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Sample records for 2-d resistive mhd

  1. Resistive MHD and kinetic simulations of 2D magnetotail equilibria leading to reconnection onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Sitnov, M. I.; Lyon, J.; Cassak, P.

    2013-12-01

    Recent progress in theory and fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of 2D magnetotail-like configurations has revealed an important class of equilibria, which can be unstable to ion tearing instability and eventually result in explosive dissipation of energy, fast plasma sheet flows, dipolarizations and changes in initial magnetic topology (reconnection). Such configurations are characterized by an increase of magnetic flux at the tailward end of the equilibrium state. While the instability and subsequent reconfiguration of the initial state exhibit kinetic signatures, the question remains, which parts of the process can be reproduced using reduced plasma models, e.g., resistive and Hall MHD. In this presentation we explore the stability of the new class of magnetotail equilibria to the resistive tearing mode and investigate its properties as a function of equilibrium parameters, e.g., the current sheet thickness and the amount of flux accumulation at the tailward end of the equilibrium, as well as other system parameters, e.g., resistivity and Lundquist number. We discuss comparative aspects of the system behavior in kinetic and resistive MHD simulations, in particular, what, if any, parameters of the MHD system lead to similar growth rates of the instability. Since the theoretical onset condition of the kinetic tearing mode can be expressed fully in MHD terms, we also investigate the effects of including this criterion as an additional constraint on the tearing onset in our resistive MHD simulations. This work is a first step toward inclusion of a kinetically-motivated description of reconnection onset in global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere.

  2. Global existence and uniqueness theorem to 2-D incompressible non-resistive MHD system with non-equilibrium background magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Cuili; Zhang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we consider the global existence and uniqueness of the solution to the 2D incompressible non-resistive MHD system with non-equilibrium background magnetic field. Our result implies that a strong enough non-equilibrium background magnetic field will guarantee the stability of the nonlinear MHD system. Beside the classical energy method, the interpolation inequalities and the algebraic structure of the equations coming from the incompressibility of the fluid are crucial in our arguments.

  3. 2-D MHD numerical simulations of EML plasma armatures with ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, G. C.; Huerta, M. A.; Thio, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    We use a 2-D) resistive MHD code to simulate an EML plasma armature. The energy equation includes Ohmic heating, radiation heat transport and the ideal gas equation of state, allowing for variable ionization using the Saha equations. We calculate rail ablation taking into account the flow of heat into the interior of the rails. Our simulations show the development of internal convective flows and secondary arcs. We use an explicit Flux Corrected Transport algorithm to advance all quantities in time.

  4. 2-D skin-current toroidal-MHD-equilibrium code

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Niland, R.A.; Coonrod, J.; Levine, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    A two-dimensional, toroidal, ideal MHD skin-current equilibrium computer code is described. The code is suitable for interactive implementation on a minicomptuer. Some examples of the use of the code for design and interpretation of toroidal cusp experiments are presented.

  5. 2D MHD test-particle simulations in modeling geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Elkington, S. R.; Hudson, M. K.; Murphy, J. J.; Schmitt, P.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of magnetic storms on the evolution of the electron radiation belts are studied using MHD test-particle simulations. The 2D guiding center code developed by Elkington et al. (2002) has been used to simulate particle motion in the Solar Magnetic equatorial plane in the MHD fields calculated from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD code. However, our study shows that the B-minimum plane is well off the SM equatorial plane during solstice events. Since 3D test-particle simulation is computationally expensive, we improve the 2D model by pushing particles in the B-minimum surface instead of the SM equatorial plane. Paraview software is used to visualize the LFM data file and to find the B-minimum surface. Magnetic and electric fields on B-minimum surface are projected to the equatorial plane for particle pushing.

  6. Problems in nonlinear resistive MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, A.D.; Strait, E.J.; La Haye, R.J.; Chu, M.S.; Miller, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    Two experimentally relevant problems can relatively easily be tackled by nonlinear MHD codes. Both problems require plasma rotation in addition to the nonlinear mode coupling and full geometry already incorporated into the codes, but no additional physics seems to be crucial. These problems discussed here are: (1) nonlinear coupling and interaction of multiple MHD modes near the B limit and (2) nonlinear coupling of the m/n = 1/1 sawtooth mode with higher n gongs and development of seed islands outside q = 1.

  7. A pressure-based high resolution numerical method for resistive MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xisto, Carlos M.; Páscoa, José C.; Oliveira, Paulo J.

    2014-10-01

    In the paper we describe in detail a numerical method for the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations involving viscous flow and report the results of application to a number of typical MHD test cases. The method is of the finite volume type but mixes aspects of pressure-correction and density based solvers; the algorithm arrangement is patterned on the well-known PISO algorithm, which is a pressure method, while the flux computation makes use of the AUSM-MHD scheme, which originates from density based methods. Five groups of test cases are addressed to verify and validate the method. We start with two resistive MHD cases, namely the Shercliff and Hunt flow problems, which are intended to validate the method for low-speed resistive MHD flows. The remaining three test cases, namely the cloud-shock interaction, the MHD rotor and the MHD blast wave, are standard 2D ideal MHD problems that serve to validate the method under high-speed flow and complex interaction of MHD shocks. Finally, we demonstrate the method with a more complex application problem, and discuss results of simulation for a quasi-bi-dimensional self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster, for which we study the effect of cathode length upon the electromagnetic nozzle performance.

  8. Implicit adaptive mesh refinement for 2D reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby; Chacón, Luis; Pernice, Michael

    2008-10-01

    An implicit structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) solver for 2D reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is described. The time-implicit discretization is able to step over fast normal modes, while the spatial adaptivity resolves thin, dynamically evolving features. A Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method is used for the nonlinear solver engine. For preconditioning, we have extended the optimal "physics-based" approach developed in [L. Chacón, D.A. Knoll, J.M. Finn, An implicit, nonlinear reduced resistive MHD solver, J. Comput. Phys. 178 (2002) 15-36] (which employed multigrid solver technology in the preconditioner for scalability) to SAMR grids using the well-known Fast Adaptive Composite grid (FAC) method [S. McCormick, Multilevel Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations, SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 1989]. A grid convergence study demonstrates that the solver performance is independent of the number of grid levels and only depends on the finest resolution considered, and that it scales well with grid refinement. The study of error generation and propagation in our SAMR implementation demonstrates that high-order (cubic) interpolation during regridding, combined with a robustly damping second-order temporal scheme such as BDF2, is required to minimize impact of grid errors at coarse-fine interfaces on the overall error of the computation for this MHD application. We also demonstrate that our implementation features the desired property that the overall numerical error is dependent only on the finest resolution level considered, and not on the base-grid resolution or on the number of refinement levels present during the simulation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the tool on several challenging problems.

  9. OpenMHD: Godunov-type code for ideal/resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2016-04-01

    OpenMHD is a Godunov-type finite-volume code for ideal/resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). It is written in Fortran 90 and is parallelized by using MPI-2 and OpenMP. The code was originally developed for studying magnetic reconnection problems and has been made publicly available in the hope that others may find it useful.

  10. The ideal tearing mode: 2D MHD simulations in the linear and nonlinear regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Simone; Del Zanna, Luca; Pucci, Fulvia; Velli, Marco; Papini, Emanuele

    2015-04-01

    We present compressible, resistive MHD numerical simulations of the linear and nonlinear evolution of the tearing instability, for both Harris sheet and force-free initial equilibrium configurations. We analyze the behavior of a current sheet with aspect ratio S1/3, where S is the Lundquist number. This scaling has been recently recognized to be the threshold for fast reconnection occurring on the ideal Alfvenic timescale, with a maximum growth rate that becomes asymptotically independent on S. Our simulations clearly confirm that the tearing instability maximum growth rate and the full dispersion relation are exactly those predicted by the linear theory, at least for the values of S explored here. In the nonlinear stage, we notice the rapid onset and subsequent coalescence of plasmoids, as observed in previous simulations of the Sweet-Parker reconnection scenario. These findings strongly support the idea that in a fully dynamic regime, as soon as current sheets develop and reach the critical threshold in their aspect ratio of S1/3 (occurring well before the Sweet-Parker configuration is able to form), the tearing mode is able to trigger fast reconnection and plasmoids formation on Alfvenic timescales, as required to explain the violent flare activity often observed in solar and astrophysical plasmas.

  11. First results from ideal 2-D MHD reconstruction: magnetopause reconnection event seen by Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, W.-L.; Ã-. Sonnerup, B. U.

    2008-09-01

    We have applied a new reconstruction method (Sonnerup and Teh, 2008), based on the ideal single-fluid MHD equations in a steady-state, two-dimensional geometry, to a reconnection event observed by the Cluster-3 (C3) spacecraft on 5 July 2001, 06:23 UT, at the dawn-side Northern-Hemisphere magnetopause. The event has been previously studied by use of Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction, performed in the deHoffmann-Teller frame, and using the assumption that the flow effects were either negligible or the flow was aligned with the magnetic field. Our new method allows the reconstruction to be performed in the frame of reference moving with the reconnection site (the X-line). In the event studied, this motion is tailward/equatorward at 140 km/s. The principal result of the study is that the new method functions well, generating a magnetic field map that is qualitatively similar to those obtained in the earlier GS-based reconstructions but now includes the reconnection site itself. In comparison with the earlier map by Hasegawa et al. (2004), our new map has a slightly improved ability (cc=0.979 versus cc=0.975) to predict the fields measured by the other three Cluster spacecraft, at distances from C3 ranging from 2132 km (C1) to 2646 km (C4). The new field map indicates the presence of a magnetic X-point, located some 5300 km tailward/equatorward of C3 at the time of its traversal of the magnetopause. In the immediate vicinity of the X-point, the ideal-MHD assumption breaks down, i.e. resistive and/or other effects should be included. We have circumvented this problem by an ad-hoc procedure in which we allow the axial part of convection electric field to be non-constant near the reconnection site. The new reconstruction method also provides a map of the velocity field, in which the inflow into the wedge of reconnected field lines and the plasma jet within it can be seen, and maps of the electric potential and of the electric current distribution. Even though the

  12. Towards a Scalable Fully-Implicit Fully-coupled Resistive MHD Formulation with Stabilized FE Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J N; Pawlowski, R P; Banks, J W; Chacon, L; Lin, P T; Tuminaro, R S

    2009-06-03

    This paper presents an initial study that is intended to explore the development of a scalable fully-implicit stabilized unstructured finite element (FE) capability for low-Mach-number resistive MHD. The discussion considers the development of the stabilized FE formulation and the underlying fully-coupled preconditioned Newton-Krylov nonlinear iterative solver. To enable robust, scalable and efficient solution of the large-scale sparse linear systems generated by the Newton linearization, fully-coupled algebraic multilevel preconditioners are employed. Verification results demonstrate the expected order-of-acuracy for the stabilized FE discretization of a 2D vector potential form for the steady and transient solution of the resistive MHD system. In addition, this study puts forth a set of challenging prototype problems that include the solution of an MHD Faraday conduction pump, a hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Bernard linear stability calculation, and a magnetic island coalescence problem. Initial results that explore the scaling of the solution methods are presented on up to 4096 processors for problems with up to 64M unknowns on a CrayXT3/4. Additionally, a large-scale proof-of-capability calculation for 1 billion unknowns for the MHD Faraday pump problem on 24,000 cores is presented.

  13. Energy structure of MHD flow coupling with outer resistance circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. J.; Chen, Y. Q.; Peng, Z. L.

    2015-08-01

    Energy structure of MHD flow coupling with outer resistance circuit is studied to illuminate qualitatively and quantitatively the energy relation of this basic MHD flow system with energy input and output. Energy structure are analytically derived based on the Navier-Stocks equations for two-dimensional fully-developed flow and generalized Ohm's Law. The influences of applied magnetic field, Hall parameter and conductivity on energy structure are discussed based on the analytical results. Associated energies in MHD flow are deduced and validated by energy conservation. These results reveal that energy structure consists of two sub structures: electrical energy structure and internal energy structure. Energy structure and its sub structures provide an integrated theoretical energy path of the MHD system. Applied magnetic field and conductivity decrease the input energy, dissipation by fluid viscosity and internal energy but increase the ratio of electrical energy to input energy, while Hall parameter has the opposite effects. These are caused by their different effects on Bulk velocity, velocity profiles, voltage and current in outer circuit. Understanding energy structure helps MHD application designers to actively adjust the allocation of different parts of energy so that it is more reasonable and desirable.

  14. 2D Radiation MHD K-shell Modeling of Single Wire Array Stainless Steel Experiments on the Z Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Apruzese, J. P.; Chong, Y. K.; Davis, J.; Dasgupta, A.; Whitney, K. G.; Clark, R. W.; Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    Many physical effects can produce unstable plasma behavior that affect K-shell emission from arrays. Such effects include: asymmetry in the initial density profile, asymmetry in power flow, thermal conduction at the boundaries, and non-uniform wire ablation. Here we consider how asymmetry in the radiation field also contributes to the generation of multidimensional plasma behavior that affects K-shell power and yield. To model this radiation asymmetry, we have incorporated into the MACH2 r-z MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE population kinetics based on radiation transport using multi-dimensional ray tracing. Such methodology is necessary for modeling the enhanced radiative cooling that occurs at the anode and cathode ends of the pinch during the run-in phase of the implosion. This enhanced radiative cooling is due to reduced optical depth at these locations producing an asymmetric flow of radiative energy that leads to substantial disruption of large initial diameter (>5 cm) pinches and drives 1D into 2D fluid (i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor like) flows. The impact of this 2D behavior on K-shell power and yield is investigated by comparing 1D and 2D model results with data obtained from a series of single wire array stainless steel experiments performed on the Z generator.

  15. Characterization of saturated MHD instabilities through 2D electron temperature profile reconstruction from 1D ECE measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sertoli, M.; Horváth, L.; Pokol, G. I.; Igochine, V.; Barrera, L.

    2013-05-01

    A new method for the reconstruction of two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature profiles in the presence of saturated magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) modes from the one-dimensional (1D) electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic is presented. The analysis relies on harmonic decomposition of the electron temperature oscillations through short time Fourier transforms and requires rigid poloidal mode rotation as the only assumption. The method is applicable to any magnetic perturbation as long as the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers m and n are known. Its application to the case of a (m, n) = (1, 1) internal kink mode on ASDEX Upgrade is presented and a new way to estimate the mode displacement is explained. For such modes, it is shown that the higher order harmonics usually visible in the ECE spectrogram arise also for the pure m = n = 1 mode and that they cannot be directly associated with m = n > 1 magnetic perturbations. This method opens up new possibilities for electron heat transport studies in the presence of saturated MHD modes and a way to disentangle the impurity density contributions from electron temperature effects in the analysis of the soft x-ray data.

  16. Turning the resistive MHD into a stochastic field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materassi, M.; Consolini, G.

    2008-08-01

    Classical systems stirred by random forces of given statistics may be described via a path integral formulation in which their degrees of freedom are stochastic variables themselves, undergoing a multiple-history probabilistic evolution. This framework seems to be easily applicable to resistive Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD). Indeed, MHD equations form a dynamic system of classical variables in which the terms representing the density, the pressure and the conductivity of the plasma are irregular functions of space and time when turbulence occurs. By treating those irregular terms as random stirring forces, it is possible to introduce a Stochastic Field Theory which should represent correctly the impulsive phenomena caused by the spece- and time-irregularity of plasma turbulence. This work is motivated by the recent observational evidences of the crucial role played by stochastic fluctuations in space plasmas.

  17. Resistive MHD studies of reversed shear current profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillips, M.W.

    1996-12-31

    Experiments at TFTR, DIII-D and elsewhere, in which current density distributions possessing an off-axis maximum are generated and sustained on a resistive diffusion timescale, continue to be of interest. Here, attention is concentrated on the possible role of resistive instabilities in such plasmas. Using experimental profile information from TFTR as initial data the parameters of interest are varied systematically to study the excitation of resistive instabilities over a range of p from zero to the limits determined by ideal MHD. Computationally, there is a wealth of resistive modes predicted to occur. Thus, it is found that when the minimum value of the safety factor, q{sub min}, exceeds 2 the configuration is either stable or, in some circumstances, the resistive interchange mode can be excited. When q{sub min} {le} 2 localized tearing or double tearing modes are excited at low pressures becoming more global in character as the pressure nears the ideal NHD limit.

  18. Continuous MHD Jet Launching from Resistive Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casse, Fabien L.; Keppens, Rony

    We present numerical MHD simulations of a magnetized accretion disk launching super-fastmagnetosonic jets. These axisymmetric simulations model a time-dependant resistive accretion disk threaded by an initial vertical magnetic field. The resistivity is only important inside the disk and is prescribed as an alpha-type law where the alpha coefficient αm is smaller than unity. We show that the launching of a collimated outflow occurs self-consistently and the ejection of matter is continuous and quasi-stationary. These are the first ever 2.5D simulations of resistive accretion disks launching non-transient ideal MHD jets. This outflow is safely characterized as a jet since the flow becomes super-fastmagnetosonic well-collimated and reaches a quasi-stationary state. We present a complete illustration and explanation of the `accretion-ejection' mechanism that leads to jet formation from a magnetized accretion disk. In particular the magnetic torque inside the disk brakes the matter azimuthally and allows for accretion while it is responsible for an effective magneto-centrifugal acceleration in the jet. As such the magnetic field channels the disk angular momentum and powers the jet acceleration and collimation. The jet originates from the inner disk region where equipartition between thermal and magnetic forces is achieved.

  19. The ideal tearing mode: theory and resistive MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, L.; Landi, S.; Papini, E.; Pucci, F.; Velli, M.

    2016-05-01

    Classical MHD reconnection theories, both the stationary Sweet-Parker model and the tearing instability, are known to provide rates which are too slow to explain the observations. However, a recent analysis has shown that there exists a critical threshold on current sheet's thickness, namely a/L ∼ S -1/3, beyond which the tearing modes evolve on fast macroscopic Alfvénic timescales, provided the Lunquist number S is high enough, as invariably found in solar and astrophysical plasmas. Therefore, the classical Sweet-Parker scenario, for which the diffusive region scales as a/L ∼ S -1/2 and thus can be up to ∼ 100 times thinner than the critical value, is likely to be never realized in nature, as the current sheet itself disrupts in the elongation process. We present here two-dimensional, compressible, resistive MHD simulations, with S ranging from 105 to 107, that fully confirm the linear analysis. Moreover, we show that a secondary plasmoid instability always occurs when the same critical scaling is reached on the local, smaller scale, leading to a cascading explosive process, reminiscent of the flaring activity.

  20. Application of rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA) to intermittent fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows, 2D MHD simulation and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Chang, T.

    2010-12-01

    A new method in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events was introduced by Cheng and Wu [Chang T. and Wu C.C., Physical Rev, E77, 045401(R), 2008]. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has been demonstrated using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. It has also been successfully applied to in-situ solar wind observations [Chang T., Wu, C.C. and Podesta, J., AIP Conf Proc. 1039, 75, 2008], and the broadband electric field oscillations from the auroral zone [Tam, S.W.Y. et al., Physical Rev, E81, 036414, 2010]. We take the next step in this procedure. By using the ROMA spectra and the scaled probability distribution functions (PDFs), raw PDFs can be calculated, which can be compared directly with PDFs from observations or simulation results. In addition to 2D MHD simulation results and in-situ solar wind observation, we show clearly using the ROMA analysis the multifractal character of the 3D fluid simulation data obtained from the JHU turbulence database cluster at http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu. In particular, we show the scaling of the non-symmetrical PDF for the parallel-velocity fluctuations of this 3D fluid data.

  1. 2D Resistive Magnetohydrodynamics Calculations with an Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, C. L.; Gianakon, T. A.; Lipnikov, K. N.; Nelson, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    Single fluid resistive MHD is useful for modeling Z-pinch configurations in cylindrical geometry. One such example is thin walled liners for shock physics or HEDP experiments driven by capacitor banks such as the LANL's PHELIX or Sandia-Z. MHD is also useful for modeling high-explosive-driven flux compression generators (FCGs) and their high-current switches. The resistive MHD in our arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) code operates in one and two dimensions in both Cartesian and cylindrical geometry. It is implemented as a time-step split operator, which consists of, ideal MHD connected to the explicit hydro momentum and energy equations and a second order mimetic discretization solver for implicit solution of the magnetic diffusion equation. In a staggered grid scheme, a single-component of cell-centered magnetic flux is conserved in the Lagrangian frame exactly, while magnetic forces are accumulated at the nodes. Total energy is conserved to round off. Total flux is conserved under the ALE relaxation and remap. The diffusion solver consistently computes Ohmic heating. Both Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions are available with coupling to external circuit models. Example calculations will be shown.

  2. ELRIS2D: A MATLAB Package for the 2D Inversion of DC Resistivity/IP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, Irfan

    2016-04-01

    ELRIS2D is an open source code written in MATLAB for the two-dimensional inversion of direct current resistivity (DCR) and time domain induced polarization (IP) data. The user interface of the program is designed for functionality and ease of use. All available settings of the program can be reached from the main window. The subsurface is discretized using a hybrid mesh generated by the combination of structured and unstructured meshes, which reduces the computational cost of the whole inversion procedure. The inversion routine is based on the smoothness constrained least squares method. In order to verify the program, responses of two test models and field data sets were inverted. The models inverted from the synthetic data sets are consistent with the original test models in both DC resistivity and IP cases. A field data set acquired in an archaeological site is also used for the verification of outcomes of the program in comparison with the excavation results.

  3. A Numerical Study of Resistivity and Hall Effects for a Compressible MHD Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of resistive, Hall, and viscous terms on the flow structure compared with compressible ideal MHD is studied numerically for a one-fluid non-ideal MHD model. The goal of the present study is to shed some light on the emerging area of non-ideal MHD modeling and simulation. Numerical experiments are performed on a hypersonic blunt body flow with future application to plasma aerodynamics flow control in reentry vehicles. Numerical experiments are also performed on a magnetized time-developing mixing layer with possible application to magnetic/turbulence mixing.

  4. 2D MHD and 1D HD Models of a Solar Flare—a Comprehensive Comparison of the Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P.; Murawski, K.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    Without any doubt, solar flaring loops possess a multithread internal structure that is poorly resolved, and there are no means to observe heating episodes and thermodynamic evolution of the individual threads. These limitations cause fundamental problems in numerical modeling of flaring loops, such as selection of a structure and a number of threads, and an implementation of a proper model of the energy deposition process. A set of one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic models of a flaring loop are developed to compare energy redistribution and plasma dynamics in the course of a prototypical solar flare. Basic parameters of the modeled loop are set according to the progenitor M1.8 flare recorded in AR 10126 on 2002 September 20 between 09:21 UT and 09:50 UT. The nonideal 1D models include thermal conduction and radiative losses of the optically thin plasma as energy-loss mechanisms, while the nonideal 2D models take into account viscosity and thermal conduction as energy-loss mechanisms only. The 2D models have a continuous distribution of the parameters of the plasma across the loop and are powered by varying in time and space along and across the loop heating flux. We show that such 2D models are an extreme borderline case of a multithread internal structure of the flaring loop, with a filling factor equal to 1. Nevertheless, these simple models ensure the general correctness of the obtained results and can be adopted as a correct approximation of the real flaring structures.

  5. 2D MHD AND 1D HD MODELS OF A SOLAR FLARE—A COMPREHENSIVE COMPARISON OF THE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P.; Murawski, K.; Srivastava, A. K. E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl E-mail: asrivastava.app@iitbhu.ac.in

    2015-11-01

    Without any doubt, solar flaring loops possess a multithread internal structure that is poorly resolved, and there are no means to observe heating episodes and thermodynamic evolution of the individual threads. These limitations cause fundamental problems in numerical modeling of flaring loops, such as selection of a structure and a number of threads, and an implementation of a proper model of the energy deposition process. A set of one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic models of a flaring loop are developed to compare energy redistribution and plasma dynamics in the course of a prototypical solar flare. Basic parameters of the modeled loop are set according to the progenitor M1.8 flare recorded in AR 10126 on 2002 September 20 between 09:21 UT and 09:50 UT. The nonideal 1D models include thermal conduction and radiative losses of the optically thin plasma as energy-loss mechanisms, while the nonideal 2D models take into account viscosity and thermal conduction as energy-loss mechanisms only. The 2D models have a continuous distribution of the parameters of the plasma across the loop and are powered by varying in time and space along and across the loop heating flux. We show that such 2D models are an extreme borderline case of a multithread internal structure of the flaring loop, with a filling factor equal to 1. Nevertheless, these simple models ensure the general correctness of the obtained results and can be adopted as a correct approximation of the real flaring structures.

  6. 2D/3D electron temperature fluctuations near explosive MHD instabilities accompanied by minor and major disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Lee, K. D.; Ko, W.-H.; Park, Y.-S.; Park, B. H.; In, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Minor and major disruptions by explosive MHD instabilities were observed with the novel quasi 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system in the KSTAR plasma. The fine electron temperature (T e) fluctuation images revealed two types of minor disruptions: a small minor disruption is a q∼ 2 localized fast transport event due to a single m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth, while a large minor disruption is partial collapse of the q≤slant 2 region with two successive fast heat transport events by the correlated m/n  =  2/1 and m/n  =  1/1 instabilities. The m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth during the minor disruption is normally limited below the saturation width. However, as the additional interchange-like perturbation grows near the inner separatrix of the 2/1 island, the 2/1 island can expand beyond the limit through coupling with the cold bubble formed by the interchange-like perturbation.

  7. New insights into the generalized Rutherford equation for nonlinear neoclassical tearing mode growth from 2D reduced MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhof, E.; de Blank, H. J.; Pratt, J.

    2016-03-01

    Two dimensional reduced MHD simulations of neoclassical tearing mode growth and suppression by ECCD are performed. The perturbation of the bootstrap current density and the EC drive current density perturbation are assumed to be functions of the perturbed flux surfaces. In the case of ECCD, this implies that the applied power is flux surface averaged to obtain the EC driven current density distribution. The results are consistent with predictions from the generalized Rutherford equation using common expressions for Δ \\text{bs}\\prime and Δ \\text{ECCD}\\prime . These expressions are commonly perceived to describe only the effect on the tearing mode growth of the helical component of the respective current perturbation acting through the modification of Ohm’s law. Our results show that they describe in addition the effect of the poloidally averaged current density perturbation which acts through modification of the tearing mode stability index. Except for modulated ECCD, the largest contribution to the mode growth comes from this poloidally averaged current density perturbation.

  8. Low-Resistance 2D/2D Ohmic Contacts: A Universal Approach to High-Performance WSe2, MoS2, and MoSe2 Transistors.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsun-Jen; Chamlagain, Bhim; Koehler, Michael; Perera, Meeghage Madusanka; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David; Tománek, David; Zhou, Zhixian

    2016-03-01

    We report a new strategy for fabricating 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts for a variety of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) using van der Waals assembly of substitutionally doped TMDs as drain/source contacts and TMDs with no intentional doping as channel materials. We demonstrate that few-layer WSe2 field-effect transistors (FETs) with 2D/2D contacts exhibit low contact resistances of ∼0.3 kΩ μm, high on/off ratios up to >10(9), and high drive currents exceeding 320 μA μm(-1). These favorable characteristics are combined with a two-terminal field-effect hole mobility μFE ≈ 2 × 10(2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature, which increases to >2 × 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at cryogenic temperatures. We observe a similar performance also in MoS2 and MoSe2 FETs with 2D/2D drain and source contacts. The 2D/2D low-resistance ohmic contacts presented here represent a new device paradigm that overcomes a significant bottleneck in the performance of TMDs and a wide variety of other 2D materials as the channel materials in postsilicon electronics.

  9. Resistive MHD studies of high-. beta. -tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, V.E.; Carreras, B.A.; Hicks, H.R.; Holmes, J.A.; Garcia, L.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical calculations have been performed to study the MHD activity in high-..beta.. tokamaks such as ISX-B. These initial value calculations built on earlier low ..beta.. techniques, but the ..beta.. effects create several new numerical issues. These issues are discussed and resolved. In addition to time-stepping modules, our system of computer codes includes equilibrium solvers (used to provide an initial condition) and output modules, such as a magnetic field line follower and an X-ray diagnostic code. The transition from current driven modes at low ..beta.. to predominantly pressure driven modes at high ..beta.. is described. The nonlinear studies yield X-ray emissivity plots which are compared with experiment.

  10. Effect of Resistive MHD on the Performance of the CDX-U Spherical Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breslau, J.; Hwang, Y. S.; Stutman, D.; Choe, W.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Jones, T. G.

    1996-11-01

    The ST tokamak operational current limit has been explored experimentally in CDX-U. The operational q(a) limit of ≈ 3.5 [q_cyl ≈ 1] has been observed. This current limit is observed to be associated with the onset of the n=1/m=3 resistive MHD mode. While the 1/3 mode does not cause a hard disruption, the increased MHD activity imposes a practical limit on the achievable current, and can be seen for a wide range of q(a). In a ST configuration, due to a rapid change in the q value near the edge region, the q=3 layer is located relatively close to the plasma edge even when q(a) value is much larger than 3. With appearance of sawtooth (q ≈ 1 layer), together with the 1/3 mode, the coupling of resistive modes could lead to a strong internal reconnection event (IRE) as observed previously in START. While the current does not terminate due to IRE, it leads to a rapid loss of heat from the plasma interior. Therefore, it is quite clear that it is desirable to avoid it if at all possible. Interestingly, MHD-quiescent discharges can be indeed obtained by appropriate discharge programming (likely to be due to a different current profile). The MHD quiescent discharge has a factor of 2 - 3 improvement in the electron energy confinement.

  11. Investigation of the effect of resistive MHD modes on spherical torus performance in CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.; Stutman, D.; Hwang, Y.S.

    1997-01-01

    Resistive MHD modes and associated effects on spherical torus performance are investigated in the CDX-U device for Ip {le} 100 kA. Presently, the growth of resistive MHD modes (n=1/m=3 or n=1/m=2) as the edge q[q(a)] is lowered toward 3.5 appears to limit the maximum current achievable in CDX-U. For low q(a) discharges, a prominent rotating hot spot can be seen with the soft x-ray array, indicative of a magnetic island associated with a n=1/m=1 mode. The edge mode, which is n=1/m=3 or n=1/m=2, can be seen by the soft x-ray and edge magnetic pick up coil array. The growth of those modes in space and amplitude eventually leads to an Internal Reconnection Event (IRE). Prior to the IRE, strong mode-mixing takes place suggesting magnetic island overlap. The IRE causes a rapid heat loss from the core causing a strong plasma elongation and current spike due to the plasma inductance drop. With an appropriate discharge control, a MHD quiescent high confinement regime with over twice the central electron temperature relative to the MHD active regime has been found. To assess the halo-induced effects during the MHD events, a pair of segmented Rogowski coils were installed on the center stack. The observed halo-induced current fraction is generally small (less than 5% of the total plasma current) even for the case of forced disruption.

  12. High-beta extended MHD simulations of stellarators with Spitzer resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, Torrin

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear, extended MHD code NIMROD is used to study high-beta, 3D magnetic topology evolution of a toroidal stellarator. The configurations under investigation derive from the geometry of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) experiment. However, the vacuum rotational transform profile is artificially raised by modifying applied magnetic fields in an effort to examine the sensitivity of low order rational surfaces and/or magnetic islands. Finite beta plasmas are created using a volumetric heating source and temperature dependent anisotropic heat conduction and resistivity. Flux surface dependent temperature and density profiles are used for the initial condition so that Spitzer resistivity can be applied. The onset of MHD instabilities and nonlinear consequences are monitored as a function of beta as well as the fragility of the magnetic surfaces. Research supported by US DOE under grant no. DE-FG02-99ER54546.

  13. Quantum Hall effect: The resistivity of a 2D electron gas—a thermodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisin, M. V.

    2005-09-01

    Based on a thermodynamic approach, we have calculated the resistivity of a 2D electron gas, assumed dissipationless in a strong quantum limit. Standard measurements, with extra current leads, define the resistivity caused by a combination of Peltier and Seebeck effects. The current causes heating (cooling) at the first (second) sample contacts, due to the Peltier effect. The contact temperatures are different. The measured voltage is equal to the Peltier effect-induced thermoemf which is linear in current. As a result, the resistivity is non-zero as I→0. The resistivity is a universal function of magnetic field and temperature, expressed in fundamental units h/e2. The universal features of magnetotransport data observed in the experiment confirm our predictions.

  14. Linear Analysis of the m=0 Instability for a Visco-resistive Hall MHD Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, B.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    2006-01-05

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the linear dispersion relation for the axisymmetric (m=0) compressible interchange instability of Bennett equilibria in a visco-resistive, Hall MHD plasma. The full anisotropic stress tensor with Braginskii viscous coefficients is considered. The eigenvalues are obtained numerically. For small axial mode number, Hall currents enhance the growth rates, whereas in the limit of high mode number the growth rates are suppressed, eventually resulting in wave cutoff, even in the ideal limit. For the visco-resistive plasma the unstable spectra are weakly dependent on the off-diagonal elements of the stress tensor.

  15. 2D Resistivity and Induced Polarization Measurement for Manganese Ore Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srigutomo, Wahyu; Trimadona; Pratomo, Prihandhanu M.

    2016-08-01

    2D Resistivity and Induced Polarization (IP) survey was conducted to delineate the presence of minerals containing manganese in form of manganese ore. The resistivity method concerns with resistivity (ohm.m) of rocks which indicates the electrical properties in terms of ability to resist the flow of electrical current. The presence of manganese in rocks generally lowers the resistivity. The Induced Polarization (IP) method deals with chargeability (in msec) which indicates the strength of polarization effects experienced by ions in the vicinity of metallic grains in rock. The presence of manganese in rocks increases the chargeability of the rock when measured using IP method. The low resistivity zones (< 5 ohm.m) are situated in the western part, central part, and eastern part of the investigated area. These zones may strongly correlate to the presence of manganese ore. However, these low resistivity zones may have been influenced by the presence of clay or weathered soil. In this case, the high chargeability zones will help in confirming the prospective zones caused by manganese ore. The thicknesses of the manganese ore layer vary from about 5 to 20 m based on the cross-sections. Based on the results, we estimated the geometry of the associated manganese prospective zones for resistivity (< 5 ohm.m) and chargeability (>10 msec).

  16. 2D resistivity inversion using conjugate gradients for a finite element discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozo, C. A.; Santos, F. M.; Porsani, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we present a DC 2D inversion algorithm using conjugate gradients relaxation to solve the maximum likelihood inverse equations. We apply, according to Zhang (1995), the maximum likelihood inverse theory developed by Tarantola and Valette (1982) to our 2D resistivity inversion. This algorithm was chosen to this research because it doesn't need to calculate the field's derivatives. Since conjugate gradient techniques only need the results of the sensitivity matrix à or its transpose ÃT multiplying a vector, the actual computation of the sensitivity matrix are not performed, according to the methodology described in Zhang (1995). In Zhang (1995), the terms Ãx and ÃTy, are dependent of the stiffness matrix K and its partial derivative ∂K⁄∂ρ. The inversion methodology described in Zhang (1995) is for the case of 3D electrical resistivity by finite differences discretization. So it was necessary to make a series of adjustments to obtain a satisfactory result for 2D electrical inversion using finite element method. The difference between the modeling of 3D resistivity with finite difference and the 2D finite element method are in the integration variable, used in the 2D case. In the 2D case the electrical potential are initially calculated in the transformed domain, including the stiffness matrix, and only in the end is transformed in Cartesian domain. In the case of 3D, described by Zhang (1995) this is done differently, the calculation is done directly in the Cartesian domain. In the literature was not found any work describing how to deal with this problem. Because the calculations of Ãx and ÃTy must be done without having the real stiffness matrix, the adaptation consist in calculate the stiffness matrix and its partial derivative using a set of integration variables. We transform those matrix in the same form has in the potential case, but with different sets of variables. The results will be presented and are very promising.

  17. Modeling of magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail using global MHD simulation with an effective resistivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den, M.; Horiuchi, R.; Fujita, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is considered to play an important role in space phenomena such as substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. Tanaka and Fujita reproduced substorm evolution process by numerical simulation with the global MHD code [1]. In the MHD framework, the dissipation model is introduced for modeling of the kinetic effects. They found that the normalized reconnection viscosity, one of the dissipation model employed there, gave a large effect for the dipolarization, central phenomenon in the substorm development process, though that viscosity was assumed to be a constant parameter. It is well known that magnetic reconnection is controlled by microscopic kinetic mechanism. Frozen-in condition is broken due to particle kinetic effects and collisionless reconnection is triggered when current sheet is compressed as thin as ion kinetic scales under the influence of external driving flow [2, 3]. Horiuchi and his collaborators showed that reconnection electric field generated by microscopic physics evolves inside ion meandering scale so as to balance the flux inflow rate at the inflow boundary, which is controlled by macroscopic physics [2]. That is, effective resistivity generated through this process can be expressed by balance equation between micro and macro physics. In this paper, we perform substorm simulation by using the global MHD code developed by Tanaka [3] with this effective resistivity instead of the empirical resistivity model. We obtain the AE indices from simulation data, in which substorm onset can be seen clearly, and investigate the relationship between the substorm development and the effective resistivity model. [1] T. Tanaka, A, Nakamizo, A. Yoshikawa, S. Fujita, H. Shinagawa, H. Shimazu, T. Kikuchi, and K. K. Hashimoto, J. Geophys. Res. 115 (2010) A05220,doi:10.1029/2009JA014676. [2] W. Pei, R. Horiuchi, and T. Sato, Physics of Plasmas,Vol. 8 (2001), pp. 3251-3257. [3] A. Ishizawa, and R. Horiuchi, Phys. Rev. Lett., Vol. 95, 045003 (2005). [4

  18. Minimally implicit Runge-Kutta methods for Resistive Relativistic MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloy, Miguel-Á.; Cordero-Carrión, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    The Relativistic Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic (RRMHD) equations are a hyperbolic system of partial differential equations used to describe the dynamics of relativistic magnetized fluids with a finite conductivity. Close to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic regime, the source term proportional to the conductivity becomes potentially stiff and cannot be handled with standard explicit time integration methods. We propose a new class of methods to deal with the stiffness fo the system, which we name Minimally Implicit Runge-Kutta methods. These methods avoid the development of numerical instabilities without increasing the computational costs in comparison with explicit methods, need no iterative extra loop in order to recover the primitive (physical) variables, the analytical inversion of the implicit operator is trivial and the several stages can actually be viewed as stages of explicit Runge-Kutta methods with an effective time-step. We test these methods with two different one-dimensional test beds in varied conductivity regimes, and show that our second-order schemes satisfy the theoretical expectations.

  19. Impact of resistive MHD plasma response on perturbation field sidebands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, D. M.; Evans, T. E.; Moyer, R. A.; Lyons, B. C.; Ferraro, N. M.; Park, G.-Y.

    2016-07-01

    Single fluid linear simulations of a KSTAR RMP ELM suppressed discharge with the M3D-C1 resistive magnetohydrodynamic code have been performed for the first time. The simulations show that the application of the n  =  1 perturbation using the KSTAR in-vessel control coils (IVCC), which apply modest levels of n  =  3 sidebands (~20% of the n  =  1), leads to levels of n  =  3 sideband that are comparable to the n  =  1 when plasma response is included. This is due to the reduced level of screening of the rational-surface-resonant n  =  3 component relative to the rational-surface-resonant n  =  1 component. The n  =  3 sidebands could play a similar role in ELM suppression on KSTAR as the toroidal sidebands (n  =  1, 2, 4) in DIII-D n  =  3 ELM suppression with missing I-coil segments (Paz Soldan et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 073013). This result may help to explain the uniqueness of ELM suppression with n  =  1 perturbations in KSTAR since the effective perturbation is a mixed n  =  1/n  =  3 perturbation similar to n  =  3 ELM suppression in DIII-D.

  20. Inversion of 2-D DC resistivity data using rapid optimization and minimal complexity neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. K.; Tiwari, R. K.; Singh, S. B.

    2010-02-01

    The backpropagation (BP) artificial neural network (ANN) technique of optimization based on steepest descent algorithm is known to be inept for its poor performance and does not ensure global convergence. Nonlinear and complex DC resistivity data require efficient ANN model and more intensive optimization procedures for better results and interpretations. Improvements in the computational ANN modeling process are described with the goals of enhancing the optimization process and reducing ANN model complexity. Well-established optimization methods, such as Radial basis algorithm (RBA) and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithms (LMA) have frequently been used to deal with complexity and nonlinearity in such complex geophysical records. We examined here the efficiency of trained LMA and RB networks by using 2-D synthetic resistivity data and then finally applied to the actual field vertical electrical resistivity sounding (VES) data collected from the Puga Valley, Jammu and Kashmir, India. The resulting ANN reconstruction resistivity results are compared with the result of existing inversion approaches, which are in good agreement. The depths and resistivity structures obtained by the ANN methods also correlate well with the known drilling results and geologic boundaries. The application of the above ANN algorithms proves to be robust and could be used for fast estimation of resistive structures for other complex earth model also.

  1. Quantization of the diagonal resistance : density gradients and the empirical resistance rule in a 2D system.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Stormer, H. L.; Vicente, C. L.; Sullivan, N. S.; Xia, J. S.; Adams, E. D.; West, Ken W.; Tsui, Daniel Chee; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; Baldwin, K. W.

    2005-04-01

    We have observed quantization of the diagonal resistance, R{sub xx}, at the edges of several quantum Hall states. Each quantized R{sub xx} value is close to the difference between the two adjacent Hall plateaus in the off-diagonal resistance, R{sub xy}. Peaks in R{sub xx} occur at different positions in positive and negative magnetic fields. Practically all R{sub xx} features can be explained quantitatively by a 1%/cm electron density gradient. Therefore, R{sub xx} is determined by Rxy and unrelated to the diagonal resistivity {rho}{sub xx}. Our findings throw an unexpected light on the empirical resistivity rule for 2D systems.

  2. MHD computation of feedback of resistive-shell instabilities in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Zita, E.J.; Prager, S.C.; Ho, Y.L.; Schnack, D.D

    1992-05-01

    MHD computation demonstrates that feedback can sustain reversal and reduce loop voltage in resistive-shell reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. Edge feedback on {approximately}2R/a tearing modes resonant near axis is found to restore plasma parameters to nearly their levels with a close-fitting conducting shell. When original dynamo modes are stabilized, neighboring tearing modes grow to maintain the RFP dynamo more efficiently. This suggests that experimentally observed limits on RFP pulselengths to the order of the shell time can be overcome by applying feedback to a few helical modes.

  3. MHD simulations of three-dimensional resistive reconnection in a cylindrical plasma column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striani, E.; Mignone, A.; Vaidya, B.; Bodo, G.; Ferrari, A.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a plasma phenomenon where a topological rearrangement of magnetic field lines with opposite polarity results in dissipation of magnetic energy into heat, kinetic energy and particle acceleration. Such a phenomenon is considered as an efficient mechanism for energy release in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. An important question is how to make the process fast enough to account for observed explosive energy releases. The classical model for steady state magnetic reconnection predicts reconnection times scaling as S1/2 (where S is the Lundquist number) and yields time-scales several order of magnitude larger than the observed ones. Earlier two-dimensional MHD simulations showed that for large Lundquist number the reconnection time becomes independent of S (`fast reconnection' regime) due to the presence of the secondary tearing instability that takes place for S ≳ 1 × 104. We report on our 3D MHD simulations of magnetic reconnection in a magnetically confined cylindrical plasma column under either a pressure balanced or a force-free equilibrium and compare the results with 2D simulations of a circular current sheet. We find that the 3D instabilities acting on these configurations result in a fragmentation of the initial current sheet in small filaments, leading to enhanced dissipation rate that becomes independent of the Lundquist number already at S ≃ 1 × 103.

  4. Imaging geological contact utilizing 2D resistivity method for light rail transit (LRT) track alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nisa'; Saad, Rosli; Muztaza, Nordiana M.; Ismail, Noer E. H.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to locate the geological contact using 2D resistivity method for Light Rail Transit (LRT) track alignment. The resistivity method was conducted on eight survey lines with the length of line 1 was 600m. The length of line 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 were 200m each while line 8 is 115m. All the survey used minimum electrode spacing of 5m and using Pole-dipole array with minimum current is 2mA and maximum was 20mA. The result obtained from the pseudosection showed that the area generally divided into three main zones, fill materials/residual soil with a resistivity value of <500 Ωm, saturated zone with a resistivity value of 30-100 Ωm and bedrock with a resistivity value of >2000 Ωm. Three fractured zones were detected along line L1 and a lot of boulders were detected at L1, L3, L4, L5 and L6. The geological contact was between the residual soil and granite bedrock.

  5. Intrinsic rotation due to MHD activity in a tokamak with a resistive wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, M. G.; Gimblett, C. G.; Hastie, R. J.

    2013-05-01

    MHD activity in a tokamak, in the form of waves and instabilities, generally has a preferred direction for propagation in a two-fluid plasma. When the radial component of magnetic field associated with this activity interacts with a resistive wall, momentum or angular momentum will be given to the wall. The equal and opposite reaction will be on the plasma, in particular, for ideal and resistive modes, at the singular or resonant surfaces for the various modes. In this case the torque exerted is electromagnetic. This is in contrast to other mechanisms for intrinsic or spontaneous rotation which may arise at the plasma boundary. The resistive wall is considered generally, and the thin and thick wall limits found, the latter being relevant to ITER parameters. Remarkably small radial perturbing fields of order 0.1 G could produce a torque comparable in effect to the apparent anomalous toroidal viscosity.

  6. Adaptive finite element modeling of direct current resistivity in 2-D generally anisotropic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Yuguo; Liu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite element (FE) algorithm for direct current (DC) resistivity modeling in 2-D generally anisotropic conductivity structures. Our algorithm is implemented on an unstructured triangular mesh that readily accommodates complex structures such as topography and dipping layers and so on. We implement a self-adaptive, goal-oriented grid refinement algorithm in which the finite element analysis is performed on a sequence of refined grids. The grid refinement process is guided by an a posteriori error estimator. The problem is formulated in terms of total potentials where mixed boundary conditions are incorporated. This type of boundary condition is superior to the Dirichlet type of conditions and improves numerical accuracy considerably according to model calculations. We have verified the adaptive finite element algorithm using a two-layered earth with azimuthal anisotropy. The FE algorithm with incorporation of mixed boundary conditions achieves high accuracy. The relative error between the numerical and analytical solutions is less than 1% except in the vicinity of the current source location, where the relative error is up to 2.4%. A 2-D anisotropic model is used to demonstrate the effects of anisotropy upon the apparent resistivity in DC soundings.

  7. Scalable implicit incompressible resistive MHD with stabilized FE and fully-coupled Newton–Krylov-AMG

    DOE PAGES

    Shadid, J. N.; Pawlowski, R. P.; Cyr, E. C.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Chacon, L.; Weber, P. D.

    2016-02-10

    Here, we discuss that the computational solution of the governing balance equations for mass, momentum, heat transfer and magnetic induction for resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) systems can be extremely challenging. These difficulties arise from both the strong nonlinear, nonsymmetric coupling of fluid and electromagnetic phenomena, as well as the significant range of time- and length-scales that the interactions of these physical mechanisms produce. This paper explores the development of a scalable, fully-implicit stabilized unstructured finite element (FE) capability for 3D incompressible resistive MHD. The discussion considers the development of a stabilized FE formulation in context of the variational multiscale (VMS) method,more » and describes the scalable implicit time integration and direct-to-steady-state solution capability. The nonlinear solver strategy employs Newton–Krylov methods, which are preconditioned using fully-coupled algebraic multilevel preconditioners. These preconditioners are shown to enable a robust, scalable and efficient solution approach for the large-scale sparse linear systems generated by the Newton linearization. Verification results demonstrate the expected order-of-accuracy for the stabilized FE discretization. The approach is tested on a variety of prototype problems, that include MHD duct flows, an unstable hydromagnetic Kelvin–Helmholtz shear layer, and a 3D island coalescence problem used to model magnetic reconnection. Initial results that explore the scaling of the solution methods are also presented on up to 128K processors for problems with up to 1.8B unknowns on a CrayXK7.« less

  8. Detection of Cracks Using 2d Electrical Resistivity Imaging In A Cultivated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samouëlian, A.; Cousin, I.; Richard, G.; Bruand, A.

    Variations of soil structure is significant for the understanding of water and gas trans- fer in soil profiles. In the context of arable land, soil structure can be compacted due to either agriculture operation (wheel tracks), or hardsetting and crusting processes. As a consequence, soil porosity is reduced which may lead to decrease water infiltra- tion and to anoxic conditions. Porosity can be increased by cracks formation due to swelling and shrinking phenomenon. We present here a laboratory experiment based on soil electrical characteristics. Electrical resistivity allows a non destructive three di- mensional and dynamical analysis of the soil structure. Our main objective is to detect cracks in the soil. Cracks form an electrical resistant object and the contrast of resis- tivity between air and soil is large enough to be detected. Our sample is an undisturbed soil block 240mm*170mm*160mm with an initial structure compacted by wheel traf- fic. Successive artificial cracks are generated. Electrodes built with 2 mm ceramic cups permit a good electrical contact at the soil surface whatever its water content. They are installed 15 mm apart and the electrical resistivity is monitored using a dipole-dipole and wenner multi-electrodes 2D imaging method which gives a picture of the subsur- face resistivity. The interpreted resistivity sections show the major soil structure. The electrical response changes with the cracks formation. The structure information ex- tracted from the electrical map are in good agreement with the artificially man-made cracks. These first results demonstrate the relevance of high resolution electrical imag- ing of the soil profile. Further experiments need to be carried out in order to monitor natural soil structure evolution during wetting-drying cycles.

  9. Large resistive 2D Micromegas with genetic multiplexing and some imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouteille, S.; Attié, D.; Baron, P.; Calvet, D.; Magnier, P.; Mandjavidze, I.; Procureur, S.; Riallot, M.

    2016-10-01

    The performance of the first large resistive Micromegas detectors with 2D readout and genetic multiplexing is presented. These detectors have a 50 × 50cm2 active area and are equipped with 1024 strips both in X- and Y-directions. The same genetic multiplexing pattern is applied on both coordinates, resulting in the compression of signals on 2 × 61 readout channels. Four such detectors have been built at CERN, and extensively tested with cosmics. The resistive strip film allows for very high gain operation, compensating for the charge spread on the 2 dimensions as well as the S / N loss due to the huge, 1 nF input capacitance. This film also creates a significantly different signal shape in the X- and Y-coordinates due to the charge evacuation along the resistive strips. All in all a detection efficiency above 95% is achieved with a 1 cm drift gap. Though not yet optimal, the measured 300 μm spatial resolution allows for very precise imaging in the field of muon tomography, and some applications of these detectors are presented.

  10. Improved 2-D resistivity imaging of features in covered karst terrain with arrays of implanted electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiflu, H. G.; Kruse, S. E.; Harro, D.; Loke, M. H.; Wilkinson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography is commonly used to identify geologic features associated with sinkhole formation. In covered karst terrain, however, it can be difficult to resolve the depth to top of limestone with this method. This is due to the fact that array lengths, and hence depth of resolution, are often limited by residential or commercial lot dimensions in urban environments. Furthermore, the sediments mantling the limestone are often clay-rich and highly conductive. The resistivity method has limited sensitivity to resistive zones beneath conductive zones. This sensitivity can be improved significantly with electrodes implanted at depth in the cover sediments near the top of limestone. An array of deep electrodes is installed with direct push technology in the karst cover. When combined with a surface array in which each surface electrode is underlain by a deep electrode, the array geometry is similar to a borehole array turned on its side. This method, called the Multi-Electrode Resistivity Implant Technique (MERIT), offers the promise of significantly improved resolution of epikarst and cover collapse development zones in the overlying sediment, the limestone or at the sediment-bedrock interface in heterogeneous karst environments. With a non-traditional array design, the question of optimal array geometries arises. Optimizing array geometries is complicated by the fact that many plausible 4-electrode readings will produce negative apparent resistivity values, even in homogeneous terrain. Negative apparent resistivities cannot be used in inversions based on the logarithm of the apparent resistivity. New algorithms for seeking optimal array geometries have been developed by modifying the 'Compare R' method of Wilkinson and Loke. The optimized arrays show significantly improved resolution over basic arrays adapted from traditional 2D surface geometries. Several MERIT case study surveys have been conducted in covered karst in west-central Florida, with

  11. Electrical resistivity tomography applied to a complex lava dome: 2D and 3D models comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The study of volcanic domes growth (e.g. St. Helens, Unzen, Montserrat) shows that it is often characterized by a succession of extrusion phases, dome explosions and collapse events. Lava dome eruptive activity may last from days to decades. Therefore, their internal structure, at the end of the eruption, is complex and includes massive extrusions and lava lobes, talus and pyroclastic deposits as well as hydrothermal alteration. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for volcano structure imaging. Because a large range of resistivity values is often observed in volcanic environments, the method is well suited to study the internal structure of volcanic edifices. We performed an ERT survey on an 11ka years old trachytic lava dome, the Puy de Dôme volcano (French Massif Central). The analysis of a recent high resolution DEM (LiDAR 0.5 m), as well as other geophysical data, strongly suggest that the Puy de Dôme is a composite dome. 11 ERT profiles have been carried out, both at the scale of the entire dome (base diameter of ~2 km and height of 400 m) on the one hand, and at a smaller scale on the summit part on the other hand. Each profile is composed of 64 electrodes. Three different electrode spacing have been used depending on the study area (35 m for the entire dome, 10 m and 5 m for its summit part). Some profiles were performed with half-length roll-along acquisitions, in order to keep a good trade-off between depth of investigation and resolution. Both Wenner-alpha and Wenner-Schlumberger protocols were used. 2-D models of the electrical resistivity distribution were computed using RES2DINV software. In order to constrain inversion models interpretation, the depth of investigation (DOI) method was applied to those results. It aims to compute a sensitivity index on inversion results, illustrating how the data influence the model and constraining models

  12. Local Existence for the Non-Resistive MHD Equations in Nearly Optimal Sobolev Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fefferman, Charles L.; McCormick, David S.; Robinson, James C.; Rodrigo, Jose L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper establishes the local-in-time existence and uniqueness of solutions to the viscous, non-resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations in R^d, where d = 2, 3, with initial data {B_0in H^s(R^d)} and {u_0in H^{s-1+ɛ}(R^d)} for {s > d/2} and any {0 < ɛ < 1} . The proof relies on maximal regularity estimates for the Stokes equation. The obstruction to taking {ɛ=0} is explained by the failure of solutions of the heat equation with initial data {u_0in H^{s-1}} to satisfy {uin L^1(0,T; H^{s+1})} ; we provide an explicit example of this phenomenon.

  13. Altered NK Cell Development and Enhanced NK Cell-Mediated Resistance to MCMV in NKG2D-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zafirova, Biljana; Mandarić, Sanja; Antulov, Ronald; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonsson, Helena; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Jonjić, Stipan; Polić, Bojan

    2009-01-01

    Summary NKG2D is a potent activating receptor on NK cells which acts as a molecular sensor for stressed cells expressing NKG2D ligands such as infected or tumor transformed cells. Although NKG2D is expressed on NK cell precursors, its role in NK cell development is still not known. We have generated NKG2D-deficient mice by targeting the Klrk1 locus. Here we provide evidence for an important regulatory role of NKG2D in the development of NK cells. The absence of NKG2D causes faster division of NK cells, perturbation in size of some NK cell subpopulations and their augmented sensitivity to apoptosis. As expected, NKG2D−/− NK cells are less responsive to tumor targets expressing NKG2D ligands. NKG2D−/− mice, however, show an enhanced NK cell-mediated resistance to MCMV infection as a consequence of NK cell dysregulation. Altogether, these findings provide evidence for yet unknown regulatory function of NKG2D in NK cell physiology. PMID:19631564

  14. Computational modeling of neoclassical and resistive MHD tearing modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Gianakon, T.A.

    1996-02-01

    Numerical studies of the linear and nonlinear evolution of magnetic tearing type modes in three-dimensional toroidal geometry are presented. In addition to traditional resistive MHD effects, where the parameter {Delta}{prime} determines the stability properties, neoclassical effects have been included for the first time in such models. The inclusion of neoclassical physics introduces and additional free-energy source for the nonlinear formation of magnetic islands through the effects of a bootstrap current in Ohm`s law. The neoclassical tearing mode is demonstrated to be destabilized in plasmas which are otherwise {Delta}{prime} stable, albeit once an island width threshold is exceeded. The simulations are based on a set of neoclassical reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in three-dimensional toroidal geometry derived from the two-fluid equations in the limit of small inverse aspect ratio {epsilon} and low plasma pressure {beta} with neoclassical closures for the viscous force {del} {center_dot} {leftrightarrow}{pi}. The poloidal magnetic flux {psi}, the toroidal vorticity {omega}{sup {zeta}}, and the plasma pressure p are time advanced using the parallel projection of Ohm`s law, the toroidal projection of the curl of the momentum equation, and a pressure evolution equation with anisotropic pressure transport parallel to and across magnetic field lines. The equations are implemented in an initial value code which Fourier decomposes equilibrium and perturbation quantities in the poloidal and toroidal directions, and finite differences them radially based on a equilibrium straight magnetic field line representation. An implicit algorithm is used to advance the linear terms; the nonlinear terms are advanced explicitly. The simulations are benchmarked linearly and nonlinearly against single and multiple helicity {Delta}{prime} tearing modes in toroidal geometry in the absence of neo-classical effects.

  15. Global well-posedness for the incompressible MHD equations with density-dependent viscosity and resistivity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Xin; Ye, Xia

    2016-10-01

    This paper concerns an initial-boundary value problem of the inhomogeneous incompressible MHD equations in a smooth bounded domain. The viscosity and resistivity coefficients are density-dependent. The global well-posedness of strong solutions is established, provided the initial norms of velocity and magnetic field are suitably small in some sense, or the lower bound of the transport coefficients are large enough. More importantly, there is not any smallness condition on the density and its gradient.

  16. The cone penetration test and 2D imaging resistivity as tools to simulate the distribution of hydrocarbons in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Corona, M.; García, J. A.; Taller, G.; Polgár, D.; Bustos, E.; Plank, Z.

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of geophysical electrical surveys is to determine the subsurface resistivity distribution by making measurements on the ground surface. From these measurements, the true resistivity of the subsurface can be estimated. The ground resistivity is related to various geological parameters, such as the mineral and fluid content, porosity and degree of water saturation in the rock. Electrical resistivity surveys have been used for many decades in hydrogeological, mining and geotechnical investigations. More recently, they have been used for environmental surveys. To obtain a more accurate subsurface model than is possible with a simple 1-D model, a more complex model must be used. In a 2-D model, the resistivity values are allowed to vary in one horizontal direction (usually referred to as the x direction) but are assumed to be constant in the other horizontal (the y) direction. A more realistic model would be a fully 3-D model where the resistivity values are allowed to change in all three directions. In this research, a simulation of the cone penetration test and 2D imaging resistivity are used as tools to simulate the distribution of hydrocarbons in soil.

  17. Resistive Tearing Instability in Electron-MHD: Application to Neutron Star Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    We study a resistive tearing instability developing in a system evolving through the combined effect of Hall drift in the Electron-MHD limit and Ohmic dissipation. We explore first the exponential growth of the instability in the linear case and we find the fastest growing mode, the corresponding eigenvalues and dispersion relation. The instability growth rate scales as γ∝B2/3σ-1/3 where B is the magnetic field and σ the electrical conductivity. We confirm the development of the tearing resistive instability in the fully non-linear case, in a plane parallel configuration where the magnetic field polarity reverses, through simulations of systems initiating in Hall equilibrium with some superimposed perturbation. Following a transient phase, during which there is some minor rearrangement of the magnetic field, the perturbation grows exponentially. Once the instability is fully developed the magnetic field forms the characteristic islands and X-type reconnection points, where Ohmic decay is enhanced. We discuss the implications of this instability for the local magnetic field evolution in neutron stars' crusts, proposing that it can contribute to heating near the surface of the star, as suggested by models of magnetar post-burst cooling. In particular, we find that a current sheet a few meters thick, covering as little as 1% of the total surface can provide 1042~erg in thermal energy within a few days. We briefly discuss applications of this instability in other systems where the Hall effect operates such as protoplanetary discs and space plasmas.

  18. Combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction and geotechnical investigations for Bukit Bunuh complex crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azwin, I. N.; Saad, Rosli; Saidin, Mokhtar; Nordiana, M. M.; Anderson Bery, Andy; Hidayah, I. N. E.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in studying impact crater on earth has increased tremendously due to its importance in geologic events, earth inhabitant history as well as economic value. The existences of few shock metamorphism and crater morphology evidences are discovered in Bukit Bunuh, Malaysia thus detailed studies are performed using geophysical and geotechnical methods to verify the type of the crater and characteristics accordingly. This paper presents the combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction, geotechnical SPT N value, moisture content and RQD within the study area. Three stages of data acquisition are made starting with regional study followed by detailed study on West side and East side. Bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity were digitized from 2-D resistivity and seismic sections at specific distance and depth for corresponding boreholes and samples taken. Generally, Bukit Bunuh shows the complex crater characteristics. Standard table of bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity against SPT N value, moisture content and RQD are produce according to geological classifications of impact crater; inside crater, rim/slumped terrace and outside crater.

  19. Acquisition of a single EZH2 D1 domain mutation confers acquired resistance to EZH2-targeted inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Theresa; Nerle, Sujata; Pritchard, Justin; Zhao, Boyang; Rivera, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Although targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment, overcoming acquired resistance remains a major clinical challenge. EZH2 inhibitors (EZH2i), EPZ-6438 and GSK126, are currently in the early stages of clinical evaluation and the first encouraging signs of efficacy have recently emerged in the clinic. To anticipate mechanisms of resistance to EZH2i, we used a forward genetic platform combining a mutagenesis screen with next generation sequencing technology and identified a hotspot of secondary mutations in the EZH2 D1 domain (Y111 and I109). Y111D mutation within the WT or A677G EZH2 allele conferred robust resistance to both EPZ-6438 and GSK126, but it only drove a partial resistance within the Y641F allele. EZH2 mutants required histone methyltransferase (HMT) catalytic activity and the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) components, SUZ12 and EED, to drive drug resistance. Furthermore, D1 domain mutations not only blocked the ability of EZH2i to bind to WT and A677G mutant, but also abrogated drug binding to the Y641F mutant. These data provide the first cellular validation of the mechanistic model underpinning the oncogenic function of WT and mutant EZH2. Importantly, our findings suggest that acquired-resistance to EZH2i may arise in WT and mutant EZH2 patients through a single mutation that remains targetable by second generation EZH2i. PMID:26360609

  20. Magnetic turbulence and resistive MHD instabilities in a 0. 6 < q < 3 poloidal divertor tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Agim, Y.Z.; Callen, J.D.; Chang, Z.; Dexter, R.N.; Goetz, J.A.; Graessle, D.E.; Haines, E.; Kortbawi, D.; LaPointe, M.A.; Moyer, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Detailed statistical properties of internal magnetic turbulence, and internal disruptions in magnetically- and materially-limited discharges, are studied in the Tokapole II poloidal divertor tokamak over the safety factor range 0.6 < q{sub a} < 3. A nonlinear MHD code treats tearing modes in the divertor geometry. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Tuning and simulating a 193-nm resist for 2D applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, William B.; Wiaux, Vincent; Ercken, Monique; Bui, Bang; Byers, Jeff D.; Pochkowski, Mike

    2002-07-01

    For some applications, the usefulness of lithography simulation results depends strongly on the matching between experimental conditions and the simulation input parameters. If this matching is optimized and other sources of error are minimized, then the lithography model can be used to explain printed wafer experimental results. Further, simulation can be useful in predicting the results or in choosing the correct set of experiments. In this paper, PROLITH and ProDATA AutoTune were used to systematically vary simulation input parameters to match measured results on printed wafers used in a 193 nm process. The validity of the simulation parameters was then checked using 3D simulation compared to 2D top-down SEM images. The quality of matching was evaluated using the 1D metrics of average gate CD and Line End Shortening (LES). To ensure the most accurate simulation, a new approach was taken to create a compound mask from GDSII contextual information surrounding an accurate SEM image of the reticle region of interest. Corrections were made to account for all metrology offsets.

  2. Detection of metallic and plastic landmines using the GPR and 2-D resistivity techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metwaly, M.

    2007-12-01

    Low and non-metallic landmines are one of the most difficult subsurface targets to be detected using several geophysical techniques. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) performance at different field sites shows great success in detecting metallic landmines. However significant limitations are taking place in the case of low and non-metallic landmines. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) technique is tested to be an alternative or confirmation technique for detecting the metallic and non-metallic landmines in suspicious cleared areas. The electrical resistivity responses using forward modeling for metallic and non-metallic landmines buried in dry and wet environments utilizing the common electrode configurations have been achieved. Roughly all the utilized electrode arrays can establish the buried metallic and plastic mines correctly in dry and wet soil. The accuracy differs from one array to the other based on the relative resistivity contrast to the host soil and the subsurface distribution of current and potential lines as well as the amplitude of the noises in the data. The ERI technique proved to be fast and effective tool for detecting the non-metallic mines especially in the conductive environment whereas the performances of the other metal detector (MD) and GPR techniques show great limitation.

  3. Phosphoproteomic analysis of wild-type and antimony-resistant Leishmania braziliensis lines by 2D-DIGE technology.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Douglas de Souza; Pescher, Pascale; Laurent, Christine; Lenormand, Pascal; Späth, Gerald F; Murta, Silvane M F

    2015-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most studied post-translational modifications that is involved in different cellular events in Leishmania. In this study, we performed a comparative phosphoproteomics analysis of potassium antimonyl tartrate (SbIII)-resistant and -susceptible lines of Leishmania braziliensis using a 2D-DIGE approach followed by MS. In order to investigate the differential phosphoprotein abundance associated with the drug-induced stress response and SbIII-resistance mechanisms, we compared nontreated and SbIII-treated samples of each line. Pair wise comparisons revealed a total of 116 spots that showed a statistically significant difference in phosphoprotein abundance, including 11 and 34 spots specifically correlated with drug treatment and resistance, respectively. We identified 48 different proteins distributed into seven biological process categories. The category "protein folding/chaperones and stress response" is mainly implicated in response to SbIII treatment, while the categories "antioxidant/detoxification," "metabolic process," "RNA/DNA processing," and "protein biosynthesis" are modulated in the case of antimony resistance. Multiple sequence alignments were performed to validate the conservation of phosphorylated residues in nine proteins identified here. Western blot assays were carried out to validate the quantitative phosphoproteome analysis. The results revealed differential expression level of three phosphoproteins in the lines analyzed. This novel study allowed us to profile the L. braziliensis phosphoproteome, identifying several potential candidates for biochemical or signaling networks associated with antimony resistance phenotype in this parasite.

  4. Optimized arrays for 2-D resistivity survey lines with a large number of electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loke, M. H.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J. E.; Uhlemann, S. S.; Sorensen, J. P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies show that optimized arrays generated using the 'Compare R' method have significantly better resolution than conventional arrays. This method determines the optimum set of arrays by selecting those that give the maximum model resolution. The number of possible arrays (the comprehensive data set) increases with the fourth power of the number of electrodes. The optimization method faces practical limitations for 2-D survey lines with more than 60 electrodes where the number of possible arrays exceeds a million. Several techniques are proposed to reduce the calculation time for such survey lines. A single-precision version of the 'Compare R' algorithm using a new ranking function reduces the calculation time by two to eight times while providing results similar to the double-precision version. Recent improvements in computer GPU technology can reduce the calculation time by about seven times. The calculation time is reduced by half by using the fact that arrays that are symmetrical about the center of the line produce identical changes in the model resolution values. It is further reduced by more than thirty times by calculating the Sherman-Morrison update for all the possible two-electrode combinations, which are then used to calculate the model resolution values for the four-electrode arrays. The calculation time is reduced by more then ten times by using a subset of the comprehensive data set consisting of only symmetrical arrays. Tests with a synthetic model and field data set show that optimized arrays derived from this subset produce inversion models with differences of less than 10% from those derived using the full comprehensive data set. The optimized data sets produced models that are more accurate than the Wenner-Schlumberger array data sets in all the tests.

  5. A 2D vector map watermarking algorithm resistant to simplication attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuanjian; Liang, Bin; Zhao, Qingzhan; Qiu, Zuqi; Peng, Yuwei; Yu, Liang

    2009-12-01

    Vector maps are valuable asset of data producers. How to protect copyright of vector maps effectively using digital watermarking is a hot research issue. In this paper, we propose a new robust and blind watermarking algorithm resilient to simplification attack. We proof that spatial topological relation between map objects bears an important property of approximate simplification invariance. We choose spatial topological relations as watermark feature domain and embed watermarks by slightly modifying spatial topological relation between map objects. Experiment shows that our algorithm has good performance to resist simplification attack and tradeoff of the robustness and data fidelity is acquired.

  6. 2D Time-lapse Resistivity Monitoring of an Organic Produced Gas Plume in a Landfill using ERT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, N. D.; Mendonça, C. A.; Doherty, R.

    2014-12-01

    This project has the objective to study a landfill located on the margins of Tietê River, in São Paulo, Brazil, using the electroresistivity tomography method (ERT). Due to huge organic matter concentrations in the São Paulo Basin quaternary sediments, there is subsurface depth related biogas accumulation (CH4 and CO2), induced by anaerobic degradation of the organic matter. 2D resistivity sections were obtained from a test area since March 2012, a total of 7 databases, being the last one dated from October 2013. The studied line has the length of 56m, the electrode interval is of 2m. In addition, there are two boreholes along the line (one with 3 electrodes and the other one with 2) in order to improve data quality and precision. The boreholes also have a multi-level sampling system that indicates the fluid (gas or water) presence in relation to depth. With our results it was possible to map the gas plume position and its area of extension in the sections as it is a positive resistivity anomaly, with the gas level having approximately 5m depth. With the time-lapse analysis (Matlab script) between the obtained 2D resistivity sections from the site, it was possible to map how the biogas volume and position change in the landfill in relation to time. Our preliminary results show a preferential gas pathway through the subsurface studied area. A consistent relation between the gas depth and obtained microbiological data from archea and bacteria population was also observed.

  7. 2D cross-borehole resistivity tomographies below foundations as a tool to design proper remedial actions in covered karst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deceuster, J.; Delgranche, J.; Kaufmann, O.

    2006-09-01

    To assess the subsurface conditions beneath a 4-floor public building, where sinkhole collapses had already occurred, twenty-three 2D cross-borehole resistivity tomographies were conducted beneath the building foundations in January and February 2004. The aim of these geophysical investigations was to build a model of the complex subsurface geometry in order to estimate and minimize costs of remediation works. In cross-borehole resistivity tomography standard electrode configurations do not exist yet. Thus, preliminary field tests were performed to determine a suitable combination of arrays and to estimate the stability of these measurements on the site. A combination of cross-borehole arrays and single-hole arrays was then selected. The measures were conducted on each panel using this combination of arrays. Over 2500 apparent resistivities were measured on each panel. The inversion problem was solved within the Res2DInv® software. On tomographies weathered zones were clearly identified as low resistivity zones (< 50 Ωm). The strong contrast in resistivities compared to solid limestone ( ρ > 200 Ω m) led to establish a 3D model of the ground conditions. This model showed large variations in buried rockhead depths from 6 to more than 24 m. Four zones of different ranges of depth-to-bedrock were identified inside, which three vertically elongated weathered zones were also delineated. Based on these results, a remediation plan which consisted in underpinning the foundations with about 250 micropiles was designed. The feedback of the remedial works showed that tomographies gave a very accurate overview of the buried rockhead depths (with a precision of about 1 m).

  8. Chronicle of Bukit Bunuh for possible complex impact crater by 2-D resistivity imaging (2-DERI) with geotechnical borehole records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinmin, M.; Saad, R.; Saidin, M.; Ismail, N. A.

    2015-03-01

    A 2-D resistivity imaging (2-DERI) study was conducted at Bukit Bunuh, Lenggong, Perak. Archaeological Global Research Centre, Universiti Sains Malaysia shows the field evidence of shock metamorphisms (suevite breccia) and crater morphology at Bukit Bunuh. A regional 2-DERI study focusing at Bukit Bunuh to identify the features of subsurface and detail study was then executed to verify boundary of the crater with the rebound effects at Bukit Bunuh which covered approximately 132.25 km2. 2-DERI survey used resistivity equipment by ABEM SAS4000 Terrameter and ES10-64C electrode slector with pole-dipole array. The survey lines were carried out using `roll-along' technique. The data were processed and analysed using RES2DINV, Excel and Surfer software to obtain resistivity results for qualitative interpretations. Bedrock depths were digitized from section by sections obtained. 2-DERI results gives both regional and detail study shows that the study area was divided into two main zones, overburden consists of alluvium mix with boulders embedded with resistivity value of 10-800 Ωm and granitic bedrock with resistivity value of >1500 Ωm and depth 5-50 m. The low level bedrock was circulated by high level bedrock (crater rim) was formed at the same area with few spots of high level bedrock which appeared at the centre of the rim which suspected as rebound zones (R). Assimilations of 2-DERI with boreholes are successful give valid and reliable results. The results of the study indicates geophysical method are capable to retrieve evidence of meteorite impact subsurface of the studied area.

  9. Observations of resistive MHD activity in CDX-U spherical torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Stutman, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Finkenthal, M.; Regan, S. P.; Moos, H. W.; Cdx-U Group

    1997-11-01

    A comprehensive diagnostics set for MHD activity and impurity transport studies is implemented on CDX-U. The MHD activity in the core is characterized by a persistent m=1/n=1 rotating mode, while the outer plasma activity is dominated by an m=2/n=1 mode. To unfold the geometric characteristics of the m=1 island we fit the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a computer generated image to that of the experimental image. The results show significant asymmetries in island emissivity and magnetic fluctuations. Another ubiquitous phenomenon in CDX-U plasmas is the internal magnetic reconnection (IRE). The USXR data suggests that this is caused by the growth and overlap of the m=1 and m=2 modes. Interestingly, despite significant cooling of the core, the q =1 surface seems to survive through the reconnection but shrinks in radius, consistent with a current profile flattening. At the same time, the edge q increases, consistent with the relative immunity to disruptions of spherical tori. Following hints of Ti increases after IRE's (START, UK), we have begun investigating the reconnection as a possible magnetic heating mechanism, a topic of major astrophysical interest.

  10. 3D MHD Simulations of Tokamak Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James

    2014-10-01

    Two disruption scenarios are modeled numerically by use of the CORSICA 2D equilibrium and NIMROD 3D MHD codes. The work follows the simulations of pressure-driven modes in DIII-D and VDEs in ITER. The aim of the work is to provide starting points for simulation of tokamak disruption mitigation techniques currently in the CDR phase for ITER. Pressure-driven instability growth rates previously observed in simulations of DIIID are verified; Halo and Hiro currents produced during vertical displacements are observed in simulations of ITER with implementation of resistive walls in NIMROD. We discuss plans to exercise new code capabilities and validation.

  11. Time-lapse 2D electrical resistivity tomographies for investigating the Picerno landslide (Basilicata Region, southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luongo, Raffaele; de Bari, Claudia; Calamita, Giuseppe; Loperte, Antonio; Perrone, Angela; Satriani, Antonio; Votta, Mario; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    The rainwater infiltration into the soil and the increase of pore water pressure in the vadose zone can be considered the main causes of shallow landslides triggering. The standard techniques used to measure the water content of the soil and the piezometric levels in areas of potential instability are the TDR method and the piezometric measurements, respectively. These techniques, while allowing to obtain direct information of the considered parameter, provide a punctual information about the specific hydrological characteristics of the investigated soil. Recently, the literature reports many examples of applications of indirect methods for the study and the estimate of water content in the first layers of the subsoil. In particular, the 2D electrical resistivity tomography has been applied for obtaining information about the temporal and spatial patterns of water infiltration processes. This paper reports the results obtained in the area affected by the Picerno landslide (Basilicata Region, Southern Italy), which represents one of the test sites of Morfeo project (Monitoraggio e Rischio da Frana mediante dati EO) funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The studied slope has been frequently involved in reactivation phenomena the most recent of which occurred on March 2006. In the area, we have installed a prototype system for time-dependent analysis of electrical resistivity images and TDR measurements. The geophysical results are opportunely integrated with the piezometric data. The system is composed of a 48-channel cable connected to the georesistivimeter Syscal Pro Switch 48, the electrodes are placed at a distance of 1 m. Two holes used to measure the piezometric level and another four equipped with TDR probes are located along the acquisition profile. The electrical resistivity tomographies and the water content measurements are performed with time intervals selected by considering the rainfall intensity and frequency. The first preliminary result of this

  12. Proceedings of the workshop on nonlinear MHD and extended MHD

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Nonlinear MHD simulations have proven their value in interpreting experimental results over the years. As magnetic fusion experiments reach higher performance regimes, more sophisticated experimental diagnostics coupled with ever expanding computer capabilities have increased both the need for and the feasibility of nonlinear global simulations using models more realistic than regular ideal and resistive MHD. Such extended-MHD nonlinear simulations have already begun to produce useful results. These studies are expected to lead to ever more comprehensive simulation models in the future and to play a vital role in fully understanding fusion plasmas. Topics include the following: (1) current state of nonlinear MHD and extended-MHD simulations; (2) comparisons to experimental data; (3) discussions between experimentalists and theorists; (4) /equations for extended-MHD models, kinetic-based closures; and (5) paths toward more comprehensive simulation models, etc. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  14. STAT3 contributes to NK cell recognition by modulating expression of NKG2D ligands in adriamycin-resistant K562/AO2 cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaohui; Lu, Xuzhang; Jia, Zhuxia; Zhang, Xiuwen; Han, Wenmin; Rong, Xiao; Ma, Lingdi; Zhou, Min; Chen, Baoan

    2015-11-01

    Leukemic cells can survive after chemotherapy by acquisition of multidrug resistance genes, but other phenotypes related to escape from immune recognition remain elusive. Adriamycin-resistant K562/AO2 cells are less susceptible to elimination by NK cells compared with wild type K562 cells due to lower expression of NKG2D ligands. Treatment of K562/AO2 cells with STAT3 inhibitor VII resulted in reduced expression of multidrug resistance gene P-glycoprotein, and up-regulation of NKG2D ligands on K562/AO2 cells. Meanwhile, K562/AO2 cells treated with STAT3 inhibitor proliferated less and were more susceptible to killing by NK cells than untreated K562/AO2 cells. The enhanced cytotoxicity of NK cells against K562/AO2 cells was partly blocked by treatment of NK cells with anti-NKG2D antibodies. These data suggest that STAT3 contributes to NK cell recognition by modulating NKG2D ligands in K562/AO2 cells, which may a mechanism by which cells survive and cause relapse of leukemia.

  15. Generalized reduced MHD equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.; Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.

    1998-07-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general toroidal configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson.

  16. Resistance to Cytarabine Induces the Up-regulation of NKG2D Ligands and Enhances Natural Killer Cell Lysis of Leukemic Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Ogbomo, Henry; Michaelis, Martin; Klassert, Denise; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged treatment of leukemic cells with chemotherapeutic agents frequently results in development of drug resistance. Moreover, selection of drug-resistant cell populations may be associated with changes in malignant properties such as proliferation rate, invasiveness, and immunogenicity. In the present study, the sensitivity of cytarabine (1-β-d-arabinofuranosylcytosine, araC)-resistant and parental human leukemic cell lines (T-lymphoid H9 and acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia Molt-4) to natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing was investigated. The results obtained demonstrate that araC-resistant H9 and Molt-4 (H9rARAC100 and Molt-4rARAC100) cell lines are more sensitive to NK cell-mediated lysis than their respective parental cell lines. This increased sensitivity was associated with a higher surface expression of ligands for the NK cell-activating receptor NKG2D, notably UL16 binding protein-2 (ULBP-2) and ULBP-3 in H9rARAC100 and Molt-4rARAC100 cell lines. Blocking ULBP-2 and ULBP-3 or NKG2D with monoclonal antibody completely abrogated NK cell lysis. Constitutive phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but not pAKT was higher in araC-resistant cells than in parental cell lines. Inhibition of ERK using ERK inhibitor PD98059 decreased both ULBP-2/ULBP-3 expression and NK cell cytotoxicity. Furthermore, overexpression of constitutively active ERK in H9 parental cells resulted in increased ULBP-2/ULBP-3 expression and enhanced NK cell lysis. These results demonstrate that increased sensitivity of araC-resistant leukemic cells to NK cell lysis is caused by higher NKG2D ligand expression, resulting from more active ERK signaling pathway. PMID:19048119

  17. Investigation of island formation due to RMPs in DIII-D plasmas with the SIESTA resistive MHD equilibrium code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshman, S. P.; Shafer, M. W.; Seal, S. K.; Canik, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    > The SIESTA magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium code has been used to compute a sequence of ideally stable equilibria resulting from numerical variation of the helical resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) applied to an axisymmetric DIII-D plasma equilibrium. Increasing the perturbation strength at the dominant , resonant surface leads to lower MHD energies and increases in the equilibrium island widths at the (and sidebands) surfaces, in agreement with theoretical expectations. Island overlap at large perturbation strengths leads to stochastic magnetic fields which correlate well with the experimentally inferred field structure. The magnitude and spatial phase (around the dominant rational surfaces) of the resonant (shielding) component of the parallel current are shown to change qualitatively with the magnetic island topology.

  18. Investigation of island formation due to RMPs in DIII-D plasmas with the SIESTA resistive MHD equilibrium code

    DOE PAGES

    Hirshman, S. P.; Shafer, M. W.; Seal, S. K.; Canik, J. M.

    2016-03-03

    The SIESTA magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium code has been used to compute a sequence of ideally stable equilibria resulting from numerical variation of the helical resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) applied to an axisymmetric DIII-D plasma equilibrium. Increasing the perturbation strength at the dominant $m=2$,$n=-1$ resonant surface leads to lower MHD energies and increases in the equilibrium island widths at the $m=2$ (and sidebands) surfaces, in agreement with theoretical expectations. Island overlap at large perturbation strengths leads to stochastic magnetic fields which correlate well with the experimentally inferred field structure. The magnitude and spatial phase (around the dominant rational surfaces) of themore » resonant (shielding) component of the parallel current are shown to change qualitatively with the magnetic island topology.« less

  19. 2D Spinodal Decomposition in Forced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, Patrick; Chacon, Luis; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a second order phase transition for binary fluid mixture, from one thermodynamic phase to form two coexisting phases. The governing equation for this coarsening process below critical temperature, Cahn-Hilliard Equation, is very similar to 2D MHD Equation, especially the conserved quantities have a close correspondence between each other, so theories for MHD turbulence are used to study spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence. Domain size is increased with time along with the inverse cascade, and the length scale can be arrested by a forced turbulence with direct cascade. The two competing mechanisms lead to a stabilized domain size length scale, which can be characterized by Hinze Scale. The 2D spinodal decomposition in forced turbulence is studied by both theory and simulation with ``pixie2d.'' This work focuses on the relation between Hinze scale and spectra and cascades. Similarities and differences between spinodal decomposition and MHD are investigated. Also some transport properties are studied following MHD theories. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  20. Investigating Hydrogeologic Controls on Sandhill Wetlands in Covered Karst with 2D Resistivity and Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, C. M.; Nowicki, R. S.; Rains, M. C.; Kruse, S.

    2015-12-01

    In west-central Florida, wetland and lake distribution is strongly controlled by karst landforms. Sandhill wetlands and lakes are sand-filled upland basins whose water levels are groundwater driven. Lake dimensions only reach wetland edges during extreme precipitation events. Current wetland classification schemes are inappropriate for identifying sandhill wetlands due to their unique hydrologic regime and ecologic expression. As a result, it is difficult to determine whether or not a wetland is impacted by groundwater pumping, development, and climate change. A better understanding of subsurface structures and how they control the hydrologic regime is necessary for development of an identification and monitoring protocol. Long-term studies record vegetation diversity and distribution, shallow ground water levels and surface water levels. The overall goals are to determine the hydrologic controls (groundwater, seepage, surface water inputs). Most recently a series of geophysical surveys was conducted at select sites in Hernando and Pasco County, Florida. Electrical resistivity and ground penetrating radar were employed to image sand-filled basins and the top of the limestone bedrock and stratigraphy of wetland slopes, respectively. The deepest extent of these sand-filled basins is generally reflected in topography as shallow depressions. Resistivity along inundated wetlands suggests the pools are surface expressions of the surficial aquifer. However, possible breaches in confining clay layers beneath topographic highs between depressions are seen in resistivity profiles as conductive anomalies and in GPR as interruptions in otherwise continuous horizons. These data occur at sites where unconfined and confined water levels are in agreement, suggesting communication between shallow and deep groundwater. Wetland plants are observed outside the historic wetland boundary at many sites, GPR profiles show near-surface layers dipping towards the wetlands at a shallower

  1. 3D MHD VDE and disruptions simulations of tokamaks plasmas including some ITER scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, R.; Strauss, H. R.; Breslau, J.

    2009-03-01

    Tokamaks vertical displacement events (VDEs) and disruptions simulations in toroidal geometry by means of a single fluid visco-resistive magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) model are presented in this paper. The plasma model is completed with the presence of a 2D wall with finite resistivity which allows the study of the relatively slowly growing magnetic perturbation, the resistive wall mode (RWM), which is, in this paper, the main drive of the disruption evolution. Amplitudes and asymmetries of the halo currents pattern at the wall are also calculated and comparisons with tokamak experimental databases and predictions for ITER are given.

  2. Combined 2-D Electrical Resistivity and Self Potential Survey to Investigate the Pattern of the Watukosek Fault System Around the Lusi Eruption Site, Indonesia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, A.; Husein, A.; Mauri, G.; Lupi, M.; Hadi, S.; Kemna, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Lusi mud eruption is located in the Sidoarjo area, Indonesia and is continuously erupting hot mud since its birth in May 2006. A comprehensive combined electrical resistivity and self-potential (SP) survey was performed in the 7 km2 area inside the Lusi embankment that had been built to contain the erupted mud and to prevent flooding of the surrounding roads and settlements. The goal of the geophysical survey is to map the near-surface occurrence of the Watukosek fault system, upon which LUSI resides, delineate its spatial pattern and monitor its development. We completed six lines of measurements combining resistivity measurement using Wenner configuration and SP measurements using roll-along technique. Three subparallel lines were located either to the north and to the south of the main crater. Each line was approximately W-E oriented extending for ~1.26 km. The surveyed regions consist of dried mud breccia (containing clayey-silty-sandy admixture with clast up to ~ 10 cm in size). The thickness of the dry walkable mud is approximately 2-3 m and the deeper layer consist of water saturated mud that could be vulnerable to a liquefaction scenario in case of significant seismic activity in the region. The resistivity data were inverted into 2-D resistivity images with a maximum exploration depth of almost 200 m. The resistivity images consistently reveal a region of about 300 m in width (between 30-90 m depth) characterized by anomalous resistivities, which are lower than the value observed in the surounding area. The position of these anomalies is also supported by the SP data, which suggests that their origin is related to fluid flow path in the subsurface. Thus the combined resistivity and SP results allow inference of an improved model of the Watukosek fault system.

  3. Application of 2-D geoelectrical resistivity tomography for mountain permafrost detection in sporadic permafrost environments: Experiences from Eastern Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Mountain permafrost covers some 2000 km² of the Austrian Alps which is less than 2.5% of the national territory. Delineating the altitudinal lower limit of permafrost in the mountains of Austria is difficult due the complex topography, the rather sparseness of field verification data and the lack of long-term permafrost monitoring data. Such monitoring data should cover different slope aspects, different elevations, different substrates and different mountain regions of Austria. In this study it was attempted to delineate the lower limit of permafrost at two study sites in the Tauern Range, Austria, applying two-dimensional geoelectrical resistivity tomography (ERT). In addition, multi-annual ground temperature data collected by miniature temperature datalogger (MDT) were used to validate the results. At the study site Hochreichart (maximum elevation 2416 m asl), located in the Seckauer Tauern Range, 14 ERT profiles (lengths 48-196 m; electrode spacing 2, 2.5 or 4 m) were measured at elevations between 1805 and 2416 m asl. Measurements were carried out at two cirques (Reichart, Schöneben) and at the summit plateau of Hochreichart. Results at this site indicate that permafrost lenses are detectable at elevations down to c.1900 m asl at radiation-sheltered sites. Furthermore, at the summit plateau permafrost only occurs as rather small lenses. The ERT-based permafrost pattern is generally confirmed by the MTD data with negative mean annual ground temperature values at only a few monitoring sites. However, the possibility of air-filled cavities causing higher resistive zones faking permafrost existence cannot be excluded because coarse-grained sediments (i.e. relict rock glaciers and autochthonous block fields) are widespread at this study site. At the second study site Kögele Cirque (maximum elevation 3030 m asl) located in the Schober Mountains 12 ERT profiles (lengths 48 m; electrode spacing 2 m) were measured at elevations between 2631 and 2740 m asl. Spatially

  4. The Feasibility of Using High Resolution 2D Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) for characterize the possible hydraulic boundaries along the western foothill of Bagua-Douliu Hills, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.; Chang, P.; Wu, Y.; Chen, J.; Huang, C.; Wang, Y.; Chen, W.

    2011-12-01

    In the study we try to characteristize the hydraulic boundary that separates the Pleistocene Toukeshan Formation from the Holocene sediments with Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) method near the Bizetou Pass of the Choushui River. Comparing 2D Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) with water level logs and core data from observation wells, we attempted to map the distribution of the shallow groundwater surfaces and the composition variations of the shallow unconfined aquifer from upper to lower fan across the Bizetou Pass. We found that the shallow groundwater surface drops sudenly from about 110m to 70 m after passing the Bizetou Pass from observation wells at the east and west side of the Pass and with about 3 km apart. The inverted resistivity images also show that the hydraulic gradient estimated from the resistivity images is getting larger to about 7% near the Bizetou Pass and then becoming less than 3% in the west the Pass. In addition, we found a significant change from about 1500 ohm-m to 500 ohm-m in the unconfined aquifer after passing the Bizetou Pass from the upstream side. The high resistivity value (about 1500 ohm-m) in the east of Bizetou Pass may represent the compacted Pleistocene Tokeshan sand and gravel layers, and the relatively low resistivity value (about 500 ohm-m) in the west of Bizetou Pass was the loose Holocene alluvium sediments. Since the previous study shows that the Changhua fault is not outcropped at the ground surface, our findings imply that the hydraulic boundary may be due to the less permeable Toukoshan Formation. To confirm this, the future work will extend the study area in North-South direction between Changhua County and Yunlin County.

  5. Resistive reduced MHD modeling of multi-edge-localized-mode cycles in Tokamak X-point plasmas.

    PubMed

    Orain, F; Bécoulet, M; Huijsmans, G T A; Dif-Pradalier, G; Hoelzl, M; Morales, J; Garbet, X; Nardon, E; Pamela, S; Passeron, C; Latu, G; Fil, A; Cahyna, P

    2015-01-23

    The full dynamics of a multi-edge-localized-mode (ELM) cycle is modeled for the first time in realistic tokamak X-point geometry with the nonlinear reduced MHD code jorek. The diamagnetic rotation is found to be instrumental to stabilize the plasma after an ELM crash and to model the cyclic reconstruction and collapse of the plasma pressure profile. ELM relaxations are cyclically initiated each time the pedestal gradient crosses a triggering threshold. Diamagnetic drifts are also found to yield a near-symmetric ELM power deposition on the inner and outer divertor target plates, consistent with experimental measurements.

  6. 3D MHD disruptions simulations of tokamaks plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, Roberto; Strauss, Hank; Breslau, Joshua

    2008-11-01

    Tokamaks Vertical Displacement Events (VDEs) and disruptions simulations in toroidal geometry by means of a single fluid visco-resistive magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) model are presented in this paper. The plasma model, implemented in the M3D code [1], is completed with the presence of a 2D homogeneous wall with finite resistivity. This allows the study of the relatively slowly growing magneto-hydro-dynamical perturbation, the resistive wall mode (RWM), which is, in this work, the main drive of the disruptions. Amplitudes and asymmetries of the halo currents pattern at the wall are also calculated and comparisons with tokamak experimental databases and predictions for ITER are given. [1] W. Park, E.V. Belova, G.Y. Fu, X.Z. Tang, H.R. Strauss, L.E. Sugiyama, Phys. Plasmas 6 (1999) 1796.

  7. MHD turbulent processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, David

    1988-01-01

    Three areas of study in MHD turbulence are considered. These are the turbulent relaxation of the toroidal Z pinch, density fluctuations in MHD fluids, and MHD cellular automata. A Boolean computer game that updates a cellular representation in parallel and that has macroscopic averages converging to solutions of the two-dimensional MHD equations is discussed.

  8. A Preliminary Appraisal of the Effect of Pumping on Seawater Intrusion and Upconing in a Small Tropical Island Using 2D Resistivity Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Mohammad Firuz; Ibrahim, Shaharin; Sulaiman, Wan Nor Azmin; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2014-01-01

    The existing knowledge regarding seawater intrusion and particularly upconing, in which both problems are linked to pumping, entirely relies on theoretical assumptions. Therefore, in this paper, an attempt is made to capture the effects of pumping on seawater intrusion and upconing using 2D resistivity measurement. For this work, two positions, one perpendicular and the other parallel to the sea, were chosen as profile line for resistivity measurement in the coastal area near the pumping wells of Kapas Island, Malaysia. Subsequently, water was pumped out of two pumping wells simultaneously for about five straight hours. Then, immediately after the pumping stopped, resistivity measurements were taken along the two stationed profile lines. This was followed by additional measurements after four and eight hours. The results showed an upconing with low resistivity of about 1–10 Ωm just beneath the pumping well along the first profile line that was taken just after the pumping stopped. The resistivity image also shows an intrusion of saline water (water enriched with diluted salt) from the sea coming towards the pumping well with resistivity values ranging between 10 and 25 Ωm. The subsequent measurements show the recovery of freshwater in the aquifer and how the saline water is gradually diluted or pushed out of the aquifer. Similarly the line parallel to the sea (L2) reveals almost the same result as the first line. However, in the second and third measurements, there were some significant variations which were contrary to the expectation that the freshwater may completely flush out the saline water from the aquifer. These two time series lines show that as the areas with the lowest resistivity (1 Ωm) shrink with time, the low resistivity (10 Ωm) tends to take over almost the entire area implying that the freshwater-saltwater equilibrium zone has already been altered. These results have clearly enhanced our current understanding and add more scientific

  9. FLIP MHD - A particle-in-cell method for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, J. U.

    1991-01-01

    The fluid-implicit-particle, or 'FLIP' method presently extended to 2D and 3D MHD flow incorporates a Lagrangian field representation and yields a grid magnetic Reynolds number of up to 16 while preserving contact continuities that retain the Galilean invariance of the MHD flow equations. Analytical arguments and numerical examples demonstrate the conservation of mass, momentum, magnetic flux, and energy; 2D calculation results for the illustrative cases of contact discontinuity convection, Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flow.

  10. Modeling of fast neutral-beam-generated ion effects on MHD-spectroscopic observations of resistive wall mode stability in DIII-D plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, F. Hanson, J. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-02-15

    Experiments conducted at DIII-D investigate the role of drift kinetic damping and fast neutral beam injection (NBI)-ions in the approach to the no-wall β{sub N} limit. Modelling results show that the drift kinetic effects are significant and necessary to reproduce the measured plasma response at the ideal no-wall limit. Fast neutral-beam ions and rotation play important roles and are crucial to quantitatively match the experiment. In this paper, we report on the model validation of a series of plasmas with increasing β{sub N}, where the plasma stability is probed by active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) spectroscopy. The response of the plasma to an externally applied field is used to probe the stable side of the resistive wall mode and obtain an indication of the proximity of the equilibrium to an instability limit. We describe the comparison between the measured plasma response and that calculated by means of the drift kinetic MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], which includes the toroidal rotation, the electron and ion drift-kinetic resonances, and the presence of fast particles for the modelled plasmas. The inclusion of kinetic effects allows the code to reproduce the experimental results within ∼13% for both the amplitude and phase of the plasma response, which is a significant improvement with respect to the undamped MHD-only model. The presence of fast NBI-generated ions is necessary to obtain the low response at the highest β{sub N} levels (∼90% of the ideal no-wall limit). The toroidal rotation has an impact on the results, and a sensitivity study shows that a large variation in the predicted response is caused by the details of the rotation profiles at high β{sub N}.

  11. Effects of vitamin D supplementation and circuit training on indices of obesity and insulin resistance in T2D and vitamin D deficient elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung-Jun; Kang, Chang-Kyun; Park, Hyon; Lee, Man-Gyoon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of vitamin D supplementation and circuit training on body composition, abdominal fat, blood lipids, and insulin resistance in T2D and vitamin D deficient elderly women. [Methods] Fifty-two elderly women were randomly assigned to either the vitamin D supplementation with circuit training group (D+T: n = 15), the circuit training group (T: n = 13), the vitamin D supplementation group (D: n = 11), or the control group (CON: n = 13). The subjects in D took vitamin D supplements at 1,200 IU per day for 12 weeks; the subjects in T exercised 3 to 4 times per week, 25 to 40 minutes per session for 12 weeks; and the subjects in D+T participated in both treatments. Subjects in CON were asked to maintain normal daily life pattern for the duration of the study. Body composition, abdominal fat, blood lipids, and surrogate indices for insulin resistance were measured at pre- and post-test and the data were compared among the four groups and between two tests by utilizing two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. The main results of the present study were as follows: [Results] 1) Body weight, fat mass, percent body fat, and BMI decreased significantly in T, whereas there were no significant changes in the variables in D and CON. Lean body mass showed no significant changes in all groups. 2) TFA and SFA decreased significantly in T, whereas there were no significant changes in the variables in D and CON. The other abdominal fat related variables showed no significant changes in all groups. 3) TC, TG, HDL-C, and LDL-C showed improvements in T, whereas there were no significant changes in the variables in D and CON. 4) Fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR tended to be lower in D+T. [Conclusion] It was concluded that the 12 weeks of vitamin D supplementation and circuit training would have positive effects on abdominal fat and blood lipid profiles in T2D and vitamin D deficient elderly women. Vitamin D

  12. MHD Power Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Arthur; Rosa, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the operation of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator and advantages of the system over coal, oil or nuclear powered generators. Details the development of MHD generators in the United States and Soviet Union. (CP)

  13. A 2D model to design MHD induction pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, R.; Zeininger, J.

    2006-09-01

    Technical liquid metal systems accompanied by a thermal transfer of energy such as reactor systems, metallurgical processes, metal refinement, casting, etc., require a forced convection of the fluid. The increased temperatures and more often the environmental conditions as, e.g., in a nuclear environment, pumping principles are required, in which rotating parts are absent. Additionally, in many applications a controlled atmosphere is indispensable, in order to ensure the structural integrity of the duct walls. An interesting option to overcome the sealing problem of a mechanical pump towards the surrounding is offered by induction systems. Although their efficiency compared to that of turbo machines is quite low, they have several advantages, which are attractive to the specific requirements in liquid metal applications such as: - low maintenance costs due to the absence of sealings, bearings and moving parts; - low degradation rate of the structural material; - simple replacement of the inductor without cut of the piping system; - fine regulation of flow rate by different inductor connections; - change of pump characteristics without change of the mechanical set-up. Within the article, general design requirements of electromagnetic pumps (EMP) are elaborated. The design of two annular linear induction pumps operating with sodium and lead-bismuth are presented and the calculated pump characteristics and experimentally obtained data are compared. In this context, physical effects leading to deviations between the model and the real data are addressed. Finally, the main results are summarized. Tables 4, Figs 4, Refs 12.

  14. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  15. A Group of Novel Serum Diagnostic Biomarkers for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis by iTRAQ-2D LC-MS/MS and Solexa Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Liu, Chang-Ming; Wei, Li-Liang; Shi, Li-Ying; Pan, Zhi-Fen; Mao, Lian-Gen; Wan, Xiao-Chen; Ping, Ze-Peng; Jiang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Zhong-Liang; Li, Zhong-Jie; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), especially multidrug-resistance tuberculosis (MDR-TB) presented a major challenge for TB treatment today. We performed iTRAQ labeling coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D LC-MS/MS) and Solexa sequencing among MDR-TB patients, drug-sensitive tuberculosis (DS-TB) patients, and healthy controls. A total of 50 differentially expressed proteins and 43 differentially expressed miRNAs (fold change >1.50 or <0.60, P<0.05) were identified in the MDR-TB patients compared to both DS-TB patients and healthy controls. We found that 22.00% of differentially expressed proteins and 32.56% of differentially expressed miRNAs were related, and could construct a network mainly in complement and coagulation cascades. Significant differences in CD44 antigen (CD44), coagulation factor XI (F11), kininogen-1 (KNG1), miR-4433b-5p, miR-424-5p, and miR-199b-5p were found among MDR-TB patients, DS-TB patients and healthy controls (P<0.05) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and SYBR green qRT-PCR validation. A strong negative correlation, consistent with the target gene prediction, was found between miR-199b-5p and KNG1 (r=-0.232, P=0.017). Moreover, we established the MDR-TB diagnostic model based on five biomarkers (CD44, KNG1, miR-4433b-5p, miR-424-5p, and miR-199b-5p). Our study proposes potential biomarkers for MDR-TB diagnosis, and also provides a new experimental basis to understand the pathogenesis of MDR-TB. PMID:26884721

  16. Imaging high stage river-water intrusion into a contaminated aquifer along a major river corridor using 2-D time-lapse surface electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, E. L.; Johnson, T. C.; Greenwood, W. J.; Zachara, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    The Hanford 300 Area is located adjacent to the Columbia River in south-central Washington State, USA, and was a former site for nuclear fuel processing operations. Waste disposal practices resulted in persistent unsaturated zone and groundwater contamination, the primary contaminant of concern being uranium. Uranium behavior at the site is intimately linked with river stage driven groundwater-river water exchange such that understanding the nature of river water intrusion into the 300 Area is critical for predicting uranium desorption and transport. In this paper, we use 2-D surface-based time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to image the inland intrusion of river water during high stage conditions. We inverted approximately 1200 data sets (400 per line over three lines) using high performance computing resources to produce a time-lapse sequence of changes in bulk conductivity caused by river water intrusion during the 2011 spring runoff cycle over approximately 125 days. To invert the data, we use an image differencing approach that does not require regularization in the time dimension, enabling the inversion to accommodate the sharp, time varying contrasts in conductivity imposed by the moving water table. The resulting time series for each mesh element was then analyzed using common time series analysis to reveal the timing and location of river water intrusion beneath each line. The results reveal nonuniform flows characterized by preferred flow zones where river water enters and exits quickly with stage increase and decrease, and low permeability zones with broader bulk conductivity "break through" curves and longer river water residence times.

  17. Supersonic MHD generator system

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, M.A.

    1983-11-29

    An improved MHD electrical power generating system of the type having a MHD topping cycle and a steam generating bottoming cycle is disclosed. The system typically includes a combustion system, a conventional MHD generator and a first diffuser radiant boiler. The improvement comprises a first supersonic MHD generator and ramjet engine configuration operatively connected in series with each other and with the conventional MHD generator. The first supersonic MHD generator and ramjet engine configuration increase the power output and improve the operating efficiency of the electrical generating system. A diffuser system is also disclosed which is in fluid communication with the supersonic MHD generator and the ramjet engine for collecting bypass plasma gas to be used for heating a second radiant boiler adapted for powering a steam turbine generator.

  18. Chemical solver to compute molecule and grain abundances and non-ideal MHD resistivities in prestellar core-collapse calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, P.; Masson, J.; Chabrier, G.; Hennebelle, P.; Commerçon, B.; Vaytet, N.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a detailed chemical network relevant to calculate the conditions that are characteristic of prestellar core collapse. We solve the system of time-dependent differential equations to calculate the equilibrium abundances of molecules and dust grains, with a size distribution given by size-bins for these latter. These abundances are used to compute the different non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamics resistivities (ambipolar, Ohmic and Hall), needed to carry out simulations of protostellar collapse. For the first time in this context, we take into account the evaporation of the grains, the thermal ionisation of potassium, sodium, and hydrogen at high temperature, and the thermionic emission of grains in the chemical network, and we explore the impact of various cosmic ray ionisation rates. All these processes significantly affect the non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamics resistivities, which will modify the dynamics of the collapse. Ambipolar diffusion and Hall effect dominate at low densities, up to nH = 1012 cm-3, after which Ohmic diffusion takes over. We find that the time-scale needed to reach chemical equilibrium is always shorter than the typical dynamical (free fall) one. This allows us to build a large, multi-dimensional multi-species equilibrium abundance table over a large temperature, density and ionisation rate ranges. This table, which we make accessible to the community, is used during first and second prestellar core collapse calculations to compute the non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamics resistivities, yielding a consistent dynamical-chemical description of this process. The multi-dimensional multi-species equilibrium abundance table and a copy of the code are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A18

  19. 2-D Imaging of Electron Temperature in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    T. Munsat; E. Mazzucato; H. Park; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-07-08

    By taking advantage of recent developments in millimeter wave imaging technology, an Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) instrument, capable of simultaneously measuring 128 channels of localized electron temperature over a 2-D map in the poloidal plane, has been developed for the TEXTOR tokamak. Data from the new instrument, detailing the MHD activity associated with a sawtooth crash, is presented.

  20. Featured Image: Tests of an MHD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Creating the codes that are used to numerically model astrophysical systems takes a lot of work and a lot of testing! A new, publicly available moving-mesh magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code, DISCO, is designed to model 2D and 3D orbital fluid motion, such as that of astrophysical disks. In a recent article, DISCO creator Paul Duffell (University of California, Berkeley) presents the code and the outcomes from a series of standard tests of DISCOs stability, accuracy, and scalability.From left to right and top to bottom, the test outputs shown above are: a cylindrical Kelvin-Helmholtz flow (showing off DISCOs numerical grid in 2D), a passive scalar in a smooth vortex (can DISCO maintain contact discontinuities?), a global look at the cylindrical Kelvin-Helmholtz flow, a Jupiter-mass planet opening a gap in a viscous disk, an MHD flywheel (a test of DISCOs stability), an MHD explosion revealing shock structures, an MHD rotor (a more challenging version of the explosion), a Flock 3D MRI test (can DISCO study linear growth of the magnetorotational instability in disks?), and a nonlinear 3D MRI test.Check out the gif below for a closer look at each of these images, or follow the link to the original article to see even more!CitationPaul C. Duffell 2016 ApJS 226 2. doi:10.3847/0067-0049/226/1/2

  1. Passive stabilization in a linear MHD stability code

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, A.M.M.

    1980-03-01

    Utilizing a Galerkin procedure to calculate the vacuum contribution to the ideal MHD Lagrangian, the implementation of realistic boundary conditions are described in a linear stability code. The procedure permits calculation of the effect of arbitrary conducting structure on ideal MHD instabilities, as opposed to the prior use of an encircling shell. The passive stabilization of conducting coils on the tokamak vertical instability is calculated within the PEST code and gives excellent agreement with 2-D time dependent simulations of PDX.

  2. MHD modeling of dense plasma focus electrode shape variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Harry; Hartman, Charles; Schmidt, Andrea; Tang, Vincent; Link, Anthony; Ellsworth, Jen; Reisman, David

    2013-10-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) is a very simple device physically, but results to date indicate that very extensive physics is needed to understand the details of operation, especially during the final pinch where kinetic effects become very important. Nevertheless, the overall effects of electrode geometry, electrode size, and drive circuit parameters can be informed efficiently using MHD fluid codes, especially in the run-down phase before the final pinch. These kinds of results can then guide subsequent, more detailed fully kinetic modeling efforts. We report on resistive 2-d MHD modeling results applying the TRAC-II code to the DPF with an emphasis on varying anode and cathode shape. Drive circuit variations are handled in the code using a self-consistent circuit model for the external capacitor bank since the device impedance is strongly coupled to the internal plasma physics. Electrode shape is characterized by the ratio of inner diameter to outer diameter, length to diameter, and various parameterizations for tapering. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Numerical MHD codes for modeling astrophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldoba, A. V.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Lii, P. S.; Comins, M. L.; Dyda, S.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a Godunov-type magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code based on the Miyoshi and Kusano (2005) solver which can be used to solve various astrophysical hydrodynamic and MHD problems. The energy equation is in the form of entropy conservation. The code has been implemented on several different coordinate systems: 2.5D axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates, 2D Cartesian coordinates, 2D plane polar coordinates, and fully 3D cylindrical coordinates. Viscosity and diffusivity are implemented in the code to control the accretion rate in the disk and the rate of penetration of the disk matter through the magnetic field lines. The code has been utilized for the numerical investigations of a number of different astrophysical problems, several examples of which are shown.

  4. MHD simulations on an unstructured mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.; Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Longcope, D.W.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    Two reasons for using an unstructured computational mesh are adaptivity, and alignment with arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Two codes which use finite element discretization on an unstructured mesh are described. FEM3D solves 2D and 3D RMHD using an adaptive grid. MH3D++, which incorporates methods of FEM3D into the MH3D generalized MHD code, can be used with shaped boundaries, which might be 3D.

  5. MHD Turbulence and Magnetic Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  6. Magnetic reconnection in a compressible MHD plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji; Birn, Joachim

    2011-04-15

    Using steady-state resistive MHD, magnetic reconnection is reinvestigated for conditions of high resistivity/low magnetic Reynolds number, when the thickness of the diffusion region is no longer small compared to its length. Implicit expressions for the reconnection rate and other reconnection parameters are derived based on the requirements of mass, momentum, and energy conservation. These expressions are solved via simple iterative procedures. Implications specifically for low Reynolds number/high resistivity are being discussed.

  7. FEMHD: An adaptive finite element method for MHD and edge modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the code FEMHD, an adaptive finite element MHD code, which is applied in a number of different manners to model MHD behavior and edge plasma phenomena on a diverted tokamak. The code uses an unstructured triangular mesh in 2D and wedge shaped mesh elements in 3D. The code has been adapted to look at neutral and charged particle dynamics in the plasma scrape off region, and into a full MHD-particle code.

  8. Aniso2D

    2005-07-01

    Aniso2d is a two-dimensional seismic forward modeling code. The earth is parameterized by an X-Z plane in which the seismic properties Can have monoclinic with x-z plane symmetry. The program uses a user define time-domain wavelet to produce synthetic seismograms anrwhere within the two-dimensional media.

  9. Towards 2D nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sook; Yu, Changqian; Hayes, Robert; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Polymer vesicles (``polymersomes'') are an intriguing class of soft materials, commonly used to encapsulate small molecules or particles. Here we reveal they can also effectively incorporate nanoparticles inside their polymer membrane, leading to novel ``2D nanocomposites.'' The embedded nanoparticles alter the capacity of the polymersomes to bend and to stretch upon external stimuli.

  10. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2014-10-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Initial results of the code parallelization will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  11. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2013-10-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Preliminary results of the code parallelization will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  12. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2015-11-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Results of MARS parallelization and of the development of a new fix boundary equilibrium code adapted for MARS input will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  13. Mesh2d

    2011-12-31

    Mesh2d is a Fortran90 program designed to generate two-dimensional structured grids of the form [x(i),y(i,j)] where [x,y] are grid coordinates identified by indices (i,j). The x(i) coordinates alone can be used to specify a one-dimensional grid. Because the x-coordinates vary only with the i index, a two-dimensional grid is composed in part of straight vertical lines. However, the nominally horizontal y(i,j0) coordinates along index i are permitted to undulate or otherwise vary. Mesh2d also assignsmore » an integer material type to each grid cell, mtyp(i,j), in a user-specified manner. The complete grid is specified through three separate input files defining the x(i), y(i,j), and mtyp(i,j) variations.« less

  14. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine Derivatives as HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors with Significantly Improved Drug Resistance Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongwei; Fang, Zengjun; Li, Zhenyu; Huang, Boshi; Zhang, Heng; Lu, Xueyi; Xu, Haoran; Zhou, Zhongxia; Ding, Xiao; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    We designed and synthesized a series of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with a piperidine-substituted thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine scaffold, employing a strategy of structure-based molecular hybridization and substituent decorating. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited broad-spectrum activity with low (single-digit) nanomolar EC50 values toward a panel of wild-type (WT), single-mutant, and double-mutant HIV-1 strains. Compound 27 was the most potent; compared with ETV, its antiviral efficacy was 3-fold greater against WT, 5-7-fold greater against Y181C, Y188L, E138K, and F227L+V106A, and nearly equipotent against L100I and K103N, though somewhat weaker against K103N+Y181C. Importantly, 27 has lower cytotoxicity (CC50 > 227 μM) and a huge selectivity index (SI) value (ratio of CC50/EC50) of >159101. 27 also showed favorable, drug-like pharmacokinetic and safety properties in rats in vivo. Molecular docking studies and the structure-activity relationships provide important clues for further molecular elaboration. PMID:27541578

  15. Theory of MHD Jets and Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsinganos, Kanaris

    A brief review is given of selected results of our analytical and numerical work on the construction of time-independent and time-dependent MHD models for non relativistic astrophysical outflows and jets. The equations for steady MHD plasma flows are first outlined. Next, 1-D spherically symmetric outflows are briefly discussed, namely the Parker thermally driven nonrotating wind, as the classical prototype of all astrophysical outflows and the Weber-Davis magnetocentrifugally driven wind together with its astrophysical implications for magnetic braking, etc. Then, we turn to the 2-D MHD problem for steady and non steady 2-D axisymmetric magnetized and rotating plasma outflows. The only available exact solutions for such outflows are those in separable coordinates, i.e. those with the symmetry of radial or meridional self-similarity. Physically accepted solutions pass from the fast magnetosonic separatrix surface in order to satisfy MHD causality. An energetic criterion is outlined for selecting radially expanding winds from cylindrically expanding jets. The basics of jet acceleration, collimation, minimum fieldline inclination and angular momentum removal are illustrated in the context of radially self similar models. Numerical simulations of magnetic self-collimation verify several results of analytical steady solutions. The outflow from solar-type inefficient magnetic rotators is very weakly collimated while that from a ten times faster rotating YSO produces a tightly collimated jet. We also propose a two-component model consisting of a wind outflow from the central object and a faster rotating outflow launched from the surrounding accretion disk which plays the role of the flow collimator. We also briefly discuss the problem of shock formation during the magnetic collimation of wind-type outflows into jets.

  16. Energy Cascades in MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexakis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Most astrophysical and planetary systems e.g., solar convection and stellar winds, are in a turbulent state and coupled to magnetic fields. Understanding and quantifying the statistical properties of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) turbulence is crucial to explain the involved physical processes. Although the phenomenological theory of hydro-dynamic (HD) turbulence has been verified up to small corrections, a similar statement cannot be made for MHD turbulence. Since the phenomenological description of Hydrodynamic turbulence by Kolmogorov in 1941 there have been many attempts to derive a similar description for turbulence in conducting fluids (i.e Magneto-Hydrodynamic turbulence). However such a description is going to be based inevitably on strong assumptions (typically borrowed from hydrodynamics) that do not however necessarily apply to the MHD case. In this talk I will discuss some of the properties and differences of the energy and helicity cascades in turbulent MHD and HD flows. The investigation is going to be based on the analysis of direct numerical simulations. The cascades in MHD turbulence appear to be a more non-local process (in scale space) than in Hydrodynamics. Some implications of these results to turbulent modeling will be discussed

  17. Survey of MHD plant applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, J. J.; Seikel, G. R.; Cutting, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Open-cycle MHD is one of the major R&D efforts in the Department of Energy's program to meet the national goal of reducing U.S. dependence on oil through increased utilization of coal. MHD offers an effective way to use coal to produce electric power at low cost in a highly efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. Open-cycle MHD plants are categorized by the MHD combustor oxidizer, its temperature and the method of preheat. The paper discusses MHD baseline plant design, open-cycle MHD plant in the Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), early commercial MHD plants, conceptual studies of the engineering test facility, retrofit (addition of an MHD topping cycle to an existing steam plant), and other potential applications and concepts. Emphasis is placed on a survey of both completed and ongoing studies to define both commercial and pilot plant design, cost, and performance.

  18. Imaging high stage river-water intrusion into a contaminated aquifer along a major river corridor using 2D time-lapse surface electrical resistivity tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, Erin L.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Greenwood, William J.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-03-29

    The Hanford 300 Area is located adjacent to the Columbia River in south-central Washington State, USA, and was a former site for nuclear fuel processing operations. Waste disposal practices resulted in persistent unsaturated zone and groundwater contamination, the primary contaminant of concern being uranium. Uranium behavior at the site is intimately linked with river stage driven groundwater-river water exchange such that understanding the nature of river water intrusion into the 300 Area is critical for predicting uranium desorption and transport. In this paper we use time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to image the inland intrusion of river during high stage conditions. We demonstrate a modified time-lapse inversion approach, whereby the transient water table elevation is explicitly modeled by removing regularization constraints across the water table boundary. This implementation was critical for producing meaningful imaging results. We inverted approximately 1200 data sets (400 per line over 3 lines) using high performance computing resources to produce a time-lapse sequence of changes in bulk conductivity caused by river water intrusion during the 2011 spring runoff cycle over approximately 125 days. The resulting time series for each mesh element was then analyzed using common time series analysis to reveal the timing and location of river water intrusion beneath each line. The results reveal non-uniform flows characterized by preferred flow zones where river water enters and exits quickly with stage increase and decrease, and low permeability zones with broader bulk conductivity ‘break through’ curves and longer river water residence times. The time-lapse ERT inversion approach removes the deleterious effects of changing water table elevation and enables remote and spatial continuous groundwater-river water exchange monitoring using surface based ERT arrays under conditions where groundwater and river water conductivity are in contrast.

  19. MHD plant turn down considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Lineberry, J.T.; Chapman, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    The topic of part load operation of the MHD power plant is assessed. Current and future planned MHD research is reviewed in terms of addressing topping and bottoming cycle integration needs. The response of the MHD generator to turn up and down scenarios is reviewed. The concept of turning the MHD power to met changes in plant load is discussed. The need for new ideas and focused research to study MHD plant integration and problems of plant turn down and up is cited. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Disk MHD generator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Retallick, F. D.

    1980-01-01

    Directly-fired, separately-fired, and oxygen-augmented MHD power plants incorporating a disk geometry for the MHD generator were studied. The base parameters defined for four near-optimum-performance MHD steam power systems of various types are presented. The finally selected systems consisted of (1) two directly fired cases, one at 1920 K (2996F) preheat and the other at 1650 K (2500 F) preheat, (2) a separately-fired case where the air is preheated to the same level as the higher temperature directly-fired cases, and (3) an oxygen augmented case with the same generator inlet temperature of 2839 (4650F) as the high temperature directly-fired and separately-fired cases. Supersonic Mach numbers at the generator inlet, gas inlet swirl, and constant Hall field operation were specified based on disk generator optimization. System pressures were based on optimization of MHD net power. Supercritical reheat stream plants were used in all cases. Open and closed cycle component costs are summarized and compared.

  1. MHD Generating system

    DOEpatents

    Petrick, Michael; Pierson, Edward S.; Schreiner, Felix

    1980-01-01

    According to the present invention, coal combustion gas is the primary working fluid and copper or a copper alloy is the electrodynamic fluid in the MHD generator, thereby eliminating the heat exchangers between the combustor and the liquid-metal MHD working fluids, allowing the use of a conventional coalfired steam bottoming plant, and making the plant simpler, more efficient and cheaper. In operation, the gas and liquid are combined in a mixer and the resulting two-phase mixture enters the MHD generator. The MHD generator acts as a turbine and electric generator in one unit wherein the gas expands, drives the liquid across the magnetic field and thus generates electrical power. The gas and liquid are separated, and the available energy in the gas is recovered before the gas is exhausted to the atmosphere. Where the combustion gas contains sulfur, oxygen is bubbled through a side loop to remove sulfur therefrom as a concentrated stream of sulfur dioxide. The combustor is operated substoichiometrically to control the oxide level in the copper.

  2. Extended MHD Simulations of Spheromaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2012-10-01

    Nonlinear extended MHD simulations of a spheromak in a cylindrical flux conserver are performed using the NIMROD code (JCP 195, 2004). An idealized series of simulations starting from a Grad-Shafranov equilibrium and small non-axisymmetric perturbations are performed to model the sustained decay phase. The resulting confinement leads to steep resistivity gradients. Strong current gradients develop, driving tearing modes that dominate the evolution of the spheromak. Absent in these simulations are the remains of n=1 fluctuations created during the formation process. A second series of simulations start from vacuum fields and model the full spheromak evolution, including the formation process where the n=1 fluctuations dominate. To understand the role of pressure driven instabilities in the evolution of the spheromak, a numerical diagnostic is developed to calculate the Mercier stability criterion from the axisymmetric fields.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann LES for MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, Chris; Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Soe, Min

    2015-11-01

    Dellar's lattice Boltzmann (LB) model of 2D incompressible MHD introduced both a scalar velocity and vector magnetic distribution functions, which automatically enforces div B = 0 through the trace of an antisymmetric perturbed tensor. In the Smagorinsky LES model, the filtered Reynolds stresses are modeled by mean field gradient terms, with ad hoc closure eddy transport terms. Ansumali et. al. have developed an LES for Navier-Stokes turbulence by filtering the underlying mesoscopic LB. The filtered LB equations are then subjected to the Chapman-Enskog expansion. A Smagorinsky-like LES is recovered with no ad hoc assumptions other than the subgrid terms contribute only at the transport time scales. Here we extend these ideas to 2D MHD turbulence. The DNS data base is being generated from a multiple relaxation time (MRT) model with a quasi-entropic analytic scheme introduced recently by Karlin et. al. (2014) based on splitting the moment representation into various subgroups. Work supported by NSF, DoD.

  4. Reduced Extended MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, P. J.; Abdelhamid, H. M.; Grasso, D.; Hazeltine, R. D.; Lingam, M.; Tassi, E.

    2015-11-01

    Over the years various reduced fluid models have been obtained for modeling plasmas, with the goal of capturing important physics while maintaining computability. Such models have included the physics contained in various generalizations of Ohm's law, including Hall drift and electron inertia. In a recent publication it was shown that full 3D extended MHD is a Hamiltonian system by finding its noncanonical Poisson bracket. Subsequently, this bracket was shown to be derivable from that for Hall MHD by a series of remarkable transformations, which greatly simplifies the proof of the Jacobi identity and allows one to immediately obtain generalizations of the helicity and cross helicity. In this poster we use this structure to obtain exact reduced fluid models with the effects of full two-fluid theory. Results of numerical computations of collisionless reconnection using an exact reduced 4-field model will be presented and analytical comparisons of mode structure of previous reduced models will be made.

  5. 2D and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography imaging of earthquake related ground deformations at the Ancient Roman Forum and Isis Temple of Baelo Claudia (Cádiz, South Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pablo G.

    2010-05-01

    The ancient roman city of Baelo Claudia has been subject of several papers on earthquake environmental effects (EEE) and well as earthquake archaeological effects (EAE). During the field training course on archaeoseismology and palaeoseismology conducted in September 2009 (INQUA-IGCP567 Workshop) held at Baelo Claudia, four Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT) profiles were carried out, by the teams of the Salamanca University (Spain), RWTH Aachen University (Germany) and the Geological Survey of Spain (IGME). ERT surveys were developed in the eastern side of the ancient roman Forum across the unexcavated sector of the archaeological site heading on the 1st Century AD Isis Temple. Each ERT profile was constituted by a 48 multielectrode array with spacing of 2 m resulting in a total length of investigation of around 384 m. ERT lines were separated 10 m each other resulting in a total research area of 3840 m2 to a mean investigation depth of 16 m. The selected survey configurations were Pole-Dipole and Wenner in order to get detailed information about lateral resistivity contrasts, but with a reasonable depth of investigation. The resulting 2D resistivity pseudosections clearly display deformations of the buried roman pavements which propagated in depth within the pre-roman clayey substratum of the Bolonia Bay area.. 3D modelling of the 2D pseudosections indicates that the observed deformations are related to near-surface landsliding, being possible to calculate the minimum volume of mobilized material. ERT 3D imaging allow to refine previous GPR surveys conducted at this same area and to get a subsurface picture of ground deformations caused by repeated earthquakes during the 1st and 3rd Centuries AD. Preliminary calculated volume for the mobilized materials affecting the foundations of the Isis Temple and Forum clearly points to a minimum ESI-07 VIII Intensity validating previous research in the zone. This study has been supported by the Spanish Research Projects

  6. Nonlinear wave propagation and reconnection at magnetic X-points in the Hall MHD regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threlfall, J.; Parnell, C. E.; De Moortel, I.; McClements, K. G.; Arber, T. D.

    2012-08-01

    Context. The highly dynamical, complex nature of the solar atmosphere naturally implies the presence of waves in a topologically varied magnetic environment. Here, the interaction of waves with topological features such as null points is inevitable and potentially important for energetics. The low resistivity of the solar coronal plasma implies that non-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects should be considered in studies of magnetic energy release in this environment. Aims: This paper investigates the role of the Hall term in the propagation and dissipation of waves, their interaction with 2D magnetic X-points and the nature of the resulting reconnection. Methods: A Lagrangian remap shock-capturing code (Lare2d) was used to study the evolution of an initial fast magnetoacoustic wave annulus for a range of values of the ion skin depth (δi) in resistive Hall MHD. A magnetic null-point finding algorithm was also used to locate and track the evolution of the multiple null-points that are formed in the system. Results: Depending on the ratio of ion skin depth to system size, our model demonstrates that Hall effects can play a key role in the wave-null interaction. In particular, the initial fast-wave pulse now consists of whistler and ion-cyclotron components; the dispersive nature of the whistler wave leads to (i) earlier interaction with the null; (ii) the creation of multiple additional, transient nulls and, hence, an increased number of energy release sites. In the Hall regime, the relevant timescales (such as the onset of reconnection and the period of the oscillatory relaxation) of the system are reduced significantly, and the reconnection rate is enhanced.

  7. Classical MHD shocks: theory and numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai V.

    2005-08-01

    Recent results are surveyed in the investigation of the behavior of shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and corresponding structures in dissipative/resistive plasma flows. In contrast to evolutionary shocks, a solution of the problem of the nonevolutionary shock interaction with small perturbations is either nonunique or does not exist. The peculiarity of non-ideal MHD is in that some nonevolutionary shocks have dissipative structures. Since this structure is always non-plane, it can reveal itself in problems where transverse perturbations do not exist due to symmetries restrictions. We discuss the numerical behavior of nonevolutionary shocks and argue that they necessarily disappear once the problem is solved in a genuinely three-dimensional statement.

  8. High divergent 2D grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Jianyong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A 3×3 high divergent 2D-grating with period of 3.842μm at wavelength of 850nm under normal incidence is designed and fabricated in this paper. This high divergent 2D-grating is designed by the vector theory. The Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) in association with the simulated annealing (SA) is adopted to calculate and optimize this 2D-grating.The properties of this grating are also investigated by the RCWA. The diffraction angles are more than 10 degrees in the whole wavelength band, which are bigger than the traditional 2D-grating. In addition, the small period of grating increases the difficulties of fabrication. So we fabricate the 2D-gratings by direct laser writing (DLW) instead of traditional manufacturing method. Then the method of ICP etching is used to obtain the high divergent 2D-grating.

  9. FLASH MHD simulations of experiments that study shock-generated magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2015-12-01

    We summarize recent additions and improvements to the high energy density physics capabilities in FLASH, highlighting new non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities. We then describe 3D Cartesian and 2D cylindrical FLASH MHD simulations that have helped to design and analyze experiments conducted at the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a laser illuminates a carbon rod target placed in a gas-filled chamber. A magnetic field diagnostic (called a Bdot) employing three very small induction coils is used to measure all three components of the magnetic field at a chosen point in space. The simulations have revealed that many fascinating physical processes occur in the experiments. These include megagauss magnetic fields generated by the interaction of the laser with the target via the Biermann battery mechanism, which are advected outward by the vaporized target material but decrease in strength due to expansion and resistivity; magnetic fields generated by an outward expanding shock via the Biermann battery mechanism; and a breakout shock that overtakes the first wave, the contact discontinuity between the target material and the gas, and then the initial expanding shock. Finally, we discuss the validation and predictive science we have done for this experiment with FLASH.

  10. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function is explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows

  11. Stochastic Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric Data

    2010-07-01

    The algorithm is developed to invert 2D magnetotelluric (MT) data based on sharp boundary parametrization using a Bayesian framework. Within the algorithm, we consider the locations and the resistivity of regions formed by the interfaces are as unknowns. We use a parallel, adaptive finite-element algorithm to forward simulate frequency-domain MT responses of 2D conductivity structure. Those unknown parameters are spatially correlated and are described by a geostatistical model. The joint posterior probability distribution function ismore » explored by Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods. The developed stochastic model is effective for estimating the interface locations and resistivity. Most importantly, it provides details uncertainty information on each unknown parameter. Hardware requirements: PC, Supercomputer, Multi-platform, Workstation; Software requirements C and Fortan; Operation Systems/version is Linux/Unix or Windows« less

  12. Kinetic MHD simulation of large 'circ; tearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott; Uzdensky, Dmitri

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a second-order accurate semi-implicit δ method for kinetic MHD simulation with Lorentz force ions and fluid electrons. The model has been used to study the resistive tearing mode instability, which involves multiple spatial scales. In small 'circ; cases, the linear growth rate and eigenmode structure are consistent with resistive MHD analysis. The Rutherford stage and saturation are demonstrated, but the simulation exhibits different saturation island widths compared with previous MHD simulations. In large 'circ; cases, nonlinear simulations show multiple islands forming, followed by the islands coalescing at later times. The competition between these two processes strongly influences the reconnection rates and eventually leads to a steady state reconnection. We will present various parameter studies and show that our hybrid results agree with fluid analysis in certain limits (e.g., relatively large resisitivities).

  13. Fully implicit adaptive mesh refinement MHD algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby

    2005-10-01

    In the macroscopic simulation of plasmas, the numerical modeler is faced with the challenge of dealing with multiple time and length scales. The former results in stiffness due to the presence of very fast waves. The latter requires one to resolve the localized features that the system develops. Traditional approaches based on explicit time integration techniques and fixed meshes are not suitable for this challenge, as such approaches prevent the modeler from using realistic plasma parameters to keep the computation feasible. We propose here a novel approach, based on implicit methods and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Our emphasis is on both accuracy and scalability with the number of degrees of freedom. To our knowledge, a scalable, fully implicit AMR algorithm has not been accomplished before for MHD. As a proof-of-principle, we focus on the reduced resistive MHD model as a basic MHD model paradigm, which is truly multiscale. The approach taken here is to adapt mature physics-based technologyootnotetextL. Chac'on et al., J. Comput. Phys. 178 (1), 15- 36 (2002) to AMR grids, and employ AMR-aware multilevel techniques (such as fast adaptive composite --FAC-- algorithms) for scalability. We will demonstrate that the concept is indeed feasible, featuring optimal scalability under grid refinement. Results of fully-implicit, dynamically-adaptive AMR simulations will be presented on a variety of problems.

  14. Cometary MHD and chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegmann, R.; Schmidt, H. U.; Huebner, W. F.; Boice, D. C.

    1987-01-01

    An MHD and chemical comet-coma model was developed, applying the computer program of Huebner (1985) for the detailed chemical evolution of a spherically expanding coma and the program of Schmidt and Wegman (1982) and Wegman (1987) for the MHD flow of plasma and magnetic field in a comet to the Giotto-mission data on the ion abundances measured by the HIS ion mass spectrometer. The physics and chemistry of the coma are modeled in great detail, including photoprocesses, gas-phase chemical kinetics, energy balance with a separate electron temperature, multifluid hydrodynamics with a transition to free molecular flow, fast-streaming atomic and molecular hydrogen, counter and cross streaming of the ionized species relative to the neutral species in the coma-solar wind interaction region with momentum exchange by elastic collisions, mass-loading through ion pick-up, and Lorentz forces of the advected magnetic field. The results, both inside and outside of the contact surface, are discussed and compared with the relevant HIS ion mass spectra.

  15. MHD stability control in alternate confinement concept experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, E. B.

    2006-10-01

    High-quality plasma operation and good energy confinement in the alternate confinement experiments require control of ideal and resistive MHD instabilities. New experiments in the revitalized ICC program, supported by modern MHD computational capabilities, are demonstrating progress in this control which significantly extends previous work. Results from the classical tokamak are thereby extended into new parameter regimes, generating insight into the physics. We consider both toroidal and open concepts and, where appropriate, highlight comparisons with the tokamak, ST, and stellarator. The driving forces for ideal MHD modes are characterized using the Frieman-Rotenberg condition, which generalizes the stability analysis by including plasma flow. Stabilizing mechanisms include conducting walls (RFP, spheromak, FRC); plasma shaping as characterized by the magnetic dipole moment (spheromak, FRC); current-profile control (RFP, spheromak); sheared, super-Alfvénic flows (Z-pinch, centrifugal mirror); quadrupole magnetic wells (FRC, mirror); and high kinetic-energy density flow in good curvature regions (gas-dynamic trap). Resistive tearing is stabilized or limited by current profile control, primarily in the RFP and spheromak. Non-MHD mechanisms such as FLR can also be stabilizing and will be most effective if the MHD growth rate is minimized. Most of the experimental work to date has focused on global or large-scale modes; the possible consequences of short-wavelength or local modes will be explored. E. Frieman and M. Rotenberg, Rev. Mod. Phys. 32, 898 (1960).

  16. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  17. Ultrafast 2D IR microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Carlos R.; Schach, Denise; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of heterogeneous samples with μm-scale spatial resolution, sub-picosecond time resolution, and the molecular structure information of 2D IR, enabling the measurement of vibrational dynamics through correlations in frequency, time, and space. The setup is based on a fully collinear “one beam” geometry in which all pulses propagate along the same optics. Polarization, chopping, and phase cycling are used to isolate the 2D IR signals of interest. In addition, we demonstrate the use of vibrational lifetime as a contrast agent for imaging microscopic variations in molecular environments. PMID:25089490

  18. MHD stable regime of the tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Furth, H.P.; Boozer, A.H.

    1986-10-01

    A broad family of tokamak current profiles is found to be stable against ideal and resistive MHD kink modes for 1 less than or equal to q(0), with q(a) as low 2. For 0.5 less than or equal to q(0) < and q(a) > 1, current profiles can be found that are unstable only to the m = 1, n = 1 mode. A specific ''optimal'' tokamak profile can be selected from the range of stable solutions, by imposing a common upper limit on dj/dr - corresponding in ohmic equilibrium to a limitation of dT/sub e//dr by anomalous transport.

  19. AnisWave 2D

    2004-08-01

    AnisWave2D is a 2D finite-difference code for a simulating seismic wave propagation in fully anisotropic materials. The code is implemented to run in parallel over multiple processors and is fully portable. A mesh refinement algorithm has been utilized to allow the grid-spacing to be tailored to the velocity model, avoiding the over-sampling of high-velocity materials that usually occurs in fixed-grid schemes.

  20. Observational Tests of Recent MHD Turbulence Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Guhathakurta, M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This grant seeks to analyze the Heliospheric Missions data to test current theories on the angular dependence (with respect to mean magnetic field direction) of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind. Solar wind turbulence may be composed of two or more dynamically independent components. Such components include magnetic pressure-balanced structures, velocity shears, quasi-2D turbulence, and slab (Alfven) waves. We use a method, developed during the first two years of this grant, for extracting the individual reduced spectra of up to three separate turbulence components from a single spacecraft time series. The method has been used on ISEE-3 data, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Ulysses, and Voyager data samples. The correlation of fluctuations as a function of angle between flow direction and magnetic-field direction is the focus of study during the third year.

  1. MHD Simulation Heliospheric Magnetic Fields and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2005-01-01

    This talk will present a summary of our results on simulations of heliospheric structure and dynamics. We use a three-dimensional MHD code in spherical coordinates to produce a solar wind containing a rotating, tilted heliospheric current sheet, fast-slow stream and microstream shear layers, waves, 2-D turbulence, and pressure balanced structures that are input to the inner (superAlfvenic) boundary. The evolution of various combinations of these has led to a deeper understanding of sector structure, magnetic holes, fluctuation anisotropies, and general turbulent evolution. We show how the sectors are likely to be connected, how spiral fields can arise, and how field line diffusion can be caused by waves with transverse structure and microstream shears.

  2. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  3. Observational Tests of Recent MHD Turbulence Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy

    2001-06-01

    This grant seeks to analyze the Heliospheric Missions data to test current theories on the angular dependence (with respect to mean magnetic field direction) of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind. Solar wind turbulence may be composed of two or more dynamically independent components. Such components include magnetic pressure-balanced structures, velocity shears, quasi-2D turbulence, and slab (Alfven) waves. We use a method, developed during the first two years of this grant, for extracting the individual reduced spectra of up to three separate turbulence components from a single spacecraft time series. The method has been used on ISEE-3 data, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Ulysses, and Voyager data samples. The correlation of fluctuations as a function of angle between flow direction and magnetic-field direction is the focus of study during the third year.

  4. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Revolutionary rather than evolutionary changes in propulsion systems are most likely to decrease cost of space transportation and to provide a global range capability. Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion is a revolutionary propulsion system. The performance of scramjet engines can be improved by the AJAX energy management concept. A magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) generator controls the flow and extracts flow energy in the engine inlet and a MHD accelerator downstream of the combustor accelerates the nozzle flow. A progress report toward developing the MHD technology is presented herein. Recent theoretical efforts are reviewed and ongoing experimental efforts are discussed. The latter efforts also include an ongoing collaboration between NASA, the US Air Force Research Laboratory, US industry, and Russian scientific organizations. Two of the critical technologies, the ionization of the air and the MHD accelerator, are briefly discussed. Examples of limiting the combustor entrance Mach number to a low supersonic value with a MHD energy bypass scheme are presented, demonstrating an improvement in scramjet performance. The results for a simplified design of an aerospace plane show that the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Equilibrium ionization and non-equilibrium ionization are discussed. The thermodynamic condition of air at the entrance of the engine inlet determines the method of ionization. The required external power for non-equilibrium ionization is computed. There have been many experiments in which electrical power generation has successfully been achieved by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) means. However, relatively few experiments have been made to date for the reverse case of achieving gas acceleration by the MHD means. An experiment in a shock tunnel is described in which MHD acceleration is investigated experimentally. MHD has several

  5. Production of MHD fluid

    DOEpatents

    Lacey, James J.; Kurtzrock, Roy C.; Bienstock, Daniel

    1976-08-24

    A hot gaseous fluid of low ash content, suitable for use in open-cycle MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) power generation, is produced by means of a three-stage process comprising (1) partial combustion of a fossil fuel to produce a hot gaseous product comprising CO.sub.2 CO, and H.sub.2 O, (2) reformation of the gaseous product from stage (1) by means of a fluidized char bed, whereby CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O are converted to CO and H.sub.2, and (3) combustion of CO and H.sub.2 from stage (2) to produce a low ash-content fluid (flue gas) comprising CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O and having a temperature of about 4000.degree. to 5000.degree.F.

  6. MHD channel performance for potential early commercial MHD power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swallom, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    The commercial viability of full and part load early commercial MHD power plants is examined. The load conditions comprise a mass flow of 472 kg/sec in the channel, Rosebud coal, 34% by volume oxygen in the oxidizer preheated to 922 K, and a one percent by mass seeding with K. The full load condition is discussed in terms of a combined cycle plant with optimized electrical output by the MHD channel. Various electrical load parameters, pressure ratios, and magnetic field profiles are considered for a baseload MHD generator, with a finding that a decelerating flow rate yields slightly higher electrical output than a constant flow rate. Nominal and part load conditions are explored, with a reduced gas mass flow rate and an enriched oxygen content. An enthalpy extraction of 24.6% and an isentropic efficiency of 74.2% is predicted for nominal operation of a 526 MWe MHD generator, with higher efficiencies for part load operation.

  7. Spontaneous Reconnection Onset in the Magnetotail: Kinetic and MHD Pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Merkin, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanism of the reconnection onset in planetary magnetotails has been a topic of hot debate for more than three decades. At the kinetic level of description the key problem is a seemingly universal stability of the collisionless tearing mode when electrons are magnetized by the magnetic field normal to the current sheet. This effect can be eliminated in 2D equilibria with magnetic flux accumulated at the anti-sunward end of the tail. However, the resulting instability seen in 2D PIC simulations with open boundaries differs from the classical tearing mode because its main effect is the formation of dipolarization fronts, i. e., regions of an enhanced normal magnetic field rather than the reversal of its sign. Strong tailward gradients of the normal magnetic field characteristic of fronts suggest that they can be destroyed in 3D by buoyancy and flapping instabilities. However, 3D PIC simulations show that buoyancy and flapping motions can neither destroy nor change critically the near-2D picture of the front evolution, although they do significantly disturb it. Modeling and understanding of this kinetic picture of the reconnection onset in MHD terms is critically important for incorporating the explosive reconnection physics into global models of the magnetosphere and solar corona. A key to this has become the recognition that tail current sheets with accumulated flux regions can also be unstable with respect to an ideal analog of the tearing mode, which has a similar structure of the electromagnetic field and plasma perturbations but preserves the original magnetic field topology. MHD simulations with high Lundquist number confirm the existence of such "pseudo-tearing" instability regimes. Non-MHD effects, including different motions of electron and ion species as well as the ion Landau dissipation transform these ideal MHD motions into the tearing/slippage instability obtained in PIC simulations.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) nuclear weapons effects on submarine cable systems. Volume 1. Experiments and analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report presents a study of the nuclear weapons magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects on submarine communications cables. The study consisted of the analysis and interpretation of currently available data on submarine cable systems TAT-4, TAT-6, and TAT-7. The primary result of the study is that decrease of the effective resistivity with frequency over the available experimental range, coupled with the model results, leads to quite small effective resistivities at the MHD characteristic frequencies, and hence small earth potential differences. Thus, it appears that submarine cable systems are less susceptible to an MHD threat than their land-based counter-parts.

  9. MHD properties of magnetosheath flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Crooker, N. U.; Erickson, G. M.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.; Maynard, N. C.; Schoendorf, J. A.; Siebert, K. D.; Weimer, D. R.; White, W. W.; Wilson, G. R.

    2002-04-01

    We discuss four aspects of magnetosheath flow that require MHD for their calculation and understanding. We illustrate these aspects with computations using a numerical MHD code that simulates the global magnetosphere and its magnetosheath. The four inherently MHD aspects of magnetosheath flow that we consider are the depletion layer, the magnetospheric sash, MHD flow deflections, and the magnetosheath's slow-mode expansion into the magnetotail. We introduce new details of these aspects or illustrate known details in a new way, including the dependence of the depletion layer on interplanetary magnetic filed clock angle; agreement between the locations of the antiparallel regions of Luhmann et al. (J. Geophys. Res. 89 (1984) 1739) and the magnetospheric sash, and deflections corresponding separately to a stagnation line and magnetic reconnection.

  10. Indian MHD programme - status review

    SciTech Connect

    Arunachalam, S.A.; Malghan, V.R.; Thiagarajan, K.

    1993-12-31

    MHD technology development activities are carried out in 5MWt MHD pilot plant and auxiliary component test rigs. The airpreheater, hot air duct, FRP duct, main combustor, nozzle and downstream ducts have been successfully worked for about 2200 hours. Present direction of experimentation is to develop further the hot wall channel and demonstrate high enthalpy extraction. Initial experiments on MHD channel used water cooled copper electrodes filled with ceramics and was operated in cold mode. The current drain was low in this case and a new generator has been designed to operate at a thermal input of 8 MWt and a hot wall temperature around 1800 C. The status of recent experiments in MHD flow train and development of subsystems are discussed in this paper.

  11. MHD program plan, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The current magnetohydrodynamic MHD program being implemented is a result of a consensus established in public meetings held by the Department of Energy in 1984. The public meetings were followed by the formulation of a June 1984 Coal-Fired MHD Preliminary Transition and Program Plan. This plan focused on demonstrating the proof-of-concept (POC) of coal-fired MHD electric power plants by the early 1990s. MHD test data indicate that while there are no fundamental technical barriers impeding the development of MHD power plants, technical risk remains. To reduce the technical risk three key subsystems (topping cycle, bottoming cycle, and seed regeneration) are being assembled and tested separately. The program does not require fabrication of a complete superconducting magnet, but rather the development and testing of superconductor cables. The topping cycle system test objectives can be achieved using a conventional iron core magnet system already in place at a DOE facility. Systems engineering-derived requirements and analytical modeling to support scale-up and component design guide the program. In response to environmental, economic, engineering, and utility acceptance requirements, design choices and operating modes are tested and refined to provide technical specifications for meeting commercial criteria. These engineering activities are supported by comprehensive and continuing systems analyses to establish realistic technical requirements and cost data. Essential elements of the current program are to: Develop technical and environmental data for the integrated MHD topping cycle system through POC testing (1000 hours); and bottoming cycle (4000 hours); design, construct, and operate a POC seed regeneration system capable of processing spent seed materials from the MHD bottoming cycle, prepare conceptual designs for a site specific MHD retrofit plant, and continue supporting research necessary for system testing. 7 figs.

  12. Propagation and Dissipation of MHD Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.

    2006-11-01

    bholadwivedi@gmail.com In view of the landmark result on the solar wind outflow, starting between 5 Mm and 20 Mm above the photosphere in magnetic funnels, we investigate the propagation and dissipation of MHD waves in coronal holes. We underline the importance of Alfvén wave dissipation in the magnetic funnels through the viscous and resistive plasma. Our results show that Alfvén waves are one of the primary energy sources in the innermost part of coronal holes where the solar wind outflow starts. We also consider compressive viscosity and thermal conductivity to study the propagation and dissipation of long period slow longitudinal MHD waves in polar coronal holes. We discuss their likely role in the line profile narrowing, and in the energy budget for coronal holes and the solar wind. We compare the contribution of longitudinal MHD waves with high frequency Alfvén waves.

  13. Some mathematical questions related to the MHD equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sermange, M.; Temam, R.

    1983-09-01

    Some questions relating to the large time behavior of the solutions of MHD equations for a viscous incompressible resistive fluid are investigated. The physical system is briefly described and the functional setting of the equations, a flow in a bounded domain or in whole space with a space periodicity property in all directions. The main existence and uniqueness results for weak and strong solutions of the MHD equations are recalled. Regularity properties and bounds on the solutions to the equations which are valid for all time are established and the concept of functional invariant sets is introduced which is contained in the space of smooth functions if the data are sufficiently regular. The squeezing property of the trajectories are stated and it is shown that any functional invariant set for the MHD equations, and in particular any attractor, has a finite Haussdorf dimension. The flow is found to be totally determined for large dimensions by a finite number of parameters. 26 references.

  14. Perturbed Stability Analysis of External Ideal MHD Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Garstka, G. D.; Turnbull, A. D.; Garofalo, A. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2002-11-01

    Traditionally, numerical parameter scans are performed to study the effects of equilibrium shaping and profiles on long wavelength ideal MHD instabilities. Previously, we introduced a new perturbative technique to more efficiently explore these dependencies: changes in delta-W due to small equilibrium variations are found using a perturbation of the energy principle rather than with an eigenvalue-solver instability code. With this approach, the stability properties of similar equilibria can be efficiently explored without generating complete numerical results for every set of parameters (which is time-intensive for accurate representations of several configurations). Here, we apply this approach to toroidal geometry using GATO (an ideal MHD stability code) and experimental equilibria. In particular, we explore ideal MHD stability of external kink modes in the spherical tokamak Pegasus and resistive wall modes in DIII-D.

  15. Dynamo action in dissipative, forced, rotating MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is an inherent feature of large-scale, energetic astrophysical and geophysical magnetofluids. In general, these are rotating and are energized through buoyancy and shear, while viscosity and resistivity provide a means of dissipation of kinetic and magnetic energy. Studies of unforced, rotating, ideal (i.e., non-dissipative) MHD turbulence have produced interesting results, but it is important to determine how these results are affected by dissipation and forcing. Here, we extend our previous work and examine dissipative, forced, and rotating MHD turbulence. Incompressibility is assumed, and finite Fourier series represent turbulent velocity and magnetic field on a 643 grid. Forcing occurs at an intermediate wave number by a method that keeps total energy relatively constant and allows for injection of kinetic and magnetic helicity. We find that 3-D energy spectra are asymmetric when forcing is present. We also find that dynamo action occurs when forcing has either kinetic or magnetic helicity, with magnetic helicity injection being more important. In forced, dissipative MHD turbulence, the dynamo manifests itself as a large-scale coherent structure that is similar to that seen in the ideal case. These results imply that MHD turbulence, per se, may play a fundamental role in the creation and maintenance of large-scale (i.e., dipolar) stellar and planetary magnetic fields.

  16. Extended MHD Stabiliy Calculations of Spheromak Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2013-10-01

    Linear extended MHD calculations of spheromak equilibria in a cylindrical flux conserver are performed using the NIMROD code (Sovinec et al., JCP 195, 2004). A series of Grad-Sharfranov equilibria are generated with β ranging from 0 . 4 % to 4 . 2 % , corresponding to peak electron temperatures ranging 50 to 300 eV. These equilibria use a λ profile representative of SSPX shot 14590, which measured a peak electron temperature of 325 eV (McLean et al., POP 13, 2006). Resistive MHD calculations find that the β = 0 . 4 % case is unstable to resonant resistive interchange modes with γτA <= 2 . 3 % . These modes transition to ideal interchange as the equilibrium pressure is increased. Growth rates as large as γτA = 20 % are calculated for the 4 . 2 % β case. Calculations including ion-gyroviscosity show a minimal reduction of growth rate. Effects from including the Hall and Electron pressure terms in Ohm's Law and the cross-field diamagnetic heat flux are investigated. Results of related nonlinear simulations are also presented. Work Supported by US DOE.

  17. The Biermann catastrophe of numerical MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, C.; Tzeferacos, P.; Lee, D.; Lamb, D. Q.; Weide, K.; Fatenejad, M.; Miller, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Biermann Battery effect is frequently invoked in cosmic magnetogenesis and studied in High-Energy Density laboratory physics experiments. Unfortunately, direct implementation of the Biermann effect in MHD codes is known to produce unphysical magnetic fields at shocks whose value does not converge with resolution. We show that this convergence breakdown is due to naive discretization, which fails to account for the fact that discretized irrotational vector fields have spurious solenoidal components that grow without bound near a discontinuity. We show that careful consideration of the kinetics of ion viscous shocks leads to a formulation of the Biermann effect that gives rise to a convergent algorithm. We note a novel physical effect a resistive magnetic precursor in which Biermann-generated field in the shock “leaks” resistively upstream. The effect appears to be potentially observable in experiments at laser facilities.

  18. MHD-EMP protection guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Vance, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear detonation at altitudes several hundred kilometers above the earth will severely distort the earth's magnetic field and result in a strong magnetohyrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP). The geomagnetic disturbance interacts with the soil to induce current and horizontal electric gradients. The geomagnetic disturbance interacts with the soil to induced current and horizontal electric gradients in the earth. MHD-EMP, also called E3 since it is the third component of the high-altitude EMP (HEMP), lasts over 100 s after the exoatmospheric burst. MHD-EMP is similar to solar geomagnetic storms in it's global and low frequency (less than 1 Hz) nature except that E3 can be much more intense with a far shorter duration. When the MHD-EMP gradients are integrated over great distances by power lines, communication cables, or other long conductors, the induced voltages are significant. (The horizontal gradients in the soil are too small to induce major responses by local interactions with facilities.) The long pulse waveform for MHD-EMP-induced currents on long lines has a peak current of 200 A and a time-to-half-peak of 100 s. If this current flows through transformer windings, it can saturate the magnetic circuit and cause 60 Hz harmonic production. To mitigate the effects of MHD-EMP on a facility, long conductors must be isolated from the building and the commercial power harmonics and voltage swings must be addressed. The transfer switch would be expected to respond to the voltage fluctuations as long as the harmonics have not interfered with the switch control circuitry. The major sources of MHD-EMP induced currents are the commercial power lines and neutral; neutral current indirect coupling to the facility power or ground system via the metal fence, powered gate, parking lights, etc; metal water pipes; phone lines; and other long conductors that enter or come near the facility. The major source of harmonics is the commercial power system.

  19. DYNA2D96. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    DYNA2D is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  20. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  1. Low Frequency Response of Plasma to MHD Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2007-11-01

    MHD stability of the plasma depends critically on the frequency and wave length of the perturbation. Future tokamaks are expected to operate in regimes where the external macro-scale perturbations have much lower frequencies than the intrinsic dynamical time scales of the particles [1]. This situation calls for a detailed re-examination of the assumptions on previous models of the response of the plasma to MHD perturbations [2]. The kinetic formulation of MHD response [3] is examined numerically in this work. The energy and momentum flux across the plasma surface is expressed in terms of the MHD perturbations. Implication on the stability and plasma response [4] relevant for the resistive wall mode, with its time scale dramatically reduced by the external resistive wall, is discussed. [1] B. Hu, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005). [2] A. Bondeson and M.S. Chu, Phys. Plasmas 3, 3013 (1996). [3] T.M. Antonsen, Jr. and Y.C. Lee, Phys. Fluids 25, 132 (1982). [4] Y.Q. Liu, et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3681 (2000).

  2. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  3. Spatially Resolved Synthetic Spectra from 2D Simulations of Stainless Steel Wire Array Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Chong, Y. K.; Dasgupta, A.; Davis, J.

    2009-01-21

    A 2D radiation MHD model has been developed to investigate stainless steel wire array implosion experiments on the Z and refurbished Z machines. This model incorporates within the Mach2 MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE kinetics and ray trace based radiation transport. Such a method is necessary in order to account for opacity effects in conjunction with ionization kinetics of K-shell emitting plasmas. Here the model is used to investigate multi-dimensional effects of stainless steel wire implosions. In particular, we are developing techniques to produce non-LTE, axially and/or radially resolved synthetic spectra based upon snapshots of our 2D simulations. Comparisons between experimental spectra and these synthetic spectra will allow us to better determine the state of the experimental pinches.

  4. MOSS2D V1

    2001-01-31

    This software reduces the data from two-dimensional kSA MOS program, k-Space Associates, Ann Arbor, MI. Initial MOS data is recorded without headers in 38 columns, with one row of data per acquisition per lase beam tracked. The final MOSS 2d data file is reduced, graphed, and saved in a tab-delimited column format with headers that can be plotted in any graphing software.

  5. MHD can clean up the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, A.C.; Crawford, L.W.; Holt, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) involves interactions among electromagnetic fields and electrically conducting gases and liquids. The most developed application for MM in the United States is for central station electric power generation using a coal-fired combined cycle system. Proof-of-Concept (POC) scale demonstration of the downstream components used in this technology is currently being carried out at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), located at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI). Some of the attractive features of MHD include: A potential for increasing overall plant efficiency to 60% as compared to <40% for conventional power plants. Provision of built-in controls to eliminate/reduce the emissions of acid rain precursors, such as SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] well below the existing New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Clean Air Act requirements. Provision of adequate particulate resistivity for easy and efficient capture of submicron sized panicles in dry and wet electrostatic precipitators. Provision of built-in control to eliminate/reduce the Cl[sub 2]/HCl emission problems common to waste incinerators. Producing nearly zero emissions of priority pollutants (inorganics as well as organics on a pound per pound of coal basis) in comparison to conventional coal-fired facilities. Environmentally acceptable solid and liquid waste streams, and release of less CO[sub 2] (a suspected greenhouse gas) per unit of electricity generated than the conventional power plant due to the increased efficiency.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) channel corner seal

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1980-01-01

    A corner seal for an MHD duct includes a compressible portion which contacts the duct walls and an insulating portion which contacts the electrodes, sidewall bars and insulators. The compressible portion may be a pneumatic or hydraulic gasket or an open-cell foam rubber. The insulating portion is segmented into a plurality of pieces of the same thickness as the electrodes, insulators and sidewall bars and aligned therewith, the pieces aligned with the insulator being of a different size from the pieces aligned with the electrodes and sidewall bars to create a stepped configuration along the corners of the MHD channel.

  7. Temporal evolution of a Current Sheet with Initial Finite Perturbations by Three-dimensional MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Takaaki

    Temporal evolution of a current sheet with initial perturbations is studied by using the threedimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The magnetic reconnection is considered to be the main engine of the energy rele ase in solar flares. The structure of the diffusion region is, however, not stil l understood under the circumstances with enormously large magnetic Reynolds num ber as the solar corona. In particular, the relationship between the flare's macroscopic physics and the microscopic ones are unclear. It is generally believed that the MHD turbulence s hould play a role in the intermediate scale. The initial current sheet is in an approximately hydromagnetic equilibrium with anti-parallel magnetic field in the y-direction. We imposed a finite-amplitude perturbations (=50ee what happens. Special attention is paid upon the evolution of a three-dimens ional structure in the direction along the initial electric current (z-direction ). Our preliminary results are as follows: (1) In the early phase of the evolut ion, high wavenumber modes in the z-direction are excited and grow. (2) Many "X "-type neutral points (lines) are generated along the magnetic neutral line (pla ne) in the current sheet. When they evolve into the non-linear phase, three-dime nsional structures in the z-direction also evolve. The spatial scale in the z-di rection seems to be almost comparable with that in the xy-plane. (3) The energy release rate is reduced in case of 3D simulations compared with 2D ones probably because of the reduction of the inflow cross sections by the formation of pattc hy structures in the current sheet.

  8. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, R.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pollina, R.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Avco-Everett Research Lab., Everett, MA )

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of MHD materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues; sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate.

  9. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to design and construct prototypical hardware for an integrated MHD topping cycle, and conduct long duration proof-of-concept tests of integrated system at the US DOE Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering design data base on MHD power train reliability, availability, maintainability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up the topping cycle design to the next level of development, an early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include: A slagging coal combustor with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with an Eastern (Illinois {number sign}6) or Western (Montana Rosebud) coal, a segmented supersonic nozzle, a supersonic MHD channel capable of generating at least 1.5 MW of electrical power, a segmented supersonic diffuser section to interface the channel with existing facility quench and exhaust systems, a complete set of current control circuits for local diagonal current control along the channel, and a set of current consolidation circuits to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

  10. MHD-EMP protection guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Vance, E.F.

    1992-03-01

    A nuclear detonation at altitudes several hundred kilometers above the earth will severely distort the earth`s magnetic field and result in a strong magnetohyrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP). The geomagnetic disturbance interacts with the soil to induce current and horizontal electric gradients. The geomagnetic disturbance interacts with the soil to induced current and horizontal electric gradients in the earth. MHD-EMP, also called E3 since it is the third component of the high-altitude EMP (HEMP), lasts over 100 s after the exoatmospheric burst. MHD-EMP is similar to solar geomagnetic storms in it`s global and low frequency (less than 1 Hz) nature except that E3 can be much more intense with a far shorter duration. When the MHD-EMP gradients are integrated over great distances by power lines, communication cables, or other long conductors, the induced voltages are significant. (The horizontal gradients in the soil are too small to induce major responses by local interactions with facilities.) The long pulse waveform for MHD-EMP-induced currents on long lines has a peak current of 200 A and a time-to-half-peak of 100 s. If this current flows through transformer windings, it can saturate the magnetic circuit and cause 60 Hz harmonic production. To mitigate the effects of MHD-EMP on a facility, long conductors must be isolated from the building and the commercial power harmonics and voltage swings must be addressed. The transfer switch would be expected to respond to the voltage fluctuations as long as the harmonics have not interfered with the switch control circuitry. The major sources of MHD-EMP induced currents are the commercial power lines and neutral; neutral current indirect coupling to the facility power or ground system via the metal fence, powered gate, parking lights, etc; metal water pipes; phone lines; and other long conductors that enter or come near the facility. The major source of harmonics is the commercial power system.

  11. MHD Simulations of Disruptions in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breslau, J. A.; Strauss, H. R.; Paccagnella, R.; Jardin, S. C.

    2011-10-01

    Research tokamaks such as ITER must be designed to tolerate a limited number of disruptions without sustaining significant damage. It is therefore vital to have numerical tools that can accurately predict the effects of these events. The 3D nonlinear extended MHD code M3D has been augmented with models of the vacuum/halo region and a thin axisymmetric resistive shell that allow it to simulate disruptions and calculate the associated wall currents and forces. Its reliability, however, must be assessed with careful validation studies against disruption databases from existing experiments. Here we compare M3D VDE/kink disruption calculations with data from NSTX. The results of high-resolution numerical simulations at realistic Lundquist numbers show reasonable agreement with experimental data and provide confidence that M3D will be a useful tool for future ITER calculations. The effects of different choices of plasma outflow boundary conditions will also be reported.

  12. Divergence Free High Order Filter Methods for Multiscale Non-ideal MHD Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern

    2003-01-01

    Low-dissipative high order filter finite difference methods for long time wave propagation of shock/turbulence/combustion compressible viscous MHD flows has been constructed. Several variants of the filter approach that cater to different flow types are proposed. These filters provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of the divergence of the magnetic field (Delta . B) numerical error in the sense that no standard divergence cleaning is required. For certain 2-D MHD test problems, divergence free preservation of the magnetic fields of these filter schemes has been achieved.

  13. Variational Integration for Ideal MHD with Built-in Advection Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yao; Qin, Hong; Burby, J. W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2014-08-05

    Newcomb's Lagrangian for ideal MHD in Lagrangian labeling is discretized using discrete exterior calculus. Variational integrators for ideal MHD are derived thereafter. Besides being symplectic and momentum preserving, the schemes inherit built-in advection equations from Newcomb's formulation, and therefore avoid solving them and the accompanying error and dissipation. We implement the method in 2D and show that numerical reconnection does not take place when singular current sheets are present. We then apply it to studying the dynamics of the ideal coalescence instability with multiple islands. The relaxed equilibrium state with embedded current sheets is obtained numerically.

  14. MHD simulation of a magnetized target in an imploding conical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Conical imploding magnetic target fusion (MTF) is a new concept, in which the compression comes from both fast mechanic implosion and synchronized theta-pinching or Z-pinching. The compressed magnetized target has a moving end, an increasing external current, and an accumulating high density. Magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) simulation could help revealing the details of the evolving plasma and finding the parameters (imploding speed, fuel amount, theta-pinch or Z-pinch current profile, etc.) required to reach Lawson Criterion. Preliminary 2D MHD simulation results of a conical imploding theta-pinch are presented.

  15. Unparticle example in 2D.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Howard; Kats, Yevgeny

    2008-09-26

    We discuss what can be learned about unparticle physics by studying simple quantum field theories in one space and one time dimension. We argue that the exactly soluble 2D theory of a massless fermion coupled to a massive vector boson, the Sommerfield model, is an interesting analog of a Banks-Zaks model, approaching a free theory at high energies and a scale-invariant theory with nontrivial anomalous dimensions at low energies. We construct a toy standard model coupling to the fermions in the Sommerfield model and study how the transition from unparticle behavior at low energies to free particle behavior at high energies manifests itself in interactions with the toy standard model particles.

  16. Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tixador, P.

    1994-04-01

    Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion are now attracting attention in several countries. Different superconducting MagLev and MHD systems will be described concentrating on, above all, the electromagnetic aspect. Some programmes occurring throughout the world will be described. Magnetic levitated trains could be the new high speed transportation system for the 21st century. Intensive studies involving MagLev trains using superconductivity have been carried out in Japan since 1970. The construction of a 43 km long track is to be the next step. In 1991 a six year programme was launched in the United States to evaluate the performances of MagLev systems for transportation. The MHD (MagnetoHydroDynamic) offers some interesting advantages (efficiency, stealth characteristics, ...) for naval propulsion and increasing attention is being paid towards it nowadays. Japan is also up at the top with the tests of Yamato I, a 260 ton MHD propulsed ship. Depuis quelques années nous assistons à un redémarrage de programmes concernant la lévitation et la propulsion supraconductrices. Différents systèmes supraconducteurs de lévitation et de propulsion seront décrits en examinant plus particulièrement l'aspect électromagnétique. Quelques programmes à travers le monde seront abordés. Les trains à sustentation magnétique pourraient constituer un nouveau mode de transport terrestre à vitesse élevée (500 km/h) pour le 21^e siècle. Les japonais n'ont cessé de s'intéresser à ce système avec bobine supraconductrice. Ils envisagent un stade préindustriel avec la construction d'une ligne de 43 km. En 1991 un programme américain pour une durée de six ans a été lancé pour évaluer les performances des systèmes à lévitation pour le transport aux Etats Unis. La MHD (Magnéto- Hydro-Dynamique) présente des avantages intéressants pour la propulsion navale et un regain d'intérêt apparaît à l'heure actuelle. Le japon se situe là encore à la pointe des d

  17. Newtonian CAFE: a new ideal MHD code to study the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. J.; Guzmán, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present a new independent code designed to solve the equations of classical ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in three dimensions, submitted to a constant gravitational field. The purpose of the code centers on the analysis of solar phenomena within the photosphere-corona region. In special the code is capable to simulate the propagation of impulsively generated linear and non-linear MHD waves in the non-isothermal solar atmosphere. We present 1D and 2D standard tests to demonstrate the quality of the numerical results obtained with our code. As 3D tests we present the propagation of MHD-gravity waves and vortices in the solar atmosphere. The code is based on high-resolution shock-capturing methods, uses the HLLE flux formula combined with Minmod, MC and WENO5 reconstructors. The divergence free magnetic field constraint is controlled using the Flux Constrained Transport method.

  18. Shear-induced instability and arch filament eruption - A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Song, M. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Dryer, M.

    1991-01-01

    A situation wherein a bipolar magnetic field embedded in a stratified solar atmosphere undergoes symmetrical shear motion at the footpoints is investigated via a 2D (nonplanar) MHD simulation. It was found that the vertical plasma flow velocities grow exponentially, leading to a new type of global MHD instability. The growth rate increases almost linearly until it reaches the same order of magnitude as the Alfven speed. Then a nonlinear MHD instability occurs beyond this point. It was found that the central loops are pinched by opposing Lorentz forces, and the outer closed loops stretch upward with the vertically-rising mass flow. The nonlinear dynamical shearing instability is illustrated by a numerical example that is given for three different values of the plasma beta that span several orders of magnitude.

  19. MHD simple waves and the divergence wave

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-25

    In this paper we investigate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simple divergence waves in MHD, for models in which nablacentre dotBnot =0. These models are related to the eight wave Riemann solvers in numerical MHD, in which the eighth wave is the divergence wave associated with nablacentre dotBnot =0. For simple wave solutions, all physical variables (the gas density, pressure, fluid velocity, entropy, and magnetic field induction in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function phi. We consider the form of the MHD equations used by both Powell et al. and Janhunen. It is shown that the Janhunen version of the equations possesses fully nonlinear, exact simple wave solutions for the divergence wave, but no physically meaningful simple divergence wave solution exists for the Powell et al. system. We suggest that the 1D simple, divergence wave solution for the Janhunen system, may be useful for the testing and validation of numerical MHD codes.

  20. Chapter 3: MHD stability, operational limits and disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hender, T. C.; Wesley, J. C.; Bialek, J.; Bondeson, A.; Boozer, A. H.; Buttery, R. J.; Garofalo, A.; Goodman, T. P.; Granetz, R. S.; Gribov, Y.; Gruber, O.; Gryaznevich, M.; Giruzzi, G.; Günter, S.; Hayashi, N.; Helander, P.; Hegna, C. C.; Howell, D. F.; Humphreys, D. A.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Hyatt, A. W.; Isayama, A.; Jardin, S. C.; Kawano, Y.; Kellman, A.; Kessel, C.; Koslowski, H. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Lazzaro, E.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lukash, V.; Manickam, J.; Medvedev, S.; Mertens, V.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nakamura, Y.; Navratil, G.; Okabayashi, M.; Ozeki, T.; Paccagnella, R.; Pautasso, G.; Porcelli, F.; Pustovitov, V. D.; Riccardo, V.; Sato, M.; Sauter, O.; Schaffer, M. J.; Shimada, M.; Sonato, P.; Strait, E. J.; Sugihara, M.; Takechi, M.; Turnbull, A. D.; Westerhof, E.; Whyte, D. G.; Yoshino, R.; Zohm, H.; ITPA MHD, the; Disruption; Magnetic Control Topical Group

    2007-06-01

    Progress in the area of MHD stability and disruptions, since the publication of the 1999 ITER Physics Basis document (1999 Nucl. Fusion 39 2137-2664), is reviewed. Recent theoretical and experimental research has made important advances in both understanding and control of MHD stability in tokamak plasmas. Sawteeth are anticipated in the ITER baseline ELMy H-mode scenario, but the tools exist to avoid or control them through localized current drive or fast ion generation. Active control of other MHD instabilities will most likely be also required in ITER. Extrapolation from existing experiments indicates that stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by highly localized feedback-controlled current drive should be possible in ITER. Resistive wall modes are a key issue for advanced scenarios, but again, existing experiments indicate that these modes can be stabilized by a combination of plasma rotation and direct feedback control with non-axisymmetric coils. Reduction of error fields is a requirement for avoiding non-rotating magnetic island formation and for maintaining plasma rotation to help stabilize resistive wall modes. Recent experiments have shown the feasibility of reducing error fields to an acceptable level by means of non-axisymmetric coils, possibly controlled by feedback. The MHD stability limits associated with advanced scenarios are becoming well understood theoretically, and can be extended by tailoring of the pressure and current density profiles as well as by other techniques mentioned here. There have been significant advances also in the control of disruptions, most notably by injection of massive quantities of gas, leading to reduced halo current fractions and a larger fraction of the total thermal and magnetic energy dissipated by radiation. These advances in disruption control are supported by the development of means to predict impending disruption, most notably using neural networks. In addition to these advances in means to control or

  1. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  2. Rapporteur report: MHD electric power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seikel, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Five US papers from the Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on MHD Electrical Power Generation at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are summarized. Results of the initial parametric phase of the US effort on the study of potential early commercial MHD plants are reported and aspects of the smaller commercial prototype plant termed the Engineering Test Facility are discussed. The alternative of using a disk geometry generator rather than a linear generator in baseload MHD plants is examined. Closed-cycle as well as open-cycle MHD plants are considered.

  3. Nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic wave propagation in the neighbourhood of a 2D magnetic X-point: oscillatory reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, J. A.; De Moortel, I.; Hood, A. W.; Brady, C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: This paper extends the models of Craig & McClymont (1991, ApJ, 371, L41) and McLaughlin & Hood (2004, A&A, 420, 1129) to include finite β and nonlinear effects. Aims: We investigate the nature of nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic waves about a 2D magnetic X-point. Methods: We solve the compressible and resistive MHD equations using a Lagrangian remap, shock capturing code (Arber et al. 2001, J. Comp. Phys., 171, 151) and consider an initial condition in {v}×{B} \\cdot {hat{z}} (a natural variable of the system). Results: We observe the formation of both fast and slow oblique magnetic shocks. The nonlinear wave deforms the X-point into a “cusp-like” point which in turn collapses to a current sheet. The system then evolves through a series of horizontal and vertical current sheets, with associated changes in connectivity, i.e. the system exhibits oscillatory reconnection. Our final state is non-potential (but in force balance) due to asymmetric heating from the shocks. Larger amplitudes in our initial condition correspond to larger values of the final current density left in the system. Conclusions: The inclusion of nonlinear terms introduces several new features to the system that were absent from the linear regime. A movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. MHD activity in the ISX-B tokamak: experimental results and theoretical interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B.A.; Dunlap, J.L.; Bell, J.D.; Charlton, L.A.; Cooper, W.A.; Dory, R.A.; Hender, T.C.; Hicks, H.R.; Holmes, J.A.; Lynch, V.E.

    1982-01-01

    The observed spectrum of MHD fluctuations in the ISX-B tokamak is clearly dominated by the n=1 mode when the q=1 surface is in the plasma. This fact agrees well with theoretical predictions based on 3-D resistive MHD calculations. They show that the (m=1; n=1) mode is then the dominant instability. It drives other n=1 modes through toroidal coupling and n>1 modes through nonlinear couplings. These theoretically predicted mode structures have been compared in detail with the experimentally measured wave forms (using arrays of soft x-ray detectors). The agreement is excellent. More detailed comparisons between theory and experiment have required careful reconstructions of the ISX-B equilibria. The equilibria so constructed have permitted a precise evaluation of the ideal MHD stability properties of ISX-B. The present results indicate that the high ..beta.. ISX-B equilibria are marginally stable to finite eta ideal MHD modes. The resistive MHD calculations also show that at finite ..beta.. there are unstable resistive pressure driven modes.

  5. MHD simulations: Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiengarten, T.; Kleimann, J.; Fichtner, H.; Kühl, P.; Heber, B.; Kissmann, R.

    2013-12-01

    Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) form in the solar wind when parcels of fast-speed wind interact with slow-speed wind due to the rotation of the Sun. The resulting buildup of pressure generates disturbances that, with increasing time (or distance from the Sun), may develop into a so-called forward-reverse shock-pair. During solar-quiet times CIRs can be the dominant force shaping large-scale structures in the heliosphere. Studying CIRs is therefore important because the associated shocks are capable of e.g. accelerating energetic particles or deflecting cosmic rays. The global structure of CIRs can be modeled with an MHD approach that gives the plasma quantities needed to model the transport of particles in the heliosphere (with e.g. stochastic differential equations (SDEs)). Our MHD code CRONOS employs a semi-discrete finite volume scheme with adaptive time-stepping Runge-Kutta integration. The solenoidality of the magnetic field is ensured via constrained transport and the code supports Cartesian, Cylindrical and Spherical coordinates (including coordinate singularities) with the option for non-equidistant grids. The code runs in parallel (MPI) and supports the HDF5 output data format. Here, we show results from 3D-MHD simulations with our code CRONOS for a) analytic boundary conditions where results can be compared to those obtained with a different code and b) boundary conditions derived with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model from observational data (WSO), which are compared to spacecraft observations. Comparison with Pizzo (1982) for analytic boundary conditions Comparison with STEREO A for Carrington Rotation 2060

  6. Ceramic components for MHD electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, D.D.

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf/sub x/In/sub y/A/sub z/O/sub 2/ where x = 0.1 to 0.4, y = 0.3 to 0.6, z = 0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  7. Ceramic component for MHD electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Bates, Junior L.

    1981-01-01

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf.sub.x In.sub.y A.sub.z O.sub.2 where x=0.1 to 0.4, y=0.3 to 0.6, z=0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  8. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This eighteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1991 to January 31, 1992. The precombustor is fully assembled. Manufacturing of all slagging stage components has been completed. All cooling panels were welded in place and the panel/shell gap was filled with RTV. Final combustor assembly is in progress. The low pressure cooling subsystem (LPCS) was delivered to the CDIF. Second stage brazing issues were resolved. The construction of the two anode power cabinets was completed.

  9. Kinematic MHD Models of Collapsing Magnetic Traps: Extension to 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, Keith J.; Neukirch, Thomas

    2009-02-16

    We show how fully 3D kinematic MHD models of collapsing magnetic traps (CMTs) can be constructed, thus extending previous work on 2D trap models. CMTs are thought to form in the relaxing magnetic field lines in solar flares and it has been proposed that they play an important role in the acceleration of high-energy particles. This work is a first step to understanding the physics of CMTs better.

  10. Gasified coal-fired system. [MHD generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, J.H.

    1982-08-24

    A downflow coal gasifier, supplied lime/limestone with the coal, removes sulfur and obviates the production of particulate matter in generating a clean, low btu gas for the combustor of an mhd channel. Air for both the combustor of the mhd channel and the gasifier is heated by the discharged fluids from the channel.

  11. System analysis of high performance MHD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Berry, G.F.; Hu, N.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation on the upper ranges of performance that an MHD power plant using advanced technology assumptions might achieve and a parametric study on the key variables affecting this high performance. To simulate a high performance MHD power plant and conduct a parametric study, the Systems Analysis Language Translator (SALT) code developed at Argonne National Laboratory was used. The parametric study results indicate that the overall efficiency of an MHD power plant can be further increased subject to the improvement of some key variables such as, the MHD generator inverter efficiency, channel electrical loading factor, magnetic field strength, preheated air temperature, and combustor heat loss. In an optimization calculation, the simulated high performance MHD power plant using advanced technology assumptions can attain an ultra high overall efficiency, exceeding 62%. 12 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  13. Cusp geometry in MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, George; Crooker, Nancy; Siebert, Keith; Maynard, Nelson; Weimer, Daniel; White, Willard

    2005-01-01

    The MHD simulations described here show that the latitude of the high-altitude cusp decreases as the IMF swings from North to South, that there is a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at high-altitude associated with a dawn dusk component of the IMF, and that at the same time there is also a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at low-altitude. The simulations generate a feature that represents what has been called the cleft. It appears as a tail (when the IMF has a By component) attached to the cusp, extending either toward the dawn flank or the dusk flank depending on the dawn dusk orientation of the IMF. This one-sided cleft connects the cusp to the magnetospheric sash. We compare cusp geometry predicted by MHD simulations against published observations based on Hawkeye and DMSP data. Regarding the high-altitude predictions, the comparisons are not definitive, mainly because the observations are incomplete or mutually inconsistent. Regarding the low-altitude prediction of a strong dawn dusk asymmetry, the observations are unambiguous and are in good qualitative agreement with the prediction.

  14. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D. ); Sikes, W.C. )

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  15. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  16. Mice that are resistant to diet-induced weight loss have greater food anticipatory activity and altered melanocortin-3 receptor (MC3R) and dopamine receptor 2 (D2) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vaanholt, Lobke M; Mitchell, Sharon E; Sinclair, Rachel E; Speakman, John R

    2015-07-01

    Diet-induced weight loss varies considerably between individuals, but the mechanisms driving these individual differences remain largely unknown. Here we investigated whether key neuropeptides involved in the regulation of energy balance or reward systems were differentially expressed in mice that were prone or resistant to caloric restriction (CR) induced weight loss. Mice (n=30 males and n=34 females) were fed 70% of their own baseline ad libitum intake for 25days, after which their brains were collected and expression of various neuropeptides were investigated and compared between the 10 male and 10 female mice that showed the greatest (high weight loss, HWL) or lowest weight loss (LWL) (n=40 in total). HWL mice showed a differential neuropeptide profile to LWL in both sexes, characterised by increased expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), leptin receptor (ObRb), and melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3R) in the arcuate nucleus. No changes in the expression of fat mass and obesity related gene (FTO) or suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (Socs3) were observed. Levels of dopamine D2 receptor were decreased in the nucleus accumbens in HWL compared to LWL mice. HWL mice showed a stronger increase in food anticipatory activity (FAA) in response to CR than LWL mice. These results indicate that the mice prone to diet-induced weight loss experienced greater hunger, potentially driving their elevated FAA.

  17. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOEpatents

    Gentry, Stephen M.; Wehlburg, Christine M.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Smith, Mark W.; Smith, Jody L.

    2006-02-07

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  18. MHD waves and instabilities for gravitating, magnetized configurations in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, Rony; Goedbloed, Hans J. P.

    Seismic probing of equilibrium configurations is of course well-known from geophysics, but has also been succesfully used to determine the internal structure of the Sun to an amazing accuracy. The results of helioseismology are quite impressive, although they only exploit an equilibrium structure where inward gravity is balanced by a pressure gradient in a 1D radial fashion. In principle, one can do the same for stationary, gravitating, magnetized plasma equilibria, as needed to perform MHD seismology in astrophysical jets or accretion disks. The introduction of (sheared) differential rotation does require the important switch from diagnosing static to stationary equilibrium configurations. The theory to describe all linear waves and instabilities in ideal MHD, given an exact stationary, gravitating, magnetized plasma equilibrium, in any dimensionality (1D, 2D, 3D) has been known since 1960, and is governed by the Frieman-Rotenberg equation. The full (mathematical) power of spectral theory governing physical eigenmode determination comes into play when using the Frieman-Rotenberg equation for moving equilibria, as applicable to astrophysical jets, accretion disks, but also solar flux ropes with stationary flow patterns. I will review exemplary seismic studies of flowing equilibrium configurations, covering solar to astrophysical configurations in motion. In that case, even essentially 1D configurations require quantification of the spectral web of eigenmodes, organizing the complex eigenfrequency plane.

  19. Simulations of Pulse Detonation Engines with MHD Thrust Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeineh, Christopher; Roth, Timothy; Cole, Lord; Karagozian, Ann; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2008-11-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have received significant attention in recent years due to their potentially superior performance over constant-pressure engines. Yet unsteady chamber pressures cause the PDRE flow to be either over-expanded or under-expanded for the majority of the cycle, with substantial performance loss in atmospheric flight applications. The present computational studies examine the potential benefits of using magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) thrust augmentation by extracting energy via a generator in the PDRE nozzle and applying it to a separate, secondary stream. In the present studies, which involve both transient quasi-1D and 2D numerical simulations, the energy extracted from the nozzle flow is directly applied to a by-pass air stream through an MHD accelerator. The air stream is first shocked by the under-expanded nozzle flow and raised to high temperature, allowing thermal ionization. The specific conditions for thrust augmentation are examined. Alternative configurations utilizing a magnetic piston in the PDRE chamber are also explored. Results show potential performance gains but with significant challenges, depending on the operating and flight conditions.

  20. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee's activities to date have focused primarily on the technology transfer'' aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

  1. Application of Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and Recent Research Trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Nobuhiro

    As the applications of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion, research and development for high-efficiency and low emission electric power generation system, MHD accelerations and/or MHD thrusters, and flow control around hypersonic and re-entry vehicles are introduced. For closed cycle MHD power generation, high-efficiency MHD single system is the most hopeful system and space power system using mixed inert gas (MIG) working medium is proposed. For open cycle MHD, high-efficiency coal fired MHD system with CO2 recovery has been proposed. As inverse process of MHD power generation, MHD accelerators/thrusters are expected as the next generation propulsion system. Heat flux reduction to protect re-entry vehicles is expected by an MHD process for safety return from space missions.

  2. MHD Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae with Cosmos++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Shizuka; Salmonson, Jay

    2010-10-01

    We performed 2D, axisymmetric, MHD simulations with Cosmos++ in order to examine the growth of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in core-collapse supernovae. We have initialized a non-rotating 15 Msolar progenitor, infused with differential rotation and poloidal magnetic fields. The collapse of the iron core is simulated with the Shen EOS, and the parametric Ye and entropy evolution. The wavelength of the unstable mode in the post-collapse environment is expected to be only ~200 m. In order to achieve the fine spatial resolution requirement, we employed remapping technique after the iron core has collapsed and bounced. The MRI unstable region appears near the equator and angular momentum and entropy are transported outward. Higher resolution remap run display more vigorous overturns and stronger transport of angular momentum and entropy. Our results are in agreement with the earlier work by Akiyama et al. [1] and Obergaulinger et al. [2].

  3. SSX MHD plasma wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael R.; Schaffner, David A.

    2015-06-01

    A new turbulent plasma source at the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) facility is described. The MHD wind tunnel configuration employs a magnetized plasma gun to inject high-beta plasma into a large, well-instrumented, vacuum drift region. This provides unique laboratory conditions approaching that in the solar wind: there is no applied background magnetic field in the drift region and has no net axial magnetic flux; the plasma flow speed is on the order of the local sound speed (M ~ 1), so flow energy density is comparable to thermal energy density; and the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure is of order unity (plasma β ~ 1) so thermal energy density is also comparable to magnetic energy density. Results presented here and referenced within demonstrate the new capabilities and show how the new platform is proving useful for fundamental plasma turbulence studies.

  4. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This seventeenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period August 1, 1991 to October 31, 1991. Manufacturing of the prototypical combustor pressure shell has been completed including leak, proof, and assembly fit checking. Manufacturing of forty-five cooling panels was also completed including leak, proof, and flow testing. All precombustor internal components (combustion can baffle and swirl box) were received and checked, and integration of the components was initiated. A decision was made regarding the primary and backup designs for the 1A4 channel. The assembly of the channel related prototypical hardware continued. The cathode wall electrical wiring is now complete. The mechanical design of the diffuser has been completed.

  5. Cosmological AMR MHD with Enzo

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hao; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we present EnzoMHD, the extension of the cosmological code Enzoto include magnetic fields. We use the hyperbolic solver of Li et al. (2008) for the computation of interface fluxes. We use constrained transport methods of Balsara & Spicer (1999) and Gardiner & Stone (2005) to advance the induction equation, the reconstruction technique of Balsara (2001) to extend the Adaptive Mesh Refinement of Berger & Colella (1989) already used in Enzo, though formulated in a slightly different way for ease of implementation. This combination of methods preserves the divergence of the magnetic field to machine precision. We use operator splitting to include gravity and cosmological expansion. We then present a series of cosmological and non cosmologjcal tests problems to demonstrate the quality of solution resulting from this combination of solvers.

  6. MHD seed recovery and regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-10-01

    The TRW Econoseed MHD Seed Regeneration Process is based on the reaction of calcium formate with potassium sulfate spent seed from an MHD electric power generation plant. The process was tested at bench scale, design a proof of concept (POC) test plant, plan and cost a Phase 2 project for a POC plant evaluation and prepare a conceptual design of a 300 MW (t) commercial plant. The results of the project are as follows: (1) each of the unit operations is demonstrated, and (2) the data are incorporated into a POC plant design and project cost, as well as a 300 MW (t) commercial retrofit plant design and cost estimate. Specific results are as follows: (1) calcium formate can be produced at 100 percent yield in a total retention time of less than 5 minutes, (2) utilizing the calcium formate, spent seed can quantitatively be converted to potassium formate, potassium carbonate or mixtures of these with potassium sulfate as per the commercial design without measurable loss of potassium to insolubles at a total retention time under 20 minutes and ambient pressure, (3) the solid rejects form the process meet RCRA EP Toxicity requirements for safe disposal, and (4) filtration and evaporation data, as well as reaction data cited above, show that the Econoseed technology is ready for scale up to POC plant scale. Economics forecast studies show that the total cost per unit of potassium for seed regeneration by the Econoseed Process is in the range of $0.23 to $0.27/lb, a cost which is less than half the potassium cost of $0.63/lb for purchasing new potassium carbonate.

  7. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    A summary of the work is excerpted here. Final design of an MHD channel for the ITC program POC test has been completed. The channel was designed to be capable of 1.5 MW {sub e} power output and a lifetime of 2000 hours. Emphasis was placed upon durability and reliability. Hence, specific measures were taken to design against channel damage due to electric faults. The life-limiting issues associated with electrochemical corrosion and erosion of gas-side surfaces were addressed by the use of various materials with proven wear characteristics in a coal-fired MHD channel environment. Pitting of prototypical sidewall coupons was observed in the CDIF workhorse testing. The most likely cause of the observed pitting, water leaks resulting from cooling water tube braze failures, has been remedied. New brazing procedures and isolation of the sidebar gas-side material from water contact will prevent sidebar pitting in the prototypical channel. Water-side corrosion tests reported in this quarterly report include the latest results of tungsten-copper elements at controlled pH, heat flux and voltage levels. In the combustion subsystem, efforts continued to focus on understanding and improving the current levels of slag recovery and seed utilization achieved by the combustor. Analytical support was also provided in the areas of slag rejection system operation, precombustor operation, and oil burner design modification. Channel data analysis activities continued in support of prototypical coupon testing at the CDIF. Analyses are presented on channel wall slagging behavior and sidewall voltage distributions.

  8. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  9. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  10. Distribution of temperature in the slot of an induction MHD pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishbergs, R.

    2007-09-01

    At thermal calculations of the induction MHD machines, the mean temperatures of main parts of the machine are often defined. Yet, with the increase of specific electromagnetic loads, with the use of new heat-resistant insulating materials and with the intention to use electrically short windings (a small number of poles that causes asymmetry of phase currents) in the pumps of mean power determining are the local temperature peaks in the winding, though the winding mean temperature is far from limiting. The paper considers the temperature distribution over the slot height in the induction MHD pump. Figs 2, Refs 13.

  11. MHD-EMP analysis and protection. Technical report. [MHD-EMP (magnetohydrodynamic-electromagnetic pulse)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Tesche, F.M.; McConnell, B.W.; Vance, E.F.

    1993-09-01

    A large nuclear detonation at altitudes of several hundred kilometers above the earth distorts the earth's magnetic field and produces a strong magnetohydrodynamic-electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP). MHD-EMP is similar to solar geomagnetic storms in its global and low frequency (less than 1 Hz) nature except that it can be more intense with a shorter duration. It will induce quasi-dc currents in long lines. The MHD-EMP induced currents may cause large voltage fluctuations and severe harmonic distortion in commercial electric power systems. Several MHD-EMP coupling models for predicting the induced current on a wide variety of conducting structures are described, various simulation concepts are summarized, and the results from several MHD-EMP tests are presented. To mitigate the effects of MHD-EMP on a facility, long conductors must be isolated from the building, and the commercial power harmonics and voltage swings must be addressed. It is found that facilities can be protected against MHD-EMP by using methods which are consistent with standard engineering practices. MHD-EMP Interaction Analysis, Power Line Model, MHD-EMP Protection Guidelines, Transformer Test.

  12. 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of SATURN imploding Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, J.H.; Eddleman, J.L.; Springer, P.T.

    1995-11-06

    Z-pinch implosions driven by the SATURN device at Sandia National Laboratory are modeled with a 2D radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, showing strong growth of magneto-Rayleigh Taylor (MRT) instability. Modeling of the linear and nonlinear development of MRT modes predicts growth of bubble-spike structures that increase the time span of stagnation and the resulting x-ray pulse width. Radiation is important in the pinch dynamics keeping the sheath relatively cool during the run-in and releasing most of the stagnation energy. The calculations give x-ray pulse widths and magnitudes in reasonable agreement with experiments, but predict a radiating region that is too dense and radially localized at stagnation. We also consider peaked initial density profiles with constant imploding sheath velocity that should reduce MRT instability and improve performance. 2D krypton simulations show an output x-ray power > 80 TW for the peaked profile.

  13. 2D materials: to graphene and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2011-01-01

    This review is an attempt to illustrate the different alternatives in the field of 2D materials. Graphene seems to be just the tip of the iceberg and we show how the discovery of alternative 2D materials is starting to show the rest of this iceberg. The review comprises the current state-of-the-art of the vast literature in concepts and methods already known for isolation and characterization of graphene, and rationalizes the quite disperse literature in other 2D materials such as metal oxides, hydroxides and chalcogenides, and metal-organic frameworks.

  14. Open Boundary Conditions for Dissipative MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, E T

    2011-11-10

    In modeling magnetic confinement, astrophysics, and plasma propulsion, representing the entire physical domain is often difficult or impossible, and artificial, or 'open' boundaries are appropriate. A novel open boundary condition (BC) for dissipative MHD, called Lacuna-based open BC (LOBC), is presented. LOBC, based on the idea of lacuna-based truncation originally presented by V.S. Ryaben'kii and S.V. Tsynkov, provide truncation with low numerical noise and minimal reflections. For hyperbolic systems, characteristic-based BC (CBC) exist for separating the solution into outgoing and incoming parts. In the hyperbolic-parabolic dissipative MHD system, such separation is not possible, and CBC are numerically unstable. LOBC are applied in dissipative MHD test problems including a translating FRC, and coaxial-electrode plasma acceleration. Solution quality is compared to solutions using CBC and zero-normal derivative BC. LOBC are a promising new open BC option for dissipative MHD.

  15. MHD power generation: not now, but ever

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The basic concept of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) has been known for over 100 years, but commercial viability is still a decade or more away despite US-Soviet collaborations to solve engineering problems. The simplicity of the concept offers advantages in terms of stress and efficiency, but implementation requires high-conductivity fluids and specially-designed subsystems. Other problems include the Hall field effect, the size and flux density requirements of superconducting magnets, ash, seed recovery, power inversion, and channel design. Researchers are developing both open-cycle and closed-cycle systems as well as technologies based on MHD and steam bottoming and MHD cogeneration. First-generation MHD plants will probably stress reliability above efficiency. Military applications could include space power generation. 4 figures. (DCK)

  16. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. [Threshold unstable MHD activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical predictions were compared with available data from JET on the threshold unstable MHD activity in toroidal confinement devices. In particular, questions arising as to Hartmans number and the selection of a kinematic viscosity are discussed.

  17. Solar driven liquid metal MHD power generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A solar energy collector focuses solar energy onto a solar oven which is attached to a mixer which in turn is attached to the channel of a MHD generator. Gas enters the oven and a liquid metal enters the mixer. The gas/liquid metal mixture is heated by the collected solar energy and moves through the MHD generator thereby generating electrical power. The mixture is then separated and recycled.

  18. Solar driven liquid metal MHD power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1983-06-01

    A solar energy collector focuses solar energy onto a solar oven which is attached to a mixer which in turn is attached to the channel of a MHD generator. Gas enters the oven and a liquid metal enters the mixer. The gas/liquid metal mixture is heated by the collected solar energy and moves through the MHD generator thereby generating electrical power. The mixture is then separated and recycled.

  19. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  20. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  1. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  2. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  3. MHD heat and seed recovery technology project

    SciTech Connect

    Petrick, M.; Johnson, T. R.

    1980-08-01

    The MHD Heat and Seed Recovery Technology Project at Argonne National Laboratory is obtaining information for the design and operation of the steam plant downstream of the MHD channel-diffuser, and of the seed regeneration process. The project goal is to supply the engineering data required in the design of components for prototype and demonstration MHD facilities. The work is being done in close cooperation with the Heat Recovery-Seed Recovery facility, which will be a 20-MW pilot plant of the MHD steam bottoming system. The primary effort of the HSR Technology Project is directed toward experimental investigations of critical issues, such as 1) NO/sub x/ behavior in the radiant boiler and secondary combustor; 2) radiant boiler design to meet the multiple requirements of steam generation, NO/sub x/ decomposition, and seed slag separation; 3) effects of solid or liquid seed deposits on heat transfer and gas flow in the steam and air heaters; 4) formation, growth, and deposition of seed-slag particles, 5) character of the combustion gas effluents, and 6) the corrosion and erosion of ceramic and metallic materials of construction. These investigations are performed primarily in a 2-MW test facility, Argonne MHD Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL). Other project activities are related to studies of the thermochemistry of the seed-slag combustion gas system, identification of ceramic and metallic materials for service in the MHD-steam plant, and evaluation of seed regeneration processes. Progress is reported.

  4. MHD technology transfer, integration, and review committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-05-01

    As part of Task 8 of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The TTIRC consists of an Executive Committee (EC) which acts as the governing body, and a General Committee (GC), also referred to as the main or full committee, consisting of representatives from the various POC contractors, participating universities and national laboratories, utilities, equipment suppliers, and other potential MHD users or investors. The purpose of the TTIRC is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the U.S. MHD Program. There are seven sections: introduction; Executive Committee and General Committee activity; Committee activities related to technology transfer; ongoing POC integration activities being performed under the auspices of the Executive Committee; recommendations passed on to the DOE by the Executive Committee; Planned activities for the next six months.

  5. GMC COLLISIONS AS TRIGGERS OF STAR FORMATION. I. PARAMETER SPACE EXPLORATION WITH 2D SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Benjamin; Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Bruderer, Simon

    2015-09-20

    We utilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to develop a numerical model for giant molecular cloud (GMC)–GMC collisions between nearly magnetically critical clouds. The goal is to determine if, and under what circumstances, cloud collisions can cause pre-existing magnetically subcritical clumps to become supercritical and undergo gravitational collapse. We first develop and implement new photodissociation region based heating and cooling functions that span the atomic to molecular transition, creating a multiphase ISM and allowing modeling of non-equilibrium temperature structures. Then in 2D and with ideal MHD, we explore a wide parameter space of magnetic field strength, magnetic field geometry, collision velocity, and impact parameter and compare isolated versus colliding clouds. We find factors of ∼2–3 increase in mean clump density from typical collisions, with strong dependence on collision velocity and magnetic field strength, but ultimately limited by flux-freezing in 2D geometries. For geometries enabling flow along magnetic field lines, greater degrees of collapse are seen. We discuss observational diagnostics of cloud collisions, focussing on {sup 13}CO(J = 2–1), {sup 13}CO(J = 3–2), and {sup 12}CO(J = 8–7) integrated intensity maps and spectra, which we synthesize from our simulation outputs. We find that the ratio of J = 8–7 to lower-J emission is a powerful diagnostic probe of GMC collisions.

  6. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology. PMID:27478083

  7. Chemical Approaches to 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Chemistry plays an ever-increasing role in the production, functionalization, processing and applications of graphene and other 2D materials. This special issue highlights a selection of enlightening chemical approaches to 2D materials, which nicely reflect the breadth of the field and convey the excitement of the individuals involved in it, who are trying to translate graphene and related materials from the laboratory into a real, high-impact technology.

  8. HYBRID AND HALL-MHD SIMULATIONS OF COLLISIONLESS RECONNECTION: EFFECTS OF PLASMA PRESSURE TENSOR

    SciTech Connect

    L. YIN; D. WINSKE; ET AL

    2001-05-01

    In this study we performed two-dimensional hybrid (particle ions, massless fluid electrons) and Hall-MHD simulations of collisionless reconnection in a thin current sheet. Both calculations include the full electron pressure tensor (instead of a localized resistivity) in the generalized Ohm's law to initiate reconnection, and in both an initial perturbation to the Harris equilibrium is applied. First, electron dynamics from the two calculations are compared, and we find overall agreement between the two calculations in both the reconnection rate and the global configuration. To address the issue of how kinetic treatment for the ions affects the reconnection dynamics, we compared the fluid-ion dynamics from the Hall-MHD calculation to the particle-ion dynamics obtained from the hybrid simulation. The comparison demonstrates that off-diagonal elements of the ion pressure tensor are important in correctly modeling the ion out-of-plane momentum transport from the X point. It is that these effects can be modeled efficiently using a particle Hall-MHD simulation method in which particle ions used in a predictor/corrector to implement the ion gyro-radius corrections. We also investigate the micro- macro-scale coupling in the magnetotail dynamics by using a new integrated approach in which particle Hall-MHD calculations are embedded inside a MHD simulation. Initial results of the simulation concerning current sheet thinning and reconnection dynamics are discussed.

  9. Glitter in a 2D monolayer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ming; Dornfeld, Matthew; Frauenheim, Thomas; Ganz, Eric

    2015-10-21

    We predict a highly stable and robust atomically thin gold monolayer with a hexagonal close packed lattice stabilized by metallic bonding with contributions from strong relativistic effects and aurophilic interactions. We have shown that the framework of the Au monolayer can survive 10 ps MD annealing simulations up to 1400 K. The framework is also able to survive large motions out of the plane. Due to the smaller number of bonds per atom in the 2D layer compared to the 3D bulk we observe significantly enhanced energy per bond (0.94 vs. 0.52 eV per bond). This is similar to the increase in bond strength going from 3D diamond to 2D graphene. It is a non-magnetic metal, and was found to be the global minima in the 2D space. Phonon dispersion calculations demonstrate high kinetic stability with no negative modes. This 2D gold monolayer corresponds to the top monolayer of the bulk Au(111) face-centered cubic lattice. The close-packed lattice maximizes the aurophilic interactions. We find that the electrons are completely delocalized in the plane and behave as 2D nearly free electron gas. We hope that the present work can inspire the experimental fabrication of novel free standing 2D metal systems.

  10. 2d index and surface operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadde, Abhijit; Gukov, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we compute the superconformal index of 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theories. The 2d superconformal index, a.k.a. flavored elliptic genus, is computed by a unitary matrix integral much like the matrix integral that computes the 4d superconformal index. We compute the 2d index explicitly for a number of examples. In the case of abelian gauge theories we see that the index is invariant under flop transition and under CY-LG correspondence. The index also provides a powerful check of the Seiberg-type duality for non-abelian gauge theories discovered by Hori and Tong. In the later half of the paper, we study half-BPS surface operators in = 2 super-conformal gauge theories. They are engineered by coupling the 2d (2, 2) supersymmetric gauge theory living on the support of the surface operator to the 4d = 2 theory, so that different realizations of the same surface operator with a given Levi type are related by a 2d analogue of the Seiberg duality. The index of this coupled system is computed by using the tools developed in the first half of the paper. The superconformal index in the presence of surface defect is expected to be invariant under generalized S-duality. We demonstrate that it is indeed the case. In doing so the Seiberg-type duality of the 2d theory plays an important role.

  11. 2D-2D tunneling field-effect transistors using WSe2/SnSe2 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tania; Tosun, Mahmut; Hettick, Mark; Ahn, Geun Ho; Hu, Chenming; Javey, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional materials present a versatile platform for developing steep transistors due to their uniform thickness and sharp band edges. We demonstrate 2D-2D tunneling in a WSe2/SnSe2 van der Waals vertical heterojunction device, where WSe2 is used as the gate controlled p-layer and SnSe2 is the degenerately n-type layer. The van der Waals gap facilitates the regulation of band alignment at the heterojunction, without the necessity of a tunneling barrier. ZrO2 is used as the gate dielectric, allowing the scaling of gate oxide to improve device subthreshold swing. Efficient gate control and clean interfaces yield a subthreshold swing of ˜100 mV/dec for >2 decades of drain current at room temperature, hitherto unobserved in 2D-2D tunneling devices. The subthreshold swing is independent of temperature, which is a clear signature of band-to-band tunneling at the heterojunction. A maximum switching ratio ION/IOFF of 107 is obtained. Negative differential resistance in the forward bias characteristics is observed at 77 K. This work bodes well for the possibilities of two-dimensional materials for the realization of energy-efficient future-generation electronics.

  12. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.

  13. 2D FEM Heat Transfer & E&M Field Code

    1992-04-02

    TOPAZ and TOPAZ2D are two-dimensional implicit finite element computer codes for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ2D can also be used to solve electrostatic and magnetostatic problems. The programs solve for the steady-state or transient temperature or electrostatic and magnetostatic potential field on two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature or potential-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation.more » By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. The programs can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  14. MHD equilibria with diamagnetic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessarotto, M.; Zorat, R.; Johnson, J. L.; White, R. B.

    1997-11-01

    An outstanding issue in magnetic confinement is the establishment of MHD equilibria with enhanced flow shear profiles for which turbulence (and transport) may be locally effectively suppressed or at least substantially reduced with respect to standard weak turbulence models. Strong flows develop in the presence of equilibrium E× B-drifts produced by a strong radial electric field, as well as due to diamagnetic contributions produced by steep equilibrium radial profiles of number density, temperature and the flow velocity itself. In the framework of a kinetic description, this generally requires the construction of guiding-center variables correct to second order in the relevant expansion parameter. For this purpose, the Lagrangian approach developed recently by Tessarotto et al. [1] is adopted. In this paper the conditions of existence of such equilibria are analyzed and their basic physical properties are investigated in detail. 1 - M. Pozzo, M. Tessarotto and R. Zorat, in Theory of fusion Plasmas, E.Sindoni et al. eds. (Societá Italiana di Fisica, Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1996), p.295.

  15. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This fourteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1990 to January 31, 1991. Testing of the High Pressure Cooling Subsystem electrical isolator was completed. The PEEK material successfully passed the high temperature, high pressure duration tests (50 hours). The Combustion Subsystem drawings were CADAM released. The procurement process is in progress. An equipment specification and RFP were prepared for the new Low Pressure Cooling System (LPCS) and released for quotation. Work has been conducted on confirmation tests leading to final gas-side designs and studies to assist in channel fabrication.The final cathode gas-side design and the proposed gas-side designs of the anode and sidewall are presented. Anode confirmation tests and related analyses of anode wear mechanisms used in the selection of the proposed anode design are presented. Sidewall confirmation tests, which were used to select the proposed gas-side design, were conducted. The design for the full scale CDIF system was completed. A test program was initiated to investigate the practicality of using Avco current controls for current consolidation in the power takeoff (PTO) regions and to determine the cause of past current consolidation failures. Another important activity was the installation of 1A4-style coupons in the 1A1 channel. A description of the coupons and their location with 1A1 channel is presented herein.

  16. Industrial applications of MHD high temperature air heater technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, D. P.; Fenstermacher, J. E.; White, L. R.; Marksberry, C. L.

    1981-12-01

    The MHD high temperature air heater (HTAH) requires technology beyond the current state-of-the-art of industrial regenerative heaters. Specific aspects of HTAH technology which may find other application include refractory materials and valves resistant to the high temperature, corrosive, slag-bearing gas, materials resistant to cyclic thermal stresses, high temperature support structures for the cored brick bed, regenerative heater operating techniques for preventing accumulation of slag in the heater, and analytical tools for computing regenerative heater size, cost, and performance. Areas where HTAH technology may find application include acetylene/ethylene production processes, flash pyrolysis of coal, high temperature gas reactors, coal gasification processes, various metallurgical processes, waste incineration, and improvements to existing regenerator technology such as blast furnace stoves and glass tank regenerators.

  17. The Turbulent Magnetic Prandtl Number of MHD Turbulence in Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaoyue; Gammie, Charles F.

    2009-06-01

    The magnetic Prandtl number PrM is the ratio of viscosity to resistivity. In astrophysical disks the diffusion of angular momentum (viscosity) and magnetic fields (resistivity) are controlled by turbulence. Phenomenological models of the evolution of large-scale poloidal magnetic fields in disks suggest that the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number PrM,T controls the rate of escape of vertical field from the disk; for PrM,T <= R/H vertical field diffuses outward before it can be advected inward by accretion. Here we measure field diffusion and angular momentum transport due to MHD turbulence in a shearing box, and thus PrM,T, by studying the evolution of a sinusoidal perturbation in the magnetic field that is injected into a turbulent background. We show that the perturbation is always stable, decays approximately exponentially, has decay rate vpropk 2, and that the implied PrM,T ~ 1.

  18. Newtonian CAFE: a new ideal MHD code to study the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Avilés, J. J.; Cruz-Osorio, A.; Lora-Clavijo, F. D.; Guzmán, F. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new code designed to solve the equations of classical ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in three dimensions, submitted to a constant gravitational field. The purpose of the code centres on the analysis of solar phenomena within the photosphere-corona region. We present 1D and 2D standard tests to demonstrate the quality of the numerical results obtained with our code. As solar tests we present the transverse oscillations of Alfvénic pulses in coronal loops using a 2.5D model, and as 3D tests we present the propagation of impulsively generated MHD-gravity waves and vortices in the solar atmosphere. The code is based on high-resolution shock-capturing methods, uses the Harten-Lax-van Leer-Einfeldt (HLLE) flux formula combined with Minmod, MC, and WENO5 reconstructors. The divergence free magnetic field constraint is controlled using the Flux Constrained Transport method.

  19. Alfvén ionization in an MHD-gas interactions code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. D.; Diver, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical model of partially ionized plasmas is developed in order to capture their evolving ionization fractions as a result of Alfvén ionization (AI). The mechanism of, and the parameter regime necessary for, AI is discussed and an expression for the AI rate based on fluid parameters, from a gas-MHD model, is derived. This AI term is added to an existing MHD-gas interactions' code, and the result is a linear, 2D, two-fluid model that includes momentum transfer between charged and neutral species as well as an ionization rate that depends on the velocity fields of both fluids. The dynamics of waves propagating through such a partially ionized plasma are investigated, and it is found that AI has a significant influence on the fluid dynamics as well as both the local and global ionization fraction.

  20. An MHD study of the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objective of this research program is to obtain a better understanding of the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium through the use of numerical solutions of the time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The simulated results will be compared with observations where possible and with the results from previous analytic and numerical studies. The primary progress during the first two years has been to develop codes for 2-D models in both spherical and cylindrical coordinates and to apply them to the solar wind-interstellar medium interaction. Computations have been carried out for both a relatively simple gas-dynamic interaction and a flow-aligned interstellar magnetic field. The results have been shown to compare favorably with models that use more approximations and to modify and extend the previous results as would be expected. Work has also been initiated on the development of a 3-D MHD code in spherical coordinates.

  1. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V‑1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies.

  2. Orthotropic Piezoelectricity in 2D Nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    García, Y.; Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B.; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Sotomayor-Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The control of electromechanical responses within bonding regions is essential to face frontier challenges in nanotechnologies, such as molecular electronics and biotechnology. Here, we present Iβ-nanocellulose as a potentially new orthotropic 2D piezoelectric crystal. The predicted in-layer piezoelectricity is originated on a sui-generis hydrogen bonds pattern. Upon this fact and by using a combination of ab-initio and ad-hoc models, we introduce a description of electrical profiles along chemical bonds. Such developments lead to obtain a rationale for modelling the extended piezoelectric effect originated within bond scales. The order of magnitude estimated for the 2D Iβ-nanocellulose piezoelectric response, ~pm V−1, ranks this material at the level of currently used piezoelectric energy generators and new artificial 2D designs. Such finding would be crucial for developing alternative materials to drive emerging nanotechnologies. PMID:27708364

  3. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  4. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  5. 2D and 3D Numerical Simulations of Flux Cancellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Linton, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Cancellation of magnetic flux in the solar photosphere and chromosphere has been linked observationally and theoretically to a broad range of solar activity, from filament channel formation to CME initiation. Because this phenomenon is typically measured at only a single layer in the atmosphere, in the radial (line of sight) component of the magnetic field, the actual processes behind this observational signature are ambiguous. It is clear that reconnection is involved in some way, but the location of the reconnection sites and associated connectivity changes remain uncertain in most cases. We are using numerical modeling to demystify flux cancellation, beginning with the simplest possible configuration: a subphotospheric Lundquist flux tube surrounded by a potential field, immersed in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere, spanning many orders of magnitude in plasma beta. In this system, cancellation is driven slowly by a 2-cell circulation pattern imposed in the convection zone, such that the tops of the cells are located around the beta=1 level (i.e., the photosphere) and the flows converge and form a downdraft at the polarity inversion line; note however that no flow is imposed along the neutral line. We will present the results of 2D and 3D MHD-AMR simulations of flux cancellation, in which the flux at the photosphere begins in either an unsheared or sheared state. In all cases, a low-lying flux rope is formed by reconnection at the polarity inversion line within a few thousand seconds. The flux rope remains stable and does not rise, however, in contrast to models which do not include the presence of significant mass loading.

  6. Modeling of substorm development with a kinematic effect by the global MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den, Mitsue; Fujita, Shigeru; Tanaka, Takashi; Horiuchi, Ritoku

    Magnetic reconnection is considered to play an important role in space phenomena such as substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. Recently, Tanaka and Fujita reproduced substorm evoution process by numerical simulation with the global MHD code. In the MHD framework, the dissipation model is used for modeling of the kinetic effects. They found that the normalized reconnection viscosity, one of the dessipation model employed there, gave a large effect for the substorm development though that viscosity was assumed to be a constant parameter. It is well known that magnetric reconnection is controlled by microscopic kinetic mechanism. Horiuchi et al. investigated the roles of microscopic plasma instabilities on the violation of the frozen-in condition by examining the force balance equation based on explicit electromagnetic particle simulation for an ion-scale current sheet, and concluded that the growth of drift kink instability can create anomalous resistivity leading to the excitation of collisionless reconnection. They estimated the effective resistivity based on the particle simulation data. In this paper, we perform substorm simulation by using the global MHD code with this anomalous resistivity obtained in their microscopic approach istead of the emprical resistivity model, and investigate the relationship between the substorm development and the anomalous resistivity model.

  7. Initial Studies of Validation of MHD Models for MST Reversed Field Pinch Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, C. M.; Almagri, A. F.; Craig, D.; McCollam, K. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Sauppe, J. P.; Sovinec, C. R.; Triana, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative validation of visco-resistive MHD models for RFP plasmas takes advantage of MST's advanced diagnostics. These plasmas are largely governed by MHD relaxation activity, so that a broad range of validation metrics can be evaluated. Previous nonlinear simulations using the visco-resistive MHD code DEBS at Lundquist number S = 4 ×106 produced equilibrium relaxation cycles in qualitative agreement with experiment, but magnetic fluctuation amplitudes b~ were at least twice as large as in experiment. The extended-MHD code NIMROD previously suggested that a two-fluid model may be necessary to produce b~ in agreement with experiment. For best comparisons with DEBS and to keep computational expense tractable, NIMROD is run in single-fluid mode at low S. These simulations are complemented by DEBS at higher S in cylindrical geometry, which will be used to examine b~ as a function of S. Experimental measurements are used with results from these simulations to evaluate validation metrics. Convergence tests of previous high S DEBS simulations are also discussed, along with benchmarking of DEBS and NIMROD with the SPECYL and PIXIE3D codes. Work supported by U.S. DOE and NSF.

  8. A stochastic approach to uncertainty in the equations of MHD kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Edward G.; Elman, Howard C.

    2015-03-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kinematics model describes the electromagnetic behavior of an electrically conducting fluid when its hydrodynamic properties are assumed to be known. In particular, the MHD kinematics equations can be used to simulate the magnetic field induced by a given velocity field. While prescribing the velocity field leads to a simpler model than the fully coupled MHD system, this may introduce some epistemic uncertainty into the model. If the velocity of a physical system is not known with certainty, the magnetic field obtained from the model may not be reflective of the magnetic field seen in experiments. Additionally, uncertainty in physical parameters such as the magnetic resistivity may affect the reliability of predictions obtained from this model. By modeling the velocity and the resistivity as random variables in the MHD kinematics model, we seek to quantify the effects of uncertainty in these fields on the induced magnetic field. We develop stochastic expressions for these quantities and investigate their impact within a finite element discretization of the kinematics equations. We obtain mean and variance data through Monte Carlo simulation for several test problems. Toward this end, we develop and test an efficient block preconditioner for the linear systems arising from the discretized equations.

  9. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials. PMID:25169938

  10. Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiantong; Lemme, Max C; Östling, Mikael

    2014-11-10

    Inkjet printing of 2D layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, has attracted great interests for emerging electronics. However, incompatible rheology, low concentration, severe aggregation and toxicity of solvents constitute critical challenges which hamper the manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Here, we introduce a simple and general technology concept (distillation-assisted solvent exchange) to efficiently overcome these challenges. By implementing the concept, we have demonstrated excellent jetting performance, ideal printing patterns and a variety of promising applications for inkjet printing of 2D layered materials.

  11. Dipole Alignment in Rotating MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.; Fu, Terry; Morin, Lee

    2012-01-01

    We present numerical results from long-term CPU and GPU simulations of rotating, homogeneous, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, and discuss their connection to the spherically bounded case. We compare our numerical results with a statistical theory of geodynamo action that has evolved from the absolute equilibrium ensemble theory of ideal MHD turbulence, which is based on the ideal MHD invariants are energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity. However, for rotating MHD turbulence, the cross helicity is no longer an exact invariant, although rms cross helicity becomes quasistationary during an ideal MHD simulation. This and the anisotropy imposed by rotation suggests an ansatz in which an effective, nonzero value of cross helicity is assigned to axisymmetric modes and zero cross helicity to non-axisymmetric modes. This hybrid statistics predicts a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field due to broken ergodicity , as well as dipole vector alignment with the rotation axis, both of which are observed numerically. We find that only a relatively small value of effective cross helicity leads to the prediction of a dipole moment vector that is closely aligned (less than 10 degrees) with the rotation axis. We also discuss the effect of initial conditions, dissipation and grid size on the numerical simulations and statistical theory.

  12. Linkage studies for T2D in Chop and C/EBPbeta chromosomal regions in Italians.

    PubMed

    Gragnoli, Claudia; Pierpaoli, Laura; Piumelli, Nunzia; Chiaramonte, Francesco

    2007-11-01

    The genes causing type 2 diabetes (T2D), a complex heterogeneous disorder, differ and/or overlap in various populations. Among others there are two loci in linkage to T2D, the chromosomes 20q12-13.1 and 12q15. These two regions harbor two genes, C/EBPbeta and CHOP, which are excellent candidate genes for T2D. In fact, C/EBPbeta protein cooperates with HNF4alpha (MODY1, monogenic form of diabetes) and 1alpha (MODY3, monogenic form of diabetes). C/EBPbeta mediates suppression of insulin gene transcription in hyperglycemia and may contribute to insulin-resistance. It interacts in a complex pathway with the CHOP protein. CHOP may play a role in altered beta-cell glucose metabolism, in beta-cell apoptosis, and in lack of beta-cell replication. Thus, both C/EBPbeta and CHOP genes may independently and interactively contribute to T2D. The chromosomal regions targeting C/EBPbeta and CHOP genes have never been previously explored in T2D. We planned to identify their potential contribution to T2D in Italians. We have genotyped a group of affected siblings/families with both late- and early-onset T2D around the C/EBPbeta and the CHOP genes. We have performed non-parametric linkage analysis in the total T2D group, in the late-onset and the early-onset group, separately. We have identified a suggestive linkage to T2D in the CHOP gene locus in the early-onset T2D group (P = 0.04). We identified the linkage to T2D in the chromosome 12q15 region in the early-onset T2D families and specifically target the CHOP gene. Our next step will be the identification of CHOP gene variants, which may contribute to the linkage to T2D in Italians. PMID:17620318

  13. Assessment of MHD power plants with coal gasification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delallo, M. R., Jr.; Weinstein, R. E.; Cutting, J. C.; Owens, W. R.

    1981-12-01

    An assessment of the operational characteristics and cost of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power plants integrated with coal gasification was performed. The coal gasifier produces a slag and sulfur free fuel for the MHD combustor. This clean fuel eliminates slag and sulfur interactions with the MHD topping cycle and simplifies the design of the combustor, the MHD channel, and the heat and seed recovery (HRSR) subsystem components. This may increase MHD and HRSR system reliability and provide the potential for earlier commercial demonstration of MHD. Integration techniques with three advanced medium BTU gasifiers were evaluated and an optimum system defined. A detailed comparison was then performed with a direct coal fired MHD power plant using oxygen enrichment. Results indicate that incorporating a coal gasification process with MHD simplifies system design at the expense of lower overall net plant efficiency and higher levelized cost of electricity

  14. Slow shock and rotational discontinuity in MHD and Hall MHD models with anisotropic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau, L.-N.; Wang, B.-J.

    2016-07-01

    Pressure anisotropy may modify the characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, in particular, the slow mode wave and the corresponding shocks and discontinuities. In this study the formation of slow shocks (SSs) in anisotropic plasmas is examined by solving the gyrotropic MHD and Hall MHD equations numerically for one-dimensional Riemann problem. The MHD shocks and discontinuities are generated by imposing a finite normal magnetic field on the Harris type current sheet with a guide magnetic By component. It is shown that anomalous SSs moving faster than the intermediate wave or with positive density-magnetic field correlation may be generated in gyrotropic MHD and Hall MHD models. Moreover, for some parameter values SSs may exhibit upstream wave trains with right-handed polarization in contrast with the earlier prediction that SSs shall possess downstream left-hand polarized wave trains based on the isotropic Hall MHD theory. For the cases of By ≠ 0, SSs with increased density and decreased magnetic field followed by noncoplanar intermediate mode or rotational discontinuity (RD)-like structures similar to the compound SS-RD structures observed in space plasma environments may possibly form in symmetric and asymmetric current layers. The Walén relation of these anomalous RDs without the correction of pressure anisotropy may significantly be violated.

  15. Parallel stitching of 2D materials

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Xi; Wu, Lijun; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; et al

    2016-01-27

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal–semiconductor, semiconductor–semiconductor, and insulator–semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective “sowing” of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Lastly, the methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  16. Parallel Stitching of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Lin, Yuxuan; Ma, Qiong; Wang, Ziqiang; Song, Yi; Yu, Lili; Huang, Shengxi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Hsu, Allen L; Bie, Yaqing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Zhu, Yimei; Wu, Lijun; Li, Ju; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing

    2016-03-23

    Diverse parallel stitched 2D heterostructures, including metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, and insulator-semiconductor, are synthesized directly through selective "sowing" of aromatic molecules as the seeds in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The methodology enables the large-scale fabrication of lateral heterostructures, which offers tremendous potential for its application in integrated circuits.

  17. Fully implicit adaptive mesh refinement algorithm for reduced MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby; Pernice, Michael; Chacon, Luis

    2006-10-01

    In the macroscopic simulation of plasmas, the numerical modeler is faced with the challenge of dealing with multiple time and length scales. Traditional approaches based on explicit time integration techniques and fixed meshes are not suitable for this challenge, as such approaches prevent the modeler from using realistic plasma parameters to keep the computation feasible. We propose here a novel approach, based on implicit methods and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Our emphasis is on both accuracy and scalability with the number of degrees of freedom. As a proof-of-principle, we focus on the reduced resistive MHD model as a basic MHD model paradigm, which is truly multiscale. The approach taken here is to adapt mature physics-based technology to AMR grids, and employ AMR-aware multilevel techniques (such as fast adaptive composite grid --FAC-- algorithms) for scalability. We demonstrate that the concept is indeed feasible, featuring near-optimal scalability under grid refinement. Results of fully-implicit, dynamically-adaptive AMR simulations in challenging dissipation regimes will be presented on a variety of problems that benefit from this capability, including tearing modes, the island coalescence instability, and the tilt mode instability. L. Chac'on et al., J. Comput. Phys. 178 (1), 15- 36 (2002) B. Philip, M. Pernice, and L. Chac'on, Lecture Notes in Computational Science and Engineering, accepted (2006)

  18. Two-fluid MHD Regime of Drift Wave Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shang-Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Xie, Jin-Lin; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Drift wave instabilities contribute to the formation of edge turbulence and zonal flows, and thus are believed to play essential roles in the anomalous transport processes in tokamaks. Whereas drift waves are generally assumed to be local and electrostatic, experiments have often found regimes where the spatial scales and the magnetic components of drift waves approach those of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes. In this work we study such a drift wave regime in a cylindrical magnetized plasma using a full two-fluid MHD model implemented in the NIMROD code. The linear dependency of growth rates on resistivity and the dispersion relation found in the NIMROD calculations qualitatively agree with theoretical analysis. As the azimuthal mode number increases, the drift modes become highly localized radially; however, unlike the conventional local approximation, the radial profile of the drift mode tends to shift toward the edge away from the center of the density gradient slope, suggesting the inhomogeneity of two-fluid effects. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11275200 and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant 2014GB124002.

  19. MHD Simulations of Plasma Dynamics with Non-Axisymmetric Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Chris; Levesque, Jeffrey; Morgan, Kyle; Jarboe, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The arbitrary geometry, 3D extended MHD code PSI-TET is applied to linear and non-linear simulations of MCF plasmas with non-axisymmetric boundaries. Progress and results from simulations on two experiments will be presented: 1) Detailed validation studies of the HIT-SI experiment with self-consistent modeling of plasma dynamics in the helicity injectors. Results will be compared to experimental data and NIMROD simulations that model the effect of the helicity injectors through boundary conditions on an axisymmetric domain. 2) Linear studies of HBT-EP with different wall configurations focusing on toroidal asymmetries in the adjustable conducting wall. HBT-EP studies the effect of active/passive stabilization with an adjustable ferritic wall. Results from linear verification and benchmark studies of ideal mode growth with and without toroidal asymmetries will be presented and compared to DCON predictions. Simulations of detailed experimental geometries are enabled by use of the PSI-TET code, which employs a high order finite element method on unstructured tetrahedral grids that are generated directly from CAD models. Further development of PSI-TET will also be presented including work to support resistive wall regions within extended MHD simulations. Work supported by DoE.

  20. EDITORIAL: 15th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: 3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control 15th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: 3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttery, Richard

    2011-08-01

    This annual workshop on MHD Stability Control has been held since 1996 with a focus on understanding and developing control of MHD instabilities for future fusion reactors. The workshop generally covers a wide range of stability topics: from disruptions, to tearing modes, error fields, ELMs, resistive wall modes (RWMs) and ideal MHD. It spans many device types, particularly tokamaks, stellarators and reversed field pinches, to pull out commonalities in the physics and improve understanding. In 2010 the workshop was held on 15-17 November at the University of Wisconsin in Madison and was combined with the annual US-Japan MHD Workshop. The theme was `3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control', with a focus on multidisciplinary sessions exploring issues of plasma response to 3D fields, the manifestation of such fields in the plasma, and how they influence stability. This has been a topic of renewed interest, with utilisation of 3D fields for ELM control now planned in ITER, and a focus on the application of such fields for error field correction, disruption avoidance, and RWM control. Key issues included the physics of the interaction, types of coils and harmonic spectra needed to control instabilities, and subsidiary effects such as braking (or rotating) the plasma. More generally, a wider range of issues were discussed including RWM physics, tearing mode physics, disruption mitigation, ballooning stability, the snowflake divertor concept, and the line tied pinch! A novel innovation to the meeting was a panel discussion session, this year on Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity, which ran well; more will be tried next year. In this special section of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion we present several of the invited and contributed papers from the 2010 workshop, which have been subject to the normal refereeing procedures of the journal. These papers give a sense of the exceptional quality of the presentations at this workshop, all of which may be found at http://fusion.gat.com/conferences/mhd

  1. TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. B.; Edwards, A. L.

    1990-05-01

    TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available.

  2. Screening and transport in 2D semiconductor systems at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Das Sarma, S.; Hwang, E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature carrier transport properties in 2D semiconductor systems can be theoretically well-understood within RPA-Boltzmann theory as being limited by scattering from screened Coulomb disorder arising from random quenched charged impurities in the environment. In this work, we derive a number of analytical formula, supported by realistic numerical calculations, for the relevant density, mobility, and temperature range where 2D transport should manifest strong intrinsic (i.e., arising purely from electronic effects) metallic temperature dependence in different semiconductor materials arising entirely from the 2D screening properties, thus providing an explanation for why the strong temperature dependence of the 2D resistivity can only be observed in high-quality and low-disorder 2D samples and also why some high-quality 2D materials manifest much weaker metallicity than other materials. We also discuss effects of interaction and disorder on the 2D screening properties in this context as well as compare 2D and 3D screening functions to comment why such a strong intrinsic temperature dependence arising from screening cannot occur in 3D metallic carrier transport. Experimentally verifiable predictions are made about the quantitative magnitude of the maximum possible low-temperature metallicity in 2D systems and the scaling behavior of the temperature scale controlling the quantum to classical crossover. PMID:26572738

  3. Improvement of Scramjet Performance-Experimental Demonstration of MHD Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul; Mehta, Unmeel B.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the critical technologies of MHD (Magnetohydrodynamics) bypass scramjet propulsion for space launch and cruise vehicles is MHD acceleration. An experiment in a shock tunnel is described in which MHD acceleration is investigated experimentally. The objectives, the methods used and the preliminary results are described in this paper.

  4. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  5. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    PubMed

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  6. Modeling of Feedback Stabilization of External MHD Modes in Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Chance, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.

    2000-10-01

    The intelligent shell feedback scheme(C.M. Bishop, Plasma Phys. Contr. Nucl. Fusion 31), 1179 (1989). seeks to utilize external coils to suppress the unstable MHD modes slowed down by the resistive shell. We present a new formulation and numerical results of the interaction between the plasma and its outside vacuum region, with complete plasma response and the inclusion of a resistive vessel in general toroidal geometry. This is achieved by using the Green's function technique, which is a generalization of that previously used for the VACUUM(M.S. Chance, Phys. Plasmas 4), 2161 (1997). code and coupled with the ideal MHD code GATO. The effectiveness of different realizations of the intelligent shell concept is gauged by their ability to minimize the available free energy to drive the MHD mode. Computations indicate poloidal coverage of 30% of the total resistive wall surface area and 6 or 7 segments of ``intelligent coil'' arrays superimposed on the resistive wall will allow recovery of up to 90% the effectiveness of the ideal shell in stabilizing the ideal external kink.

  7. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. Themore » isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.« less

  8. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  9. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  10. Explicit 2-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-08-07

    DYNA2D* is a vectorized, explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. DYNA2D* contains 13 material models and 9 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented in all machine versions are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, rubber, high explosive burn, isotropic elastic-plastic, temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The isotropic and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, and tabulated.

  11. 2D photonic-crystal optomechanical nanoresonator.

    PubMed

    Makles, K; Antoni, T; Kuhn, A G; Deléglise, S; Briant, T; Cohadon, P-F; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Pinard, L; Michel, C; Dolique, V; Flaminio, R; Cagnoli, G; Robert-Philip, I; Heidmann, A

    2015-01-15

    We present the optical optimization of an optomechanical device based on a suspended InP membrane patterned with a 2D near-wavelength grating (NWG) based on a 2D photonic-crystal geometry. We first identify by numerical simulation a set of geometrical parameters providing a reflectivity higher than 99.8% over a 50-nm span. We then study the limitations induced by the finite value of the optical waist and lateral size of the NWG pattern using different numerical approaches. The NWG grating, pierced in a suspended InP 265-nm thick membrane, is used to form a compact microcavity involving the suspended nanomembrane as an end mirror. The resulting cavity has a waist size smaller than 10 μm and a finesse in the 200 range. It is used to probe the Brownian motion of the mechanical modes of the nanomembrane. PMID:25679837

  12. Compact 2-D graphical representation of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randić, Milan; Vračko, Marjan; Zupan, Jure; Novič, Marjana

    2003-05-01

    We present a novel 2-D graphical representation for DNA sequences which has an important advantage over the existing graphical representations of DNA in being very compact. It is based on: (1) use of binary labels for the four nucleic acid bases, and (2) use of the 'worm' curve as template on which binary codes are placed. The approach is illustrated on DNA sequences of the first exon of human β-globin and gorilla β-globin.

  13. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  14. Layer Engineering of 2D Semiconductor Junctions.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Sobhani, Ali; Lei, Sidong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Gong, Yongji; Jin, Zehua; Zhou, Wu; Yang, Yingchao; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xifan; Yakobson, Boris; Vajtai, Robert; Halas, Naomi J; Li, Bo; Xie, Erqing; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-07-01

    A new concept for junction fabrication by connecting multiple regions with varying layer thicknesses, based on the thickness dependence, is demonstrated. This type of junction is only possible in super-thin-layered 2D materials, and exhibits similar characteristics as p-n junctions. Rectification and photovoltaic effects are observed in chemically homogeneous MoSe2 junctions between domains of different thicknesses. PMID:27136275

  15. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  16. MAGNUM-2D computer code: user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    England, R.L.; Kline, N.W.; Ekblad, K.J.; Baca, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Information relevant to the general use of the MAGNUM-2D computer code is presented. This computer code was developed for the purpose of modeling (i.e., simulating) the thermal and hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of a waste package emplaced in a deep geologic repository. The MAGNUM-2D computer computes (1) the temperature field surrounding the waste package as a function of the heat generation rate of the nuclear waste and thermal properties of the basalt and (2) the hydraulic head distribution and associated groundwater flow fields as a function of the temperature gradients and hydraulic properties of the basalt. MAGNUM-2D is a two-dimensional numerical model for transient or steady-state analysis of coupled heat transfer and groundwater flow in a fractured porous medium. The governing equations consist of a set of coupled, quasi-linear partial differential equations that are solved using a Galerkin finite-element technique. A Newton-Raphson algorithm is embedded in the Galerkin functional to formulate the problem in terms of the incremental changes in the dependent variables. Both triangular and quadrilateral finite elements are used to represent the continuum portions of the spatial domain. Line elements may be used to represent discrete conduits. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Jeong Seuk; Amani, Matin; Chen, Kevin; Tosun, Mahmut; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Roy, Tania; Eggleston, Michael S; Wu, Ming C; Dubey, Madan; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Javey, Ali

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  18. Interfacing graphene and related 2D materials with the 3D world.

    PubMed

    Tománek, David

    2015-04-10

    An important prerequisite to translating the exceptional intrinsic performance of 2D materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides into useful devices precludes their successful integration within the current 3D technology. This review provides theoretical insight into nontrivial issues arising from interfacing 2D materials with 3D systems including epitaxy and ways to accommodate lattice mismatch, the key role of contact resistance and the effect of defects in electrical and thermal transport.

  19. Axisymmetric ideal MHD stellar wind flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, M.; Olbert, S.

    1978-01-01

    The ideal MHD equations are reduced to a single equation under the assumption of axisymmetric flow. A variational principle from which the equation is derivable is given. The characteristics of the equation are briefly discussed. The equation is used to rederive the theorem of Gussenhoven and Carovillano.

  20. Combined propellant for pulse MHD generator

    SciTech Connect

    Dogadayev, R.V.; Dyogtev, Yu.G.; Gomozov, V.A.; Klyachko, L.A.

    1994-12-31

    The results of the experimental researches and calculations of the pulse MHD generator equilibrium plasma which is the products of the solid pyrotechnical (metal) fuel (PF) combustion in the air (combined propellant - CP) are presented. The optimum fuel composition and the excess air factor have been determined. The magnesium- and aluminium-based PF experimental samples have been calculated, manufactured and tested. The conception has been suggested, the model plasma generator has been designed and manufactured. The dependencies of pressure, temperature, heat losses, electrical conductivity and electron mobility and their pulsations in the small-scale MHD generator channel (m{approx}1.5 kg/s, M{approx}3, p{approx}0.07MPa, T{approx}2800K) upon different factors have been determined experimentally. Under these conditions the electrical conductivity reached 25 S/m. The solid MgO particles spectrum in the supersonic flow has been determined. The MHD conversion with the use of the CP has been demonstrated. The maximum electrical power of the {open_quotes}Pamir-0-KT{close_quotes} small-scale MHD generator was 68 kW with the magnetic field 1.9 T.

  1. MHD Ballooning Instability in the Plasma Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng; S. Zaharia

    2003-10-20

    Based on the ideal-MHD model the stability of ballooning modes is investigated by employing realistic 3D magnetospheric equilibria, in particular for the substorm growth phase. Previous MHD ballooning stability calculations making use of approximations on the plasma compressibility can give rise to erroneous conclusions. Our results show that without making approximations on the plasma compressibility the MHD ballooning modes are unstable for the entire plasma sheet where beta (sub)eq is greater than or equal to 1, and the most unstable modes are located in the strong cross-tail current sheet region in the near-Earth plasma sheet, which maps to the initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the ionosphere. However, the MHD beq threshold is too low in comparison with observations by AMPTE/CCE at X = -(8 - 9)R(sub)E, which show that a low-frequency instability is excited only when beq increases over 50. The difficulty is mitigated by considering the kinetic effects of ion gyrorad ii and trapped electron dynamics, which can greatly increase the stabilizing effects of field line tension and thus enhance the beta(sub)eq threshold [Cheng and Lui, 1998]. The consequence is to reduce the equatorial region of the unstable ballooning modes to the strong cross-tail current sheet region where the free energy associated with the plasma pressure gradient and magnetic field curvature is maximum.

  2. Single Scan 2D NMR Spectroscopy on a 25 T Bitter Magnet.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Boaz; Shetty, Kiran; Brey, William W; Gan, Zhehong; Frydman, Lucio

    2007-07-16

    2D NMR relies on monitoring systematic changes in the phases incurred by spin coherences as a function of an encoding time t(1), whose value changes over the course of independent experiments. The intrinsic multiscan nature of such protocols implies that resistive and/or hybrid magnets, capable of delivering the highest magnetic field strengths but possessing poor temporal stabilities, become unsuitable for 2D NMR acquisitions. It is here shown with a series of homo- and hetero-nuclear examples that such limitations can be bypassed using recently proposed 2D "ultrafast" acquisition schemes, which correlate interactions along all spectral dimensions within a single scan.

  3. Single Scan 2D NMR Spectroscopy on a 25 T Bitter Magnet

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Boaz; Shetty, Kiran; Brey, William W.; Gan, Zhehong; Frydman, Lucio

    2007-01-01

    2D NMR relies on monitoring systematic changes in the phases incurred by spin coherences as a function of an encoding time t1, whose value changes over the course of independent experiments. The intrinsic multiscan nature of such protocols implies that resistive and/or hybrid magnets, capable of delivering the highest magnetic field strengths but possessing poor temporal stabilities, become unsuitable for 2D NMR acquisitions. It is here shown with a series of homo- and hetero-nuclear examples that such limitations can be bypassed using recently proposed 2D “ultrafast” acquisition schemes, which correlate interactions along all spectral dimensions within a single scan. PMID:18037970

  4. Closed Loop Feedback of MHD Instabilities on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Bialek, J.; Garofalo, A.M.; Johnson, L.C.; La Haye, R.J.; Lazarus, E.A.

    2001-01-16

    A system of coils, sensors and amplifiers has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak to study the physics of feedback stabilization of low-frequency MHD [magnetohydrodynamic] modes such as the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM). Experiments are being performed to assess the effectiveness of this minimal system and benchmark the predictions of theoretical models and codes. In the last campaign, the experiments have been extended to a regime where the RWM threshold is lowered by a fast ramp of the plasma current. In these experiments, the onset time of the RWM is very reproducible. With this system, the onset of the RWM has been delayed by up to 100 msec without degrading plasma performance. The growth rate of the mode increases proportional to the length of delay, suggesting that the plasma is evolving towards a more unstable configuration. The present results have suggested directions for improving the feedback system including better sensors and improved feedback algorithms.

  5. Realistic Modeling of SDO/AIA-discovered Coronal Fast MHD Wave Trains in Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, Leon; Liu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution EUV observations by space telescopes have provided plenty of evidence for coronal MHD waves in active regions. In particular, SDO/AIA discovered quasi-periodic, fast-mode propagating MHD wave trains (QFPs), which can propagate at speeds of ~1000 km/s perpendicular to the magnetic field. Such waves can provide information on the energy release of their associated flares and the magnetized plasma structure of the active regions. Before we can use these waves as tools for coronal seismology, 3D MHD modeling is required for disentangling observational ambiguities and improving the diagnostic accuracy. We present new results of observationally contained models of QFPs using our recently upgraded radiative, thermally conductive, visco-resistive 3D MHD code. The waves are excited by time-depended boundary conditions constrained by the spatial (localized) and quasi-periodic temporal evolution of a C-class flare typically associated with QFPs. We investigate the excitation, propagation, and damping of the waves for a range of key model parameters, such as the background temperature, density, magnetic field structure, and the location of the flaring site within the active region. We synthesize EUV intensities in multiple AIA channels and then obtain the model parameters that best reproduce the properties of observed QFPs. We discuss the implications of our model results for the seismological application of QFPs and for understanding the dynamics of their associated flares.

  6. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing–Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing–Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  7. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing-Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing-Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  8. A hybrid MHD system for early plants or retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, F.E.; Ike, L.J.

    1982-05-01

    The current status of MHD technology and the engineering data that will be available within the next few years are sufficient to design and construct a hybrid MHD plant in which an MHD power train and a conventional steam boiler power train can be integrated at the steam level. The proposed program will speed the development of commercial MHD power generation and reduce both the risk and cost of the development program to the Government and the involved utilities. The result will be a more expedient and more economic availability of the MHD power generation technology. The hybrid concept can prove the commercial viability of the MHD technology for both retrofit and early commercial plants. The inclusion of an MHD power generation cycle in the next MPC generating plant will reduce the demand for coal, meet all air quality and environmental standards and produce electricity at a cost competitive with existing methods and less expensively than unproven and uncertain future coal generating concepts.

  9. Symmetry, Statistics and Structure in MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Here, we examine homogeneous MHD turbulence in terms of truncated Fourier series. The ideal MHD equations and the associated statistical theory of absolute equilibrium ensembles are symmetric under P, C and T. However, the presence of invariant helicities, which are pseudoscalars under P and C, dynamically breaks this symmetry. This occurs because the surface of constant energy in phase space has disjoint parts, called components: while ensemble averages are taken over all components, a dynamical phase trajectory is confined to only one component. As the Birkhoff-Khinchin theorem tells us, ideal MHD turbulence is thus non-ergodic. This non-ergodicity manifests itself in low-wave number Fourier modes that have large mean values (while absolute ensemble theory predicts mean values of zero). Therefore, we have coherent structure in ideal MHD turbulence. The level of non-ergodicity and amount of energy contained in the associated coherent structure depends on the values of the helicities, as well as on the presence, or not, of a mean magnetic field and/or overall rotation. In addition to the well known cross and magnetic helicities, we also present a new invariant, which we call the parallel helicity, since it occurs when mean field and rotation axis are aligned. The question of applicability of these results to real (i.e., dissipative) MHD turbulence is also examined. Several long-time numerical simulations on a 64(exp 3) grid are given as examples. It is seen that coherent structure begins to form before decay dominates over nonlinearity. The connection of these results with inverse spectral cascades, selective decay, and magnetic dynamos is also discussed.

  10. Collisionless magnetic reconnection under anisotropic MHD approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Kota; Hoshino, Masahiro

    We study the formation of slow-mode shocks in collisionless magnetic reconnection by using one- and two-dimensional collisionless magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) simulations based on the double adiabatic approximation, which is an important step to bridge the gap between the Petschek-type MHD reconnection model accompanied by a pair of slow shocks and the observational evidence of the rare occasion of in-situ slow shock observation. According to our results, a pair of slow shocks does form in the reconnection layer. The resultant shock waves, however, are quite weak compared with those in an isotropic MHD from the point of view of the plasma compression and the amount of the magnetic energy released across the shock. Once the slow shock forms, the downstream plasma are heated in highly anisotropic manner and a firehose-sense (P_{||}>P_{⊥}) pressure anisotropy arises. The maximum anisotropy is limited by the marginal firehose criterion, 1-(P_{||}-P_{⊥})/B(2) =0. In spite of the weakness of the shocks, the resultant reconnection rate is kept at the same level compared with that in the corresponding ordinary MHD simulations. It is also revealed that the sequential order of propagation of the slow shock and the rotational discontinuity, which appears when the guide field component exists, changes depending on the magnitude of the guide field. Especially, when no guide field exists, the rotational discontinuity degenerates with the contact discontinuity remaining at the position of the initial current sheet, while with the slow shock in the isotropic MHD. Our result implies that the slow shock does not necessarily play an important role in the energy conversion in the reconnection system and is consistent with the satellite observation in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  11. High contrast 2D visualization of edge plasma instabilities by ECE imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, G. S.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    High contrast high resolution 2D images of edge MHD instabilities have been obtained for the KSTAR H-mode plasmas in 2010 using an electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging system. A fast structural evolution of the edge instabilities has been identified where the validity of the observed structures, i.e., the local measurement is ensured by the high contrast. On the other hand, the exact interpretation of the ECE intensity (Trad) is not straightforward due to the marginal optical depth ( ~ 1) in the plasma edge region. The effect of the electron temperature (Te) and density (ne) profiles in the edge region on the ECE localization and intensity have been evaluated for typical KSTAR H-mode discharges.

  12. Protein kinase A represses skeletal myogenesis by targeting myocyte enhancer factor 2D.

    PubMed

    Du, Min; Perry, Robert L S; Nowacki, Nathaniel B; Gordon, Joseph W; Salma, Jahan; Zhao, Jianzhong; Aziz, Arif; Chan, Joseph; Siu, K W Michael; McDermott, John C

    2008-05-01

    Activation of protein kinase A (PKA) by elevation of the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) level inhibits skeletal myogenesis. Previously, an indirect modulation of the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) was implicated as the mechanism. Because myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) proteins are key regulators of myogenesis and obligatory partners for the MRFs, here we assessed whether these proteins could be involved in PKA-mediated myogenic repression. Initially, in silico analysis revealed several consensus PKA phosphoacceptor sites on MEF2, and subsequent analysis by in vitro kinase assays indicated that PKA directly and efficiently phosphorylates MEF2D. Using mass spectrometric determination of phosphorylated residues, we document that MEF2D serine 121 and serine 190 are targeted by PKA. Transcriptional reporter gene assays to assess MEF2D function revealed that PKA potently represses the transactivation properties of MEF2D. Furthermore, engineered mutation of MEF2D PKA phosphoacceptor sites (serines 121 and 190 to alanine) rendered a PKA-resistant MEF2D protein, which efficiently rescues myogenesis from PKA-mediated repression. Concomitantly, increased intracellular cAMP-mediated PKA activation also resulted in an enhanced nuclear accumulation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and a subsequent increase in the MEF2D-HDAC4 repressor complex. Collectively, these data identify MEF2D as a primary target of PKA signaling in myoblasts that leads to inhibition of the skeletal muscle differentiation program.

  13. GBL-2D Version 1.0: a 2D geometry boolean library.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Yarberry, Victor R.; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes version 1.0 of GBL-2D, a geometric Boolean library for 2D objects. The library is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes primarily represent geometric data and relationships. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edge uses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. The routines contain algorithms for geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations: Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. A variety of additional analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various file formats are also provided. The GBL-2D library was originally developed as a geometric modeling engine for use with a separate software tool, called SummitView [1], that manipulates the 2D mask sets created by designers of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). However, many other practical applications for this type of software can be envisioned because the need to perform 2D Boolean operations can arise in many contexts.

  14. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms. 2. MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Steinolfson, R.S. ); Winglee, R.M. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors present a global MHD simulation of the magnetotail in an effort to study magnetic storm development. They address the question of energy storage in the current sheet in the early phases of storm growth, which previous simulations have not shown. They address this problem by dealing with the variation of the resistivity throughout the magnetosphere. They argue that MHD theory should provide a suitable representation to this problem on a global scale, even if it does not handle all details adequately. For their simulation they use three different forms for the resistivity. First is a uniform and constant resistivity. Second is a resistivity proportional to the current density, which is related to argument that resistivity is driven by wave-particle interactions which should be strongest in regions where the current is the greatest. Thirdly is a model where the resistivity varies with the magnetic field strength, which was suggested by previous results from particle simulations of the same problem. The simulation then gives approximately the same response of the magnetosphere for all three of the models. Each results in the formation and ejection of plasmoids, but the energy stored in the magnetotail, the timing of substorm onset in relation to the appearance of a southward interplanetary magnetic field, and the speed of ejection of the plasmoids formed differ with the resistivity models.

  15. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  16. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  17. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  18. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  19. Multienzyme Inkjet Printed 2D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Efrat; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mandler, Daniel

    2015-08-19

    The use of printing to produce 2D arrays is well established, and should be relatively facile to adapt for the purpose of printing biomaterials; however, very few studies have been published using enzyme solutions as inks. Among the printing technologies, inkjet printing is highly suitable for printing biomaterials and specifically enzymes, as it offers many advantages. Formulation of the inkjet inks is relatively simple and can be adjusted to a variety of biomaterials, while providing nonharmful environment to the enzymes. Here we demonstrate the applicability of inkjet printing for patterning multiple enzymes in a predefined array in a very straightforward, noncontact method. Specifically, various arrays of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx), invertase (INV) and horseradish peroxidase (HP) were printed on aminated glass surfaces, followed by immobilization using glutardialdehyde after printing. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for imaging the printed patterns and to ascertain the enzyme activity. The successful formation of 2D arrays consisting of enzymes was explored as a means of developing the first surface confined enzyme based logic gates. Principally, XOR and AND gates, each consisting of two enzymes as the Boolean operators, were assembled, and their operation was studied by SECM. PMID:26214072

  20. Flow development and analysis of MHD generators and seawater thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D. ); Roy, G.D. )

    1992-03-01

    In this paper, the flow characteristics inside magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma generators and seawater thrusters are analyzed and are compared using a three-dimensional computer model that solves the governing partial differential equations for fluid flow and electrical fields. Calculations have been performed for a Faraday plasma generator and for a continuous electrode seawater thruster. The results of the calculations show that the effects caused by the interaction of the MHD forces with the fluid flow are strongly manifested in the case of the MHD generator as compared to the flow development in the MHD thruster. The existence of velocity overshoots over the sidewalls confirm previously published results for MHD generators with strong MHD interaction. For MHD thrusters, the velocity profile is found to be slightly flatter over the sidewall as compared to that over the electrode wall. As a result, distinct enhancement of the skin friction exists over the sidewalls of MHD generators in comparison to that of MHD thrusters. Plots of velocity profiles and skin friction distributions are presented to illustrate and compare the flow development in MHD generators and thrusters.

  1. Global Extended MHD Studies of Fast Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Breslau J.A.; Jardin, S.C.

    2002-09-18

    Recent experimental and theoretical results have led to two lines of thought regarding the physical processes underlying fast magnetic reconnection. One is based on the traditional Sweet-Parker model but replaces the Spitzer resistivity with an enhanced resistivity caused by electron scattering by ion acoustic turbulence. The other includes the finite gyroradius effects that enter Ohm's law through the Hall and electron pressure gradient terms. A 2-D numerical study, conducted with a new implicit parallel two-fluid code, has helped to clarify the similarities and differences in predictions between these two models and provides some insight into their respective ranges of validity.

  2. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is still preferable over 2

  3. Results of 500-hour superheater/intermediate temperature airheater tube corrosion tests in the MHD coal fired flow facility

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.K.; Li, M.

    1991-05-01

    Corrosion data have been obtained for tubes, (austenitic steels, carbon steels, and intermediate chromium steels), exposed to conditions representative of superheater and intermediate temperature air heater components for 500 hours in a proof-of-concept magnetohydrodynamics MHD coal fired flow facility (MHD CFFF). The tubes, coated with K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-rich deposits, developed oxide surface scales which were not protective against intergranular sulfur penetration of the subsurface metal. Corrosion rates derived from scale thickness and intergranular corrosion depth measurements are reported, along with scale morphologies and compositions. The implications of the results on commercial MHD utilization of the alloys are discussed, as well as the indicated need for more corrosion resistant alloys or coatings under the most severe exposure conditions. 4 refs., 27 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. VisAn MHD: a toolbox in Matlab for MHD computer model data visualisation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, P.

    2007-03-01

    Among the many challenges facing modern space physics today is the need for a visualisation and analysis package which can examine the results from the diversity of numerical and empirical computer models as well as observational data. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models represent the latest numerical models of the complex Earth's space environment and have the unique ability to span the enormous distances present in the magnetosphere from several hundred kilometres to several thousand kilometres above the Earth surface. This feature enables scientist to study complex structures of processes where otherwise only point measurements from satellites or ground-based instruments are available. Only by combining these observational data and the MHD simulations it is possible to enlarge the scope of the point-to-point observations and to fill the gaps left by measurements in order to get a full 3-D representation of the processes in our geospace environment. In this paper we introduce the VisAn MHD toolbox for Matlab as a tool for the visualisation and analysis of observational data and MHD simulations. We have created an easy to use tool which is capable of highly sophisticated visualisations and data analysis of the results from a diverse set of MHD models in combination with in situ measurements from satellites and ground-based instruments. The toolbox is being released under an open-source licensing agreement to facilitate and encourage community use and contribution.

  5. TOPAZ2D heat transfer code users manual and thermal property data base

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Edwards, A.L.

    1990-05-01

    TOPAZ2D is a two dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. This user's manual provides information on the structure of a TOPAZ2D input file. Also included is a material thermal property data base. This manual is supplemented with The TOPAZ2D Theoretical Manual and the TOPAZ2D Verification Manual. TOPAZ2D has been implemented on the CRAY, SUN, and VAX computers. TOPAZ2D can be used to solve for the steady state or transient temperature field on two dimensional planar or axisymmetric geometries. Material properties may be temperature dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. Time or temperature dependent internal heat generation can be defined locally be element or globally by material. TOPAZ2D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermally controlled reactive chemical mixtures, thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluid flow, phase change, and energy balances. Thermal stresses can be calculated using the solid mechanics code NIKE2D which reads the temperature state data calculated by TOPAZ2D. A three dimensional version of the code, TOPAZ3D is available. The material thermal property data base, Chapter 4, included in this manual was originally published in 1969 by Art Edwards for use with his TRUMP finite difference heat transfer code. The format of the data has been altered to be compatible with TOPAZ2D. Bob Bailey is responsible for adding the high explosive thermal property data.

  6. MHD Waves in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter focuses on reviewing several observational aspects of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the solar wind, in particular on Alfvén waves, Alfvénic turbulent spectrum, and their role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. It also reviews computational models that incorporate Alfvén waves as the driving source of the wind in the lower corona (coronal holes) and in the inner heliosphere, with emphasis on multi-dimensional models. Evidence for MHD waves in the solar wind is obtained from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations using Earth-based radio telescope observations of distant (galactic) radio sources. The solar wind electron density variability in the line of sight affects the received radio signal. The propagating fluctuations and their correlations are used to estimate the solar wind velocity and the wave amplitude in the parallel and the perpendicular directions in line of sight.

  7. MHD shocks in coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is the study of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced as a result of the interaction of ejected lower coronal plasma with the ambient corona. The types of shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced for representative coronal conditions and disturbance velocities were determined. The wave system and the interactions between the ejecta and ambient corona were studied using both analytic theory and numerical solutions of the time-dependent, nonlinear MHD equations. Observations from the SMM coronagraph/polarimeter provided both guidance and motivation and are used extensively in evaluating the results. As a natural consequence of the comparisons with the data, the simulations assisted in better understanding the physical interactions in coronal mass ejections (CME's).

  8. Amplitudes of MHD Waves in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Aimee Ann; Cally, Paul; Baldner, Charles; Kleint, Lucia; Tarbell, Theodore D.; De Pontieu, Bart; Scherrer, Philip H.; Rajaguru, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The conversion of p-modes into MHD waves by strong magnetic fields occurs mainly in the sub-photospheric layers. The photospheric signatures of MHD waves are weak due to low amplitudes at the beta=1 equipartion level where mode-conversion occurs. We report on small amplitude oscillations observed in the photosphere with Hinode SOT/SP in which we analyze time series for sunspots ARs 12186 (11.10.2014) and 12434 (17.10.2015). No significant magnetic field oscillations are recovered in the umbra or penumbra in the ME inversion. However, periodicities in the inclination angle are found at the umbral/penumbral boundary with 5 minute periods. Upward propagating waves are indicated in the intensity signals correlated between HMI and AIA at different heights. We compare SP results with the oscillations observed in HMI data. Simultaneous IRIS data shows transition region brightening above the umbral core.

  9. MHD processes in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic field measurements from Voyager and the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes in the outer heliosphere are reviewed. A bibliography of the experimental and theoretical work concerning magnetic fields and plasmas observed in the outer heliosphere is given. Emphasis in this review is on basic concepts and dynamical processes involving the magnetic field. The theory that serves to explain and unify the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma observations is magnetohydrodynamics. Basic physical processes and observations that relate directly to solutions of the MHD equations are emphasized, but obtaining solutions of this complex system of equations involves various assumptions and approximations. The spatial and temporal complexity of the outer heliosphere and some approaches for dealing with this complexity are discussed.

  10. Design Study: Rocket Based MHD Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report addresses the technical feasibility and design of a rocket based MHD generator using a sub-scale LOx/RP rocket motor. The design study was constrained by assuming the generator must function within the performance and structural limits of an existing magnet and by assuming realistic limits on (1) the axial electric field, (2) the Hall parameter, (3) current density, and (4) heat flux (given the criteria of heat sink operation). The major results of the work are summarized as follows: (1) A Faraday type of generator with rectangular cross section is designed to operate with a combustor pressure of 300 psi. Based on a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla, the electrical power output from this generator is estimated to be 54.2 KW with potassium seed (weight fraction 3.74%) and 92 KW with cesium seed (weight fraction 9.66%). The former corresponds to a enthalpy extraction ratio of 2.36% while that for the latter is 4.16%; (2) A conceptual design of the Faraday MHD channel is proposed, based on a maximum operating time of 10 to 15 seconds. This concept utilizes a phenolic back wall for inserting the electrodes and inter-electrode insulators. Copper electrode and aluminum oxide insulator are suggested for this channel; and (3) A testing configuration for the sub-scale rocket based MHD system is proposed. An estimate of performance of an ideal rocket based MHD accelerator is performed. With a current density constraint of 5 Amps/cm(exp 2) and a conductivity of 30 Siemens/m, the push power density can be 250, 431, and 750 MW/m(sup 3) when the induced voltage uB have values of 5, 10, and 15 KV/m, respectively.

  11. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  12. Statistical Theory of the Ideal MHD Geodynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, J. V.

    2012-01-01

    A statistical theory of geodynamo action is developed, using a mathematical model of the geodynamo as a rotating outer core containing an ideal (i.e., no dissipation), incompressible, turbulent, convecting magnetofluid. On the concentric inner and outer spherical bounding surfaces the normal components of the velocity, magnetic field, vorticity and electric current are zero, as is the temperature fluctuation. This allows the use of a set of Galerkin expansion functions that are common to both velocity and magnetic field, as well as vorticity, current and the temperature fluctuation. The resulting dynamical system, based on the Boussinesq form of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, represents MHD turbulence in a spherical domain. These basic equations (minus the temperature equation) and boundary conditions have been used previously in numerical simulations of forced, decaying MHD turbulence inside a sphere [1,2]. Here, the ideal case is studied through statistical analysis and leads to a prediction that an ideal coherent structure will be found in the form of a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field that results from broken ergodicity, an effect that has been previously studied both analytically and numerically for homogeneous MHD turbulence [3,4]. The axial dipole component becomes prominent when there is a relatively large magnetic helicity (proportional to the global correlation of magnetic vector potential and magnetic field) and a stationary, nonzero cross helicity (proportional to the global correlation of velocity and magnetic field). The expected angle of the dipole moment vector with respect to the rotation axis is found to decrease to a minimum as the average cross helicity increases for a fixed value of magnetic helicity and then to increase again when average cross helicity approaches its maximum possible value. Only a relatively small value of cross helicity is needed to produce a dipole moment vector that is aligned at approx.10deg with the

  13. A hybrid numerical fluid dynamics code for resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jeffrey

    2006-04-01

    Spasmos is a computational fluid dynamics code that uses two numerical methods to solve the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in compressible, inviscid, conducting media[1]. The code is implemented as a set of libraries for the Python programming language[2]. It represents conducting and non-conducting gases and materials with uncomplicated (analytic) equations of state. It supports calculations in 1D, 2D, and 3D geometry, though only the 1D configuation has received significant testing to date. Because it uses the Python interpreter as a front end, users can easily write test programs to model systems with a variety of different numerical and physical parameters. Currently, the code includes 1D test programs for hydrodynamics (linear acoustic waves, the Sod weak shock[3], the Noh strong shock[4], the Sedov explosion[5], magnetic diffusion (decay of a magnetic pulse[6], a driven oscillatory "wine-cellar" problem[7], magnetic equilibrium), and magnetohydrodynamics (an advected magnetic pulse[8], linear MHD waves, a magnetized shock tube[9]). Spasmos current runs only in a serial configuration. In the future, it will use MPI for parallel computation.

  14. A hybrid numerical fluid dynamics code for resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    2006-04-01

    Spasmos is a computational fluid dynamics code that uses two numerical methods to solve the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in compressible, inviscid, conducting media[1]. The code is implemented as a set of libraries for the Python programming language[2]. It represents conducting and non-conducting gases and materials with uncomplicated (analytic) equations of state. It supports calculations in 1D, 2D, and 3D geometry, though only the 1D configuation has received significant testing to date. Becausemore » it uses the Python interpreter as a front end, users can easily write test programs to model systems with a variety of different numerical and physical parameters. Currently, the code includes 1D test programs for hydrodynamics (linear acoustic waves, the Sod weak shock[3], the Noh strong shock[4], the Sedov explosion[5], magnetic diffusion (decay of a magnetic pulse[6], a driven oscillatory "wine-cellar" problem[7], magnetic equilibrium), and magnetohydrodynamics (an advected magnetic pulse[8], linear MHD waves, a magnetized shock tube[9]). Spasmos current runs only in a serial configuration. In the future, it will use MPI for parallel computation.« less

  15. MHD Turbulence in the Taurus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, M.; Gong, H.; Brunt, C.; Ostriker, E.

    2005-12-01

    The presence of MHD turbulence in the Taurus Molecular Cloud is examined from 12CO and 13CO J=1-0 imaging observations using the FCRAO 14 meter telescope. The degree of velocity anisotropy is measured from velocity structure functions derived separately along the x and y axes using Principal Component Analysis of spectroscopic imaging data (Brunt & Heyer 2002). Such anisotropy is predicted from model descriptions and computational simulations of MHD turbulence in the case of strong magnetic fields (Goldreich & Sridhar 1995; Cho, Lazarian, & Vishniac 2002; Vestuto, Ostriker, & Stone 2003). Within a subfield of the Taurus image where the column densities are low, this velocity anisotropy is largest along an angle that is coincident with the local magnetic field direction determined independently from optical polarization of background stars.The structure function derived from data perpendicular to the local field shows a shallower scaling exponent and a larger scaling coefficient than the values that describe the structure function constructed along the magnetic field as predicted by the MHD models. This alignment provides strong evidence that the magnetic field is a significant dynamical force within this column density regime of the Taurus cloud.

  16. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is a universal, nonlinear phenomenon found in all energetic fluid and plasma motion. In particular. understanding magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and incorporating its effects in the computation and prediction of the flow of ionized gases in space, for example, are great challenges that must be met if such computations and predictions are to be meaningful. Although a general solution to the "problem of turbulence" does not exist in closed form, numerical integrations allow us to explore the phase space of solutions for both ideal and dissipative flows. For homogeneous, incompressible turbulence, Fourier methods are appropriate, and phase space is defined by the Fourier coefficients of the physical fields. In the case of ideal MHD flows, a fairly robust statistical mechanics has been developed, in which the symmetry and ergodic properties of phase space is understood. A discussion of these properties will illuminate our principal discovery: Coherent structure and randomness co-exist in ideal MHD turbulence. For dissipative flows, as opposed to ideal flows, progress beyond the dimensional analysis of Kolmogorov has been difficult. Here, some possible future directions that draw on the ideal results will also be discussed. Our conclusion will be that while ideal turbulence is now well understood, real turbulence still presents great challenges.

  17. Energetic particle effects on global MHD modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of energetic particles on MHD type modes are studied by analytical theories and the nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K). In particular we address the problems of (1) the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of resonant fishbone'' internal modes and (2) the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances. Analytical theories are presented to help explain the NOVA-K results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral-beam injection (NBI) or ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), a stability window for the n=1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beat space exists even in the absence of core ion finite Larmor radius effect (finite {omega}{sub *i}). On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to resonantly excite instability of the n=1 internal mode and can lower the critical beta threshold. The circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha particle pressure. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Robust preconditioners for incompressible MHD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yicong; Hu, Kaibo; Hu, Xiaozhe; Xu, Jinchao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we develop two classes of robust preconditioners for the structure-preserving discretization of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) system. By studying the well-posedness of the discrete system, we design block preconditioners for them and carry out rigorous analysis on their performance. We prove that such preconditioners are robust with respect to most physical and discretization parameters. In our proof, we improve the existing estimates of the block triangular preconditioners for saddle point problems by removing the scaling parameters, which are usually difficult to choose in practice. This new technique is applicable not only to the MHD system, but also to other problems. Moreover, we prove that Krylov iterative methods with our preconditioners preserve the divergence-free condition exactly, which complements the structure-preserving discretization. Another feature is that we can directly generalize this technique to other discretizations of the MHD system. We also present preliminary numerical results to support the theoretical results and demonstrate the robustness of the proposed preconditioners.

  19. NASA Lewis Research Center combustion MHD experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The MHD power generation experiments were conducted in a high field strength cryomagnet which was adapted from an existing facility. In its original construction, it consisted of 12 high purity aluminum coils pool cooled in a bath of liquid neon. In this configuration, a peak field of 15 tesla was produced. For the present experiments, the center four coils were removed and a 23 cm diameter transverse warm bore tube was inserted to allow the placement of the MHD experiment between the remaining eight coils. In this configuration, a peak field of 6 tesla should be obtainable. The time duration of the experiment is limited by the neon supply which allows on the order of 1 minute of total operating time followed by an 18-hour reliquefaction period. As a result, the experiments are run in a pulsed mode. The run duration for the data presented here was 5 sec. The magnetic field profile along the MHD duct is shown. Since the working fluid is in essence superheated steam, it is easily water quenched at the exit of the diffuser and the components are designed vacuum tight so that the exhaust pipe and demister an be pumped down to simulate the vacuum of outer space.

  20. Anisotropic MHD model and some solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V. D.; Dzhalilov, N. S.

    2010-09-15

    MHD waves and instabilities in a collisionless anisotropic-pressure plasma are analyzed in an anisotropic MHD model based on the 16-moment approximation, and the results are found to agree well with those obtained in the low-frequency limit of the kinetic model. It is shown that accounting for heat fluxes leads to an asymmetry in the phase velocities of the wave modes with respect to the heat flux direction and also to a strong interaction between the modes, especially between the backward ones (those that propagate in a direction opposite to that of the heat flux). A correct description of the mirror instability is given. The resonant interaction of three backward modes-fast acoustic, fast magnetosonic, and slow acoustic-under the conditions for the onset of the classical firehose instability triggers a new type of instability the growth rate of which is faster than the maximum growth rate of the conventional firehose instability. The results prove that, in contrast to the familiar Chew-Goldberger-Low approximate model, the anisotropic MHD approach provides a correct description of the large-scale dynamics of collisionless anisotropic plasmas (such as solar corona, solar wind, and ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas).

  1. Canard configured aircraft with 2-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.; Henderson, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    A closely-coupled canard fighter with vectorable two-dimensional nozzle was designed for enhanced transonic maneuvering. The HiMAT maneuver goal of a sustained 8g turn at a free-stream Mach number of 0.9 and 30,000 feet was the primary design consideration. The aerodynamic design process was initiated with a linear theory optimization minimizing the zero percent suction drag including jet effects and refined with three-dimensional nonlinear potential flow techniques. Allowances were made for mutual interference and viscous effects. The design process to arrive at the resultant configuration is described, and the design of a powered 2-D nozzle model to be tested in the LRC 16-foot Propulsion Wind Tunnel is shown.

  2. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated microshutter arrays consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutters demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  3. 2D Electrostatic Actuation of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Devin E.; Oh, Lance H.; Li, Mary J.; Jones, Justin S.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Zheng, Yun; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    An electrostatically actuated microshutter array consisting of rotational microshutters (shutters that rotate about a torsion bar) were designed and fabricated through the use of models and experiments. Design iterations focused on minimizing the torsional stiffness of the microshutters, while maintaining their structural integrity. Mechanical and electromechanical test systems were constructed to measure the static and dynamic behavior of the microshutters. The torsional stiffness was reduced by a factor of four over initial designs without sacrificing durability. Analysis of the resonant behavior of the microshutter arrays demonstrates that the first resonant mode is a torsional mode occurring around 3000 Hz. At low vacuum pressures, this resonant mode can be used to significantly reduce the drive voltage necessary for actuation requiring as little as 25V. 2D electrostatic latching and addressing was demonstrated using both a resonant and pulsed addressing scheme.

  4. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  5. MINERVA: Ideal MHD stability code for toroidally rotating tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiba, N.; Tokuda, S.; Furukawa, M.; Snyder, P. B.; Chu, M. S.

    2009-08-01

    A new linear MHD stability code MINERVA is developed for investigating a toroidal rotation effect on the stability of ideal MHD modes in tokamak plasmas. This code solves the Frieman-Rotenberg equation as not only the generalized eigenvalue problem but also the initial value problem. The parallel computing method used in this code realizes the stability analysis of both long and short wavelength MHD modes in short time. The results of some benchmarking tests show the validity of this MINERVA code. The numerical study with MINERVA about the toroidal rotation effect on the edge MHD stability shows that the rotation shear destabilizes the intermediate wavelength modes but stabilizes the short wavelength edge localized MHD modes, though the rotation frequency destabilizes both the long and the short wavelength MHD modes.

  6. CAST2D: A finite element computer code for casting process modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1991-10-01

    CAST2D is a coupled thermal-stress finite element computer code for casting process modeling. This code can be used to predict the final shape and stress state of cast parts. CAST2D couples the heat transfer code TOPAZ2D and solid mechanics code NIKE2D. CAST2D has the following features in addition to all the features contained in the TOPAZ2D and NIKE2D codes: (1) a general purpose thermal-mechanical interface algorithm (i.e., slide line) that calculates the thermal contact resistance across the part-mold interface as a function of interface pressure and gap opening; (2) a new phase change algorithm, the delta function method, that is a robust method for materials undergoing isothermal phase change; (3) a constitutive model that transitions between fluid behavior and solid behavior, and accounts for material volume change on phase change; and (4) a modified plot file data base that allows plotting of thermal variables (e.g., temperature, heat flux) on the deformed geometry. Although the code is specialized for casting modeling, it can be used for other thermal stress problems (e.g., metal forming).

  7. Theoretical modelling of the feedback stabilization of external MHD modes in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Chu, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical framework for understanding the feedback mechanism for stabilization of external MHD modes has been formulated. Efficient computational tools - the GATO stability code coupled with a substantially modified VACUUM code - have been developed to effectively design viable feedback systems against these modes. The analysis assumed a thin resistive shell and a feedback coil structure accurately modelled in θ and phi, albeit with only a single harmonic variation in phi. Time constants and induced currents in the enclosing resistive shell are calculated. An optimized configuration based on an idealized model has been computed for the DIII-D device. Up to 90% of the effectiveness of an ideal wall can be achieved.

  8. First measurements with the Munich 2D-ACAR spectrometer on Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Leitner, Michael; Böni, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The Munich 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the Maier-Leibnitz accelerator laboratory in Garching has recently become operational. In the present implementation a 2D-ACAR spectrometer is set up, with a baseline of 16.5 m, a conventional 22Na positron source and two Anger-type gamma-cameras. The positrons are guided onto the sample by a magnetic field generated by a normal conducting electromagnet. The sample can be either cooled by a standard closed-cycle-cryostat to low temperatures or heated by a resistive filament to temperatures up to 500 K. We present the key features of this new 2D-ACAR spectrometer and, in addition, discuss first measurements on the pure metal system Cr. The 2D-ACAR measurements have been performed on Cr at different temperatures: at 5 K and at room temperature in the anti-ferromagnetic phase and at 318K slightly above the paramagnetic phase transition.

  9. Downstream component corrosion in coal-fired MHD power plants

    SciTech Connect

    White, M. K.

    1980-06-01

    Results are given to date of corrosion probe studies conducted to evaluate the nature and severity of degradation of oiler and superheater materials in coal-fired MHD power generation systems. Tests were conducted with two air or nitrogen cooled probes in Cell III of the UTSI MHD facility. One probe had carbon steel samples subjected to metal temperatures of from 547K to 719K and reducing (SR = 0.85) gas conditions to simulate boiler tube conditions. The exposure time to date on these samples is 240 minutes. The other probe had samples of carbon steel, chromium-molybdenum steels and stainless steels subjected to temperatures ranging from 811K to 914K with oxidizing (SR = 1.15) gas conditions. The total run time on these samples was 70 minutes. The boiler probe samples were found to undergo predominantly pitted type corrosion beneath a deposit of ash/seed material having approximately 34% K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Weight loss rates varied from about 1.5 x 10/sup -4/ gm/hr-cm/sup 2/ at the cool end of the probe to about 5.5 x 10/sup -4/ gm/hr-cm/sup 2/ at the hot end. This loss is attributed primarily to sulfidation by hydrogen sulfide. Resistance to scaling of superheater materials increased progressively with the degree of alloying. Attack appeared to be in the form of surface scales containing mixtures of oxides and is attributed to either gaseous oxidation or to the presence of complex potassium trisulfates.

  10. CYP2D6*36 gene arrangements within the cyp2d6 locus: association of CYP2D6*36 with poor metabolizer status.

    PubMed

    Gaedigk, Andrea; Bradford, L Dianne; Alander, Sarah W; Leeder, J Steven

    2006-04-01

    Unexplained cases of CYP2D6 genotype/phenotype discordance continue to be discovered. In previous studies, several African Americans with a poor metabolizer phenotype carried the reduced function CYP2D6*10 allele in combination with a nonfunctional allele. We pursued the possibility that these alleles harbor either a known sequence variation (i.e., CYP2D6*36 carrying a gene conversion in exon 9 along the CYP2D6*10-defining 100C>T single-nucleotide polymorphism) or novel sequences variation(s). Discordant cases were evaluated by long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to test for gene rearrangement events, and a 6.6-kilobase pair PCR product encompassing the CYP2D6 gene was cloned and entirely sequenced. Thereafter, allele frequencies were determined in different study populations comprising whites, African Americans, and Asians. Analyses covering the CYP2D7 to 2D6 gene region established that CYP2D6*36 did not only exist as a gene duplication (CYP2D6*36x2) or in tandem with *10 (CYP2D6*36+*10), as previously reported, but also by itself. This "single" CYP2D6*36 allele was found in nine African Americans and one Asian, but was absent in the whites tested. Ultimately, the presence of CYP2D6*36 resolved genotype/phenotype discordance in three cases. We also discovered an exon 9 conversion-positive CYP2D6*4 gene in a duplication arrangement (CYP2D6*4Nx2) and a CYP2D6*4 allele lacking 100C>T (CYP2D6*4M) in two white subjects. The discovery of an allele that carries only one CYP2D6*36 gene copy provides unequivocal evidence that both CYP2D6*36 and *36x2 are associated with a poor metabolizer phenotype. Given a combined frequency of between 0.5 and 3% in African Americans and Asians, genotyping for CYP2D6*36 should improve the accuracy of genotype-based phenotype prediction in these populations.

  11. EDITORIAL: MHD stability control in toroidal devices MHD stability control in toroidal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, Michio

    2010-10-01

    The annual workshop on MHD stability control has been held since 1996 with an emphasis on controlling MHD stability, which is considered to be an obstacle to achieving high performance in fusion reactors. The meeting is organized as a joint US/Japan undertaking with the meeting held in the US and Japan in alternating years. Each year, a specific theme is selected, based on the interest of our community, ranging from burning plasmas to fundamental physics processes essential for MHD stability. The 2009 meeting with the theme of 'Assuring successful MHD control in ITER' was held at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University. With ITER construction progressing at full speed, there is increasing interest in assuring successful MHD control in ignited plasmas and beyond. Focusing on planned hardware and development of plasma profile control systems in ITER operational scenarios, subjects included instabilities such as sawteeth, fishbones and TAEs, NTMs, locked modes, RWMs, and ELMs. Control aspects included mode control, non-axis-symmetric error-field control, and disruption control in tokamaks, RFPs, and stellarators. In this special section of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion we present several of the invited and contributed papers from the 2009 workshop, which have been subject to the normal refereeing procedures of the journal. These papers give a sense of the exceptional quality of the presentations at this workshop, all of which may be found at http://fusion.gat.com/conferences/mhd09/ The program committee deeply appreciates the participation and support our community has shown for more than a decade in this workshop series. Without doubt, we will extend our workshop along with the progress of fusion research toward successful reactors.

  12. Computation of the MHD modes with rotation and kinetic effects: AEGIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.-J.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Turnbull, A.; Waelbroeck, F.; van Dam, J. W.; Berk, H.

    2003-10-01

    A new linear MHD eigenvalue code called AEGIS (Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Shooting) is being developed at the IFS. The benchmarking of AEGIS with GATO is underway and will be presented. Plasma rotation is being included, with the effect of rotation-enhanced plasma compressibility also taken into account. As a first step in including rotational effects, the ideal MHD model is being employed. Details of the numerical scheme will be described, along with preliminary numerical results. The plan to include kinetic compressiblity will be discussed. With this new code, rotational stabilization of resistive wall modes can be rigorously calculated for the first time. The algorithm also allows FLR effects to be included. Many helpful suggestions from A. Glasser are acknowledged.

  13. Advanced MHD Algorithm for Solar and Space Science: lst Year Semi Annual Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnack, Dalton D.; Lionello, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    We report progress for the development of MH4D for the first and second quarters of FY2004, December 29, 2002 - June 6, 2003. The present version of MH4D can now solve the full viscous and resistive MHD equations using either an explicit or a semi-implicit time advancement algorithm. In this report we describe progress in the following areas. During the two last quarters we have presented poster at the EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly in Nice, France, April 6-11, 2003, and a poster at the 2003 International Sherwood Theory Conference in Corpus Christi, Texas, April 28-30 2003. In the area of code development, we have implemented the MHD equations and the semi-implicit algorithm. The new features have been tested.

  14. Identification of standing MHD modes in MHD simulations of planetary magnetospheres. Application to Mercury.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griton, Léa; Pantellini, Filippo; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    We present 3D simulations of the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury's magnetosphere using the magnetohydrodynamic code AMRVAC. A procedure for the identification of standing MHD modes has been applied to these simulations showing that large scale standing slow mode structures may exist in Mercury's magnetosheath. The identification is mostly based on relatively simple approximate analytical solutions to the old problem of determining the family of all standing linear plane MHD waves in a flowing plasma. The question of the identification of standing slow mode structures using in situ measurements such as the future BepiColombo MMO mission to Mercury will be discussed as well.

  15. NASA Lewis H2-O2 MHD program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M.; Nichols, L. D.; Seikel, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    Performance and power costs of H2-O2 combustion powered steam-MHD central power systems are estimated. Hydrogen gas is assumed to be transmitted by pipe from a remote coal gasifier into the city and converted to electricity in a steam MHD plant having an integral gaseous oxygen plant. These steam MHD systems appear to offer an attractive alternative to both in-city clean fueled conventional steam power plants and to remote coal fired power plants with underground electric transmission into the city. Status and plans are outlined for an experimental evaluation of H2-O2 combustion-driven MHD power generators at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  16. A new inversion method for (T2, D) 2D NMR logging and fluid typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Zou, Youlong; Zhou, Cancan

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (1D NMR) logging technology has some significant limitations in fluid typing. However, not only can two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) provide some accurate porosity parameters, but it can also identify fluids more accurately than 1D NMR. In this paper, based on the relaxation mechanism of (T2, D) 2D NMR in a gradient magnetic field, a hybrid inversion method that combines least-squares-based QR decomposition (LSQR) and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) is examined in the 2D NMR inversion of various fluid models. The forward modeling and inversion tests are performed in detail with different acquisition parameters, such as magnetic field gradients (G) and echo spacing (TE) groups. The simulated results are discussed and described in detail, the influence of the above-mentioned observation parameters on the inversion accuracy is investigated and analyzed, and the observation parameters in multi-TE activation are optimized. Furthermore, the hybrid inversion can be applied to quantitatively determine the fluid saturation. To study the effects of noise level on the hybrid method and inversion results, the numerical simulation experiments are performed using different signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and the effect of different SNRs on fluid typing using three fluid models are discussed and analyzed in detail.

  17. A Single-Material Logical Junction Based on 2D Crystal PdS2.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani-Asl, Mahdi; Kuc, Agnieszka; Miró, Pere; Heine, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    A single-material logical junction with negligible contact resistance is designed by exploiting quantum-confinement effects in 1T PdS2 . The metallic bilayer serves as electrodes for the semiconducting channel monolayer, avoiding contact resistance. Heat dissipation is then governed by tunnel loss, which becomes negligible at channel lengths larger than 2.45 nm. This value marks the integration limit for a conventional 2D transistor.

  18. A Single-Material Logical Junction Based on 2D Crystal PdS2.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani-Asl, Mahdi; Kuc, Agnieszka; Miró, Pere; Heine, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    A single-material logical junction with negligible contact resistance is designed by exploiting quantum-confinement effects in 1T PdS2 . The metallic bilayer serves as electrodes for the semiconducting channel monolayer, avoiding contact resistance. Heat dissipation is then governed by tunnel loss, which becomes negligible at channel lengths larger than 2.45 nm. This value marks the integration limit for a conventional 2D transistor. PMID:26632273

  19. Design of the 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument for the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X. M.; Yang, Z. J.; Ma, X. D.; Zhu, Y. L.; Luhmann, N. C.; Domier, C. W.; Ruan, B. W.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic is being developed for the J-TEXT tokamak. It will provide the 2D electron temperature information with high spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution. The new ECEI instrument is being designed to support fundamental physics investigations on J-TEXT including MHD, disruption prediction, and energy transport. The diagnostic contains two dual dipole antenna arrays corresponding to F band (90-140 GHz) and W band (75-110 GHz), respectively, and comprises a total of 256 channels. The system can observe the same magnetic surface at both the high field side and low field side simultaneously. An advanced optical system has been designed which permits the two arrays to focus on a wide continuous region or two radially separate regions with high imaging spatial resolution. It also incorporates excellent field curvature correction with field curvature adjustment lenses. An overview of the diagnostic and the technical progress including the new remote control technique are presented.

  20. PIERNIK MHD code - a multi-fluid, non-ideal extension of the relaxing-TVD scheme (III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasz, M.; Kowalik, K.; Wóltański, D.; Pawłaszek, R.

    2012-09-01

    We present a new multi-fluid, grid MHD code PIERNIK, which is based on the Relaxing TVD scheme (Jin & Xin 1995). The original scheme (see Trac & Pen 2003; Pen et al 2003) has been extended by an addition of dynamically independent, but interacting fluids: dust and a diffusive cosmic ray gas, described within the fluid approximation, with an option to add other fluids in an easy way. The code has been equipped with shearing-box boundary conditions, and a selfgravity module, Ohmic resistivity module, as well as other facilities which are useful in astrophysical fluid-dynamical simulations. The code is parallelized by means of the MPI library. In this paper we present Ohmic resistivity extension of the original Relaxing TVD MHD scheme, and show examples of magnetic reconnection in cases of uniform and current-dependent resistivity prescriptions.

  1. Radiofrequency Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of Fermi Gases in the 2D to Quasi-2D Dimensional Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chingyun; Kangara, Jayampathi; Arakelyan, Ilya; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We tune the dimensionality of a strongly interacting degenerate 6 Li Fermi gas from 2D to quasi-2D, by adjusting the radial confinement of pancake-shaped clouds to control the radial chemical potential. In the 2D regime with weak radial confinement, the measured pair binding energies are in agreement with 2D-BCS mean field theory, which predicts dimer pairing energies in the many-body regime. In the qausi-2D regime obtained with increased radial confinement, the measured pairing energy deviates significantly from 2D-BCS theory. In contrast to the pairing energy, the measured radii of the cloud profiles are not fit by 2D-BCS theory in either the 2D or quasi-2D regimes, but are fit in both regimes by a beyond mean field polaron-model of the free energy. Supported by DOE, ARO, NSF, and AFOSR.

  2. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  3. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  4. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations.

  5. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  6. MHD Simulations of the Plasma Flow in the Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. E. R.; Keidar, M.; Sankaran, K.; olzin, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of plasma through a magnetic nozzle is simulated by solving the governing equations for the plasma flow in the presence of an static magnetic field representing the applied nozzle. This work will numerically investigate the flow and behavior of the plasma as the inlet plasma conditions and magnetic nozzle field strength are varied. The MHD simulations are useful for addressing issues such as plasma detachment and to can be used to gain insight into the physical processes present in plasma flows found in thrusters that use magnetic nozzles. In the model, the MHD equations for a plasma, with separate temperatures calculated for the electrons and ions, are integrated over a finite cell volume with flux through each face computed for each of the conserved variables (mass, momentum, magnetic flux, energy) [1]. Stokes theorem is used to convert the area integrals over the faces of each cell into line integrals around the boundaries of each face. The state of the plasma is described using models of the ionization level, ratio of specific heats, thermal conductivity, and plasma resistivity. Anisotropies in current conduction due to Hall effect are included, and the system is closed using a real-gas equation of state to describe the relationship between the plasma density, temperature, and pressure.A separate magnetostatic solver is used to calculate the applied magnetic field, which is assumed constant for these calculations. The total magnetic field is obtained through superposition of the solution for the applied magnetic field and the self-consistently computed induced magnetic fields that arise as the flowing plasma reacts to the presence of the applied field. A solution for the applied magnetic field is represented in Fig. 1 (from Ref. [2]), exhibiting the classic converging-diverging field pattern. Previous research was able to demonstrate effects such as back-emf at a super-Alfvenic flow, which significantly alters the shape of the

  7. 2-D Animation's Not Just for Mickey Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of two-dimensional (2-D) animation; highlights include character animation, painting issues, and motion graphics. Sidebars present Silicon Graphics animations tools and 2-D animation programs for the desktop computer. (DGM)

  8. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J. O.; Sanford, Larry

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  9. MAZE96. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-24

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  10. Annular MHD Physics for Turbojet Energy Bypass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The use of annular Hall type MHD generator/accelerator ducts for turbojet energy bypass is evaluated assuming weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges. The equations for a 1-D, axisymmetric MHD generator/accelerator are derived and numerically integrated to determine the generator/accelerator performance characteristics. The concept offers a shockless means of interacting with high speed inlet flows and potentially offers variable inlet geometry performance without the complexity of moving parts simply by varying the generator loading parameter. The cycle analysis conducted iteratively with a spike inlet and turbojet flying at M = 7 at 30 km altitude is estimated to have a positive thrust per unit mass flow of 185 N-s/kg. The turbojet allowable combustor temperature is set at an aggressive 2200 deg K. The annular MHD Hall generator/accelerator is L = 3 m in length with a B(sub r) = 5 Tesla magnetic field and a conductivity of sigma = 5 mho/m for the generator and sigma= 1.0 mho/m for the accelerator. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the generator is eta(sub sg) = 84 percent at an enthalpy extraction ratio, eta(sub Ng) = 0.63. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the accelerator is eta(sub sa) = 81 percent at an enthalpy addition ratio, eta(sub Na) = 0.62. An assessment of the ionization fraction necessary to achieve a conductivity of sigma = 1.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 1.90 X 10(exp -6), and for sigma = 5.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 9.52 X 10(exp -6).

  11. MHD Turbulence at Moderate Magnetic Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knaepen, B.; Kassinos, S.; Carati, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the present article we will consider the decay of MHD turbulence under the influence of a strong external magnetic field at moderate magnetic Reynolds numbers. Typical values of R(sub m) that are considered here range from R(sub m) approx. 0.1 to R(sub m) approx. 20. As a comparison, the initial kinetic Reynolds number common to all our simulations is Re(sub L) = 199. This means that the range of Prandtl numbers explored is 5 x 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1). Our motivation is mainly to exhibit how the transition from the QS approximation to FMHD occurs. At the lowest values of R(sub m) studied here, the QS approximation is shown to model the flow faithfully. However, for the higher values of R(sub m) considered, it is clearly inadequate but can be replaced by another approximation which will be referred to as the Quasi-Linear (QL) approximation. Another objective of the present study is to describe how variations in the magnetic Reynolds number (while maintaining all other parameters constant) affect the dynamics of the flow. This complements past studies where variations in either the strength of the external magnetic field or the kinetic Reynolds number were considered. This article is organized as follows. In section 2 we recall the definition of the quasi-static approximation. Section 3 is devoted to the description of the numerical experiments performed using the quasi-static approximation and full MHD. In section 4 we describe the quasi-linear approximation and test it numerically against full MHD. A concluding summary is given in section 5.

  12. Nonlinear MHD Waves in a Prominence Foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ˜ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5-14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ˜20 km s-1, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  13. 2d PDE Linear Asymmetric Matrix Solver

    1983-10-01

    ILUCG2 (Incomplete LU factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d problems) was developed to solve a linear asymmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as plasma diffusion, equilibria, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These equations share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized with finite-difference or finite-elementmore » methods, the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ILUCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. A generalization of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For problems having a symmetric matrix ICCG2 should be used since it runs up to four times faster and uses approximately 30% less storage. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source, containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  14. Position control using 2D-to-2D feature correspondences in vision guided cell micromanipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanliang; Han, Mingli; Shee, Cheng Yap; Ang, Wei Tech

    2007-01-01

    Conventional camera calibration that utilizes the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the camera and the objects has certain limitations for micro-level cell operations due to the presence of hardware deviations and external disturbances during the experimental process, thereby invalidating the extrinsic parameters. This invalidation is often neglected in macro-world visual servoing and affects the visual image processing quality, causing deviation from the desired position in micro-level cell operations. To increase the success rate of vision guided biological micromanipulations, a novel algorithm monitoring the changing image pattern of the manipulators including the injection micropipette and cell holder is designed and implemented based on 2 dimensional (2D)-to 2D feature correspondences and can adjust the manipulator and perform position control simultaneously. When any deviation is found, the manipulator is retracted to the initial focusing plane before continuing the operation.

  15. Casting process modeling using CAST2D: The part mold interface

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1991-10-01

    Correctly modeling the physics across the part-mold interface is crucial in predicting the quality of a cast part. Most metals undergo a volume change on solidification (e.g., aluminum -6.6%) and shrinkage on cooling. As the cast metal shrinks, it pulls away from the mol wall creating a gap. This gap effects the thermal contact resistance between the part and mold. The thermal contact resistance increase as the gap widens. This directly effects the cooling rate and ultimately the final cast shape, stress state, and quality of the cast part. CAST2D is a coupled thermal-stress finite element computer code for casting process modeling. This code can be used to predict the final shape and stress state of cast parts. CAST2D couples the heat transfer code TOPAZ2D and solid mechanics code NIKE2D. CAST2D is a code in development. This report presents the status of a general purpose thermal-mechanical interface algorithm. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  16. MHD bending waves in a current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    Transverse MHD bending waves are considered in an isothermal and compressible two-dimensional current sheet of finite thickness in which the magnetic field changes direction and strength. The general form of the wave equation is obtained. It is shown that rotation of the magnetic field across the current sheet prevents the existence of singular points so that continuous spectrum solutions and the concomitant wave decay disappear. Instead, normal modes exist and closed integral solution for arbitrary current sheet structure are found. The results are discussed in terms of small-scale waves on the heliospheric current sheet.

  17. MHD performance calculations with oxygen enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, C. C. P.; Staiger, P. J.; Seikel, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    The impact of oxygen enrichment of the combustion air on the generator and overall plant performance was studied for the ECAS-scale MHD/steam plants. A channel optimization technique is described and the results of generator performance calculations using this technique are presented. Performance maps were generated to assess the impact of various generator parameters. Directly and separately preheated plant performance with varying O2 enrichment was calculated. The optimal level of enrichment was a function of plant type and preheat temperature. The sensitivity of overall plant performance to critical channel assumptions and oxygen plant performance characteristics was also examined.

  18. MHD oxidant intermediate temperature ceramic heater study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. W.; Chait, I. L.; Saari, D. P.; Marksberry, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The use of three types of directly fired ceramic heaters for preheating oxygen enriched air to an intermediate temperature of 1144K was investigated. The three types of ceramic heaters are: (1) a fixed bed, periodic flow ceramic brick regenerative heater; (2) a ceramic pebble regenerative heater. The heater design, performance and operating characteristics under conditions in which the particulate matter is not solidified are evaluated. A comparison and overall evaluation of the three types of ceramic heaters and temperature range determination at which the particulate matter in the MHD exhaust gas is estimated to be a dry powder are presented.

  19. 2-D Finite Element Heat Conduction

    1989-10-30

    AYER is a finite element program which implicitly solves the general two-dimensional equation of thermal conduction for plane or axisymmetric bodies. AYER takes into account the effects of time (transient problems), in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity, a three-dimensional velocity distribution, and interface thermal contact resistance. Geometry and material distributions are arbitrary, and input is via subroutines provided by the user. As a result, boundary conditions, material properties, velocity distributions, and internal power generation may be mademore » functions of, e.g., time, temperature, location, and heat flux.« less

  20. A Planar Quantum Transistor Based on 2D-2D Tunneling in Double Quantum Well Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    We report on our work on the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT), based on the gate-control of two-dimensional -- two-dimensional (2D-2D) tunneling in a double quantum well heterostructure. While previous quantum transistors have typically required tiny laterally-defined features, by contrast the DELTT is entirely planar and can be reliably fabricated in large numbers. We use a novel epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) flip-chip process, whereby submicron gating on opposite sides of semiconductor epitaxial layers as thin as 0.24 microns can be achieved. Because both electron layers in the DELTT are 2D, the resonant tunneling features are unusually sharp, and can be easily modulated with one or more surface gates. We demonstrate DELTTs with peak-to-valley ratios in the source-drain I-V curve of order 20:1 below 1 K. Both the height and position of the resonant current peak can be controlled by gate voltage over a wide range. DELTTs with larger subband energy offsets ({approximately} 21 meV) exhibit characteristics that are nearly as good at 77 K, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Using these devices, we also demonstrate bistable memories operating at 77 K. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for room temperature operation, increases in gain, and high-speed.

  1. 'Brukin2D': a 2D visualization and comparison tool for LC-MS data

    PubMed Central

    Tsagkrasoulis, Dimosthenis; Zerefos, Panagiotis; Loudos, George; Vlahou, Antonia; Baumann, Marc; Kossida, Sophia

    2009-01-01

    Background Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) is a commonly used technique to resolve complex protein mixtures. Visualization of large data sets produced from LC-MS, namely the chromatogram and the mass spectra that correspond to its compounds is the focus of this work. Results The in-house developed 'Brukin2D' software, built in Matlab 7.4, which is presented here, uses the compound data that are exported from the Bruker 'DataAnalysis' program, and depicts the mean mass spectra of all the chromatogram compounds from one LC-MS run, in one 2D contour/density plot. Two contour plots from different chromatograph runs can then be viewed in the same window and automatically compared, in order to find their similarities and differences. The results of the comparison can be examined through detailed mass quantification tables, while chromatogram compound statistics are also calculated during the procedure. Conclusion 'Brukin2D' provides a user-friendly platform for quick, easy and integrated view of complex LC-MS data. The software is available at . PMID:19534737

  2. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) by methadone.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, D; Otton, S V; Sproule, B A; Busto, U; Inaba, T; Kalow, W; Sellers, E M

    1993-01-01

    1. In microsomes prepared from three human livers, methadone competitively inhibited the O-demethylation of dextromethorphan, a marker substrate for CYP2D6. The apparent Ki value of methadone ranged from 2.5 to 5 microM. 2. Two hundred and fifty-two (252) white Caucasians, including 210 unrelated healthy volunteers and 42 opiate abusers undergoing treatment with methadone were phenotyped using dextromethorphan as the marker drug. Although the frequency of poor metabolizers was similar in both groups, the extensive metabolizers among the opiate abusers tended to have higher O-demethylation metabolic ratios and to excrete less of the dose as dextromethorphan metabolites than control extensive metabolizer subjects. These data suggest inhibition of CYP2D6 by methadone in vivo as well. 3. Because methadone is widely used in the treatment of opiate abuse, inhibition of CYP2D6 activity in these patients might contribute to exaggerated response or unexpected toxicity from drugs that are substrates of this enzyme. PMID:8448065

  3. Priority pollutant analysis of MHD-derived combustion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Katherine D.

    An important factor in developing Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for commercial applications is environmental impact. Consequently, an effort was initiated to identify and quantify any possible undesirable minute chemical constituents in MHD waste streams, with special emphasis on the priority pollutant species. This paper discusses how priority pollutant analyses were used to accomplish the following goals at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI): comparison of the composition of solid combustion products collected from various locations along a prototypical MHD flow train during the firing of Illinois No. 6 and Montana Rosebud coals; comparison of solid waste products generated from MHD and conventional power plant technologies; and identification of a suitable disposal option for various MHD derived combustion products. Results from our ongoing research plans for gas phase sampling and analysis of priority pollutant volatiles, semi-volatiles, and metals are discussed.

  4. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  5. Nonlinear tearing mode study using the almost ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, C.; Callen, J.D.; Jensen, T.H.

    1998-12-31

    The tearing mode is an important resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) mode. It perturbs the initial equilibrium magnetic flux surfaces through magnetic field line reconnection to form new flux surfaces with magnetic islands. In the study of the tearing mode, usually the initial equilibria are one dimensional with two ignorable coordinates and the perturbed equilibria are two dimensional with one ignorable coordinate. The tearing mode can be linearly unstable and its growth saturates at a fine amplitude. The neoclassical tearing mode theory shows that the mode can be nonlinearly driven by the bootstrap current even when it is linearly stable to the classical tearing mode. It is important to study the nonlinear behavior of the tearing mode. As an intrinsically nonlinear approach, the use of the almost ideal MHD constraint is suited to study the nonlinear properties of the tearing mode. In this paper, as a validation of the method, the authors study two characteristics of the tearing mode using the almost ideal MHD constraint: (1) the linear stability condition for the initial one dimensional equilibrium; and (2) the final saturation level for the unstable case. In this work, they only consider the simplest case where no gradient of pressure or current density exists at the mode resonant surface.

  6. Adaptive Numerical Dissipation Control in High Order Schemes for Multi-D Non-Ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, B.

    2005-01-01

    The required type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter to accurately resolve all relevant multiscales of complex MHD unsteady high-speed shock/shear/turbulence/combustion problems are not only physical problem dependent, but also vary from one flow region to another. In addition, proper and efficient control of the divergence of the magnetic field (Div(B)) numerical error for high order shock-capturing methods poses extra requirements for the considered type of CPU intensive computations. The goal is to extend our adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order filter schemes and our new divergence-free methods for ideal MHD to non-ideal MHD that include viscosity and resistivity. The key idea consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and leave the rest of the region free from numerical dissipation contamination. These scheme-independent detectors are capable of distinguishing shocks/shears, flame sheets, turbulent fluctuations and spurious high-frequency oscillations. The detection algorithm is based on an artificial compression method (ACM) (for shocks/shears), and redundant multiresolution wavelets (WAV) (for the above types of flow feature). These filters also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error.

  7. A Mechanism for the Loading-Unloading Substorm Cycle Missing in MHD Global Magnetospheric Simulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Uritsky, V.; Vassiliadis, D.; Baker, D. N.

    2005-01-01

    Loading and consequent unloading of magnetic flux is an essential element of the substorm cycle in Earth's magnetotail. We are unaware of an available global MHD magnetospheric simulation model that includes a loading- unloading cycle in its behavior. Given the central role that MHD models presently play in the development of our understanding of magnetospheric dynamics, and given the present plans for the central role that these models will play in ongoing space weather prediction programs, it is clear that this failure must be corrected. A 2-dimensional numerical driven current-sheet model has been developed that incorporates an idealized current- driven instability with a resistive MHD system. Under steady loading, the model exhibits a global loading- unloading cycle. The specific mechanism for producing the loading-unloading cycle will be discussed. It will be shown that scale-free avalanching of electromagnetic energy through the model, from loading to unloading, is carried by repetitive bursts of localized reconnection. Each burst leads, somewhat later, to a field configuration that is capable of exciting a reconnection burst again. This process repeats itself in an intermittent manner while the total field energy in the system falls. At the end of an unloading interval, the total field energy is reduced to well below that necessary to initiate the next unloading event and, thus, a loading-unloading cycle results. It will be shown that, in this model, it is the topology of bursty localized reconnection that is responsible for the appearance of the loading-unloading cycle.

  8. Dissipation of Energy, Cross Helicity, and Magnetic Helicity in Ideal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aluie, Hussein; Eyink, Gregory L.; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2007-11-01

    The ``invariants'' of ideal MHD--energy, cross helicity, and magnetic helicity--need not be conserved in the limit of zero viscosity and resistivity if the solution fields become singular. This is observed to occur in MHD turbulence, where the effective dissipation is due to nonlinear cascade of the invariants to small-scales. We study the large-scale balances of the three invariants via a ``coarse-graining'' approach related to Wilson-Kadanoff renormalization group. The ideal dissipation in this framework is due to ``turbulent stress'' and ``turbulent EMF'' generated by eliminated plasma motions below the coarse-graining length. We derive upper bounds on these turbulent contributions to the MHD equations and improve the necessary conditions of [1] for ideal dissipation. In particular, we show that the conditions for turbulent dissipation/forward cascade of magnetic helicity are so severe--infinite 3rd-order moments of the velocity & magnetic fields!--that they are unlikely to ever naturally occur. We also establish local balance equations in space-time of the three invariants, both for measurable ``coarsed-grained'' variables and also for ``bare'' fields. On this basis we give physical interpretations of the turbulent cascades, in terms of work concepts for energy and in terms of topological linkage [2] for the two helicities. [1] Caflisch et al. 1997 Comm. Math. Phys. 184, 443-455 [2] Moffatt, H. K. 1969 J. Fluid Mech. 35, 117-129.

  9. Nonlinear three-dimensional MHD simulations of tearing modes in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütjens, H.; Luciani, J. F.; Garbet, X.

    2001-12-01

    The comprehension of the dynamics of classical and neoclassical tearing modes is a key issue in high-performance tokamak plasmas. Avoiding these instabilities requires a good knowledge of all the physical mechanisms involved in their linear and/or nonlinear onset. Our tridimensional time evolution code XTOR, which solves the full magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations including thermal transport, is used to tackle this difficult problem. In this paper, to show the state of art in full-scale nonlinear MHD simulations of tokamak plasmas, we investigate the effect of plasma curvature on the tearing mode dynamics. For a realistic picture of this dynamics, heat diffusion is required in the linear regimes as well, as in the nonlinear regimes. We present a new dispersion relation including perpendicular and parallel transport, and show that it matches the linear and nonlinear regimes. This leads to a new tearing mode island evolution equation including curvature effects, valid for every island size in tokamak plasmas. This equation predicts a nonlinearly unstable regime for tearing instabilities, i.e. a regime which is linearly stable, but where the tearing mode can be destabilized nonlinearly by a finite-size seed island. These theoretical predictions are in good agreement with XTOR simulations. In particular, the nonlinear instability due to curvature effects is reproduced. Our results have an important impact on the onset mechanism of neoclassical tearing modes. They indeed predict that curvature effects lead to a resistive MHD threshold.

  10. Magnetic Braking and Protostellar Disk Formation: The Ideal MHD Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellon, Richard R.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2008-07-01

    Magnetic fields are usually considered dynamically important in star formation when the dimensionless mass-to-flux ratio is close to, or less than, unity (λ lesssim 1). We show that, in disk formation, the requirement is far less stringent. This conclusion is drawn from a set of 2D (axisymmetric) simulations of the collapse of rotating, singular isothermal cores magnetized to different degrees. We find that a weak field corresponding to λ ~ 100 can begin to disrupt the rotationally supported disk through magnetic braking, by creating regions of rapid, supersonic collapse in the disk. These regions are separated by one or more centrifugal barriers, where the rapid infall is temporarily halted. The number of centrifugal barriers increases with the mass-to-flux ratio λ. When λ gtrsim 100, they merge together to form a more or less contiguous, rotationally supported disk. Even though the magnetic field in such a case is extremely weak on the scale of dense cores, it is amplified by collapse and differential rotation, to the extent that its pressure dominates the thermal pressure in both the disk and its surrounding region. For relatively strongly magnetized cores with λ lesssim 10, the disk formation is suppressed completely, as found previously. A new feature is that the mass accretion is highly episodic, due to reconnection of the magnetic field lines accumulated near the center. For rotationally supported disks to appear during the protostellar mass accretion phase of star formation in dense cores with realistic field strengths, the powerful magnetic brake must be weakened, perhaps through nonideal MHD effects. Another possibility is to remove, through protostellar winds, the material that acts to brake the disk rotation. We discuss the possibility of observing a generic product of the magnetic braking, an extended circumstellar region that is supported by a combination of toroidal magnetic field and rotation—a "magnetogyrosphere"—interferometrically.

  11. The RFP dynamo: MHD to kinetic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarff, J. S.; Almagri, A. F.; den Hartog, D. J.; McCollam, K. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sauppe, J. P.; Sovinec, C. R.; Terry, P. W.; Triana, J. C.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Parke, E.

    2015-11-01

    The hallmark of magnetic relaxation in an RFP plasma is profile flattening of J0 .B0 /B2 effected by a dynamo-like emf in Ohm's law. This is well-studied in single-fluid MHD, but recent MST results and extended MHD modeling show that both and the Hall emf, - /ene , are important, revealing decoupled electron and ion motion. Since dynamo is current-related, the electron fluid emf, , captures both effects. In MST, the electron flow is dominantly Ve , 1 ~E1 ×B0 /B2 , implying ~ / B . This and the Hall emf are measured in MST for comparison in Ohm's law. A finite-pressure response is also possible, e.g., ``diamagnetic dynamo'', ∇ . /ene , associated with diamagnetic drift, and ``kinetic dynamo'' associated with collisionless streaming of electrons in a stochastic magnetic field. Correlation measurements and using FIR interferometry and Thomson scattering reveal these as small but finite in MST. A kinetic emf might be expected for any high-beta plasma with inhomogeneous pressure. Support by DOE/NSF.

  12. Investigations for biogas operated MHD power generators

    SciTech Connect

    Dahiya, R.P.; Chand, A.; Sharma, S.C.

    1983-12-01

    Biogas is produced from the anaerobic fermentation of the organic matter containing cellulose, such as agricultural wastes, human wastes, animal wastes, etc. It contains methane (50-70%), carbon dioxide (30-50%), and very small amounts of hydrogen and hydrogen sulphide. Adequate quantities of raw material to generate biogas are normally available in rural areas, and therefore, there is a possibility that almost all the energy requirements of the rural sector may be fulfilled by biogas. Presently in the rural sector, biogas is used mainly to provide thermal energy (for cooking, etc.), and up to a limited extent, to meet the electrical energy requirements by running electrical generators with engines powered by a mixture of oil and biogas. In this paper, the authors propose a scheme in which biogas can be used to generate electricity more efficiently by using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generators. Investigations have been carried out to make feasibility studies for biogas-operated open cycle MHD power generators. Composition, temperature and electrical conductivity of the seeded (with potassium) combustion products of biogas-air/oxygen systems have been analytically investigated for different percentages of CO/sub 2/ in biogas and at various combustor pressures for a seeding ratio of 1 percent by weight. The effect of preheating and enrichment of air on temperature and electrical conductivity of the seeded combustion plasmas has also been studied.

  13. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  14. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  15. Almost but not quite 2D, Non-linear Bayesian Inversion of CSEM Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A.; Key, K.; Bodin, T.

    2013-12-01

    The geophysical inverse problem can be elegantly stated in a Bayesian framework where a probability distribution can be viewed as a statement of information regarding a random variable. After all, the goal of geophysical inversion is to provide information on the random variables of interest - physical properties of the earth's subsurface. However, though it may be simple to postulate, a practical difficulty of fully non-linear Bayesian inversion is the computer time required to adequately sample the model space and extract the information we seek. As a consequence, in geophysical problems where evaluation of a full 2D/3D forward model is computationally expensive, such as marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) mapping of the resistivity of seafloor oil and gas reservoirs, Bayesian studies have largely been conducted with 1D forward models. While the 1D approximation is indeed appropriate for exploration targets with planar geometry and geological stratification, it only provides a limited, site-specific idea of uncertainty in resistivity with depth. In this work, we extend our fully non-linear 1D Bayesian inversion to a 2D model framework, without requiring the usual regularization of model resistivities in the horizontal or vertical directions used to stabilize quasi-2D inversions. In our approach, we use the reversible jump Markov-chain Monte-Carlo (RJ-MCMC) or trans-dimensional method and parameterize the subsurface in a 2D plane with Voronoi cells. The method is trans-dimensional in that the number of cells required to parameterize the subsurface is variable, and the cells dynamically move around and multiply or combine as demanded by the data being inverted. This approach allows us to expand our uncertainty analysis of resistivity at depth to more than a single site location, allowing for interactions between model resistivities at different horizontal locations along a traverse over an exploration target. While the model is parameterized in 2D, we

  16. Energy analysis of MHD-steam and MHD-gas-steam power plants integrated with coal gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Zaporowski, B.; Roszkiewicz, J.; Sroka, K.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents energy analysis of combined two media (MHD-steam) and three media (MHD-gas-steam) power plants of high efficiency of conversion of chemical energy of fuel into electric energy integrated with coal gasification. The goal of this paper is to show the possibility of obtaining the high efficiency (about 60%) of the conversion of chemical energy of coal into electric energy in combined power plants with the open cycle MHD generators. The base of performed energy analysis are the elaborated mathematical models: of gas generator, of combustion chamber of MHD generator, of MHD channel, of high-temperature heater of oxygen, nitrogen and air, of steam generator and the cycle of steam turbine and of the cycle of gas turbine, and also the computer programmes, elaborated on the base of these models for numerical simulation of the processes of energy conversion in these elements. The elaborated mathematical model of the process of coal gasification for MHD-steam power plants allows to calculate: composition, physical properties and energy parameters of gas produced in the process of coal gasification, the consumption and temperature of gasifying medium and both the chemical and energy efficiency of coal gasification. Gas produced in the process of coal gasification is directed to combustion chamber of MHD generator after desulphurization. The mathematical model of physical, chemical and energy processes in combustion chamber of MHD generator allows to determine the temperature of oxidizer and its enrichment in oxygen necessary to obtain the plasma parameters desired for optimum process of energy conversion in MHD channel. The mathematical model of energy conversion in open cycle MHD channel was presented in paper. This model allows to perform numerical simulation of energy conversion process and to determine optimum parameters of plasma at the inlet to the channel necessary to obtain maximum efficiency of energy conversion.

  17. Supra-Arcade Downflows: Observations and MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Innes, D.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Huang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Supra-arcade downflows (hereafter referred to as SADs) are low-emission, elongated features usually observed above post-eruption coronal arcades. Although SADs have been observed for decades, the mechanism for their formation remains unclear. It has been suggested that SADs are shrinking loops or wakes following shrinking loops in the exhaust region of magnetic reconnection. We have undertaken a detailed comparison between numerical simulation and observation to test these ideas. Using data from SDO/AIA, we study four flare events with SADs, and show distinct differences between reconnected loops and SADs. The observations also exhibit downward moving SADs intertwined with bright upward moving spikes. Whereas SADs are dark, hot voids, spikes are brighter, slightly cooler structures. In our high-Lundquist-number 3D resistive MHD simulations, we demonstrate that secondary ballooning/interchange instabilities develop in the downstream region of a reconnecting current sheet. The instability results in the formation of low-density coherent structures that resemble SADs, and high-density structures that look like the spikes. Comparison between the simulation results and observations suggests that secondary interchange/ballooning instabilities of reconnecting current sheets provide a plausible mechanism for the observed features of SADs and spikes.

  18. Power take-off analysis for diagonally connected MHD channels

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Y C; Doss, E D

    1980-01-01

    The electrical loading of the power take-off region of diagonally connected MHD channels is investigated by a two-dimensional model. The study examines the loading schemes typical of those proposed for the U-25 and U-25 Bypass channels. The model is applicable for the following four cases: (1) connection with diodes only, (2) connection with diodes and equal resistors, (3) connection with diodes and variable resistances to obtain a given current distribution, and (4) connection with diodes and variable resistors under changing load. The analysis is applicable for the power take-off regions of single or multiple-output systems. The general behaviors of the current and the potential distributions in all four cases are discussed. The analytical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. It is found possible to design the electrical circuit of the channel in the take-off region so as to achieve a fairly even load current output under changing total load current.

  19. 3D MHD simulations of radial wire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, C.; Ampleford, D.; Ciardi, A.; Chittenden, J.; Bland, S.; Niasse, N.

    2008-04-01

    We present 3D resistive MHD simulations evaluating multi-MA radial wire arrays as a potential compact, high intensity source for inertial confinement fusion and laboratory astrophysics. A radial wire array consists of wires running radially outwards from a central electrode, and was first investigated at the 1 MA level on the MAGPIE generator at Imperial College. Originally used as a method of producing magnetic tower laboratory jets relevant to astrophysics[1], they have also shown potential as a high power x-ray source. Able to produce x-ray pulses with a rise time and peak power comparable to cylindrical wire arrays, radial arrays occupy a smaller volume and may consequently be able to access higher power densities. We discuss simulation results reproducing radial array experiments performed on the MAGPIE facility as a means of benchmarking our model. This model is then used to evaluate radial wire arrays in the multi-MA regime for planned experiments on the Saturn generator of Sandia National Laboratories. [1] A. Ciardi et al, Phys. Plasmas 14, 056501 (2007)

  20. Computational MHD on 3D Unstructured Lagrangian Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, C. L.; Barnes, D. C.

    1999-11-01

    Lagrangian computational meshes are typically employed to model multi-material problems because they do not require costly interface tracking methods. Our algorithms, for ideal and non-ideal 3D MHD, are designed for use on such meshes composed of polyhedral cells with an arbitrary number of faces. This allows for mesh refinement during a calculation to prevent the well known problem of mesh tangling. The action of the magnetic vector potential, A \\cdot δ l, is centered on edges. For ideal and non-ideal flow, this maintains nabla \\cdot B = 0 to round-off error. Vertex forces are derived by the variation of magnetic energy with respect to vertex positions, F = - partial WB / partial r. This assures symmetry as well as magnetic flux, momentum, and energy conservation. The method is local so that parallelization by domain decomposition is natural for large meshes. The resistive diffusion part is calculated using the support operator method, to obtain energy conservation, symmetry. Implicit time difference equations are solved by preconditioned, conjugate gradient methods. Results of convergence tests are presented. Boundary conditions at plasma vaccuum interfaces have been incorporated. Initial results of an annular Z-pinch implosion problem are shown.

  1. MHD Simulation of RF Current Drive in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J. A.; Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.; Diem, S.; Harvey, R. W.

    2013-10-01

    Auxiliary current drive using the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) may advance the performance of the RFP. In prior computations, a hypothetical edge-localized current is shown to suppress tearing activity that governs transport in the RFP. Ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the current drive. To support MST EBW studies, an integrated modeling scheme incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ~ 104) agree with the previous work but at MST-like S (S ~ 3 × 106) show unexpected results. The effect on the current profile by the rf-driven force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as S increases. Simulations reproduce the experimentally observed periodic current profile relaxation events (sawteeth). With rf drive, reduction of tearing mode amplitudes is seen, but is limited to periods between each sawtooth, which persist with up to 10 MW of rf. Prolonged low tearing amplitudes are predicted with the combination of current drive and reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, these simulations show that the resistivity profile has a strong effect on the optimal current drive profile for mode stabilization. Work supported by US DoE.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of 2D molybdenum carbide (MXene)

    DOE PAGES

    Halim, Joseph; Kota, Sankalp; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Naguib, Michael; Zhao, Meng -Qiang; Moon, Eun Ju; Pitock, Jeremy; Nanda, Jagjit; May, Steven J.; Gogotsi, Yury; et al

    2016-02-17

    Large scale synthesis and delamination of 2D Mo2CT x (where T is a surface termination group) has been achieved by selectively etching gallium from the recently discovered nanolaminated, ternary transition metal carbide Mo2Ga2C. Different synthesis and delamination routes result in different flake morphologies. The resistivity of free-standing Mo2CT x films increases by an order of magnitude as the temperature is reduced from 300 to 10 K, suggesting semiconductor-like behavior of this MXene, in contrast to Ti3C2T x which exhibits metallic behavior. At 10 K, the magnetoresistance is positive. Additionally, changes in electronic transport are observed upon annealing of the films.more » When 2 μm thick films are tested as electrodes in supercapacitors, capacitances as high as 700 F cm–3 in a 1 m sulfuric acid electrolyte and high capacity retention for at least 10,000 cycles at 10 A g–1 are obtained. Free-standing Mo2CT x films, with ≈8 wt% carbon nanotubes, perform well when tested as an electrode material for Li-ions, especially at high rates. In conclusion, at 20 and 131 C cycling rates, stable reversible capacities of 250 and 76 mAh g–1, respectively, are achieved for over 1000 cycles.« less

  3. Mechanical characterization of 2D, 2D stitched, and 3D braided/RTM materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaton, Jerry W.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1993-01-01

    Braided composite materials have potential for application in aircraft structures. Fuselage frames, floor beams, wing spars, and stiffeners are examples where braided composites could find application if cost effective processing and damage tolerance requirements are met. Another important consideration for braided composites relates to their mechanical properties and how they compare to the properties of composites produced by other textile composite processes being proposed for these applications. Unfortunately, mechanical property data for braided composites do not appear extensively in the literature. Data are presented in this paper on the mechanical characterization of 2D triaxial braid, 2D triaxial braid plus stitching, and 3D (through-the-thickness) braid composite materials. The braided preforms all had the same graphite tow size and the same nominal braid architectures, (+/- 30 deg/0 deg), and were resin transfer molded (RTM) using the same mold for each of two different resin systems. Static data are presented for notched and unnotched tension, notched and unnotched compression, and compression after impact strengths at room temperature. In addition, some static results, after environmental conditioning, are included. Baseline tension and compression fatigue results are also presented, but only for the 3D braided composite material with one of the resin systems.

  4. Suppression of MHD fluctuations leading to improved confinement in a gun-driven spheromak.

    PubMed

    McLean, H S; Woodruff, S; Hooper, E B; Bulmer, R H; Hill, D N; Holcomb, C; Moller, J; Stallard, B W; Wood, R D; Wang, Z

    2002-03-25

    Magnetic fluctuations have been reduced to approximately 1% during discharges on the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment by shaping the spatial distribution of the bias magnetic flux in the device. In the resulting quiescent regime, the safety factor profile is nearly flat in the plasma and the dominant ideal and resistive MHD modes are greatly reduced. During this period, the temperature profile is peaked at the magnetic axis and maps onto magnetic flux contours. Energy confinement time is improved over previous reports in a driven spheromak.

  5. Alignment of Velocity and Magnetic Fluctuations in Simulations of Anisotropic MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2007-11-01

    There has been recent theoretical interest in the effect of the alignment of velocity and magnetic fluctuations in three-dimensional (3D) MHD turbulence with a large-scale magnetic field [Boldyrev 2005, 2006]. This theory predicts that the angle θ between the velocity and magnetic fluctuation vectors has a scaling of θ&1/4circ;, where λ is the spatial scale of the fluctuations. There have also been simulations on 3D forced MHD turbulence that supports this prediction [Mason et al. 2006, 2007]. The scaling has also been tested against observations of solar wind turbulence [Podesta et al. 2007]. We report here simulation results based on decaying 2D turbulence. The scaling of θ&1/4circ; and Iroshnikov-Kraichnan scaling has also been observed within a range of time interval and spatial scales, despite the fact that Boldyrev's theory was developed for fully 3D turbulence in the presence of a strong external field. As the external field is reduced in magnitude and becomes comparable to the magnitude of magnetic fluctuations or lower, the scale-dependent alignment is weakened. Implications for observations of solar wind turbulence will be discussed.

  6. Existence of two MHD reconnection modes in a solar 3D magnetic null point topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariat, Etienne; Antiochos, Spiro; DeVore, C. Richard; Dalmasse, Kévin

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic topologies with a 3D magnetic null point are common in the solar atmosphere and occur at different spatial scales: such structures can be associated with some solar eruptions, with the so-called pseudo-streamers, and with numerous coronal jets. We have recently developed a series of numerical experiments that model magnetic reconnection in such configurations in order to study and explain the properties of jet-like features. Our model uses our state-of-the-art adaptive-mesh MHD solver ARMS. Energy is injected in the system by line-tied motion of the magnetic field lines in a corona-like configuration. We observe that, in the MHD framework, two reconnection modes eventually appear in the course of the evolution of the system. A very impulsive one, associated with a highly dynamic and fully 3D current sheet, is associated with the energetic generation of a jet. Before and after the generation of the jet, a quasi-steady reconnection mode, more similar to the standard 2D Sweet-Parker model, presents a lower global reconnection rate. We show that the geometry of the magnetic configuration influences the trigger of one or the other mode. We argue that this result carries important implications for the observed link between observational features such as solar jets, solar plumes, and the emission of coronal bright points.

  7. Analysis and design of an ultrahigh temperature hydrogen-fueled MHD generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moder, Jeffrey P.; Myrabo, Leik N.; Kaminski, Deborah A.

    1993-01-01

    A coupled gas dynamics/radiative heat transfer analysis of partially ionized hydrogen, in local thermodynamic equilibrium, flowing through an ultrahigh temperature (10,000-20,000 K) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is performed. Gas dynamics are modeled by a set of quasi-one-dimensional, nonlinear differential equations which account for friction, convective and radiative heat transfer, and the interaction between the ionized gas and applied magnetic field. Radiative heat transfer is modeled using nongray, absorbing-emitting 2D and 3D P-1 approximations which permit an arbitrary variation of the spectral absorption coefficient with frequency. Gas dynamics and radiative heat transfer are coupled through the energy equation and through the temperature- and density-dependent absorption coefficient. The resulting nonlinear elliptic problem is solved by iterative methods. Design of such MHD generators as onboard, open-cycle, electric power supplies for a particular advanced airbreathing propulsion concept produced an efficient and compact 128-MWe generator characterized by an extraction ratio of 35.5 percent, a power density of 10,500 MWe/cu m, and a specific (extracted) energy of 324 MJe/kg of hydrogen. The maximum wall heat flux and total wall heat load were 453 MW/sq m and 62 MW, respectively.

  8. Inversion methods for the measurements of MHD-like density fluctuations by Heavy Ion Beam Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaquias, A.; Henriques, R. B.; Nedzelsky, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    We report here on the recent developments in the deconvolution of the path integral effects for the study of MHD pressure-like fluctuations measured by Heavy Ion Beam Diagnostic. In particular, we develop improved methods to account for and remove the path integral effect on the determination of the ionization generation factors, including the double ionization of the primary beam. We test the method using the HIBD simulation code which computes the real beam trajectories and attenuations due to electron impact ionization for any selected synthetic profiles of plasma current, plasma potential, electron temperature and density. Simulations have shown the numerical method to be highly effective in ISTTOK within an overall accuracy of a few percent (< 3%). The method here presented can effectively reduce the path integral effects and may serve as the basis to develop improved retrieving techniques for plasma devices working even in higher density ranges. The method is applied to retrieve the time evolution and spatial structure of m=1 and m=2 modes. The 2D MHD mode-like structure is reconstructed by means of a spatial projection of all 1D measurements obtained during one full rotation of the mode. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  9. Development of materials for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamics (MHD): ceramic electrode. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Marchant, D.D.

    1986-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory, supported by the US Department of Energy, developed advanced materials for use in open-cycle, closed cycle magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power generation, an advanced energy conversion system in which the flow of electrically conducting fluid interacts with an electric field to convert the energy directly into electricity. The purpose of the PNL work was to develop electrodes for the MHD channel. Such electrodes must have: (1) electrical conductivity above 0.01 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ from near room temperature to 1900/sup 0/K, (2) resistance to both electrochemical and chemical corrosion by both slag and potassium seed, (3) resistance to erosion by high-velocity gases and particles, (4) resistance to thermal shock, (5) adequate thermal conductivity, (6) compatibility with other channel components, particularly the electrical insulators, (7) oxidation-reduction stability, and (8) adequate thermionic emission. This report describes the concept and development of high-temperature, graded ceramic composite electrode materials and their electrical and structural properties. 47 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. Extended MHD Study of Interchange Modes in Spheromaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Eric C.

    Extended MHD effects on pressure driven interchange modes are studied in decaying spheromak equilibria. Equilibria at conditions relevant to high temperature SSPX [Hooper et al., Nucl. Fus. 1999] discharges are ideal interchange unstable. Extended MHD introduces drifts which have a stabilizing effect, reducing the linear growth rate, on the high-n modes. However, extended MHD has a mixed effect on the low-n modes. The low- n modes have the greatest impact on confinement. In some cases extended MHD is destabilizing, increasing the growth rate, while in other cases extended MHD is stabilizing. A cylindrical screw-pinch model that approximates decaying spheromaks, is studied to better understand the lack of stabilization on the low- n modes. The extended MHD effects reduce the growth rate at small Hall parameter, but a second instability exists at finite Hall parameter. The second mode grows at a rate comparable to the MHD interchange mode. The diamagnetic heat flux has an important stabilizing effect, delaying the onset of the second mode. In calculations that neglect the diamagnetic heat flux, the second mode is dominant at experimentally relevant Hall parameters, and its growth rate exceeds the MHD growth rate. However, including the diamagnetic heat flux delays the onset of the second mode. Here significant stabilization is observed at experiential conditions for Suydam parameters D s<1. This is four times the marginal ideal stable condition. An extended MHD dispersion relation for the gravitational interchange mode [Zhu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008] is analyzed to understand the nature of the second instability. The inclusion of the two-fluid Ohm's law introduces an ion drift wave. The ion drift wave can interact with the gravitational interchange mode producing a second instability.

  11. GRADSPMHD: A parallel MHD code based on the SPH formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaverbeke, S.; Keppens, R.; Poedts, S.

    2014-03-01

    We present GRADSPMHD, a completely Lagrangian parallel magnetohydrodynamics code based on the SPH formalism. The implementation of the equations of SPMHD in the “GRAD-h” formalism assembles known results, including the derivation of the discretized MHD equations from a variational principle, the inclusion of time-dependent artificial viscosity, resistivity and conductivity terms, as well as the inclusion of a mixed hyperbolic/parabolic correction scheme for satisfying the ∇ṡB→ constraint on the magnetic field. The code uses a tree-based formalism for neighbor finding and can optionally use the tree code for computing the self-gravity of the plasma. The structure of the code closely follows the framework of our parallel GRADSPH FORTRAN 90 code which we added previously to the CPC program library. We demonstrate the capabilities of GRADSPMHD by running 1, 2, and 3 dimensional standard benchmark tests and we find good agreement with previous work done by other researchers. The code is also applied to the problem of simulating the magnetorotational instability in 2.5D shearing box tests as well as in global simulations of magnetized accretion disks. We find good agreement with available results on this subject in the literature. Finally, we discuss the performance of the code on a parallel supercomputer with distributed memory architecture. Catalogue identifier: AERP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 620503 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 19837671 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 90/MPI. Computer: HPC cluster. Operating system: Unix. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, parallelized using MPI. RAM: ˜30 MB for a

  12. Computational Screening of 2D Materials for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunima K; Mathew, Kiran; Zhuang, Houlong L; Hennig, Richard G

    2015-03-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials exhibit a range of extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties different from their bulk counterparts with potential applications for 2D materials emerging in energy storage and conversion technologies. In this Perspective, we summarize the recent developments in the field of solar water splitting using 2D materials and review a computational screening approach to rapidly and efficiently discover more 2D materials that possess properties suitable for solar water splitting. Computational tools based on density-functional theory can predict the intrinsic properties of potential photocatalyst such as their electronic properties, optical absorbance, and solubility in aqueous solutions. Computational tools enable the exploration of possible routes to enhance the photocatalytic activity of 2D materials by use of mechanical strain, bias potential, doping, and pH. We discuss future research directions and needed method developments for the computational design and optimization of 2D materials for photocatalysis.

  13. Viscous, Resistive Magnetorotational Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessah, Martin E.; Chan, Chi-kwan

    2008-09-01

    We carry out a comprehensive analysis of the behavior of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in viscous, resistive plasmas. We find exact, nonlinear solutions of the nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations describing the local dynamics of an incompressible, differentially rotating background threaded by a vertical magnetic field when disturbances with wavenumbers perpendicular to the shear are considered. We provide a geometrical description of these viscous, resistive MRI modes and show how their physical structure is modified as a function of the Reynolds and magnetic Reynolds numbers. We demonstrate that when finite dissipative effects are considered, velocity and magnetic field disturbances are no longer orthogonal (as is the case in the ideal MHD limit) unless the magnetic Prandtl number is unity. We generalize previous results found in the ideal limit and show that a series of key properties of the mean Reynolds and Maxwell stresses also hold for the viscous, resistive MRI. In particular, we show that the Reynolds stress is always positive and the Maxwell stress is always negative. Therefore, even in the presence of viscosity and resistivity, the total mean angular momentum transport is always directed outward. We also find that, for any combination of the Reynolds and magnetic Reynolds numbers, magnetic disturbances dominate both the energetics and the transport of angular momentum and that the total mean energy density is an upper bound for the total mean stress responsible for angular momentum transport. The ratios between the Maxwell and Reynolds stresses and between magnetic and kinetic energy densities increase with decreasing Reynolds numbers for any magnetic Reynolds number; the lowest limit of both ratios is reached in the ideal MHD regime. The analytical results presented here provide new benchmarks for the various algorithms employed to solve the viscous, resistive MHD equations in the shearing box approximation.

  14. WOMBAT: sWift Objects for Mhd BAsed on Tvd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendygral, Peter; Porter, David; Edmon, Paul; Delgado, Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    WOMBAT (sWift Objects for Mhd BAsed on Tvd) is an astrophysical fluid code that is an implementation of a non-relativistic MHD TVD scheme; an extension for relativistic MHD has been added. The code operates on 1, 2, and 3D Eulerian meshes (cartesian and cylindrical coordinates) with magnetic field divergence restriction controlled by a constrained transport (CT) scheme. The user can tune code performance to a given processor based on chip cache sizes. Proper settings yield significant speed-ups due to efficient cache reuse.

  15. A summary of the ECAS MHD power plant results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seikel, G. R.; Harris, L. P.

    1976-01-01

    The performance and the cost of electricity (COE) for MHD systems utilizing coal or coal derived fuels are summarized along with a conceptual open cycle MHD plant design. The results show that open cycle coal fired recuperatively preheated MHD systems have potentially one of the highest coal-pile-to-bus bar efficiencies (48.3%) and also one of the lowest COE of the systems studied. Closed cycle, inert gas systems do not appear to have the potential of exceeding the efficiency of or competing with the COE of advanced steam plants.

  16. Broken Symmetry and Coherent Structure in MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Absolute equilibrium ensemble theory for ideal homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is fairly well developed. Theory and Simulation indicate that ideal MHD turbulence non-ergodic and contains coherent structure. The question of applicability real (i.e., dissipative) MHD turbulence is examined. Results from several very long time numerical simulations on a 64(exp 3) grid are presented. It is seen that coherent structure begins to form before decay dominates over nonlinearity. The connection with inverse spectral cascades and selective decay will also be discussed.

  17. MHD augmented chemical rocket propulsion for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, R.J.; Chapman, J.N.; Rhodes, R.P. )

    1992-07-01

    A performance analysis is carried out of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) augmented chemical thruster (based on a gaseous hydrogen-oxygen system) for space applications such as orbit transfer. The mathematical model used in the analysis is a one-dimensional flow model using equilibrium chemistry for the combustor, choked nozzle, and MHD channel portions of the system, and chemical nonequilibrium kinetics for the high area-ratio gas dynamic nozzle portion of the system. The performance of the chemical-MHD-augmented thruster is compared with that of a pure electric thruster of the same specific impulse level. 13 refs.

  18. MHD stability of incompressible coronal loops with radiative energy loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, C.-H.

    1983-01-01

    Previous studies of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of solar coronal loops have not taken into account the effects of radiative energy loss in the energy equation. However, since coronal loops continuously lose energy by radiation and heat conduction, it is important to understand how these energy loss mechanisms affect MHD stability. We investigate the problem assuming that a magnetic loop has cylindrical geometry. As a first step, stability is studied for a localized mode, and the result is applied to a specific equilibrium. We find that the radiative energy loss effect not only changes the growth rate of ideally unstable modes, but also alters the stability boundary predicted by ideal MHD theory.

  19. Hilbert-Huang Transform in MHD Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kakurin, A.M.; Orlovsky, I.I.

    2005-12-15

    A new method for processing experimental data from MHD diagnostics is discussed that provides a more detailed study of the dynamics of large-scale MHD instabilities. The method is based on the Hilbert-Huang transform method and includes an empirical mode decomposition algorithm, which is used to decompose the experimental MHD diagnostic signals into a set of frequency- and amplitude-modulated harmonics in order to construct the time evolutions of the amplitudes and frequencies of these harmonics with the help of the Hilbert transform. The method can also be applied to analyze data from other diagnostics that measure unsteady oscillating signals.

  20. Synthetic Covalent and Non-Covalent 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Boott, Charlotte E; Nazemi, Ali; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    The creation of synthetic 2D materials represents an attractive challenge that is ultimately driven by their prospective uses in, for example, electronics, biomedicine, catalysis, sensing, and as membranes for separation and filtration. This Review illustrates some recent advances in this diverse field with a focus on covalent and non-covalent 2D polymers and frameworks, and self-assembled 2D materials derived from nanoparticles, homopolymers, and block copolymers.

  1. Drag reduction in turbulent MHD pipe flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlandi, P.

    1996-01-01

    This is a preliminary study devoted to verifying whether or not direct simulations of turbulent Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) flows in liquid metals reproduce experimental observations of drag reduction. Two different cases have been simulated by a finite difference scheme which is second order accurate in space and time. In the first case, an external azimuthal magnetic field is imposed. In this case, the magnetic field acts on the mean axial velocity and complete laminarization of the flow at N(sub a) = 30 has been achieved. In the second case, an axial magnetic field is imposed which affects only fluctuating velocities, and thus the action is less efficient. This second case is more practical, but comparison between numerical and experimental results is only qualitative.

  2. MHD simulation of the Bastille day event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, Jon; Torok, Tibor; Downs, Cooper; Lionello, Roberto; Titov, Viacheslav; Caplan, Ronald M.; Mikić, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2016-03-01

    We describe a time-dependent, thermodynamic, three-dimensional MHD simulation of the July 14, 2000 coronal mass ejection (CME) and flare. The simulation starts with a background corona developed using an MDI-derived magnetic map for the boundary condition. Flux ropes using the modified Titov-Demoulin (TDm) model are used to energize the pre-event active region, which is then destabilized by photospheric flows that cancel flux near the polarity inversion line. More than 1033 ergs are impulsively released in the simulated eruption, driving a CME at 1500 km/s, close to the observed speed of 1700km/s. The post-flare emission in the simulation is morphologically similar to the observed post-flare loops. The resulting flux rope that propagates to 1 AU is similar in character to the flux rope observed at 1 AU, but the simulated ICME center passes 15° north of Earth.

  3. Multimegawatt NEP with vapor core reactor MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Blair; Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2002-01-01

    Efforts at the Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute have assessed the feasibility of combining gaseous or vapor core reactors with magnetohydrodynamic power generators to provide extremely high quality, high density, and low specific mass electrical power for space applications. Innovative shielding strategies are employed to maintain an effective but relatively low mass shield, which is the most dominating part of multi-megawatt space power systems. The fission driven magnetohydrodynamic generator produces tens of kilowatt DC power at specific mass of less than 0.5 kg/kW for the total power system. The MHD output with minor conditioning is coupled to magnetoplasmadynamic thruster to achieve an overall NEP system specific mass of less than 1.0 kg/kW for power levels above 20 MWe. Few other concepts would allow comparable ensuing payload savings and flexible mission abort options for manned flights to Mars for example. .

  4. Benchmarking extended MHD modeling of resonant magnetic perturbations against measurements of islands and screening on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, M. W.; Canik, J. M.; Hirshman, S. P.; Evans, T. E.; Ferraro, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments where resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied to L-mode plasmas are used to test the fundamental plasma response physics on island formation in resistive MHD models. Fine torque scans reveal that large RMP-induced n=1 islands open at multiple mode-rational surfaces (m=2,3,4) at low rotation, but are screened elsewhere. Time-independent linear resistive MHD simulations with the M3D-C1 code predict a narrow region centered at at ωe⊥ < 0 where resonant fields are found to be weakly screened, though strongly screened elsewhere. Experimentally, the island formation window is wider and centered at ωe⊥ < 0. Nonlinear resistive MHD simulations in the absence of rotation are performed with the SIESTA code. A series of meta-stable equilibria are modeled with an increasing helical 2/1 perturbation. These meta-stable equilibria demonstrate the transition from even-parity screening currents at the rational surface at low perturbation levels to odd-pairty Pfirsch-Schlüter currents when a large island is present. Supported by US DOE DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  5. A Two-Fluid, MHD Coronal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.; McComas, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    We describe first results from a numerical two-fluid MHD model of the global structure of the solar corona. The model is two-fluid in the sense that it accounts for the collisional energy exchange between protons and electrons. As in our single-fluid model, volumetric heat and momentum sources are required to produce high speed wind from coronal holes, low speed wind above streamers, and mass fluxes similar to the empirical solar wind. By specifying different proton and electron heating functions we obtain a high proton temperature in the coronal hole and a relatively low proton temperature in the streamer (in comparison with the electron temperature). This is consistent with inferences from SOHO/UVCS, and with the Ulysses/SWOOPS proton and electron temperature measurements which we show from the fast latitude scan. The density in the coronal hole between 2 solar radii and 5 solar radii (2RS and 5RS) is similar to the density reported from SPARTAN 201-01 measurements by Fisher and Guhathakurta. The proton mass flux scaled to 1 AU is 2.4 x 10(exp 8)/sq cm s, which is consistent with Ulysses observations. Inside the closed field region, the density is sufficiently high so that the simulation gives equal proton and electron temperatures due to the high collision rate. In open field regions (in the coronal hole and above the streamer) the proton and electron temperatures differ by varying amounts. In the streamer, the temperature and density are similar to those reported empirically by Li et al and the plasma beta is larger than unity everywhere above approx. 1.5 R(sub s), as it is in all other MHD coronal streamer models.

  6. A Two-Fluid, MHD Coronal Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.; McComas, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    We describe first results from a numerical two-fluid MHD model of the global structure of the solar Corona. The model is two-fluid in the sense that it accounts for the collisional energy exchange between protons and electrons. As in our single-fluid model, volumetric heat and Momentum sources are required to produce high speed wind from Corona] holes, low speed wind above streamers, and mass fluxes similar to the empirical solar wind. By specifying different proton and electron heating functions we obtain a high proton temperature in the coronal hole and a relatively low proton temperature above the streamer (in comparison with the electron temperature). This is consistent with inferences from SOHO/UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer instrument (UVCS), and with the Ulysses/Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun instrument (SWOOPS) proton and electron temperature measurements which we show from the fast latitude scan. The density in the coronal hole between 2 and 5 solar radii (2 and 5 R(sub S)) is similar to the density reported from SPARTAN 201.-01 measurements by Fisher and Guhathakurta [19941. The proton mass flux scaled to 1 AU is 2.4 x 10(exp 8)/sq cm s, which is consistent with Ulysses observations. Inside the closed field region, the density is sufficiently high so that the simulation gives equal proton and electron temperatures due to the high collision rate. In open field regions (in the coronal hole and above the streamer) the proton and electron temperatures differ by varying amounts. In the streamer the temperature and density are similar to those reported empirically by Li et al. [1998], and the plasma beta is larger than unity everywhere above approx. 1.5 R(sub S), as it is in all other MHD coronal streamer models [e.g., Steinolfson et al., 1982; also G. A. Gary and D. Alexander, Constructing the coronal magnetic field, submitted to Solar Physics, 1998].

  7. A two-fluid, MHD coronal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.; McComas, D. J.

    1999-03-01

    We describe first results from a numerical two-fluid MHD model of the global structure of the solar corona. The model is two-fluid in the sense that it accounts for the collisional energy exchange between protons and electrons. As in our single-fluid model, volumetric heat and momentum sources are required to produce high speed wind from coronal holes, low speed wind above streamers, and mass fluxes similar to the empirical solar wind. By specifying different proton and electron heating functions we obtain a high proton temperature in the coronal hole and a relatively low proton temperature above the streamer (in comparison with the electron temperature). This is consistent with inferences from SOHO/UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer instrument (UVCS) [Kohl et al., 1997], and with the Ulysses/Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun instrument (SWOOPS) proton and electron temperature measurements which we show from the fast latitude scan. The density in the coronal hole between 2 and 5 solar radii (2 and 5RS) is similar to the density reported from SPARTAN 201-01 measurements by Fisher and Guhathakurta [1994]. The proton mass flux scaled to 1 AU is 2.4×108cm-2s-1, which is consistent with Ulysses observations [Phillips et al., 1995]. Inside the closed field region, the density is sufficiently high so that the simulation gives equal proton and electron temperatures due to the high collision rate. In open field regions (in the coronal hole and above the streamer) the proton and electron temperatures differ by varying amounts. In the streamer the temperature and density are similar to those reported empirically by Li et al. [1998], and the plasma β is larger than unity everywhere above ~1.5RS, as it is in all other MHD coronal streamer models [e.g., Steinolfson et al., 1982; also G. A. Gary and D. Alexander, Constructing the coronal magnetic field, submitted to Solar Physics, 1998].

  8. Global MHD simulations of Neptune's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejnertsen, L.; Eastwood, J. P.; Chittenden, J. P.; Masters, A.

    2016-08-01

    A global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation has been performed in order to investigate the outer boundaries of Neptune's magnetosphere at the time of Voyager 2's flyby in 1989 and to better understand the dynamics of magnetospheres formed by highly inclined planetary dipoles. Using the MHD code Gorgon, we have implemented a precessing dipole to mimic Neptune's tilted magnetic field and rotation axes. By using the solar wind parameters measured by Voyager 2, the simulation is verified by finding good agreement with Voyager 2 magnetometer observations. Overall, there is a large-scale reconfiguration of magnetic topology and plasma distribution. During the "pole-on" magnetospheric configuration, there only exists one tail current sheet, contained between a rarefied lobe region which extends outward from the dayside cusp, and a lobe region attached to the nightside cusp. It is found that the tail current always closes to the magnetopause current system, rather than closing in on itself, as suggested by other models. The bow shock position and shape is found to be dependent on Neptune's daily rotation, with maximum standoff being during the pole-on case. Reconnection is found on the magnetopause but is highly modulated by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and time of day, turning "off" and "on" when the magnetic shear between the IMF and planetary fields is large enough. The simulation shows that the most likely location for reconnection to occur during Voyager 2's flyby was far from the spacecraft trajectory, which may explain the relative lack of associated signatures in the observations.

  9. Magnetorotational Instability of Dissipative MHD Flows

    SciTech Connect

    HERRON, ISOM H

    2010-07-10

    Executive summary Two important general problems of interest in plasma physics that may be addressed successfully by Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are: (1) Find magnetic field configurations capable of confining a plasma in equilibrium. (2) Study the stability properties of each such an equilibrium. It is often found that the length scale of many instabilities and waves that are able to grow or propagate in a system, are comparable with plasma size, such as in magnetically confined thermonuclear plasmas or in astrophysical accretion disks. Thus MHD is able to provide a good description of such large-scale disturbances. The Magnetorotational instability (MRI) is one particular instance of a potential instability. The project involved theoretical work on fundamental aspects of plasma physics. Researchers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) began to perform a series of liquid metal Couette flow experiments between rotating cylinders. Their purpose was to produce MRI, which they had predicted theoretically 2002, but was only observed in the laboratory since this project began. The personnel on the project consisted of three persons: (1) The PI, who was partially supported on the budget during each of four summers 2005-2008. (2) Two graduate research assistants, who worked consecutively on the project throughout the years 2005-2009. As a result, the first student, Fritzner Soliman, obtained an M.S. degree in 2006; the second student, Pablo Suarez obtained the Ph.D. degree in 2009. The work was in collaboration with scientists in Princeton, periodic trips were made by the PI as part of the project. There were 4 peer-reviewed publications and one book produced.

  10. CYP2D6 Genotyping and Tamoxifen: An Unfinished Story in the Quest for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Jonas A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2011-01-01

    The philosophy behind personalized medicine is that each patient has a unique biologic profile that should guide the choice of therapy, resulting in an improved treatment outcome, ideally with reduced toxicity. Thus, there has been increasing interest in identifying genetic variations that are predictive of a drug’s efficacy or toxicity. Although it is one of the most effective drugs for treating breast cancer, tamoxifen is not effective in all estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients, and it is frequently associated with side effects, such as hot flashes. Relative resistance to tamoxifen treatment may be a result, in part, from impaired drug activation by cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). Indeed, recent studies have identified allelic variations in CYP2D6 to be an important determinant of tamoxifen’s activity (and toxicity). This article will summarize the current information regarding the influence of the major genotypes and CYP2D6 inhibitors on tamoxifen metabolism, with a focus on its clinical utility and the current level of evidence for CYP2D6 genotyping of patients who are candidates for tamoxifen treatment. PMID:21421116

  11. A Geometric Boolean Library for 2D Objects

    2006-01-05

    The 2D Boolean Library is a collection of C++ classes -- which primarily represent 2D geometric data and relationships, and routines -- which contain algorithms for 2D geometric Boolean operations and utility functions. Classes are provided for 2D points, lines, arcs, edgeuses, loops, surfaces and mask sets. Routines are provided that incorporate the Boolean operations Union(OR), XOR, Intersection and Difference. Various analytical geometry routines and routines for importing and exporting the data in various filemore » formats, are also provided in the library.« less

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) (2dFGRS Team, 1998-2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colless, M.; Dalton, G.; Maddox, S.; Sutherland, W.; Norberg, P.; Cole, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bridges, T.; Cannon, R.; Collins, C.; Couch, W.; Cross, N.; Deeley, K.; de Propris, R.; Driver, S. P.; Efstathiou, G.; Ellis, R. S.; Frenk, C. S.; Glazebrook, K.; Jackson, C.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, I.; Lumsden, S.; Madgwick, D.; Peacock, J. A.; Peterson, B. A.; Price, I.; Seaborne, M.; Taylor, K.

    2007-11-01

    The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) is a major spectroscopic survey taking full advantage of the unique capabilities of the 2dF facility built by the Anglo-Australian Observatory. The 2dFGRS is integrated with the 2dF QSO survey (2QZ, Cat. VII/241). The 2dFGRS obtained spectra for 245591 objects, mainly galaxies, brighter than a nominal extinction-corrected magnitude limit of bJ=19.45. Reliable (quality>=3) redshifts were obtained for 221414 galaxies. The galaxies cover an area of approximately 1500 square degrees selected from the extended APM Galaxy Survey in three regions: a North Galactic Pole (NGP) strip, a South Galactic Pole (SGP) strip, and random fields scattered around the SGP strip. Redshifts are measured from spectra covering 3600-8000 Angstroms at a two-pixel resolution of 9.0 Angstrom and a median S/N of 13 per pixel. All redshift identifications are visually checked and assigned a quality parameter Q in the range 1-5; Q>=3 redshifts are 98.4% reliable and have an rms uncertainty of 85 km/s. The overall redshift completeness for Q>=3 redshifts is 91.8% but this varies with magnitude from 99% for the brightest galaxies to 90% for objects at the survey limit. The 2dFGRS data base is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/2dFGRS/. (6 data files).

  13. Pareto joint inversion of 2D magnetotelluric and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, Katarzyna; Bogacz, Adrian; Kozubal, Adam; Danek, Tomasz; Wojdyła, Marek

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution, the first results of the "Innovative technology of petrophysical parameters estimation of geological media using joint inversion algorithms" project were described. At this stage of the development, Pareto joint inversion scheme for 2D MT and gravity data was used. Additionally, seismic data were provided to set some constrains for the inversion. Sharp Boundary Interface(SBI) approach and description model with set of polygons were used to limit the dimensionality of the solution space. The main engine was based on modified Particle Swarm Optimization(PSO). This algorithm was properly adapted to handle two or more target function at once. Additional algorithm was used to eliminate non- realistic solution proposals. Because PSO is a method of stochastic global optimization, it requires a lot of proposals to be evaluated to find a single Pareto solution and then compose a Pareto front. To optimize this stage parallel computing was used for both inversion engine and 2D MT forward solver. There are many advantages of proposed solution of joint inversion problems. First of all, Pareto scheme eliminates cumbersome rescaling of the target functions, that can highly affect the final solution. Secondly, the whole set of solution is created in one optimization run, providing a choice of the final solution. This choice can be based off qualitative data, that are usually very hard to be incorporated into the regular inversion schema. SBI parameterisation not only limits the problem of dimensionality, but also makes constraining of the solution easier. At this stage of work, decision to test the approach using MT and gravity data was made, because this combination is often used in practice. It is important to mention, that the general solution is not limited to this two methods and it is flexible enough to be used with more than two sources of data. Presented results were obtained for synthetic models, imitating real geological conditions, where

  14. Quasi 2D Materials: Raman Nanometrology and Thermal Management Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahil, Khan Mohammad Farhan

    Quasi two-dimensional (2D) materials obtained by the "graphene-like" exfoliation attracted tremendous attention. Such materials revealed unique electronic, thermal and optical properties, which can be potentially used in electronics, thermal management and energy conversion. This dissertation research addresses two separate but synergetic problems: (i) preparation and optical characterization of quasi-2D films of the bismuth-telluride (Bi 2Te3) family of materials, which demonstrate both thermoelectric and topological insulator properties; and (ii) investigation of thermal properties of composite materials prepared with graphene and few-layer graphene (FLG). The first part of dissertation reports properties of the exfoliated few-quintuple layers of Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3 and Sb 2Te3. Both non-resonant and resonant Raman scattering spectra have been investigated. It was found that the crystal symmetry breaking in few-quintuple films results in appearance of A1u-symmetry Raman peaks, which are not active in the bulk crystals. The scattering spectra measured under the 633-nm wavelength excitation reveals a number of resonant features, which could be used for analysis of the electronic and phonon processes in these materials. The obtained results help to understand the physical mechanisms of Raman scattering in the few-quintuple-thick films and can be used for nanometrology of topological insulator films on various substrates. The second part of the dissertation is dedicated to investigation of properties of composite materials prepared with graphene and FLG. It was found that the optimized mixture of graphene and multilayer graphene---produced by the high-yield inexpensive liquid-phase-exfoliation technique---can lead to an extremely strong enhancement of the cross-plane thermal conductivity K of the composite. The "laser flash" measurements revealed a record-high enhancement of K by 2300 % in the graphene-based polymer at the filler loading fraction f =10 vol. %. It was

  15. Klassifikation von Standardebenen in der 2D-Echokardiographie mittels 2D-3D-Bildregistrierung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmeir, Christoph; Subramanian, Navneeth

    Zum Zweck der Entwicklung eines Systems, das einen unerfahrenen Anwender von Ultraschall (US) zur Aufnahme relevanter anatomischer Strukturen leitet, untersuchen wir die Machbarkeit von 2D-US zu 3D-CT Registrierung. Wir verwenden US-Aufnahmen von Standardebenen des Herzens, welche zu einem 3D-CT-Modell registriert werden. Unser Algorithmus unterzieht sowohl die US-Bilder als auch den CT-Datensatz Vorverarbeitungsschritten, welche die Daten durch Segmentierung auf wesentliche Informationen in Form von Labein für Muskel und Blut reduzieren. Anschließend werden diese Label zur Registrierung mittels der Match-Cardinality-Metrik genutzt. Durch mehrmaliges Registrieren mit verschiedenen Initialisierungen ermitteln wir die im US-Bild sichtbare Standardebene. Wir evaluierten die Methode auf sieben US-Bildern von Standardebenen. Fünf davon wurden korrekt zugeordnet.

  16. Epitaxial 2D SnSe2/ 2D WSe2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Aretouli, Kleopatra Emmanouil; Tsoutsou, Dimitra; Tsipas, Polychronis; Marquez-Velasco, Jose; Aminalragia Giamini, Sigiava; Kelaidis, Nicolaos; Psycharis, Vassilis; Dimoulas, Athanasios

    2016-09-01

    van der Waals heterostructures of 2D semiconductor materials can be used to realize a number of (opto)electronic devices including tunneling field effect devices (TFETs). It is shown in this work that high quality SnSe2/WSe2 vdW heterostructure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN(0001)/Si(111) substrates using a Bi2Se3 buffer layer. A valence band offset of 0.8 eV matches the energy gap of SnSe2 in such a way that the VB edge of WSe2 and the CB edge of SnSe2 are lined up, making this materials combination suitable for (nearly) broken gap TFETs. PMID:27537619

  17. CVMAC 2D Program: A method of converting 3D to 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Lown, J.

    1990-06-20

    This paper presents the user with a method of converting a three- dimensional wire frame model into a technical illustration, detail, or assembly drawing. By using the 2D Program, entities can be mapped from three-dimensional model space into two-dimensional model space, as if they are being traced. Selected entities to be mapped can include circles, arcs, lines, and points. This program prompts the user to digitize the view to be mapped, specify the layers in which the new two-dimensional entities will reside, and select the entities, either by digitizing or windowing. The new two-dimensional entities are displayed in a small view which the program creates in the lower left corner of the drawing. 9 figs.

  18. 2D Four-Channel Perfect Reconstruction Filter Bank Realized with the 2D Lattice Filter Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, S.; Ertüzün, A.

    2006-12-01

    A novel orthogonal 2D lattice structure is incorporated into the design of a nonseparable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction filter bank. The proposed filter bank is obtained by using the polyphase decomposition technique which requires the design of an orthogonal 2D lattice filter. Due to constraint of perfect reconstruction, each stage of this lattice filter bank is simply parameterized by two coefficients. The perfect reconstruction property is satisfied regardless of the actual values of these parameters and of the number of the lattice stages. It is also shown that a separable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction lattice filter bank can be constructed from the 1D lattice filter and that this is a special case of the proposed 2D lattice filter bank under certain conditions. The perfect reconstruction property of the proposed 2D lattice filter approach is verified by computer simulations.

  19. Functional characterization of CYP2D6 enhancer polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danxin; Papp, Audrey C.; Sun, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    CYP2D6 metabolizes nearly 25% of clinically used drugs. Genetic polymorphisms cause large inter-individual variability in CYP2D6 enzyme activity and are currently used as biomarker to predict CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotype. Previously, we had identified a region 115 kb downstream of CYP2D6 as enhancer for CYP2D6, containing two completely linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs133333 and rs5758550, associated with enhanced transcription. However, the enhancer effect on CYP2D6 expression, and the causative variant, remained to be ascertained. To characterize the CYP2D6 enhancer element, we applied chromatin conformation capture combined with the next-generation sequencing (4C assays) and chromatin immunoprecipitation with P300 antibody, in HepG2 and human primary culture hepatocytes. The results confirmed the role of the previously identified enhancer region in CYP2D6 expression, expanding the number of candidate variants to three highly linked SNPs (rs133333, rs5758550 and rs4822082). Among these, only rs5758550 demonstrated regulating enhancer activity in a reporter gene assay. Use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats mediated genome editing in HepG2 cells targeting suspected enhancer regions decreased CYP2D6 mRNA expression by 70%, only upon deletion of the rs5758550 region. These results demonstrate robust effects of both the enhancer element and SNP rs5758550 on CYP2D6 expression, supporting consideration of rs5758550 for CYP2D6 genotyping panels to yield more accurate phenotype prediction. PMID:25381333

  20. An Incompressible 2D Didactic Model with Singularity and Explicit Solutions of the 2D Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Dongho; Constantin, Peter; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-09-01

    We give an example of a well posed, finite energy, 2D incompressible active scalar equation with the same scaling as the surface quasi-geostrophic equation and prove that it can produce finite time singularities. In spite of its simplicity, this seems to be the first such example. Further, we construct explicit solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations whose gradients grow exponentially in time for all time. In addition, we introduce a variant of the 2D Boussinesq equations which is perhaps a more faithful companion of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations than the usual 2D Boussinesq equations.

  1. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Discretization of MHD on 3D Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R N; White, D A; Wallin, B K; Solberg, J M

    2006-06-12

    We present an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) discretization of the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) on unstructured hexahedral grids. The method is formulated using an operator-split approach with three distinct phases: electromagnetic diffusion, Lagrangian motion, and Eulerian advection. The resistive magnetic dynamo equation is discretized using a compatible mixed finite element method with a 2nd order accurate implicit time differencing scheme which preserves the divergence-free nature of the magnetic field. At each discrete time step, electromagnetic force and heat terms are calculated and coupled to the hydrodynamic equations to compute the Lagrangian motion of the conducting materials. By virtue of the compatible discretization method used, the invariants of Lagrangian MHD motion are preserved in a discrete sense. When the Lagrangian motion of the mesh causes significant distortion, that distortion is corrected with a relaxation of the mesh, followed by a 2nd order monotonic remap of the electromagnetic state variables. The remap is equivalent to Eulerian advection of the magnetic flux density with a fictitious mesh relaxation velocity. The magnetic advection is performed using a novel variant of constrained transport (CT) that is valid for unstructured hexahedral grids with arbitrary mesh velocities. The advection method maintains the divergence free nature of the magnetic field and is second order accurate in regions where the solution is sufficiently smooth. For regions in which the magnetic field is discontinuous (e.g. MHD shocks) the method is limited using a novel variant of algebraic flux correction (AFC) which is local extremum diminishing (LED) and divergence preserving. Finally, we verify each stage of the discretization via a set of numerical experiments.

  2. Nonlinear MHD simulations of Quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Loarte, A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Snyder, P. B.; Hoelzl, M.; Zeng, L.

    2015-09-01

    In the Quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) regime, the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO), thought to be a saturated kink-peeling mode (KPM) driven unstable by current and rotation, is found in experiment to provide sufficient stationary edge particle transport to avoid the periodic expulsion of particles and energy by edge localized modes (ELMs). In this paper, both linear and nonlinear MHD modelling of QH-mode plasmas from the DIII-D tokamak have been investigated to understand the mechanism leading to the appearance of the EHO in QH-mode plasmas. For the first time nonlinear MHD simulations with low-n modes both with ideal wall and resistive wall boundary conditions have been carried out with the 3D non-linear MHD code JOREK. The results show, in agreement with the original conjectures, that in the non-linear phase, kink peeling modes are the main unstable modes in QH-mode plasmas of DIII-D and that the kink-peeling modes saturate non-linearly leading to a 3D stationary state. The characteristics of the kink-peeling modes, in terms of mode structure and associated decrease of the edge plasma density associated with them, are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the EHO in DIII-D. The effect of plasma resistivity, the role of plasma parallel rotation as well as the effect of the conductivity of the vacuum vessel wall on the destabilization and saturation of kink-peeling modes have been evaluated for experimental QH-mode plasma conditions in DIII-D.

  3. Coronal extension of the MURaM radiative MHD code: From quiet sun to flare simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, Matthias D.; Cheung, Mark

    2016-05-01

    We present a new version of the MURaM radiative MHD code, which includes a treatment of the solar corona in terms of MHD, optically thin radiative loss and field-aligned heat conduction. In order to relax the severe time-step constraints imposed by large Alfven velocities and heat conduction we use a combination of semi-relativistic MHD with reduced speed of light ("Boris correction") and a hyperbolic formulation of heat conduction. We apply the numerical setup to 4 different setups including a mixed polarity quiet sun, an open flux region, an arcade solution and an active region setup and find all cases an amount of coronal heating sufficient to maintain a corona with temperatures from 1 MK (quiet sun) to 2 MK (active region, arcade). In all our setups the Poynting flux is self-consistently created by photospheric and sub-photospheric magneto-convection in the lower part of our simulation domain. Varying the maximum allowed Alfven velocity ("reduced speed of light") leads to only minor changes in the coronal structure as long as the limited Alfven velocity remains larger than the speed of sound and about 1.5-3 times larger than the peak advection velocity. We also found that varying details of the numerical diffusivities that govern the resistive and viscous energy dissipation do not strongly affect the overall coronal heating, but the ratio of resistive and viscous energy dependence is strongly dependent on the effective numerical magnetic Prandtl number. We use our active region setup in order to simulate a flare triggered by the emergence of a twisted flux rope into a pre-existing bipolar active region. Our simulation yields a series of flares, with the strongest one reaching GOES M1 class. The simulation reproduces many observed properties of eruptions such as flare ribbons, post flare loops and a sunquake.

  4. MHD-Induced Alpha Particle Loss in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.; von Goeler, S.

    1999-03-01

    MHD-induced increases in alpha particle loss to the wall were observed for both coherent modes and transient reconnection events using an array of scintillator detectors near the wall of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The magnitude of the coherent MHD-induced alpha loss as seen by these detectors was normally comparable to the MHD-quiescent first-orbit or toroidal-field ripple loss, but the magnitude of the alpha loss during reconnection events was up to 1000 times higher than this for a short time. Modeling suggest that the coherent MHD loss mechanism will be even less significant for future reactor-scale deuterium-tritium tokamaks due to the smaller ratio of the alpha gyroradius to minor radius.

  5. Pseudo-MHD ballooning modes in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1996-08-01

    The MHD description of a plasma is extended to allow electrons to have both fluid-like and adiabatic-regime responses within an instability eigenmode. In the resultant {open_quotes}pseudo-MHD{close_quotes} model, magnetic field line bending is reduced in the adiabatic electron regime. This makes possible a new class of ballooning-type, long parallel extent, MHD-like instabilities in tokamak plasmas for {alpha} > s{sup 2}(2 {sup 7/3}/9) (r{sub p}/R{sub 0}) or-d{radical}{Beta}/dr > (2{sup 1/6} /3)(s/ R{sub 0q}), which is well below the ideal-MHD stability boundary. The marginally stable pressure profile is similar in both magnitude and shape to that observed in ohmically heated tokamak plasmas.

  6. MHD generator component development. Quarterly report, July 1983-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    The overall objectives of this program are two-fold: (1) To contribute, by appropriate systematic experimental and analytical investigations, to the engineering data base necessary for the design and construction of MHD generators at CDIF-scale (50 MW/sub th/) and baseload scale (2000 MW/sub th/). (2) To design and fabricate specific hardware items to be tested at the CDIF site in Butte, Montana. The program consists of a series of related tasks: (1) MHD channel design and performance; (2) MHD channel construction and lifetime; (3) MHD channel loading and control; (4) facility operation; (5) CDIF related hardware; and (6) high interaction tests of a supersonic channel. Progress is reported. (WHK)

  7. Diagnostic development and support of MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for HRSR support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with MHD Energy Center computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. MSU personnel will also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs.

  8. Three Dimensional Simulations of Compressible Hall MHD Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-15

    We have developed three dimensional, time dependent, compressible, non-adiabatic, driven and massively parallelized Hall magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate turbulent spectral cascades in a regime where characteristic lengthscales associated with plasma fluctuations are smaller than ion gyro radii. Such regime is ubiquitously present in solar wind and many other collisionless space plasmas. Particularly in the solar wind, the high time resolution databases identify a spectral break at the end of MHD inertial range spectrum that corresponds to a high frequency regime. In the regime, turbulent cascades cannot be explained by the usual MHD models. With the help of our 3D Hall MHD code, we find that characteristic turbulent interactions in the high frequency regime evolve typically on kinetic Alfven time scales. The turbulent fluctuation associated with kinetic Alfven interactions are compressive and anisotropic and possess equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energies.

  9. Laser-powered MHD generators for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion systems of the pulsed laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave, plasma MHD, and liquid-metal MHD (LMMHD) types are assessed for their potential as space-based laser-to-electrical power converters. These systems offer several advantages as energy converters relative to the present chemical, nuclear, and solar devices, including high conversion efficiency, simple design, high-temperature operation, high power density, and high reliability. Of these systems, the Brayton cycle liquid-metal MHD system appears to be the most attractive. The LMMHD technology base is well established for terrestrial applications, particularly with regard to the generator, mixer, and other system components. However, further research is required to extend this technology base to space applications and to establish the technology required to couple the laser energy into the system most efficiently. Continued research on each of the three system types is recommended.

  10. Solar Wind Prediction at Pluto During the New Horizons Flyby: Results From a Two-Dimensional Multi-fluid MHD Model of the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, B.; Toth, G.; Opher, M.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-12-01

    We adapted the outer heliosphere (OH) component of the Space Weather Modeling Framework, which is a 3-D global multi-fluid MHD model of the outer heliosphere with one ion fluid and four neutral populations, for time-dependent 2-D multi-fluid MHD simulations of solar wind propagation from a heliocentric distance of 1 AU up to 50 AU. We used this model to predict the solar wind plasma parameters as well as the interplanetary magnetic field components at Pluto and along the New Horizons trajectory during the whole calendar year of 2015 including the closest approach on July 14. The simulation is run in the solar equatorial plane in the heliographic inertial frame (HGI). The inner boundary conditions along a circle of 1 AU radius are set by near-Earth solar wind observations (hourly OMNI data), assuming that the global solar wind distribution does not change much during a Carrington rotation (27.2753 days). Our 2-D multi-fluid MHD code evolves one ion fluid and two neutral fluids, which are the primary interstellar neutral atoms and the interstellar neutral atoms deflected in the outer heliosheath between the slow bow shock and the heliopause. Spherical expansion effects are properly taken into account for the ions and the solar magnetic field. The inflow parameters of the two neutral fluids (density, temperature, and velocity components) are set at the negative X (HGI) boundary at 50 AU distance, which are taken from previous 3-D global multi-fluid MHD simulations of the heliospheric interface in a much larger simulation box (1500x1500x1500 AU). The inflow velocity vectors of the two neutral fluids define the so-called hydrogen deflection plane. The solar wind ions and the interstellar neutrals interact through charge exchange source terms included in the multi-fluid MHD equations, so the two neutral populations are evolved self-consistently. We validate our model with the available plasma data from New Horizons as well as with Voyager 2 plasma and magnetic field

  11. Adaptation algorithms for 2-D feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kaczorek, T

    1995-01-01

    The generalized weight adaptation algorithms presented by J.G. Kuschewski et al. (1993) and by S.H. Zak and H.J. Sira-Ramirez (1990) are extended for 2-D madaline and 2-D two-layer feedforward neural nets (FNNs).

  12. Integrating Mobile Multimedia into Textbooks: 2D Barcodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uluyol, Celebi; Agca, R. Kagan

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to empirically compare text-plus-mobile phone learning using an integrated 2D barcode tag in a printed text with three other conditions described in multimedia learning theory. The method examined in the study involved modifications of the instructional material such that: a 2D barcode was used near the text, the…

  13. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density. PMID:27334788

  14. CYP2D6: novel genomic structures and alleles

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Whitney E.; Walker, Denise L.; O’Kane, Dennis J.; Mrazek, David A.; Fisher, Pamela K.; Dukek, Brian A.; Bruflat, Jamie K.; Black, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective CYP2D6 is a polymorphic gene. It has been observed to be deleted, to be duplicated and to undergo recombination events involving the CYP2D7 pseudogene and surrounding sequences. The objective of this study was to discover the genomic structure of CYP2D6 recombinants that interfere with clinical genotyping platforms that are available today. Methods Clinical samples containing rare homozygous CYP2D6 alleles, ambiguous readouts, and those with duplication signals and two different alleles were analyzed by long-range PCR amplification of individual genes, PCR fragment analysis, allele-specific primer extension assay, and DNA sequencing to characterize alleles and genomic structure. Results Novel alleles, genomic structures, and the DNA sequence of these structures are described. Interestingly, in 49 of 50 DNA samples that had CYP2D6 gene duplications or multiplications where two alleles were detected, the chromosome containing the duplication or multiplication had identical tandem alleles. Conclusion Several new CYP2D6 alleles and genomic structures are described which will be useful for CYP2D6 genotyping. The findings suggest that the recombination events responsible for CYP2D6 duplications and multiplications are because of mechanisms other than interchromosomal crossover during meiosis. PMID:19741566

  15. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density.

  16. Conceptual design of the MHD Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.; Bercaw, R. W.; Burkhart, J. A.; Mroz, T. S.; Rigo, H. S.; Pearson, C. V.; Warinner, D. K.; Hatch, A. M.; Borden, M.; Giza, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the MHD engineering test facility, a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commerical feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates are included and the engineering issues that should be reexamined are identified.

  17. Performance optimization of an MHD generator with physical constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, C. C. P.; Seikel, G. R.; Smith, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A method to optimize the Faraday MHD generator performance under a prescribed set of electrical and magnet constraints is described. The results of generator performance calculations using this technique are presented for a very large MHD/steam plant. The differences between the maximum power and maximum net power generators are described. The sensitivity of the generator performance to the various operational parameters are presented.

  18. MHD instabilities of collisionless space plasma with heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. D.; Dzhalilov, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    Properties of instabilities in a collisionless plasma are considered based on 16-moment MHD equations with allowance for differences between the heat fluxes along the magnetic field due to longitudinal and transverse thermal ion motions. It is shown that the increments and thresholds appreciably depend on these two heat fluxes for all compressible instabilities arising in the MHD approach (second compressible fire-hose, mirror, and thermal instabilities).

  19. Performance of MHD insulating materials in a potassium environment

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Park, J.H.; Rink, D.L.; Thomas, C.A.

    1991-12-01

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the compatibility of the MHD insulating materials boron nitride and silicon nitride in a potassium environment at temperatures of 1000 and 1400{degrees}F (538 and 760{degrees}C, respectively) and to measure the electrical conductivities of the specimens before and after exposure to potassium. Based on the test results, an assessment is to be made of the suitability of these materials for application as insulator materials in an MHD channel.

  20. Evaluation of the ECAS open cycle MHD power plant design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seikel, G. R.; Staiger, P. J.; Pian, C. C. P.

    1978-01-01

    The Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS) MHD/steam power plant is described. The NASA critical evaluation of the design is summarized. Performance of the MHD plant is compared to that of the other type ECAS plant designs on the basis of efficiency and the 30-year levelized cost of electricity. Techniques to improve the plant design and the potential performance of lower technology plants requiring shorter development time and lower development cost are then discussed.

  1. Review of Recent Results in Global MHD Modeling: ISTP Project Scientist for Theory and Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Global MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations have shown a remarkable ability to describe the global dynamics of geospace. The limitations of the physical approximations underlying MHD would seem to limit the effectiveness of these codes, since kinetic and hybrid effects should manifest themselves by cross-scale coupling from microscales to mesoscales to global scales. However three effects appear to allow the codes to operate much more successfully than one would at first believe. They are:(l) the globally self-consistent nature of the codes with very well defined exterior boundary conditions (the solar wind) which allows the proper intercommunication between magnetospheric regions on MHD scales, (2) the control by global dynamics of the boundary layer locations where micro and meso scale processes operate, and (3) the critical role of numerical diffusion and with a sufficiently high resolution grid, the use of an empirical resistivity term, which if set at a level where the major magnetosphere boundaries properly calibrate against their observed locations, appear to well represent the effects of kinetic and hybrid processes on the global dynamics. The effectiveness of the global MHD codes, which have been developed under the ISTP mission, in describing Wind, Polar and Geotail observations, as well as ground-based observations are described. Particular emphasis is placed upon the Polar imaging data which when combined with ground-based data and global MHD-based synthetic aurora and convection patterns provide a powerful tool in understanding the final link in the solar-terrestrial chain: coupling into the atmosphere and ionosphere.

  2. 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, K S; Mishchenko, A; Carvalho, A; Castro Neto, A H

    2016-07-29

    The physics of two-dimensional (2D) materials and heterostructures based on such crystals has been developing extremely fast. With these new materials, truly 2D physics has begun to appear (for instance, the absence of long-range order, 2D excitons, commensurate-incommensurate transition, etc.). Novel heterostructure devices--such as tunneling transistors, resonant tunneling diodes, and light-emitting diodes--are also starting to emerge. Composed from individual 2D crystals, such devices use the properties of those materials to create functionalities that are not accessible in other heterostructures. Here we review the properties of novel 2D crystals and examine how their properties are used in new heterostructure devices.

  3. Van der Waals stacked 2D layered materials for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Qixing; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhuo; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2016-06-01

    The band gaps of many atomically thin 2D layered materials such as graphene, black phosphorus, monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides and hBN range from 0 to 6 eV. These isolated atomic planes can be reassembled into hybrid heterostructures made layer by layer in a precisely chosen sequence. Thus, the electronic properties of 2D materials can be engineered by van der Waals stacking, and the interlayer coupling can be tuned, which opens up avenues for creating new material systems with rich functionalities and novel physical properties. Early studies suggest that van der Waals stacked 2D materials work exceptionally well, dramatically enriching the optoelectronics applications of 2D materials. Here we review recent progress in van der Waals stacked 2D materials, and discuss their potential applications in optoelectronics.

  4. Estrogen-Induced Cholestasis Leads to Repressed CYP2D6 Expression in CYP2D6-Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xian

    2015-01-01

    Cholestasis activates bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and subsequently enhances hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). We previously demonstrated that SHP represses the transactivation of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen-induced cholestasis on CYP2D6 expression. Estrogen-induced cholestasis occurs in subjects receiving estrogen for contraception or hormone replacement, or in susceptible women during pregnancy. In CYP2D6-humanized transgenic (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, cholestasis triggered by administration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at a high dose led to 2- to 3-fold decreases in CYP2D6 expression. This was accompanied by increased hepatic SHP expression and subsequent decreases in the recruitment of HNF4α to CYP2D6 promoter. Interestingly, estrogen-induced cholestasis also led to increased recruitment of estrogen receptor (ER) α, but not that of FXR, to Shp promoter, suggesting a predominant role of ERα in transcriptional regulation of SHP in estrogen-induced cholestasis. EE2 at a low dose (that does not cause cholestasis) also increased SHP (by ∼50%) and decreased CYP2D6 expression (by 1.5-fold) in Tg-CYP2D6 mice, the magnitude of differences being much smaller than that shown in EE2-induced cholestasis. Taken together, our data indicate that EE2-induced cholestasis increases SHP and represses CYP2D6 expression in Tg-CYP2D6 mice in part through ERα transactivation of Shp promoter. PMID:25943116

  5. From MHD regime to quiescent non-inductive discharges in Tore Supra: experimental observations and MHD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maget, P.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Lütjens, H.; Ottaviani, M.; Moreau, Ph; Ségui, J.-L.

    2009-06-01

    Attempts to run non-inductive plasma discharges on Tore Supra sometimes fail due to the triggering of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) instabilities that saturate at a large amplitude, producing degraded confinement and loss of wave driven fast electrons (the so-called MHD regime (Maget et al 2005 Nucl. Fusion 45 69-80)). In this paper we investigate the transition to this soft (in the sense of non-disruptive) MHD limit from experimental observations, and compare it with non-linear code predictions. Such a comparison suggests that different non-linear regimes, with periodic relaxations or saturation, are correctly understood. However, successful non-inductive discharges without detectable magnetic island at q = 2 cannot be reproduced if realistic transport coefficients are used in the computation. Additional physics seems mandatory for explaining these discharges, such as diamagnetic effects, that could also justify cases of abrupt transition to the MHD regime.

  6. Pulse Detonation Rocket MHD Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse detonation research engine (MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) Model PDRE (Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine) G-2) has been developed for the purpose of examining integrated propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic power generation applications. The engine is based on a rectangular cross-section tube coupled to a converging-diverging nozzle, which is in turn attached to a segmented Faraday channel. As part of the shakedown testing activity, the pressure wave was interrogated along the length of the engine while running on hydrogen/oxygen propellants. Rapid transition to detonation wave propagation was insured through the use of a short Schelkin spiral near the head of the engine. The measured detonation wave velocities were in excess of 2500 m/s in agreement with the theoretical C-J velocity. The engine was first tested in a straight tube configuration without a nozzle, and the time resolved thrust was measured simultaneously with the head-end pressure. Similar measurements were made with the converging-diverging nozzle attached. The time correlation of the thrust and head-end pressure data was found to be excellent. The major purpose of the converging-diverging nozzle was to configure the engine for driving an MHD generator for the direct production of electrical power. Additional tests were therefore necessary in which seed (cesium-hydroxide dissolved in methanol) was directly injected into the engine as a spray. The exhaust plume was then interrogated with a microwave interferometer in an attempt to characterize the plasma conditions, and emission spectroscopy measurements were also acquired. Data reduction efforts indicate that the plasma exhaust is very highly ionized, although there is some uncertainty at this time as to the relative abundance of negative OH ions. The emission spectroscopy data provided some indication of the species in the exhaust as well as a measurement of temperature. A 24-electrode-pair segmented Faraday channel and 0.6 Tesla permanent

  7. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-01

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  8. EVIDENCE OF ACTIVE MHD INSTABILITY IN EULAG-MHD SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Nicolas; Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul E-mail: strugarek@astro.umontreal.ca

    2015-11-10

    We investigate the possible development of magnetohydrodynamical instabilities in the EULAG-MHD “millennium simulation” of Passos and Charbonneau. This simulation sustains a large-scale magnetic cycle characterized by solar-like polarity reversals taking place on a regular multidecadal cadence, and in which zonally oriented bands of strong magnetic fields accumulate below the convective layers, in response to turbulent pumping from above in successive magnetic half-cycles. Key aspects of this simulation include low numerical dissipation and a strongly sub-adiabatic fluid layer underlying the convectively unstable layers corresponding to the modeled solar convection zone. These properties are conducive to the growth and development of two-dimensional instabilities that are otherwise suppressed by stronger dissipation. We find evidence for the action of a non-axisymmetric magnetoshear instability operating in the upper portions of the stably stratified fluid layers. We also investigate the possibility that the Tayler instability may be contributing to the destabilization of the large-scale axisymmetric magnetic component at high latitudes. On the basis of our analyses, we propose a global dynamo scenario whereby the magnetic cycle is driven primarily by turbulent dynamo action in the convecting layers, but MHD instabilities accelerate the dissipation of the magnetic field pumped down into the overshoot and stable layers, thus perhaps significantly influencing the magnetic cycle period. Support for this scenario is found in the distinct global dynamo behaviors observed in an otherwise identical EULAG-MHD simulations, using a different degree of sub-adiabaticity in the stable fluid layers underlying the convection zone.

  9. Evidence of Active MHD Instability in EULAG-MHD Simulations of Solar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Nicolas; Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the possible development of magnetohydrodynamical instabilities in the EULAG-MHD “millennium simulation” of Passos & Charbonneau. This simulation sustains a large-scale magnetic cycle characterized by solar-like polarity reversals taking place on a regular multidecadal cadence, and in which zonally oriented bands of strong magnetic fields accumulate below the convective layers, in response to turbulent pumping from above in successive magnetic half-cycles. Key aspects of this simulation include low numerical dissipation and a strongly sub-adiabatic fluid layer underlying the convectively unstable layers corresponding to the modeled solar convection zone. These properties are conducive to the growth and development of two-dimensional instabilities that are otherwise suppressed by stronger dissipation. We find evidence for the action of a non-axisymmetric magnetoshear instability operating in the upper portions of the stably stratified fluid layers. We also investigate the possibility that the Tayler instability may be contributing to the destabilization of the large-scale axisymmetric magnetic component at high latitudes. On the basis of our analyses, we propose a global dynamo scenario whereby the magnetic cycle is driven primarily by turbulent dynamo action in the convecting layers, but MHD instabilities accelerate the dissipation of the magnetic field pumped down into the overshoot and stable layers, thus perhaps significantly influencing the magnetic cycle period. Support for this scenario is found in the distinct global dynamo behaviors observed in an otherwise identical EULAG-MHD simulations, using a different degree of sub-adiabaticity in the stable fluid layers underlying the convection zone.

  10. Efficient 2D MRI relaxometry using compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Cloninger, Alexander; Czaja, Wojciech; Basser, Peter J.

    2015-06-01

    Potential applications of 2D relaxation spectrum NMR and MRI to characterize complex water dynamics (e.g., compartmental exchange) in biology and other disciplines have increased in recent years. However, the large amount of data and long MR acquisition times required for conventional 2D MR relaxometry limits its applicability for in vivo preclinical and clinical MRI. We present a new MR pipeline for 2D relaxometry that incorporates compressed sensing (CS) as a means to vastly reduce the amount of 2D relaxation data needed for material and tissue characterization without compromising data quality. Unlike the conventional CS reconstruction in the Fourier space (k-space), the proposed CS algorithm is directly applied onto the Laplace space (the joint 2D relaxation data) without compressing k-space to reduce the amount of data required for 2D relaxation spectra. This framework is validated using synthetic data, with NMR data acquired in a well-characterized urea/water phantom, and on fixed porcine spinal cord tissue. The quality of the CS-reconstructed spectra was comparable to that of the conventional 2D relaxation spectra, as assessed using global correlation, local contrast between peaks, peak amplitude and relaxation parameters, etc. This result brings this important type of contrast closer to being realized in preclinical, clinical, and other applications.

  11. Practical Algorithm For Computing The 2-D Arithmetic Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Irving S.; Choi, Y. Y.; Yu, Xiaoli

    1989-05-01

    Recently, Tufts and Sadasiv [10] exposed a method for computing the coefficients of a Fourier series of a periodic function using the Mobius inversion of series. They called this method of analysis the Arithmetic Fourier Transform(AFT). The advantage of the AFT over the FN 1' is that this method of Fourier analysis needs only addition operations except for multiplications by scale factors at one stage of the computation. The disadvantage of the AFT as they expressed it originally is that it could be used effectively only to compute finite Fourier coefficients of a real even function. To remedy this the AFT developed in [10] is extended in [11] to compute the Fourier coefficients of both the even and odd components of a periodic function. In this paper, the improved AFT [11] is extended to a two-dimensional(2-D) Arithmetic Fourier Transform for calculating the Fourier Transform of two-dimensional discrete signals. This new algorithm is based on both the number-theoretic method of Mobius inversion of double series and the complex conjugate property of Fourier coefficients. The advantage of this algorithm over the conventional 2-D FFT is that the corner-turning problem needed in a conventional 2-D Discrete Fourier Transform(DFT) can be avoided. Therefore, this new 2-D algorithm is readily suitable for VLSI implementation as a parallel architecture. Comparing the operations of 2-D AFT of a MxM 2-D data array with the conventional 2-D FFT, the number of multiplications is significantly reduced from (2log2M)M2 to (9/4)M2. Hence, this new algorithm is faster than the FFT algorithm. Finally, two simulation results of this new 2-D AFT algorithm for 2-D artificial and real images are given in this paper.

  12. Prognostic and clinicopathological significance of Cacna2d1 expression in epithelial ovarian cancers: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dandan; Holm, Ruth; Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Trope, Claes G; Nesland, Jahn M; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, in which cancer stem cells (CSC) have been reported to be the driving force of relapse and therapy-resistance. It is therefore important to explore CSC markers in ovarian cancer. This project aimed to explore the correlation between the expression of potential CSC maker Cacna2d1 and clinicopathological parameters in 238 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) samples. Immunohistochemically, positive Cacna2d1 expression was observed in 83.6% (199/238) of the EOC tumors, among which 107 tumors (44.9%) were highly positive and 92 (38.7%) tumors were weakly positive for the Cacna2d1 protein expression. Among the 158 serous carcinomas, the Cacna2d1 positivity was 148 (93.7%), in which 88 (55.7%) were highly positive, and 60 (38.0%) were weakly positive for the Cacna2d1 protein expression. Most strikingly, the Cacna2d1 was specifically expressed in the infiltration front areas of the EOC tumors. Statistical analyses showed that positive expression of Cacna2d1 was significantly associated with advanced FIGO stage (P<0.001), histological subtype (P=0.017) and tumor differentiation (P=0.015). Positive Cacna2d1 protein expression was significantly associated with poor overall survival (OS) and shorter progression free survival (PFS) in both total EOCs and serous carcinomas, although multivariate analyses did not reach statistical significance. In summary, our results suggest Cacna2d1 protein may play a crucial role in promoting aggressive EOC behavior and progression, and Cacna2d1 may serve as a novel predictive prognostic marker and a potential target for therapeutic intervention in EOCs. PMID:27725913

  13. The Biermann Catastrophe in Numerical MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, Carlo; Tzeferacos, Petros; Lee, Dongwook; Weide, Klaus; Lamb, Donald; Fatenejad, Milad; Miller, Joshua

    2014-10-01

    The Biermann Battery (BB) effect is widely invoked as a mechanism to generate cosmic magnetic fields from unmagnetized plasmas. The BB effect, which relies on large, non-aligned gradients of electron density and pressure, is expected to function most efficiently at shocks, where such gradients are largest. Simulations of cosmic magnetogenesis have accordingly relied on shocks to enhance the BB effect. What went unnoticed until recently is the fact that straightforward algorithmic implementations of the BB effect in MHD codes break down precisely at hydrodynamic discontinuities such as shocks - where the BB effect is of greatest interest - yielding results that fail to converge with resolution. We discuss this breakdown, show its origin, and present an alternative algorithm that gives finite and convergent results. We demonstrate convergence using an implementation of the algorithm within the FLASH code, and verify that the algorithm yields physically sensible results at shocks. We discuss novel - and physically observable - effects that attend the BB effect at shocks. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC.

  14. MHD models for Sun-grazing comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ying-Dong; Shou, Yin-Si; Russell, Christopher T.; Combi, Michael R.; Hansen, Kenneth C.

    2014-05-01

    Sun-grazing comets have high orbital eccentricities and low perihelia. They travel between the outer solar system and the lower corona. Recent advances in spacecraft imaging capabilities have enabled us to observe these comets with high resolution both in time and space. These comets exhibit rich tail activity in the lower corona, even multiple tails. Sun-grazing comets interact with the coronal plasma in a very different way, than in the conventional models of comet-solar wind interactions. The parameters, scales, and chemistry are very different. In this study, we have simplified the interaction into two different baseline models. In the first model we show the comet appearance in sub-Alfvenic solar wind. A single-fluid MHD model is applied to comet C2012 S1 (ISON) conditions. In the second model we adopt the chemical reactions with extreme ionization rates around the perihelion of comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy). We use our multi-fluid model to track all charge states of oxygen, from O+ to O6+. These steady-state models can be used to explain the chronicle of comet tail appearance as it approaches perihelion.

  15. Global MHD simulations of plasmaspheric plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J.; Ouellette, J.; Merkin, V. G.

    2015-12-01

    The plasmasphere represents a separate population from the rest of themagnetosphere, generally high density but cold. When the solar windturns strongly southward this plasma is convected toward the daysidemagnetopause and affects the interaction of the solar wind with themagnetosphere. We have used multi-fluid simulations using the LFMglobal MHD code to model this interaction. The plasmasphere isinitialized as a cold (~1eV) hydrogen plasma in a quiet northward IMFstate with a density distribution appropriate for K_p = 1. Thecorotation potential from the ionosphere spins up the plasmasphereinto rough corotation. After a initialization period of hours, asouthward IMF is introduced and the enhanced convection initiates asurge of plasmaspheric density to the dayside. We discuss two aspectsof this interaction, the effects on dayside reconnection and on theKelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). We find that the mass loading ofmagnetospheric flux tubes slows local reconnection rates, though notas much as predicted by Borovsky et al. [2013]. We findthat the total reconnection rate is reduced, although not as much aswould be predicted by just the sub-solar reconnection rate. The KHIis somewhat reduced by the plasmaspheric loading of density in the lowlatitude boundary layer. It has been suggested that the presence ofthe plasmasphere may lead to enhanced ULF wave power in the interiorof the magnetosphere from the KHI waves. We find only a minimal effect during northward IMF. For southward IMF, the situation is complicated by the interaction of KHI with non-steady reconnection.

  16. Exact vectorial law for axisymmetric MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, S.

    2009-12-01

    3D incompressible MHD turbulence is investigated under the assumptions of homogeneity and axisymmetry. We demonstrate that previous works of Chandrasekhar (1950) may be improved significantly by using a different formalism for the representation of two-point correlation tensors. From this axisymmetric kinematics, the equations a la von Karman-Howarth are derived from which an exact relation is found in terms of measurable correlations. The relation is then analyzed in the particular case of a medium permeated by an imposed magnetic field. We make the ansatz that the development of anisotropy implies an algebraic relation between the axial and the radial components of the separation vector and we derive an exact vectorial law which is parametrized by the intensity of anisotropy. The critical balance proposed by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995) is used to fix this parameter and to obtain a unique exact expression; the particular limits of correlations transverse and parallel to the mean field are given for which simple expressions are found. Predictions for the energy spectra are also proposed by a straightforward dimensional analysis of the exact law; it gives a stronger theoretical background to the heuristic spectra previously proposed in the context of the critical balance. We also discuss the wave turbulence limit of an asymptotically large external magnetic field which appears as a natural limit of the vectorial relation. A new interpretation of the anisotropic solar wind observations is eventually discussed.

  17. MHD air preheaters: Results of thermomechanical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Valente, T. )

    1994-12-01

    The thermomechanical tests conducted on four different high-purity periclase magnesia-fired brick were used to select suitable refractory material for the design of a regenerative heat exchanger (Cowper type) for an open-cycle indirect preheating, MHD pilot plant. Tests were conducted under the most severe temperature condition allowable in standard test equipment. The choice among the refractories were made supposing that the ranking established with these tests does not change for higher temperatures (up to 1,900 C). Refractory material M1 exhibited the best behavior. The reported values can be used for the preliminary design of the heat exchanger, using the appropriate safety coefficient. The effective behavior of the materials can be completely understood only with experimental data obtained by the effective operation condition, because size and shape of the material strongly affect the service behavior. The best test is a pilot plant, using scaled-down criteria. This will overcome the difficulty of the standard test at 1,900 C, caused by test equipment limitations.

  18. Impact of Interface Roughness on the Metallic Transport of Strongly Correlated 2D Holes in GaAs Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goble, Nicholas; Watson, John; Manfra, Michael; Gao, Xuan

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the non-monotonic behavior in the temperature dependent resistance, R(T) , of strongly correlated two-dimensional (2D) carriers in clean semiconductors has been a central issue in the studies of 2D metallic states and metal-insulator transitions. We have studied the transport of high mobility 2D holes in 20nm wide GaAs quantum wells with varying interface roughness by changing the Al fraction x in the AlxGa1-xAs barrier. Prior to this work, no comprehensive study of the non-monotonic resistance peak against controlled barrier characteristics has been conducted. We show that the shape of the electronic contribution to R(T) is qualitatively unchanged throughout all of our measurements, regardless of the percentage of Al in the barrier. It is observed that increasing x or short range interface roughness suppresses both the strength and characteristic temperature scale of the 2D metallicity, pointing to the distinct role of short range versus long range disorder in the 2D metallic transport in this 2D hole system with interaction parameter rs ~ 20. N.G. acknowledges the US DOE GAANN fellowship (P200A090276 & P200A070434). M.J.M. is supported by the Miller Family Foundation and the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DMS (DE-SC0006671). X.P.A.G thanks the NSF for funding support (DMR-0906415).

  19. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Vries, P. C. de; Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Park, H. K.; Munsat, T.

    2010-10-15

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  20. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  1. Recent advances in 2D materials for photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianzhou

    2016-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing attention for photocatalytic applications because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties. This review gives a brief overview of the recent developments concerning the chemical synthesis and structural design of 2D materials at the nanoscale and their applications in photocatalytic areas. In particular, recent progress on the emerging strategies for tailoring 2D material-based photocatalysts to improve their photo-activity including elemental doping, heterostructure design and functional architecture assembly is discussed.

  2. The role of the electron convection term for the parallel electric field and electron acceleration in MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, K.; Terada, N.; Katoh, Y.; Misawa, H.

    2011-08-15

    There has been a great concern about the origin of the parallel electric field in the frame of fluid equations in the auroral acceleration region. This paper proposes a new method to simulate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations that include the electron convection term and shows its efficiency with simulation results in one dimension. We apply a third-order semi-discrete central scheme to investigate the characteristics of the electron convection term including its nonlinearity. At a steady state discontinuity, the sum of the ion and electron convection terms balances with the ion pressure gradient. We find that the electron convection term works like the gradient of the negative pressure and reduces the ion sound speed or amplifies the sound mode when parallel current flows. The electron convection term enables us to describe a situation in which a parallel electric field and parallel electron acceleration coexist, which is impossible for ideal or resistive MHD.

  3. MHD simulation of RF current drive in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.; Diem, S.; Harvey, R. W.

    2014-02-12

    Auxiliary heating and current drive using RF waves such as the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) promises to advance the performance of the reversed field pinch (RFP). In previous computational work [1], a hypothetical edge-localized current drive is shown to suppress the tearing activity which governs the macroscopic transport properties of the RFP. The ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include a reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the Gaussian-shaped external current drive. In support of the EBW experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus, an integrated modeling scheme now incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ∼ 10{sup 4}) generally agree with the previous work; significantly more burdensome simulations at MST-like Lundquist number (S ∼ 3×10{sup 6}) show unexpected results. The effect on nonlinearly saturated current profile by a particular RF-driven external force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as the Lundquist number increases toward experimental values. Simulations reproduce the periodic current profile relaxation events observed in experiment (sawteeth) in the absence of current profile control. Reduction of the tearing mode amplitudes is still observable; however, reduction is limited to periods between the large bursts of magnetic activity at each sawtooth. The sawtoothing pattern persists with up to 10 MW of externally applied RF power. Periods with prolonged low tearing amplitude are predicted with a combination of external current drive and a reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, the resistivity profile is observed to have a strong effect on the optimal externally driven current profile for mode stabilization.

  4. MHD simulation of RF current drive in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Diem, S.; Forest, C. B.; Harvey, R. W.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2014-02-01

    Auxiliary heating and current drive using RF waves such as the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) promises to advance the performance of the reversed field pinch (RFP). In previous computational work [1], a hypothetical edge-localized current drive is shown to suppress the tearing activity which governs the macroscopic transport properties of the RFP. The ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include a reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the Gaussian-shaped external current drive. In support of the EBW experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus, an integrated modeling scheme now incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ˜ 104) generally agree with the previous work; significantly more burdensome simulations at MST-like Lundquist number (S ˜ 3×106) show unexpected results. The effect on nonlinearly saturated current profile by a particular RF-driven external force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as the Lundquist number increases toward experimental values. Simulations reproduce the periodic current profile relaxation events observed in experiment (sawteeth) in the absence of current profile control. Reduction of the tearing mode amplitudes is still observable; however, reduction is limited to periods between the large bursts of magnetic activity at each sawtooth. The sawtoothing pattern persists with up to 10 MW of externally applied RF power. Periods with prolonged low tearing amplitude are predicted with a combination of external current drive and a reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, the resistivity profile is observed to have a strong effect on the optimal externally driven current profile for mode stabilization.

  5. Fast Ion Induced Shearing of 2D Alfven Eigenmodes Measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, Ben; Classen, I.G.J.; Domier, C. W.; Heidbrink, W.; Luhmann, N.C.; Nazikian, Raffi; Park, H.K.; Spong, Donald A; Van Zeeland, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfven eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  6. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D.; Sikes, W.C.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  7. Interpreting observations of molecular outflow sources: the MHD shock code mhd_vode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, D. R.; Pineau des Forêts, G.

    2015-06-01

    The planar MHD shock code mhd_vode has been developed in order to simulate both continuous (C) type shock waves and jump (J) type shock waves in the interstellar medium. The physical and chemical state of the gas in steady-state may also be computed and used as input to a shock wave model. The code is written principally in FORTRAN 90, although some routines remain in FORTRAN 77. The documented program and its input data are described and provided as supplementary material, and the results of exemplary test runs are presented. Our intention is to enable the interested user to run the code for any sensible parameter set and to comprehend the results. With applications to molecular outflow sources in mind, we have computed, and are making available as supplementary material, integrated atomic and molecular line intensities for grids of C- and J-type models; these computations are summarized in the Appendices. Appendix tables, a copy of the current version of the code, and of the two model grids are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/578/A63

  8. High-order conservative finite difference GLM-MHD schemes for cell-centered MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, Andrea; Tzeferacos, Petros; Bodo, Gianluigi

    2010-08-01

    We present and compare third- as well as fifth-order accurate finite difference schemes for the numerical solution of the compressible ideal MHD equations in multiple spatial dimensions. The selected methods lean on four different reconstruction techniques based on recently improved versions of the weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes, monotonicity preserving (MP) schemes as well as slope-limited polynomial reconstruction. The proposed numerical methods are highly accurate in smooth regions of the flow, avoid loss of accuracy in proximity of smooth extrema and provide sharp non-oscillatory transitions at discontinuities. We suggest a numerical formulation based on a cell-centered approach where all of the primary flow variables are discretized at the zone center. The divergence-free condition is enforced by augmenting the MHD equations with a generalized Lagrange multiplier yielding a mixed hyperbolic/parabolic correction, as in Dedner et al. [J. Comput. Phys. 175 (2002) 645-673]. The resulting family of schemes is robust, cost-effective and straightforward to implement. Compared to previous existing approaches, it completely avoids the CPU intensive workload associated with an elliptic divergence cleaning step and the additional complexities required by staggered mesh algorithms. Extensive numerical testing demonstrate the robustness and reliability of the proposed framework for computations involving both smooth and discontinuous features.

  9. THE BEHAVIOR OF TRANSVERSE WAVES IN NONUNIFORM SOLAR FLUX TUBES. I. COMPARISON OF IDEAL AND RESISTIVE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume; Oliver, Ramón; Goossens, Marcel

    2013-11-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitously observed in the solar atmosphere. Kink waves are a type of transverse MHD waves in magnetic flux tubes that are damped due to resonant absorption. The theoretical study of kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes is usually based on the simplification that the transverse variation of density is confined to a nonuniform layer much thinner than the radius of the tube, i.e., the so-called thin boundary approximation. Here, we develop a general analytic method to compute the dispersion relation and the eigenfunctions of ideal MHD waves in pressureless flux tubes with transversely nonuniform layers of arbitrary thickness. Results for kink waves are produced and compared with fully numerical resistive MHD eigenvalue computations in the limit of small resistivity. We find that the frequency and resonant damping rate are the same in both ideal and resistive cases. The actual results for thick nonuniform layers deviate from the behavior predicted in the thin boundary approximation and strongly depend on the shape of the nonuniform layer. The eigenfunctions in ideal MHD are very different from those in resistive MHD. The ideal eigenfunctions display a global character regardless of the thickness of the nonuniform layer, while the resistive eigenfunctions are localized around the resonance and are indistinguishable from those of ordinary resistive Alfvén modes. Consequently, the spatial distribution of wave energy in the ideal and resistive cases is dramatically different. This poses a fundamental theoretical problem with clear observational consequences.

  10. Development of the PARVMEC Code for Rapid Analysis of 3D MHD Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, Sudip; Hirshman, Steven; Cianciosa, Mark; Wingen, Andreas; Unterberg, Ezekiel; Wilcox, Robert; ORNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The VMEC three-dimensional (3D) MHD equilibrium has been used extensively for designing stellarator experiments and analyzing experimental data in such strongly 3D systems. Recent applications of VMEC include 2D systems such as tokamaks (in particular, the D3D experiment), where application of very small (delB/B ~ 10-3) 3D resonant magnetic field perturbations render the underlying assumption of axisymmetry invalid. In order to facilitate the rapid analysis of such equilibria (for example, for reconstruction purposes), we have undertaken the task of parallelizing the VMEC code (PARVMEC) to produce a scalable and temporally rapidly convergent equilibrium code for use on parallel distributed memory platforms. The parallelization task naturally splits into three distinct parts 1) radial surfaces in the fixed-boundary part of the calculation; 2) two 2D angular meshes needed to compute the Green's function integrals over the plasma boundary for the free-boundary part of the code; and 3) block tridiagonal matrix needed to compute the full (3D) pre-conditioner near the final equilibrium state. Preliminary results show that scalability is achieved for tasks 1 and 3, with task 2 still nearing completion. The impact of this work on the rapid reconstruction of D3D plasmas using PARVMEC in the V3FIT code will be discussed. Work supported by U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.

  11. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  12. Emerging and potential opportunities for 2D flexible nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weinan; Park, Saungeun; Akinwande, Deji

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the emergence of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and black phosphorus (BP) among the growing portfolio of layered van der Waals thin films. Graphene, the prototypical 2D material has advanced rapidly in device, circuit and system studies that has resulted in commercial large-area applications. In this work, we provide a perspective of the emerging and potential translational applications of 2D materials including semiconductors, semimetals, and insulators that comprise the basic material set for diverse nanosystems. Applications include RF transceivers, smart systems, the so-called internet of things, and neurotechnology. We will review the DC and RF electronic performance of graphene and BP thin film transistors. 2D materials at sub-um channel length have so far enabled cut-off frequencies from baseband to 100GHz suitable for low-power RF and sub-THz concepts.

  13. 2D hexagonal quaternion Fourier transform in color image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Artyom M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel concept of the quaternion discrete Fourier transform on the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, which we call the two-dimensional hexagonal quaternion discrete Fourier transform (2-D HQDFT). The concept of the right-side 2D HQDFT is described and the left-side 2-D HQDFT is similarly considered. To calculate the transform, the image on the hexagonal lattice is described in the tensor representation when the image is presented by a set of 1-D signals, or splitting-signals which can be separately processed in the frequency domain. The 2-D HQDFT can be calculated by a set of 1-D quaternion discrete Fourier transforms (QDFT) of the splitting-signals.

  14. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  15. Double resonance rotational spectroscopy of CH2D+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpfer, Matthias; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Context. Deuterated forms of CH are thought to be responsible for deuterium enrichment in lukewarm astronomical environments. There is no unambiguous detection of CH2D+ in space to date. Aims: Four submillimetre rotational lines of CH2D+ are documented in the literature. Our aim is to present a complete dataset of highly resolved rotational lines, including millimetre (mm) lines needed for a potential detection. Methods: We used a low-temperature ion trap and applied a novel IR-mm-wave double resonance method to measure the rotational lines of CH2D+. Results: We measured 21 low-lying (J ≤ 4) rotational transitions of CH2D+ between 23 GHz and 1.1 THz with accuracies close to 2 ppb.

  16. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices. PMID:26839956

  17. ORION96. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.A.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-02

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  18. Toward textbook multigrid efficiency for fully implicit resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, Mark F.; Samtaney, Ravi; Brandt, Achi

    2010-09-01

    Multigrid methods can solve some classes of elliptic and parabolic equations to accuracy below the truncation error with a work-cost equivalent to a few residual calculations – so-called ‘‘textbook” multigrid efficiency. We investigate methods to solve the system of equations that arise in time dependent magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with textbook multigrid efficiency. We apply multigrid techniques such as geometric interpolation, full approximate storage, Gauss–Seidel smoothers, and defect correction for fully implicit, nonlinear, second-order finite volume discretizations of MHD. We apply these methods to a standard resistive MHD benchmark problem, the GEM reconnection problem, and add a strong magnetic guide field,more » which is a critical characteristic of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We show that our multigrid methods can achieve near textbook efficiency on fully implicit resistive MHD simulations.« less

  19. Toward textbook multigrid efficiency for fully implicit resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Mark F.; Samtaney, Ravi; Brandt, Achi

    2010-09-01

    Multigrid methods can solve some classes of elliptic and parabolic equations to accuracy below the truncation error with a work-cost equivalent to a few residual calculations – so-called ‘‘textbook” multigrid efficiency. We investigate methods to solve the system of equations that arise in time dependent magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with textbook multigrid efficiency. We apply multigrid techniques such as geometric interpolation, full approximate storage, Gauss–Seidel smoothers, and defect correction for fully implicit, nonlinear, second-order finite volume discretizations of MHD. We apply these methods to a standard resistive MHD benchmark problem, the GEM reconnection problem, and add a strong magnetic guide field, which is a critical characteristic of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We show that our multigrid methods can achieve near textbook efficiency on fully implicit resistive MHD simulations.

  20. Toward textbook multigrid efficiency for fully implicit resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Mark F.; Samtaney, Ravi; Brandt, Achi

    2013-12-14

    Multigrid methods can solve some classes of elliptic and parabolic equations to accuracy below the truncation error with a work-cost equivalent to a few residual calculations – so-called “textbook” multigrid efficiency. We investigate methods to solve the system of equations that arise in time dependent magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with textbook multigrid efficiency. We apply multigrid techniques such as geometric interpolation, full approximate storage, Gauss-Seidel smoothers, and defect correction for fully implicit, nonlinear, second-order finite volume discretizations of MHD. We apply these methods to a standard resistive MHD benchmark problem, the GEM reconnection problem, and add a strong magnetic guide field, which is a critical characteristic of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We show that our multigrid methods can achieve near textbook efficiency on fully implicit resistive MHD simulations.

  1. Phylogenetic tree construction based on 2D graphical representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Shan, Xinzhou; Zhu, Wen; Li, Renfa

    2006-04-01

    A new approach based on the two-dimensional (2D) graphical representation of the whole genome sequence [Bo Liao, Chem. Phys. Lett., 401(2005) 196.] is proposed to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of genomes. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the 2D curves. The fuzzy theory is used to construct phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic relationships of H5N1 avian influenza virus illustrate the utility of our approach.

  2. Generating a 2D Representation of a Complex Data Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A computer program, designed to assist in the development and debugging of other software, generates a two-dimensional (2D) representation of a possibly complex n-dimensional (where n is an integer >2) data structure or abstract rank-n object in that other software. The nature of the 2D representation is such that it can be displayed on a non-graphical output device and distributed by non-graphical means.

  3. Anisotropic 2D Materials for Tunable Hyperbolic Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Nemilentsau, Andrei; Low, Tony; Hanson, George

    2016-02-12

    Motivated by the recent emergence of a new class of anisotropic 2D materials, we examine their electromagnetic modes and demonstrate that a broad class of the materials can host highly directional hyperbolic plasmons. Their propagation direction can be manipulated on the spot by gate doping, enabling hyperbolic beam reflection, refraction, and bending. The realization of these natural 2D hyperbolic media opens up a new avenue in dynamic control of hyperbolic plasmons not possible in the 3D version.

  4. A simultaneous 2D/3D autostereo workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Dennis; McGinnis, Bradley; Talandis, Jonas; Leigh, Jason; Peterka, Tom; Knoll, Aaron; Sumer, Aslihan; Papka, Michael; Jellinek, Julius

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel immersive workstation environment that scientists can use for 3D data exploration and as their everyday 2D computer monitor. Our implementation is based on an autostereoscopic dynamic parallax barrier 2D/3D display, interactive input devices, and a software infrastructure that allows client/server software modules to couple the workstation to scientists' visualization applications. This paper describes the hardware construction and calibration, software components, and a demonstration of our system in nanoscale materials science exploration.

  5. QUENCH2D. Two-Dimensional IHCP Code

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, A.; Beck, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    QUENCH2D* is developed for the solution of general, non-linear, two-dimensional inverse heat transfer problems. This program provides estimates for the surface heat flux distribution and/or heat transfer coefficient as a function of time and space by using transient temperature measurements at appropriate interior points inside the quenched body. Two-dimensional planar and axisymmetric geometries such as turnbine disks and blades, clutch packs, and many other problems can be analyzed using QUENCH2D*.

  6. Adaptive Numerical Dissipative Control in High Order Schemes for Multi-D Non-Ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, B.

    2004-01-01

    The goal is to extend our adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order filter schemes and our new divergence-free methods for ideal MHD to non-ideal MHD that include viscosity and resistivity. The key idea consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and leave the rest of the region free of numerical dissipation contamination. These scheme-independent detectors are capable of distinguishing shocks/shears, flame sheets, turbulent fluctuations and spurious high-frequency oscillations. The detection algorithm is based on an artificial compression method (ACM) (for shocks/shears), and redundant multi-resolution wavelets (WAV) (for the above types of flow feature). These filter approaches also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error. The filter scheme consists of spatially sixth order or higher non-dissipative spatial difference operators as the base scheme for the inviscid flux derivatives. If necessary, a small amount of high order linear dissipation is used to remove spurious high frequency oscillations. For example, an eighth-order centered linear dissipation (AD8) might be included in conjunction with a spatially sixth-order base scheme. The inviscid difference operator is applied twice for the viscous flux derivatives. After the completion of a full time step of the base scheme step, the solution is adaptively filtered by the product of a 'flow detector' and the 'nonlinear dissipative portion' of a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. In addition, the scheme independent wavelet flow detector can be used in conjunction with spatially compact, spectral or spectral element type of base schemes. The ACM and wavelet filter schemes using the dissipative portion of a second-order shock-capturing scheme with sixth-order spatial central base scheme for both the inviscid and viscous MHD flux

  7. Spectroscopic measurement of the MHD dynamo in the MST reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, J.T.

    1998-09-01

    The author has directly observed the coupling of ion velocity fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations to produce an MHD dynamo electric field in the interior of the MST reversed field pinch. Chord averaged ion velocity fluctuations were measured with a fast spectroscopic diagnostic which collects line radiation from intrinsic carbon impurities simultaneously along two lines of sight. The chords employed for the measurements resolved long wavelength velocity fluctuations of several km/s at 8--20 kHz as tiny, fast Doppler shifts in the emitted line profile. During discrete dynamo events the velocity fluctuations, like the magnetic fluctuations, increase dramatically. The toroidal and poloidal chords with impact parameters of 0.3 a and 0.6 a respectively, resolved fluctuation wavenumbers with resonance surfaces near or along the lines of sight indicating a radial velocity fluctuation width for each mode which spans only a fraction of the plasma radius. The phase between the measured toroidal velocity fluctuations and the magnetic fluctuations matches the predictions of resistive MHD while the poloidal velocity fluctuations exhibit a phase consistent with the superposition of MHD effects and the advection of a mean flow gradient past the poloidal line of sight. Radial velocity fluctuations resolved by a chord through the center of the plasma were small compared to the poloidal and toroidal fluctuations and exhibited low coherence with the magnetic fluctuations. The ensembled nonlinear product of the ion velocity fluctuations and fluctuations in the magnetic field indicates a substantial dynamo electric field which peaks during the periods of spontaneous flux generation.

  8. Simulating MEMS Chevron Actuator for Strain Engineering 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    2D materials pose an exciting paradigm shift in the world of electronics. These crystalline materials have demonstrated high electric and thermal conductivities and tensile strength, showing great potential as the new building blocks of basic electronic circuits. However, strain engineering 2D materials for novel devices remains a difficult experimental feat. We propose the integration of 2D materials with MEMS devices to investigate the strain dependence on material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, refractive index, mechanical elasticity, and band gap. MEMS Chevron actuators, provides the most accessible framework to study strain in 2D materials due to their high output force displacements for low input power. Here, we simulate Chevron actuators on COMSOL to optimize actuator design parameters and accurately capture the behavior of the devices while under the external force of a 2D material. Through stationary state analysis, we analyze the response of the device through IV characteristics, displacement and temperature curves. We conclude that the simulation precisely models the real-world device through experimental confirmation, proving that the integration of 2D materials with MEMS is a viable option for constructing novel strain engineered devices. The authors acknowledge support from NSF DMR1411008.

  9. Linear and Nonlinear MHD Wave Processes in Plasmas. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tataronis, J. A.

    2004-06-01

    This program treats theoretically low frequency linear and nonlinear wave processes in magnetized plasmas. A primary objective has been to evaluate the effectiveness of MHD waves to heat plasma and drive current in toroidal configurations. The research covers the following topics: (1) the existence and properties of the MHD continua in plasma equilibria without spatial symmetry; (2) low frequency nonresonant current drive and nonlinear Alfven wave effects; and (3) nonlinear electron acceleration by rf and random plasma waves. Results have contributed to the fundamental knowledge base of MHD activity in symmetric and asymmetric toroidal plasmas. Among the accomplishments of this research effort, the following are highlighted: Identification of the MHD continuum mode singularities in toroidal geometry. Derivation of a third order ordinary differential equation that governs nonlinear current drive in the singular layers of the Alfvkn continuum modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. Bounded solutions of this ODE implies a net average current parallel to the toroidal equilibrium magnetic field. Discovery of a new unstable continuum of the linearized MHD equation in axially periodic circular plasma cylinders with shear and incompressibility. This continuum, which we named “accumulation continuum” and which is related to ballooning modes, arises as discrete unstable eigenfrequency accumulate on the imaginary frequency axis in the limit of large mode numbers. Development of techniques to control nonlinear electron acceleration through the action of multiple coherent and random plasmas waves. Two important elements of this program aye student participation and student training in plasma theory.

  10. MHD aspects of fire-hose type instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Hau, L.

    2003-12-01

    In a homogeneous anisotropic plasma the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Alfvén wave may become unstable for p∥ > pperpendicular to + B2/μ 0. Recently a new type of fire-hose instability is found by Hellinger and Matsumoto [2000] that has maximum growth rate occurring for oblique propagation and may grow faster than the Alfvén mode. This new mode is compressional and may be more efficient at destroying pressure anisotropy than the standard fire hose. In this study we examines the fire-hose type (p∥ > pperpendicular to ) instabilities based on the linear and nonlinear double-polytropic MHD theory. It is shown that there exist two types of MHD fire-hose instabilities associated with the intermediate and slow modes, respectively, and with suitable choice of polytropic exponents the linear instability criteria become the same as those based on the Vlasov theory in the hydromagnetic limit. Moreover, the properties of the nonlinear MHD fire-hose instabilities are found to have great similarities with those obtained from the kinetic theory and hybrid simulation. In particular, the classical fire-hose instability evolves toward the linear fire-hose stability threshold while the nonlinear marginal stability associated with the new fire hose is well below the condition of β ∥ - β perpendicular to = 2 but complies with less stringent linear stability threshold for MHD slow-mode wave.

  11. Further analysis of MHD acceleration for a hypersonic wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, M.J.; Schmidt, H.J.; Chapman, J.N.

    1995-12-31

    A previously completed MHD study of the use of an MHD accelerator with seeded air from a state-of-the-art arc heater, was generally hailed as showing that the system studied has some promise of meeting the most critical hypersonic testing requirements. However, some concerns existed about certain aspects of the results. This paper discusses some of these problems and presents analysis of potential solutions. Specifically the problems addressed are; reducing the amount of seed in the flow, reducing test chamber temperatures, and reducing the oxygen dissociation. Modeling techniques are used to study three design variables of the MHD accelerator. The accelerator channel inlet Mach number, the accelerator channel divergence angle, and the magnetic field strength are all studied. These variables are all optimized to meet the goals for seed, temperature, and dissociated oxygen reduction. The results of this paper are encouraging, showing that all three goals can be met. General relationships are observed as to how the design variables affect the performance of the MHD accelerator facility. This paper expands on the results presented in the UTSI report and further supports the feasibility of MHD acceleration as a means to provide hypersonic flight simulation.

  12. A MHD channel study for the ETF conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Staiger, P. J.; Smith, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The procedures and computations used to identify an MHD channel for a 540 mW(I) EFT-scale plant are presented. Under the assumed constraints of maximum E(x), E(y), J(y) and Beta; results show the best plant performance is obtained for active length, L is approximately 12 M, whereas in the initial ETF studies, L is approximately 16 M. As MHD channel length is reduced from 16 M, the channel enthalpy extraction falls off, slowly. This tends to reduce the MHD power output; however, the shorter channels result in lower heat losses to the MHD channel cooling water which allows for the incorporation of more low pressure boiler feedwater heaters into the system and an increase in steam plant efficiency. The net result of these changes is a net increase in the over all MHD/steam plant efficiency. In addition to the sensitivity of various channel parameters, the trade-offs between the level of oxygen enrichment and the electrical stress on the channel are also discussed.

  13. MHD activity in CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Soukhanovskii, V.; May, M. J.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Majeski, R.; Kaita, R.; Dieter, A.

    1998-11-01

    The CDX-U MHD spectrum can roughly be described as linear combinations of two extreme states: a rotating m=1/n=1 'snake' in the core coupled with a 2/1 island at the periphery, and a purely sawtoothing core with very low peripheral fluctuations. Overall confinement and profile shapes differ significantly between these states, with the (1/1, 2/1) dominated plasma (most frequent) having reduced core temperature and a tenous edge. The level of (1/1, 2/1) activity seems correlated with Zeff. Using rotational tomography and SVD techniques in conjunction with USXR imaging, we find the snake to be a large island-like structure having up to about a/3 and 1.5 radian radial and poloidal extent, respectively. Using fast multilayer mirror monochromators and a 'differential fluctuation spectroscopy' technique we estimate a strong impurity accumulation in the snake and a hollow impurity profile in the background plasma, suggesting a 'vacuum-cleaner' effect for the 1/1 island. The CDX-U snake seems in many respects similar to the pellet induced snake observed in large tokamaks. Reconstruction of the sawtooth emissivity indicates an evolution in good agreement with the Kadomtsev reconnection model. Interestingly however, at the sawtooth crash we do not observe any major perturbations in the spectroscopic signals outside q=1, while the emissivity gradient there is unusually sharp. Finally, the Internal Reconnection Event is described as reflected in the USXR and magnetic signals. Work supported by DoE grant No. DE-FG02-86ER52314ATDoE and DoE contract No. DE-AC02-76-CHO-3073.

  14. 2D and 3D simulations of damage in 5-grain copper gas gun samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, Davis L; Cerreta, Ellen K; Dennis - Koller, Darcie; Escobedo - Diaz, Juan P; Trujillo, Carl P; Luo, Shengian; Bingert, John F

    2010-12-16

    2D and 3D Hydrocode simulations were done of a gas gun damage experiment involving a 5 grain sample with a polycrystalline flyer with a velocity of about 140 m/s. The simulations were done with the Flag hydrocode and involved explicit meshing of the 5 grains with a single crystal plasticity model and a pressure based damage model. The calculated fields were compared with two cross sections from the recovered sample. The sample exhibited grain boundary cracks at high angle and tilt grain boundaries in the sample but not at a sigma 3 twin boundary. However, the calculation showed large gradients in stress and strain at only the twin boundary, contrary to expectation. This indicates that the twin boundary is quite strong to resist the predicted high gradients and that the calculation needs the addition of a grain boundary fracture mode. The 2D and 3D simulations were compared.

  15. Synthesize function for describing distorted 2-D magnetotelluric responses caused by topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promdee, Ninrat; Sarakorn, Weerachai

    2016-04-01

    In this research, the distortions of 2-D magnetotelluric responses caused by topographies are described by an appropriated synthesize functions. The damping wave equations and the considered topographic curves are used as the kernel of selected synthesize functions. The parameters of those functions are estimated by using the randomized neighborhood search method. The validity of functions is tested on half-space and COMMEMI2D-1 models with cosinusoidal, Gaussian and logistic topographic curves. The obtained results indicate that distorted apparent resistivity are well described by the selected synthesize functions with an acceptable root mean square errors. The obtained values of parameters are varied on both periods of EM wave and height of topographies.

  16. Research on non-linearity correction of 2D-PSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiawei; Chen, Sihai; Chen, Wei; Wu, Xin; Xiang, Sihua

    2009-08-01

    PSD(Position Sensitive Detector) is a kind of electrophotonic detector based on lateral photoeffect. PSD is widely used in non-contact measurement as it's highly sensitive to the position of incident light. But, it suffers from non-linearity because of nonuniform surface resistance which reduces the measuring precision and reliability. In this paper, The non-linear error of 2D-PSD(Two-dimensional PSD) is partly corrected using algorithm for duo-linear interpolation based on LabVIEW(Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench). The corrected result shows that the linearity of 2D-PSD is greatly improved without increasing the complexity of hardware. After the non-linearity correction, the usable area of PSD is extended and the precision of the measurement system is improved.

  17. Thermal Conductivity and Thermopower near the 2D Metal-Insulator transition, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    SARACHIK, MYRIAM P

    2015-02-20

    STUDIES OF STRONGLY-INTERACTING 2D ELECTRON SYSTEMS – There is a great deal of current interest in the properties of systems in which the interaction between electrons (their potential energy) is large compared to their kinetic energy. We have investigated an apparent, unexpected metal-insulator transition inferred from the behavior of the temperature-dependence of the resistivity; moreover, detailed analysis of the behavior of the magnetoresistance suggests that the electrons’ effective mass diverges, supporting this scenario. Whether this is a true phase transition or crossover behavior has been strenuously debated over the past 20 years. Our measurements have now shown that the thermoelectric power of these 2D materials diverges at a finite density, providing clear evidence that this is, in fact, a phase transition to a new low-density phase which may be a precursor or a direct transition to the long sought-after electronic crystal predicted by Eugene Wigner in 1934.

  18. Characteristics of 2D magnetic field sensor based on magnetic sensitivity diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Yang, Xianghong; Yu, Yang; Wu, Tong; Wen, Dianzhong

    2015-04-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) magnetic field sensor is proposed in this paper. It contains two Wheatstone bridges composed of four magnetic sensitivity diodes(MSDs)with similar characteristics and four loading resistances. In order to realize the axial symmetric distribution of four MSDs, two MSDs with opposite magnetic sensitive directions were located along the x and -x axes, and two with opposite magnetic sensitive directions were located along the y and -y axes. The experimental results indicate that when VDD = 5.0 V, the magnetic sensitivities of the 2D magnetic sensor can reach SxB = 544 mV/T and SyB = 498 mV/T in the x and y directions, respectively. Consequently, it is possible to measure the two-dimensional magnetic field.

  19. Use of the 'Precessions' process for prepolishing and correcting 2D & 2(1/2)D form.

    PubMed

    Walker, David D; Freeman, Richard; Morton, Roger; McCavana, Gerry; Beaucamp, Anthony

    2006-11-27

    The Precessions process polishes complex surfaces from the ground state preserving the ground-in form, and subsequently rectifies measured form errors. Our first paper introduced the technology and focused on the novel tooling. In this paper we describe the unique CNC machine tools and how they operate in polishing and correcting form. Experimental results demonstrate both the '2D' and '2(1/2)D' form-correction modes, as applied to aspheres with rotationally-symmetric target-form.

  20. ALEGRA-MHD : version 4.6

    SciTech Connect

    Garasi, Christopher Joseph; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Haill, Thomas A.; Summers, Randall M.; Robinson, Allen Conrad

    2005-01-01

    ALEGRA is an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element code that emphasizes large distortion and shock propagation in inviscid fluids and solids. This document describes user options for modeling resistive magnetohydrodynamic, thermal conduction, and radiation emission effects.