedran, R.C.; Martijn de Sterke, C.

    2005-10-01

    We present a comprehensive treatment of the level shift and decay rate of a model line source in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC) composed of circular cylinders. The quantities in this strictly two-dimensional system are determined by the two-dimensional local density of states (2D LDOS), which we compute using Rayleigh-multipole methods. We extend the critical point analysis that is traditionally applied to the 2D DOS (or decay rate) to the level shift. With this, we unify the crucial quantity for experiment - the 2D LDOS in a finite PC - with the band structure and the 2D DOS, 2D LDOS, and level shift in infinite PC's. Consistent with critical point analysis, large variations in the level shift are associated with large variations in the 2D DOS (and 2D LDOS), corroborating a giant anomalous Lamb shift. The boundary of a finite 2D PC can produce resonances that cause the 2D LDOS in a finite 2D PC to differ markedly from the 2D LDOS in an infinite 2D PC.

  2. Two-dimensional treatment of the level shift and decay rate in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Fussell, D P; McPhedran, R C; Martijn de Sterke, C

    2005-10-01

    We present a comprehensive treatment of the level shift and decay rate of a model line source in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC) composed of circular cylinders. The quantities in this strictly two-dimensional system are determined by the two-dimensional local density of states (2D LDOS), which we compute using Rayleigh-multipole methods. We extend the critical point analysis that is traditionally applied to the 2D DOS (or decay rate) to the level shift. With this, we unify the crucial quantity for experiment--the 2D LDOS in a finite PC--with the band structure and the 2D DOS, 2D LDOS, and level shift in infinite PC's. Consistent with critical point analysis, large variations in the level shift are associated with large variations in the 2D DOS (and 2D LDOS), corroborating a giant anomalous Lamb shift. The boundary of a finite 2D PC can produce resonances that cause the 2D LDOS in a finite 2D PC to differ markedly from the 2D LDOS in an infinite 2D PC.

  3. Two-dimensional treatment of the level shift and decay rate in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussell, D. P.; McPhedran, R. C.; Martijn de Sterke, C.

    2005-10-01

    We present a comprehensive treatment of the level shift and decay rate of a model line source in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC) composed of circular cylinders. The quantities in this strictly two-dimensional system are determined by the two-dimensional local density of states (2D LDOS), which we compute using Rayleigh-multipole methods. We extend the critical point analysis that is traditionally applied to the 2D DOS (or decay rate) to the level shift. With this, we unify the crucial quantity for experiment—the 2D LDOS in a finite PC—with the band structure and the 2D DOS, 2D LDOS, and level shift in infinite PC’s. Consistent with critical point analysis, large variations in the level shift are associated with large variations in the 2D DOS (and 2D LDOS), corroborating a giant anomalous Lamb shift. The boundary of a finite 2D PC can produce resonances that cause the 2D LDOS in a finite 2D PC to differ markedly from the 2D LDOS in an infinite 2D PC.

  4. 2D Crystal heterostructures properties and growth by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Grace Huili

    Two-dimensional (2D) crystals such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) along with other families of layered materials including graphene, SnSe2, GaSe, BN etc, has attracted intense attention from the scientific community. One monolayer of such materials represent the thinnest ``quantum wells''. These layered materials typically possess an in-plane hexagonal crystal structure, and can be stacked together by interlayer van der Waals interactions. Therefore, it is possible to create novel heterostructures by stacking materials with large lattice mismatches and different properties, for instance, superconductors (NbSe2) , metals, semi-metals (graphene), semiconductors (MoS2) and insulators (BN). Numerous novel material properties and device concepts have been discovered, proposed and demonstrated lately. However, the low internal photoluminescence efficiency (IPE, <1%) and low carrier mobility observed in the 2D semiconductors suggest strongly that the materials under investigation today most likely suffer from a high concentration of defects. In this talk, I will share our progress and the challenges we face in terms of preparing, characterizing these 2D crystals as well as pursuing their applications. This work has been supported in part by NSF, AFOSR and LEAST, one of the STARnet centers.

  5. Zero-n gap in one dimensional photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chobey, Mahesh K. Suthar, B.

    2016-05-06

    We study a one-dimensional (1-D) photonic crystal composed of Double Positive (DPS) and Double Negative (DNG) material. This structure shows omnidirectional photonic bandgap, which is insensitive with angle of incidence and polarization. To study the effect of structural parameters on the photonic band structure, we have calculated photonic band gap at various thicknesses of DPS and DNG.

  6. Analysis and Application of the Bi-Directional Scatter Distribution Function of Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Calculated normal-incidence reflectance spectra with TM polarization for five different values of the superstrate refractive index: (a) 1.00, (b...a liquid crystal superstrate [7] (right) SEM image of mold used to create the GMRF [8] 6 Figure 3. 2-D GMRF photonic crystal: (left) 3-D...schematic, without the superstrate [8] (right) SEM image of the mold used to produce the PC[8] superstrate is increased. It is important to note

  7. Experimental demonstration of light bending at optical frequencies using a non-homogenizable graded photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Do, Khanh-Van; Le Roux, Xavier; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2012-02-13

    Experimental results on light bending in a non-homogenizable graded photonic crystal operating at optical wavelengths are presented in this paper. A square lattice silicon on insulator photonic crystal made of a two-dimensional chirp of the air-hole filling factor is exploited to produce the bending effect in a near bandgap frequency range. The sensitivity of light paths to wavelength tuning is also exploited to show demultiplexing capability with low insertion loss (<2dB) and low crosstalk (~-20dB). This experimental demonstration opens opportunities for light manipulation using a generalized two-dimensional chirp of photonic crystal lattice parameters. It also constitutes an alternative solution to the use of photonic metamaterials combining dielectric and metallic materials with sub-wavelength unit cells.

  8. Improving thin-film crystalline silicon solar cell efficiencies with photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Bermel, Peter; Luo, Chiyan; Zeng, Lirong; Kimerling, Lionel C; Joannopoulos, John D

    2007-12-10

    Most photovoltaic (solar) cells are made from crystalline silicon (c-Si), which has an indirect band gap. This gives rise to weak absorption of one-third of usable solar photons. Therefore, improved light trapping schemes are needed, particularly for c-Si thin film solar cells. Here, a photonic crystal-based light-trapping approach is analyzed and compared to previous approaches. For a solar cell made of a 2 mum thin film of c-Si and a 6 bilayer distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) in the back, power generation can be enhanced by a relative amount of 24.0% by adding a 1D grating, 26.3% by replacing the DBR with a six-period triangular photonic crystal made of air holes in silicon, 31.3% by a DBR plus 2D grating, and 26.5% by replacing it with an eight-period inverse opal photonic crystal.

  9. Effect of the elliptic rods orientations on the asymmetric light transmission in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, A.; Ouerghi, F.; AbdelMalek, F.; Haxha, S.; Ademgil, H.; Akowuah, E. K.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we report a novel design of a photonic crystal utilizing elliptic rods. The two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal consists of an asymmetric distribution of unit cells to ensure the one-way transmission of light. Analysis performed indicated that the orientation of the ellipse along the major and minor axis has an influence on the shift of the transmission. In particular, this results in shift of the transmission towards high frequencies and subsequent oscillation of its magnitude. The peak of the transmission band was also found to be strongly influenced by the orientation angle, θ. It has been demonstrated that the strong asymmetric propagation properties of the proposed photonic crystal structure enables the switching of incident light from one direction to another. The proposed structure may be applied as a building block to integrated photonics applications.

  10. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-06-18

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 10(5) with a mode-volume of ~ 1.7(λ/n)(3). This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices.

  11. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform

    PubMed Central

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-01-01

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 105 with a mode-volume of ~1.7(λ/n)3. This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices. PMID:26086849

  12. Raman cooling in silicon photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Chung; Bahl, Gaurav

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling of solids can be achieved through various photon up-conversion processes including anti-Stokes photoluminescence and anti-Stokes light scattering. While it has been shown that cooling using photoluminescence-based methods can achieve efficiency comparable to that of thermoelectric cooling, the reliance on specific transitions of the rare-earth dopants limits material choice. Light scattering, on the other hand, occurs in all materials, and has the potential to enable cooling in most materials. We show that by engineering the photonic density of states of a material, one can suppress the Stokes process, and enhance the anti-Stokes radiation. We employ the well-known diamond-structured photonic crystal patterned in crystalline silicon to demonstrate theoretically that when operating within a high transparency regime, the net energy removal rate from phonon annihilation can overcome the optical absorption. The engineered photonic density of states can thus enable simultaneous cooling of all Raman-active phonon modes and the net cooling of the solid.

  13. Single photon emission from diamond nanocrystals in an opal photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L A; Zhai, Y; Dawes, J M; Steel, M J; Rabeau, J R; Withford, M J

    2009-09-28

    We present the first optical measurement of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in a three-dimensional photonic crystal. The photonic crystal, fabricated by self-assembly of polystyrene microspheres, exhibits a photonic stopband that overlaps the NV photoluminescence spectrum. A modified emission spectrum and photon antibunching were measured from the NV centers. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements revealed a 30% increase in the source lifetime. Encapsulation of single NV centers in a three-dimensional photonic crystal is a step towards controlling emission properties of a single photon source.

  14. Half-disordered photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Beque, V; Keilman, J; Citrin, D S

    2016-08-10

    Optical transmission spectra of finite-thickness slabs of two-dimensional triangular-lattice photonic crystals of air holes in a dielectric matrix with various concentrations of randomly located vacancies (absent air holes) are studied. We focus on structures in which only one half of the structure-the incidence or transmission side-is disordered. We find vacancy-induced scattering gives rise to a strong difference in the two cases; for light incident on the disordered side, high transmission within the photonic pseudogap at normal incidence is predicted, in strong contrast to the opposite case, where low transmission is predicted throughout the pseudogap, as is observed in the case of an ideal structure with no defects.

  15. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  16. Band structure peculiarities of magnetic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, A. H.; Golik, S. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this work we studied light diffraction in magneto-photonic crystals (MPC) having large magneto-optical activity and modulation large depth. The case of arbitrary angles between the direction of the external static magnetic field and the normal to the border of the MPC layer is considered. The problem is solved by Ambartsumian's modified layer addition method. It is found that there is a new type of non-reciprocity, namely, the relation R (α) ≠ R (- α) takes place, where R is the reflection coefficient, and α is the incidence angle. It is shown the formation of new photonic band gap (PBG) at oblique incidence of light, which is not selective for the polarization of the incident light, in the case when the external magnetic field is directed along the medium axis. Such a system can be used as: a tunable polarization filter, polarization mirror, circular (elliptical) polarizer, tunable optical diode, etc.

  17. Square lattice photonic crystal surface mode lasers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tsan-Wen; Lu, Shao-Ping; Chiu, Li-Hsun; Lee, Po-Tsung

    2010-12-06

    In this report, we propose a square lattice photonic crystal hetero-slab-edge microcavity design. In numerical simulations, three surface modes in this microcavity are investigated and optimized by tuning the slab-edge termination τ and gradual mirror layer. High simulated quality (Q) factor of 2.3 × 10(5) and small mode volume of 0.105 μm(3) are obtained from microcavity with τ = 0.80. In experiments, we obtain and identify different surface modes lasing. The surface mode in the second photonic band gap shows a very-low threshold of 140 μW and high Q factor of 5,500, which could be an avenue to low-threshold optical lasers and highly sensitive sensor applications with efficient light-matter interactions.

  18. Dirac directional emission in anisotropic zero refractive index photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    He, Xin-Tao; Zhong, Yao-Nan; Zhou, You; Zhong, Zhi-Chao; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-08-14

    A certain class of photonic crystals with conical dispersion is known to behave as isotropic zero-refractive-index medium. However, the discrete building blocks in such photonic crystals are limited to construct multidirectional devices, even for high-symmetric photonic crystals. Here, we show multidirectional emission from low-symmetric photonic crystals with semi-Dirac dispersion at the zone center. We demonstrate that such low-symmetric photonic crystal can be considered as an effective anisotropic zero-refractive-index medium, as long as there is only one propagation mode near Dirac frequency. Four kinds of Dirac multidirectional emitters are achieved with the channel numbers of five, seven, eleven, and thirteen, respectively. Spatial power combination for such kind of Dirac directional emitter is also verified even when multiple sources are randomly placed in the anisotropic zero-refractive-index photonic crystal.

  19. Dirac directional emission in anisotropic zero refractive index photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin-Tao; Zhong, Yao-Nan; Zhou, You; Zhong, Zhi-Chao; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-01-01

    A certain class of photonic crystals with conical dispersion is known to behave as isotropic zero-refractive-index medium. However, the discrete building blocks in such photonic crystals are limited to construct multidirectional devices, even for high-symmetric photonic crystals. Here, we show multidirectional emission from low-symmetric photonic crystals with semi-Dirac dispersion at the zone center. We demonstrate that such low-symmetric photonic crystal can be considered as an effective anisotropic zero-refractive-index medium, as long as there is only one propagation mode near Dirac frequency. Four kinds of Dirac multidirectional emitters are achieved with the channel numbers of five, seven, eleven, and thirteen, respectively. Spatial power combination for such kind of Dirac directional emitter is also verified even when multiple sources are randomly placed in the anisotropic zero-refractive-index photonic crystal. PMID:26271208

  20. Photonic crystal devices formed by a charged-particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Koops, Hans W. P.

    2000-01-01

    A photonic crystal device and method. The photonic crystal device comprises a substrate with at least one photonic crystal formed thereon by a charged-particle beam deposition method. Each photonic crystal comprises a plurality of spaced elements having a composition different from the substrate, and may further include one or more impurity elements substituted for spaced elements. Embodiments of the present invention may be provided as electromagnetic wave filters, polarizers, resonators, sources, mirrors, beam directors and antennas for use at wavelengths in the range from about 0.2 to 200 microns or longer. Additionally, photonic crystal devices may be provided with one or more electromagnetic waveguides adjacent to a photonic crystal for forming integrated electromagnetic circuits for use at optical, infrared, or millimeter-wave frequencies.

  1. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  2. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  3. Bovine F1Fo ATP synthase monomers bend the lipid bilayer in 2D membrane crystals

    PubMed Central

    Jiko, Chimari; Davies, Karen M; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Maeda, Shintaro; Mills, Deryck J; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Gerle, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We have used a combination of electron cryo-tomography, subtomogram averaging, and electron crystallographic image processing to analyse the structure of intact bovine F1Fo ATP synthase in 2D membrane crystals. ATPase assays and mass spectrometry analysis of the 2D crystals confirmed that the enzyme complex was complete and active. The structure of the matrix-exposed region was determined at 24 Å resolution by subtomogram averaging and repositioned into the tomographic volume to reveal the crystal packing. F1Fo ATP synthase complexes are inclined by 16° relative to the crystal plane, resulting in a zigzag topology of the membrane and indicating that monomeric bovine heart F1Fo ATP synthase by itself is sufficient to deform lipid bilayers. This local membrane curvature is likely to be instrumental in the formation of ATP synthase dimers and dimer rows, and thus for the shaping of mitochondrial cristae. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06119.001 PMID:25815585

  4. From Homochiral Clusters to Racemate Crystals: Viable Nuclei in 2D Chiral Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Seibel, Johannes; Parschau, Manfred; Ernst, Karl-Heinz

    2015-07-01

    The quest for enantiopure compounds raises the question of which factors favor conglomerate crystallization over racemate crystallization. Studying nucleation and crystal growth at surfaces with submolecular-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy is a suitable approach to better understand intermolecular chiral recognition. Racemic heptahelicene on the Ag(100) surface shows a transition from homochiral nuclei to larger racemic motifs, although the extended homochiral phase exhibits higher density. The homochiral-heterochiral transition is explained by the higher stability of growing nuclei due to a better match of the molecular lattice to the substrate surface. Our observations are direct visual proof of viable nuclei.

  5. Photonic crystals possessing multiple Weyl points and the experimental observation of robust surface states

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Xiao, Meng; Chan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Weyl points, as monopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space, have captured much attention recently in various branches of physics. Realizing topological materials that exhibit such nodal points is challenging and indeed, Weyl points have been found experimentally in transition metal arsenide and phosphide and gyroid photonic crystal whose structure is complex. If realizing even the simplest type of single Weyl nodes with a topological charge of 1 is difficult, then making a real crystal carrying higher topological charges may seem more challenging. Here we design, and fabricate using planar fabrication technology, a photonic crystal possessing single Weyl points (including type-II nodes) and multiple Weyl points with topological charges of 2 and 3. We characterize this photonic crystal and find nontrivial 2D bulk band gaps for a fixed kz and the associated surface modes. The robustness of these surface states against kz-preserving scattering is experimentally observed for the first time. PMID:27703140

  6. Photonic crystals possessing multiple Weyl points and the experimental observation of robust surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Xiao, Meng; Chan, C. T.

    2016-10-01

    Weyl points, as monopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space, have captured much attention recently in various branches of physics. Realizing topological materials that exhibit such nodal points is challenging and indeed, Weyl points have been found experimentally in transition metal arsenide and phosphide and gyroid photonic crystal whose structure is complex. If realizing even the simplest type of single Weyl nodes with a topological charge of 1 is difficult, then making a real crystal carrying higher topological charges may seem more challenging. Here we design, and fabricate using planar fabrication technology, a photonic crystal possessing single Weyl points (including type-II nodes) and multiple Weyl points with topological charges of 2 and 3. We characterize this photonic crystal and find nontrivial 2D bulk band gaps for a fixed kz and the associated surface modes. The robustness of these surface states against kz-preserving scattering is experimentally observed for the first time.

  7. Hydrogen sensor based on metallic photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Nau, D; Seidel, A; Orzekowsky, R B; Lee, S-H; Deb, S; Giessen, H

    2010-09-15

    We present a hydrogen sensor based on metallic photonic crystal slabs. Tungsten trioxide (WO(3)) is used as a waveguide layer below an array of gold nanowires. Hydrogen exposure influences the optical properties of this photonic crystal arrangement by gasochromic mechanisms, where the photonic crystal geometry leads to sharp spectral resonances. Measurements reveal a change of the transmission depending on the hydrogen concentration. Theoretical limits for the detection range and sensitivity of this approach are discussed.

  8. Young's double-slit experiment in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, C. M.

    2012-10-01

    We present an experimental and numerical study of the transmission of a photonic crystal perforated by two subwavelength slits, separated by two wavelengths. The experimental near-field image of the double-slit design of the photonic crystal shows an interference pattern, which is analogous to Young's experiment. This interference arises as a consequence of the excitation of surface states of the photonic crystals and agrees very well with the simulations.

  9. Young's double-slit experiment in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2012-10-01

    We present an experimental and numerical study of the transmission of a photonic crystal perforated by two sub-wavelength slits, separated by two wavelengths.The experimental near-field image of the double-slit design of the photonic crystal shows an interference pattern, which is analogous to Young’s experiment. This interference arises as a consequence of the excitation of surface states of the photonic crystals and agrees very well with the simulations.

  10. One-dimensional photonic crystals bound by light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Liyong; Li, Xiao; Chen, Jun; Cao, Yongyin; Du, Guiqiang; Ng, Jack

    2017-08-01

    Through rigorous simulations, the light scattering induced optical binding of one-dimensional (1D) dielectric photonic crystals is studied. The optical forces corresponding to the pass band, band gap, and band edge are qualitatively different. It is shown that light can induce self-organization of dielectric slabs into stable photonic crystals, with its lower band edge coinciding with the incident light frequency. Incident light at normal and oblique incidence and photonic crystals with parity-time symmetry are also considered.

  11. Tuning quantum correlations with intracavity photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Maria M. de; Gomila, Damia; Zambrini, Roberta; Garcia-March, Miguel Angel

    2011-09-15

    We show how to tune quantum noise in nonlinear systems by means of periodic spatial modulation. We prove that the introduction of an intracavity photonic crystal in a multimode optical parametric oscillator inhibits and enhances light quantum fluctuations. Furthermore, it leads to a significant noise reduction in field quadratures, robustness of squeezing in a wider angular range, and spatial entanglement. These results have potential benefits for quantum imaging, metrology, and quantum information applications and suggest a control mechanism of fluctuations by spatial modulation of interest also in other nonlinear systems.

  12. Photonic crystal self-collimation sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufei; Wang, Hailing; Xue, Qikun; Zheng, Wanhua

    2012-05-21

    A novel refractive index sensor based on the two dimensional photonic crystal folded Michelson interferometer employing the self-collimation effect is proposed and its performances are theoretically investigated. Two sensing areas are included in the sensor. Simulation results indicate the branch area is suitable for the small index variety range and fine detection, whereas the reflector area prone to the large index change range and coarse detection. Because of no defect waveguides and no crosstalk of signal, the sensor is desirable to perform monolithic integrated, low-cost, label-free real-time parallel sensing. In addition, a flexible design of self-collimation sensors array is demonstrated.

  13. Super-collimation by axisymmetric photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Purlys, V.; Gailevičius, D.; Peckus, M.; Gadonas, R.; Maigyte, L.; Staliunas, K.

    2014-06-02

    We propose and experimentally show the mechanism of beam super-collimation by axisymmetric photonic crystals, specifically by periodic (in propagation direction) structure of layers of concentric rings. The physical mechanism behind the effect is an inverse scattering cascade of diffracted wave components back into on- and near-axis angular field components, resulting in substantial enhancement of intensity of these components. We explore the super-collimation by numerical calculations and prove it experimentally. We demonstrate experimentally the axial field enhancement up to 7 times in terms of field intensity.

  14. Efficient photonic crystal Y-junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rab; Karle, Tim J.; Moerman, I.; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2003-07-01

    A highly efficient Y-junction based on a planar photonic crystal (PhC) platform is presented. The PhC consists of a triangular array of holes etched into a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, with a typical period of 322 nm and ~35% fill factor. The Y-junction has smaller holes positioned at the centre of the junction, giving rise to very uniform splitting and high transmission. The performance is very encouraging, with experimental transmission of approximately 40% for each arm of the Y-splitter relative to a comparable single-defect PhC waveguide.

  15. Broadband dispersion-compensating photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sigang; Zhang, Yejin; He, Lina; Xie, Shizhong

    2006-10-01

    We present a modified dual-core photonic crystal fiber, based on pure silica, with special grapefruit holes in the inner cladding. The fiber has large, broadband negative dispersion, and the dispersion value varies linearly from -380to-420 ps/(nmkm) in the C band. To decrease the fabrication difficulty, large air holes are adopted. Furthermore, the chromatic dispersion of the fiber is not sensitive to the structure parameters. So the proposed fiber structure can greatly facilitate fiber drawing and can be used for broadband dispersion compensation.

  16. Anomalous bending effect in photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Tu, Haohua; Jiang, Zhi; Marks, Daniel L; Boppart, Stephen A

    2008-04-14

    An unexpected transmission loss up to 50% occurs to intense femtosecond pulses propagating along an endlessly single-mode photonic crystal fiber over a length of 1 m. A specific leaky-fiber mode gains amplification along the fiber at the expense of the fundamental fiber mode through stimulated four-wave mixing and Raman scattering, leading to this transmission loss. Bending near the fiber entrance dissipates the propagating seed of this leaky mode, preventing the leaky mode amplification and therefore enhancing the transmission of these pulses.

  17. Design of two-dimensional photonic crystals with large absolute band gaps using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Linfang; Ye, Zhuo; He, Sailing

    2003-07-01

    A two-stage genetic algorithm (GA) with a floating mutation probability is developed to design a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal of a square lattice with the maximal absolute band gap. The unit cell is divided equally into many square pixels, and each filling pattern of pixels with two dielectric materials corresponds to a chromosome consisting of binary digits 0 and 1. As a numerical example, the two-stage GA gives a 2D GaAs structure with a relative width of the absolute band gap of about 19%. After further optimization, a new 2D GaAs photonic crystal is found with an absolute band gap much larger than those reported before.

  18. Combined enhanced fluorescence and label-free biomolecular detection with a photonic crystal surface.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Chan, Leo L; Cunningham, Brian T

    2007-04-20

    A 2D photonic crystal surface with a different period in each lateral direction is demonstrated to detect biomolecules using two distinct sensing modalities. The sensing mechanisms both rely on the generation of a resonant reflection peak at one of two specific wavelengths, depending on the polarization of light that is incident on the photonic crystal. One polarization results in a resonant reflection peak in the visible spectrum to coincide with the excitation wavelength of a fluorophore, while the orthogonal polarization results in a resonant reflection peak at an infrared wavelength which is used for label-free detection of adsorbed biomolecules. The photonic crystal resonance for fluorescence excitation causes enhanced near fields at the structure surface, resulting in increased signal from fluorophores within 100 nm of the device surface. Label-free detection is performed by illuminating the photonic crystal with white light and monitoring shifts in the peak reflected wavelength of the infrared resonance with a high-resolution imaging detection instrument. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis was used to determine optimal dimensions for the photonic crystal structure, and devices were fabricated using a polymer-based nanoreplica molding approach. Fluorescence-based and label-free detection were demonstrated using arrays of spots of dye-conjugated streptavidin. Quantification of the fluorescent signal showed that the fluorescence output from protein spots on the photonic crystal was increased by up to a factor of 35, and deposited spots were also imaged in the label-free detection mode.

  19. A Photonic Crystal Protein Hydrogel Sensor for Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhongyu; Kwak, Daniel H; Punihaole, David; Hong, Zhenmin; Velankar, Sachin S; Liu, Xinyu; Asher, Sanford A

    2015-10-26

    We report two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) sensing materials that selectively detect Candida albicans (C. albicans). These sensors utilize Concanavalin A (Con A) protein hydrogels with a 2D PC embedded on the Con A protein hydrogel surface, that multivalently and selectively bind to mannan on the C. albicans cell surface to form crosslinks. The resulting crosslinks shrink the Con A protein hydrogel, reduce the 2D PC particle spacing, and blue-shift the light diffracted from the PC. The diffraction shifts can be visually monitored, measured with a spectrometer, or determined from the Debye diffraction ring diameter. Our unoptimized hydrogel sensor has a detection limit of around 32 CFU/mL for C. albicans. This sensor distinguishes between C. albicans and those microbes devoid of cell-surface mannan such as the gram-negative bacterium E. coli. This sensor provides a proof-of-concept for utilizing recognition between lectins and microbial cell surface carbohydrates to detect microorganisms in aqueous environments.

  20. Ultra high quality factor one dimensional photonic crystal/photonic wire micro-cavities in silicon-on-insulator (SOI).

    PubMed

    Zain, Ahmad R; Johnson, Nigel P; Sorel, Marc; De La Rue, Richard M

    2008-08-04

    We present experimental results on photonic crystal/photonic wire micro-cavity structures that demonstrate further enhancement of the quality-factor (Q-factor)--up to approximately 149,000--in the fibre telecommunications wavelength range. The Q-values and the useful transmission levels achieved are due, in particular, to the combination of both tapering within and outside the micro-cavity, with carefully designed hole diameters and non-periodic hole placement within the tapered section. Our 2D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulation approach shows good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Biomimetic Photonic Crystals based on Diatom Algae Frustules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishler, Jonathan; Alverson, Andrew; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Diatom algae are unicellular, photosynthetic microorganisms with a unique external shell known as a frustule. Frustules, which are composed of amorphous silica, exhibit a unique periodic nano-patterning, distinguishing diatoms from other types of phytoplankton. Diatoms have been studied for their distinctive optical properties due to their resemblance of photonic crystals. In this regard, diatoms are not only considered for their applications as photonic crystals, but also for their use as biomimetic templates for artificially fabricated photonic crystals. Through the examination and measurement of the physical characteristics of many scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of diatom frustules, a biomimetic photonic crystal derived from diatom frustules can be recreated and modeled with the finite element method. In this approach, the average geometries of the diatom frustules are used to recreate a 2-dimensional photonic crystal, after which the electric field distribution and optical transmission through the photonic crystal are both measured. The optical transmission is then compared to the transmission spectra of a regular hexagonal photonic crystal, revealing the effects of diatom geometry on their optical properties. Finally, the dimensions of the photonic crystal are parametrically swept, allowing for further control over the transmission of light through the photonic crystal.

  2. Photonic crystals possessing single and double Weyl points (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Che Ting

    2016-09-01

    The concepts of topological states have captured much attention in condensed-matter physics and the importance of these systems is subsequently realized in other subfields, such as cold atom and classical waves. In the past few years, the attention was focused on "topological insulators" while very recently, the attention is shifting to "Weyl semi-metals" which have gapless bulk band structures with pairs of topological points (called Weyl points) and topologically-protected surface states. In this work, we designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized a Weyl photonic crystal with both single and double Weyl points. We used tight-binding Hamiltonian as a starting point to guide us to the structures that have the correct symmetry to support topological features including synthetic gauge flux and associated Weyl points. We fabricated for the first time a system that exhibits Weyl points of topological charge higher than 1. In our photonic crystal, the existence of the double Weyl point is made possible by the degeneracy between the two single Weyl points which is protected by C3 symmetry and time reversal. Once the C3 symmetry is broken, two Weyl points with charge of ±1 will separate and each forms a linear dispersion in all three directions. Nontrivial 2D bulk band gaps for fixed kz and Weyl points were confirmed by angle-resolved transmission spectra. The robustness of the associated surface states against kz-preserved scattering was experimentally observed.

  3. Switchable Photonic Crystals Using One-Dimensional Confined Liquid Crystals for Photonic Device Application.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seong Ho; Gim, Min-Jun; Lee, Wonsuk; Choi, Suk-Won; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-01-25

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have recently attracted considerable attention, with much effort devoted to photonic bandgap (PBG) control for varying the reflected color. Here, fabrication of a modulated one-dimensional (1D) anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) PC with a periodic porous structure is reported. The PBG of the fabricated PC can be reversibly changed by switching the ultraviolet (UV) light on/off. The AAO nanopores contain a mixture of photoresponsive liquid crystals (LCs) with irradiation-activated cis/trans photoisomerizable azobenzene. The resultant mixture of LCs in the porous AAO film exhibits a reversible PBG, depending on the cis/trans configuration of azobenzene molecules. The PBG switching is reliable over many cycles, suggesting that the fabricated device can be used in optical and photonic applications such as light modulators, smart windows, and sensors.

  4. Nucleation and growth of 2D covalent organic frameworks: polymerization and crystallization of COF monomers.

    PubMed

    Koo, B T; Heden, R F; Clancy, P

    2017-04-12

    We establish a theoretical foundation for understanding the nucleation and growth of 2D covalent organic frameworks (COFs) from solution. This foundation should make it easier to realize some of the unique properties of COFs in targeted applications by allowing us to understand how processing variables such as solvent choice and linkage chemistry lead to larger crystalline domains. We use free energy techniques to map out the reaction mechanisms and activation energies of three fundamental reactions that are responsible for the early stages of 2D COF nucleation for a prototypical and commonly used 2D boronate ester material, COF-5, in water and methanol solvents. We show that the presence of water and methanol greatly catalyzes the boronate ester formation reactions, lowering the activation energy barrier by about 10 kcal mol(-1) relative to an uncatalyzed reaction pathway. This is in good agreement with experimental observations by Smith and Dichtel (JACS 2014). Our crystallization studies also conclusively eliminate certain proposed mechanisms of growth, such as polymerization of large sheets followed by stacking, while strengthening the case for templated polymerization as a likely growth mechanism for COF crystals.

  5. Investigation of the Band Structure of Graphene-Based Plasmonic Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Pingping; Qiu, Weibin; Lin, Zhili; Chen, Houbo; Tang, Yixin; Wang, Jia-Xian; Kan, Qiang; Pan, Jiao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) graphene-based plasmonic photonic crystals (PhCs) are proposed. The band structures and density of states (DOS) have been numerically investigated. Photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in both 1D and 2D PhCs. Meanwhile, graphene-based plasmonic PhC nanocavity with resonant frequency around 175 THz, is realized by introducing point defect, where the chemical potential is from 0.085 to 0.25 eV, in a 2D PhC. Also, the bending wvaguide and the beam splitter are realized by introducing the line defect into the 2D PhC. PMID:28335295

  6. Investigation of the Band Structure of Graphene-Based Plasmonic Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Pingping; Qiu, Weibin; Lin, Zhili; Chen, Houbo; Tang, Yixin; Wang, Jia-Xian; Kan, Qiang; Pan, Jiao-Qing

    2016-09-09

    In this paper, one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) graphene-based plasmonic photonic crystals (PhCs) are proposed. The band structures and density of states (DOS) have been numerically investigated. Photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in both 1D and 2D PhCs. Meanwhile, graphene-based plasmonic PhC nanocavity with resonant frequency around 175 THz, is realized by introducing point defect, where the chemical potential is from 0.085 to 0.25 eV, in a 2D PhC. Also, the bending wvaguide and the beam splitter are realized by introducing the line defect into the 2D PhC.

  7. Hexagonal photonic crystal waveguide based on barium titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianheng; Liu, Zhifu; Wessels, Bruce W.; Tu, Yongming; Ho, Seng-Tiong; Joshi-Imre, Alexandra; Ocola, Leonidas E.

    2011-03-01

    The simulation, fabrication and measurement of nonlinear photonic crystals (PhCs) with hexagonal symmetry in epitaxial BaTiO3 were investigated. The optical transmission properties of a PhC were simulated by a 2-D finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method. A complete bandgap exists for both the TE and TM optical modes. The fabricated PhC has a well-defined stop band over the spectral region of 1525 to 1575 nm. A microcavity structure was also fabricated by incorporation of a line defect in the PhC. Transmission of the microcavity structure over the spectral region from 1456 to 1584nm shows a well-defined 5 nm wide window at 1495nm. Simulations indicate that the phase velocity matched PhC microcavity device of 0.5 mm long can potentially serve as modulator with a 3 dB bandwidth of 4 THz.

  8. Dual negative refraction in a two dimension square photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbali, J.; AbdelMalek, F.

    2015-09-01

    Dual refraction effect based on the overlapping bands in a two dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PhC) is demonstrated. The PhC consists of alumina rods with a dielectric constant ε=8.9, arranged in a square lattice in air. To disperse light which has special excitation frequency and a specific incident angle, by this PhC we optimize his structural parameters such as the radius of dielectric rods). It is shown that two focusing phenomena are formed in the PhC image plan; the degeneracy of modes can be applied to realize optical interference and wave front division. The simulation results are obtained by employing the PWM for analyzing bands structure and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) to predict the evolution of the electric fields.

  9. All-optical high performance graphene-photonic crystal switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseini, Mehrdad; Malekmohammad, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The all-optical switch is realized based on nonlinear transmission changes in Fano resonance of 2D photonic crystals (PhC) which enhances the light intensity on the graphene in PhC; and in this study, the graphene layer is used as the nonlinear material. The refractive index change of graphene layer leads to a shift in the Fano resonance frequency due to the input light intensity through the Kerr nonlinear effect. Through finite-difference time-domain simulation, it is found that the high performance of all-optical switching can be achieved by the designed structure with a threshold pump intensity as low as MW/cm2. This structure is featured by optical bistability. The obtained results are applicable in micro optical integrated circuits for modulators, switches and logic elements for optical computation.

  10. Characterization of tunable photonic crystal fiber directional couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun Soo; Park, Kwang No; Lee, Kyung Shik

    2007-06-01

    We present a tunable photonic crystal fiber (PCF) directional coupler fabricated by a side-polishing method. The PCF directional coupler was modeled as a typical single-mode fiber-based directional coupler and analyzed using the improved effective-index method (IEIM). The characteristics of the PCF directional coupler such as the coupling coefficient and the coupling ratio were measured and found to be in good agreement with those predicted by the theoretical model. The PCF directional coupler exhibited an insertion loss of ˜2 dB for a 3 dB coupler and was able to tune the coupling ratio between 0% and 100% by tilting the angle of the top side-polished quartz block against the fixed-bottom quartz block.

  11. Growth of Large and Highly Ordered 2D Crystals of a K+ Channel, Structural Role of Lipidic Environment

    PubMed Central

    De Zorzi, Rita; Nicholson, William V.; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Erne-Brand, Françoise; Vénien-Bryan, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    2D crystallography has proven to be an excellent technique to determine the 3D structure of membrane proteins. Compared to 3D crystallography, it has the advantage of visualizing the protein in an environment closer to the native one. However, producing good 2D crystals is still a challenge and little statistical knowledge can be gained from literature. Here, we present a thorough screening of 2D crystallization conditions for a prokaryotic inwardly rectifying potassium channel (>130 different conditions). Key parameters leading to very large and well-organized 2D crystals are discussed. In addition, the problem of formation of multilayers during the growth of 2D crystals is also addressed. An intermediate resolution projection map of KirBac3.1 at 6 Å is presented, which sheds (to our knowledge) new light on the structure of this channel in a lipid environment. PMID:23870261

  12. Designing artificial 2D crystals with site and size controlled quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xuejun; Kang, Jiahao; Cao, Wei; Chu, Jae Hwan; Gong, Yongji; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Banerjee, Kaustav

    2017-08-30

    Ordered arrays of quantum dots in two-dimensional (2D) materials would make promising optical materials, but their assembly could prove challenging. Here we demonstrate a scalable, site and size controlled fabrication of quantum dots in monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and quantum dot arrays with nanometer-scale spatial density by focused electron beam irradiation induced local 2H to 1T phase change in MoS2. By designing the quantum dots in a 2D superlattice, we show that new energy bands form where the new band gap can be controlled by the size and pitch of the quantum dots in the superlattice. The band gap can be tuned from 1.81 eV to 1.42 eV without loss of its photoluminescence performance, which provides new directions for fabricating lasers with designed wavelengths. Our work constitutes a photoresist-free, top-down method to create large-area quantum dot arrays with nanometer-scale spatial density that allow the quantum dots to interfere with each other and create artificial crystals. This technique opens up new pathways for fabricating light emitting devices with 2D materials at desired wavelengths. This demonstration can also enable the assembly of large scale quantum information systems and open up new avenues for the design of artificial 2D materials.

  13. Connected hexagonal photonic crystals with largest full band gap.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Chen, Y; Chern, R; Chang, Chien

    2005-10-03

    A two-dimensional photonic crystal with a large full band gap has been designed, fabricated, and characterized. The photonic crystal design was based on a calculation using inverse iteration with multigrid acceleration. The fabrication of the photonic crystal on silicon was realized by the processes of electron-beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching. It was found that the hexagonal array of circular columns and rods has an optimal full photonic band gap. In addition, we show that a larger extraction of light from our designed photonic crystal can be obtained when compared with the frequently used photonic crystals reported previously. Our designed PC structure therefore should be very useful for creating highly efficient optoelectronic devices.

  14. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence for early breast cancer biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Brian T; Zangar, Richard C

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces offer a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics. Through the complementary processes of photonic crystal enhanced excitation and enhanced extraction, a periodic dielectric-based nanostructured surface can simultaneously increase the electric field intensity experienced by surface-bound fluorophores and increase the collection efficiency of emitted fluorescent photons. Through the ability to inexpensively fabricate photonic crystal surfaces over substantial surface areas, they are amenable to single-use applications in biological sensing, such as disease biomarker detection in serum. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity, multiplexed biomarker detection in the context of breast cancer diagnosis. We will summarize recent efforts to improve the detection limits of such assays though the use of photonic crystal surfaces. Reduction of detection limits is driven by low autofluorescent substrates for photonic crystal fabrication, and detection instruments that take advantage of their unique features.

  15. Dielectric matrices with air cavities as a waveguide photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanov, D. A.; Skripal', A. V.; Merdanov, M. K.; Gorlitskii, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    Frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient of a microwave photonic crystal that represents a structure containing alternating layers of ceramic material (Al2O3) with a relatively large number of cavities and foam plastic are studied in the presence and absence of distortions of the periodicity of a photonic structure. The frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient can be analyzed using a model of effective medium that makes it possible to consider the interaction of electromagnetic wave and photonic crystal using a transfer matrix of a 1D photonic crystal. The band character of the frequency dependence of the transmission coefficient of the photonic crystal related to the periodicity of the photonic crystal in the transverse plane for the waveguide with a standard cross section is not manifested in a certain range of material permittivities.

  16. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qinglan; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO{sub 2} dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  17. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  18. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinglan; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-08-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO2 dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  19. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinglan; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J; Cunningham, Brian T

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO2 dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  20. Flexible photonic crystals for strain sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Luís M.; Gonçalves, M. Clara; Almeida, Rui M.

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) photonic crystals (PCs) have been studied as possible strain sensing materials, based on strain-induced stop band frequency shifting. Self-assembly of polystyrene microspheres, achieved by sedimentation over a flexible polyimide tape substrate whose surface hydrophilicity was optimized in order to achieve maximum wettability, led to an organized 3-D direct opal template. This was infiltrated with a silica sol-gel solution by dip-coating or by chemical vapour deposition and an inverse opal structure was ultimately obtained by chemical dissolution of the polymer template. The structural and optical properties of these PCs have been studied by scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and UV/visible spectroscopy under variable degrees of strain. FE-SEM showed the presence of ordered domains up to ∼30 μm2. A mechano-optical effect was evidenced by strain-induced shifting of the photonic stop band peak wavelength of the direct, infiltrated and inverse opals up to 50 nm in transmission mode, due to changes in interplanar spacing upon bending the flexible PCs. Optical response strain cycles were studied, suggesting the possible use of these structures in reversible photonic strain sensors integrated in sensor/actuator devices.

  1. Gallium Nitride Based Logpile Photonic Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Li, Qiming; Lee, Yun-Ju; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Wang, George T.; Fischer, Arthur J.

    2011-11-09

    A nine-layer logpile three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) is demonstrated composed of single crystalline gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods, ~ 100 nm in size with lattice constants of 260, 280, and 300 nm with photonic band gap in the visible region. This unique GaN structure is created through a combined approach of a layer-by-layer template fabrication technique and selective metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These GaN 3DPC exhibit a stacking direction band gap characterized by strong optical reflectance between 380 and 500 nm. By introducing a ''line-defect'' cavity in the fifth (middle) layer of the 3DPC, a localized transmission mode with a quality factor of 25–30 is also observed within the photonic band gap. The realization of a group III nitride 3DPC with uniform features and a band gap at wavelengths in the visible region is an important step toward realizing complete control of the electromagnetic environment for group III nitride-based optoelectronic devices.

  2. Gallium nitride based logpile photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Li, Qiming; Lee, Yun-Ju; Figiel, Jeffrey J; Wang, George T; Fischer, Arthur J

    2011-11-09

    We demonstrate a nine-layer logpile three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) composed of single crystalline gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods, ∼100 nm in size with lattice constants of 260, 280, and 300 nm with photonic band gap in the visible region. This unique GaN structure is created through a combined approach of a layer-by-layer template fabrication technique and selective metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These GaN 3DPC exhibit a stacking direction band gap characterized by strong optical reflectance between 380 and 500 nm. By introducing a "line-defect" cavity in the fifth (middle) layer of the 3DPC, a localized transmission mode with a quality factor of 25-30 is also observed within the photonic band gap. The realization of a group III nitride 3DPC with uniform features and a band gap at wavelengths in the visible region is an important step toward realizing complete control of the electromagnetic environment for group III nitride based optoelectronic devices.

  3. High-resistance liquid-crystal lens array for rotatable 2D/3D autostereoscopic display.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Cheng; Jen, Tai-Hsiang; Ting, Chih-Hung; Huang, Yi-Pai

    2014-02-10

    A 2D/3D switchable and rotatable autostereoscopic display using a high-resistance liquid-crystal (Hi-R LC) lens array is investigated in this paper. Using high-resistance layers in an LC cell, a gradient electric-field distribution can be formed, which can provide a better lens-like shape of the refractive-index distribution. The advantages of the Hi-R LC lens array are its 2D/3D switchability, rotatability (in the horizontal and vertical directions), low driving voltage (~2 volts) and fast response (~0.6 second). In addition, the Hi-R LC lens array requires only a very simple fabrication process.

  4. Manipulation of photons at the surface of three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu

    2009-07-16

    In three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals, refractive-index variations with a periodicity comparable to the wavelength of the light passing through the crystal give rise to so-called photonic bandgaps, which are analogous to electronic bandgaps for electrons moving in the periodic electrostatic potential of a material's crystal structure. Such 3D photonic bandgap crystals are envisioned to become fundamental building blocks for the control and manipulation of photons in optical circuits. So far, such schemes have been pursued by embedding artificial defects and light emitters inside the crystals, making use of 3D bandgap directional effects. Here we show experimentally that photons can be controlled and manipulated even at the 'surface' of 3D photonic crystals, where 3D periodicity is terminated, establishing a new and versatile route for photon manipulation. By making use of an evanescent-mode coupling technique, we demonstrate that 3D photonic crystals possess two-dimensional surface states, and we map their band structure. We show that photons can be confined and propagate through these two-dimensional surface states, and we realize their localization at arbitrary surface points by designing artificial surface-defect structures through the formation of a surface-mode gap. Surprisingly, the quality factors of the surface-defect mode are the largest reported for 3D photonic crystal nanocavities (Q up to approximately 9,000). In addition to providing a new approach for photon manipulation by photonic crystals, our findings are relevant for the generation and control of plasmon-polaritons in metals and the related surface photon physics. The absorption-free nature of the 3D photonic crystal surface may enable new sensing applications and provide routes for the realization of efficient light-matter interactions.

  5. Machine Learning Energies of 2 Million Elpasolite (A B C2D6) Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Felix A.; Lindmaa, Alexander; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Armiento, Rickard

    2016-09-01

    Elpasolite is the predominant quaternary crystal structure (AlNaK2F6 prototype) reported in the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database. We develop a machine learning model to calculate density functional theory quality formation energies of all ˜2 ×106 pristine A B C2D6 elpasolite crystals that can be made up from main-group elements (up to bismuth). Our model's accuracy can be improved systematically, reaching a mean absolute error of 0.1 eV /atom for a training set consisting of 10 ×103 crystals. Important bonding trends are revealed: fluoride is best suited to fit the coordination of the D site, which lowers the formation energy whereas the opposite is found for carbon. The bonding contribution of the elements A and B is very small on average. Low formation energies result from A and B being late elements from group II, C being a late (group I) element, and D being fluoride. Out of 2 ×106 crystals, 90 unique structures are predicted to be on the convex hull—among which is NFAl2Ca6, with a peculiar stoichiometry and a negative atomic oxidation state for Al.

  6. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  7. Modeling of Si/Ge based two-dimensional photonic crystal nanocavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmasari, Lita; Zain, Ahmad Rifqi M.; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2016-11-01

    This paper has theoretically demonstrated the variation of geometrical parameters for L3 cavity photonic crystal. We have tuned a lattice constant of the photonic crystal to optimize the device. 2D photonic crystal structures with L3 configuration arranged in the triangular lattice is simulated using 2D FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain) approach. We have tuned the stop band within 1451 nm to 1532 nm wavelength windows. This stop band was achieved with a hole diameter of 150 nm and lattice constant, a of 350 nm. We have also varied the lattice constant to 320 nm, 330 nm, 340 nm, 350 nm and 360 nm respectively by keeping the hole diameter to 150 nm. The Q factor does not show any significant changes with different lattice constant. The highest Q factor of approximately 7000 was obtained with the lattice constant of 350 nm and hole diameter of 150 nm at the resonance wavelength of 1472 nm. The resonance excited by the L3 photonic crystal cavity structure in Si/Ge layer grown on silicon-on-insulator were achieved at 1476 nm with a right combination of lattice constant and hole diameters. This resonance wavelength was obtained at lattice constant 360 nm and hole diameter 150 nm. The highest optical transmission spectra also achieved at this parameter was approximately 30%. The resonance wavelength between this two geometry parameter was almost the same. This result can be utilized in telecommunication wavelength for many applications in the photonic area.

  8. Recent advances in liquid-crystal fiber optics and photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woliński, T. R.; Siarkowska, A.; Budaszewski, D.; Chychłowski, M.; Czapla, A.; Ertman, S.; Lesiak, P.; Rutkowska, K. A.; Orzechowski, K.; Sala-Tefelska, M.; Sierakowski, M.; DÄ browski, R.; Bartosewicz, B.; Jankiewicz, B.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Mergo, P.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid crystals over the last two decades have been successfully used to infiltrate fiber-optic and photonic structures initially including hollow-core fibers and recently micro-structured photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). As a result photonic liquid crystal fibers (PLCFs) have been created as a new type of micro-structured fibers that benefit from a merge of "passive" PCF host structures with "active" LC guest materials and are responsible for diversity of new and uncommon spectral, propagation, and polarization properties. This combination has simultaneously boosted research activities in both fields of Liquid Crystals Photonics and Fiber Optics by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more "special" than previously thought. Simultaneously, photonic liquid crystal fibers create a new class of fiber-optic devices that utilize unique properties of the photonic crystal fibers and tunable properties of LCs. Compared to "classical" photonic crystal fibers, PLCFs can demonstrate greatly improved control over their optical properties. The paper discusses the latest advances in this field comprising PLCFs that are based on nanoparticles-doped LCs. Doping of LCs with nanoparticles has recently become a common method of improving their optical, magnetic, electrical, and physical properties. Such a combination of nanoparticles-based liquid crystals and photonic crystal fibers can be considered as a next milestone in developing a new class of fiber-based optofluidic systems.

  9. Slow light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Takesue, Hiroki; Shimizu, Kaoru; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Notomi, Masaya

    2013-04-08

    We demonstrate the generation of quantum-correlated photon pairs from a Si photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguide. A slow-light supermode realized by the collective resonance of high-Q and small-mode-volume photonic-crystal cavities successfully enhanced the efficiency of the spontaneous four-wave mixing process. The generation rate of photon pairs was improved by two orders of magnitude compared with that of a photonic-crystal line defect waveguide without a slow-light effect.

  10. Atomically Phase-Matched Second-Harmonic Generation in a 2D Crystal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-26

    single or a few atomic layers. Rich physical properties, such as the emerging photoluminescence6,7, excellent transistor on-off ratio8, optical valley...OPEN ORIGINAL ARTICLE Atomically phase-matched second-harmonic generation in a 2D crystal Mervin Zhao1,2,*, Ziliang Ye1,2,*, Ryuji Suzuki3,4,*, Yu...arising from a single atomic layer, where the SH light elucidated important information such as the grain boundaries and electronic structure in these ultra

  11. Assembly of Dimer-Based Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in colloid synthesis to prepare monodisperse shape anisotropic particles provide the opportunity to address challenges related to structural diversity in ordered colloidal solids. In particular, computational simulations and mechanical models suggest that upon system densification nonspherical dimer colloids undergo disorder-order and order-order phase transitions to unconventional solid structures including, base-centered monoclinic crystals, degenerate aperiodic crystals, plastic crystal or rotator, etc. based on free energy minimization. The particle systems have notable analogy to molecular systems, where the shape of molecules and their packing density has been shown to critically influence structural phase behavior and lead to a rich variety of structures, both natural and synthetic. The materials engineering challenges have been in attaining sufficiently monodisperse (size uniformity) colloidal building blocks, as well as the lack of understanding and control of self-assembly processes for non-spherical colloids. This talk highlights our investigations of how particle shape programs the self-organization of colloidal structures. Methods including evaporation mediated assembly and confinement provide a platform to understand the formation of complex colloidal structures from non-spherical building blocks (silica-coated iron oxide, polystyrene, hollow silica shell). Optical property simulations for unconventional 2D and 3D structures with nonspherical particle bases will also be discussed.

  12. 2D modeling of regeneration surface growth on a single-crystal sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, V. G.; Gavryushkin, P. N.; Fursenko, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of a sphere produced from a single crystal potassium alum in course of its regeneration, using numerical 2D-simulation in the kinematic model, which describes the growth of the regenerating surfaces.The modeling results demonstrate a qualitative agreement between the predictions of the kinematic model and real processes of sphere regeneration. It is shown that the face arising on the regenerating surface of a sphere may grow either more slowly or more rapidly than the surrounding surface. In the latter case, the face interacts with the regeneration surface and disappears from the sphere surface before intersecting in edges with neighboring faces. The influence of the input model parameters on the numerical modeling results is analyzed. It is established that the roughness parameters of the initial surface of a single-crystal sphere significantly affect the surface evolution during regeneration.

  13. Cylindrical liquid crystal lenses system for autostereoscopic 2D/3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Huang, Yi-Pai; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Wang, Po-Hao; Chen, Po-Chuan; Tsai, Chao-Hsu

    2012-06-01

    The liquid crystal lenses system, which could be electrically controlled easily for autostereoscopic 2D/3D switchable display was proposed. The High-Resistance liquid crystal (HRLC) lens utilized less controlled electrodes and coated a high-resistance layer between the controlled-electrodes was proposed and was used in this paper. Compare with the traditional LC lens, the HR-LC Lens could provide smooth electric-potential distribution within the LC layer under driving status. Hence, the proposed HR-LC Lens had less circuit complexity, low driving voltage, and good optical performance also could be obtained. In addition, combining with the proposed driving method called dual-directional overdriving method, the above method could reduce the switching time by applying large voltage onto cell. Consequently, the total switching time could be further reduced to around 2second. It is believed that the LC lens system has high potential in the future.

  14. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  15. Liquid sensor based bio-chip for DNA analysis of cancer using photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Harshada; Nischitha, R.; Indumathi, T. S.; Sharan, Preeta

    2015-07-01

    Silicon photonics is poised to revolutionize bio-sensing applications, specifically in medical diagnostics. The need for cost effective and reliable bio-sensors in medical applications is an ever growing and everlasting one. In this synopsis we have designed a 2-D hexagonal photonic crystal ring resonator based bio-sensor that is able to detect lung cancer from blood. Simulation and analysis has been done for normal DNA and the cancer affected DNA in blood. The intensity level of transmission spectrum has been observed. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method is used for analysis. MEEP (MIT Electromagnetic Equation Propagation) tool and RSOFT Photonic Suite CAD tool are used designing the photonic crystal sensor. The results show that for small changes in the refractive index of the input samples there is a significant shift in wavelength and amplitude. Thus the sensor is highly sensitive for change in refractive index and hence differentiating normal and cancer affected DNA.

  16. Interface electromagnetic waves between Kronig-Penney photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrany, Khashayar; Momeni, Babak; Khorasani, Sina; Rashidian, Bizhan

    2003-02-01

    The electromagnetic interface states formed in a heterostructure composed of two semi-infinite Kronig-Penny photonic crystals have been studied. Modified transfer matrices have been used for study of Kronig-Penny photonic crystals (heterostructures with conducting interfaces) to show strong similarity between solid-state physics and electromagnetics. Our calculations are limited to TE polarization.

  17. Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Rana; Christensen, C.; Muehlmeier, J.; Tuttle, G.; Ho, K.-M.

    2008-04-07

    Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals with complete photonic band gaps are simulated with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations, and compared with measurements on microwave scale photonic crystals. The transmission through waveguide bends critically depends on the photonic crystal architecture in the bend region. We have found experimentally and theoretically, a new waveguide bend configuration consisting of overlapping rods in the bend region, that performs better than the simple waveguide bend of terminated rods, especially in the higher frequency portion of the band. Efficient beam splitters with this junction geometry are also simulated.

  18. Heteroplasmon hybridization in stacked complementary plasmo-photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Masanobu; Choi, Bongseok

    2015-03-11

    We constructed plasmo-photonic crystals in which efficient light-trapping, plasmonic resonances couple with photonic guided resonances of large density of states and high-quality factor. We have numerically and experimentally shown that heteroplasmon hybrid modes emerge in stacked complementary (SC) plasmo-photonic crystals. The resonant electromagnetic-field distributions evidence that the two hybrid modes originate from two different heteroplasmons, exhibiting a large energy splitting of 300 meV. We further revealed a series of plasmo-photonic modes in the SC crystals.

  19. Modelling and fabrication of GaAs photonic-crystal cavities for cavity quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Khankhoje, U K; Kim, S-H; Richards, B C; Hendrickson, J; Sweet, J; Olitzky, J D; Khitrova, G; Gibbs, H M; Scherer, A

    2010-02-10

    In this paper, we present recent progress in the growth, modelling, fabrication and characterization of gallium arsenide (GaAs) two-dimensional (2D) photonic-crystal slab cavities with embedded indium arsenide (InAs) quantum dots (QDs) that are designed for cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) experiments. Photonic-crystal modelling and device fabrication are discussed, followed by a detailed discussion of different failure modes that lead to photon loss. It is found that, along with errors introduced during fabrication, other significant factors such as the presence of a bottom substrate and cavity axis orientation with respect to the crystal axis, can influence the cavity quality factor (Q). A useful diagnostic tool in the form of contour finite-difference time domain (FDTD) is employed to analyse device performance.

  20. Performance investigation of side-coupled interlaced symmetric-shaft-shape photonic crystal sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhongyuan; Zhou, Jian; Huang, Lijun; Sun, Fujun; Tian, Huiping

    2016-12-01

    We design symmetric-shaft-shape photonic crystal sensor arrays (SSPhCSAs) which can be used in refractive index sensing, and the performance of the structure is investigated. The structure consists of four symmetric-shaft-shape photonic crystal (SSPhC) cavities side-coupled to a W1 photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide. Each cavity has slightly different cavity spacing with different resonant frequency. By using two dimensional finite-difference time-domain (2D-FDTD) method, the simulation result obtained indicates the performance of the sensor arrays. The sensitivities of the four sensor units are 178, 252, 328 and 398 nm/RIU, respectively, with the detection limit of 10-3. The crosstalk lower than 20 dB is obtained.

  1. Large-area, near-infrared (IR) photonic crystals with colloidal gold nanoparticles embedding.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shobha; Baev, Alexander; Jee, Hongsub; Hu, Rui; Burzynski, Ryszard; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Prasad, Paras N

    2010-04-01

    A polymeric composite material composed of colloidal gold nanoparticles (<10 nm) and SU8 has been utilized for the fabrication of large-area, high-definition photonic crystal. We have successfully fabricated near-infrared photonic crystal slabs from composite materials using a combination of multiple beam interference lithography and reactive ion etching processes. Doping of colloidal gold nanoparticles into the SU8 photopolymer results in a better definition of structural features and hence in the enhancement of the optical properties of the fabricated photonic crystals. A 2D air hole array of triangular symmetry with a hole-to-hole pitch of approximately 500 nm has been successfully fabricated in a large circular area of 1 cm diameter. Resonant features observed in reflectance spectra of our slabs are found to depend on the exposure time, and can be tuned over a range of near-infrared frequencies.

  2. Spectral Approach to Anderson Localization in a Disordered 2D Complex Plasma Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinova, Eva; Liaw, Constanze; Matthews, Lorin; Busse, Kyle; Hyde, Truell

    2016-10-01

    In condensed matter, a crystal without impurities acts like a perfect conductor for a travelling wave-particle. As the level of impurities reaches a critical value, the resistance in the crystal increases and the travelling wave-particle experiences a transition from an extended to a localized state, which is called Anderson localization. Due to its wide applicability, the subject of Anderson localization has grown into a rich field in both physics and mathematics. Here, we introduce the mathematics behind the spectral approach to localization in infinite disordered systems and provide physical interpretation in context of both quantum mechanics and classical physics. We argue that the spectral analysis is an important contribution to localization theory since it avoids issues related to the use of boundary conditions, scaling, and perturbation. To test accuracy and applicability we apply the spectral approach to the case of a 2D hexagonal complex plasma crystal used as a macroscopic analog for a graphene-like medium. Complex plasma crystals exhibit characteristic distance and time scales, which are easily observable by video microscopy. As such, these strongly coupled many-particle systems are ideal for the study of localization phenomena. The goal of this research is to both expand the spectral method into the classical regime and show the potential of complex plasma as a macroscopic tool for localization experiments. NSF / DOE funding is gratefully acknowledged - PHY1414523 & PHY1262031.

  3. Birefringence-Directed Raman Selection Rules in 2D Black Phosphorus Crystals.

    PubMed

    Mao, Nannan; Wu, Juanxia; Han, Bowen; Lin, Jingjing; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2016-05-01

    The incident and scattered light engaged in the Raman scattering process of low symmetry crystals always suffer from the birefringence-induced depolarization. Therefore, for anisotropic crystals, the classical Raman selection rules should be corrected by taking the birefringence effect into consideration. The appearance of the 2D anisotropic materials provides an excellent platform to explore the birefringence-directed Raman selection rules, due to its controllable thickness at the nanoscale that greatly simplifies the situation comparing with bulk materials. Herein, a theoretical and experimental investigation on the birefringence-directed Raman selection rules in the anisotropic black phosphorus (BP) crystals is presented. The abnormal angle-dependent polarized Raman scattering of the Ag modes in thin BP crystal, which deviates from the normal Raman selection rules, is successfully interpreted by the theoretical model based on birefringence. It is further confirmed by the examination of different Raman modes using different laser lines and BP samples of different thicknesses. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Strongly-Refractive One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal prisms can separate a beam of polychromatic electromagnetic waves into constituent wavelength components and can utilize unconventional refraction properties for wavelength dispersion over significant portions of an entire photonic band rather than just near the band edges outside the photonic band gaps. Using a ID photonic crystal simplifies the design and fabrication process and allows the use of larger feature sizes. The prism geometry broadens the useful wavelength range, enables better optical transmission, and exhibits angular dependence on wavelength with reduced non-linearity. The properties of the 1 D photonic crystal prism can be tuned by varying design parameters such as incidence angle, exit surface angle, and layer widths. The ID photonic crystal prism can be fabricated in a planar process, and can be used as optical integrated circuit elements.

  5. Fano resonance in anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao; Zhang, Yao; Yan, Peng; Xu, Shao Hui; Ouyang, Hao Miao; Zhang, Li De

    2014-01-08

    Anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals with periodic porous structure have been prepared using voltage compensation method. The as-prepared sample showed an ultra-narrow photonic bandgap. Asymmetric line-shape profiles of the photonic bandgaps have been observed, which is attributed to Fano resonance between the photonic bandgap state of photonic crystal and continuum scattering state of porous structure. And the exhibited Fano resonance shows more clearly when the sample is saturated ethanol gas than air-filled. Further theoretical analysis by transfer matrix method verified these results. These findings provide a better understanding on the nature of photonic bandgaps of photonic crystals made up of porous materials, in which the porous structures not only exist as layers of effective-refractive-index material providing Bragg scattering, but also provide a continuum light scattering state to interact with Bragg scattering state to show an asymmetric line-shape profile.

  6. Evidence for a New Intermediate Phase in a Strongly Correlated 2D System near Wigner Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xuan; Qiu, Richard; Goble, Nicholas; Serafin, Alex; Yin, Liang; Xia, Jian-Sheng; Sullivan, Neil; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    How the two dimensional (2D) quantum Wigner crystal (WC) transforms into the metallic liquid phase remains an outstanding problem in physics. In theories considering the 2D WC to liquid transition in the clean limit, it was suggested that a number of intermediate phases might exist. We have studied the transformation between the metallic fluid phase and the low magnetic field reentrant insulating phase (RIP) which was interpreted as due to the WC [Qiu et al., PRL 108, 106404 (2012)], in a strongly correlated 2D hole system in GaAs quantum well with large interaction parameter rs (~20-30) and high mobility. Instead of a sharp transition, we found that increasing density (or lowering rs) drives the RIP into a state where the incipient RIP coexists with Fermi liquid. This apparent mixture phase intermediate between Fermi liquid and WC also exhibits a non-trivial temperature dependent resistivity behavior which can be qualitatively understood by the reversed melting of WC in the mixture, in analogy to the Pomeranchuk effect in the solid-liquid mixture of Helium-3. X.G. thanks NSF (DMR-0906415) for supporting work at CWRU. Experiments at the NHMFL High B/T Facility were supported by NSF Grant 0654118 and the State of Florida. L.P. thanks the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and NSF MRSEC (DMR-0819860) for support.

  7. 2D coordination polymers of macrocyclic oxamide with polycarboxylates: syntheses, crystal structures and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya-Qiu; Xu, Yan-Yan; Gao, Dong-Zhao; Zhang, Guo-Ying; Liu, Yiao-Xu; Wang, Jing; Liao, Dai-Zheng

    2012-05-14

    Five new 2D coordination polymers, [Co(nip)(CuL)(H(2)O)]·CH(3)OH (1), [Mn(ip)(NiL)]·0.63H(2)O (2), [Cu(ip)(CuL)] (3), [Mn(6)(CuL)(6)(btc)(4)(H(2)O)(4)]·7H(2)O (4), and [Cu(CuL)(Hbtc)(H(2)O)] (5)(ML, H(2)L = 2,3-dioxo-5,6,14,15-dibenzo-1,4,8,12-tetraazacyclo-pentadeca-7,13-diene; H(2)nip = 5-nitroisophthalic acid; H(2)ip = m-isophthalic acid; H(3)btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid) have been synthesized by a solvothermal method and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complexes 1-5 exhibit different 2D layered structures formed by Co(2)Cu(2) (1), Mn(2)Ni(2) (2), Cu(4) (3), Mn(3)Ni(3) (4), Cu(4) (5) units, respectively, via the oxamide and diverse carboxylic acid bridges. Compounds 1, 2, 3 and 5 are uninodal 4-connected (4, 4)-grids topology, while complex 4 possesses a 2D network with (3, 4)-connected (4(2).8)(4)(4(3).6(2).8)(3) topology. The results of magnetic determination show pronounced antiferromagnetic interactions in 1-4.

  8. PMN-PT single crystal for endoscopic ultrasound 2D array application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuhang; Liang, Huageng; Zhu, Benpeng; Zhou, Dan; Yang, Xiaofei

    2017-03-01

    Based on lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single crystal, a 24 × 24 row-column addressing endoscopic two-dimensional array has been successfully fabricated using novel flanged electrodes and "semi-kerf" technologies. Each row/column array element was measured to have an electromechanical coupling coefficient of 0.81, a center frequency of 5MHz, and a fractional bandwidth of approximately 88% at -6 dB. Of particular significance was that the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate element exhibits much higher sensitivity compared with lead zirconate titanate-based 2D arrays with similar operational frequency and element area. According to the Field II simulated results, although the obtained beamwidth at -6 dB was a little inferior to that of the fully sampled 24 × 24 two-dimensional array, it is believed that the beamwidth can be improved by appropriately increasing the element number. These results demonstrated that the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate single-crystal 2D array is a promising candidate for real-time three-dimensional endoscopic ultrasound imaging.

  9. Inexpensive photonic crystal spectrometer for colorimetric sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Kurt M; Jia, Zhang; Pervez, Nadia K; Cox, Marshall P; Gazes, Michael J; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2013-02-25

    Photonic crystal spectrometers possess significant size and cost advantages over traditional grating-based spectrometers. In a previous work [Pervez, et al, Opt. Express 18, 8277 (2010)] we demonstrated a proof of this concept by implementing a 9-element array photonic crystal spectrometer with a resolution of 20 nm. Here we demonstrate a photonic crystal spectrometer with improved performance. The dependence of the spectral recovery resolution on the number of photonic crystal arrays and the width of the response function from each photonic crystal is investigated. A mathematical treatment, regularization based on known information of the spectrum, is utilized in order to stabilize the spectral estimation inverse problem and achieve improved spectral recovery. Colorimetry applications, the measurement of CIE 1931 chromaticities and the color rendering index, are demonstrated with the improved spectrometer.

  10. Silicon-based photonic crystal waveguides and couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Stephen G.

    2008-10-01

    Most commercial photonics-related research and development efforts currently fall into one or both of the following technological sectors: silicon photonics and photonic integrated circuits. Silicon photonics [18] is the field concerned with assimilating photonic elements into the well-established CMOS VLSI architecture and IC manufacturing. The convergence of these technologies would be mutually advantageous: photonic devices could increase bus speeds and greatly improve chip-to-chip and board-to-board data rates, whereas photonics, as a field, would benefit from mature silicon manufacturing and economies of scale. On the other hand, those in the photonic integrated circuit sector seek to continue the miniaturization of photonic devices in an effort to obtain an appreciable share of the great windfall of profits that occur when manufacturing, packaging, and testing costs are substantially reduced by shrinking photonic elements to chip-scale dimensions. Integrated photonics companies may [12] or may not [34] incorporate silicon as the platform. In this thesis, we seek to further develop a technology that has the potential to facilitate the forging of silicon photonics and photonic integrated circuits: photonic crystals on silicon-on-insulator substrates. We will first present a brief overview of photonic crystals and their physical properties. We will then detail a finely-tuned procedure for fabricating two-dimensional photonic crystal in the silicon-on-insulator material system. We will then examine transmission properties of our fabricated devices including propagation loss, group index dispersion, and coupling efficiency of directional couplers. Finally, we will present a description of a system for adiabatically tapering optical fibers and the results of using tapered fibers for efficiently coupling light into photonic crystal devices.

  11. Tuning light focusing with liquid crystal infiltrated graded index photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, B.; Giden, I. H.; Kurt, H.

    2017-01-01

    We perform numerical analyses of tunable graded index photonic crystals based on liquid crystals. Light manipulation with such a photonic medium is explored and a new approach for active tuning of the focal distance is proposed. The graded index photonic crystal is realized using the symmetry reduced unit element in two-dimensional photonic crystals without modifying the dielectric filling fraction or cell size dimensions. By applying an external static electric field to liquid crystals, their refractive indices and thus, the effective refractive index of the whole graded index photonic crystal will be changed. Setting the lattice constant to a=400 nm yields a tuning of 680 nm for focal point position. This property can be used for designing an electro-optic graded index photonic crystal-based flat lens with a tunable focal point. Future optical systems may have benefit from such tunable graded index lenses.

  12. Photonic crystal cavities with metallic Schottky contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Quiring, W.; Al-Hmoud, M.; Reuter, D.; Zrenner, A.; Rai, A.; Wieck, A. D.

    2015-07-27

    We report about the fabrication and analysis of high Q photonic crystal cavities with metallic Schottky-contacts. The structures are based on GaAs n-i membranes with an InGaAs quantum well in the i-region and nanostructured low ohmic metal top-gates. They are designed for photocurrent readout within the cavity and fast electric manipulations. The cavity structures are characterized by photoluminescence and photocurrent spectroscopy under resonant excitation. We find strong cavity resonances in the photocurrent spectra and surprisingly high Q-factors up to 6500. Temperature dependent photocurrent measurements in the region between 4.5 K and 310 K show an exponential enhancement of the photocurrent signal and an external quantum efficiency up to 0.26.

  13. Enhanced photoacoustic detection using photonic crystal substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Kaiyang; McClelland, John; Lu, Meng

    2014-04-21

    This paper demonstrates the enhanced photoacoustic sensing of surface-bound light absorbing molecules and metal nanoparticles using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) substrate. The PC structure functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength where the analyte absorption is strong. The optical resonance of the PC sensor provides an intensified evanescent field with respect to the excitation light source and results in enhanced optical absorption by surface-immobilized samples. For the analysis of a light absorbing dye deposited on the PC surface, the intensity of photoacoustic signal was enhanced by more than 10-fold in comparison to an un-patterned acrylic substrate. The technique was also applied to detect gold nanorods and exhibited more than 40 times stronger photoacoustic signals. The demonstrated approach represents a potential path towards single molecule absorption spectroscopy with greater performance and inexpensive instrumentation.

  14. Photonic crystal surface waves for optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Konopsky, Valery N; Alieva, Elena V

    2007-06-15

    We present a new optical biosensor technique based on registration of dual optical s-polarized modes on a photonic crystal surface. The simultaneous registration of two optical surface waves with different evanescent depths from the same surface spot permits the segregation of the volume and the surface contributions from an analyte, while the absence of metal damping permits an increase in the propagation length of the optical surface waves and the sensitivity of the biosensor. Our technique was tested with the binding of biotin molecules to a streptavidin monolayer that has been detected with signal/noise ratio of approximately 15 at 1-s signal accumulation time. The detection limit is approximately 20 fg of the analyte on the probed spot of the surface.

  15. Photonic crystal nanostructures for optical biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Dorfner, D; Zabel, T; Hürlimann, T; Hauke, N; Frandsen, L; Rant, U; Abstreiter, G; Finley, J

    2009-08-15

    We present the design, fabrication and optical investigation of photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity drop filters for use as optical biosensors. The resonant cavity mode wavelength and Q-factor are studied as a function of the ambient refractive index and as a function of adsorbed proteins (bovine serum albumin) on the sensor surface. Experiments were performed by evanescent excitation of the cavity mode via a PhC waveguide. This in turn is coupled to a ridge waveguide that allows the introduction of a fluid flow cell on a chip. A response of partial delta lambda/delta c=(4.54+/-0.66)x10(5)nm/M is measured leading to a measured detection limit as good as Delta m=4.0+/-0.6 fg or Delta m/Delta A=(4.9+/-0.7)x10(2)pg/mm(2)in the sensitive area.

  16. Bio-inspired photonic crystals with superwettability.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Minxuan; Wang, Jingxia; Jiang, Lei

    2016-12-21

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have attracted enormous research interest due to their unique light manipulation and potential applications in sensing, catalysts, detection, displays, solar cells and other fields. In particular, many novel applications of PCs are derived from their surface wettability. Generally, the wettability of PCs is determined by a combination of its surface geometrical structures and surface chemical compositions. This review focuses on the recent developments in the mechanism, fabrication and application of bio-inspired PCs with superwettability. It includes information on constructing superwetting PCs based on designing the topographical structure and regulating the surface chemical composition, and information on extending the practical applications of superwetting PCs in humidity/oil/solvent sensing, actuating, anti-fouling and liquid-impermeable surface, chemical detection, etc.

  17. Mode conversion in magneto photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    otmani, Hamza; Bouchemat, Mohamed; Hocini, Abdesselam; Boumaza, Touraya; benmerkhi, ahlem

    2017-01-01

    The first concept of an integrated isolator was based on nonreciprocal TE-TM mode conversion, the nonreciprocal coupling between these modes is caused by the Faraday rotation if the magnetization is aligned along the z-axis, parallel to mode propagation. We propose to study this magneto-optical phenomenon, by the simulation of magneto photonic crystal fibre (MPCF), it consists of a periodic triangular lattice of air-holes filled with magnetic fluid which consists of magnetic nanoparticles into a BIG (Bismuth Iron Garnet) fibre. We simulated the influence of gyrotropy and the wavelength, and calculated Faraday rotation and modal birefringence. In this fibre the light is guided by internal total reflection, like classical fibres. However it was shown that they could function on a mode conversion much stronger than conventional fibres.

  18. Polarization modulation instability in photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Kruhlak, R J; Wong, G K; Chen, J S; Murdoch, S G; Leonhardt, R; Harvey, J D; Joly, N Y; Knight, J C

    2006-05-15

    Polarization modulation instability (PMI) in birefringent photonic crystal fibers has been observed in the normal dispersion regime with a frequency shift of 64 THz between the generated frequencies and the pump frequency. The generated sidebands are orthogonally polarized to the pump. From the observed PMI frequency shift and the measured dispersion, we determined the phase birefringence to be 5.3 x 10(-5) at a pump wavelength of 647.1 nm. This birefringence was used to estimate the PMI gain as a function of pump wavelength. Four-wave mixing experiments in both the normal and the anomalous dispersion regimes generated PMI frequency shifts that show good agreement with the predicted values over a 70 THz range. These results could lead to amplifiers and oscillators based on PMI.

  19. Semicrystalline woodpile photonic crystals without complicated alignment via soft lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Kuang, Ping; Leung, Wai; Kim, Yong-Sung; Park, Joong-Mok; Kang, Henry; Constant, Kristen; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2010-05-13

    We report the fabrication and characterization of woodpile photonic crystals with up to 12 layers through titania nanoparticle infiltration of a polymer template made by soft lithography. Because the complicated alignment in the conventional layer-by-layer fabrication associated with diamondlike symmetry is replaced by a simple 90{sup o} alignment, the fabricated photonic crystal has semicrystalline phase. However, the crystal performs similarly to a perfectly aligned crystal for the light propagation integrated from the surface normal to 30{sup o} at the main photonic band gap.

  20. Single-particle detection of virus simulants under microfluidic flow with two-dimensional photonic crystals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Benjamin L.; Baker, James E.; Sriram, Rashmi

    2017-05-01

    Because of their compatibility with standard CMOS fabrication, small footprint, and exceptional sensitivity, Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals (2D PhCs) have been posited as attractive components for the development of real-time integrated photonic virus sensors. While detection of single virus-sized particles by 2D PhCs has been demonstrated, specific recognition of a virus simulant under conditions relevant to sensor use (including aqueous solution and microfluidic flow) has remained an unsolved challenge. This talk will describe the design and testing of a W1 waveguide-coupled 2D PhC in the context of addressing that challenge.

  1. Photonic crystal based polarization insensitive flat lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turduev, M.; Bor, E.; Kurt, H.

    2017-07-01

    The paper proposes a new design of an inhomogeneous artificially created photonic crystal lens structure consisting of annular dielectric rods to efficiently focus both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations of light into the same focal point. The locations of each individual cell that contains the annular dielectric rods are determined according to a nonlinear distribution function. The inner and outer radii of the annular photonic dielectric rods are optimized with respect to the polarization insensitive frequency response of the transmission spectrum of the lens structure. The physical background of the polarization insensitive focusing mechanism is investigated in both spatial and frequency domains. Moreover, polarization independent wavefront transformation/focusing has been explored in detail by investigating the dispersion relation of the structure. Corresponding phase index distribution of the lens is attained for polarization insensitive normalized frequency range of a/λ  =  0.280 and a/λ  =  0.300, where a denotes the lattice constant of the designed structure and λ denotes the wavelength of the incident light. We show the wave transformation performance and focal point movement dynamics for both polarizations of the lens structure by specially adjusting the length of the structure. The 3D finite-difference time domain numerical analysis is also performed to verifiy that the proposed design is able to focus the wave regardless of polarization into approximately the same focal point (difference between focal distances of both polarizations stays below 0.25λ) with an operating bandwidth of 4.30% between 1476 nm and 1541 nm at telecom wavelengths. The main superiorities of the proposed lens structure are being all dielectric and compact, and having flat front and back surfaces, rendering the proposed lens design more practical in the photonic integration process in various applications such as optical switch

  2. Automated optimization of photonic crystal slab cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkov, Momchil; Savona, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    Thanks to their high quality factor, combined to the smallest modal volume, defect-cavities in photonic crystal slabs represent a promising, versatile tool for fundamental studies and applications in photonics. In paricular, the L3, H0, and H1 defects are the most popular and widespread cavity designs, due to their compactness, simplicity, and small mode volume. For these cavities, the current best optimal designs still result in Q-values of a few times 105 only, namely one order of magnitude below the bound set by fabrication imperfections and material absorption in silicon. Here, we use a genetic algorithm to find a global maximum of the quality factor of these designs, by varying the positions of few neighbouring holes. We consistently find Q-values above one million - one order of magnitude higher than previous designs. Furthermore, we study the effect of disorder on the optimal designs and conclude that a similar improvement is also expected experimentally in state-of-the-art systems.

  3. Photonic crystal light-emitting sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Aurélien; Benisty, Henri; Weisbuch, Claude

    2012-12-01

    Photonic crystals (PhCs) are periodically structured optical media offering the opportunity for spontaneous emission (SpE) to be strongly controlled in spatial terms (directions) or in absolute terms (rates). We discuss the application of this concept for practical light-emitting sources, summarizing the principles and actual merits of various approaches based on two- and three-dimensional PhCs. We take into consideration the numerous constraints on real-world light-emitting structures and materials. The various mechanisms through which modified photonic bands and band gaps can be used are first revisited in view of their use in light sources. We then present an in-depth discussion of planar emitters and enhanced extraction of light thanks to grating diffraction. Applications to conventional III-V semiconductors and to III-nitrides are reviewed. Comparison with random surface roughening reveals some common physical limitations. Some advanced approaches with complex structures or etched active structures are also discussed. Finally, the most promising mechanism to enhance the SpE rate, the Purcell effect, is considered. Its implementation, including through plasmonic effects, is shown to be effective only for very specific sources. We conclude by outlining the mix of physics and material parameters needed to grasp the relevant issues.

  4. Optical limiter based on two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belabbas, Amirouche; Lazoul, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The aim behind this work is to investigate the capabilities of nonlinear photonic crystals to achieve ultra-fast optical limiters based on third order nonlinear effects. The purpose is to combine the actions of nonlinear effects with the properties of photonic crystals in order to activate the photonic band according to the magnitude of the nonlinear effects, themselves a function of incident laser power. We are interested in designing an optical limiter based nonlinear photonic crystal operating around 1064 nm and its second harmonic at 532 nm. Indeed, a very powerful solid-state laser that can blind or destroy optical sensors and is widely available and easy to handle. In this work, we perform design and optimization by numerical simulations to determine the better structure for the nonlinear photonic crystal to achieve compact and efficient integrated optical limiter. The approach consists to analyze the band structures in Kerr-nonlinear two-dimensional photonic crystals as a function of the optical intensity. We confirm that these bands are dynamically red-shifted with regard to the bands observed in linear photonic crystals or in the case of weak nonlinear effects. The implemented approach will help to understand such phenomena as intensitydriven optical limiting with Kerr-nonlinear photonic crystals.

  5. Structural Color Patterns by Electrohydrodynamic Jet Printed Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haibo; Zhu, Cun; Tian, Lei; Liu, Cihui; Fu, Guangbin; Shang, Luoran; Gu, Zhongze

    2017-02-09

    In this work, we demonstrate the fabrication of photonic crystal patterns with controllable morphologies and structural colors utilizing electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing with colloidal crystal inks. The final shape of photonic crystal units is controlled by the applied voltage signal and wettability of the substrate. Optical properties of the structural color patterns are tuned by the self-assembly of the silica nanoparticle building blocks. Using this direct printing technique, it is feasible to print customized functional patterns composed of photonic crystal dots or photonic crystal lines according to relevant printing mode and predesigned tracks. This is the first report for E-jet printing with colloidal crystal inks. Our results exhibit promising applications in displays, biosensors, and other functional devices.

  6. Thermally Driven Photonic Actuator Based on Silica Opal Photonic Crystal with Liquid Crystal Elastomer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Huihui; Li, Jun; Shi, Yang; Guo, Jinbao; Wei, Jie

    2016-04-13

    We have developed a novel thermoresponsive photonic actuator based on three-dimensional SiO2 opal photonic crystals (PCs) together with liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs). In the process of fabrication of such a photonic actuator, the LCE precursor is infiltrated into the SiO2 opal PC followed by UV light-induced photopolymerization, thereby forming the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film with a bilayer structure. We find that this bilayer composite film simultaneously exhibits actuation behavior as well as the photonic band gap (PBG) response to external temperature variation. When the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film is heated, it exhibits a considerable bending deformation, and its PBG shifts to a shorter wavelength at the same time. In addition, this actuation is quite fast, reversible, and highly repeatable. The thermoresponsive behavior of the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite films mainly derives from the thermal-driven change of nematic order of the LCE layer which leads to the asymmetric shrinkage/expansion of the bilayer structure. These results will be of interest in designing optical actuator systems for environment-temperature detection.

  7. Photon-Assisted Resonant Tunneling and 2-D Plasmon Modes in Double Quantum Wells in Intense Terahertz Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, X. G.; Allen, S. J.; Lin, S. Y.; Simmons, J. A.; Blount, M. A.; Baca, W. E.

    1998-03-01

    We explore photon-assisted resonant tunneling in double quantum well systems in intense terahertz electric fields that have separately- contacted wells. We have two goals in mind: 1) increase the basic understanding of photon assisted tunneling in semiconductors and 2) assess the potential of this structure as a detector. We can control the tunneling current by varying the electron density of each 2D electron gas or by changing the relative separation of the Fermi levels. This allows us to prepare the system in such a way that photons of the appropriate energy may induce resonant tunneling, which is monitored by a change in conductance. We also examine the possible enhancement of the resonant tunneling by resonant excitations of acoustic plasmon modes. This work is supported by ONR, the U. S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 and Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología, México.

  8. Study of deformed quasi-periodic Fibonacci two dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Abdelaziz, K.; Bouazzi, Y.; Kanzari, M.

    2015-09-01

    Quasi-periodic photonic crystals are not periodic structures. These structures are generally obtained by the arrangement of layers according to a recursive rule. Properties of these structures make more attention the researchers especially in the case when applying defects. So, photonic crystals with defects present localized modes in the band gap leading to many potential applications such light localization. The objective of this work is to study by simulation the effect of the global deformation introduced in 2D quasiperiodic photonic crystals. Deformation was introduced by applying a power law, so that the coordinates y of the deformed object were determined through the coordinates x of the non-deformed structure in accordance with the following rule: y = x1+k. Here k is the coefficient defining the deformation. Therefore, the objective is to study the effect of this deformation on the optical properties of 2D quasiperiodic photonic crystals, constructed by Fibonacci generation. An omnidirectional mirror was obtained for optimization Fibonacci iteration in a part of visible spectra.

  9. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gyula I.; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-01

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model.

  10. Saturation and stability of nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Franco-Ortiz, M; Corella-Madueño, A; Rosas-Burgos, R A; Adrian Reyes, J; Avendaño, Carlos G

    2017-03-29

    We consider a one-dimensional photonic crystal made by an infinite set of nonlinear nematic films immersed in a linear dielectric medium. The thickness of each equidistant film is negligible and its refraction index depends continuously on the electric field intensity, giving rise to all the involved nonlinear terms, which joints from a starting linear index for negligible amplitudes to a final saturation index for extremely large field intensities. We show that the nonlinear exact solutions of this system form an intensity-dependent band structure which we calculate and analyze. Next, we ponder a finite version of this system; that is, we take a finite array of linear dielectric stacks of the same size separated by the same nonlinear extremely thin nematic slabs and find the reflection coefficients for this arrangement and obtain the dependence on the wave number and intensity of the incident wave. As a final step we analyze the stability of the analytical solutions of the nonlinear crystal by following the evolution of an additive amplitude to the analytical nonlinear solution we have found here. We discuss our results and state our conclusions.

  11. Saturation and stability of nonlinear photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Ortiz, M.; Corella-Madueño, A.; Rosas-Burgos, R. A.; Reyes, J. Adrian; Avendaño, Carlos G.

    2017-03-01

    We consider a one-dimensional photonic crystal made by an infinite set of nonlinear nematic films immersed in a linear dielectric medium. The thickness of each equidistant film is negligible and its refraction index depends continuously on the electric field intensity, giving rise to all the involved nonlinear terms, which joints from a starting linear index for negligible amplitudes to a final saturation index for extremely large field intensities. We show that the nonlinear exact solutions of this system form an intensity-dependent band structure which we calculate and analyze. Next, we ponder a finite version of this system; that is, we take a finite array of linear dielectric stacks of the same size separated by the same nonlinear extremely thin nematic slabs and find the reflection coefficients for this arrangement and obtain the dependence on the wave number and intensity of the incident wave. As a final step we analyze the stability of the analytical solutions of the nonlinear crystal by following the evolution of an additive amplitude to the analytical nonlinear solution we have found here. We discuss our results and state our conclusions.

  12. Peculiarities of the band structure of multi-component photonic crystals with different dimensions.

    PubMed

    Samusev, A K; Samusev, K B; Rybin, M V; Limonov, M F

    2010-03-24

    In this work we offer a simple analytical method which allows us to determine and study the effects of the selective switching of photonic stop-bands in multi-component photonic crystals (Mc-PhCs) of any dimensionality. The calculations for Mc-PhCs with low dielectric contrast have been performed in the framework of the model based on the scattering form factor analysis. It has been shown that the effects of selective switching of photonic stop-bands predicted theoretically and found experimentally before in three-dimensional (3D) Mc-PhC have a general character and may be observed also in one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Mc-PhCs. It is found that 1D, 2D and 3D Mc-PhCs demonstrate unexpectedly similar quasi-periodic behaviour of photonic stop-bands as a function of the reciprocal lattice vector. A proper choice of the structural and dielectric parameters can create a resonance photonic stop-band determining the Bragg wavelengths, to which a photonic crystal can never be transparent.

  13. Polymorphic polytypic transition induced in crystals by interaction of spirals and 2D growth mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquilano, Dino; Veesler, Stéphane; Astier, Jean Pierre; Pastero, Linda

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between crystal polymorphism and polytypism can be revealed by surface patterns through the interlacing of the growth spirals. Simple high-symmetry structures as SiC, ZnS, CdI2 and more complex low-symmetry layered structures as n-paraffins, n-alcohols and micas are concerned with polymorphic-polytypic transition. In this paper, we will show for the first time, through in situ AFM observations and X-ray diffractometry, that a protein polymorph (P2 12 12 1α-amylase) locally changes, during growth, to a monoclinic P2 1 polytype, thanks to the screw dislocation activity. The interplay between spiral steps and 2D nuclei of the polytypes coexisting in the same crystalline individual allows to foresee the consequences on the crystal quality. The discussion is extended to other mineral and biological molecules and a new general rule is proposed to explain the interactions between surface patterns and the bulk crystal structure.

  14. Characteristics of 2D Turbulent Flows that Self-Organize into Vortex Crystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, D. Z.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    1998-11-01

    The free relaxation of inviscid incompressible 2D turbulence is often dominated by strong vortices (intense vorticity patches) that move chaotically and merge. However, recent experiments have found that the mergers can be arrested by the formation of vortex crystals, in which a number N ~ 5-20 of strong vortices persist for long times, forming stable patterns in a low vorticity background.(K.S. Fine et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 3277 (1995). Here we estimate N from properties of the initial flow. Vortex crystals form because the chaotic motions of the strong vortices ``cool'' as they increase the entropy of the background.(D.Z. Jin and D.H.E. Dubin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80), 4434 (1998). If the cooling rate is faster than the rate of mergers, then the vortices fall into a crystal pattern before they can merge. We estimate the merger rate from the observed early-time power law decay of the number of vortices,^2 and estimate the cooling rate from the mixing of the background by the strong vortices. We find that N ∝ (N_i)^γ, where 0 < γ < 1 is an exponent that depends on flow parameters, and Ni is the initial number of strong vortices. This scaling agrees with the experiments as well as with simulations, with no adjustable parameters.

  15. Characteristics of 2D Turbulent Flows that Self-Organize into Vortex Crystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, D. Z.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    1998-11-01

    The free relaxation of inviscid incompressible 2D turbulence is often dominated by strong vortices (intense vorticity patches) that move chaotically and merge. However, recent experiments have found that the mergers can be arrested by the formation of vortex crystals, in which a number N ~ 5-20 of strong vortices remain in the final state, forming stable patterns in a low vorticity background.(K.S. Fine et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 3277 (1995). Here we estimate N from properties of the initial flow. Vortex crystals form because the chaotic motions of the strong vortices cool due to interactions with the background.(D.Z. Jin and D.H.E. Dubin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80), 4434 (1998). When the cooling rate is faster than the rate of mergers the vortices fall into a crystal pattern before they can merge. We estimate the merger rate from the observed power law decay of the number of vortices^2 and the cooling rate from the rate of mixing of the background by the strong vortices. We find that N ∝ (N_i)^γ, where 0 < γ < 1 is an exponent that depends on several parameters, and Ni is the initial number of strong vortices. This scaling agrees with the experiments as well as with simulations, with no adjustable parameters.

  16. 2D-crystallization of Rhodococcus 20S proteasome at the liquid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Kazuhiro

    1996-10-01

    The 2D-crystallization method using the liquid-liquid interface between a aqueous phase (protein solution) and a thin organic liquid (dehydroabietylamine) layer has been applied to the Rhodococcus 20S proteasome. The 20S proteasome is known to be the core complex of the 26S proteasome, which is the central protease of the ubiquitin-dependent pathway. Two types of ordered arrays were obtained, both large enough for high resolution analysis by electron crystallography. The first one had a four-fold symmetry, whereas the second one was found out to be a hexagonally close-packed array. By image analysis based on a real space correlation averaging (CAV) technique, the close-packed array was found to be hexagonally packed, but the molecules had presumably rotational freedom. The four-fold array was found to be a true crystal with p4 symmetry. Lattice constants were a = b = 20.0 nm and α = 90°. The unit cell of this crystal contained two molecules. The diffraction pattern computed from the original picture showed spots up to (4, 5) that corresponds to 3.1 nm resolution. After applying an unbending procedure, the diffraction pattern showed spots extending to 1.8 nm resolution.

  17. Spectroscopy of photonic band gaps in mesoporous one-dimensional photonic crystals based on aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Voinov, Yu. P.; Shchavlev, V. V.; Bi, Dongxue; Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao

    2016-12-01

    Mesoporous one-dimensional photonic crystals based on aluminum oxide have been synthesized by electrochemical etching method. Reflection spectra of the obtained mesoporous samples in a wide spectral range that covers several band gaps are presented. Microscopic parameters of photonic crystals are calculated and corresponding reflection spectra for the first six band gaps are presented.

  18. Dual exposure, two-photon, conformal phasemask lithography for three dimensional silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shir, Daniel J.; Nelson, Erik C.; Chanda, Debashis; Brzezinski, Andrew; Braun, Paul V.; Rogers, John A.; Wiltzius, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the fabrication and characterization of three dimensional silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystals. A dual exposure, two-photon, conformal phasemask technique is used to create high quality polymer woodpile structures over large areas with geometries that quantitatively match expectations based on optical simulations. Depositing silicon into these templates followed by the removal of the polymer results in silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystals for which calculations indicate a wide, complete photonic bandgap over a range of structural fill fractions. Spectroscopic measurements of normal incidence reflection from both the polymer and siliconphotonic crystals reveal good optical properties.

  19. Wave propagation in photonic crystals and metamaterials: Surface waves, nonlinearity and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingnan

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystals and metamaterials, both composed of artificial structures, are two interesting areas in electromagnetism and optics. New phenomena in photonic crystals and metamaterials are being discovered, including some not found in natural materials. This thesis presents my research work in the two areas. Photonic crystals are periodically arranged artificial structures, mostly made from dielectric materials, with period on the same order of the wavelength of the working electromagnetic wave. The wave propagation in photonic crystals is determined by the Bragg scattering of the periodic structure. Photonic band-gaps can be present for a properly designed photonic crystal. Electromagnetic waves with frequency within the range of the band-gap are suppressed from propagating in the photonic crystal. With surface defects, a photonic crystal could support surface modes that are localized on the surface of the crystal, with mode frequencies within the band-gap. With line defects, a photonic crystal could allow the propagation of electromagnetic waves along the channels. The study of surface modes and waveguiding properties of a 2D photonic crystal will be presented in Chapter 1. Metamaterials are generally composed of artificial structures with sizes one order smaller than the wavelength and can be approximated as effective media. Effective macroscopic parameters such as electric permittivity ϵ, magnetic permeability μ are used to characterize the wave propagation in metamaterials. The fundamental structures of the metamaterials affect strongly their macroscopic properties. By designing the fundamental structures of the metamaterials, the effective parameters can be tuned and different electromagnetic properties can be achieved. One important aspect of metamaterial research is to get artificial magnetism. Metallic split-ring resonators (SRRs) and variants are widely used to build magnetic metamaterials with effective μ < 1 or even μ < 0. Varactor based

  20. Influence of surface termination on inverse Goos-Hänchen shift of negatively refractive photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinbing; Liang, Binming; Chen, Jiabi; Cai, Xiaoshu; Jiang, Qiang; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-07-01

    The effect of surface termination on the inverse Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift of two-dimensional (2D) negatively refractive photonic crystals (NRPhCs) containing air holes arranged in a hexagonal lattice in a dielectric background is investigated for transverse magnetic (TM) polarization. Results show that the magnitude of the inverse GH shift of 2D-NRPhCs strongly depends on surface termination even for an incident beam with a fixed frequency and incidence angle. Calculation of dispersion of surface mode as a function of termination reveals that large inverse GH shift of 2D-NRPhCs results from the excitation of backward surface mode. In addition, the coupling coefficient of the incident field into the field of surface mode and energy flux around the interface are studied and demonstrate the above conclusion. This paper will provide technical information regarding the combination of various functional photonic elements in the design of integrated optical circuits.

  1. Optical coupling between atomically thin black phosphorus and a two dimensional photonic crystal nanocavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yasutomo; Moriya, Rai; Yabuki, Naoto; Arai, Miho; Kakuda, Masahiro; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Machida, Tomoki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    Atomically thin black phosphorus (BP) is an emerging two dimensional (2D) material exhibiting bright photoluminescence in the near infrared region. Coupling its radiation to photonic nanostructures will be an important step toward the realization of 2D material based nanophotonic devices that operate efficiently in the near infrared region, which includes the technologically important optical telecommunication wavelength bands. In this letter, we demonstrate the optical coupling between atomically thin BP and a 2D photonic crystal nanocavity. We employed a home-build dry transfer apparatus for placing a thin BP flake on the surface of the nanocavity. Their optical coupling was analyzed through measuring cavity mode emission under optical carrier injection at room temperature.

  2. Insight into the crystallization of amorphous imine-linked polymer networks to 2D covalent organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J; Overholts, Anna C; Hwang, Nicky; Dichtel, William R

    2016-03-04

    We explore the crystallization of a high surface area imine-linked two-dimensional covalent organic framework (2D COF). The growth process reveals rapid initial formation of an amorphous network that subsequently crystallizes into the layered 2D network. The metastable amorphous polymer may be isolated and resubjected to growth conditions to form the COF. These experiments provide the first mechanistic insight into the mechanism of imine-linked 2D COF formation, which is distinct from that of boronate-ester linked COFs.

  3. High extinction ratio bandgap of photonic crystals in LNOI wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shao-Mei; Cai, Lu-Tong; Jiang, Yun-Peng; Jiao, Yang

    2017-02-01

    A high-extinction-ratio bandgap of air-bridge photonic crystal slab, in the near infrared, is reported. These structures were patterned in single-crystalline LiNbO3 film bonded to SiO2/LiNbO3 substrate by focused ion beam. To improve the vertical confinement of light, the SiO2 layer was removed by 3.6% HF acid. Compared with photonic crystals sandwiched between SiO2 and air, the structures suspending in air own a robust photonic bandgap and high transmission efficiency at valence band region. The measured results are in good agreement with numerically computed transmission spectra by finite-difference time-domain method. The air-bridge photonic crystal waveguides were formed by removing one line holes. We reveal experimentally the guiding characteristics and calculate the theoretical results for photonic crystal waveguides in LiNbO3 film.

  4. Optical extinction due to intrinsic structural variations of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenderink, A. Femius; Lagendijk, Ad; Vos, Willem L.

    2005-10-01

    Unavoidable variations in size and position of the building blocks of photonic crystals cause light scattering and extinction of coherent beams. We present a model for both two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals that relates the extinction length to the magnitude of the variations. The predicted lengths agree well with our experiments on high-quality opals and inverse opals, and with literature data analyzed by us. As a result, control over photons is limited to distances up to 50 lattice parameters (˜15 μm) in state-of-the-art structures, thereby impeding applications that require large photonic crystals, such as proposed optical integrated circuits. Conversely, scattering in photonic crystals may lead to different physics such as Anderson localization and nonclassical diffusion.

  5. Coupling light in photonic crystal waveguides: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Hemant Sankar; Goyal, Amit Kumar; Srivastava, Varun; Pal, Suchandan

    2016-07-01

    Submicron scale structures with high index contrast are key to compact structures for realizing photonic integrated structures. Ultra-compact optical devices in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates serve compatibility with semiconductor fabrication technology leading to reduction of cost and mass production. Photonic crystal structures possess immense potential for realizing various compact optical devices. However, coupling light to photonic crystal waveguide structures is crucial in order to achieve strong transmission and wider bandwidth of signal. Widening of bandwidth will increase potential for various applications and high transmission will make easy signal detection at the output. In this paper, the techniques reported so far for coupling light in photonic crystal waveguides have been reviewed and analyzed so that a comprehensive guide for an efficient coupling to photonic crystal waveguides can be made possible.

  6. Photonic-crystal slab for terahertz-wave technology platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Masayuki

    2016-03-01

    Photonic crystals manipulate photons in a manner analogous to solid-state crystals, and are composed of a dielectric material with a periodic refractive index distribution. In particular, two-dimensional photonic-crystal slabs with high index contrasts (semiconductor/air) are promising for practical applications, owing to the strong optical confinement in simple, thin planar structures. This paper presents the recent progress on a silicon photonic-crystal slab as a technology platform in the terahertz-wave region, which is located between the radio and light wave regions (0.1-10 THz). Extremely low-loss (<0.1 dB/cm) terahertz waveguides based on the photonic-bandgap effect as well as dynamic control and modulation of a terahertz-wave transmission in a photonic-crystal slab by the effective interaction between photoexcited carriers and the terahertz-wave trapping due to the photonic band-edge effect are demonstrated. Terahertz photonic-crystal slabs hold the potential for developing ultralow-loss, compact terahertz components and integrated devices used in applications including wireless communication, spectroscopic sensing, and imaging.

  7. Valley photonic crystals for control of spin and topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jian-Wen; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Zhu, Hanyu; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-11-01

    Photonic crystals offer unprecedented opportunity for light manipulation and applications in optical communication and sensing. Exploration of topology in photonic crystals and metamaterials with non-zero gauge field has inspired a number of intriguing optical phenomena such as one-way transport and Weyl points. Recently, a new degree of freedom, valley, has been demonstrated in two-dimensional materials. Here, we propose a concept of valley photonic crystals with electromagnetic duality symmetry but broken inversion symmetry. We observe photonic valley Hall effect originating from valley-dependent spin-split bulk bands, even in topologically trivial photonic crystals. Valley-spin locking behaviour results in selective net spin flow inside bulk valley photonic crystals. We also show the independent control of valley and topology in a single system that has been long pursued in electronic systems, resulting in topologically-protected flat edge states. Valley photonic crystals not only offer a route towards the observation of non-trivial states, but also open the way for device applications in integrated photonics and information processing using spin-dependent transportation.

  8. Application of photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence to a cytokine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Cunningham, Brian T

    2008-12-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces are demonstrated as a means for enhancing the detection sensitivity and resolution for assays that use a fluorescent tag to quantify the concentration of an analyte protein molecule in a liquid test sample. Computer modeling of the spatial distribution of resonantly coupled electromagnetic fields on the photonic crystal surface are used to estimate the magnitude of enhancement factor compared to performing the same fluorescent assay on a plain glass surface, and the photonic crystal structure is fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the performance using a sandwich immunoassay for the protein tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). The demonstrated photonic crystal fabrication method utilizes a nanoreplica molding technique that allows for large-area inexpensive fabrication of the structure in a format that is compatible with confocal microarray laser scanners. The signal-to-noise ratio for fluorescent spots on the photonic crystal is increased by at least 5-fold relative to the glass slide, allowing a TNF-alpha concentration of 1.6 pg/mL to be distinguished from noise on a photonic crystal surface. In addition, the minimum quantitative limit of detection on the photonic crystal surface is one-third the limit on the glass slide--a decrease from 18 to 6 pg/mL. The increased performance of the immunoassay allows for more accurate quantitation of physiologically relevant concentrations of TNF-alpha in a protein microarray format that can be expanded to multiple cytokines.

  9. Photonic crystal alloys: a new twist in controlling photonic band structure properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Dong-Uk; Roh, Young-Geun; Yu, Jaejun; Jeon, Heonsu; Park, Q-Han

    2008-04-28

    We identified new photonic structures and phenomenon that are analogous to alloy crystals and the associated electronic bandgap engineering. From a set of diamond-lattice microwave photonic crystals of randomly mixed silica and alumina spheres but with a well defined mixing composition, we observed that both bandedges of the L-point bandgap monotonically shifted with very little bowing as the composition was varied. The observed results were in excellent agreement with the virtual crystal approximation theory originally developed for electronic properties of alloy crystals. This result signifies the similarity and correspondence between photonics and electronics.

  10. Influence of lattice defects on the ferromagnetic resonance behaviour of 2D magnonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Manzin, Alessandra; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Coïsson, Marco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies, from a modelling point of view, the influence of randomly distributed lattice defects (non-patterned areas and variable hole size) on the ferromagnetic resonance behaviour and spin wave mode profiles of 2D magnonic crystals based on Ni80Fe20 antidot arrays with hexagonal lattice. A reference sample is first defined via the comparison of experimental and simulated hysteresis loops and magnetoresistive curves of patterned films, prepared by self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres. Second, a parametric analysis of the dynamic response is performed, investigating how edge, quasi-uniform and localized modes are affected by alterations of the lattice geometry and bias field amplitude. Finally, some results about the possible use of magnetic antidot arrays in frequency-based sensors for magnetic bead detection are presented, highlighting the need for an accurate control of microstructural features. PMID:26911336

  11. Influence of lattice defects on the ferromagnetic resonance behaviour of 2D magnonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzin, Alessandra; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Coïsson, Marco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-02-01

    This paper studies, from a modelling point of view, the influence of randomly distributed lattice defects (non-patterned areas and variable hole size) on the ferromagnetic resonance behaviour and spin wave mode profiles of 2D magnonic crystals based on Ni80Fe20 antidot arrays with hexagonal lattice. A reference sample is first defined via the comparison of experimental and simulated hysteresis loops and magnetoresistive curves of patterned films, prepared by self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres. Second, a parametric analysis of the dynamic response is performed, investigating how edge, quasi-uniform and localized modes are affected by alterations of the lattice geometry and bias field amplitude. Finally, some results about the possible use of magnetic antidot arrays in frequency-based sensors for magnetic bead detection are presented, highlighting the need for an accurate control of microstructural features.

  12. Method of construction of composite one-dimensional photonic crystal with extended photonic band gaps.

    PubMed

    Tolmachev, V; Perova, T; Moore, R

    2005-10-17

    A method of photonic band gap extension using mixing of periodic structures with two or more consecutively placed photonic crystals with different lattice constants is proposed. For the design of the structures with maximal photonic band gap extension the gap map imposition method is utilised. Optimal structures have been established and the gap map of photonic band gaps has been calculated at normal incidence of light for both small and large optical contrast and at oblique incidence of light for small optical contrast.

  13. Three dimensional reflectance properties of superconductor-dielectric photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, G. N. Sancheti, Bhagyashree; Pandey, J. P.; Pandey, U. K.; Ojha, S. P.

    2016-05-06

    In this present communication, we have studied the optical properties of Photonics Crystals with super conducting constituent using the TMM method for a stratified medium. We also studied the three dimensional reflectance property of superconductor-dielectric photonic crystal at different temperature and thickness. From above study we show that the superconductor-dielectric photonic crystal may be used as broad band reflector and omnidirectional reflector at low temperature below to the critical temperature. Such property may be applied to make of the reflector which can be used in low temperature region.

  14. Configurable Dirac-like conical dispersions in complex photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Changqing; Lai, Yun

    2017-01-01

    We investigate Dirac-like conical dispersions in photonic crystals with complex unit cells. Comparing with photonic crystals with simple unit cells, the complex-unit-cell design can provide extra degrees of freedom to engineer the frequency of the Dirac-like point in a broad frequency regime. Interestingly, we find that many functionalities of double zero media associated with the Dirac-like point are well preserved in such complex photonic crystals, such as wave tunneling, cloaking, wave front control, etc. Different transmission behaviors, e.g., total reflection and negative refraction, can be achieved by shifting the frequency of the Dirac-like point.

  15. Compact wavelength demultiplexing using focusing negative index photonic crystal superprisms.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Babak; Huang, Jiandong; Soltani, Mohammad; Askari, Murtaza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Rakhshandehroo, Mohammad; Adibi, Ali

    2006-03-20

    Here, we demonstrate a compact photonic crystal wavelength demultiplexing device based on a diffraction compensation scheme with two orders of magnitude performance improvement over the conventional superprism structures reported to date. We show that the main problems of the conventional superprism-based wavelength demultiplexing devices can be overcome by combining the superprism effect with two other main properties of photonic crystals, i.e., negative diffraction and negative refraction. Here, a 4-channel optical demultiplexer with a channel spacing of 8 nm and cross-talk level of better than -6.5 dB is experimentally demonstrated using a 4500 microm(2) photonic crystal region.

  16. Two-dimensionally confined topological edge states in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Sabyasachi; Miyake, Hirokazu; DeGottardi, Wade; Waks, Edo; Hafezi, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    We present an all-dielectric photonic crystal structure that supports two-dimensionally confined helical topological edge states. The topological properties of the system are controlled by the crystal parameters. An interface between two regions of differing band topologies gives rise to topological edge states confined in a dielectric slab that propagate around sharp corners without backscattering. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain calculations show these edges to be confined in the out-of-plane direction by total internal reflection. Such nanoscale photonic crystal architectures could enable strong interactions between photonic edge states and quantum emitters.

  17. Study on a Photonic Crystal Hydrogel Material for Chemical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia-Yu; Yan, Chun-Xiao; Hu, Xiao-Chun; Liu, Chao; Tang, Hua-Min; Zhou, Chao-Hua; Xue, Fei

    2014-01-01

    There is intense interest in the applications of photonic crystal hydrogel materials for the detection of glucose, metal ions, organophosphates and so on. In this paper, monodisperse polystyrene spheres with diameters between 100 440 nm were synthesized by emulsion polymerization. Highly charged polystyrene spheres readily self-assembled into crystalline colloidal array because of electrostatic interactions. Photonic crystal hydrogel materials were formed by polymerization of acrylamide hydrogel around the crystalline colloidal arrays of polystyrene spheres. After chemical modification of hydrogel backbone with carboxyl groups, our photonic crystals hydrogel materials are demonstrated to be excellent in response to pH and ionic strength changes.

  18. Determining ice water content from 2D crystal images in convective cloud systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Delphine; Coutris, Pierre; Fontaine, Emmanuel; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter

    2016-04-01

    Cloud microphysical in-situ instrumentation measures bulk parameters like total water content (TWC) and/or derives particle size distributions (PSD) (utilizing optical spectrometers and optical array probes (OAP)). The goal of this work is to introduce a comprehensive methodology to compute TWC from OAP measurements, based on the dataset collected during recent HAIC (High Altitude Ice Crystals)/HIWC (High Ice Water Content) field campaigns. Indeed, the HAIC/HIWC field campaigns in Darwin (2014) and Cayenne (2015) provide a unique opportunity to explore the complex relationship between cloud particle mass and size in ice crystal environments. Numerous mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) were sampled with the French Falcon 20 research aircraft at different temperature levels from -10°C up to 50°C. The aircraft instrumentation included an IKP-2 (isokinetic probe) to get reliable measurements of TWC and the optical array probes 2D-S and PIP recording images over the entire ice crystal size range. Based on the known principle relating crystal mass and size with a power law (m=α•Dβ), Fontaine et al. (2014) performed extended 3D crystal simulations and thereby demonstrated that it is possible to estimate the value of the exponent β from OAP data, by analyzing the surface-size relationship for the 2D images as a function of time. Leroy et al. (2015) proposed an extended version of this method that produces estimates of β from the analysis of both the surface-size and perimeter-size relationships. Knowing the value of β, α then is deduced from the simultaneous IKP-2 TWC measurements for the entire HAIC/HIWC dataset. The statistical analysis of α and β values for the HAIC/HIWC dataset firstly shows that α is closely linked to β and that this link changes with temperature. From these trends, a generalized parameterization for α is proposed. Finally, the comparison with the initial IKP-2 measurements demonstrates that the method is able to predict TWC values

  19. Section Chern number for a three-dimensional photonic crystal and the bulk-edge correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oono, Shuhei; Kariyado, Toshikaze; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    We have characterized the robust propagation modes of electromagnetic waves in helical structures by the section Chern number that is defined for a two-dimensional (2D) section of the three-dimensional (3D) Brillouin zone. The Weyl point in the photonic bands is associated with a discontinuous jump of the section Chern number. A spatially localized Gaussian basis set is used to calculate the section Chern numbers where we have implemented the divergence-free condition on each basis function in 3D. The validity of the bulk-edge correspondence in a 3D photonic crystal is discussed in relation to the broken inversion symmetry.

  20. Hydrothermal Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Electrochemical Behavior of 2d Hybrid Coordination Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Weiqiang; Zhu, Lin; Shi, Weidong; Chen, Fuxiao; Bai, Hongye; Song, Shuyan; Yan, Yongsheng

    2013-04-01

    A novel metal-organic coordination polymer [Cu(phen)(L)0.5(H2O)]n (H4L = (N,N‧-5,5‧-bis(isophthalic acid)-p-xylylenediamine, and phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) has been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystallographic data show that the title compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/n with a = 10.682(2), b = 15.682(3), c = 11.909(2) Å, β = 91.39(3)°, V = 1994.3(7) Å3, C24H17CuN3O5, Mr = 490.95, Dc = 1.635 g/cm3, F(000) = 1004, Z = 4, μ(MoKα) = 1.141 mm-1, the final R = 0.0418 and wR = 0.0983 for 3578 observed reflections (I > 2σ(I)). The structural analyses reveal that the title compound exhibits shows a 2D layer structure, which are further linked by hydrogen bonding interactions to form a three-dimensional supramolecular network. In addition, the thermal stability and electrochemical behavior of title compound has been studied. CCDC: 900413.

  1. All-optical NOR and NAND gates based on photonic crystal ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Junjie; Xiao, Jun; Fan, Lin; Li, Xiaoxu; Hai, Yunfei; Zhang, Tong; Yang, Chunbo

    2014-10-01

    We report a new configuration of all-optical logic gates based on two-dimensional (2D) square lattice photonic crystals (PCs) composed of silicon (Si) rods in Silica (SiO2). The proposed device is composed of cross-shaped waveguide and two photonic crystal ring resonators (PCRRs) without nonlinear materials and optical amplifiers. The gate has been simulated and analyzed by finite difference time domain (FDTD) and plane wave expansion (PWE) methods. The simulation results show that the proposed all-optical logic gates could really function as NOR and NAND logic gates. This new device can potentially be used in large-scale optical integration and on-chip photonic logic integrated circuits.

  2. Prospects of Wannier functions in investigating photonic crystal all-optical devices for signal processing.

    PubMed

    Muradoglu, M S; Baghai-Wadji, A R; Ng, T W

    2010-04-01

    Wannier functions derived from Bloch functions have been identified as an efficient means of analyzing the properties of photonic crystals in which localized functions have now opened the door for 2D and 3D structures containing defects to be investigated. In this paper, based on the Maxwell equations in diagonalized form and utilizing Bloch waves we have obtained an equivalent system of algebraic equations in eigenform. By establishing and exploiting several distinct properties of the resulting eigenpairs, we demonstrate an ability to construct Wannier functions associated with the simplest one-dimensional photonic structure. More importantly, the numerical investigation of the inner- and intra-band orthonormality conditions as well as Hilbert space partitioning features shows a capability for multi-resolution analysis that will make all-optical signal processing devices with photonic crystal structures feasible.

  3. High-Q photonic crystal cavities in all-semiconductor photonic crystal heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushell, Z. L.; Florescu, M.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2017-06-01

    Photonic crystal cavities enable the realization of high Q-factor and low mode-volume resonators, with typical architectures consisting of a thin suspended periodically patterned layer to maximize confinement of light by strong index guiding. We investigate a heterostructure-based approach comprising a high refractive index core and lower refractive index cladding layers. While confinement typically decreases with decreasing index contrast between the core and cladding layers, we show that, counterintuitively, due to the confinement provided by the photonic band structure in the cladding layers, it becomes possible to achieve Q factors >104 with only a small refractive index contrast. This opens up opportunities for implementing high-Q factor cavities in conventional semiconductor heterostructures, with direct applications to the design of electrically pumped nanocavity lasers using conventional fabrication approaches.

  4. Gold Nanoparticles in Photonic Crystals Applications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Venditti, Iole

    2017-01-01

    This review concerns the recently emerged class of composite colloidal photonic crystals (PCs), in which gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are included in the photonic structure. The use of composites allows achieving a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering with electronic excitations of the gold component (surface plasmon resonance, SPR) realizing a combination of absorption bands with the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystals. Considering different preparations of composite plasmonic-photonic crystals, based on 3D-PCs in presence of AuNPs, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tunable functionality of these crystals. Several chemical methods for fabrication of opals and inverse opals are presented together with preparations of composites plasmonic-photonic crystals: the influence of SPR on the optical properties of PCs is also discussed. Main applications of this new class of composite materials are illustrated with the aim to offer the reader an overview of the recent advances in this field. PMID:28772458

  5. Gold Nanoparticles in Photonic Crystals Applications: A Review.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Iole

    2017-01-24

    This review concerns the recently emerged class of composite colloidal photonic crystals (PCs), in which gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are included in the photonic structure. The use of composites allows achieving a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering with electronic excitations of the gold component (surface plasmon resonance, SPR) realizing a combination of absorption bands with the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystals. Considering different preparations of composite plasmonic-photonic crystals, based on 3D-PCs in presence of AuNPs, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tunable functionality of these crystals. Several chemical methods for fabrication of opals and inverse opals are presented together with preparations of composites plasmonic-photonic crystals: the influence of SPR on the optical properties of PCs is also discussed. Main applications of this new class of composite materials are illustrated with the aim to offer the reader an overview of the recent advances in this field.

  6. Two-pattern compound photonic crystals with a large complete photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Lin; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2011-09-15

    We present a set of two-dimensional aperiodic structures with a large complete photonic band gap (PBG), which are named two-pattern photonic crystals. By superposing two substructures without regard to registration, we designed six new aperiodic PBG structures having a complete PBG larger than 15% for {epsilon}{sub 2}/{epsilon}{sub 1} = 11.4. The rod-honeycomb two-pattern photonic crystal provides the largest complete PBG to date. An aperiodic structure becomes the champion structure with the largest PBG. Surprisingly, the TM and TE gaps of a two-pattern photonic crystal are much less interdependent than the PBGs of conventional photonic crystals proposed before, affording interesting capabilities for us to tune the TM and TE PBGs separately. By altering the respective substructures, optical devices for different polarizations (TE, TM, or both) can readily be designed.

  7. 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface: a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yue; Wang, Shiqiang; Yin, Xianpeng; Liang, Yun; Dong, Hao; Gao, Ning; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2016-07-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that the combination of periodic dielectric structures with metallic structures provides an efficient means to yield a synergetic optical response or functionality in the resultant hybrid plasmonic-photonic systems. In this work, a new hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure of 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a flat gold surface was proposed, prepared, and theoretically and experimentally characterized. This hybrid structure supports two types of modes: surface plasmon polaritons bound at the metallic surface and waveguided mode of light confined in the cavity of bowls. Optical responses of this hybrid structure as well as the spatial electric field distribution of each mode are found to be strongly dependent on the structural parameters of this system, and thus could be widely modified on demand. Importantly, compared to the widely studied hybrid systems, namely the flat metallic surface coated with a monolayer array of latex spheres, the waveguided mode with strong field enhancement appearing in the cavities of bowls is more facilely accessible and thus suitable for practical use. For demonstration, a 2D-ordered silica sub-micron bowl array deposited on a flat gold surface was fabricated and used as a regenerable platform for fluorescence enhancement by simply accommodating emitters in bowls. All the simulation and experiment results indicate that the 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface should be a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic system with great potential for applications such as sensors or tunable emitting devices if appropriate periods and materials are employed.Recently, it has been demonstrated that the combination of periodic dielectric structures with metallic structures provides an efficient means to yield a synergetic optical response or functionality in the resultant hybrid plasmonic-photonic systems. In this work, a new hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure of 2D-ordered dielectric sub

  8. Nanoplasmonic photonic crystal diatoms and phytoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Mark P.; Hajiaboli, Ahmadreza; Hiltz, Jonathan; Gonzalez, Timothy; Singh, Gursimranbir; Lennox, R. Bruce

    2011-03-01

    Evidence is emerging that silica-containing plant cells (phytoliths) and single cell micro-organisms (diatoms) exhibit optical properties reminiscent of photonic crystals. In the latter biosilicates, these properties appear to arise from light interactions with the intricate periodic patterns of micro- and nano-pores called foramina that are distributed over the frustule (outer silica shell). In this report, we show that Nitzschia Closterium pennate diatom frustules can be used to template arrays of nanoplasmonic particles to confer more complex physical properties, as shown by simulation and experiment. Selective templating of silver and gold nanoparticles in and around the array of pores was achieved by topochemical functionalization with nanoparticles deposited from solution, or by differential wetting/dewetting of evaporated gold films. The nanoplasmonic diatom frustules exhibit surface enhanced Raman scattering from chemisorbed 4-aminothiophenol. Thermally induced dewetting of gold films deposited on a frustule produces two classes of faceted gold nanoparticles. Larger particles of irregular shape are distributed with some degree of uniaxial anisotropy on the surface of the frustule. Smaller particles of more uniform size are deposited in a periodic manner in the frustule pores. It is thought that surface curvature and defects drive the hydrodynamic dewetting events that give rise to the different classes of nanoparticles. Finite difference time domain calculations on an idealized nanoplasmonic frustule suggest a complex electromagnetic field response due to coupling between localized surface plasmon modes of the nanoparticles in the foramina and an overlayer gold film.

  9. Square spiral photonic crystal with visible bandgap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbe, Joshua D.; Leontyev, Viktor; Taschuk, Michael T.; Kovalenko, Andriy; Brett, Michael J.

    2012-03-01

    Nanoimprint lithography was combined with glancing angle deposition (GLAD) of titanium dioxide to fabricate a square spiral columnar film with a bandgap in the visible spectral range. Nanoimprint stamps were fabricated with seed spacing ranging from 80 to 400 nm, and four periods of square spiral film were deposited on top of the 320 nm array of seeds. The ratio of lattice spacing, vertical pitch and spiral arm swing was chosen as a : P : A = 1 : 1.35 : 0.7 and the deposition angle was fixed at 86° to maximize the square spiral film's bandgap. Reflectivity measurements show that the fabricated structure exhibit a pseudo-gap centered at around 600 nm wavelength, in good agreement with finite difference electromagnetic simulations. The absence of a full 3D bandgap is due the deviation of GLAD columns' cross-section from the optimal one, which has to be highly elongated in the deposition plane. However, simulations show that a geometry close to the fabricated one will produce a full 3D bandgap, if the structure is inverted. The material refractive index in such an inverted photonic crystal can be as low as n = 2.15.

  10. Photonic crystal cavities and integrated optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Lin; Li, ZhiYuan

    2015-11-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to our recent works on photonic crystal (PhC) cavities and related integrated optical structures and devices. Theoretical background and numerical methods for simulation of PhC cavities are first presented. Based on the theoretical basis, two relevant quantities, the cavity mode volume and the quality factor are discussed. Then the methods of fabrication and characterization of silicon PhC slab cavities are introduced. Several types of PhC cavities are presented, such as the usual L3 missing-hole cavity, the new concept waveguide-like parallel-hetero cavity, and the low-index nanobeam cavity. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of cavity are discussed. This will help the readers to decide which type of PhC cavities to use in particular applications. Furthermore, several integrated optical devices based on PhC cavities, such as optical filters, channel-drop filters, optical switches, and optical logic gates are described in both the working principle and operation characteristics. These devices designed and realized in our group demonstrate the wide range of applications of PhC cavities and offer possible solutions to some integrated optical problems.

  11. Optics in Microstructured and Photonic Crystal Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. C.

    2008-10-01

    The development of optical fibers with two-dimensional patterns of air holes running down their length has reinvigorated research in the field of fiber optics. It has greatly—and fundamentally—broadened the range of specialty optical fibers, by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more "special" than previously thought. Fibers with air cores have made it possible to deliver energetic femtosecond-scale optical pulses, transform limited, as solitons, using single-mode fiber. Other fibers with anomalous dispersion at visible wavelengths have spawned a new generation of single-mode optical supercontinuum sources, spanning visible and near-infrared wavelengths and based on compact pump sources. A third example is in the field of fiber lasers, where the use of photonic crystal fiber concepts has led to a new hybrid laser technology, in which the very high numerical aperture available sing air holes have enabled fibers so short they are more naturally held straight than bent. This paper describes some of the basic physics and technology behind these developments, illustrated with some of the impressive demonstrations of the past 18 months.

  12. Photochemistry in photonic crystal fiber nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jocelyn S Y; Euser, Tijmen G; Farrer, Nicola J; Sadler, Peter J; Scharrer, Michael; Russell, Philip St J

    2010-05-17

    We report the use of a liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as a highly controlled photochemical reactor. Hollow-core PCFs have several major advantages over conventional sample cells: the sample volume per optical path length is very small (2.8 nL cm(-1) in the fiber used), long optical path lengths are possible as a result of very low intrinsic waveguide loss, and furthermore the light travels in a diffractionless single mode with a constant transverse intensity profile. As a proof of principle, the (very low) quantum yield of the photochemical conversion of vitamin B(12), cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) to hydroxocobalamin ([H(2)OCbl](+)) in aqueous solution was measured for several pH values from 2.5 to 7.5. The dynamics of the actively induced reaction were monitored in real-time by broadband absorption spectroscopy. The PCF nanoreactor required ten thousand times less sample volume compared to conventional techniques. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity and optical pump intensity implied that even systems with very small quantum yields can be measured very quickly--in our experiments one thousand times faster than in a conventional cuvette.

  13. Challenges in characterization of photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzycki, Krzysztof; Kobelke, Jens; Mergo, Pawel; Schuster, Kay

    2011-05-01

    We present experience with photonic crystal fiber (PCF) characterization during COST Action 299, focusing on phenomena causing errors and ways to mitigate them. PCFs developed at IPHT Jena (Germany; UMCS Lublin, Poland), designed for single mode operation were coupled to test instruments by fusion splicing to intermediate lengths of telecom single mode fibers (SMF). PCF samples were short (0.5-100 m), with 20-70 dB/km attenuation at 1310 nm and 1550 nm. Optical Time Domain Reflectometer (OTDR) was best for measuring loss as most PCFs produced strong backscattering, while variable splice losses and difficulties with PCF cleaving for optical power measurements made cutback and insertion loss measurements inaccurate. Experience with PCF handling and cleaving is also reviewed. Quality of splices to fiber under test was critical. Excitation of higher order modes produced strong "noise" during measurements of polarization parameters like PMD or PDL. Multimode propagation and vibration-induced interference precluded testing of fine dependence of PMD on temperature or strain, causing random variations comparable to true changes of PMD. OTDR measurements were not affected, but testing of short fiber sections with very different backscattering intensities puts special demands on instrument performance. Temperature testing of liquid-infiltrated PCF was time-consuming, as settling of parameters after temperature change took up to 40 minutes. PCFs were fragile, breaking below 2% linear expansion, sometimes in unusual way when twisted.

  14. Functional photonic crystal fiber sensing devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villatoro, Joel; Finazzi, Vittoria; Pruneri, Valerio

    2011-12-01

    We report on a functional, highly reproducible and cost effective sensing platform based on photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). The platform consists of a centimeter-length segment of an index-guiding PCF fusion spliced to standard single mode fibers (SMFs). The voids of the PCF are intentionally sealed over an adequate length in the PCF-SMF interfaces. A microscopic collapsed region in the PCF induces a mode field mismatch which combined with the axial symmetry of the structure allow the efficient excitation and recombination or overlapping of azimuthal symmetric modes in the PCF. The transmission or reflection spectrum of the devices exhibits a high-visibility interference pattern or a single, profound and narrow notch. The interference pattern or the notch position shifts when the length of the PCF experiences microelongations or when liquids or coatings are present on the PCF surface. Thus, the platform here proposed can be useful for sensing diverse parameters such as strain, vibration, pressure, humidity, refractive index, gases, etc. Unlike other PCF-based sensing platforms the multiplexing of the devices here proposed is simple for which it is possible to implement PCF-based sensor arrays or networks.

  15. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-01

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  16. Photonic crystals for improving light absorption in organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duché, D. Le Rouzo, J.; Masclaux, C.; Gourgon, C.

    2015-02-07

    We theoretically and experimentally study the structuration of organic solar cells in the shape of photonic crystal slabs. By taking advantage of the optical properties of photonic crystals slabs, we show the possibility to couple Bloch modes with very low group velocities in the active layer of the cells. These Bloch modes, also called slow Bloch modes (SBMs), allow increasing the lifetime of photons within the active layer. Finally, we present experimental demonstration performed by using nanoimprint to directly pattern the standard poly-3-hexylthiophène:[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butiryc acid methyl ester organic semiconductor blend in thin film form in the shape of a photonic crystal able to couple SBMs. In agreement with the model, optical characterizations will demonstrate significant photonic absorption gains.

  17. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-30

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  18. A compact acousto-optic lens for 2D and 3D femtosecond based 2-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Paul A.; Naga Srinivas, N.K.M.; Silver, R. Angus

    2010-01-01

    We describe a high speed 3D Acousto-Optic Lens Microscope (AOLM) for femtosecond 2-photon imaging. By optimizing the design of the 4 AO Deflectors (AODs) and by deriving new control algorithms, we have developed a compact spherical AOL with a low temporal dispersion that enables 2-photon imaging at 10-fold lower power than previously reported. We show that the AOLM can perform high speed 2D raster-scan imaging (>150 Hz) without scan rate dependent astigmatism. It can deflect and focus a laser beam in a 3D random access sequence at 30 kHz and has an extended focusing range (>137 μm; 40X 0.8NA objective). These features are likely to make the AOLM a useful tool for studying fast physiological processes distributed in 3D space PMID:20588506

  19. Interferometry based multispectral photon-limited 2D and 3D integral image encryption employing the Hartley transform.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, Inbarasan; Guo, Changliang; Lee, Byung-Geun; Sheridan, John T

    2015-06-15

    We present a method of securing multispectral 3D photon-counted integral imaging (PCII) using classical Hartley Transform (HT) based encryption by employing optical interferometry. This method has the simultaneous advantages of minimizing complexity by eliminating the need for holography recording and addresses the phase sensitivity problem encountered when using digital cameras. These together with single-channel multispectral 3D data compactness, the inherent properties of the classical photon counting detection model, i.e. sparse sensing and the capability for nonlinear transformation, permits better authentication of the retrieved 3D scene at various depth cues. Furthermore, the proposed technique works for both spatially and temporally incoherent illumination. To validate the proposed technique simulations were carried out for both the 2D and 3D cases. Experimental data is processed and the results support the feasibility of the encryption method.

  20. Metallic dielectric photonic crystals and methods of fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Jeffrey Brian; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2016-12-20

    A metallic-dielectric photonic crystal is formed with a periodic structure defining a plurality of resonant cavities to selectively absorb incident radiation. A metal layer is deposited on the inner surfaces of the resonant cavities and a dielectric material fills inside the resonant cavities. This photonic crystal can be used to selectively absorb broadband solar radiation and then reemit absorbed radiation in a wavelength band that matches the absorption band of a photovoltaic cell. The photonic crystal can be fabricated by patterning a sacrificial layer with a plurality of holes, into which is deposited a supporting material. Removing the rest of the sacrificial layer creates a supporting structure, on which a layer of metal is deposited to define resonant cavities. A dielectric material then fills the cavities to form the photonic crystal.

  1. Birefringence property of asymmetric structure photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingsheng; Yue, Yingjuan; Li, Yan

    2010-12-01

    The random offset of hole-position or random variation of hole-diameter always occur during the actual manufacture process of asymmetric structure photonic crystal fibers. Birefringence of asymmetric photonic crystal fibers with circular air holes and photonic crystal fibers with elliptical air holes are studied numerically based on the finite element method under the perturbation circumstance. The results indicate that when the intrinsic-birefringence of asymmetric photonic crystal fiber is smaller, the random offset of hole-position has larger influence than the variation of hole-diameter. Birefringence resulted from perturbation is less sensitive to asymmetric structures with large pitch or small air-hole. Moreover, the desired birefringence can be obtained by controlling the relative size of the two air holes or the ellipticity of the elliptical-hole.

  2. The research on a photonic-crystal fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Cheng, Yi

    2009-07-01

    To study the photonic-crystal fiber applied in the chemical sensor, the photonic-crystal fiber was used as transmission medium. With Sol-Gel method, we selective coated thin film containing fluorescent probe in the photonic-crystal fiber core, then attained an excellent photonic-crystal fiber acetylcholinesterase sensor. The sensor could be applied in biological / chemical research, clinical medicine, environmental protection, food inspection, biochemical preventive war field and so on. In organophosphorus pesticide residue testing, the experimental results indicated that the linear measurement range could arrive to 1×10-9~ 1×10-3 mol/L, moreover the detection limit is 1×10-10 mol/L.

  3. Narrow linewidth operation of buried-heterostructure photonic crystal nanolaser.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jimyung; Shinya, Akihiko; Nozaki, Kengo; Taniyama, Hideaki; Chen, Chin-Hui; Sato, Tomonari; Matsuo, Shinji; Notomi, Masaya

    2012-05-21

    We investigate the spectral linewidth of a monolithic photonic crystal nanocavity laser. The nanocavity laser is based on a buried heterostructure cavity in which an ultra-small InGaAsP active region is embedded in an InP photonic crystal. Although it was difficult to achieve narrow linewidth operation in previously reported photonic crystal nanocavity lasers, we have successfully demonstrated a linewidth of 143.5 MHz, which is far narrower than the cold cavity linewidth and the narrowest value yet reported for nanolasers and photonic crystal lasers. The narrow linewidth is accompanied by a low power consumption and an ultrasmall footprint, thus making this particular laser especially suitable for use as an integrated multi-purpose sensor.

  4. All-optical gates based on photonic crystal resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moille, Grégory; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    We briefly review the technology of advanced nonlinear resonators for all-optical gating with a specific focus on the application of high-performance signal sampling and on the properties of III-V semiconductor photonic crystals

  5. Imaging of Protein Crystals with Two-Photon Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Padayatti, Pius; Palczewska, Grazyna; Sun, Wenyu; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Salom, David

    2012-05-02

    Second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC), which portrays second-harmonic generation (SHG) by noncentrosymmetric crystals, is emerging as a powerful imaging technique for protein crystals in media opaque to visible light because of its high signal-to-noise ratio. Here we report the incorporation of both SONICC and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) into one imaging system that allows visualization of crystals as small as 10 {mu}m in their longest dimension. Using this system, we then documented an inverse correlation between the level of symmetry in examined crystals and the intensity of their SHG. Moreover, because of blue-green TPEF exhibited by most tested protein crystals, we also could identify and image SHG-silent protein crystals. Our experimental data suggest that the TPEF in protein crystals is mainly caused by the oxidation of tryptophan residues. Additionally, we found that unspecific fluorescent dyes are able to bind to lysozyme crystals and enhance their detection by TPEF. We finally confirmed that the observed fluorescence was generated by a two-photon rather than a three-photon process. The capability for imaging small protein crystals in turbid or opaque media with nondamaging infrared light in a single system makes the combination of SHG and intrinsic visible TPEF a powerful tool for nondestructive protein crystal identification and characterization during crystallization trials.

  6. Imaging of protein crystals with two–photon microscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Padayatti, Pius; Palczewska, Grazyna; Sun, Wenyu; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Salom, David

    2012-01-01

    Second–order non–linear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC), that portrays second harmonic generation (SHG) by non–centrosymmetric crystals, is emerging as a powerful imaging technique for protein crystals in media opaque to visible light because of its high signal–to–noise ratio. Here we report the incorporation of both SONICC and two–photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) into one imaging system that allows visualization of crystals as small as ~10 μm in their longest dimension. Using this system, we then documented an inverse correlation between the level of symmetry in examined crystals and the intensity of their SHG. Moreover, because of blue-green TPEF exhibited by most tested protein crystals, we also could identify and image SHG–silent protein crystals. Our experimental data suggests that the TPEF in protein crystals is mainly caused by the oxidation of tryptophan residues. Additionally, we found that unspecific fluorescent dyes are able to bind to lysozyme crystals and enhance their detection by TPFE. We finally confirmed that the observed fluorescence was generated by a two-photon rather than a three-photon process. The capability for imaging small protein crystals in turbid or opaque media with non–damaging infrared light in a single system, makes the combination of SHG and intrinsic visible TPEF a powerful tool for non–destructive protein crystal identification and characterization during crystallization trials. PMID:22324807

  7. Reconfigurable and tunable flat graphene photonic crystal circuits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zan Hui; Tan, Qi Long; Lao, Jieer; Liang, Yao; Huang, Xu Guang

    2015-07-07

    Photonic crystal waveguides and circuits are one of the basic modules for integrated photonic devices. They mainly rely on photonic bandgaps to achieve light confinement and manipulation. Herein, we propose a novel general principle or method to achieve reconfigurable and tunable flat graphene photonic crystals (FG-PCs) by selectively electrostatic gating a layer of graphene with periodic gold electrodes. The tunable flat photonic bandgap structure of the FG-PCs as a function of the Fermi level is investigated. Reconfigurable FG-PC defect waveguides and cavities created by external patterned-gate-voltage control are also proposed and discussed. The features of reconfigurable/tunable FG-PCs will add more flexibility and capabilities for the single chip integration of graphene-based integrated photonic devices.

  8. Scattering Forces within a Left-Handed Photonic Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Angeleene S.; Sukhov, Sergey V.; Dogariu, Aristide; Shalin, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic waves are known to exert optical forces on particles through radiation pressure. It was hypothesized previously that electromagnetic waves inside left-handed metamaterials produce negative radiation pressure. Here we numerically examine optical forces inside left-handed photonic crystals demonstrating negative refraction and reversed phase propagation. We demonstrate that even though the direction of force might not follow the flow of energy, the positive radiation pressure is maintained inside photonic crystals.

  9. Subcritical patterns and dissipative solitons due to intracavity photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gomila, Damia; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2007-10-15

    Manipulation of the bifurcation structure of nonlinear optical systems via intracavity photonic crystals is demonstrated. In particular, subcritical regions between spatially periodic states are stabilized by modulations of the material's refractive index. An family of dissipative solitons within this bistability range due to the intracavity photonic crystal is identified and characterized in both one and two transverse dimensions. Nontrivial snaking of the modulated-cavity soliton solutions is also presented.

  10. Scattering Forces within a Left-Handed Photonic Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Angeleene S.; Sukhov, Sergey V.; Dogariu, Aristide; Shalin, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic waves are known to exert optical forces on particles through radiation pressure. It was hypothesized previously that electromagnetic waves inside left-handed metamaterials produce negative radiation pressure. Here we numerically examine optical forces inside left-handed photonic crystals demonstrating negative refraction and reversed phase propagation. We demonstrate that even though the direction of force might not follow the flow of energy, the positive radiation pressure is maintained inside photonic crystals. PMID:28112217

  11. Scattering Forces within a Left-Handed Photonic Crystal.

    PubMed

    Ang, Angeleene S; Sukhov, Sergey V; Dogariu, Aristide; Shalin, Alexander S

    2017-01-23

    Electromagnetic waves are known to exert optical forces on particles through radiation pressure. It was hypothesized previously that electromagnetic waves inside left-handed metamaterials produce negative radiation pressure. Here we numerically examine optical forces inside left-handed photonic crystals demonstrating negative refraction and reversed phase propagation. We demonstrate that even though the direction of force might not follow the flow of energy, the positive radiation pressure is maintained inside photonic crystals.

  12. Use of a photonic crystal for optical amplifier gain control

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; El-Kady, Ihab

    2006-07-18

    An optical amplifier having a uniform gain profile uses a photonic crystal to tune the density-of-states of a gain medium so as to modify the light emission rate between atomic states. The density-of-states of the gain medium is tuned by selecting the size, shape, dielectric constant, and spacing of a plurality of microcavity defects in the photonic crystal. The optical amplifier is particularly useful for the regeneration of DWDM signals in long optical fibers.

  13. Higher-order photon correlations in pulsed photonic crystal nanolasers

    SciTech Connect

    Elvira, D.; Hachair, X.; Braive, R.; Beaudoin, G.; Robert-Philip, I.; Sagnes, I.; Abram, I.; Beveratos, A.; Verma, V. B.; Baek, B.; Nam, S. W.; Stevens, M. J.; Dauler, E. A.

    2011-12-15

    We report on the higher-order photon correlations of a high-{beta} nanolaser under pulsed excitation at room temperature. Using a multiplexed four-element superconducting single-photon detector we measured g{sup (n)}(0-vector) with n=2,3,4. All orders of correlation display partially chaotic statistics, even at four times the threshold excitation power. We show that this departure from coherence and Poisson statistics is due to the quantum fluctuations associated with the small number of photons at the lasing threshold.

  14. Novel and simple route to fabricate 2D ordered gold nanobowl arrays based on 3D colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yanying; Tao, Qin; An, Ming; Rong, Chunhui; Dong, Jian; Dai, Yurong; Qian, Weiping

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we present a new method to fabricate large-area two-dimensionally (2D) ordered gold nanobowl arrays based on 3D colloidal crystals by wet chemosynthesis, which combines the advantages of a very simple preparation and an applicability to "real" nanomaterials. By combination of in situ growth of gold nanoshell (GNSs) arrays based on three-dimensional (3D) colloidal silica crystals, a monolayer ordered reversed GNS array (2D ordered GNS array) was conveniently manufactured by an acrylic ester modified biaxial oriented polypropylene (BOPP). 2D ordered gold nanobowl array with adjustable periodic holes, good stability, reproducibility, and repeatability could be obtained when the silica core was etched by HF solution. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factor (EF) of this 2D ordered gold nanobowl array could reach 1.27 × 10(7), which shows high SERS enhancing activity and can be used as a universal SERS substrate.

  15. Magnetoresponsive discoidal photonic crystals toward active color pigments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Soo; Kim, Ju Hyeon; Lee, Joon-Seok; Sim, Jae Young; Seo, Jung Yoon; Oh, You-Kwan; Yang, Seung-Man; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2014-09-03

    Photonic microdisks with a multilayered structure are designed from photocurable suspensions by step-by-step photolithography. In each step of photolithography, either a colloidal photonic crystal or a magnetic-particle-laden layer is stacked over the windows of a photomask. Sequential photolithography enables the creation of multilayered photonic microdisks that have brilliant structural colors that can be switched by an external magnetic field. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Enhanced Ultrafast Nonlinear Optics With Microstructure Fibers And Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    NANOHOLES FREQUENCY-TUNABLE ANTI-STOKES LINE EMISSION BY EIGENMODES OF A BIREFRINGENT MICROSTRUCTURE FIBER GENERATION OF FEMTOSECOND ANTI-STOKES PULSES...laser technologies, and ultrafast photonics. ANTI-STOKES GENERATION IN GUIDED MODES OF PHOTONIC-CRYSTAL FIBERS MODIFIED WITH AN ARRAY OF NANOHOLES

  17. Local tuning of photonic crystal cavities using chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraon, Andrei; Englund, Dirk; Bulla, Douglas; Luther-Davies, Barry; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Stoltz, Nick; Petroff, Pierre; Vučković, Jelena

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to locally change the refractive index in planar optical devices by photodarkening of a thin chalcogenide glass layer deposited on top of the device. The method is used to tune the resonance of GaAs-based photonic crystal cavities by up to 3nm at 940nm. The method has broad applications for postproduction tuning of photonic devices.

  18. Hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal formed on gel-immobilized colloidal crystal via solvent substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Sho; Mori, Atsushi; Nagashima, Ken; Haraguchi, Masanobu; Okamoto, Toshihiro

    2017-06-01

    Gel-immobilized colloidal crystals were prepared to obtain hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystals, in which electric field enhancement to a greater extent than that due to localized surface plasmons (LSP) alone was expected due to coupling between LSP and the photonic band. Polystyrene colloidal crystals immobilized by the N-(hydroxymethyl)acrylamide gel were immersed in an aqueous dispersion of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Then, the gel-immobilized colloidal crystals were picked out and immersed in an ionic liquid mixture. The surfaces of the gel-immobilized colloidal crystals immersed in the AuNP dispersion were observed via scanning electron microscopy after this solvent substitution. The lattice spacing of the colloidal crystal varied as the composition of the ionic liquid mixture was changed. The composition was determined so that the photonic band gap wavelength coincided with the LSP wavelength. Further, the reflection spectra were measured. Thus, we successfully prepared a hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal.

  19. Polarisation singularities in photonic crystals for an on-chip spin-photon interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggs, Daryl M.; Young, Andrew B.; Thijssen, Arthur C. T.; Oulton, Ruth

    2015-03-01

    Integrated quantum photonic chips are a leading contender for future quantum technologies, which aim to use the entanglement and superposition properties of quantum physics to speed up the manipulation of data. Quantum information may be stored and transmitted in photons, which make excellent flying qubits. Photons suffer little from decoherence, and single qubit gates performed by changing photon phase, are straightforward. Less straightforward is the ability to create two qubit gates, where one photon is used to switch another's state; inherently difficult due to the extremely small interaction cross-section between photons. The required deterministic two-qubit interactions will likely need a hybrid scheme with the ``flying'' photonic qubit interacting with a ``static'' matter qubit. Here we present the design of a photonic crystal waveguide structure that can couple electron-spin to photon path, thus providing an interface between a static and a flying qubit. We will show that the complex polarization properties inherent in the photonic crystal eigenmodes supports polarization singularities - positions in the electric field vector where one of the parameters describing the local polarization ellipse is singular - and that these singularities are ideal for a range of quantum information applications. In particular, we will show that by placing a quantum dot at one of these singularities, the electron-spin becomes correlated with the photon emission direction, creating an in-plane spin-photon interface that can transfer quantum information from static to flying qubits.

  20. On-chip steering of entangled photons in nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Leng, H Y; Yu, X Q; Gong, Y X; Xu, P; Xie, Z D; Jin, H; Zhang, C; Zhu, S N

    2011-08-16

    One promising technique for working toward practical photonic quantum technologies is to implement multiple operations on a monolithic chip, thereby improving stability, scalability and miniaturization. The on-chip spatial control of entangled photons will certainly benefit numerous applications, including quantum imaging, quantum lithography, quantum metrology and quantum computation. However, external optical elements are usually required to spatially control the entangled photons. Here we present the first experimental demonstration of on-chip spatial control of entangled photons, based on a domain-engineered nonlinear photonic crystal. We manipulate the entangled photons using the inherent properties of the crystal during the parametric downconversion, demonstrating two-photon focusing and beam-splitting from a periodically poled lithium tantalate crystal with a parabolic phase profile. These experimental results indicate that versatile and precise spatial control of entangled photons is achievable. Because they may be operated independent of any bulk optical elements, domain-engineered nonlinear photonic crystals may prove to be a valuable ingredient in on-chip integrated quantum optics.

  1. Confined Etching within 2D and 3D Colloidal Crystals for Tunable Nanostructured Templates: Local Environment Matters.

    PubMed

    Wendisch, Fedja J; Oberreiter, Richard; Salihovic, Miralem; Elsaesser, Michael S; Bourret, Gilles R

    2017-02-01

    We report the isotropic etching of 2D and 3D polystyrene (PS) nanosphere hcp arrays using a benchtop O2 radio frequency plasma cleaner. Unexpectedly, this slow isotropic etching allows tuning of both particle diameter and shape. Due to a suppressed etching rate at the point of contact between the PS particles originating from their arrangement in 2D and 3D crystals, the spherical PS templates are converted into polyhedral structures with well-defined hexagonal cross sections in directions parallel and normal to the crystal c-axis. Additionally, we found that particles located at the edge (surface) of the hcp 2D (3D) crystals showed increased etch rates compared to those of the particles within the crystals. This indicates that 2D and 3D order affect how nanostructures chemically interact with their surroundings. This work also shows that the morphology of nanostructures periodically arranged in 2D and 3D supercrystals can be modified via gas-phase etching and programmed by the superlattice symmetry. To show the potential applications of this approach, we demonstrate the lithographic transfer of the PS template hexagonal cross section into Si substrates to generate Si nanowires with well-defined hexagonal cross sections using a combination of nanosphere lithography and metal-assisted chemical etching.

  2. Heralded single-photon source in a III-V photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Clark, Alex S; Husko, Chad; Collins, Matthew J; Lehoucq, Gaelle; Xavier, Stéphane; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2013-03-01

    In this Letter we demonstrate heralded single-photon generation in a III-V semiconductor photonic crystal platform through spontaneous four-wave mixing. We achieve a high brightness of 3.4×10(7) pairs·s(-1) nm(-1) W(-1) facilitated through dispersion engineering and the suppression of two-photon absorption in the gallium indium phosphide material. Photon pairs are generated with a coincidence-to-accidental ratio over 60 and a low g(2) (0) of 0.06 proving nonclassical operation in the single photon regime.

  3. High resolution reversible color images on photonic crystal substrates.

    PubMed

    Kang, Pilgyu; Ogunbo, Samuel O; Erickson, David

    2011-08-16

    When light is incident on a crystalline structure with appropriate periodicity, some colors will be preferentially reflected (Joannopoulos, J. D.; Meade, R. D.; Winn, J. N. Photonic crystals: molding the flow of light; Princeton University Press: Princeton, NJ, 1995; p ix, 137 pp). These photonic crystals and the structural color they generate represent an interesting method for creating reflective displays and drawing devices, since they can achieve a continuous color response and do not require back lighting (Joannopoulos, J. D.; Villeneuve, P. R.; Fan, S. H. Photonic crystals: Putting a new twist on light. Nature 1997, 386, 143-149; Graham-Rowe, D. Tunable structural colour. Nat. Photonics 2009, 3, 551-553.; Arsenault, A. C.; Puzzo, D. P.; Manners, I.; Ozin, G. A. Photonic-crystal full-colour displays. Nat. Photonics 2007, 1, 468-472; Walish, J. J.; Kang, Y.; Mickiewicz, R. A.; Thomas, E. L. Bioinspired Electrochemically Tunable Block Copolymer Full Color Pixels. Adv. Mater.2009, 21, 3078). Here we demonstrate a technique for creating erasable, high-resolution, color images using otherwise transparent inks on self-assembled photonic crystal substrates (Fudouzi, H.; Xia, Y. N. Colloidal crystals with tunable colors and their use as photonic papers. Langmuir 2003, 19, 9653-9660). Using inkjet printing, we show the ability to infuse fine droplets of silicone oils into the crystal, locally swelling it and changing the reflected color (Sirringhaus, H.; Kawase, T.; Friend, R. H.; Shimoda, T.; Inbasekaran, M.; Wu, W.; Woo, E. P. High-resolution inkjet printing of all-polymer transistor circuits. Science 2000, 290, 2123-2126). Multicolor images with resolutions as high as 200 μm are obtained from oils of different molecular weights with the lighter oils being able to penetrate deeper, yielding larger red shifts. Erasing of images is done simply by adding a low vapor pressure oil which dissolves the image, returning the substrate to its original state.

  4. 2D THz-THz-Raman Photon-Echo Spectroscopy of Molecular Vibrations in Liquid Bromoform.

    PubMed

    Finneran, Ian A; Welsch, Ralph; Allodi, Marco A; Miller, Thomas F; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2017-09-13

    Fundamental properties of molecular liquids are governed by long-range interactions that most prominently manifest at terahertz (THz) frequencies. Here we report the detection of nonlinear THz photon-echo (rephasing) signals in liquid bromoform using THz-THz-Raman spectroscopy. Together, the many observed signatures span frequencies from 0.5 to 8.5 THz and result from couplings between thermally populated ladders of vibrational states. The strongest peaks in the spectrum are found to be multiquantum dipole and 1-quantum polarizability transitions and may arise from nonlinearities in the intramolecular dipole moment surface driven by intermolecular interactions.

  5. Multicore photonic crystal fiber force meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimlinger, M.; Colalillo, A.; Coompson, J.; Wynne, R.

    2011-04-01

    A silica based three core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) force meter with fast response times (<30μs) for low wind speed detection is presented. Results are provided for PCF structures containing cores with varied lattice spacing. Force meters with high spatial resolution (sample regions <10cm) specially outfitted for extreme environmental conditions are of interest to both industry and basic research institutions. The featured PCF force meter exhibited sensitivities that agreed with theoretical predictions that are useful for the detection of minimum displacements for wind speeds <30m/s. The results of this investigation are relevant to civil engineering applications including urban sensing technologies that involve air quality monitoring. The deflection of the PCF detection interface was measured as a function of the fiber deflection or the applied force (e.g. wind speed). The three core PCF has a core diameter of 3.9μm, outer diameter of 132.5μm and 7.56μm core-core spacing. A 4cm length of the PCF is attached to the surface of a thin metal beam. One end of the PCF section is fusion spliced to a single mode fiber (SMF) at the fiber input. The remaining fiber end is coupled to a CCD camera with a lens at the PCF output. The applied force deflects the supported PCF such that the intensity distribution of the optical field for the multiple cores changes as a function of displacement. Experimental results from static deflection measurements are in agreement with coupled-mode theory and simple beam deflection theory models.

  6. Nonreciprocal Electromagnetic Devices in Gyromagnetic Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Rong-Juan; Gan, Lin; Fu, Jin-Xin; Lian, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Gyromagnetic photonic crystal (GPC) offers a promising way to realize robust transport of electromagnetic waves against backscattering from various disorders, perturbations and obstacles due to existence of unique topological electromagnetic states. The dc magnetic field exerting upon the GPC brings about the time-reversal symmetry breaking, splits the band degeneracy and opens band gaps where the topological chiral edge states (CESs) arise. The band gap can originate either from long-range Bragg-scattering effect or from short-range localized magnetic surface plasmon resonance (MSP). These topological edge states can be explored to construct backscattering-immune one-way waveguide and other nonreciprocal electromagnetic devices. In this paper we review our recent theoretical and experimental studies of the unique electromagnetic properties of nonreciprocal devices built in GPCs. We will discuss various basic issues like experimental instrumental setup, sample preparations, numerical simulation methods, tunable properties against magnetic field, band degeneracy breaking and band gap opening and creation of topological CESs. We will investigate the unidirectional transport properties of one-way waveguide under the influence of waveguide geometries, interface morphologies, intruding obstacles, impedance mismatch, lattice disorders, and material dissipation loss. We will discuss the unique coupling properties between one-wave waveguide and resonant cavities and their application as novel one-way bandstop filter and one-way channel-drop filter. We will also compare the CESs created in the Bragg-scattering band gap and the MSP band gap under the influence of lattice disorders. These results can be helpful for designing and exploring novel nonreciprocal electromagnetic devices for optical integration and information processing.

  7. Determination of blood types using a chirped photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinin, A. V.; Zanishevskaja, A. A.; Skibina, Yu. S.; Silokhin, I. Yu.; Tuchin, V. V.; Dubrovskiy, V. A.; Dolmashkin, A. A.

    2011-03-01

    A new type of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) that can be used as sensitive elements of chemical and biological sensors is presented. Hollow core photonic crystal fibers refer to a type of optical waveguides, showing unique optical properties such as photonic band gap formation and high sensitivity for refraction index, absorption and scattering coefficient of a medium within a hollow core. A significant influence of internal medium scattering coefficient on a PCF's guiding properties becomes basis for design of blood typing automatization technique specifically. Recently obtained experimental results, regarding PCF's sensitivity for internal medium optical properties changing, are presented as well.

  8. Observation of extraordinary optical activity in planar chiral photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Kuniaki; Bai, Benfeng; Meng, Xiangfeng; Karvinen, Petri; Turunen, Jari; Svirko, Yuri P; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2008-05-12

    Control of light polarization is a key technology in modern photonics including application to optical manipulation of quantum information. The requisite is to obtain large rotation in isotropic media with small loss. We report on extraordinary optical activity in a planar dielectric on-waveguide photonic crystal structure, which has no in-plane birefringence and shows polarization rotation of more than 25 degrees for transmitted light. We demonstrate that in the planar chiral photonic crystal, the coupling of the normally incident light wave with low-loss waveguide and Fabry-Pérot resonance modes results in a dramatic enhancement of the optical activity.

  9. Light-emitting biological photonic crystals: the bioengineering of metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucki, Melanie; Landwehr, Stefan; Rühling, Harald; Maniak, Markus; Fuhrmann-Lieker, Thomas

    2006-04-01

    Diatoms can be regarded as self-reproducing photonic crystal slab waveguides due to their silica cell walls that exhibit periodic pore patterns. The algae thus offer possibilities for biotechnological production of photonic crystals. Two techniques for incorporating organic laser dyes into the structures are demonstrated. First, Rhodamine B was covalently attached to the silica by an aminoalkylsilane linker. Second, highly fluorescent Rhodamine derivatives added to the culture medium were successfully taken up by the diatoms and deposited into the shell. By this techniques, it is possible to cultivate dye functionalized diatoms with emission behaviour adapted to photonic resonances.

  10. Photonic crystals, light manipulation, and imaging in complex nematic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravnik, Miha; Å timulak, Mitja; Mur, Urban; Čančula, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-03-01

    Three selected approaches for manipulation of light by complex nematic colloidal and non-colloidal structures are presented using different own custom developed theoretical and modelling approaches. Photonic crystals bands of distorted cholesteric liquid crystal helix and of nematic colloidal opals are presented, also revealing distinct photonic modes and density of states. Light propagation along half-integer nematic disclinations is shown with changes in the light polarization of various winding numbers. As third, simulated light transmission polarization micrographs of nematic torons are shown, offering a new insight into the complex structure characterization. Finally, this work is a contribution towards using complex soft matter in optics and photonics for advanced light manipulation.

  11. Photonic crystal enhanced silicon cell based thermophotovoltaic systems

    DOE PAGES

    Yeng, Yi Xiang; Chan, Walker R.; Rinnerbauer, Veronika; ...

    2015-01-30

    We report the design, optimization, and experimental results of large area commercial silicon solar cell based thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion systems. Using global non-linear optimization tools, we demonstrate theoretically a maximum radiative heat-to-electricity efficiency of 6.4% and a corresponding output electrical power density of 0.39 W cm⁻² at temperature T = 1660 K when implementing both the optimized two-dimensional (2D) tantalum photonic crystal (PhC) selective emitter, and the optimized 1D tantalum pentoxide – silicon dioxide PhC cold-side selective filter. In addition, we have developed an experimental large area TPV test setup that enables accurate measurement of radiative heat-to-electricity efficiency formore » any emitter-filter-TPV cell combination of interest. In fact, the experimental results match extremely well with predictions of our numerical models. Our experimental setup achieved a maximum output electrical power density of 0.10W cm⁻² and radiative heat-to-electricity efficiency of 1.18% at T = 1380 K using commercial wafer size back-contacted silicon solar cells.« less

  12. Self-collimation-based photonic crystal Mach-Zehnder demultiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sun-Goo; Jung, Soo-Yong; Lee, Jongjin; Park, Jong-Moon; Kee, Chul-Sik

    2016-09-01

    A photonic crystal Mach-Zehnder demultiplexer (PC-MZDmux) with four output ports based on the self-collimation phenomenon in a two-dimensional (2D) PC is proposed and numerically studied using finite-difference time-domain simulations. The PC-MZDmux is composed of three Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZIs) and each MZI consists of two 50:50 beam splitters and two perfect mirrors. Employed as the design parameters to achieve the demultiplexing functionality are the radius of phase control rods (PCRs) in the mirrors and the distance between the beam spitter and the mirror in the three MZIs. From spatial electric field distributions and transmission spectra, it is demonstrated that an incident self-collimated beam with four different frequencies can be demultiplexed to four output ports of the PC-MZDmux with proper design parameters. Our results indicate that this device design may constitute an efficient approach to light propagation manipulation and increase the application range of self-collimated beams.

  13. Photonic crystal enhanced silicon cell based thermophotovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yeng, Yi Xiang; Chan, Walker R.; Rinnerbauer, Veronika; Stelmakh, Veronika; Senkevich, Jay J.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljacic, Marin; Čelanović, Ivan

    2015-01-30

    We report the design, optimization, and experimental results of large area commercial silicon solar cell based thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion systems. Using global non-linear optimization tools, we demonstrate theoretically a maximum radiative heat-to-electricity efficiency of 6.4% and a corresponding output electrical power density of 0.39 W cm⁻² at temperature T = 1660 K when implementing both the optimized two-dimensional (2D) tantalum photonic crystal (PhC) selective emitter, and the optimized 1D tantalum pentoxide – silicon dioxide PhC cold-side selective filter. In addition, we have developed an experimental large area TPV test setup that enables accurate measurement of radiative heat-to-electricity efficiency for any emitter-filter-TPV cell combination of interest. In fact, the experimental results match extremely well with predictions of our numerical models. Our experimental setup achieved a maximum output electrical power density of 0.10W cm⁻² and radiative heat-to-electricity efficiency of 1.18% at T = 1380 K using commercial wafer size back-contacted silicon solar cells.

  14. Photonic crystal enhanced silicon cell based thermophotovoltaic systems.

    PubMed

    Yeng, Yi Xiang; Chan, Walker R; Rinnerbauer, Veronika; Stelmakh, Veronika; Senkevich, Jay J; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin; Čelanović, Ivan

    2015-02-09

    We report the design, optimization, and experimental results of large area commercial silicon solar cell based thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion systems. Using global non-linear optimization tools, we demonstrate theoretically a maximum radiative heat-to-electricity efficiency of 6.4% and a corresponding output electrical power density of 0.39 W cm(-2) at temperature T = 1660 K when implementing both the optimized two-dimensional (2D) tantalum photonic crystal (PhC) selective emitter, and the optimized 1D tantalum pentoxide - silicon dioxide PhC cold-side selective filter. In addition, we have developed an experimental large area TPV test setup that enables accurate measurement of radiative heat-to-electricity efficiency for any emitter-filter-TPV cell combination of interest. In fact, the experimental results match extremely well with predictions of our numerical models. Our experimental setup achieved a maximum output electrical power density of 0.10W cm(-2) and radiative heat-to-electricity efficiency of 1.18% at T = 1380 K using commercial wafer size back-contacted silicon solar cells.

  15. Experimental Studies of Pinning Effects in 2D Colloidal Crystals Using Microstructured Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smullin, Sylvia; Gerritsen, H. J.; Ling, Xinsheng

    1998-03-01

    We use microstructured substrates as tunable quenched symmetry-breaking fields to study the pinning effects in 2D colloidal crystals. The colloids are monodisperse charged polystyrene microspheres in pure water. In the sealed sample cell, the colloids are confined by two glass slides. A patterned plastic grating is glued on one side of the confining slides. The corrugated surface of the plastic grating becomes charged in water and exerts a periodic electric field on the charged microspheres, tunable by adjusting the confinement distance. We show that, for the first time, by using video microscopy one can observe in real time the novel effects due to the competing interactions. For example, with a square grating we have observed the Novaco-McTague rotation in a floating phase and the Pokrovsky-Talapov domain wall superlattice in a pinned phase. The results from a rough plastic substrate which simulates a random potential (in an attempt to search for a colloidal Bragg glass phase) will also be discussed. This work was supported by the startup funds and a Richard Salomon Faculty Research Award from Brown.

  16. Mach cones and wakes in a 2D dusty plasma crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, V.; Goree, J.; Ma, Z. W.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    2001-10-01

    A dusty plasma is an ionized gas containing small particles of solid matter. Highly charged polymer microspheres were suspended in a capacitively-coupled parallel-plate rf plasma. The particles settled in a horizontal monolayer, arranged in a hexagonal lattice. They were imaged using a video camera. A 2D plasma crystal sustains two kinds of sound waves, compressional and shear (transverse). When these waves are excited by a moving supersonic disturbance, the superposition of the waves creates a Mach cone, i.e., a V-shaped wake. In our experiments, the disturbance was a moving spot of argon laser light. By moving the laser spot faster than the shear sound speed c_t, but slower than the compressional sound speed c_l, we excited a shear wave Mach cone. Alternatively, by moving the laser spot faster than c_l, we excited both cones. We also observed a wake structure that arises from the compressional wave’s dispersion, for laser spot speeds both higher and lower than c_l. We compare our results to Dubin’s theory (Phys. Plasmas 2000) and to molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. Single crystal diamond boron 'delta doped' nanometric layers for 2D electronic devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, James

    2016-10-01

    Use of diamond as a semiconductor material suffers from the high activation energy of all known impurity dopants (0.37 eV for Boron, 0.6 eV for Phosphorous). To achieve the simultaneous carrier concentration and mobility desired for devices operating at room temperature, growth of a nanometric thick `delta' layer doped to above the metal insulator transition adjacent to high mobility intrinsic material can provide a 2D high mobility conduction layer. Critical to obtaining the enhanced mobility of the carriers in the layer next to the `delta' doped layer is the abruptness of the doping interface. Single and multiple nanometer thick epitaxial layers of heavily boron `delta' doped diamond have been grown on high quality, intrinsic lab grown diamond single crystals. These layers were grown in a custom microwave plasma activated chemical vapor deposition reactor based on a rapid reactant switching technique. Characterization of the `delta' layers by various analytical techniques will be presented. Electrical measurements demonstrating enhanced hole mobility (100 to 800 cm2/V sec) as well as other electrical characterizations will be presented.

  18. Alignment of crystal orientations of the multi-domain photonic crystals in Parides sesostris wing scales.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, S; Fujita, H; Kinoshita, S; Matsuhana, B

    2014-03-06

    It is known that the wing scales of the emerald-patched cattleheart butterfly, Parides sesostris, contain gyroid-type photonic crystals, which produce a green structural colour. However, the photonic crystal is not a single crystal that spreads over the entire scale, but it is separated into many small domains with different crystal orientations. As a photonic crystal generally has band gaps at different frequencies depending on the direction of light propagation, it seems mysterious that the scale is observed to be uniformly green under an optical microscope despite the multi-domain structure. In this study, we have carefully investigated the structure of the wing scale and discovered that the crystal orientations of different domains are not perfectly random, but there is a preferred crystal orientation that is aligned along the surface normal of the scale. This finding suggests that there is an additional factor during the developmental process of the microstructure that regulates the crystal orientation.

  19. Alignment of crystal orientations of the multi-domain photonic crystals in Parides sesostris wing scales

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, S.; Fujita, H.; Kinoshita, S.; Matsuhana, B.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that the wing scales of the emerald-patched cattleheart butterfly, Parides sesostris, contain gyroid-type photonic crystals, which produce a green structural colour. However, the photonic crystal is not a single crystal that spreads over the entire scale, but it is separated into many small domains with different crystal orientations. As a photonic crystal generally has band gaps at different frequencies depending on the direction of light propagation, it seems mysterious that the scale is observed to be uniformly green under an optical microscope despite the multi-domain structure. In this study, we have carefully investigated the structure of the wing scale and discovered that the crystal orientations of different domains are not perfectly random, but there is a preferred crystal orientation that is aligned along the surface normal of the scale. This finding suggests that there is an additional factor during the developmental process of the microstructure that regulates the crystal orientation. PMID:24352678

  20. Formation of collimated beams behind the woodpile photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Trull, J.; Maigyte, L.; Cojocaru, C.; Mizeikis, V.; Malinauskas, M.; Rutkauskas, M.; Peckus, M.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Juodkazis, S.; Staliunas, K.

    2011-09-15

    We experimentally observe formation of narrow laser beams behind the woodpile photonic crystal, when the beam remains well collimated in free propagation behind the crystal. We show that the collimation depends on the input laser beam's focusing conditions, and we interpret theoretically the observed effect by calculating the spatial dispersion of propagation eigenmodes and by numerical simulation of paraxial propagation model.

  1. Acousto-optics studied in polaritonic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Racknor, C.

    2010-10-01

    We have studied the acousto-optic effect on the photon transmission and the spontaneous emission in polaritonic photonic crystal. We have considered that photonic crystals are fabricated from polaritonic materials such as GaP, MgO, LiNbO3 , and LiTaO3 . A two-level quantum dot is doped in a polaritonic crystal to study the decay rate of the spontaneous emission. The decay rate of quantum dots, band structure, and photon transmission coefficient have been calculated. It is found that band-gap width and the decay rate of quantum dots depends strongly on the high-frequency dielectric constant of the polaritonic crystals while the photonic band edges vary inversely by the ratio of longitudinal- to transverse-optical phonon energies. The spontaneous decay rate of the quantum dot can be controlled by the external strain field. This finding is significant because it is well known that the spontaneous emission is source of undesirable noise in different types of electronic and optical devices. Finally, we have also found the system can be switched from transmitting state to reflecting state by applying an external strain field. These are distinct and interesting results and can be used to fabricate new types of photonic couplers and fibers which in turn can be used to fabricate all photonic switches.

  2. Huge group-velocity dispersion in a photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Cai, Yanyan; Meng, Qingsheng; Lu, Yali; Sun, Yiling; Zhang, Dengguo; Ruan, Shuangchen; Li, Jingzhen

    2005-11-01

    We investigated the group-velocity dispersion of a one dimensional uniform photonic crystal by the optical transmission method. For application in optical communications, the wavelength should be near one of the two edges of a photonic bandgap. Four kinds of dispersion-compensation may be obtained with a photonic crystal. Huge negative and positive group-velocity-dispersion (GVD) about a zero-dispersion-point as large as 5.1 Tera- ps/nm/km by a photonic crystal of 100 periods can be realized. Such a value is about 50 Giga times the GVD of conventional dispersion-compensation fibers. The GVD reaches a maximum when the optical length ratio of the high refractive index material to the low refractive index material is 1.2 for given operating parameters. When we keep the optical length of each layer being constant, the GVD is found to increase rapidly with the refractive index ration of the high refractive index material to the low one and even more rapidly with the number of periods of a photonic crystal. Under quite common operating parameters, a thin piece of photonic crystal of 100 periods may play the role of an ordinary dispersion-compensation fiber with a length over 158 kilo-meters.

  3. Design, fabrication and transmitted properties of terahertz paper photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wentao; Lin, Xian; Jin, Zuanming; Ma, Guohong; Zhong, Minjian

    2013-11-18

    The terahertz paper photonic crystals, including one-dimensional stacks, two-dimensional square and hexagonal lattices as well as three-dimensional body-centered cubic lattice, are designed and fabricated. Femtosecond laser direct writing is employed to process paper layers. The transmission properties of these photonic crystals in THz range are characterized using time-domain THz spectroscopy. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical simulations and well explained by the photonic band-structure calculated by the plane wave expansion method. Our results demonstrate that paper photonic crystals have a good performance on molding the flow of THz radiation. From another point of view, the fabrication method proposed in this work can be widely extended to manufacture different micro-structures on various materials.

  4. Experimental demonstration of analog signal transmission in a silicon photonic crystal L3 resonator.

    PubMed

    Gui, Chengcheng; Zhang, Yong; Du, Jing; Xia, Jinsong; Wang, Jian

    2015-06-01

    We design and fabricate a silicon photonic crystal L3 resonator for chip-scale analog signal transmission. The lattice constant (a) is 420 nm, and the radius of holes (r) is 126 nm. The three holes adjacent to the cavity are laterally shifted by 0.175a, 0.025a and 0.175a, respectively. We experimentally evaluate the performance of silicon photonic crystal L3 resonator for chip-scale analog signal transmission. The spurious free dynamic ranges (SFDRs) of the second-order harmonic distortion (SHD) and the third-order harmonic distortion (THD), which are important factors to assess the analog link performance, are measured for the chip-scale analog signal transmission through the fabricated silicon photonic crystal L3 resonator. The SHD SFDR and THD SFDR are measured to be ~34.6 dB and ~52.2 dB even with the input optical carrier sitting at the dip resonance wavelength of the fabricated silicon photonic crystal L3 resonator. The influences of the optical carrier wavelength and input optical power on the SHD SFDR and THD SFDR are studied in the experiment. The impacts of geometric parameters of the cavity structure (lattice constant, radius of holes, shift of the hole) on the analog signal transmission are also analyzed, showing favorable analog link performance with relatively large fabrication tolerance to design parameters.

  5. Asymmetric transport of light in arrow-shape photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahal, H.; AbdelMalek, F.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we report a design of an asymmetric light propagation based on the Photonic Crystal (PC) structure. The proposed PC is constructed of an arrow-shaped structure integrating different rows of air holes which offer more than 65% transmission in one direction and less than 1% in the opposite direction. The proposed PC is based on the use of two parallel PC waveguides with different air holes in a single platform. The design, optimization and performance of the PC waveguide devices are carried out by employing in-house accurate 2D Finite Difference Time Domain (2D FDTD) computational techniques. Our preliminary numerical simulation results show that complete asymmetric transmission can be achieved in the proposed single structure which would play a significant contribution on realization of high-volume nanoscale photonic integrated circuitry.

  6. Large three-dimensional photonic crystals based on monocrystalline liquid crystal blue phases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Hou, Chien-Tsung; Li, Cheng-Chang; Jau, Hung-Chang; Wang, Chun-Ta; Hong, Ching-Lang; Guo, Duan-Yi; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Chiang, Sheng-Ping; Bunning, Timothy J; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2017-09-28

    Although there have been intense efforts to fabricate large three-dimensional photonic crystals in order to realize their full potential, the technologies developed so far are still beset with various material processing and cost issues. Conventional top-down fabrications are costly and time-consuming, whereas natural self-assembly and bottom-up fabrications often result in high defect density and limited dimensions. Here we report the fabrication of extraordinarily large monocrystalline photonic crystals by controlling the self-assembly processes which occur in unique phases of liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties called liquid-crystal blue phases. In particular, we have developed a gradient-temperature technique that enables three-dimensional photonic crystals to grow to lateral dimensions of ~1 cm (~30,000 of unit cells) and thickness of ~100 μm (~ 300 unit cells). These giant single crystals exhibit extraordinarily sharp photonic bandgaps with high reflectivity, long-range periodicity in all dimensions and well-defined lattice orientation.Conventional fabrication approaches for large-size three-dimensional photonic crystals are problematic. By properly controlling the self-assembly processes, the authors report the fabrication of monocrystalline blue phase liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties.

  7. Liquid refractive index sensor based on a 2D 10-fold photonic quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Sun, XiaoHong; Wang, Cong; Peng, Gangding; Qi, Yongle; Wang, XiShi

    2017-09-01

    A liquid refractive index sensor is designed and optimized by using silicon-rods based on a 10-fold photonic quasicrystal without defects. The resonant mode with high Q value is chosen as the sensing wavelength in the transmission spectrum. By changing the radius of the silicon pillars, the sensor size and the refractive index of the background media, different types of sensors are designed and investigated. On the other hand, the performance of the sensor is investigated including the measurement range, sensitivity, etc. In the detection limit of spectral instruments, 0.02 nm, the sensing accuracy is 10-4 refractive index unit with a figure of merit of 1478. The measurement range is from 1.2731 to 1.4185. This will provide a new method for the design and fabrication of lab-on-chip, microfluidic optical elements and integrated optical circuits.

  8. Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Ptasinski, Joanna; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2014-01-01

    In this work we explore the negative thermo-optic properties of liquid crystal claddings for passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic integrated circuits. Photonic circuits are playing an increasing role in communications and computing, but they suffer from temperature dependent performance variation. Most existing techniques aimed at compensation of thermal effects rely on power hungry Joule heating. We show that integrating a liquid crystal cladding helps to minimize the effects of a temperature dependent drift. The advantage of liquid crystals lies in their high negative thermo-optic coefficients in addition to low absorption at the infrared wavelengths. PMID:28788565

  9. Manipulating light propagation and emission using photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Rajesh V.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2014-03-31

    We discuss the synthesis and characterization of self-assembled photonic crystals using polymer colloids having sub-micron diameters. The angle resolved optical reflectivity measurements indicate the hybridization between stop gaps in the multiple Bragg diffraction regimes. Each diffraction resonances in the multiple Bragg diffraction regimes are assigned to respective crystal planes. We also discuss laser-induced studies of spontaneous emission in self-assembled photonic crystals having Rhodamine-B dye doped colloids. Our experimental results reveal more than 51% inhibition in emission intensity within the stop gap as compared to a proper reference sample.

  10. Controllable light diffraction in woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chih-Hua; Zeng, Hao; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Maigyte, Lina; Trull, Jose; Cojocaru, Crina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-01-12

    An approach to switching between different patterns of light beams transmitted through the woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystals is proposed. The phase transition between the nematic and isotropic liquid crystal states leads to an observable variation of the spatial pattern transmitted through the photonic structure. The transmission profiles in the nematic phase also show polarization sensibility due to refractive index dependence on the field polarization. The experimental results are consistent with a numerical calculation by Finite Difference Time Domain method.

  11. A computational study of dielectric photonic-crystal-based accelerator cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, C. A.

    Future particle accelerator cavities may use dielectric photonic crystals to reduce harmful wakefields and increase the accelerating electric field (or gradient). Reduced wakefields are predicted based on the bandgap property of some photonic crystals (i.e. frequency-selective reflection/transmission). Larger accelerating gradients are predicted based on certain dielectrics' strong resistance to electrical breakdown. Using computation, this thesis investigated a hybrid design of a 2D sapphire photonic crystal and traditional copper conducting cavity. The goals were to test the claim of reduced wakefields and, in general, judge the effectiveness of such structures as practical accelerating cavities. In the process, we discovered the following: (1) resonant cavities in truncated photonic crystals may confine radiation weakly compared to conducting cavities (depending on the level of truncation); however, confinement can be dramatically increased through optimizations that break lattice symmetry (but retain certain rotational symmetries); (2) photonic crystal cavities do not ideally reduce wakefields; using band structure calculations, we found that wakefields are increased by flat portions of the frequency dispersion (where the waves have vanishing group velocities). A complete comparison was drawn between the proposed photonic crystal cavities and the copper cavities for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC); CLIC is one of the candidates for a future high-energy electron-positron collider that will study in greater detail the physics learned at the Large Hadron Collider. We found that the photonic crystal cavity, when compared to the CLIC cavity: (1) can lower maximum surface magnetic fields on conductors (growing evidence suggests this limits accelerating gradients by inducing electrical breakdown); (2) shows increased transverse dipole wakefields but decreased longitudinal monopole wakefields; and (3) exhibits lower accelerating efficiencies (unless

  12. Dynamic Photonic Materials Based on Liquid Crystals (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2015-0059 DYNAMIC PHOTONIC MATERIALS BASED ON LIQUID CRYSTALS (POSTPRINT) Luciano De Sio and Cesare Umeton University...ON LIQUID CRYSTALS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) (see back...10.1016/B978-0-444-62644-8.00001-7. 14. ABSTRACT Liquid crystals, combining optical non-linearity and self-organizing properties with fluidity, and being

  13. Research on interferometric photonic crystal fiber hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hong; Zhang, Zhen-hui; Wang, Fu-yin; Xiong, Shui-dong

    2013-08-01

    Current research on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) for acoustic sensing was focused on the PCF's pressure sensitivity enhancement. However, whether the enhancement of the PCF's pressure sensitivity can be actually realized is still controversial. Practical hydrophone, utilizing PCFs, to manifest its superior sensitivity to normal single mode fibers (SMFs) for acoustic sensing, should be made. Account to this point of view, actual hydrophone was fabricated. Index guiding PCF was used, the fiber core is solid silicon dioxide (SiO2), and the cladding is SiO2 filled with lots of periodical transverse circular air hollows. The PCF, mounted on an air-backed mandrel for structural sensitivity enhancement, was used as a sensing arm of the fiber Michelson interferometer. The other arm, so called reference arm, was made of SMF. Faraday rotator mirrors (FRM) were spliced in the end of each interferometric arm account for polarization induced phase fading, which is a common scheme in fiber interferometric sensing systems. A similar hydrophone, with all the same structure except that the PCF was exchanged into SMF, was also fabrication to make the contrast. The narrowlinewidth and frequency-tunable optical fiber laser was used to achieve high accuracy optical interferometric measurement. Meanwhile, the phase generated carrier (PGC) modulation-demodulation scheme was adopted to interrogate the measurand signal. Experiment was done by using acoustic standing-wave test apparatus. Linearity characteristics of the two hydrophones were measured at frequency 100Hz, 500Hz, and 1000Hz, experimental results showed that the maximum error of the linearity was 10%, a little larger than the theoretical results. Pressure sensitivities of the PCF hydrophone and the SMF hydrophone were measured using a reference standard PZT hydrophone in the frequency range from 20 Hz to 1600 Hz, the measurement data showed that the sensitivity of the PCF hydrophone was about -162.8 dB re. rad/μPa, with a

  14. Multi-direction high-efficiency second harmonic generation in ellipse structure nonlinear photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bao-Qin; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Rong-Juan; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-10-13

    We have designed and fabricated a lithium niobate (LN) nonlinear photonic crystal (NPC) with a two-dimensional (2D) ellipse structure of inverse poling domains. The structure can offer continuously varying reciprocal lattice vectors in different directions to compensate the phase-mismatching during the second harmonic generation (SHG) for diverse pump wavelengths. We consider three propagation directions with large effective nonlinear susceptibility and measure the nonlinear conversion efficiency of SHG. The experimental data are in good agreement with the quantitative calculation results using the effective susceptibility model with pump depletion. With high-efficiency SHG in multiple propagation direction, the 2D ellipse structure of LN NPC has the potential to realize various broadband nonlinear frequency conversion processes in different propagation direction with a single crystal.

  15. 3D holographic polymer photonic crystal for superprism application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaqi; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xiaonan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Sasa; Chen, Ray T.

    2007-02-01

    Photonic crystal based superprism offers a new way to design new optical components for beam steering and DWDM application. 3D photonic crystals are especially attractive as they could offer more control of the light beam based on the needs. A polygonal prism based holographic fabrication method has been demonstrated for a three-dimensional face-centered-cubic (FCC)-type submicron polymer photonic crystal using SU8 as the photo-sensitive material. Therefore antivibration equipment and complicated optical alignment system are not needed and the requirement for the coherence of the laser source is relaxed compared with the traditional holographic setup. By changing the top-cut prism structure, the polarization of the laser beam, the exposure and development conditions we can achieve different kinds of triclinic or orthorhombic photonic crystals on demand. Special fabrication treatments have been introduced to ensure the survivability of the fabricated large area (cm2) nano-structures. Scanning electron microscopy and diffraction results proved the good uniformity of the fabricated structures. With the proper design of the refraction prism we have achieved a partial bandgap for S+C band (1460-1565nm) in the [111] direction. The transmission and reflection spectra obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are in good agreement with simulated band structure. The superprism effects around 1550nm wavelength for the fabricated 3D polymer photonic crystal have been theoretically calculated and such effects can be used for beam steering purpose.

  16. Thermally tunable ferroelectric thin film photonic crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P. T.; Wessels, B. W.; Imre, A.; Ocola, L. E.; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Thermally tunable PhCs are fabricated from ferroelectric thin films. Photonic band structure and temperature dependent diffraction are calculated by FDTD. 50% intensity modulation is demonstrated experimentally. This device has potential in active ultra-compact optical circuits.

  17. Exceptional enhancement of Raman scattering on silver chlorobromide nanocube photonic crystals: chemical and photonic contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng; Gosztola, David J.; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Heald, Steve M.; Sun, Yugang

    2015-02-02

    Photonic crystals made from self-assembly of mono-dispersed AgClxBr1-x nanocubes, which are not plasmonically active, have been discovered to exceptionally enhance Raman scattering of molecules chemically adsorbed on their surfaces. Comprehensive control measurements and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy indicate that the Raman enhancement on the AgClxBr1-x nanocube photonic crystals is primarily ascribed to the chemical enhancement mechanism associated with the chemical interactions between adsorbing molecules and the AgClxBr1-x surfaces. In addition, the ordering of the AgClxBr1-x nanocubes in the photonic crystals can selectively reflect Raman scattering back to the detector at the bandgap position of the photonic crystals to provide additional enhancement, i.e., photonic mode enhancement. The thiophenol molecules adsorbed on the AgCl0.44Br0.56 nanocube photonic crystals exhibit astonishingly strong Raman signals that are on the same order of magnitude as those recorded from the thiophenol molecules adsorbed on the assembled Ag nanocubes.

  18. Exceptional enhancement of Raman scattering on silver chlorobromide nanocube photonic crystals: chemical and photonic contributions

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Zheng; Gosztola, David J.; Sun, Cheng-Jun; ...

    2015-02-02

    Photonic crystals made from self-assembly of mono-dispersed AgClxBr1-x nanocubes, which are not plasmonically active, have been discovered to exceptionally enhance Raman scattering of molecules chemically adsorbed on their surfaces. Comprehensive control measurements and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy indicate that the Raman enhancement on the AgClxBr1-x nanocube photonic crystals is primarily ascribed to the chemical enhancement mechanism associated with the chemical interactions between adsorbing molecules and the AgClxBr1-x surfaces. In addition, the ordering of the AgClxBr1-x nanocubes in the photonic crystals can selectively reflect Raman scattering back to the detector at the bandgap position of the photonic crystals to providemore » additional enhancement, i.e., photonic mode enhancement. The thiophenol molecules adsorbed on the AgCl0.44Br0.56 nanocube photonic crystals exhibit astonishingly strong Raman signals that are on the same order of magnitude as those recorded from the thiophenol molecules adsorbed on the assembled Ag nanocubes.« less

  19. Slow light with large group index - bandwidth product in lattice-shifted photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Li, Wenhui; Wu, Jun; Xu, Zhonghui

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a systematic optimization procedure to generate slow light with large group index, wideband, and low dispersion in an lattice-shifted photonic crystal waveguide. The waveguide is based on triangular lattice photonic crystal imposed by selectively altering the locations of the holes adjacent to the line defect. Under a constant group index criterion of ± 10% variation, when group indices are nearly constants of 24, 33, 46, 57, and 66, their corresponding bandwidths of flat band reach 24.2, 17.6, 12.8, 10.1 and 8.6 nm around 1550 nm, respectively. A nearly constant large group index - bandwidth product (GBP) of 0.37 is achieved for all cases. Low dispersion slow light propagation is confirmed by studying the relative temporal pulse-width spreading with the 2-D finite-difference time-domain method.

  20. Light trapping efficiency of organic solar cells with large period photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Peres, Léo; Vigneras, Valérie; Fasquel, Sophie

    2014-08-25

    We study the optical properties of a 2D Photonic Crystal (PC) inserted in the upper ITO electrode of a classical P3HT:PCBM solar architecture with an ultra-thin active layer. First, we analyze the optical response of the system when only the active layer is supposed to absorb light. This allows us to observe clear photonic crystal resonances in the absorption spectrum, which increase the cell efficiency even if the period of the PC is higher than the wavelength. This is in apparent contradiction with the common belief that PC should work in subwavelength regime. Then, by turning to a real system (with optical losses in all the layers), an optimized PC design is proposed, where the maximum of efficiency is obtained for a PC period of 1200 nm, much larger than visible wavelength.